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US Amy Corps of Engineers

HUNTSVILLE DIVISION

FINAL -

Defense Environmental Restoration Program for Formerly Used Defense Sites Ordnance and Explosive Waste Chemical Warfare Materials

ARCHIVES SEARCH REPORT FINDINGS YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT FORMERLY WINTER-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP

Yolo County, California Project No. J09CA009402


March 1995
Prepared by US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS ST. LOUIS DISTRICT

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHIVES SEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (FCIRMERLY WINTERS-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section Page

Introduction Authority Subject Purpose Scope Previous Site Investigations Project Inventory Report - Yolo County Airport (Winters-Davis Flight Strip) Yolo County Airport Master Plan Site and Site Area Description Location Past Uses Current Uses of Site Demographics of the Area Physical Characteristics of the Site GeologyIPhysiography Soils Hydrology Weather Ecology Real Estate DOD Ownership Present Ownership Significant Past Ownership other than DOD

C)EW/CWM Site Analysis Historical Summary of OEW/CWM Activities Records Review Summary of Interviews Site Inspection

1E;valuation of Ordnance Contamination CWh4 Contamination Evaluation CIEW Contamination Evaluation

Location Map Vicinity Map Airport Vicinity Site Plan Current Airport Layout Aerial Photo Interpretation Historic Airport Layout--1975 Historic Real Estate APPENDICES
REFERENCES ACRONYMS

REPOR'I'S/STUDIES/LETTERS/MEMORANDUMS HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS -- NOT USED


INTERVIEWS NEWSPAPERSIJOURNALS -- NOT USED PRESENT SITE PHOTOGRAPHS HISTORICAL MAPS/DRAWINGS -- NOT USED RISK ASSESSMENT CODE PROCEDURE FORMS REPORT DISTRIBUTION LIST ARCHIVE ADDRESSES

1 . 0 Introduction

In 1986, Congress established the Defense Environmental Restoration Program at 10 U. S .C. 2701 et.seq. This program directed the Secretary of Defense to "cany out a program of environmental restoration at facilities under the jurisdiction of the Secretary. "
In March, 1990, xhe EPA issued a revised National Contingency Plan. Under 40 C.F.R. 300.120, EPA designated DOD to be the removal response authority for incidents involving DoD mililary weapons and munitions under the jurisdiction, custody and control of DoD.
e g of this program, the U.S. h y Corps of Engineers has been the agency Since the b responsible for environmental restoration at Formerly-Used Defense Sites (FUDS). Since 1990, t h e U.S. Army Engineering and Suppxt Center, Huntsville, has been the Mandatory Center of Expertise and Design Center for Ordnance and Explosives.

The National Contingency Plan (NCP) was e NCP has been revised and broadened seve organizational structure and procedures presence of hazardous substances, pollutants, 1980 CERCLA states that the NCP shall appl CERCLA requirements. The March 1990 National Oil and Hazardo 40 CFR part 300 is the latest version of th be the removal response authority with and munitions under the jurisdiction, cu On April 5 , 1990, U.S. the USACE Mandatory Explosive Waste (OEW). As the responsible for the desi OEW remediations remediation programs for cooperation with the Hunt District has been a

y the Clean Water Act of 1972. The then. Its purpose is to provide the s to be taken in response to the taminants at a site. Section 105 of the response actions taken as a result of stances Pollution Contingency Plan given in

. Paragraph 300.120 states that "DOD will


incidents involving DOD military weapons and control of DOD."

SAEDH) was designated as (MCX) and Design Center for Ordnance and and Design Center for OEW, USAEDH is lementation of all Department of the Army SAEDH also designs and implements OEW e Department of Defense when requested. In .S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis preparing Archives Search Reports (ASR) for those suspected of Ordnance and Explosive Waste (OEW),

1.2 Subject
Yolo County Airport, formerly Winters-Davis Flight Strip, DERP-FUDS Site No. J09CA009400 (OEW Project No. J09CA009402) is located 8 miles northwest of downtown Davis, directly east of Winters, and approximately 12 miles southwest of Woodland in Yolo County, California (Figures 1 & 2, and Maps M-1 through M-3). In 1942, the United States acquired approximately 510 acres of land and developed the site as an airfield in support of the west coast World War I1 (WW 11) effort. By the end of October 1943 the Army Engineers had completed construction of the 8000-foot long runway. During the following year an operations tower, five bomb fuze storage magazines and thirteen bomb storage revetments, temporary troop quarters, and various other support facilities were added to the army airfield. The original Site Plan and current Airport Layout are presented on Maps M-4 respectively. and M-5,

The Army Air Corps declared the strip excess in December 1944; and the base became a sub-base of the McClellan Army Air Base (AAB), Sacramento, California on 15 May 1945. It remained with McClellan AAB until its transfer to inactive status on 30 December 1945.

This Archives Search Report compiles information obtained through historical research at various archives and records-holding facilities, interviews with persons associated with the site or its operations, and personal visits to the site. All efforts were directed toward determining the possible: use or disposal of OEW of any type, including CWM, on the FUDS. Emphasis was placed on establishing the type of munitions, containers, quantities, and area of disposal. Information obtained during this process was used in developing recommendations for further actions at the site. 1.4 Scope This investigation centered on the potential that OEW and/or CWM contamination might remain on the site. The: scope centered on providing the Huntsville Division (CEHND) with information to assist in ;a determination whether or not further study and remedial action was needed. Our study efforts concentrated specifically at the location of the former bomb storage revetment and the fuze storage magazines, including the surrounding area. This report presents the history of the site, description and characterization of the immediate surrounding area, real estate ownership information, findings of a visual field survey, and OEW site analysis, including an evaluation of potential ordnance contamination. A separate report supplements these ASR FINDINGS and furnishes the CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS.

YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (W I NTERS-DAV I S FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDS" J09CA009402 PROJECT LOCATION MAP
K I T TO SCALE
PR(MCT D I E MARCH 1995
21-MAR-1995 O W 8

I DATE OF YIP,

1994

/n/oew45~D/sh4T/map/yoIoIocCdqn

FIGURE 2
YOLO COUNTY A I R P O R T (W I N T E R S - D A V I S F L I G H T S T R I P 1 YOLO COUNTY. C A L I F O R N I A DERP-FUDSD J 0 9 C A 0 0 9 4 0 2
V I C I N I T Y MAP
NOT TO SCALE

PROJECT DATE:

MARCH 1995

I DATE OF MAP:

2.0 Previous Site Investbations


2.1 Pro-iect Inventory Re-port - Yolo County Aimort (Winters-Davis Flight S t r i ~ )
By Memorandum dated 26 August 1991, the Commanding Officer, Sacramento District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, forwarded the Findings of Fact and Determination of Eligibility (Inventory Project Reput or INPR) on the DERP-FUDS assessment for the Yolo County Airport to the Division Engineer, South Pacific Division. In the INPR it was determined that the site was formerly used by the Army and there is hazardous waste at the site eligible for cleanup under DERP-FUDS. The categories of hazards were listed as CONIHTW and OEW. The Sacramento Commander recommended to the Division Engineer that he approve the Findings and Determination of Eligibility, forward a copy of the INPR to CEMP requesting approval and funds to accomplish the CONIHTW project, and forward the INPR to CEHND with a request for a determination of the need for further study of the bomb storage area. The Division Commander signed and forwarded the INPR to HQUSACE, CEHND and CEMRD with his recommendation for approval of the proposed CONIHTW project and for CEHND to determine the need for further study and remedial action on the OEW assessment. By Correspondence dated 15 January 1992, the Chief, Environmental Restoration Division, Directorate of Military Programs, concurred with the recommendations of CESPD and authorized the remedial design and remedial action (RDIRA) for the CON/HTW project; and pending a recommendation from CEHND, a decision on the OEW project was to follow at a later date. A copy of the correspondence chain is furnished as Appendix C- 1. 2.2 Yolo County Airport Master Plan Yolo County, California, prepared a Master Plan for the Yolo County Airport in 1976 and was approved by the Planning Commission on 15 December 1976. The Master Plan and Environmental Impact Statement was adopted on 8 February 1977 by the Board of Supervisors. The plan provided guidelines for future development of the airport and the surrounding area. It was designed to establish the Yolo Airport as one system augmenting other modes of transportation and provide satisfaction for local aviation demands. The plan presented an inventory of existing facilities; site characteristics; studied the service area; forecasted future uses; and investigated alternatives for the needs based on predictions of the number and type of aircraft to be based at the municipal airport. The document included environmental studies and impacts, the current layout plan, and established a land use plan with schedules of proposed development. Included in the report are cost estimates and the results of financing and economic feasibility studies. Appendix C-9 presents the cover and selected sect.ions of the document.

3.0 Site and Site Area Descri~tion


3.1 Location
Yolo County Airport, consisting of approximately 495 acres, is the main body of a 510 acre tract once known during WW I1 as the Winters-Davis Flight Strip. It is located in Yolo County, California, approximately eight miles northwest of downtown Davis. It lies between county roads 95 and 96 running north\south. The airport is also situated between County roads 29 and 31 which run east\west (Figures 1 & 2 and Maps M-1 through M-3 ). According to historical information, the approximate center of the area is at Latitude 38"-34'-38" and Longitude 121"-151'-20". The site occupies a portion of Section 3, Township 8 North, Range 1 East, and a portion of Section 34, Township 9 North, Range 1 East.

3.2 Past Uses Before 1942, the site was used primarily for the production of livestock and grain until acquired by the Federal government. The major block of property belonged to local owners, but a second tract was acquired from the Public Roads Administration. A portion of a 160-acre tract was reserved by the owner as a farmstead. The owner leased a portion of this tract out for agricultural purposes (War Assets Administration, 1945). Map M-8 is the acquisition map that furnishes the original Historical Real Estate Transactions. 3.2.1 General History In 1942, the United States acquired approximately 510 acres of land between the towns of Winters and Davis, California for use as an airfield. Initial construction began on 20 July 1942 and was completed on 29 October 1942. This phase completed the runway to the dimensions of 8,000 k t long by 300 feet wide. The Army Engineers surfaced 4,000 feet of this runway (Yolo County Planning Board, 1976). Additional construction in 1943 included an operations tower, five bomb fuze storage magazines, and thirteen bomb storage revetments. They also installed tanks for 50,000 gallons of aviation fuel, temporary troop quarters and various other facilities (Backes, 1944). Initially the Winters-Davis Flight Strip fell under the jurisdiction of the 45th Air Base Group at Hamilton Army Air Base (Hamilton Field), San Rafael, California . Although the Army determined that the field would serve as a medium bomber base, Hamilton Field used the flight strip as a training sub-base for P-38 pilots of the 78th pursuit Group and P-39 pilots of the 328th Fighter Group (U.S.Army Air Corps (USAAC), March 1944) (Hedger, 1943). The INPR does not address the usage by Hamilton AAB during the early years. It only discusses the strip being used to provide alternate basing for B-25's normally located at McClellan AAB. Winters-Davis Flight Strip was established as an auxiliary landing field for Hamilton AAB in case the Japanese bombed the west coast communities and\or defense facilities in an air attack (War Assets Administration, 1945).

On 15 July, 1944, jurisdiction of the flight strip fell to the Western Flying Training Command (WFTC) which continued the P-38 and P-39 training. Administration of the base became the duty of Mather Army Air Base (AAB), Sacramento, California. The WFTC then transferred these responsibilities to the Stockton Army Air Field, Stockton, California in November 1944. The Army Air Corps declared the strip excess on 15 December 1944. Finally, the base became a sub-base of the McClellan AAB, Sacramento, California on 15 May 1945. It remained with McClellan Field until its transfer to inactive status under the War Assets Administration on December 30, 1945 (USAAC, 1944) (Pyle, 1944) (Mueller, 1982).
3.2.2 Interpretation of' Aerial Photography a. Photoanalysis and land use interpretation were done using the following listed photography:

Photography Date
4 Jun 1952 19 Sep 1952

Scale
Oblique lW=1167'

Source
National Archives National Archives ASCS

Identifier (s) Frame (s)


*3LHH and 4LHH *35LS, 36LS, 37LS, 35RS, 36RS, 37RS 2K-153 t h r ~ 158, and 5K-52 thm 58 3EE-35 thru 41, 3EE-44 thru 50 1MM-90 t h r ~ 96, 1MM-142 thru 148 51-24 thm 26

17 Sep 1952 and 22 Oct 1952 18 Jun 1964 11 May 1971 19 Feb 1991

1"= 1667'

1"= 1667' 1"= 1667' 1"=20()'

ASCS ASCS Geonex

*Photos dated 4 June :I952 and 19 Sep 1952 cover vicinity of the site but not the site. Photos dated 19 September are 9" x 18" photos each in two parts with one part marked and the other not marked. b. Photography cited above covering the Yolo County Airport FUDS was examined. Features of interest seen on the photography are shown on Map M-6. The 17 September 1952 photography is used as a base for the map.

c. Terrain in the vicinity of the site is flat to gently rolling. Natural surface drainage is poorly developed. However, several natural channels in the area have been improved by excavation so that drainage pattern is prominent. Flow of streams is intermittent. Land use is mainly agriculture with some residential development. Davis, a city of about 46,000 people, is located about five miles southeast of the site. The secondary road network is well developed in the vicinity. North-South freeways are located about five miles east and about seven miles west of the site. 3.2.3 MIDAnalvsis

a s analyzed using the following maps: The site w


a. USGS 7.5 minute quadrangle map sheets: MERRITI', CALIF., 1952; MERRI'IT,CALIF., 1952, photorevised 1968; MERRI?T, CALIF., 1952, photorevised 1968 and 1975; MERRITT, CALIF., 1952, photorevised 1981. b. Drawings 1 arid 2, Military Construction, Winters-Davis Flight Strip Near Davis California, US.Engineer Office, Sacramento, California, December 1943. Review of the above cited USGS map sheets confirms general description of terrain and land use given in paragraph 3.2.2~ above. Also, they were useful in finding the site on the aerial photography. The drawings cited above were useful in identifying features on the aerial photography. 3.3 Current Uses of Site In 1949, the former Winters-Davis Flight Strip was placed under the administrative control of Yolo County and they named the airfield the Yolo County International Airport. The airport remained vacant until sometime during the 1960's. During this period a walnut shell husking operation was one farming activity that occurred on the property. In 1971, the county resurfaced part of the original runway. In August 1974, Yolo Aviation Inc. leased 14.9 acres of the airport and constructed 20 hangars and other facilities. Small aircraft and local cropdusting planes started using the field during this period. These entities continue flying operations out of Yolo County Airport to the present day. The main uses include touch-and--gooperations for instructional purposes; parachute jumping; leisure or private travel; crop dusting; a sportsman range; and farming is ongoing on the unimproved land. (Yolo County Planning Ibard, 1976) (Wiswell, 1995). The current airport layout is furnished as Map M-5 and the layout for the airport in 1975 is shown in Map M-7. 3.4 Demoera~hics of the Area 3.4.1 Center of Activity The Yolo County Airport is located about eight miles west-northwest of the downtown business district of the City of Davis, Yolo County, California.

3.4.2 Po~ulation Densitv


City: Davis Area: 8.4 sq. mi. Pop.: 46,209 PI) : 5,501 persons per sq. mi.

County: Yolo Area : 1,014 sq. mi. Pop. : 141,092 PD : 139 persons per sq. mi.

3.4.3 T m s of Businesses The largest activity in the Davis area is the University of California-Davis including a medical center. There is also some manufacturing -- foods and aircraft. Also, a genetic research center and the USACE Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) are located at Davis. Of the people in Yolo County employed by businesses, about 27 percent are employed by retail trade businesses. Also prominent are service businesses at about 24 percent, as well as manufacturing businesses at about 14 percent, and wholesale trade businesses at about 13 percent. Foregoing percentages are at mid-March 1990. 3.4.4. Types of Housing Housing in Davis is composed of both single family and multi-family dwellings. 3.4.5 New Develo~ment in the Area The main new development in the Davis area is housing. 3.4.6 Qvical Cross Sections of the Po~ulation Approximately 79.8 % of the population of Davis is white, 3.0% black, 0.7% American Indian, Eskimo or Aleut, 13.2 % Asian or Pacific Islander, and 3.3 % other races. The percent (of the total population (of any race) that is of Hispanic origin is 7.4%. The part of the population under the age of 18 is 16.62, and the part over the age of 65 is 6.2%. The median :age is 25.5 years. The median value of 6,444 specified owner-occupied housing units in Davis is $191:,300.00. The number of business establishments in Yolo county can be broken down by type as follows, manufacturing 5.3 % ; agriculture 2.2 % ; services 3 1.2 % ; trade and financial 4 1.1% ; and other 20.2 % .

4.0 m s i c a l Characteristics of the site

The Yolo County Airport site is located within the Sacramento Valley Subregion of the Central Valley of California Section of the Pacific Border province. The Central Valley is a major northwest trending, southerly tilting, structural trough, asymmetrical in form with a steep western flank and a more gently inclined eastern flank. The northern third is known as the Sacramento Valley, the southern two-thirds is the San Joaquin Valley (Thornbury 1965). Up to ten miles of sediments have filled the Sacramento Valley and range in age from Jurassic to Holocene and include marine and continental rocks and deposits. This trough has probabhy existed since the Jurassic, when the Sierra Nevada and Klamath Mountains were uplifted. During the Cretaceous and through much of the Cenozoic, this trough extended westward over the site of the present Coast Ranges and may have received sediment from the Sierra Nevada on the east. The trough existed in this form until the late Pliocene when development of the Coast Ranges cut off the sea. The most recent deposits are of Holocene to Oligocene age. River deposits (Holocene), of gravel, sand, silts and minor amounts of clay deposited along channels and floodplains may include parts of the M:odesto Formation of Pleistocene age; Continental deposits (Oligocene to Holocene), are a hderogenous mix of gravels, sand, silts and clay with some cobbles, boulders and some conglomerates. The more recent deposits are underlain mostly by marine deposits of clay, shale,, siltstone, and sandstone of pre-Tertiary to Eocene age (Page 1986).
4.2 Soils

The majority of the undisturbed soils on the Yolo County Airport site are described by the profile in Table 4-1. The soils are nearly level, well-drained soils on alluvial fans. They were farmed in mixed alluvium derived from sedimentary rocks. The surface layer is usually dark grayish-brown and the substratum is brown. Erosion on these soils is only a slight hazard, and the corrosive effects of the soil on uncoated steel is moderate in the surface layers and low in the substratum (Bates 1977).

Table 4-1. Soil Profile


(in)
DESClRIPTION

PERCENTAGE PASSING SIEVE NUMBER


#4

PERM.

#40
95-100 85-95

#200 85-95 65-75


-

inlhr 0.2-0.63 0.63-2.0

AVL. WATER CAP. inlin

0-36 36-60

silty clay silty sandy clay

100 100

0.190.21 0.160.18

F a b l e modified from Soil Survey of Solano County, Ca.

4.3 Hydrology 4.3.1 Surface Water

The Yola County Airport site is located in the Sacramento River Valley of Centd California, about 20 miles west of Sacramento and 70 miles northeast of San Francisco. Site elevations vary fiom about elevation 70-100 NGVD (Net Geodetic Vertical Datum), with the site of the airport proper generally from elevation 85-100 NGVD. The site, and the entire Sacramento River Valley, is protected by an extensive system of levees, diversions, and flood control reservoirs constructed by the Corps of Engineers and the State of California. In addition, the site is 30-40 feet higher than elevations along the Sacramento River and the possibility of direct flooding by the Sacramento is so remote as to be negligible. One stream, Dry Slough, flows east across the southern portion of the site and then turns northeast as it exits the site boundary. This stream enters Willow Slough, which flows east and eventually reaches the Sacramento River. Airport site drainage is by overland flow, from west to east, to Dry Slough. Flood elevations along Dry Slough are significantly lower than elevations of the Yolo County Airport. During flood conditions, overflow from Dry Slough would generally flow east, away from the Yolo County Airport site. The likelihood of any flooding of the airport site appears remote. No hydrologic information exists for Dry or Willow Sloughs.
4.3.2 Ground Water

Post-Eocene continental deposits constitute the primary groundwater reservoir in the Sacramento Valley. The thickness of these deposits averages about 2,400 feet and increases from north to south. Natural ground water flow has been greatly altered by groundwater development and pumpage and is generally towards large withdrawal areas although there is still a large component of flow towards the Delta area. Recharge is from streams entering the valley from the Sierra Nevadas but has been increased from irrigation returns. The average hydraulic conductivity is 6.94~10 ft/s (Williamson, Prudic, and Swain 1989).
4.4 Weather

The area has a mild climate with abundant sunshine from spring through much of the fall. The bulk of the precipitation occurs during the winter months, but is not a daily occurrence. Records for the City of Sacramento show measurable rainfall occurring about nine days per month during the winter. Winter rainfall results from long duration, low intensity cyclonic storms moving inland from the Pacific Ocean. Thunderstorms are quite unusual. The summers are very dry with essentially no rainfall from about May through September. Unless significant reservoir storage exists in a given watershed, a stream may go dry during the summer and fall periods. Summer temperatures can be severe, with the record high being 115% occurring in June 1961. Temperatures well in excess of l O f l occur frequently during the summer months. However, these high temperatures are largely offset by relative humidities generally less than 20% and by afternoon ocean breezes from the Pacific Ocean, which flow through the Golden

Gate and up the Sacramento Valley. This air circulation creates a significant diurnal change in daily temperatures at the site. Drops in temperature from over l O O ! F into the 50's from mid-afternoon to late evening are not unusual in the summertime. Winter temperatures are mild, with the lowest temperatures seldom far below freezing. The record low temperature for the area is 1 8 9 occurring in December 1990. Winds irn the valley vary from about 6-9 miles per hour through the year and are from the south throughout the year except for November, when winds are from the north. The strongest wind activity occurs in the spring and fall, when a strong high pressure system forms over Northern California. Air flow passes over the northern mountains and, after descending, can give rise to periodic strong, gusty Chinook-type winds from the north. Maximum wind gusts of 65-70 miles per hour have been recorded during the months of April and October through December. Climatological data for the area are summarized in TABLE 4-2. TABLE 4-2 CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT, CALIFORNIA
Temperature (F)
Wind Velocity

Wind Direction

(mph)

7.2

SSE

SSW
SW

SW
SW
NNW

SSE

Annual

47.8

73.4

60.6

16.79

7.9

SW

Source: NOAA 1991. Local Climatological Data (temperaturelwind) of Sacramento, California. NCDC, 1993. Precipitation Data for Davis, California.

The information provided for this site was compiled from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the California Department of Fish and Game Natural Diversity Data Base (NDDB). The following Federally endangered, threatened, or candidate species occur in the vicinity of the Yolo County Airport Site: winter-run chinook salmon (Oncorhvnchus tshawvtscha), endangered; Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthvs macrole~idotusj, proposed threatened; green sturgeon (Aci-penser medirostris), candidate; vernal pool tadpole shrimp (Lqidurus packardi), endangered; conservancy fairy shrimp (Branchinecta conservatio), endangered; valley elderberry longhorn beetle (Desmocerus californicus dimorphus), threatened; vernal pool f a r shrimp (Branchinecta lynchi), threatened; California red-legged hog (Rana aurora dravtoniij, proposed endangered; California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense), candidate; western spadefoot toad (Sca~hiopushammondi hammondi), candidate; foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana bovlii), candidate; northwestern pond turtle (Clemmvs marmorata marmorataJ, candidate; southwestern pond turtle (Clemmys marmorata pallida), candidate; Pacific western big-eared bat (plecotus townsendii townsendii), candidate; greater western mastiff bat ( E U ~ O D ~erotis S californicus), candidate; riparian brush rabbit (Sylvilagus bachmank riparius), candidate; spotted bat (Euderma maculatum), candidate; alkali milk-vetch (Astragalus tener var. tener), candidate; and brittlescale (Atriplex depressa), candidate. The NDIlB listed the State threatened Swainsons hawk (F3uteo swainsoni) and the threatened giant garter snake (Thamno~his gigas) as the only species of state concern that occur in the vicinity of the Y olo County Airport Site. No additional information on the occurrence of rare or endangered species or natural communities is known at this time. This does not mean that other state or federally-listed species may not be present within the areas of interest. An on site inspection by appropriate state and federal personnel may be necessary to verify the presence, absence or location of listed spxies, or natural communities if remedial action is recommended as part of the final ASR.

5.0 Real Estate

By use permit from the: U. S. Public Roads Administration, dated 3 Novovember 1943, 201.58 acres were transferred to the War Department. An additional 308.57 acres in total were acquired by the War Department by Declaration of Taking between 1942 and 1943, for a total 510.15 acres (Map M-8).According to the INPR, the site was used as a flight strip to provide alternate basing for B25 aircraft normally located at McClellan Air Force Base. The use permit for 201.58 acres was relinquished to the Public Roads Administration (PRA) on 12 April 1946. The remaining 308.57 acres transferred to the War Assets administration (WAA) on 21 September 1946. Subsequently, a total of 294.4 acres were transferred by quitclaim deed from the WAA on 14 June 1948, along with the 201.58 acres from the PRA, to the County of Yolo for use as an airport. The remaining 14.17 acres from the WAA reverted to the original, owners, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Teardon. The quitclaim deed includes a recapture clause.

The 495.98 acre site is currently owned by the County of Yolo and utilized as the Yolo County Airport. The 14.17 acre portion of the site is presently owned by St. Mary's College and used for agriculture. Presently Yolo County is leasing the land for many differenlt purposes. These include using the property for aircraft schools; a parachute club and jumping school; crop dusting companies; and leisure and private travel. In addition, the Yolo Sportsman Association uses land for a trap shoot, 50-yard pistol range, 100-yard rifle range, and an archery range along with associated facilities. The county leases the rest of the unimproved land for farming. 5.3 Sigpificant Past owners hi^ Other than DOD The only significant past ownership is Yolo County, which leases land for the previously mentioned land usages. Documents were not clear on the reasons for early ownership by the PRA.

6.0 OEWICWM Site Anallvsis


6.1 Historical Analvsis of OEWICWM Activities Research indicates that the Army Air Corps used the field as a Western Flying Training Command sub-installation during the 15 months of flying operations during WW LT. Historical documents indicate the site was to provide alternate basing for B25 aircraft normally located at McClellan Field. A 28 July 1992 memorandum of a Site Board Meeting stated "the intended military purpose was as a medium Bombardment field for the Fourth Air Force with facilities for housing and servicing one squadron". During February 1943, planning for construction of a bomb storage facility at the facility was approved by the Fourth Army Air Force. The airstrip was to be sufficient for 12 Heavy or 16 Medium Bombers. P-38 and P--39aircraft were temporarily stationed at the base. Ordnance associated with these aircraft and possibly stored include .50 caliber ammunition, smoke and training ordnance (USAAC , 1944). 6.1.1 QEW Activities, The Army Engineers built the bomb storage area with the basing of bomber aircraft in mind. The Engineers constructed 13 Bomb Storage Revetments and 5 Bomb Fuze Storage Magazines for this purpose. The actual mission changed to training fighter pilots and the ordnance materials stored are believed to have changed, with all HE munitions transferred to areas where they would be put to use. The fact that the base was used as an auxiliary landing field for various bases also suggests that there may have been temporary storage of bombs 'and other ordnance. Although probably an isolated incident, the fact that a smoke device was found on a farm south of the airport suggests that other ordnance items could have fallen off the aircraft flying in and out of Winters-Davis Flight Strip. Airfield histories and other documents collected during this archives research did not indicate any permanent storage of ordnance items, nor do they indicate official disposition of stored ordnance. Temporary storage certainly included items normally carried during pilot training for P-38 and P-39 aircraft; and it is known that miniature practice bombs (blue paint) were reported as being found in the area of the bomb storage. Air units were not permanently stationed at the flight strip. They conducted firing and other ordnance training on their home field ranges. The available records did not indicate that while the property was under DOD control it was ever used as a rifle, skeet or any other type of range (U.S. Amy Corps of Engineers, INPR, 195)1) (USAAC, 1944). 6.1.2 (CWM Activities. Building lists do not show the construction of any chemical warfare training or storage facilities. Since the units using the strip were stationed at other air bases, home base facilities were likely used for chemical warfare training ( U . S . Army Corps of Engineers, INFR, 1991) (USAAC, 1944). No chemical identification kit information exists for the Winters-Davis Flight Strip in the report of controlled equipment items, February 1945.

6.2 Records Review St. Louis District Corps of Engineer personnel reviewed records concerning the history of the Yolo County Airport\Winters-Davis Flight Strip at the following locations.

National Pecsonnel Records Center Military Records 9700 Page Avenue St. Louis, MO 63132
The following Accessions were reviewed. 342-54D-6075, Box 1 of 1, WinternDavis Flight Strip 338-46A-,3034,Stockton Army Air Field 338-46B-3034, Stockton Army Air Field 338-53F-5038, McClellan Army Air Base 338-54D-6075, Mather Army Air Base 338-54E-6075, Mather Army Air Base 338-54F-6075, Mather Army Air Base

National Archives 8th and Pennsylvania Washington, D.C. 20408


Records were reviewed from RG 18, Records of the Army Air Forces; RG 153, Records of the Judge Advocate General and RG 407, Records of the Army Advocate General. The following applicable boxes were reviewed: RG 18 Records of the Army Air Forces, Central Decimal Files Box 1598, Windsor Locks to Worcester, MA (Winters-Davis Flight Strip) RG 153 :Records of the Judge Advocate General, Reservation File Box 98, California, Yerba Linda to Camp Young (No Yolo Co.)

National Archives-Suitland Branch 4205 Suitland Road Suitland, MD 20409


The archivists researched Record Group (RG) 77, Records of the Chief of Engineers, RG 175, Records of the Chemical Warfare Service, RG 341, Records of Headquarters, USAF, and RG 342, Records of the US. Air Force Commands. They also checked RG 72, Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics, RG 107, Office of the Secretary of War, RG 156, Records of the Chief of Ordnance, and RG 18, Records of the Army Air Forces. The following applicable records were reviewed:

NARA:

RG 77,Records of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers Entry 393, Records of Buildings, Box 286, Willock, PA to Wolf Creek Ord. (Winters-Davis Flight Strip) Bulky Files, Airfields, Construction Reports, 1917-1943

RG 175, Records of the Chemical Warfare Service Entry 2, Index Card Briefs, Boxes 64, 126, 350 and 525 Entry 67A4900 Station F i l e s ,The Archivists could not find without listing
RG 291, Records of the GSA Property Disposal Acc. # 68-A-5714, Box 58, Downey, CA to Yolo, CA (Ventura RG 338 Records of the U. S. Army Command Boxes 1-4,Sth Army Bomb Reports (No Help Overseas areas)
National Archives And Records Administration. College Park Branch 8601 Adelphi Road College Park, MD 20740

+ Yolo Co., CA)

This facility was still in the process of transferring records and little information was found related to the subject Yolo County A i i r t FUDS. We researched Record Group (RG) 237! Records of the Civil Aeronautics Administration and looked at three boxes of material. There were no records found for Winters-Davis F w t Strip or Yolo County Airport.
Chemical and Biological Defense Agency Historical Office CBDA/HO Aberdeen Proving Ground Edgewood, MD 21010

Records on Air Chemical Units was reviewed. A 1945 Chemical Equipment Listing was also reviewed. There were no records found for Winters-Davis Flight Strip or Yolo County Airport.
National Archives And Records Administration. And Federal Records Center 1000 Commodore Drive San Bruno, CA 94066

The following record groups were researched for applicable information: RG 18 Records of the Army Air Forces, RG 77 U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, RG 92 Records of the Quartermaster General, RG 121 Records of the Public Building Service, RG 269 Records of the Farm Credit Property Disposal, RG 270 Records of the War Assets Administration and RG 291 GSA Property Disposal. The following record groups and boxes were reviewed:

RG 121 Records of the Public Building Service Box 30, Winter Army Airfield (No Help) Box 35, Winters-Davis Flight Strip
RG 270 Records of the War Assets Administration Box 146, Winter Army Airfield (No Help) Box 147, Winters-Davis Flight Strip

The RG 77 map files finding aid for those maps transferred from the records center side was also researched.

U. S. Air Force Historical Center Bldg. 1405, Chennault Circle Maxwell AFB, AL. 36112
The following applicable records were reviewed: USAF Histories: 224.01, Western Flying Training Command (Winters-Davis?) 224.603 to 224.740, Western Flying Training Command (Winters-Davis?) 224.06 to 224.283, Western Flying Training Command (Winters-Davis?) 224.740 to 225.0 1, Western Flying Training Command (Witers-Davis?) 260.277 Airfield Directory of the Continental U.S. 283.81-10 to 284.04-2, 46th AB Squadron, Hamilton AAB (Admin. Winters-Davis) 284.04-;!A to 284.04-3A, 46th AB Squadron, Hamilton AAB (Admin. Winters-Davis)
U. S. Army Corps of :Engineers Records
RG 77, Acc # A-5 1-59, Box 472, Windham - Winterport (Winters-Davis F.S.)

Sacramento History Center Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 447-2958


The Sacramento History Center had moved from its old location. The Curator was contacted by telephone, and the Curator informed the archival search team that there was not any information regarding Yolo County Airport or the former Winters-Davis Flight Strip.

California State Library California Section 9th and Capitol Mall Sacramento, CA 95809
The team then reviewed the following applicable documents:

F 869 W55.W5 "Winters, CA Centennial Supplement to Winters Express Newspaper, May 22, 1975. by Broderick W. Sacto-Bryte, ca. C 979.45 1.W5 "History of Eastern Yolo Co., CAW 1945. F 869 D3.L3 "History of Davis, CAW by Joanne Leach Larkey, published by the Davis Historical and Landmarks Commission, 1968.
California State Archives 201 N. Sunrise Ave., Roseville, CA

A review of the Archives brochure revealed no worthwhile document areas to review.


University of California, Berkeley Main Library Berkeley, CA 94704

No documents were found for review at this facility. The map library was closed for renovations.
University of California, Berkeley Bancroft Library Berkeley, CA 94704

The following pertinent documents were reviewed: Pamphlets on Yolo Co., CA, Decimal # F868.Y5.P18; "Yolo Co., Land of Changing Patterns" by Joanne Larkey, Decimal # F868.Y5.L371 1987
Sacramento Public Library Sacramento, CA 95809

The team found no information at this facility on the site.


University of California, Sacramento Main Library Sacramento, CA 95809

The following document was found:

TL 725.JP5 S2 c.2 "Regional Plan, Aviation Plan


No applicable maps were found in the map library.

+ Program of the Sacramento Regional

Airports" by the Sacramento Regional Area Planning Commission, July 1974.

Woodland Public Library Woodland, CA 95695


There was no useful information at this facility on the site.

University of California, Davis Main Library Davis, CA 95616


The following document was reviewed: DOC - CA H990.Y66 1988 "Hazardous Waste Sites in Yolo Co. CAW by Tracie L. Billington, 1988 There were not applicable maps in the map library on the site.

Yo10 County Public Library Davis, CA 95616


There was no useful information found on the site.

Yolo County Archives Woodland, CA 95695


The archivist for this facility did not find any information on the site.

Yolo County Planning Department Woodland, CA 95695


The department head found and furnished two maps of the airport, and the report.

" 1976 Y'olo County Airport Master Plan, Yolo County, CA" by the Yolo County Planning Board, 1.976.
6.3 Surnrnarv of Interviews. Interviews have been held with a number of individuals who are familiar with past operations at the Yolo County Airport. Appendix E contains all conversation records of interviews. The following individuals furnished remarks pertinent to potential OEW. Austin Wiswell Yolo County Airport Manager Winters, CA Office: 625 Court Strext, Room 203 Woodland, CA 95695 (916) 666-8129

Mr. Wiswell has held the airport manager position for the past 3 + years. He stated the airport was mainly vacant until sometime during the 1960's. Since then the airport has been used by private small aircraft and local cropdusters. To his knowledge there have not been any incidents reported involving munitions at the airport. The County does not have original mapping of the field. He suggested that Mr. Duane Chamberlain, who has farmed the unimproved property on the airport, including the former bomb storage area, since the early 1980's, should be a good contact. His phone number is (916) 662-2620. Mr. Wiswell stated the best site map is available from the Sacramento District, Corps of Engineers office. He was aware of past investigations by the Corps.
His perception of the ordnance history from the perspective of a fighter pilot of 23 years is as follows: The field was established in mid-to-late 1942 in response to the threat of a Japanese attack. Many airfields up and down the coast came into existence at the same time. These were "Dispersal .BasesM in the early WW I1 period; and thus, the flight strip had a very irregular pattern of hard stand, making the facility very hard to hit if under attack. Shortly a:fterit was bui1.t (some 3 -6 months later), because of the U. S. success in the Pacific, the threat of attack ceased and Yolo became a base training for B25 Marshall Bombers. Useful live ordnance stored was transferred to areas where it would be put to good use,, according to :Mr. Wiswell. He speculated that practice bombs with spotting charges were loaded at Winters-Davis Flight Strip, and were then dropped on nearby ranges. He, however, had no records of the range locations. Live HE ordnance was, in his belief, "No longer Present" at the airfield. Mr. Ron Marley Caretaker Yolo Cou.nty Airport (916) 756-0120 Ron Marley had previously been contacted by personnel from the Sacramento District and the Environmental Department of McClellan AFB. He had discussed Environmental Hazards at Yolo Airport with these agencies and the conversation(s) can be found in backup information to the INPR filed at Sacramento District. One item related to potential OEW contamination, mentioned in records of conversations, various data bases, and other information is that a smoke device (OEW) was found on a farm south of the field and subsequently destroyed by the county. Present discussions centered on this past incident; and his specific experience on the airport proper as caretaker.
Ron served in the EOD and, thus, is a good source of knowledge of munitions for his employer. He has stated there are a lot of "rumors about the bomb storage area". However, there has never been anv dangerous ordnance found in the area. The field has been dry farmed, and there is a possibility that ordnance could have been dumped there. (In the past he has suggested to environmental officials that perhaps infrared remote sensing or some other technique(s) could be used to verify no OEW remains.

Relative to the incident of a smoke bomb being found in the field south of the airport, he related that a rancher located the practice bomb that surfaced in his field after a 3 to 4 month period of rain, similar to what has been happening lately in California. The device had a

white phosphorous content. He was fairly specific that the practice munition probably accidently detached from a WW I1 airplane. He mentioned about a 25 lb. spotting charge was associated with the device and that; because of his past EOD experience, he assisted the county with cleaning up the munition. Pilots flying from Winters-Davis Flight Strip dropped practice bombs with spotting charges, but he had no idea where the practice ranges were located. Other items mentioned by Mr. Marley: During the mid-1980s some concrete debris was busted u p The sheriffs office had practiced with Smoke and Tear Gas on the airport property, but this is unrelated to DOD use of the land during WW 11. Mr. Duane Chamberlain Residence and Business Office 34530 County Road 29 Yolo County, CA (916) 662-2620 Mr. Chamberlain was contacted at his home and business office located at 34530 County Road 29, which is about 1 mile west of the N/W corner of airport property. The following are the recollections of the conversation with Mr. Duane Chamberlain. Mr. Chamberlain indicated a long time in the past (20+ years), while farming, he tilled-up what he thought were b1u.e practice bombs. He described these items as being about 5 to 6 inches long, with fins, and about 2-1/2 inches in diameter. He briefly searched around his office for a souvenir, but was unable to find one. Based on his description, Mr. Scott Barton and Mr. William K. James, QASAS personnel with the St. Louis Distict, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, decided that Mr. Chamberlain might be describing a miniature practice bomb such as lone of the bombs identified in the Miniature 3-pound Mk 3, Mk 4, AN-Mk 5 , and AN-Mk 23; or 4.5 pound AN-Mk 43 series Figure 3). He stated not much evidence remains of the facilities that were once part of the old Winters-Davis Flight Strip. During farming operations his employees still occasionally turn up concrete chucks and they have been instructed to bury them deeper beneath the surface. There was also some debris and junk piled into a number of concrete pits adjacent to taxiways. He speculated that there might be something left in these pits. At the Southeast comer (old bomb storage area) he mentioned there was once an oil road, but his employees broke up the road materials and spread them around with not much being left. He also mentioned that near the Fire Department facility, some concrete chunks remain piled up, and tunnels run beneath the taxiways and runway.

The foll.owing individuals participated in the site investigations on the above referenced sites. Mr. Scott A. Barton Mr. William K. James Mr. Gerald V. Schwalbe

On Monday 13 February 1995, Messrs. Barton and James flew from St. Louis, MO to Sacramento, CA., arriving at approximately 1245 hours Pacific Standard time. Mr. Schwalbe, who had been on leave, picked them up at the airport. The team then drove through Woodland and then past the Yolo County Airport, where they briefly viewed the facility prior to the site visit scheduled for the following day. They also spent a brief period attempting to reach Mr. Duane Chamberlain, who farms the available land on the airport ground, but were unsuccessful. They next proceeded to Davis California, where they registered at the Rarnada Inn motel and remained overnight. An appointment had been made for early the following day, Tuesday 14 February, to meet with Mr. Wiswell, Manager, Yolo County Airport, who would escort the survey team about the airport grounds. After introductions of Messrs. Barton and James, the team conducted the site survey. Mr Wiswell first escorted the team to the far south side of the airport where they survleyed the former bomb/ammunition storage area. This location was found to be partially in crops and partially unimproved ground. The crop area was extremely muddy, but the unimproved ground was surveyed and photographs were taken of the site. Although no evidence was found of OEW scrap in the area, Kirk James did find hollow-filled tile, the material commonly used in ammunition storage structure construction. The survey team was escorted to the north side of the airport and observed and photographed the property used by the gun club. By 0930 hours the team had covered the areas of interest. Mr. Wiswell then left for another meeting. He provided directions to Mr. Chamberlain's residence, and it was understood that after contacting Mr. Chamberlain, the team might return again for further inspections. Mr. Chamberlain has farmed the unimproved airport property for many years. The team drove to Mr. Chamberlain's home and business office located at 34530 County Road 29, which is about 1 mile west of the N/W corner of the airport property. The recollections of the conversation with Duane Chamberlain are furnished in paragraph 6.3 above. After interviewing Mr. Chamberlain, the site survey team accompanied him to view the various features described at Yolo Airport. At various places, the team examined structures and took additional photographs. The pits held connection points for former water supply lines used in fire control. Entrapped surface water, junk, and other debris were evident in these reinforced concrete pits. However, nothing of an OEW nature was observed by the survey team. The tunnels beneath the pavement structures were found to be old drainage structures and concrete wing walls. Mr. Chamberlain drove to the area of the old bunkers that earlier had been viewed with Mr. Wiswell. Map M-4, Site Plan, shows the locations visited and positions of current condition photographs can be found in Appendix G of the ASR report. No evidence of ordnance and explosive waste (OEW) was found in the former ammunition storage area or anywhere elsewhere on the FUDS property. Around noon on Tuesday, 14 February 1995, after finishing the investigations at the Yolo County Airport, the survey team drove to Fresno, California to prepare for the investigations to be held at the Mt. Campbell Rifle Range FUDS.

B O M B BODY

FIRING PIN

TAIL

FIRING

B I N CUP

Miniaftlrc 3-pound M k 3, M k 4, AN-MkS, and A N 4 k 23; and 4.5-pound A t W 43 Over-all length, inches. .............. -825 Diameter, inches ..................... 2-18 k l a r ....-.................... UnipainM

These s d 8 , cast-alloy bombs have a tube ~ i o ~ their l g langitudinat x i s which houses khe S i g d Cartridge AH-Mk 4 or hik 5, a pymted-mjc charge for spotting purposes. Tfre differences bebeeween these bombs are matters o f size. The Miniature Practice Bomh AN-Mk 43 weighs 4-5 pounds; the others of this series weigh 3.8 pounds.

YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (W INTER-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY. CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDSD J09CA009402 PRACT ICE BOMB
PROJECT OATG MARCH 1995 21-MAR-1935 08:Zi

( DATE

OF MAPt

1994
&

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7.0 Site Evaluation


7.1 B M Contamination Evaluation
With reference to paragraph 6.1.2, CWM training was not shown to have been conducted on the Winters-Davis Flight Strip. No documentation exists of the presence of CWM training facilities or materials present at this FUDS. All CWM training of personnel is assumed to have occurred at the air base which the flight strip was assigned to by the Army Air Corps. 7.2 W W Contamination Evaluation With reference to paragraph 6.1.1, archival research verified that small arms ammunition, miniature practice bombs, and perhaps other HE munitions were stored at the Yolo County Airport, formerly Winters-Davis Flight Strip, DERP-FUDS Site No. J09CA009400 (OEW Project No. J09CA009402). Thirteen (13) Bomb Storage Revetments and five (5) Bomb Fuze Storage Magazines were constructed near the south flight strip boundary. None of the HE ordnance that may have been stored was shown to have been fired at, or dropped nearby, the field (although one smoke device was recovered from a farm south of the field). Reliable reports indicate small/miniature practice bombs have been recovered during ground tilling operations idnear the area of the Bomb Storage Revetments. None have been uncovered in the last 15+/- years. Based upon the evidence presented in this ASR, the potential for OEW contamination on Yolo County Airport, is judged "negligible" and a RAC score of "4" is assigned to the FUDS. Appendix I furnishes the Risk Assessment Code Procedure Form, indicating a rating of "marginal" in the Severity Category and "Occasional" assessed as the Probability Level. Despite extensive archive searches and other activities undertaken in the preparation of this report, it can not be guaranteed that DOD generated Ordnance and Explosive Waste contamination does not exist at Yolo County Airport. Based on the analysis of the records reviewed in this ASR; the previous documentation outlined in the records of the Sacramento District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; interviews with airport and public and emergency officials, historians, and others with site knowledge; and the actual visual site survey, there is little reason to suspect contamination. In summary, there is little reason to suspect contamination remains on this FUDS. One or two other action(s) may be appropriate at this site before finalizing any future course of action. These suggestions are furnished within a separate report, the Archive Search CONC1,USIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS.

Location Map Vicinity Map Airport Vicinity Site Plan Current Airport Layout Aerial Photo Interpretation Historic Airport Layout-1 975 Historic Real Estate

YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (W I NTERS-DAV I S FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDS" J09CA009402 PROJECT LOCATION MAP
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21-MAR-1995 O W 8

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YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (*INTERS-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDS" J 0 9 C A 0 0 9 4 0 2 CURRENT AIRPORT LAYOUT

FEATURE NUMBER
I .

FEATURE DESCRIPTION BOMB STORAGE AREA. THIRTEEN SQUARE REVETMENTS. RECTANGULAR BUILDING FOUNDAT ION. SMALL SQUARE STRUCTURE.
~ ~~ ~

IA.

1 8 .
IC.

2.
DEPRESSION/WEATHERED TRENCH (?I . -ROUGH SCARRED AREA WITH TWO BUILDINGS AND A TOWER. SCATTERED OBJECTS/DEBRIS. SCARRING AND DEBRIS LOOK AS I F THERE MAY HAVE BEEN A FIRE AT AND VICINITY OF THE BUILDINGS. LARGE ROUGH SCARRED AREA. POSSIBLE FORMER DISP~SAL AREA. POSSIBLE TRENCH SCARS.

LEGEND

0 ,

S I T E BOUNDARY FEATURE LOCATION

M-6

YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERPFUDS ' J 0 9 C A 0 0 9 4 0 2 A E R I A L PHOTO INTERPRETATION 1952 PHOTOGRAPHY
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ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHIVES SEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (FORMERLY WINTER-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402

APPENDICES
REFERENCES ACRONYMS

REPORTS/ST'UDIES/LE?TERS/MEMORANDUMS
HISTORICAL, PHO'I'OGRAPHS - NOT USED INTERVIEWS NEWSPAPERSIJOURNALS - NOT USED

PRESENT srm PHOTOGRAPHS


HISTORICAL MAPSIDRAWINGS - NOT USED RISK ASSESSMENT CODE PROCEDURE FORMS REPORT DISTRIBUTION LIST ARCHIVE KDDRESSES

APPENDIX A
REF'ERENCES

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHIVES SEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (FORMERLY WINTER-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402

APPENDIX A

- REFERENCES

A l . INPR REFERENCES
U.S. A r m y Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District 1991 Defense Environmental Restoration Program, Formerly Used Defense Sites, Findings and Determination of Eligibility, Garden City Army Air Field, Kansas Site No. JO9CA009400 (XWR).

A2. REFERENCES
Backes, Charles, Colonel U. S. A m y Air Corps 1944 Letter to Commanding General, Army Air Forces, Washington D. C., dated December 13, Accession # 342-54D-6075, Box 1 of 1, Folder 686, National Personnel. Records Center, St. Louis, MO. Hedger, H. E., Major, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers 1943 Telegram to Division Engineer, Salt Lake City, Utah, dated April 20, RG 77, Accession # A51-59, Box 472 Windharn - Winterport, Folder 633, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB, AL. Mueller, Robert 1989 Air Force Bases As of 17 September, 1982, published 1989, by the Office of Air Force History, Washington D.C., pages 375, 378, 397 and 400. Pyle, C. W., Colonel U. S. Army Air Corps 1944 Letter to Commanding General, Western Flying Training Command, Santa Ana, California, dated September 13, Accession # 342-54D-6075, Box 1 of 1, Folder 686, National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, MO.

U. S. Army Air Corps 1944 History of the Hamilton Field Air Base Area, California, dated February 1929 31 March 1944, Box 283.81-10 to 284.04-2, Volume 284.04-1, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB, AL.

U . S. A m y Air Corps
1944 History of the Hamilton Field Air Base Area, California, dated April - July 1944, Box 284.04-2A to 284.04-3A, Volume 284.04-3, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB, AL.

War Assets Administration 194? Preliminary Report 300.04, Winters-Davis Flight Strip, Yolo County, California, n.d., RG 2'70, Real Property Disposal Files, Box 147, Folder W-Calif-183, Winters-Davis Flight Strip, National Archives and Records Administration, San Bruno, CA..
Yolo County Planning Board 1976 Yolo County Airport Master Plan, Yolo County, CA, Yolo County Planning Department; General Files, Yolo County Planning Departmen, Woodland, CA.

A3. REFERENCES FOR GEOLOGY AND SOILS


Bates, Leland A. 197'7 Soil Survey of Solano County, California. US Department of Agriculture in cooperation with University of California Agricultural Experiment Station. Page, R.W. 1986 Regional Aquifer-System Analysis; Geology of the Fresh Ground-Water Basin of the Centrai Valley, California, with Texture Maps and Sections. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1401-C .

Thornbury, William D. 1965 Regional Geomorphology of the United States. Department of Geology, Indiana University, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York.

APPENDIX B
ACRONYMS

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHIVES SEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (FORMERLY WINTER-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402

APPENDIX B - ACRONYMS
ASR (CERCLA
Archive Search Report Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act Code of Federal Regulations Corps of Engineers, Huntsville Division Corps of Engineers, Directorate of Military Programs Corps of Engineers, Missouri River Division Corps of Engineers, South Pacific Division Cmtainerized/Hazardous and Toxic Waste Chemical Warfare Material Defense Environmental Restoration Account Defense Environmental Restoration Program Department of Defense Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Restoration Defense Account Formerly Used Defense Sites U. S. Fish and Wildlife High Explosive Hazardous and Toxic Waste Inventory Project Report Mandatory Center of Expertise National Contingency Plan National Geodetic Vertical Datum Ordnance and Explosive Waste Quality Assurance Specialist-AmmunitionSurveillance Risk Assessment Code Remedial Design and Remedial Action Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act U.S Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Army Engineer Division, Huntsville, AL U.S. Code U. S. Geological Survey Unexploded Ordnance

CFR
CEHND

CEMP
CEMRD CESPD CONrn

CWM
DERA DERP DOD EPA ERDA

m s

FWS HE HTW INPR MCPIMCX

NCP NGVD
OEW QASAS RAC RDIRA SARA USACE USAEDH USC USGS UXO

Appendices B- 1

APPENDIX C
REPORTS, STUDIES, LETTERS, MEMORANDUMS

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCSEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (FORMERLY WINTER-DAMS FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402

APPENDIX C

C I. C2.
C:3.

Inventory Project Report (INPR), 1995, Yolo County Airport, Winters, CA, Site No. .J09CA009402. Backes, Charles, Colonel U. S. Army Air Corps, Letter to Commanding General, Army Air Forces, Washington D. C., 1944. Hedger, :H. E., Major, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Telegram to Division Engineer, Salt Lake City, 1943. Mueller, Robert, Air Force Bases As of 1 7 September, 1982, published 1989, by the Office of Air Force History, Washington D.C., pages 375, 378, 397 and 400, 1989. Pyle, C. W., Colonel U. S. Army Air Corps, Letter to Commanding General, Western Flying Training Command, Santa Ana, California, 1944. U. S. Army Air Corps, History of the Hamilton Field Air Base Area, California, dated February 1929 - 3 1 March 1944. U. S. Army Air Corps, History of the Hamilton Field Air Base Area, California, 1944. War Assets Administration, Preliminary Report 300.04, Winters-Davis Flight Strip, Yolo County, California, n.d. Yolo County Planning Board, Yolo County Airport Master Plan, Yolo County, CA, 19'76. SAFETY PLAN

C4.

C5.

C6.
C7.
C%.

C19.
C110.

C: 11. SITE VISIT

C 12. File Documents References List

APPENDIX C-1
hventory Project Report (INPR), 1995, Yolo County Airport, Winters, CA, Site No. J09CA009400

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY


U.S. Army Corps of Engineers WASHINGTON, D.C. 20314-1000

REPLY T O ATTENTION OF:

CEMP-RF (200-la)

,5J/u~ Qx

MEMORANDUM FOR COMMANDER, SOUTH PACIFIC DIVISION, ATTN: CESPD-PM SUBJECT: Defense ~nvir6mentalRestoration Program for Formerly Used Defense Sites (DERP-FUDS) - Yolo County Airport, Formerly Winters-Davis Flight Strip and Yolo County International Airport, Site No. J09CA009400, Project Nos. J09CA009401 and JO9CAOO9402

I. This memorandum authorizes the remedial design and remedial action (RD/RA) for proposed containerized hazardous and toxic waste (CON/HTW) project as recommended in the Inventory Project Report, SAB. Because this project involves fuel supply lines, it is necessary that you follow the policy guidance in CEMP-RF Memorandum, 31 July 1990, Subject: Policy Guidance for Underground Storage ~anks. (USTs) in Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS). We concur with CESPD that this project should be executed by CESPK. Pending CEHND recommendation, a decision on project J09CA009402 will follow at a later date.
2 .

We request:

i3. CESPD, within sixty days of the date of this memorandum, ensure the landowners are notified of the decision and provide copies of the notification letter to CEMP-RF and CEHND-ED-PM.

b. CESPD ensure that the project is included in both the FY-92 workplan and the DERP-FUDS database for a five-year workplan development. All contracts should be awarded before the fourth quarter of any fiscal year.

c. CEHND ensure that the project is included in the inventory database within thirty days of the date of this memorandum. 3. POC: Irme Sailer, 202-504-4694.

FOR THE DIRECTOR OF MILITARY PROGRAMS:

Colonel, Corps of Engineers Chief, Environmental Restoration Division Directorate of Military Programs
CF :

CESPK-ED-M

CEHND-ED-PM

CESPD-ED-GH

(2 0 0 - l c )

M E M O R A N D U M F O R Commander, U.S. Army Corps of E n g i n e e r s , 20 M a s s a c h u s e t t s Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20314-1000 Commander, U.S. A r m y E n g i n e e r D i v i s i o n , H u n t s v i l l e , P.O. Box 1600, H u n t s v i l l e , Alabama 35807-4301 Commander, U.S. Army E n g i n e e r D i v i s i o n , M i s s o u r i R i v e r , 68101-0103 P.O. Box 103, Clowntown S t a t i o n , Omaha, Nebraska SUBJECT: Defense E n v i r o n m e n t a l R e s t o r a t i o n Program For Formerly Used D e f e n s e S i t e s (DERP-FUDS), I n v e n t o r y P r o j e c t R e p o r t ( I N P R ) f o r Yolo County A i r p o r t , S i t e No. J09CA009400.
1. I a m f o r w a r d i n g t h e INPR f o r Yolo County A i r p o r t f o r appropriate action. The s i t e is e l i g i b l e f o r DERP-FUDS. p r o p o s e d CON/HTW p r o j e c t i s a l s o e l i g i b l e .
2.

The

I recommend t h a t :

a . CEMP-R a p p r o v e t h e proposed CON/HTW p r o j e c t and a s s i g n it t h r o u g h t h i s h e a d q u a r t e r s t o CESPK f o r RD/RA.


b. CEHND d e t e r m i n e i f f u r t h e r study and r e m e d i a l a c t i o n a r e needed a t t h e bomb s t o r a g e r e v e t m e n t and f u s e s t o r a g e magazine locations.

ROGER F. Y A N K O U P E Brigadier General, U.S. Commanding

Army

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY


U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, SACRAMENTO CORPS OF ENGINEERS 1325 J STREET SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 95814-2922
REPLY To A1TEKIX)W

of

CESPK-ED-M MEMORANDUM FOR Commander, S o u t h P a c i f i c D i v i s i o n

26 August 1 9 9 1

SUBJECT: DEW-FUDS F i n a l I n v e n t o r y P r o j e c t R e p o r t (INPR) f o r S i t e No. J09CAl309400, Yolo County A i r p o r t , C a l i f o r n i a


1. T h i s INPR r e p o r t s on t h e DERo-FUDS p r e l i m i n a r y a s s e s s m e n t o f t h e Y o l o C o u n t y A i r p o r t . A s i t e v i s i t was c o n d u c t e d on d a t e s listed i n t h e report.
2. W e h a v e determined t h a t t h e s i t e was f o r m e r l y u s e d by t h e Army. A r e c o m e n d e d F i n d i n g s a n d D e t e r m i n a t i o n o f E l i g i b i l i t y i s included.

3 W e have a l s o determined t h e r e i s h i r a r d o r s waste a t t h e s i t e e l i g i b l e f o r c l e a n u p u n a e r DEW-FUDS. The c a t e g o r i e s o f w a s t e a t t h e s i t e a r e CONiHTW a n d O E W . P r o j e c t summary sheets f o r e a c h p r o p o s e d p r o j e c t are i n c l u d e d .


4.

I recommend t h a t you:

a . Approve a n d s i g n t h e F i n d i n g s a n d D e t e r m i n a t i o n o f Eligibility;
b . F o r w a r d a copy of t h i s I N P R t o CEMP r e v e s t i n g a p p r o v a l a ~ c if u n d s f o r t h i s D i s t r i c t t o a c c o m p l i s h t h e CONiHTW p r o j e c t . I f f u n d s a r e p r o v i d e d by f i r s t q u a r t e r FY92, we c a n p r o c e e d t o t h e n e a t s t e p o f d e s i g n a n d r e m e d i a t i o n i n FY92; and,

c . F o r w a r d a copy of t h i s INPR t o HND f o r t h e PA f i l e a n d f o r a d e t e r m i n a t i o n o f t h e n e e d f o r f u r t h e r s t u d y o f t h e bomb storage area.

i?pwf?du
LAURENCE R. SADOFF COL, E N Commanding

DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROGRAM

INMENTORY PROJECT REPORT

YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (WINTERS-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP) SITE NO. J09CA009400

PREPARED BY DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SACRAMENTO DISTRICT,CORPS OF ENGINEERS SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA AUGUST 1991

SITE SURVEY SUMMARY SHEET FOR DERP-FUDS SITE NO. J09CA009400 YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT
SITE NAME: Yolo County Aupon. The site was formally known as the Winters-Davis Flight Strip and the Yolo Gxmty International Air Port.

LOCATION: The site is located in Yolo County, CA approximately 8 miles northwest of downtown Davis, California. More specifically it is located between county roads 95 and 96 running north south and roads 29 and 31 running east west. See location and vicinity maps at attachments 1 and 2.
SITE HISTORY: Between 1942 and 1943 the U.S. Government acquired by declaration of taking 308.57 acres and by transfer 201.58 acres, for a total of 510.15 acres, for use as a flight strip to provide alternate basing for B25 aircraft normally located at McC1ella.n Air Force Base. Site improve,ments included a runway, taxiways, two aircraft fueling areas, an operations area, control tower, bomb storage area, and housing area. Ln 1946, the use permit for 201.58 acres was relinquished to the Public Roads Adminisuation VRA) and the remaining 308.57 acres transferred to the War Assets Administration (WAA). In 1948 the WAA transferred 294.40 acres, along with the 201.58 acres from the PRA, to the County of Yolo for use as an airport. The remaining 14.17 acres fiom the WAA reverted to the origmal owners.
SITE VISIT: a. On 26 Jan 87, Mr. Kent R Westover from the Sacramento District visited the site to assess the current conditions and met with the following persons: Director of Parks, Museum and Grounds Mr. Elarl Balc h County of Yolo 625 Court St., Room B-03 Woodland, CA 95695 (916) 666-81 15 Mr. Ron Marley
Caretaker, Yo10 County Axport, CA (916) 756-0120

b. On 27 Mar 87, Mr. Westover and Mr. Marley met w i t h on site w i t h Mr. Larry C u r t i s ,of Curits & Associates, concerning the &position of underground storage t a n k s . Curtis & Associates M r .Larry Curits P.O. Box 924 Woodland, CA 95695 (916) 753-4950 c. On 23 May 91, Ms. Sharon Bruno met on site with Messrs. Earl Balch, Ron Marley and Frank Hildebrand, Managing Partner, Yolo Aviation.

The site has experienced considerable development since the initial site visits in 1987. Messrs. Marley and Hildebrand reported both of that the two original 25,000 gal underground storage ranks,along with a new 10,000 gal tank,have been removed fiom the airport.Further, one smoke device (OEW) was found on a farm south of the airport and was destroyed by the County. The bomb storage area at the south end of the field is essentially under cultivation, except for a strip of ground covered by trees. Among the trees is a ridge of earth, approximately 5 feet high, strewn w i t h concrete rubble. No intact snuctures were visible.

CATEGORY OF HAZARDS: CONLHTW, OEW PROJECT DESCRIPTION: - C O N m : Removal of underground piping and connected f i l l stands and fueling pii: boxes at 4 locations. Test sites where tanks have been previously removed. --OEW: There are 16 known locations for either Bomb Storage Revetments or Fuse Storage Magazines. AVAILABLE STUDIES AND REPORTS: None
P A POC: Larry M. Hergrnooser, CESPK-ED-M, 9 161557-767 1

PROJECT SUMMARY SHEET FOR DERP-FUDS OEW PROJECT NO.J09CAOOP302 YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT SITE NO.J09CAW400
PROJECT DESCRPTION: Records indicate that there were 16 stmctures on site for the storage of bombs or bomb fuses. A smoke device was found on a farm south of site and destroyed by the county. There is no evidence of ordnance within the bomb storage area, nor of the open storage earthen revetments or wOOd frame earthen floor magazines. PROECT ELIGIBIZ.ITY: Records indicate that thrs facility was built and used by the U.S. Army. This project has beer1 evaluated IAW Appenhx A to the CEMP-RT Policy and Criteria Memorandun dtd 5 Apr 90.

POLICY CONSIDERATIONS: There is no policy applicable to this project. There are no records available absolving the government from site restoration. Records do not indicate any ordnance related activities occiuring on site since disposal, and no deed resmcrions are nored. No clearance certificates for OEW were located for this site.
PROPOSED PROJECT: Recommend a confirmation study within the bomb storage area IAW the RACl determination to identify the presence of any remaining OEW.

RISK ASSESSMEW CODE: Attached.


DISTRICT POC: Larry M. Bergrnooser, CESPK-ED-M, 916/557-767 1

STATE INDEX

I
I

VICINITY
S C A L E\ w
H 0
1

MAP
M i ~ t s
---

i.
$
0
N

: ---I
-d

111

SCALE 1:24000

Im u

CONTOUR

INTERVAL 5 FEET

FINDINGS AND DETERMINATION OF ELIGIBILITY


YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT YOLO, CALIFORNIA SITE NO. J09CA009400

FINDINGS OF FACT
1. By use pennit f r o m the U.S. Public Roads Administration, dated 3 November 1943, 201.58 acres were transferred to the War Department. An additional 308.57 acres in total were acquired by the War Department by Declaration of Taking between 1942 and 1943, for a total 510.15 acres.

2. The site was used as a flight snip to provide alternate basing for B25 aircraft normally located at McClellan Air Force Base. Site improvements included a runway, taxiways, two aircraft fueling areas, an operations area, control tower, bomb storage area, and housing area.

3. The use permit for 201.58 acres was relinquished to the Public Roads Administration (PRA) on 12 April 1946. The remaining 308.57 acres transferred to the War Assets Administration (WAA) on 21 September 1946. A total of 294.40 acres were transferred by quitclaim deed from the WAA on 14 June 1948, along with the 201.58 acres from the PRA, to the County of Yolo for use as an airport. The remaining 14.17 acres from the WAA reverted to the original owners, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Reardon. The quitclaim deed includes a recapture clause. The 495.98 acre site is currently owned by the County of Yolo and utilized as the Yolo County h p n . The 14.17 acre portion of the site is owned by St. Mary's College and used for agriculture. DETERMINATION
Based on the foregoing findings of fact, the site has been determined to be formerly used by the Program for Formerly Used Defense DOD. Therefore, it is elipble for the Sites, established under 10 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.

4D-f(
Date
L

10 ROG

/
. YANKOUPE Brigadier General, U.S.Army
Commanding

PROJECTSUMMARY SHEET
FOR \ DERP-FUDS COKIHTW PROJECT NO. ~ 0 9 ~ ~ 0 0 9 3 0 1

YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT SITE NO. JWCA009400


PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Records indicate that there were two (2) underground storage tanks i t h associated pipelines, fueling stations and pit and two (2) above ground storage tanks each w boxes (USTonly) on the site. Available records indicare that the tanks were removed however the associated piping, fueling stations and pits remain. PROJECT ELIGIBILITY:Records indicate that this facility was built and used by the U.S. Army. POLICY CONSIDERATIONS: Records and interviews indicate that the two underground storage tanks were beneficially used, then removed f r o m the site. As such; associated piping, fueling starions and pits are nor proposed for this project. There is no indication that the two above ground tanks were used afrer mnsfer. PROPOSED PROJECT: Removal of associated piping for the two above ground storage tanks and soil testing at the former tank sites.

DD FORM 1391: Attached


DISTRICT POC: Larry M. Bergmooser, CESPK-ED-M, 9 161557-7671

COMPOhENT

1.D A T E

ARMY

FY 19 91 MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROJECT DATA


4 PROJECT T I T L E

21 Aug 91
I

INSTALLATION AND L O ( : A T ~ O ~

Yo10 County Airport, CA


PROGRAM ELEMENT

DERP/FUDS
7 PROJECT NUMBER

Locate Underyround Pi@


8 . PROJECT COST ( $ 0 0 0 )

6 C A T E G O R Y CODE

a)N/KIw
ITEM

J O ~ C A O O ~ ~ IO ~
9 COST E S T I M A T E S

26.93
UNIT COST COST ($000:

QUANTITY

L a a t e abandoned f u e l supply lines ard test

sol1

a.
b.

Equipnent cost
F i e l d Work O f f i c e Work S o i l Sampling and Testing

c.
d.

. I

Locate abandor~edf u e l supply lines and test s o i l . ram& f r m s i t e by o t h e r s .

F u e l tanks have been

DD

DEC 76

1391

PREVIOUS EDITIONS M A Y B E USED I N T E R N A L L Y UNTIL EXHAUSTED

PAGE N O .

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY ( W H E N DATA IS ENTERED)

CONTARINATION SUflf'lARY
FOR

DERP PROJECT NO. J09CA009400


The known potential hazards at the Yo10 County Alrport consist primarily ctf above and underqround fuel storage tanks, associated plplng. fuellng pit boxes, and the possibility of ordnance at the previous Bumb Storage Area. A table follows which outlines the potential hazards and their observed or known status. INVENTORY OF POTENTIAL HAZARD Description: Bldg. T-8 (Houslng Area) Fuel Oil Storage Unit, elevated steel tank with concrete foundat ion Butene Storage Unit, elevated steel tank with concrete foundat ion Bomb Storage Area, storage revetments and magaz ines ( S e e Schedule of Buildinas for details) Gasoline Storage Unit, underqround steel tank with concrete foundation 25,000 gal Caoac i tv Comments :

500 gal

NO LONGER AT T H E SITE

Bldg. T-40 ( Hous i nq F i r ea )

1 0 0 0 gal

NO LONGER AT THE SITE

B1dqs.T-100, through T- 140 c ordnance Area) Bldg. T-210 (near south end of flight str l p )

NO VISUAL EVIDENCE:
OF ANY BUILDINGS, ORDNANCE, OR DEBRIS A T THE SITE Tank was removed 9 7 9 by Curtis in 1 and Associates. Relocated to Curtis facility and r e d f m the

site.
Bldg. T-212 lad jacent to Bldq. T-210) Truck Fill Stand, steel pipe with concrete foundation Fueling Pit Boxes and associated steel piping (piping was connected to the fuel tank, T-210) 91dq. T-280 (near north end of flight strlp) Gasoline Storage Unit, underground steel tank with concrete foundat ion
4 boxes

STILL ON SITE

800 LF of piping

BOXES STILL ON SITE - PIPING &SSUMED TO STILL


IN PLACE

25,000 gal

Tank w a s removed in 1974Relocated to Curtis facility and re'IWVd fran the slte.

Locat ion:

Description:

Capac i t v

Comments : STILL ON SITE

B l d g . T-2B2 (adjacent to Bldq. T-280)

T r u c k Fill Stand, steel pipe with concrete foundation

NFI

Eldqs. T - 2 8 4 . T-296, T-288, T-290

Fueling Pit Boxes a n d associated steel piping (piping connected to t h e fuel t a n k , 7-280)

boxes 1200 LF of piping


4

BOXES STILL ON S I T E - PIPING ASSUMED TO STILL IN P L A C E

5 -'

i 1 m, * : $ s

-.

1.-

: u -

file Name: RISK # 2 Rater's Name EC?ct+.ccst .q

L
APPSNDIX A RISK XSSESSZENT 1ROCL3URES FOR ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WhSTZ (OEU;

Plle Name: 2ISK 1 2 Revlsea: 31 Yzy 89

The 3EY r : s k assesszent : s based upon docmen:ed 2 x d e n c e cons;st:ag of r?c=r=s searzies. reycr-s oi Ex?;os:-~e Ordnance Der3chsen: actlons. and fisl2 sbs?r-:a::cris. . . :nr?r.:rews. a n d seasur23encs. These 1 i : a are used to assess the r r s i :n-:~--:ec 3asei 1 : ; o c r ? ? iazarfs 1ientli:ei at f ? ? s : : ? . 3 e rls~ assessZen: :s c m p c s c i 3 : 2.~0 f3c:ors. hazari seversf7 anc 3azarc ;robab:l:ty.

Par: I. "22:: 'ererx. Eazard sever::y c3tegcr:es are def:>ed to prov:ds a q : a : : t a r ; , : e neasar? 3 : :h2 wars: c r e c ~ b l sm s n a p resclti9g fros personnel ex?cs:r? :o -:ar:cus ty?es acd quant::;es of unexpioded ordnance Items.

A.

tcnven::znal

Crdnance and Ammun:t:on VALUE

-4; -

d -

a
Xmmun:t;en.

Blank or Pracrlce

4
10

i
, & L 6 d

Sonbs. 3?105172 Bombs. P r a c t ~ c e . Fused Grenades. 9 n e s Grenades. Y z ~ e s , Tractice, Fused

6
10

Barrier or natxrsl 5arr;er (e.g.. a fence comblned w l : h a cllf:!, vhlc!~ c2r?iet2:y surr3unas the f a c l l ~ t y ;anc a seans to control entry, at ail :lmes. :tr=ugh the Fates ar c:her entrances t3 th? f a c : ! : t y ( e . ~ . .an a c t ~ n d a r t .:elevision soc:r2rs. locke5 entrances. a r c3ntr3l;sc r:adway access :3 t k e f3c:l:ry:.
As a r t : f : : i a l

Asslgnea Value
0

. -. ... .- c -..

Z : : ?

.:..*.,a.-.e.

3ynat:cs

- 3:s deals v l ; b site conditions that are subject to change 3u: :say be ~:able at the present. Examples would be sxcesslve

sc:l

crr3s:ca

r e c ~ z ellstances f r m :he

Sy beaches or streams. increasing land development :bat could s;rz rc 1n5abl:attd areas or otherwise Increase

accessa5:l:ry.

VALUE

( ! ! a x l z a m

Vaiue of 51 Total value for hazard probability. Sux of Values A througn G. (Yot to exceed 3 5 1 . Apply thrs value to Hazard Probabili:~ Table 2 to deterzrne Bazarl Levei.

be c r e a r e a due

Hazarc P r o b a b i l : : ~ . :he probaS:lity :hat a h a z a r d h a s been o r w i l l c 3 :he p r e s e n c e and o t i e r r a t e d f;c:ors of unexploded o r d n a n c e 3 r *x?l3s:-.-e s a : 2 r l a l s on a i o r s e r l y used DOD size.
3

yss
VXLL'E

NO
VALUE

VALUE

, c

:he

s u r f a c e o r vl:h:n

3 feet.

Value f e r 1oca::cn Val-~e cf 5 1 .


2.

of .. ;XC.

iYaax:=un

i r x

3 : ~ : i ~ c e r o n e a r e s t :~kab:t~c :3ca::ons o r s t r u c t u r e s l ~ k e l yt o b e a t r ~ s k ,tw s ; f e ( r a t t d s . ? a r k s . ? l a y q r 3 c n a s , and bu:ld:ngs!.


fi,-..

D l s t 3 c c e r o Nearesr Targer Less r k a c 1 3 5 0 f e e ?


L , , ,
.1< 1

VALYE 5

feet t o 0.5 mlles

Over 5.0 m l e s D l s t a n c e t o P e r s o n s Value ! : a x u ; :s Value of 5 ; .

HAZARD P!?OBABIL;TY

Descrlptlon

Level

Value

r 1 . 5:sk Assessment. The r l s k assessment vaiue for thls s;:~ 1s detzr3:aed us;ng t5e following Tabie 3, Enter wrrh the results of the hazard proja5~l:ty and bazard severity values.

HAZARD P R O B A B I L i N (from Table 2 ;

LAYOUT

PLAN

S c o h 1-.ZOO'

I _1 110 . . ._
*

CALDc'.t

-l.t ILL-STArO --- *m"C. 7 . u c , ' ~ m c r ~ nor t

.-

SlO.A0t

u.17 -. .

--

.--

- ST.

C V L SUL

1.:

0.4.-

tsooo u s . _ ??r~c -reua

- -.
t rr

rrr

a
I I

cow -

.o o * a
STCLL t a m ~ r r rn -t ITCCL e1-t LDIC !D. a

c.

- --

nc1.r

~ ! n o u W T ~ t 1T 0 6 r m )

~ m r ; O m c . O O a u.0

A . *

APPENDIX C-2
Backes, Charles, Colonel U. S. Army Air Corps, Letter to Commanding General, Army Air Forces, Washington D. C., 1944

APPENDIX C-3
Hedger, EI. E., Major, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Telegram to Division Engineer, Salt Lake City, 1943

LEGRA.M
ClAL
I~U~I'YLJ"

--

MENT R A T E

ASSISTANT

-.

-- -----

REOPJ):

l o r k a u t l m r i z e d f o r a l o m b e h Squadron a t ilinters-3auls P l i g h t S t r i p , Califor~ia x a s d e f e r r e d penliing h e t t c r a e a t h e r c o n d i t i o n s . M now r e q u e s t a d d i t i o n a l coristruction f o r Bombb S t o r a g e a t t h i s f l i g h t s t r i p . r e q ~ e s t sr e p o r t fro, D i s t . m g r . as t o l i e n c o n s t r u c t i o n This t e l e q ~ e

APPENDIX C-4
Mueller, Robert, Air Force Bases As of 17 September, 1982, published 1989, by the Office of Air Force History, Washington D.C., pages 375,378,397 and 400, 1989

Mather Air Force Base

Location: Located 12 mi SE of CALIFORNIA Sacramento, CA. Name: Named in honor of 2d Lt Carl Spencer Mather (1894-19 18). Lieutenant Mather learned to fly in 1915 and was killed on 30 Jan 1918 while on a training flight near Ellington Field, TX, when his JN-4D collided with another aircraft. Date of Current Name: 13 Jan 1948. Previous Names: Mather Field, 2 May 1918. Date of Establishment: 21 Feb 1918. Date Construction Began: 15 Mar 1918. Date of Beneficial Occupancy: 30 Apr 1918. Base Operating Units: 283d Aero s q , 30 Apr 1918 (rdsgd Sq C, Mather Fld, Jul1918)-c. 8 Jan 1919; unk, 9 Jan-2 Nov 1919; Det, 91st Aero Sq, 3 Nov 1919-May 1922 (During Apr-Nov 1922, the 91st Sq was stationed at Crissy Fld and maintained only a small detachment at Mather Fld.); AS Det, Crissy Fld, Jun-Nov 1922.20th Pursuit Gp, 15 Nov 1930-29 Feb 1932. 77th Air Base Gp, HQ and HQ Sq, 13 May 1941 (rdsgd 77th HQ and HQ Sq, 77th Air Service Gp, 13 Jun 1942; 67th Base HQ and Air Base Sq, 1 Aug 1942); 3031st AAF Base Unit, 1 May 1944; 1505th AAF Base Unit, 15 Sep 1944; 2622d AAF Base Unit, 20 Dec 1945; 3535th Air Base Gp, 26 Aug 1948; 323d Air Base Gp, 1 Apr 1973-. Base Commanders: 1st Lt Sam P. Burman, 15 Mar 1918; Capt Albert D. Penney, 26 Apr 1918; Lt Col Delos @. Emmons, 15 Jun-30 Nov 1918; unk, 1-16 Dec 1918; Maj Walter J. Wynne, 17 Dec 1918-8 Jan 1919; unk, 9 J a n 3 Aug 1919; Maj Dana H. Crissey, 4 Aug 1919-unk; Maj Carl Spaatz, 19 Jul-7 Aug 1920; 1st Lt Eugene B. Bailey, Feb-Dec 1923; 1st Lt Paul L Williams, 11 Jan-28 Feb 1924. Maj Clarence L. Tinker, 15 Oct 1930-c. 15 Oct 1932. Maj Harvey F. Dyer, 25 Apr 1941; Lt Col (later, COP; Brig Gen)

1-1

AIR FORCE BASES AFB), Las Vegas, NV, Apr 1946 (asgnd)-31 Mar 1948 (tsfrd to Williams AFB, AZ); Lincoln Aux Fld A-2 (also Mather Aux Fld A-2), 3.3 mi WNW of Lincoln, C A , - ~ Feb 1943(asgnd)-1 Apr 1943 (tsfrd to Stockton Fld, CA); Mather Homing Bcn A m (rdsgd Mather Rad Bcn Anx #I), 2 mi SSE of White Rock, CA, 28 Dec 1955 (asgnd)-24 Sep 1962 (dspd); Minter Fld, 14 mi NW of Bakersfield, CA, 11 Jan 1946 (asgnd)-20 Dec 1946 (tsfrd to Army Div Engss); Stead AFB, Reno, NV, 15 Jun 1966 (asgnd*)-6 Nov 1969 (dspd); Stead Water Sys Am, 1 mi SE of Reno, NV, 15 Jun 1966-7 Nov 1969 (dspd); Winters-Davis Flt Strip, 7 mi ENE of Winters, CA, 7 Jul 1943 (asgnd)-unk, 15 Jul 1944 (asgnd)-24 Nov 1944 (tsfrd to Stockton Fld, CA). Major Changes in Operational Capability: Original construction completed 15 Jun 1918; training activities ceased 8 Jan 1919; field subsequently used by aerial forestry patrol; field area increased from 872 to 4,418 acres Jun 1941; navigation school started Aug 1941; major facility construction project completed 16 Mar 1942; B-25 transition 1943; Port of Embarkation for Pacific 1944-1945; USAF Bombardment and Flight Engineer Schools opened Mar 1946; 750-unit Wherry housing project completed fall 1951; expansion project to accommodate-in a tenant status-SAC B-52 operations 1956-1957; additional construction, chiefly housing and concrete operational areas, completed 1961 and 1962; GAM-77A missiles arrived 1962; electronic warfare officer training transferred from Keesler AFB, MS, 1962-1963; composite medical facility completed late 1970; SRAM weapons system operational 1 Oct 1975; weapons system security upgrade project completed Feb 1980. Major Commands to Which Assigned: Army Air Service, Mar 191822 Jun 1922. Army Air Corps, 2 Jul 1926-Nov 1932. GHQAF, 1 Mar 1935 (rdsgd AF Combat Comd, 20 Jun 1941); Air Corps Flying Training Comd, 23 Jan 1942 (rdsgd AAF Flying Training Comd, 15 Mar 1942; AAF Training Comd, 3 1 Jul1943); Air Transport Comd, 1 Oct 1944; AAF Training Comd, 20 Dec 1945 (rdsgd Air Training Comd, 1 Jul 1946)-. Major Changes in Status: Base served only for aerial forest patrol, beginning 8 Jan 1919; inactive status, 22 Jun 1922; field closed, 12 May 1923; active status, 1 Apr 1930; inactive status, 1 Nov 1932; a subpost of Presidio U.S. Army post, San Francisco, unk-13 May 1935; designated a subpost of Hamilton Fld, 13 May 1935; designated a subpost of Stockton Fld, 21. Feb 1941; established as a separate post and activated, 13 May 1941. Units Assigned:
1918 283 Aero Sq (Sq C, Mather Fld) 91 Aero Sq
30 Apr 18-c. 8 Jan 19

1919 9 Awo Sq 3 Nov 19-24 Jan 20 1920 27 Apr 20-29 Jun 22

* All Stead AFB installations were assigned to Mather AFB in inactive status in 1966.

378

McCIeIlan Air Force Base


Location: Located 7 mi NE of CALlFORNlA Sacramento, CA. Name: Named in honor of Maj Hezekiah ("Hez") McClellan (18941936). Posthumous recipient of the DFC, Major McClellan prepared early charts and records while pioneering Alaskan air routes. He died on 25-May 1936 when his Consolidated PB-2A, which he was flight-testing, crashed near Centerville, OH. Date of Current Name: 13 Jan 1948. Previous Names: Pacific Air Depot (unofficial), 1935; Sacramento Ail Depot, 1 Feb 1937; McClellan Field, 1 Dec 1939. Date of Establishment: Jul 1936. Date Construction Began: 7 Apr 1937. Date of Beneficial Occupancy: 15 Nov 1938. Base Operating Units: Sacramento Air Depot (SAD), Nov 1938; 10th Station Complement, SAD, jointly with 18th Station Complement, SAD, c. 1 Jun 1942; 495th Base HQ and Air Base Sq, 1 Feb 1943; 4127th AAF Base Unit, 1 Apr 1944; HQ and HQ Sq, Sacramento Air Materiel Air Depot, 28 Aug 1948; 3083d Air Base Gp, 5 Oct 1949; HQ and HQ Sq, Sacramento Air Materiel Air Depot, 21 May 1950; HQ Sacramento Air Materiel Air Depot, 21 May 1951; 2852d Air Base Wg, 1 Aug 1953 (rdsgd 2852d Air Base Gp, 16 Oct 1964)-. Base Commanders: Capt John A. Austin, 24 Aug 1938; 1st Lt Christian F. Dreyer, 28 Oct 1938; Maj Charles M. Savage, 31 Oct 1938; Lt Col Stephen J. Idzorek, 16 Dec 1938; Col Harold A. Straws, 5 Feb 1939; Maj Fred C. Nelson, 25 Sep 1939; Col Frank M. Kennedy, 22 Oct 1939; Lt Col Frank C. Nelson, 28 May 1940; Col John M. Clark, 10 Jun 1941; Col Burton F. Lewis, 26 May 1942; Col George W. Polk Jr, 5 Sep 1942; Brig Gen Edwin S. Perrin, 1 Feb 1943; Col James W. Brown Jr, 15 May 1943; Col

AIR FORCE BASES Sep 1945 (tsfrd to Army Div Engrs); Redding AAFld, 7% mi SE of Redding, CA, 15 Nov 1944 (asgnd)-9 Jan 1946 (tsfrd to Army Div Engrs); Reno AAB, 12 mi N of Reno, NV, 12 Feb 1943-12 Aug 1943; San Francisco Port Air Materiel Ofc, Ft Mason, CA, 1 Jul 1947-1 Aug 1954; Santa Rosa AF Recovery Cen #2 (rdsgd McClellan Admn Anx), 3 mi W of Chico, CA, 1 Apr i%5 (asgnd, detchd inst1)-25 Jan 1966(dspd); Seattle Port Air Materiel Area, Seattle, WA, 1 Jul 1947-1 Apr 1954; Stockton Fld (rdsgd Stockton AAB), 4.6 mi SSE of Stockton, CA, 8 Mar 1946 (asgnd)-30 Nov 1946 (tsfrd to Amy Div Engrs); Taft-Kern County Aprt, 1 mi ESE of Taft, CA, 17 Sep 1945 (tsfrd fr Gardner Fld, CA)-27 Sep 1945 (tsfrd to Army Div Engrs); Taft-Kern County Aprt #2, 1 mi ESE of Taft, CA, 17 Sep 1945 (tsfrd fr Gardner Fld, CAI-27 Sep 1945 (tsfrd to Army Div Engrs); USAF Petroleum Stor Dep (rdsgd Mukilteo Fuel Stor Stn; Mukilteo AF POL Retail Distrn Stn), 5 mi SW of Everett, WA, 6 Mar 1952(estbd)-1 Jan 1976 (tsfrd to MAC as a detchd instl); Winters-Davis Landing Strip, Winters, CA, 15 May 194530 Dec 1945 (tsfrd to Army Div Engrs). Major Changes in Operational Capability: Main structures including administration building, barracks, and hospital completed 18 Apr 1938; at time of dedication, 29 Apr 1939, depot and airfield facilities provided capability of repairing and overhauling 1,200 aircraft per year; P-38 and P-39 assembly lines supplemented by a P-40 line Jan 1940; base and depot used for storing aircraft, chiefly B-29s, following World War 11; stored F-80s and F-86s during early fifties; Globecom building completed and occupied Jun 1951; 105-unit Wherry housing project completed mid-1952, when base population increased from 2,300 to 6,000; vehicle, special equipment repair, and communications repair buildings completed Dec 1952; major building project to accommodate McClellan's chief tenant organization, 8th Air Divisku (later replaced by 552;d Airborne Early Warning and Control Wg), completed 1954-1956; 200-man dormitories and dining hall completed mid1956; additional housing project completed 6 May 1960; runway improvement project completed mid-1961; depot became USAF's specialist for logistic support of space systems and expanded maintenance and support of ground electronics in early 1960s; aprons and nose docks completed Jun 1% mission support responsibility for BMEWS, SAGE, and interceptor backup systems gained during 1965; seven airman dormitories completed Aug 1972; aircraft overhaul facilities completed in four stages between mid1971 and Mar 1977; depot radar systems overhaul and testing facility completed Sep 1977; logistics material processing facility completed Feb 1978; weapons system component plating shop completed late 1980; waste water reclamation plant completed early 1981. Major Commands to Which Assigned: Materiel Division, Air Corps, 24 Aug 1938; Air Service Comd, 11 Dec 1941; AAF Materiel and Services, 17 Jul 1944 (rdsgd AAF Technical Service Comd, 3 1 Aug 1944; Air Techni-

APPENDIX C-5
Pyle, C. W., Colonel W . S. Army Air Corps, Letter to Commanding General, Western Flying Training Command, Santa Ana, California, 1944

- .

---

_..
,-

1 .
.. ._ .
C.

h ,
,

,* , , -. ,

>. .

., .
I

Tbs folluuing infornution i a ahlttd i n ccmpliarne w i t h Para12,- I*r Bpartnmnt Circular 906._ i> . . - - .. , .\ , ... , , . i. ma r i b s ~sst-drthmstof ~ h i s ~ . ~ a ~ ~ .o - ~ . , - .
I
' %

,.-

-9

.h

'

"

2; Dada-Winters Flight Str* i s a d i n g l e s t r i p landing f i e l d augnmnted by fie1 s e m i ce p i t s ,oontrol t a e r snd barracks.


- .

3. landings

F U C t strip i s u s e d f o r transition * d i n g ,

t&e-off8

and

It i s reclormaended that the Davis--tern Flight S t r i p be 4. pkced c m an imctive s h t u s dpe t o the t r a n s f e r of t n i n i n g activit i e s from t h i s station.
5.

This s t a t i o n will kme no furhter use or ready d a b f o r t h i s

fie Id.
The e n t i r e f i e l d i s a v a i l a b l e f o r u s e of my ngacy w h i c h as6. sume s j u r i s d i c t i o n over it.
7.

Date of a v a i l a b i l i t y , 1 Octaber 1944. Contractual C d t m e n t s ,none.

8.

It i s recommnded t h a t t h i s air f i e l d be t r a n s f e r r e d t o the 9. C i v i l Air Patrol. 10. lone.

/s/

C. Ti. fin, Colonel, f4ir Corps, Comnrmding.

APPENDIX C-6
U. S. Army Air Corps, a s e Area, History of the Hamilton Field Air B California, dated Febmary 1929 - 31 March 1944

HISTORY OF
HAMILTON FIELD AIR B A S AREA CALIFO-W IA

HISTORY OF HAh6ILTOiri FIELD B f B BASE A.EEL4

FEBRUARY 1929 31 U C I I 1 9 4 L I . Narrative and Appendix ' A '

The Seventh Bombardment Group demonstrates i t s 15-16 a b i l i t y with B-17's i n a e r i a l ceremmy h m o r i ~ g Lieutenant Colonel David M, Meyers, r e t i r i n g . Five huvdred (500)men t r a n s p o r t e d by a i r t o scene of West Coast war maneuvers from Hamilton F i e l d t a March Field,

16

krch 1940

The Big Flood a t Hamilton Field,

20

0~ 1940

Hamilto?, F i e l d becomes a Recruit Training Center. 58-59 The 45th A i r Base Group is a c t i v a t e d ,

27
17

The Seventh Bombardme~tGroup, 8 8 t h Reconnaissance Squadron, a r d t h e F i f t h A i r Base Squadron d e p a r t Earnilto- F i e l d f o r S a l t Lake City, Utah;

The 2 0 t h P u r s u i t Group and t h e 35th P u r s u i t Group 18 a r r i v e from Moffett Field t o make t h e Tenth Purs u i t Wing a t Hamiltor Field.
Hamilton F i e l d is o f f i c i a l l y c h a ~ g e dfrom a bornb e r into a f i g h t e r baseo

C -

17, 18, 22 20
22

"Splinter C i t y n i s completed avd a s a i m e d t o t h e p e r s m n e l of t h e Tenth P u r s u i t Ting.

The 20th P u r s u i t Squadron of t h e 35th P u r s u i t Group i s ordered t o t h e Philippines; i s replaced


by t h e 34th Pursuit Squedron *om Texas.
Brooks Field,

The 1 8 t h P u r s u i t Squadron d e ' p r t s f o r Anchorage, 22 Alaska; .is replaced by t h e 7 0 t h P u r s u i t Squadron.

BP$giedie~; General Millard F , Harrnm assumes corn- Append. tlA* (NOW L i e u t e n a d General) mand of Hamiltor, Field,
Ogkland Mud- 24 cipal Air Port; Milla Field, South San Francisco; Concord, l?apa, h o v i l l e , Redding, 1.. -Sacramento, Sarita Rosp, Willows, X i n t e ~ s - D a y i ' s ;i ; . , Bayward, Marysville, a d lontague,
'

The following sub-bases acquired:

. .

defense p r o

m t s f o r t h t i t yeur ~ i l dr o r l c e n t r u t e ugon e v e n t s subsequent t o 1941.

In b r i e f , t h e !xmi Lton F i e l d de:'ense ;7lrins for 1941 mdy


me main p e r i o d s : (1) An i n t e r i o r Kuaru furnished by the

be d i v i d e d i n 1 : j . r

Sase

In Janutiry of 1941 a n w s a t oi'

sase Ganrci , : e g u l a t i o n s v ~ u sp u b l i s h e d ,

ing up t h e guard system o f tiici r o t a t i r i g p a r d s e c t i o n ( 4 5 t h Air 3 h s e

l t r 7!)A,-?u~,Sg. t o CO, 20th i'ur Gp, d t d as

UNCLASSIFIED

'

On 10 July 1941, u l l Uaso p l a n s vlerc r e ~ n o d e l a d t o comply w i t h !a) T r a i n i n g C i r cular No. 47, vrhicil d i r e c t e d t h e ?eri'ectlo!l
~cle thod s

of a d e f s n s e p l a n embodyinx tize

In brief:

1)anmge L o n t r o J 9ec:eptive ! b u s u r e s S~F lt :ar


l ;LV ~ ~ 7 T - P ' '

Obstructions 1,ALne s A l a m Systen


i;.:~:.,

AGTT ifl; i , . --- - .- - ;.J.'ltrS!T?iI;;S -.

Lhpltrcemcnt ~vouponsY nd seurch1i;;hts . i&innini; o r vrenporls L o c a l counterattack. C u r i n g most of tlle ;;eur,


;elaborate

the Yrovost i k r s i ~ u l v?1*3 0ccu;)ied i n ? r e p a r i n g

p l a n s f o r d c f o n s o , e~nbodyln;; t h o "'iT:lit;e P l a n " , which w a s t o b e subl i c t i ~ ed r i l l s wrc: h e l d d u r i n g t h e trainil-11: program;

nitted e a r l y i n 1942.

the 35th 1)i.lrsuit Group conducted y r c c t i c c i n a i r d r o m e d e f e n s e durin:; Septem-

ber and October of 1941.

I!obila

3111

c r w s wore o r g a n i z e d ;

personnel dis-

: persal crews ~ s s i g n e d ; . c o n t r o l c e n t e r s d e s i g n a t e d .
t

Sa e f f e c t i v e was t h e

!:.plan t h a t it was pluced i n i r m a d l u t e e f f e c t on 7 Ijcceniber 1941 w i t h l i t t l e


disruption of' n o . ~ i u l f u n c : t i o n s o j ' the a s e . j L f t e r 7 D e c o n h r 1 9 4 1 u l l p r e v i o u s d e f e n s a p l n n s were t r e n e n d o n s l y ex-

panded.

The iftimilton P'iczld l n t e r i o r [:uuru sjrstelrl was n o t a d e q u a t e , of c o u r s e ,


t h e r e f o r e , v u r i o u s u n i t s of

t o provide f o r t h e e x t e r n a l de~'.'ensc:oi' t h e W s o ;

the Ground Yorccs ware rushed t o t h e dasu under t h e c o n t r o l o f t h e i i e s t s r n De-

Xeserve, v i t h a complement oi' s e v e n t e e n ( 1 7 ) 1l:;ht

tl;nlcs a r r i v e d b n f o r e 15

s t o r y of the Hamilton F i e l d A i r B R S ~Area, 1929

- March 1944
(1) Sabotage from

A l e t t e r of 21 M ~ r c h lgL2 o u t l i n e s the p r o t e c t i o n of Hamilton F i e l d

Sub-bases from the four main types of expected attack:

( 2 ) sabot gee reic! from without; ( 3) a t t a c k s by parachute and/or airborne

troops ; and (h) anti-eircref t protection.


This plan o u t l i n e s the complete d e t a i l s embodying a l l the passive and

active details

Of

defense mentioned i n the discourse above, and., u t i l i z i n e

(1) A i r Base Squadron i n t e r i o r guards; ( 3 ) P u r s u i t Interceptor Squadrons;


and (3) Ground Forces assigned to the Base; i t remeined the a c t i v e defense p l a n for Hamilton F i e l d during the period of danger from enemy attack.
By

1943 the danger was so lessened t h a t the colored Guard Squadrons

outlined i n Chapter V were activated And assigned t o i n t e r n d guard duties, Late i n 1943 tile various Ground Forces u n i t s began to be moved away from t h e area,
and as of 1 January 1f34.4the 46th A i r Base Srru~dron(and l a t e r the 460th AN?

Base unit) prepare$ t o take over t h e e n t i r e f'unction of i n t e r n a l and e x t e r n a l l o c a l defense o f the :Base. Training I n 1941 Hanilton Field became a bzse f o r the f i g h t e r u n i t s operzting under the 10th P u r s u i t Wing. The main u n i t s under the control of the Wing s e r e
While s t r i c t l y t s c t i c a l

the 20th P u r s u i t Group and the 35th Pursuit Group.

u n i t s on paper, these p u r s u i t groups also served as t r a i n i n g a.gencies f o r p i l o t s , and s a constant source of trained personnel i n the formetion of new units. Durine 1941 t h e 1 4 t h ~ 5 l s t . 54thr and 55th Pursuit Groups were a c t i -

vated with personnel drswn l s r g e l y from the 20th pad 35th P u r s u i t Groups; these

new u n i t s were ultimrt;e3.y assigned t o other bases before the end of 1941.
I n February 1942 the 78th Pursuit Group ceme to Hamilton Field from

Baer Field, Indiana.

Its p i l o t s were the first here to

the drasticall-

-4\

<; , -: ;.;qy-;.,J -j . .t-L' '

r c h 1941.

UNCLASSIFIED i
I

.......................

:!~:?si:n-;f, 2 r ~ l ? c : , ; c

1 . 1 ; :;)I(;

!ii>

t i o n f : I. r ' 1 ~ } ~ i ~ m p -

APPENDIX C-7
U. S. Army Air Corps, History of the Hamilton Field Air Base Area, California, 1944

I?IS?ORY OF THE

HkXILTON FIELD A I R BASE

AREA

1 A p r i l t o 30 April 19L4 Prepared i n Kay 194 i n conplianco with AR 345-105, AAF Regulation 20-8, and Directives of t h e IV Air Force

Fourth A i r Force, San Francisco, C a l i f .

Hiil.1.q Fie3 d Army A i r F i e l d

Hayward. Army A i r F i e l d .., . i . ; l n t s r - 3 a v i s F l i g h t Strip

Kapa F l i g h t S t r i p hlarysvil.l.e krnly A i r F i e l d Santa &,s6, Army A i r F i e l d Orovil-Je Army A i r F i e l d Redding Array A i r F i e l d

APPROVED :

CKO, USA, Historical Officer

CHARLES R. :!ELIN, Colonel, A i r Corps,

Commanding.

----------------.....................
Of

tory of Amy A i r Bnse, Hamilto11 E'ld, C a l i f . 1 A p r i l 1944

- 30 A p r i l 1944

the above mentioned t r o o p s and t h e i r impedimenta wtis accomplished with-

art further d i f f i c u l t i e s .
There was c o n s i d e r a b l e change i n A p r i l i n r e g a r d t o Sub-Buses a s s i g n e

t o Hanilton F i e l d .

Since t h e primary m i s s i o n of t h i s cormand a r e a p i v o t e d

&my fron s t r i c t l y t r a i n i n g o p e r a t i o n s t o p r o c e s s i n g o u t , t h e r e was no


rlrrible or p r a c t i c a l r e n s o n f o r r e t a i n i n g a h i n i s t r a t i v c c o n t r o l over a variety of' Sub-Bases upon which wore h s e d a number of f i g h t e r t r a i n i n g
units.
k number of cliff i c u l t i e s a r o s e concerned with a c c o u n t a b i l i t y and

supply j u r i s d i c t i o n a l p r oblemc , most of whioh a c t i v i t ies were f i m l l y

transferrod t o t i i t : c o n t r o l of Chico Amy Air F'i eld.

F i n a l l y , on 25 A p r i l

1944, the following Stib-Bases were t r n n ~ f e r r e d from t h e j u r i s d i c t i o n of

W l t o n F i e l d t o t h e Chico Army A i r F i e l d Command area 1:

l.!arysvi lle Army A i r F i e l d , l.!arysville, C n l i f ' o r n i a Santa Rosa Army A i r Y i e l d , S a n t a Rosa, C a l i f o r n i a Oro7sille Army A i r F i e l d , O r o v i l l e , C a l i f o r n i a Hedding Ann:/ i d r F i e l d , :leddine;, C a l i f o r n i a .
Thus, a t tile end of A p r i l , t h e Anmilton Y i e l d Co1:~11~.ncl Area r e t a i n e d

under i t s command o n l y t11ose Sub-Dcses l o c a t e d a t M i l l s F i e l d , Haprnrd,


Concord, t h e Xinter-Davis V l i @ t S t r i p , and t h e Napa F l i ~ h t Strip, a l l

of these bases b e i n g l o c a x e a i n C a l i f o r n i a .

A c t i v i t i e s on t h e s e b a s e s

mre routine i n g e n e r a l aud mainljr concerned w i t h h o u s e k e e p i n i func ti ons.


In connection vri t h t h e t r a n s f e r of a l l Fourth A i r Force u n i t s of t h i s

atation under t h e c o ~ t r o l of t h e Cor:m~dinf; O f f i c e r , a s p e c i f i c t r e i n i n g rograrr. involving a l l e n l i s t e d and o f f ' i c e r p e r s o n n e l was inaugurated.

, Fourth AF GO

#4,

25 A p r i l 1944 (Appen C , Doc. 111)

- 13 -

Ld HdZTT09 FIELS - (460th ,,S Base U n i t ) -Suh-Bases ----

k u x i l i a r y Fieids iGont agu e iiunic i p a l .;irport Willows hirf i e l a 'vl'i~ters-Davis Flil;ht 3 Lrip

U n i t)

nit)

JNC

HISTORY O F THE H A M I L T O N FIELD A I R BASE AREA

1 May t o 30 June, 1944.

Prepared i n July 1944 i n compliance with AR 345-105,

AAF Regulation 20-8, and d i r e c t i v e s of the IV A i r Force.


FORlER DESI GIATI ONS : NONE

Fourth Air Force, San Francisco, Calif.


UNITS ASSIGNED OR ATTACBD:

lidills Field Army Air F i e l d Zayorard Army Air Field Willows A m y Air Field Winter-Davis Flight S t r i p Napa Flight S t r i p

APPROVED :

Colonel, Iiir Corps,

UNCLASSIFIED
HISTijKY OF THE IiJilAXLTON FIELD U X BASE AREA

1 J u l y t o 31 J u l y , 1944.

Prepared i n A u y s t , 1944, i n compliance w i t h XR 345-105, R e g u l a t i o n 20-8, and d i r e c t i v e s of the I V A i r Force.

PRXSXNT ASS1GHFENT :

F o u r t h A i r Force, San F r a n c i s c o , C a l i f o r n i a .

UNITS ASSIGNED OR ATTACHED:


!

Havward Army h i r F i e l d , Hayward, Ca --A pe Concord firmy hlr r L U A U , -----Xinters-Davis F l i g h t S t r i p , V I W ~ - - - , - Xapa B l i g h t S t r i p , Mapa, C a l i f o r n i a .

Colonel, Air Corps, Cornmanding.

Budget and F i s c a l u f f i c e taxes over audi'ting of non-eppropriated funds. Presentation of Awards ceremonies f o r L t . nil3.iam F . Kahn, Sergeant Joseph Flory, Cornoral Kenneth b. Nelson, and ~aptain James Lcmbuth. lnformation received t h a t the J'rocessing Sta+,ion rioul~d be moved t o ricc;hord Field, t'i a shington

Page 19
I '

Yage 25

Page 6

Concord Army A i r Field, Concord, Gclifornia, transfe:rred from j u r i s d i c t i o n of Hamilton Field. i~inters-Davis F l i g h t S t r i p , Viinters, Galifo r n i a , t r a n s f e r r e d from j u r i s d i c t i o n of ~ a r n i l & n Field. Advance party departed f o r r:cr;hord E e l d , Viashington, t o s e t up processing out a t t h a t station, Page 3

Page 6

A i r a e d a l presented t o t h e cidoc of s t a f f Sergeant James F. Svotjeck


Jack Benny, Carole Landis and company put on shon in Amphitheatre. lnformation received from Fourth A i r Force t h a t t h e Processing S t a t i o v ~ o u l d n o t be removed from t h i s s t a t i o n , Statement of Brig. Gen. Jemes E . Yarker, concerning t h e r/ing setup. iieekls sarvey inspection begun on Base by Headquarters, Army A i r Forces Field A i r lnspec t o r s , Washington, D C

page 26

Page 6

rages 4, 8 Yage 9

IIistory of t h e Hamilton F i e l d A i r Base Area, 1 J u l y t o 31 J u l y , 1944.

.....................................................................

On 1 J u l y t h e f o l l o w i n g sub-bases were a t t a c h e d t o t h e liarnilton

and p a r t i a l o p e r a t i o n : Field A i r 8 a s e Area f o r c n r e t ~ k i n s IIayward k q A i r F i e l d , liuyvmrcl , C a l i f o r n i a , Concord Amy A i r F i e l d , Concord, C a l i f o r n i a , Winters-Davis F l i g h t S t r i p , ? l i n t e r s , C u l i f o r n i a , Napa F l i g h t S t r i p , IJupu, C a l i f o r n i a

O n 8 J u l y , command j u r i s d i c t i o n of Concord Amy A i r F i e l d was


transferred from Hamilton F i e l d t o t h e Army A i r Forces w e s t e r n F l y i n g Training Command. 1 Also cln 8 J u l y , t h e Clinters-Davis F l i g h t S t r i p
MIII~

w a s t r a n s f e r r e d from t h e j u r i s d i c t i o n of Iiamilton Bield t o t h e

Air Forces % s t e r n F l y i n g T r a i n i n g Conrnand , e f f e c t i v e 1 5 July, 1944.


Thus, a t t h e end of J u l y t h e r e remained a s silb-bases of Zlumilton

Field o n l y Hayward Army A i r F i e l d and t h e 1Japa F l i g h t S t r i p , which i s


entirely u n i n h a b i t e d . Personnel changes and t r a n s f p r s were s l i g h t throughout t h e month.
[)n

18 J u l y , t h e p e r s o n n e l of t h e Iiescue Boat Detachment were t r a n s f e r -

red t o t h e 411th Army A i r r'orce Base : . n i t , w i t h c o n t r o l group a t Berke-

ley, C a l i f o r n i a ;

no change of s t a t i o n was involved.

On 19 July, Eiattery B., 747th A n t i - A i r c r a f t Automatic Veapons Battalion was t r t i n s f e r r e d by v e r b a l o r d e r s irom Iitlmilton i > i e l d t o San Fran-

On 26 J u l y , t h e e d n i n i s t r a t i o n o f a l l colored p e r s o n n e l of ~isoo.~
Sec. E.,

S t a t i o n 11, A i r Transport Conmand, was t r a n s f e r r e d from t h e

460th Army A i r Force Base Unit t o t h e Air Transport Command.

1, Appendix C.,
, Ibid.

Fourth Air Force General Order #117,

8 J u l y 1944.

, ~djutantfD s u i l y Diary, 19 J u l y 1944, on f i l e i n H i s t o r i c a l O f f i c e .

APPENDIX C-8
War Assets Administration, Preliminary Report 300.04, Winters-Davis Flight Strip, Yolo County, California, n.d.

~ ~ P I I H I IfQ e~ Wo ~ elaotiio purrp i r m rP&r~iaocrl-&inr, wed u rrr p l # h g a p f m &a s b ? & P o r $ d 0 ~ 1 8 d b u1 4 ' rin fittiilly. and kn l h e r o f 8 rwfma in Wto hmuing rrrrar ?hwe are k+wabr r y e 6 . u *' in tho uorr hrll ma k b B bower

k , Pire Webratim~ fn

C awi, d $ hli) irrh mLlwct erttm b 1 . , appa~~t-

ehr,

bui-g

war, Wra u o $wo w m k


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6

mhr pmp alrp fire a ~ i b @ r h r r r bofh i a # i d ~ ,u t d .9b

HaSTERS U V I S FLIGHT STRIP


I

YOU) COUNTX. CALIF-

The Winters-Davis Flight Strip was used for the production

of grain and llvestack when it was acq&d.

Barley and rioei were

Traat No. l l (Block 6; Sahedule 0 )


and' pasture whsn acquired.
/

was ueed . f o r a 'farmstead

It was a,portion of a 160 acre -1,


The maraining portion

of land reserved by the owner for.a ,farmstead.

of the 160 aure parcel-waa leased for agricultural prnpoaea,

LEGAL D3SCRlPTION OF PHOPEHTY

Traut 10(Co~t inued)


8 Worth, Bsnge 1 Eeet, If.
D a Bo

EXCEPTIRG TIIEREBHOK t h e 'lVest 1026

festo

m e dimnsions of the Southwest Quarter of section 3 nre oomputed to tho oenter o f sbuttin;l; roadso

S t s t e of Calffornis

The follo~incdescribed t r u c t or l a n d e i t a s t e i n the County of Yolo, , dsscrihed a8 f o l l w s , to-wit r

PhRCEL .ti: A11 that certain reul property 6 i t w t 9 i n Yolo Cormty, ~t~te-fornia, being e portion of the Southanst 1Q.srter of Section 3, Tomahlp G Worth, Hanee 1 E a ~ t , r. Do F . 8: V., mro p a r t i e d ~ r l y deacribod o s follows r
\

9 % I H ~ T N C at the quarter corner comav to Section 2 and 3; thenue Sebterly alorq the %st. nnd ;9est center l5ne of 8 8 i d Section 5 , 72e040 fe9tg thence South 1284.05 feet, mra or less, t o n point on the center l i n e of Tiillow Slox~p,h; thence along t h e aonter l i m of a e i d 3ilIarr Slouch the following courses:

0 ' ' Ennt 203.11 f a s t ; Worth 2 6 ' 25' 39" 6 a e t 401.22 North 31' la0 3 15, East 40036 feot~thsaad North 0 0 ' emst N o 9 9 feetg thence North 37O-67@. 50" Eaet 1860e5 feet; thenca Eorth 46' 160 50" E a s t 126088 feet; thence North 580 049 20" Eaet 99*97 faotj thence North 6 8 O 16' East, 101.75 feet; thence North 81' 25' 20" Eerrt t o the point o f i n t g r ~ e o t i o nof the center l i n e of s o i d 8illow Slough wit& the EssterXy li-m of aafd Section 3, s a i d point b e a m South 343&S fset from the East $mrtar corner of s s i d Seotion 31 theme leaving t h e aenter line oP W l l w Creek along the said Section 3 North 343e68 f e e t , more or lei&, t o the point of be~inningo
feet8 thence North ' 0

PARCEL 0 1 Beginning at e point on the Yast nnd % e a t aenter line of e d d ~ s c a o a3, m i d point k i n g d3 s t o n t Xest 72604'3 feet from the Eaet quarter corner of eaid S e c t i o n 3; theme Vesterlg along s s i d East end Jest center line t o the Morthrssst earner of the Sotithenst Quarter3 thrice Southerly elong the lorth end Sotlth aenter line of s s i d Seotion 3, a d j stance of 50 feet;; theme Easterly p r ~ l l e t l o and d i s t n n t 59 feet at rlght ancles from the % s t end ' R o d center l i n e o f e a i d Section 3 t o a point xhich is dietant South SO feet from tho point of beginning: thence IVorth 50 feet to the point of beginlliw.

Blook 6, Sohadule A

Pace 5

Ttsct 6 ( Continued)

being t,ho S$ of Section 34, T o 9 No, 3 . 1 E o , k O, I!., f i l e d for record fa t,he office of t h e C o m t y Seoor4.er of tho C o m t y of Yo10 on Hsrch Sth, 1909 i n Book 2 of ?,bps, at pare 1 3 .

The f ' a l l o d q described t r s c t of land sikunts.in the Coufity of Yolo, Stete of Cnliforni~, described a s follows, t o - w i t :

Lot 4 i~ Block 14 as s h ~ m on tho T'ap o f Lucerne Ferns, bcing t;33 ~ 3 of - Seotlon 34, To 9 i4so R e 1 E o , Y. Do B e k P o , filed for record in the o f f i c e af the ComLy 2ocordsr of the County of Y o l a on Yerch 9 t h , 1999, in Book 2 i\f En pa, 2t paTo 134

<

Trpct

f?

The followifl?: described t r n c t ~f 1 ~ n dsituate Ln the C o w ~ t yof Yolo, State of Cnlii'omia, described ns follcm, t o e i t :

Xats 5 and 8 in Block ths S g of Seation 34, To 9 in the office of t , h ~ Oow* 1999 in Book 2 of b p s , nt Tract 9

14 as shown on the Ihp of Luoerna Ferm , being No, i?, 1 E . , I . : D . P . & Y e p filed for rscord Recorder o f the County of Yolo on ?!%rch 9t11, page 13.

* ?. follorrine deecribed t r s s t o f l s n d sitwate i n thu County of Yolo, S t n t e of Cdifornie, descrihod per f o l l m e , to-witr
T)le

IF. D. ' l o b *;m rter

The ?Jorthwer;tquarter of Section 3, Township 8 florth, R m y t 1 To&, Y. , GXCE13TlNG TI3ER3FftOlq, 'tho ? e s t 1025 feet of said I.:orthmesS,

The ocrmge snd dimensions of the Iorthweat 2uarter of S e c t i o n 3 , are ca?nputed to the centar of abutting roads.

The following described trect of land situate in the County of Yolo, S t a t e of C a l i f o r n i a , dsscribsd as fbllowa, to=h%t z
The Xorth 24965 feet of the Southwast quarter of Section 3, Tawnahip
Block C, Sohedale A
Paze 4

.
'

SoFoI(.~5Report
'

LEGAL DESCHIFTION OF PROPERTY

Trsct 2 The following described t r u u t o f l m d situate i n the County of

Yolo, S t a t e of CaliforAda, d e s o r i b d ss fol.loucrs, to-wit r


Tho Tc?ort;hwest :t~artor of Section 34, T m s h i p 9 Forth, Range 1 Rest, D . E, & L , EXCEPTING TWEREFROFI, the %st 1.325 feet of enid ?lorthmat ( W ~ r t eo r f Section 340
Ye

The mbovs deecrihed property being a l , l ofa l a t e 35, 36, 47, and 49 and thc Rnsterlp yortton of Iats 3 1 7 , 34, 4 5 erzd 46 of Berry Vala Gardens,
nocordin? t o t% m p of' 8 r t i R Subdirision f i l e d for reaord i n t h e o f f i c e of t h e County %corder of the County of Yolo on July 19th. 1910 in Book 2 of $%pa, 4% pap9 2 h

The eoreRge ond dinensions of tho a h v e desoribed property e r e oomputed to the center of mbq~tting roads.
%

Trnct 4

'The following described t r s c t of lmd s i t u a t e i n the County of Yolo, State of California, described as follows, t o d t : . . Lots 1 and 2 in Blook 14 as shoun on the Kap of Lucerne Paras, being t h e South one-hnlf o f Seotion 34, To 9 OR., R e 1 E , , Mo DoB + d: I . , filed for record i n t h e offioe o f the County R~oorderof Yolo Co*mty, Yarch 9th, 1909 i n Book 2 .of We pa, at;pace 13. :

The dimensione of ohwe property e r e cotnprated t o the center o T e 20 foot avenue on the &st snd a 20 foot avenue on the i b s t , ,
Tract 5 The following described t r e a t o f lnnd situate in the County of Yolo, State of C ~ l i f o r n i a , described as follow3, to-wit:

Lot 3 i n Blook 14 ss ehmn on the tc'pp of Lucerns Ferns, being t h e !?. , R. 1 8,. M.. D. Do Q 3.. filed f o r record i n the o f f i c e of t h e County Reoordar o f t h e Cotraty of Yolo on Waroh 9th, 1939, i n Book 2 of h'aps,.st p g e 13.

~1of Section 34, T . 9

L i

The follow in^ descrfbe8 trnct of land eituste i n t h e Coranty o f Yolo,


St9t.e of C s t l i f orcia, descri3ed a s follows, to-wit a

Lots 6 and 7 fn Block 14 ae, ~

h on m t h e Ihp of Lucerne Farms,

Block 6, Schedule R

.
4

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i,

'r"3TVJWS-DIIYSS FLIGHT STRIP


8 .
A , .

YOLO C@?VTY, ChLIFnKNfA +,-.; . I ' - , . ? S.P.Bl-5 'L, :I , , ,A , . ' LWhI, DESCQIPTIC$ 3 F PROFE3TS 1_ ,A

Roport

- ..
1

line of m i d Section 3, s a i d point bears Sou-th 343.88 f t . , f b n ! the E a s t quortor comer of ss+d Section 3, theme' leaving snid aenterline of Xi3low SLau~halong the Ens% l i m o f s a l d Seotion 3 b r t h 343.6 f t . t o the %st q ~ a r t e rcorner safd Section 3, running thanoe Resterly nlorq: the :?$orth 13ne of' Southea~tquarter said Seotion 3 rr distanoe of 2640 f t o -' mre or lees t,o tho Worthwest corner thereof, running t h n o e northerly elonll; the e s s t e r l y l i n e of the Northw4sk quarter o r said Seotion 3 e?id t h e eestarly line o f the \Vest h a l f S.ttotion 34,'Toanship 9 North, Haage 1 Fost, Mount n i ~ b l 0 Base & X e r i d i ~ n ~distanoe e of 792000 fto mre or lees t o the northenat corner of' s 4 d pest half" Soation 34, running t b n o e westerly long the northerly l i n e of s a i d Z e s t half' Section 34 a distanae of 264O00 ft. more or less t o the paint of beginningo
a

therefrom ell Ifinarel, O i l snd other Eydrocarbon subetance \' . : Containing 307.93 scree more or. less 'in'fee. . ." . , , ,. , 7% . : .>,< . . : , ' ..- - - . -,

?hepting

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7

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Block 6 . ~chsdulbd . ,.
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Page 2

LEGAL UESCRI PTlON OF PROPEHm

.
1

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T.

. , Peginning at a point on the northarli-'lineof Soction 34, T o m h i p 9 North, Range 1 Eaat, Mount Diablo ~ e s b &'Eeridian, dietarrt e n s t e r l y along a n i d northerly l i n e 1025 f t . f r o m t h e northwest oorner, running thence eo~\fherlgdistant 1025 f t . ee.eterly a t r i g h t angles -ta tho m s t e r l y line o f Section 34 a dietanoe,of -3966f t . more o r less to n point on the north lint, of lot 1 blook 13'Luagx-m Farms Subdivision, thenoo E ~ B t e r l yalone the north ling o f aftid 'lot 1 bloak 13 t o the northeast aoraer thereof, thenoa g02therly~alongthe Easterly line of , l o t s 1, 4, 6 and 8 blook 13 e d i e t a n a e : " o f . l 3 2 0 f t ~ ~ wor re leae-to a . , p o i n t o n t h s n o r t h e r l y l i n e of ~e~tioa,3,:.;Totrmship8 North,Range 1 East, - .' I ' Eoimt,Dinblo Rase i Ihridian, theme ,'ue6terly along the nortfterly line , .. , . .: of said Ssotion 3' t o R pint d i s t a n t :ens-$erly 1025 f t . from t h e .. northwest corner said Section S,,'thenoe:aouthqrly distant 1026 f't. * : .. . e a s t e r l y a t right nngres from the westerl'g , l i n e of said Sectf nn 3 a distsaoe of 2880.d ft. mare' or 'less to a p o i n t 240.6 ft. eoutherly from the north lino of the S~uthwest'~uartek',said Seotion 3, theme E ~ u t e r l y p a r a l l e l and distant aou-Lherly 240-6 f t . a t r i g h t angles from tho northerly l i n e of the a o u t h e s t , : q u a r t e r of m i d S ~ o t i o n 3, 1616 ft, more or lees t a a point an the. easte<r-ly'lineof s a i d southrsreet q u a r t e r of , ' . Section 3, .'running thence norjherly along the ' e a s t e r l y line of said aouthwe~tquarter a t d i s t r n w ' o f ~ 1 9 0 g ~ ~ more f ' f ' ~o~r less ta r point SO f t o ; , (southerly from the northees t , , c o ~ ' ofkseid r ~ogthtnestquarter, mnning , , , - . . thenoe 'easterly, p a r a l l e l ar.d . d i s $ a n t ~ e o u ~ e r W' l y ft. n t r l e h t engler from the northerly line of the: t ~ o u t $ y ~ ihuartar ~f said Section 3, s diatnme of 1913.60 ' ft. Rora or . ~ l e h a ' ~ , , t o ' ~ ~ ~5 '0 ~o ft. + n taouthsrly end ' . . 726.40 ftc fron; t h e e a s t quarter oor@r, said Seotion 3, ruming thence fron sa! d point. South 12k.05 Ft. to .a {point on t h e centerline of lillow . : Slough thenao slang' the oenter of ' s a i d ? i f l l & .Slough t h e fof lowing aourseer North 31'13@ 50" East 203011-ft., thence North 26 26' 30" East t 36.f t . , 'theme North 300 00 East 401 *12 f't., thenes North oO.15 ~ a s'48: ' 30099 f t . , thence S o d h 37' 67 1 50" .Faat 1 8 6 a S S "ft., thence North 4 6 O I6 50" East 12S088 f t . , theme Borth 6 8 O . 9 4 ' ' 20n East 9!1097 f t . , thence Horth '.. . - ' 68O 160 Enat 101,76 ft., thenoe Forth 0I.O 25' "20". East ' t o t b point of interseation of tho c e n t e r l i n e ' o f aaid. Gillow Sloush, with the Sasterly
* .
I .

That r e a l property situate i n .thd.~&&'of Yolo, S t a t e of California, b i n g a portion of Rerq Vale Gardens and Luoerne Farm lying w i t h i n the Gest half Seotion 34, Tomehip.9 North, .+qe 1 Eaet, E b m t Diablo Base & btoridian, acaording 'to tho maps of said subdivisions as f i l e d for record i n the offioe of t h e Coimty.Reaarder of the County of Yolo on 19 July 1910 i n Book 2 of b;aplr, a t pace 27 and t h a t p o r t i o n of S e c t i i n 3, Tonnehip 8 F!orth, Range 1 East, Mount D i ~ b l oE ~ s e ,i) N r i d i a n more p a r t i c u l a r l y described 'as'followm

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BZook 6,. . ,Schedule < A ..' . , .,. '.

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Page 1

CIVIL A1R PATROL


A w AUXILIARY
OF THE

ARMYAIR -FORCES

C IQight, Sacremento Squadron 801 M e i n S t r e e t

Woodland,

California
1 2 September 1944

,%EJECT:

Use of Winters-Davis *Tight S t r i p

TO
TEBi

: Colonel Karl C . Pyle, Cormending Officer, liather Field, Sacranento, California


:

Captain w e r t 3 . Berguson, Adjutant, Xather Field, Sac:ramento, California

1 . The Voodlend R i g h t of the Civil A i r W f ml request permission t o use the Tinters-Davis Flight S t r i p t o ce~my on Cadet ~ctivities s i m i l a r t o the Sundays of 30 J u l y end 6 August.
2 . It i s desired t o use the stri? the Sundays of 24 S e p t e e r 1944 and 1 October 1944.
3 . A t t h e end of our operations the afternoon of 6 August, approximately eighteen (18) gallons of 73 octane f u e l and ten (10) quarts of o i l remined unused. Upon checking at t h e s t r i p the o t h e r day, it was found t h e f u e l was still there. I f additional 73 octane fnel cennot be supplied arrangemante w i l l be made t o purchase it f r 6 n a l o c a l Oil Campang.
4 It is my uuderstanding, because of a change in operations, the Winters-Davis F l i g h t S t r i p is t o be closed in the near future. Do you think i t would be possible t o have the strip asaigned t o t h e l o c a l C. A. P. Flight t o oversee, guard and use i n its a c t i v i t i e s . It would give it a base fram which t o operate, create still more i n t e r e s t in the program and stimulate the Cadet a c t i v i t i e s . The l o c a l u n i t could keep the s t r i p fn operating condition so i f the A. A. F . found they needed i t again it would be ready f o r immediate ase.

2nd Lt. Civil air P a t r o l Flight Leader

APPENDIX C-9
Yolo County Planning Board, Yo10 County Airport Master Plan, Yolo County, CA, 1976

5,
6 .
7.

Enviromiental - s t u d y . Airport Layout Plan. Land U s e Plan, Schedules of p o p o s e d Zevelopment. Estimates of develol~mentcost.

S .
9,

10. Financing and economic f e a s i b i l i t y . Inventorv

The Yolo County Airport i s a p b l i c l y ovmed general a v i a t i o n a i r p o r t , but u n t i l r e c e n t l y has remained e s s e n t i a l l y undeveloaed, and i t s 6,000 f o o t _nsved runway has been used c s s u a l l y by cro:; dusters o r f o r training o p r a t i o n s i n i t i a t e d a t other a i q o r t s . Since t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n of f u e l and a i r c r a f t hanger and tie-down f a c i l i t i e s i n 1975, t h e a i r p o r t has begun t o accept based a i r c r a f t and has develo2ed a s an o s e r a t i o n a l a i q o r t . .Iccor2ing t o t h e 1974 Xegional General Plan Aviation P l m and Brogram rel la red by t h e Sacranento Regional Area Planning Commission: " It i s expectee t h q t t h i s a i r p o r t w i l l continue t o develoa and exgerience increased demand f o r i t s f a c i l i t i e s . " -

" I n t k e Long term, t h i s a i ~ y o r could t acce2t excess demand from lJniversity and I:?oodland i f any thin^ were t o r e s t r i c t demand a t these f a c i l i t i e s . Because of i t s a v a i l a b l e c a c a c i t y , t h i s a i r p o r t w i l l continue to serve t r a i n i n g P l i g h t s o r i g i n a t i n g a t o t h e r a i r p o r t s within the region. "

The U . S . Govemnent i n i t i a t e d t k construction of the Davis-Vinters a i r s t r i p , now c a l l e d t h e Yolo CountyAirpor+ i n 1942 t o provide a l t e r n a t e basing f o r B25's normally located a t 24cClellan A i r Force 3ese. The i n i t i a l construction v~asb e ~ on n J u l y 20, 1942 an2 P i n a n c l n ~ was e n t i r e l y from Pegeral completed on 3cto3er 29. 1942, fun& e s t a b l i s h e d f o r t h e constructioil of fl i ~ h s t trips. The i n i t i a l c o n s t r u c t i o n consisted of cjrading a f l i d l t s t r i l 300 Ceet wide by G , 0 0 0 Ceet long and surfacincj t h e 150 f o o t c e n t r a l i~or'cion Cor a length oZ 4,000 f e e t . Subsecpsnt constrnction i n 1543 by t h e U.S. A m y Cor?s or Engineers included t 3 e coilstruction of 1,000 f e e t a t each end and <lie s u r f e c i n g Durinr~t h e of the runwzy p l u s t h e building of t h e 10 revetleents. inter end 02 1942-43 t h e basement s o i l was of poor c ~ u a l i t yan6 t h e funway subnerged vllich suLsequently Lad t o be re?laced w i t h a rmre stable base m a t e r i a l .

Tn 1949 the f l i g h t s t r i p v72s ?laced under the a d d n i s t r a t i v e c o n t r o l af Yo10 County. A t t h i s time t h e Davis-Winters N r s t r i y was naiied

/
I

under the County's jurisdiction in 1958, public restrooms were constructed. In 1971, with about $30,000 of State Aviation gas tax and County money, a portion of the runway, 86 feet wide and 6,000 feet long, was resurfaced. The original runway did not drain properly, so the runway had to he mounded slightly and repaved. On February 25, 1974, the name of the airport was changed from Yolo County International Airport to the Yolo County Airport. In August 1974, Yolo Aviation, Inc., known as the Fixed Base Operator, a leased 14.9 acres of the Airport and constructed an office and pilot lounge, 20 "T" hangars, a large maintenance hangar, and fueling facilities. Presently, services such as repairing and fueling the aircraft are offered at the airport. Presently, the Director of the Yolo County Parks and Recreation Department, has applied for Federal Airport Development Aid funds amounting to $120,000, to extend the resurfacing of the runway to a 1 0 0 foot width, construction of stub taxiways, provision of a lighting system and a few m.iscellaneous items to increase the safety of the airport, 111. EXISTING AIRPORT FACILITIES A, Description of structures and facilities 1 . Physical features . . a, The ~ i r ~ o r contains t approx. 430 acres b . 20 "T" hangars c . .A large maintenance hangar (100' X 100' ) d. Two refueling pits (a 10,000 gal. tank and a 20,000 gal. tank) e. Tie-down area for 8 aircraft f. Automobile parking area g. Pilots' lounge and office h. Public restrooms i. One 6,000' by 86' runway, the ends being connected directly by 75' wide taxiways Twelve dispersal taxiways k. The West Plainfield Fire House and Lillard Hall 1 . Abandoned control tower m. Sportsman's Area (see Page 9 ) n. Parachute Drop Zone operations
j.

2 .

a. Present use: In 1973 the County conducted a survey which determined the Airport had approximately 60 operations per day on weekdays. -..
J

Page 5

a t i o n of Owners v~hohave planes based a t Airport:


29 (March, 1 9 7 6 ) Total Planes WoodlanC 1 1 ?linters 5 Valle jo 3 Dixon 2 U ~ ~ o ~ mXL;

<z

Uses a, The Largest percentage of operations a t * e Airport c o n s i s t of touch-and-go operations f o r i n s t r u c t i o n a l mr-mses b, Parachute j m s l n q Leisure dusting e. Sportsmans range f . Farming
9,

Users a, - ~ i r c r a f schools t 1) Japan Airlines 2 ) From Sacranento, Executive A i q ~ o r t a ) Casitol Sky Park b) Patterson A i r c r a f t Con2any 3 ) . Beechcrazt Flying School a ) A l t a i r Aviation Inc,, Ekecutive Airport b) Woodland Aviation, Inc, Woodland 4 ) Cal Aggie Flying Farmers 5 , Parachute jmpfng school: 1) Classes a r e taught on Fridays and Saturdays fron 1 2 : O O noon to sunset on Fridays,at 10:00 A,EL t o sunset on Saturdays Guring t h e winter months and dawn t o sunset during t h e s m n c r months. 2 ) Average c l a s s s i z e i s 15 peosle; class s i z e varies fron one person t o 30 peo7le per c l a s s . 3 ) O n a good day, a c l a s s of 1 5 people can jump 3 or 4 times 4 ) Advanced yracl-ruting-can occur on any Friday, Saturday o r Sunday, 5 ) A2xo;:irna-tety 300 d i f f e r e n t -p e o s l e u t i l i z e t h e Airport f o r parachuting. ger weekend. 6 ) Ap2ro::imately 200. t o 250 j-a 71 Recorded jumps 2er month from 1375 t o Feb. ..

10,

1976,

m3mn 2

Accordin9 t o t h e Parks Del3artrnent recorAverage number of jumps were: 5GS/month and 14;S/weel:enii c . Crop Dusting Com?znies who use A i r F r t : 1) i-ledlock Dusters 2 ) Watts Agricultural Aviation 3 ) Onstott Dusters 4 ) Agricultural A i r - C m e Services (Dixon) , 5 ) Craig Aero (Button 07illov~) G )' J . f Dm Dusters (VJoodlmB, Anco Farms ) 7) Aero Day ( ~ o b b i n s ) 8 ) Fam Air, Inc. (sacramento) 9 ) Noe s Cro;~Dusting Service (!?illiams ) (All t h e crop dusters use t h e conventional crop dusters e x c e - ~ t f o r the Craig Aero Company who occassionally fly a m,B, a l a r g e r aixylane) Association 1) Physical features (ap~ro::. 40 acres ) a ) Trap shoot b) 50 yd, ? i s t o 1 range c) LOO yd, r i f l e range d) Archery range e) Duck pond f ) Pheasant cages A t r z i l e r used f o r clubhouse ) h) Storage areas i) i7atclman resides i n a t r a i l e r on nremises Restroom f a c i l i t i e s are i n t h e process J of being construci.ed I:) - A track Z0.r movinj t a r g e t s 2) i.%xdxrshin v a r i e s between GOO t o 900 -peogLe, t h e averace nu-r oE nenb;ers i s GO?) peosie. (:Iany ~ e o p l e use the shooting ranges td2o are n o t menbers, b u t pay the $1.00 day use f e e ) f o r lS75:
'

PaQe

-.

3 ) Appro::imately one tournanent per rnon'dl approximately 300 people attendance de2endinc~on t h e weather 4-) An annual turliey shoot including t h e following a c t i v i t i e s f o r comL3etition: a ) Pistol-running boar 5) Pistol-runninc deer c ) Rifle-running bear d ) Rifle-runniny deer e ) Archery-running boar f) Archery-running deer g) Trap shooting h) Target shooting I-Iunter Safety Classes a) Offered monthly o r u n t i l enough people sign up f o r the c l a s s b) Learn how t o trap and shoot and how t o handle and shoot a gun. 6 ) Trag Shooting a ) Presently offered on Sunday b) Starting i n 2-ay and continuing i n the s u m e r , it is offered on Wednesday nights. - - ---.

1 1 , Air Si3aces i n Service Area: The. Yolo county Ai-ort f l i g h t paths and airssace are Pree of obstructions, (see map a ) 1 2 . Other Airport F a c i l i t i e s i n YoLo County

River Road south of ~orges/~larksSurg South , Freeport Bridge, public, qeneral ~ v i + t i o n : E lihcero Country Club, 1 mile south of 1-i30 i n Davis, l x i v a t e , l i n i t e d t o 2 r i v a t e planes; University, 1 mile south of Cussell Boulevard, UCD. public, general aviation;Vattafi7oodland K J corner of Road 943 and Route 15, u l c crag dusting:l~ledlock Dusters, South of Road 27 a t Road 101, Davis, c r o ~ dusting:Dan Best A i r s t r i p , N . of Koad 14, betveen b a d 113 & ~ o a d102, p r i v a t e , farm/gersonal:~. Threo Tanch. 1 , side 2oute 1 G between Roads 63 t 69 , Cai3ay, p r i v a t e , f a n n / ~ e r s o n a l ; i h r t i n Broo. E . of Road 108, !i mile S. of 3oad 328, Davis, p r i v a t e , Fam/i~ersonal::-531L~an, E. oP Road 101, 1 mile S . of Road 24, Woo&nd, private. (See map b)
f a c i l i t i e s which a r e located i n 13. other a i q ~ o r t the Service Area: t Dixon, a. Vaca Di;:on, 4+ miles s o u t l l ~ e . s 03 p r i v a t e , fam/personal b, 1:laine P r a i r i e , 4 miles south of Di::on, farm c. Nut Tree, 2 miles e a s t of Vacaville, public, general aviation d. Sacramento X e t r o ~ o l i t n n ,1 5 miles east of I PJoodland, p h l i c , General Tranaport
Pa~e 10

,-

zV-

TOPOGRAPEN O F AREA

- m e f i e l d i s i n the--center of t h e Sacramento v a l l e y , a g e n t l y - sloi3ing p l a i n with drainage t o t h e southwest. he- average e i e v a t i o n of t h e area i s 95 f e e t above mean sea level. Forty miles t o t h e northeast, t h e e l e v a t i o n i s about 1,300 f e e t while 30 miles f u r t h e r it i s about 3,400 f e e t . A t a distance of 55 miles t o t h e w e s t , Nount Helena rises t o an e l e v a t i o n of 4,340 f e e t , while 85 miles t o the e a s t , peaks of t h e S i e r r a Nevada rise t o 10,400. Atmospheric Conditions : The Yolo County Airport is located i n t h e deciduous climate type of the i n t e r i o r area climate, y e t i s s t r o n g l y influenced by t h e maritime area climate. R a i n f a l l average i s about 1 7 inches mr year, which q e n e r s l l y f a l l s i n a period 'stween Xovember and. Larch. Snow seldom occurs. During t h e winter months, t h e r e a r e occassional periods when a l a y e r of fog w i l l form f o r two o r t h r e e days t o ss long a s two o r t h r e e weeks. There i s a growing season of 262 days, during which time temperatures a r e above 32'. llaximum temperatures reach 114', lows have been down t o 14'. Climate Features: southwesterly a Prevailing winds TJinds averaqe speed 10 i4PX (speeds of 50 iJPH occur about once i n 10 years) Clout2 Cover 196 c l e a r 'says p e r year: 55 p a r t l y cloudy days per year: 104 cloudy Says per year 36 heavy fog days p e r year Fog

(Source me Climate of Yolo Countv, "Vind Patterns Wind Conditions: . B . Schultz, W.E. Yates, of t h e Sacramento Valley", prepared by H G.E. X i l l e r , and 1 4 . D . Fitzwalter i n 1971. )
"The winds i n Yolo County a r e g r e a t l y influenced by t h e north c o a s t a l mountain range on t h e west and t h e proximity t o t h e P a c i f i c Ocean. TJesterly winds whic'h p r e v a i l n o s t of the year a r e modified i n t o southerly d i r e c t i o n s by t h e nechanical b a r r i e r of t h e s e mountain ranges. Even northwesterly winds off t h e c o a s t a r e o f t e n turned i n t o southerly winds in.'Yolo County. This ?henonenon of p r e v a i l i n g souther. l y winds, o f t e n c a l l e d sea breezes, e x i s t s i n many p a r t s of t h e Sacramento Valley. For e x m p l e , t h e 5-year average of wind d i r e c t i o n s f o r Davis shows a majority of southerly winds f o r most of t h e year. The only other winds occurring t o a g r e a t e x t e n t a r e n o r t h e r l i e s which are even more frequent i n Gcto3er, Xovember, and December. O n the o t h e r hand, i n mi~summer, t i e north d i r e c t i o n s a r e by f a r dominant, . T h i s i s e s p e c i a l l y s t r i k i n g during t h e n i g h t , when t h e northerly d i r e c t i o n s p r a c t i c a l l y disappear, I n t h e daytine t h e r e i s s t i l l a considerable number of n o r t h e r l y vinds. The build-up of these during t h e day can be noticed i n a l l o t h e r months a l s o . This su~gested the existence 02 a d i u r n a l wind p a t t e r n which was i n v e s t i o r the gated f o r various locations i n t h e Valley through t h e s u l ~ ~ ~of U . S . Public Xealth Service, Grant No. A P 292. Data was taken a t TJinters, Dunnigan, Davis, Sacramento, Executive Airport, and G r i m e s . The study shows t h a t i n the Sacramento Valley t h e southerly winds strongly dominate during t h e summer month3, and usually continue
1 Page 1

1 tae 1 vilmle n i g h t . I n Yolo County, however, a larcje p o r t i o n c e a s e d u r i n g t h e morn in^ hours when a c o n s i d e r a b l e number , ; , f : ..o?therly winds occur.
.

, f then

'20~ J

,/'

me percentage of t h e n o r t h e r l y winds i s n o t high a t t h e Sacramento ~ : e c u t i v eA i r p o r t n e a r t h e e a s t e r n border of Yolo county, b u t it , i n c r e a s e s r a p i d l y between- t h i s p o i n t and t h e western p a r t of Yolo county. A t Davis, t h e teinporary change t o n o r t h e r l y d i r e c t i o n s occurs on more t h a n h a l f oE t h e days a t about 9:00 A21 PST. I t is s t i l l more pronounced a t t h e s t a t i o n s w e s t of Davis, s o t h a t t h e switch t o s o u t h e r l y winds i n t h e afternoon becomes more s t r i k i n g . S i n i l a r developments a l s o a r e observed i n s p r i n g and f s l l , u n l e s s s y p r e s s e d by major storm a c t i v i t y o r d i f f e r e n t barometric p a t t e r n s frorn t h o s e p r e v a i l i n g i n summer.
The e:::3lanan-cion f o r t h e "reversed" flow i n t h e morning hours i n Yolo County was found by s t r e a m l i n e a n a l y s i s u s i n g a l l Sacramento Valley s t a t i o n s t h a t were a v a i l a b l e , and t h o s e e s p e c i a l l y i n s t a l l e d f o r t h i s study. In t h e f i r s t o f t h e f o u r e:rarn~Aes m i d n i g h t t o 1 ALl, of J u l y 2 9 , 1966, a l l v a l l e y s t a t i o n s , vZlich can 3e recognized by wind arrows, show t h e inClux oC t h e oceanic a i r , This a i r movement f r o m south to n o r t h C Q R ~ throuy;ll ~ ~ U ~ nig ~h t , w i t h t h e v e l o c i t y a t t h e s e ground s t a t i o n s g r a d u a l l y d e c r e a s i n g from t h e d e l t a a r e a toward t h e S u t t e r B u t t e s , a s can be seen by t h e isotachs-lines of equal v e l o c i t i e s , t r l ~ i c hu s u a l l y c r o s s t h e s t r e a m l i n e s . By davm t h e 2 e n e t r a t i o n of t h e marine a i r flow appears weaker a s t h e s t r e a m l i n e s show s o u t h e r l y 6 i r e c t F o n s o n l y 'bn t h e e a s t s i d e of t h e v a l l e y . J u s t s o u t h of t h e S u t t e r B u t t e s t h i s e a s t - s i d e a i r c r o s s e s t h e v a l l e y toward t h e w e s t s i d e where it c o n t i n u e s down the v a l l e y a s a n o r t h e r l y wind, This eddy-like a i r movenent i s best develo_ned between 9:00 anc? 10:OO A.H. The i s o t a c h s f o r t h i s t i n e a l s o show t h a t i t i s very l i g h t , which mekes s p r a y i n g o p e r a t i o n s w i t h a g r i c u l t u r a l chemicals p o s s i b l e a l l morning, u n t i l a new surge of t h e marine a i r t a k e s p l s c e (1:OO t o 2:00 PX). . However, a s p r a y i n g p l a n according t o t h e d i r e c t i o n regime appears necessary. "

A,

1969

- 1975 Yolo

County A i r p o r t Ekpenditures

Resurface Airport Runway $33,422.96 150.00 Patch South Driveway 1,500.00 P e n e t r a t e & S e a l T r a n s i t Parking Area 80.00 Sweep North Half of Runway 400.00 Center Line S t r i p e & N u m b e r Runway Ends P e n e t r a t e & S e a l Runway & Taxiway 8,820.39 Patch Taxiway 95-00 Make and I n s t a l l Sign 35.00 150.00 P a i n t White Line Down Edges of R u n w a y
TOTAL

Average Yearly Expenditure Miscellaneous Expenses T o t a l Average Yearly Expensitures


1

8,930-67
50.00
$ 8,980.67

Page 12

yolo County Service Area

DEFIXITION O F SEXVICE & I A POL', YOLO C O m F L AIXPORT

The p o t e n t i a l s e r v i c e area of an aiq3or.t is normally r e f e r r e d t o t i n t e n s of a c e r t a i n narinum t r a v e l time between t h e a i r ~ o r and trip o r i g i n s . 'It.10 C i p r e s a r e used, 30 minvtes nnd 40 minutes, * The experience i n California has shown 30 minutes t o be a nore r e a l i s t i c s e r v i c e area l i m i t f o r general a v i a t i o n a i r p o r t s . (See ma^ c ' PJithin t h e defined s e r v i c e a r e a , many f a c t o r s influence t h e actua?, a v i a t i o n denand f o r a p a r t i c u l a r a i r p o e , s u c h as: population, average income of t h e population, tLle *,4yriber of o t h e r a i r p o r t s drawing on t h e sane s e r v i c e area, t h e r e l a t i v e competitiveness of each of the a i r p o r t s , and the capacity of t h e a i r p o r t , Yol@ County A i q a r t has been estiinated t o have a c a p a c i t y of lS5,OOO annual o--rations , with c e r t a i n improve?.ents such a s l i c j h t i n s , apsroach slo;e i n d i c a t o r s , and a d d i t i o n a l runway e x i t s The t y p c a l exqerience i n California has been t h a t an averaue of 100,000-150,000 a i i u a l operations i s necessary t o have user revenues cover operating costs. Projected increased demand indicate8 Yolo County Airport coulZ a t t r a c t 100 based a i r c r a f t by 2,000A.D., accompanied by no expansion T h i s insicates nearly of University Airport or-' iJoodland-Watts. 80,000 annual o-=rations which i s nearing the break even p o i n t f o r revenues and expenses. The projection of t h i s demand a l s o assmes t h a t o t h e r a i q ~ o r t s(i. e. , l?atonas, Kio Linda, Franklin, and Lincoln) w i l l a t t r a c t muck of the Sacramento Pletro,mlitan Area deinanc?.
As
P

w e mentioned e a r l i e r , a major' f a c t o r influencing the dernsind f o r a p a r t i c u l a r a i r p r t is the competitiveness of tiiat a i r s o r t f o r t h e p a r t i c u l a r nar'!;e t segment l y i n g within t h e defined geographic s e r v i c e area. Three types of a i r c r a z t demand (13ersona1, i n s t r u c t i o n a l . and a e r i a l a 2 p l i c a t i o n ) a r e expected t o c r e a t e t h e majority of a i r c r a f t demand Eor Yolo County ~ x p r t . Personal and a e r i a l a s p l i c a t i o n a i r c r a f t demand a r e shown t o be very s e n s i t i v e ( f i x e d c o s t e l a s t i c i t y o2 3.578) t o parkinq c o s t s . Effective use of t h i s v a r i a b l e could allow yolo County Airport t o increase i t s based a i r c r a f t by cornpetlng with t h e previously mentioned a i r p o r t s f o r t h e o v e r a l l increase i n general a v i a t i o n demancl within Yolo County A i v o r t ' s geogra?hically defined s e r v i c e area.

There a r e about I4 a i r p o r t s ranginq from a l a r g e secondary n a t i o n a l a i r s o r t t o simple a i r s t r i p a s l i s t e d i n t h e inventory. Borges-Clariceburg, University, Vatts-?Joodland, Sacramento-iaietro, Xut Tree, Vaca-Dixon and l h i n e P r a i r i e have the most influence on t h e Yolo County k i r 2 o r t - S e r v i c e Area. Borges-Clar?isSurq Airport, a p r i v a t e l y otmed an6 o2erated f a c i l i t y , i s located i n the southern most s o r t i o n of Yolo County. I t i s not contern@-ated t h a t t h i s f a c i l i t y w i l l grow a t art-accelerated r a t e . T t i s well located t o serve a s ~ s s i b l e r e l i e f f o r Sacramento Executive Airport. (1974 S U P C ~ e p o r t )
J

Page 14

Table #1 Department of Finance Population Projections for the County of Yolo Baseline Alternate Projections Series D-100 104,900 118,800 133,000 147,300 161,100 174, 500 187,600 Series E-0 104,500 114,500 121,600 128,000 133,700 138,500 142,500 Series D-150 104,900 119,800 136,600 153,000 170,100 186,200 202,000 Series C-150 105,100 120,600 138,400 156,000 174,600 192,400 210,700

The population projection used for the forecasting purposes for the Master Plan is the baseline figure, Series D-100, because it is the medium figure of the Department of Finance's four baseline projections. According to the 1975 Special Census, the population of Yolo County is 100,783 which differs from the projection by 4,000people. The population of Yolo County in 1975 increased by 14,494 persons from the 1969 census figure of 86,289 people. The discrepancy between the 1975'census figures and the projection was most likely caused by the continued decrease in the average family size in Yolo County between 1969 and 1975. The forecasting method utilized in the Master Plan is similar to the method used in the Nut Tree Airport Master Plan and the Delano Municipal Airport Master Plan, Aviation Aircraft Projections

A.

Projection.of Based Aircraft at Yolo County Airport

County Residents in. 1976 owned 134 airplanes. That figure represents an increase of only eleven planes in seven years. The nunher of aircraft listed in the Assessor's records (primary source of data) fluctuates a lot because people sometimes base their aircraft in other counties during a single year. Table #2 Based Aircraft Owned by County Residents In Yolo County (yolo County Assessor's Office ~ecords) Year 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976
No. of Planes 123 120 117 125 157 136 142 J 134

Page 19

o County i k s e s s o r I s I?ecorc!s, i n d i c a t i n g t i , e n~xIL,erc>2 t h s e d i n Yolo Couiity, owned by County resiCents and idents,v~ill be used f o r t 3 e z v i a t i o n f o r e c a s t p r o j e c t i o n s f o r t1:e i4aster Plzn. According t o t h e 1975 Assessor's AircraEt L i s t , t k e r e were 1.52 >lanes based i n Yolo County. That showed only 3 a d d i t i o n a l >lanes i n t h e County s i n c e t h e 1972 A i r c r a f t L i s t and bo'iil f i g u r e s e::cluc?c crop cluster l ~ l a n e s . One net306 t o derive a r a t i o f o r ?rejecting t h e number of based a i r c r a f t i n t h e County i s t o use tile nunber oC based ~Dlsnes i n t h e Couaty dFvi.6eG by the t o t a l county population. Elus i n 1975, 152 airj31anes divided by 100,733 persons, d e r i v e s a r a t i o 02 .CG151 ~ ~ l a n s~er e s _ncroon. Using ,00151 planes p e r person t i x e s t h e D e p r t i e a t 02 Finance Toi~ulationpro) e c t i o n s , t h e nur&er of based a i r c r a f t ~rhi.ch can 3e expected i n Yolo County is grojected.
Table G3

2rojection of General Aviation A i r c r a E t Yo10 County 19G0-2005

'L%e s i n g l e engine @ane &minates ceileral and cor,mercial a v i a t i o n in YoLo Co~mty. The majority or" t h e planes located i n khe cocnty 3ave a raaxinui.~ti='l;e--of2 weig11t 02 less than 3, G O 0 lbs, and 'lave 2 four s e a t ca2acity,

i-ccorcZng t o Liilton Vatto, i n I-kLrc;ioC 1975 t h e r e :.rere only a few lanes i n Yolo C0u.ilt.y 02 10,000 ;?ounds o r nore. 171ree such >lanes k r e l o c a t e 6 a t Yolo County A i n o r t , had a gross weight 05 i0,0001bs., 2 C , OC3 1 1 3 s . and X , 000 l ! ~ (,a C(l.5 G GeecixrzZt, a TE.1 and a DC-3, i n t h t oxcer).

In Zuly 1976, a t the p!,;.nes l i s t e d by the engine planes. Only s i n g l e engine planes

Yolo Comty R i r p r t , the n e j o r i t y of t h e County Assessor a r e four ;>lace, sincile t w o ' o f t h e seventeen planes are 1-3 place and one 1s a twin englne a n c r a f t ,

The ~ x o j e c t e d changes i n the type of a i r c r a f t a n t i c i p a t e t h a t t h e proportion oC s i n g l e engine 4 T place and multi engine a i r c r a f t w i l l i n c r e a s e , while t h e number of 1-3 p l a c e s i n q l e engine a i r c r a f t w i l l decrease, Presently i n Yolo County, t h e r e a r e apixoximately 50 s i n g l e ensine 1-3 ?lace a i r c r a f t nmking about 30% of t h e total based a i r c r a e t i n Yolo County.

- . .1
P a , ,
--20 --

There a r e two a l t e r n a t i v e methods i n forecasting the number of based a i r c r a f t a t t h e Yolo County Xir?ort, Alternative I assumes t h a t t h e pro2ortion of t h e number of planes based a t the Yolo County'Airport t o t h e t o t a l number of planes located i n t h e County w i l l remain stable. This r a t i o of 29/152 o r 0,190 (yolo County Aiq~ort based a i r c r a f t per t o t a l number of planes i n Y o l o county) times t h e projected n u d e r of a i r c r a f t f o r t h e t o t a l county predicts t h e nmber of based a i r c r a f t anticipated a t Yolo County Airport. Table Projection Alternative I of Based A i r c r a f t a t Yolo County a-rt

Year 1975 1920 1925 1990 1395 2000

Based A i r c r s f t
29
42 45

34 32

50

The h i s t o r i c a l record a t t h e Yolo County Aiwr-L iioes not proviZe l of a i r c r a f t an accurate !xtse f o r projecting the ~ t e n t i a n&r because t h e a i r p o r t kas only h e n develo,peC! since 1974, There a r e currently 23 planes based a t t h e a i r p r t , b ~ t there a r z f a c i l i t i e s f o r thirty-one planes. The rvlarcl-r 1976 f icjures and plane t y p s w i l l be used f o r forecasting purposes, A w t i L e

BT-.
1

The assuin~ptionsCor a l t e r n a t e <$2 a r e the following: 1)


2)

Watts-i.JoodlanZ and University A i q o r t w i l l not e q a n 6 . Sacra~ento Metro A i q ~ o r t w i l l continue t o 5e a A i r Carrier A i q o r t and w i l l not reach i t s Zullest capacity by 2005.
A l l new planes l o c a t i n g i n Yolo County w i l l most l i k e l y base a t the Yolo County Rin-3ort.

3)

Projections 50s Based Aircraft . a t Yolo County S-ir-port Year -

l9G0 19C5 1990 195'5


2000

2005; Page 2 1

he following f i g u r e s could a l s o be predicted depending on t h e fore-

a s t i n g method and t h e v a r i a b l e s used: 1.


A 1974 SRAPC report predicted t h a t t h e r e would be 100 based

a i r c r a f t located a t t h e Yolo County Airport by the year 2000 (Please see page 14 of t h e t e x t ) .

2.

A more recent SRAPC report completed i n 1976 estimated t h a t

39 planes would be based a t t h e a i r p o r t i n 1995 (Please see page 70). 3. If m e t h o k t e r n a t i v e i s u t i l i z e d with d i f f e r e n t Department of Finance f o r 2000 A.D., t h e following estimat i o n could a l s o be-predicted: a. Using S e r i e s E-0, which i s t h e lowest population p r o j e c t i o n , approximately 39 planes would be based a t the airport. Using S e r i e s D-150, 53 based a i r c r a f t would be located a t t h e County f a c i l i t i e s , S e r i e s C-150, which i s t h e highest baseline f i g u r e , 55 based a i r c r a f t would be located a t t h e a i r p o r t , a

b.

c.
4.

Using forecasting m e t h o d t e r n a t i v e s but varying t h e e r of planes would be Finance f i g u r i n g , t h e folfuwi predicted f o r t h e year 2000: a. b.
C.

S e r i e s E-0

86 based a i r c r a f t

S e r i e s 0-150 S e r i e s C-150

158 based a i r c r a f t 168 based a i r c r a f t

Page 2 2

I t hss been a n t i c i p a t e s t h a t t L e f u t u r e grotkh of a i r operations a t t h e Yolo County A i q o r t w i l l be r e l a t e d t o t h e number of a i r c r a 2 t based a t tl;e f i e l d f o r Local a c t i v i t y .

I n 1973, z.ppo;rha.tely 60 operations _ger week say w e r e t h e recorzed Gigure hy t h e County a t t2e Aiq3ort o r apyo::imately 21,3GO operations :for t h e year. I n accorSance with FlA Advisory C i r c u l a r 150/5070-5 t h e value oC GSO o:~erations>er based a i r c r a g t is given as a high t p i c a l n o m f o r General Avistion Airports i n 1966. This value of 590 nultF@.Fed by tile appropriate increase f a c t o r of 1.08 f o r a d j u s t i r q per based base n o n s t o 1975, y i e l d s an adjusted 745 o ~ e r a t i o n s z i r c r a f t p e r year, According t o t h e S t a t e DrvFsion oC Aeronautics, the value of 750 o ~ e r a t i o n s ser based a i r c r a f t is a reasona3le estimate f o r t h e amount of a c t i v i t y which occurs a t t h e Yo10 County iCultiplying 750 o i ~ e r a t i o n stirnes t h e 29 based a i r c r a f t r t a t t k e Yolo County Airport, it should be a n t i c i y t e d t h a t 21,750 operstbons w i l l occur i n 1976.

Operation Projections f o r Yolo County Airport Using Series D-100 Baseline Population Figures
.
'

1920 1985 199C 1995


2CX

2005

5G glanes X 77 ~3lanes X 97 planes : 1 1 2 0 planes 2: 160 ?lanes 2.: 150 lz~lanes%

750 750 750 750 750 750

= 42,000 annual oLperations


= 57,750 muzl oLperations = 72,750 annual operations = 90,000 annual ogerations = 105,000 annual o:xrations = 120,000 annual operations

This t z b l e sllows that 2 5 o r 30 years f r o n now t h e Yolo County Aiqort read: t h e s t a g e of a Basic U t i l i t y Stage I1 A i r p o r t (Ceeder systemthigh d e n s i t y ) with between 1GC,000 and 200,000 average (See definitions) annual o ~ ~ e r a t i o n s

ZaciLity r e ~ ~ u i r e n e n a ts r e developed Prom infonnstion obtained from t h e inventory-ca~3acity infonnation, t h e demnd a n a l y s i s and f r o n F A A BSvisory Circulars an6 Regulations which ?roviSees c r i t e r i a Tor Sesign of a i r p o r t commponents. These recqnrernents a r e then incor:>orated i n t o the a i r i m r t plans prepared as p a r t of t h e I.hster Plan Study. Tile f a c i l i t y r e q u f t m e n t s $or the Yo10 County A i q . r - k , and >roAmaedexp?nsions are l i s t e d on t h e following page.

Page 2 3

S o i l types a r e described a s fo!,lo~~s: 1-Iillciate l o r n (B&\) The surface runofz of t h i s FIillgate s o i l is v2ry slow and t h e erosion hazard i s none t o s l i g h t . c a p a b i l i t y u n i t 211s-3 ( 1 7 ) . The a v a i l a b l e ?later h o l d i n s c a p a c i t y i s 4.0 t o 6.0 inches. The i s 20 t o 30 inches. This s o i l has severe effective root d e $ A ~ s o i l 1Frnitctions f o r s e p t i c tank f i l t e r Eield.
T h i s i.Iyers s o i l i s slowly permable. Surface bIyers Clay (ids) runoff i s verv slow, an2 t h e r e i s l i t t l e o r no hazard oE erosion. The a v a i l a 3 i l i t y v ~ t e r holding c a ~ 3 a c i t y i s 8.0 t o 10.0 inches. The ecr'ective r m t i n g de2t'n i s more than 60 inches. Matural ty n i t 11s 5 (17). This s o i l f e r t i l i t y i s f i i ~ h ,c a ~ ~ a b i l i u has severe s o i l l i n i t a t i o n s f o r se;.tic tad: f i l t e r Cield.

Waste Water T r e a h e n t

The erristinq s e ~ ~ k itc.rk .c and leach l i n e systeii serves the $resent p b l i c restroorn f a c i l i t i e s and t h e F . 3 . 0 . office. m11 6evelopnent a'-.t h e f a c i l i t y w i l l dezancl a treatment plant.

O n an6 ofC-site coslCftions I-lill5ate loam and biyers loan s o i l s ~ ~ e r a e a b i l i vhich ty means surface ruaofg w t e r have a very s l o v ~ 2 e r c o l a t e s throush the s o i l very slovrly. Alt'nouqh t!le AF-ort has a h i s t o r y 02 clrainace problems, i f t h e runway is p r o ~ e i r l y constructecl vhen i t i s eqanded, no water shov.16 stand on t h e l h e i l f u t u r e develognznt occurs at t k e a i ~ o r runway t surgace. W . air~ort, hawever, due t o t h e increased surface runoE2, a The a r e a Zrains \ coriplete Srainaqe system should be i n s t a l l e d . i n t o Chicf:ahonlr,y S l o ~ g t~liicl? l~ has a h i s t o r i c dloodinq prokdem. Additional surface runozf occassioned by the d e v o l o p e n t oT t h e air-2ort would be e x ~ e c t e d . Temi30rary sondin9 :or flooZ waters could be provided oa t h e site.

Toxic chexicals 2nd 2 e s t i c i d e s should be s t o r e d i n a EenceZ s r e a t o prevent u:lautllorized ;.ersonnel f r o n c o ~ i i l gi n t o contact v ~ i t hthex. kAn area c l o s e t o the ta::iw.~ay and access road, y e t array Cron t k e t e m i i l a l , w i l l b e designate6 :or the storage of I n t h e cro13 d u s t e r business c5enicals used b r t h e cro-:, Zusters. \:water i s a l s o use(', KlereZore, a s q e r a t e waste l i q u i d Gisposal s h c u l 6 be constructed so a s t o reduce the 2 o s s i 5 i l i t y tank s y s t e ~ 02 c o a t a ~ i n a t i o n ,

Page 2 8 .

~unicipalUtilities - are compatible as far as noise is concerned, but the following may present obstructions or hazards:

1 . Gas and Oil Facilities, including above ground pipelines and storage facilities - marginal under approach zone surfaces.
2.

Electrical Plants Power Lines

marginal under approach zone surfaces.


C

3.

poor under approach zone surfaces.

In addition, trash dumps and incinerators may create a smoke problem, and garbage dumps may attract birds. Commercial Uses - Restaurants, shopping centers, office buildings, public buildings, banks, gasoline stations, hotels, motels, and theaters are good uses on an airport or adjacent to it but should incorporate sound reduction in buildings for internal livability. None of these should be constructed in high hazard airport safety areas. Industrial Uses - are acceptable except for'thosethat produce smoke, electronic interference, or misleading lights. Sound conditioning of structures may be required to reduce exterior noise to acceptable levels for internal operations. Some .industriescannot be located near airports because noise and vibrations interfere with delicate instruments. Residential and ~ e r t a i Institutional ~ Uses - are considered poor adjacent to airport areas, and particularly under the approach zones because of both noise and hazard. ~cousticaltreatment will reduce noise in the buildings, but it will not reduce noise during outdoor - activity. The Yolo County Land Use-Plancontinues to state:
1 . Agricultural, recreational, and open space designations are the most compatible land uses around the Airport.
2.

Industrial and Commercial designations around the current airport boundary will be discouraged. All residential development will be discouraged around the airport.

3.

4 . Recreational uses, i.e., parachuting, model airplanes, will be allowed to continue at the airport until they become incompatible with aviation uses.

The current Special Height Zone is adequate for future development at the airport.

Page 30

Environmental Review

/-

The p r o j e c t i d e n t i f i c a t i o n , o b j e c t i v e s , an6 l o c a t i o n has been nreviously discussed i n t h e i4aster Plan and t h e p r o j e c t d e s c r i ~ ~ t i o i l , geologic 2nd gedologiic conditions, hydrolic , atmnos~heric ,a d t r a f f i c conditions can be found i n t h e Physical Requirenents Section, which s t z r t s on ?age 22. The only vegetation and w i l d l i f e which e x i s t s on t h e a i r p o r t pro?erty a r e those comnon t o ur3an and a g r i c u l t u r a l h a b i t a t s ; a list of w i l d l i f e and veqetation can be found i n t h e Yolo County General Plan Conservation Element.

Socio-Cultural and Socio-Economic Factors: C u l t c r a l Resources: There a r e no archeological, a r c h i t e c t u r a l o r engineering f e a t c r e s of m y s i g n i f i c a n c e l o c a t e 6 a t the Yolo County A i r p o r t o t h e r thzn t h e a i n 2 o r t itself. The only h i s t o r i c a l s i g n i c i c a n c e t h e a i r p o r t may have i s i t s minor role during Vorld T?ar I1 as a auxiliary landing s t r i p for McClellan A i r Force Base. L i l l a r d iiall has s o c i a l s i g n i f i c a n c e to t h e West P l a i n f i e l d peo9le because the h a l l serves a s a meeting place f o r them. The v?est P l a i n f i e l d F i r e S t a t i o n i s the focus f o r the mostly volunteer f i r e depw3ment. Public F a c i l i t i e s :

a .

c, d, e.

Yolo County S h e r i f f Department I'Jest P l a i n f i e l d F i r e .Department mF1itie.s: 2 a c . i f . i ~ Telepl?one Company and P.G,&E. Davis Kaste Reqoval Yolo County Public Works Department f o r Road Maintenance

Aesthetics: The on.ly area of i n t e r e s t located i n t h e v i c i n i t y i s t h e grove of Eucalmtus t r e e s located near t h e southern bounchry of the a i q o r t . The o,ld c o n t r o l -tower i s a l s o i n t e r e s t i n g t o loo:: a t LOO, as a reanant f:ron XorlZ T?ar 11.
rC

: e a i r p r t li~s the s o t e n t i s 1 t o inzuce nuisance con&tions, Zuisance: % e s g e c i a l l y noise. Other nuisance conditions such a s v i b r a t i o n s , d u s t , odor and 2 1 x 2 e x i s t e i t h e r fron t h e e i r c r a f t themselves, such 2 s v i b r a t i o n s o r odor from t h e crop d ~ s t e r s and t h e i r p e s t i c i d e s , or qLare 2rox the as+al-L and concrete pavements o r fro13 t h e n e t a l buildings. l?oFse conditions w i l l be discussed under t h e See Economic Re5ort s e c t i o n , ir~~3ac Econonic, t Population snd Land U s e : Accordinc,. t o t h e 1975 S p c i a l Census, 477 3eonle r e s i d e i n t h e area surroundin5 t h e .airiiort 3ounSed by County Roads 27, 93, 32 and W., Since That is an i n c r e a s e 02 7 4 people from t h e 1959 Census figures: 1352, 32 new d v ~ e l l i f q s were b u i l t i n t h e v i c i n i t y , 1 9 residences -were b u i l t i n t h e Census Tract Area which is located adjacent t o t h e aiqort ro~3erty :to t h e e a s t , and seven hones were b u i l t immeGiately southeast 02 t h e a i r s o r t . Table JjG; cle@cts the- 1963 and 1575 Census r ' i g x e n Lor t h e area surroundinq t h e -Yolo county i l i r ~ 3 o r t .

Population and Z o u s i n ~ Ficjures


TOTAL

Housing Units Vacant Units Percent Xouseholds Eousel~oldPop, Po?, % I<ouseho2d Groui3 W a r t e r s Total Population
1975 S ~ e c i a Census l Ficiures
TOTAL

Page 32

Geolodc and PeSoloaic Impacts: There w i l l be sone adverse i q a c t s a s s o c i a t e d vrith t h e pro2osed developiients when t h e a i r p o r t i s u g r a S e d and meets t h e U t i l i t y o r Transcort A i r s o r t C l a s s i f i c a t i o n . Land Wiilch has a k i ~ h natural ,c ~ertiLity and i s c u r r e n t l y used f o r dry farming w i l l be convertec! t o a i r : ~ o r t i n d u s t r i a l use. I n order t o meet t h e f u t u r e demnGs, Class 3 and 4- s o i l s v r i L l be covered by pavement Zor a pemanent access roa6, by 3 u i l d i n g s t o house z i r c r a c t o r m i a t i o n uses, and by waste \rater E a c l l l t i e s o r d r a i n a ~ e ponds. Construction work w i l l c r e a t e d u s t , which could be mitigated by s ~ r i r i l c l i n gGown t h e s o i l .

IUtl:ou$l t h e r e i s adequate space within t h e a i w o r t p r o l ~ e r t yto m e t t h e Clear Zone Area s ~ ~ e c i f i c s t i o n fs o r a U-Lility Aiq3ort Category, an a d d i t i o n a l 27.0 a c r e s i s needed t o meet t11e T r a n s p r t Clear Zone Area requirements i f t h e runway r e i i i n s 5,000 f e e t long. F a develop men-k r i g h t easeqsnt may 3e s u f f i c i e n t t o the north of t h e s i n c e the land could continue t o be famed a f t e r tl?e a i ~ o r t of tlie rumray, hov~ever, reac7;les i t s ultinaize s i z e . Tile land s o u t l ~ t 4 e 13.7 a c r e s n u s t 3e 2urchased s i n c e s e v e r a l accessory buildings a d porsilbLy a single-family Gwelling a r e loca-ted within t h e pro-msed a c l e a r zone.

E l e c a i x c i t y of t h e e x i s t i n g w e l l can a e e t t k e nceds of t h e Yolo County Airport Zor many years 6ependinq on t 5 e t y ? e of uses which l o c a t e s there. Before t h e a i q o r t reaches I t ' s ultimate s i z e , . P u r ~ F n gEroin e2cl-r well i n t h e however, a nev w e 1 1 w i l l be needed. area c o n t r i k t e s to t k e d r a w down pro31ein i n the v i c i n i t y vjllich lowers t h e u n d e r ~ r o u r dwater s u r f ace.

The a i r s o r t _nro?erty i s l o c a t e d within t h e PlainCieiZ Ridge ground water basin and i n tiia 7 i l l o w Slouql s u r f a c e ~ r z t e r hydrolosic basin. kccordinq t o t h e X2y1 1975 ClenCeaen re12ort t i t l e ~ , " Y o l o Coanty-Inves'iisation " t h e Plainfiel-d Ri6cje is zn i s o l a t e d body of . lile a r e a contains hard s i l t and c l a y , dissected a l l u v i a l d e ~ o s i t s . .n sandstone and cement& gravel oC thc Tekziiria Zomation vd~ichtends t o ix2ede t h e movement of c;round water between t h e 3p3r ant: Lower Cache-Putah Basins." According t o E l l l 3erg, an encineer f o r LuhdorEC Conpny, .tilcl: vrzter q u a l i t y i s s i m i l a r t o i700dland1s water. Be s l s o s a i d t h a t t h e ui->?er d o a c s t i c wells a r e i n marginal condition because of t h e &ought and a r e a forraation, There a r e nany poc?;ets of water located i n t h e a i r s o r t v i c i n i t y , but a 50C Coot dee? well ~ ~ o u no-t l d be an uncommon occurence due t o the PlainEield R i c l g e fonnation. The f u t u r e usage of water a t t h e aimor-: w i l l k e l 3 deplete the underand according t o t h e ~ l c n ~ e n re k p o r t , each qrounc? iratcr sup$y, year tlle county- i s overclraring t h e grounc? water supi$y. In a 30 year Feriod. 1944-1974, t h e decrease i n groundwater storage has
-

Page 33

anounted t o a;?~xo::inately 500,OOG a c r e f e e t .

T h e airi.ort pr-erty i s locatec? i n l?illovl Slouch Basin. The grinci~al drainacje course i s VJillov Slow$, rll~ichflows Yoodlancl and Davis, receives winter runoffs and easturar8ly IIett-~~eil sumner i r r i g a t i o n drainacje from t k e e n t i r e c e n t r a l ~ 3 o r t i o nof t h e County an6 s p i l l s i n t o t h e Yolo Bypass. The sources of water i n t h i s a r e a . a r e runof5 Zrc)1;1 t h e f o o t h i l l s and south c e n t r a l portion of 'she County and diversions f r o m Cache Creel-,' a t Capay.

i?illow Slough i s "eel by s e v e r a l c a n a l s , i r r i q e t i o n c?itcheo, an2 small streams and flow i s o f t e n s;3orac?ic. iieasurene3ts of flow are ilot nade, ant! LiniteG water w a l i t y monitoring has r e c e n t l y beea s t a r t d b u t i t i s known t h a t t h i s a r e a floods g e r i o 6 i c a l l y . The ?romse2 e;gmsions w i l l irqack t h e hjrdrolopz? of the area by creaking a d d i t i o n a l irapervious sureaces which vri.3-L reduce ?enetration 02 ~11rCace rrzter t o t h e underground basin and t r i l l increase stoxx 'cmter m o f f from t h e site. The increased okom water mnozf emu7b ilot s e r i o u s l y increase t h e ClooCLinc,: ~ ~ r o b l e which x Pollution oQ surfzce water Cram c a s u a l c r o p dustin9 loafin9 operations e x i s t s a t .the site.
J

Jmes :<oslow, A i r Pollution Control O f r i c e r f o r Solaiio-Yolo y re pared these c o m e n t s v~hicliw i l l be attached late;-,

i3o s i p i f i c m t aZverse i n p c t s a r e a s s o c i a t e d with f u t u r e e x p a n s i o ~ s

a t the s i r - m r t i n as much as t h e ?.an$ is alreacly i n t e n s i v e l y used a32 h s 3een levele8. Grasses o r a n h a l s that a r e displaced 3 y t h e construction a c t i v i t i e s can s e t t l e e i t h e r on neiflloring g r o p r t i e s o r i n the s2ace whicil w i l l remain vacant or LandocapeB.
Socio-Cultural and Socio-Zcoxomic Ixxcts: C u l t u r c l Imi3acts :

The ~ x o ~ ~ o s e:q?anoion eC v r i l l have no adverse i ~ q e c t s on t1.e c u l t u r a l resources because t h e r e a r e no ::nown archeological, h i s t o r i c a l o r a r c h i t e c t u r a l f e a t u r e s of sir;nificance e x i s t i n 9 at t h e a i r o r t . The e x p n s i o r . w i l l be a benePit f o r t h e peg-3le 02 Yolo County . poi~osecl ci~rec;ly by c : ~ ~ n S i n c n; l o c a l t r a n s w r t a t i o n mock, and i n d i r e c t l y 3y i n c r e a s i i q t h e safety 02 t h e a i r p o r t f o r the a i r p o r t users.

Enerav U s e and Conservation : :?it11 t h e increase 02 o p r a t i o n s a t t h e - a i r p o r e wken ';he Yolo County f?ir-?oi-t reaciles t h e U t i l i t y or Trans2ort catecpry, r-lore gasoline and rue1 w i l l be cons-uned then previously used a t the a i q o r t .
I

According t o t h e Sacranento Ilegional Aren Plannin~ onh hiss ion report,


Page 34

&&oyee an3 user p p u l a t i o n w i l l . increase, but r e s i d e n t i a l .903ulatioa ni$t decrease t o rriinimize a 7otextFal noise nuisance c o n f l i c t , The increased a c t i v i t y w i l l have a adverse i m p c t on t h e ~3eo:~le vd~ocurrently reside near t h e a i q o r t ,especially these people t ~ h ol i v e on County *all 2 5 , 29 and 30 and on Yoserilite and Carlsbad S t r e e t s . Traffic :

The nuzber of t r l y generated a t tke Yolo 2iir-2ort has been a;3coxFii1ate?. f o r t h e f u t u r e pro~oseGexpansions by urinc;. the S t a t e 02 CaliZornis' s T r i ~ Ends Generation Eesearck Counts study. If Yolo County A i q p r t reaches t h e s i z e and category of Sonom County ixr-mrt, t h e averase treekCny t r a f - f i c can he e ~ e c t e d t o appro:Lz1ate'.l,0@0t r i 2 s 2er day. conditions e x i s t i n g a t t h e i3a2a Airport nay a l s o be a h i l a r t o t h e conditions vfiicl-r zay e x i s t a t Yolo County Aiqmrt i n 1995. Vhen t 1 2 0 a i r c r a f i based a t t h e a i q o r - k , it is Yolo County A i r ~ r has i~ossible the averacje flightsper clay v~ould be 634, It could then be expected t h a t t k e a i q o r t w i l l have 5 employees and 125 gar?:ing b2acen. An averaqe week&y t r a f f i c count of 600 t r i p s m y be expected. Land Use: T3e l~roi3osede v n s i o n of t h e Solo County A i v o r t w i l l exert pressure on tile surroundin? a g r i c u l t u r a l areas t o convert t o urban uses, such a s tor-x~ercial o r ~ n d u s t r i a l uses. AFr:?ort developents ineuce urbanization vE1ic21 i s coqitrary t o t h e Yolo County General Plan ~onservation and Opes Ssace Elements' policy of ? r e s e r v i n ~agrlculturn-. land. Eventually land h a t i s used f o r a g r i c u l t u r a l 9roduction ni@~!lt be re6esic;nated f o r Connercia?. o r I n d u s t r i a l Designations. The a i r ~ ~ o e:gsasion rt w i l l have a sic,mificant adverse iLni-~act on t h e r e s i d e n t i a l and agricultural d e s i ~ n a t i o a s , Public F a c i l i t i e s :

A&erse i n p c t on Yolo County Sheriff Depctnent because nore nen would be needed t o 2rovide aCequate protection a t tI:e a i r y o r t .
Fire Der3artmen.t:

Adverse i ~ p a c t s on t h e Vest PlziinnPield F i r e De?artrae-it because nore rnen and ecicipment would be neede6 t o meet t h e demnfis cjeneratd by a Basic Trans2ort category a i r p o r t , Utilities:
P. G . & E . Conpaily , -pacific Telerjhone Con?any, an8 Davis ??EtsteRemoval can meet t h e Euture demand. A new well w i l l be necessary an3 a more

waste water systen i s needed t o y e v e n t a6ver.e Aesthetic Lm3acts:


I

irp~acts

Views of t h e Vaca i . I o ~ n ' i a i i itmy ~~ ' 3 e blocked Pror.1 t l x resiclential. m i t s located t o t h e e a s t of t h e airport. Some a i q o r t develoy,lents, i. e. r e s t a u r a n t s which a r e two-stories , could emMe people t o enjoy a b e a n t i f u l panoramic view of tile a u r r o u n d i n ~region.

This s e c t i o n included with tlre noise contour nags w i l l be added a t a l a t e r date,

APPENDIX C-10
SAFETY PLAN

SITE SPECIFIC SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN (SSHP) OEWICWM Archives Search Site Inspection V i s i t
Yo10 County Airport Yolo County, California Site # J09CA009400

1. REFERENCES: a. Safety Manual, CELMS-PM-M, 16 Sep 93 w/ Chl. b. SOP for Reporting Ordnance and Unexploded Ordnance (UXO), CELMS-PM-M,
19 Jan 95.

c. OEW Guidance Regarding Coordination with EOD Organizations, 10 Jan 95.

2. GENERAL: This plan prescribes the safety and health requirements for team activities and operations conducted to determine the presence of ordnance and explosive waste and lor chemical warfare materials at the specified site.
a. The Safety Officer has final authority on a l l matters relating to safety. The safety rules will be followed at all times. Any member of the team may stop operations if they observe a situation or activity which poses a potential hazard to any individual or to the operation. All actions must comply with the common sense rule! b. All team :memberswill be aware of the local emergency numbers and the location of the nearest telephone. c. A minimum of two and a maximum of eight persons will be allowed on-site at any one time. d. The property owner is not required to sign the SSHP, but should be politely asked to participate in the safety briefing.

3. MISSION: Reconnoiter, document, and photograph areas on Yolo County Airport, formerly Winters-Davis Flight Strip and Yolo County International, Yolo County, CA, suspected to be contaminated with UXO andlor toxic chemical munitions.

4. SAFETY PRECAUTIONS: A l l team members w i l l stay within sight of each other while on site. A first aid kit w i l l be on hand. The following three basic safety rules apply at all

times: a. Rule 1 - Do not touch or pick up anything at the site. b. Rule 2 - Do not step anywhere you cannot see where you place your foot. c. Rule 3 - There will be no eating or smoking at the site. Hands will be washed after the survey and prior to eating. Drinking fluids should be done during periodic breaks.

5. SITE COMMUNICATIONS: The primary means of wmmunicating with other team members will be by voice. Team members will always remain within sight of each other. Cellular telephones should be carried to facilitate and expedite calling for emergency medical services.
6. NATUFUL HAZARDS: Cold, wet weather may be encountered during the month of February. Snakes, biting insects, and poisonous plants wuld be encountered.

7. ORDNANCE HAZARDS: Practice bombs, small arms ammunition, as well as other miscellaneous items might be found in the area. 8. HAZARD EVALUATION: Estimate the overall hazards using the following guidelines: (check appropriate item) [ ] Low (small arms ammunitions) [XJ Moderate (practice bombs with spotting charge) [ ] High (high explosive munitions, toxic chemicals, WP) [ ] Unknown

9. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES: First aid will be rendered for any injuries. In the event of a detonation, everyone should freeze until the situation can be assessed by the team leader. Unnecessary injuries can be avoided by not panicking and planning a logical course of action, which may include retracing your steps out of an impact area. Emergency medical services will be contacted by the most expeditious means available.
10. SAFETY STATEMENT: Safety is everyone's business. No unnecessary risks will be taken to obtain photos or other data. Team members are responsible for notifjmg the project Manager or safety Officer of any physical conditions that may impede or prevent their

accomplishment of the mission. An example is allergic reactions to bee stings. Important Phone Numbers

Emergency medical service: Law enforcement agency: Huntsville Sdety: Non-emergency number:

91 1 911 (205) 895-1582/1579 (800) 627-3532, PIN 777-2534

SSHP reviewed by:

/'

Encls 1. Safety Briefing Attendance 2. Safety gear

SITE SURVEY SAFETY BRIEFING


PPE x
Work Clothing Gloves Hardhat Hearing protection Safety shoes Safety glasses
Site Hazards
x

OEW CSM HlW Slips, falls, trips Wildlife Vegetation

Weather Precautions

cold ColdIHeat Severe Weather

Safety Briefing Attendance


All team members and any accompanying personnel will be briefed and sign this form:

Print name and organization William K. James CELMS-PM-M Scott A. Barton CELMS-PM-M Gerald V. Schwalbe CELMS-PM-M

MANDATORY MINIMUM SAFETY GEAR

First aid kit (individual) Survival kit Fire starter Space blanket Whistle

Mirror
Cellular phone Flash light Survey tape
Canteen

APPENDIX C-11
SrrE VISIT

CELMS-PM-M MEMORANDUM FOR RECORD (Mike Dace)

6 March 1995

SUBJECT: Trip Report-Site Surveys for Yolo County Airport, Formerly Winters-Davis Flight Strip, DERP-EUDS Project No. J09CA009401, and Mt. Campbell Rifle Range, DERP-FUDS Project No. J09CA087601. 1. The following individuals participated in the site investigations on the above referenced sites. Mr. Scott A. Barton Mr. William K. James Mr. Gerald V. Schwalbe
2. On Monday 13 February 1995, Messrs. Barton and James flew from St. Louis, MO to Sacramento, CA., arriving at approximately 1245 hours Pacilic Standard time. Mr. Schwalbe, who had been on leave, picked them up at the airport. The team then drove through Woodland and then past the Yolo County Arrport, where they briefly viewed the facility prior to the site visit scheduled for the following day. They also spent a brief period attempting to reach Mr. Duane Chamberlain, who farms the available land on the airport ground, but were unsuccessful. They next proceeded to Davis California, where they registered at the Ramada Inn motel and remained overnight.

3. An appointment had been made for early the following day, Tuesday 14 February, to meet with Mr. Wiswell, Manager, Yolo County Airport, who would escort the survey team about the airport grounds. After introductions of Messrs. Barton and James, the team conducted the site survey. Mr Wiswell first escorted the team to the far south side of the airport where they surveyed the former bombiammo storage area. This location was found to be partially in crops and partially unimproved ground. The crop area was extremely muddy, but the unimproved ground was surveyed and photographs were taken of the site. Although no evidence:was found of OEW scrap in the area, Kirk James did iind hollowfilled tile, the material commonly used in ammo storage structure construction. The survey team then was escorted to the north side of the airport and observed and photographed the property used by the gun club. By 0930 hours the team had covered the areas of interest. Mr. Wiswell then left for another meeting. He provided directions to Mr. Chamberlain, and it was understood that after contacting Mr. Chamberlain, the team might return again for further inspections. Mr. Chamberlain has farmed the property for many years.
4. The team drove to Mr. Chamberlain's home and business office located at 34530 County Road 29, which is about 1 mile west of the N/W corner of airport property. The following

are the recollections of our conversation with Duane Chamberlain. He indicated a long time in the past (20+ years) Blue Practice Bomb Rounds were occasionally tilled up by his farming equipment. He described these as being about 5 to 6 inches long, with fins, and about 2-1/2 inches in diameter. He briefly searched around his office for a souvenir, finding none. He stated there is not much evidence remains of the facilities once part of the old

Winter-Davis Air Strip. During farming operations his employees still occasionally turned up concrete chucks, which they were instructed to bury deeper beneath the surface. There was also some debris and junk piled into a number of concrete pits adjacent to taxiways. He speculated that there may be something left in these pits. At the Southeast corner (old bomb storage area) he mentioned there was once an oil road, but they had broken this up and spread it around with nothing much left. He also mentioned that near the Fire Department facility, some chunks of concrete remain piled up and tunnels run beneath the taxiways and runway. Mr. Chamberlain then proceeded to drive us to view the various features he described. At various places, the team examined structures and took additional photographs. The pits held connection points for former water supply lines used in fire control. Entrapped surface water, junk, and other debris were evident in these reinforced concrete pits. However, nothing on an OEW nature was observed by the survey team. The tunnels beneath the pavement structures were found to be old drainage structures and concrete wing walls. He then drove to the area of the old bunkers, where we had previously been escorted by Mr. Wiswell. No evidence of ordnance and explosive waste (OEW) was found in the former ammo storage area or anywhere elsewhere on the FUDS property.

6. Around noon Tuesday, the survey team drove to Fresno California, arriving and registering at our motel at approxihely 1530 hours. Shortly thereafter, the team drove to the Mt. Campbell Rifle Range FUDS, with the intention of contacting Mr. Matthew Pennebaker, Caretaker for the property, phone: (209) 638-6871. (Ownership is D. W. Ketscher Trust, used for grazing land, office phone (209) 638-3001.) However, he was not at home. After taking panoramic view photographs from the road adjacent to the rifle range FUDS covering the mountain side beyond, the t e a m returned to their motel arriving at approximately 1800 hrs. The actual site survey was scheduled for the following day.
7. On Wednesday 15 February 1995, after phoning the caretaker for permission to access the property, the team proceeded to sweep the actual rifle range property (INPR - 210 acres) site and the mountain side beyond (another 400+/- acres). Mr. Schwalbe thoroughly

covered the area surrounding the rifle range berm, the berm itself, and an area on the southeast side of Mt. Campbell climbing and searching to approximate elevation 700 feet msl. No evidence of OEW was found on or near the former rifle range berm. This confmed results of previous searches of the rifle range accomplished by Ted Moore's team which found no evidence of OEW.
8. Messrs. James and Barton proceeded up the mountain from the rifle berm towards the North reaching approximately one half way up to the crest (Elev 1000 +I- feet msl); and they then proceeded laterally across the hillside generally to the southwest in search of remnants of the practice rockets previously found by an ASR search team from St. Louis. Confirmation of the type and size of practice munitions was their objective. In criss-crossing the mountainside, Mr. James found OEW remnants of a 3.5 inch practice rocket warhead. Photographs were taken of the evidence that practice rounds were left on the hillside from National Guard training activities. Upon our return to St. Louis it was learned that more, and perhaps better evidence, of the training use of Mt. Campbell can be found closer to the crest of the mountain.

9. Following the site visit at approximately 1230 hours, the team returned to car and drove to Sacramento CA, where they remained overnight. On Thursday 16 February 1995, the survey team departed from Sacramento airport at about 0800 hrs Pacific Standard time, arriving in St. Louis at 1330 hrs Central Standard Time.
10. POCs this office are the undersigned:

QASAS ext. 8844

safety 0&r ext. 8762

Project Manager ext. 8788

APPENDIX C-12
DOCUMENT REFERENCE LLST

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHNES SEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AlRPORT (FORMERLY WINTER-DAVE FLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402

DOCUMENT C12 - F'ILE DOCUMENT REFERENCES

C12.1 Jones, Fred K., Captain, Assistant Adjutant General 1943 Letter to 4th Army, Presidio of San Francisco, California, dated March 10, Record Group 18, Series: Central Decimal Files, October 1942 - May 1944, Box 1598 Windsor Locks to Worcester, Folder Winters-Davis Flight Strip 600 M i s c . ,National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D. C. C12.2 09Brien,John J., Colonel, U. S. A r m y Corps of Engineers 1943 Letter to Commanding General, U. S. Army Air Forces, Acquistion of Land, dated May 11, Record Group 18, Series: Central Decimal Files, October 1942 - May 1944, Box 1598 Windsor Locks to Worcester, Folder Winters-Davis Flight Strip 600 Misc., National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D. C. C12.3 Newman, James B. Jr., Colonel, U. S. A m y Air Corps 1943 Letter to Commanding General, U. S. Army Air Forces, Acquistion of Land, 2nd indorsement, dated March 10, Record Group 18, Series: Central Decimal Files, October 1942 - May 1944, Box 1598 Windsor Locks to Worcester, Folder Winters-Davis Flight Strip 600 Misc., National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D. C. C12.4 Lyle, John M., U .Colonel, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers 1944 Letter to Chief of Engineers on the Proposed transfer of Winters-Davis Flight Strip to the Western Flying Training Command, dated April 29, Record Group 18, Series: Central Decimal Files, October 1942 - May 1944, Box 1598 Windsor Locks to Worcester, Folder Winters-Davis Flight Strip 600 Misc., National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D. C. C12.5 Summers, I. B., Colonel, Adjutant General 1943 Letter to 4th Army, Presidio of San Francisco, California, dated March 1, 2nd indorsement, Record Group 18, Series: Central Decimal Files, October 1942 May 1944, Box 1598 Windsor Locks to Worcester, Folder Winters-Davis Flight Strip 600 Misc., National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D. C.

C12.6 Summers, I. B., Colonel, Adjutant General 1943 Letter to 4th Army, Presidio of San Francisco, California, dated March 1, 2nd indorsement, Record Group 18, Series: Central Decimal Files, October 1942 May 1944, Box 1598 Windsor Locks to Worcester, Folder Winters-Davis Flight Strip 600 Misc., National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D. C. C12.7 Naismith, W., Chairman, Yolo County, CA, Board of Supercrisors 1948 Letter from War Assets Administration on Winters-Davis Flight Strip Disposal, dated January 20, Record Group 270, Series: Real Property Files, Box 147, Folder W-Calif-183, WD-779 (3) Disposal Data, Winters-Davis Flight Strip, National Archives and Records Administration, Pacific Sierra Region, San Bruno, CA. C12.8 Sears, Julian D., Acting Director, U. S. Geological Survey 1947 Letter to Mr. W. D. Rowe, Director Control Division, War Assets Administration on Winters-Davis Flight Strip, dated August 11, Record Group 270, Series: Real Property Files, Box 147, Folder W-Calif-183, WD-779 (3) Disposal Data, Winters-Davis Flight Strip, National Archives and Records Administration, Pacific Sierra Region, San Bruno, CA. C12.9 U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, P o s t Engineer, Winters-Davis Flight Strip 1944 Report on Evaluation of Carrying Capacities of Air Field Pavements, WintersDavis Flight Strip, dated April, Record Group 77, Accession # A5 1-59, Box: 472 Windham - Winterport, Folder: 686.61, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB, AL. C12.10 U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, P o s t Engineer, Winters-Davis Flight Strip 1943 Site Board Report on Winters-Davis Flight Strip, dated 1943?, Record Group 77, Accession # A51-59, Box: 472 Windham - Winterport, Folder: 685, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB, AL. C12.11 L i e , Herbert A., Lt. Colonel, U . S. Army Adjutant General 1945 General Order No. 33, Assumption of Command Jurisdiction of Winters-Davis Landing Strip, Winters, California, dated May 24, Record Group 77, Accession # A5 1-59, Box: 472 Windham - Winterport, Folder: 323.3, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB, AL. C12.12 Jones, Fred K. Jr., Captain, U. S. Army Assistant Adjutant General 1943 Letter to 4th Army, Presidio of San Francisco, California on Construction of the Bomb Storage Unit at Winters-Davis Flight Strip, Winters, California, dated March 18, Record Group 77, Accession # A51-59, Box: 472 Windham Winterport, Folder: 686, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB,
AL.

C12.13 Federal Aviation Administration 1945 U. S. A. (Conus) Airfield Directory, Fact Sheet on Winters Flight Strip, CA, Box 260.277 v. 1, page 260, USAF Historical Research Center, Maxwell AFB, AL. C12.14 Yo10 County Planning Department 1994 Map on Proposed Development Program, Yolo County Airport, Yolo County, CA, Exhibit A, dated December 27, Yolo County Planning Department General Files, Yolo County Planning Department, Woodland, CA. C12.15 Yo10 County Planning Department 1994 Map of Airport Vicinity, Yolo County Airport, Yolo County, CA, dated October, Yolo County Planning Department General Files, Yolo County Planning Department, Woodland, CA. C12.16 Woodland, CA, League of Women Voters 1980 Study of "Know Your County, Yolo County History and Government", dated January, Published by the Woodland, CA, League of Women Voters, Woodland, CA. C12.17 U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis District 1994 Site Fact Sheet on Yolo County Airport, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis District, St. Louis, MO.

APPENDIX D
HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS NOT USED

APPENDIX E
INTERVIEWS

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCRIVES SEARCH REPORT FOR

YOU) COUNTY AIRPORT (FORMERLYWINTER-DAVISFLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIF'ORNLA


DEW-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402 Interviews have been held with a number of individuals who are familiar with past operations at the Yolo County Airport. The following individuals furnished remarks pertinent to potential OEW. Austin Wiswell Yo10 County A q o r t Manager Winters, CA Office: 625 Court Street, Room 203 Woodland, CA 95695 (916) 666-8129 Mr. Wiswell has held the airport manager position for the past 3+ years. He stated the airport was mainly vacant until sometime during the 1960's. Since then the airport has been used by private small aircraft and local cropdusters. To his knowledge there have not been any incidents reported involving munitions at the airport. The County does not have original mapping of the field. He suggested that Mr. Duane Chamberlain, who has farmed the unimproved property on the airport, including the former bomb storage area, since the early 1980's, should be a good contact. His phone number is (916) 662-2620. Mr. Wiswell stated the best site map is available from the Sacramento District, Corps of Engineers office. He was aware of past investigations by the Corps. His perception of the ordnance history from the perspective of a fighter pilot of 23 years is as follows: The field was established in mid-to-late 1942 in response to the threat of a up and down the coast came into existence at the same Japanese Attack. Many time. These were "Dispersal Bases" in the early WW II period; and thus, the flight strip had a very irregular pattern of hard stand, making the facility very hard to hit if under attack. Shortly after it was built (some 3 -6 months later), because of the U. S. success in the Pacific, the threat of attack ceased and Yolo became a base training for B25 Marshall Bombers. Useful live ordnance stored was transferred to areas where it would be put to good use, according to Mr. Wiswell. He speculated that practice bombs with spotting charges were loaded at Winters-Davis Flight Strip, and were then dropped on nearby ranges. He, however, had no records of the range locations. Live HE ordnance was, in his belief, "No longer Present" at the

Mr. Ron Marley Caretaker Yolo County Airport (916) 756-0120


Ron Marley had previously been contacted by personnel from the Sacramento District and the Environmental Department of McClellan AFB. He had discussed Environmental Hazards at Yolo Airport with these agencies and the conversation(s) can be found in backup information to the INPR filed at Sacramento District. One item related to potential OEW contamination, mentioned in records of conversations, various data bases, and other information is that a smoke device (OEW) was found on a farm south of the field and subsequently destroyed by the county. Present discussions centered on this past incident; and his specific experience on the airport proper as caretaker. Ron served in the EOD and, thus, is a good source of knowledge of munitions for his employer. He has stated there are a lot of "rumors about the bomb storage area". However, the has never b n an The field has been dry farmed, and there is a possibility that ordnance could have been dumped there. (In the past he has suggested to environmental officials that perhaps infrared remote sensing or some other technique(s) could be used to verify no OEW remains.

r e

Relative to the incident of a smoke bomb being found in the field south of the airport, he related that a rancher located the practice bomb that surfaced in his field after a 3 to 4 month period of rain, similar to what has been happening lately in California. The device had a white phosphorous content. He was fairly specific that the practice munition probably accidently detached from a WW I1 airplane. He mentioned about a 25 lb. spotting charge was associated with the device and that; because of his past EOD experience, he assisted the county with cleaning up the munition. Pilots flying from Winters-Davis Flight Strip dropped practice bombs with spotting charges, but he had no idea where the practice ranges were located. Other items mentioned by Mr. Marley: During the mid-1980s some concrete debris was busted up. The sheriffs office had practiced with Smoke and Tear Gas on the airport property, but this is unrelated to DOD use of the land during W W 11. Mr. Duane Chamberlain Residence and Business Office 34530 County Road 29 Yolo County, CA (9 16) 662-2620 Mr. Chamberlain was contacted at his home and business office located at 34530 County Road 29, which is about 1 mile west of the N/W corner of airport property. The following are the recollections of the conversation with Mr. Duane Chamberlain. Mr. Chamberlain indicated a long time in the past (20+ years), while farming, he tilled-up what he thought were blue practice bombs. He described these items as being about 5 to 6 inches long, with

fins, and about 2-112 inches in diameter. He briefly searched around his office for a souvenir, but was unable to find one. Based on his description, Mr. Scott Barton and Mr. William K. James, QASAS personnel with the St. Louis Distict, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, decided that Mr. Chamberlain might be describing a miniature practice bomb such as one of the bombs identified in the Miniature 3-pound Mk3, Mk 4, AN-Mk5, and AN-Mk23; or 4.5 pound AN-Mk 43 series (Figure 3). He stated not much evidence remains of the facilities that were once part of the old Winters-Davis Flight Strip. During farming operations his employees still occasionally turn up concrete chucks and they have been instructed to bury them deeper beneath the surface. There was also some debris and junk piled into a number of concrete pits adjacent to taxiways. He speculated that there might be something left in these pits. At the Southeast corner (old bomb storage area) he mentioned there was once an oil road, but his employees broke up the road materials and spread them around with not much being left. He also mentioned that near the Fire Department facility, some concrete chunks remain piled up, and tunnels run beneath the taxiways and runway.

TELEPHONE OR VERBAL CONVERSATION RECORD


SUBJECT OF CONVERSATtON

DATE 01-19-95

Availability of Information on Winters-Davis Flight Strip (Yolo Co. Airport )

1
PERSON CAUJNG ADDRESS

INCOMING CALL PHONE NUMBER AND EXTENSION

PEW"

c-D
-

I
OUTGOING CALL

PHONE NUMBER AND EXTENSION

PERSON CALLING

Ken Brimm
PERSON CALLED

ADDRESS
USACOE/CELMS/PD-R 1222 SPRUCE ST. ST. LOUIS, MO 63103

PHONE NUMBER AND EJCIENSION


014)-331-8797

. Historian
-

OFFICE
McClellan AFB, Sacremento, CA

PHONE NUMBER AND EXTENSION

~ g t Charles Irwin,

(916) 643-6946

SUMMARY OF CONVERSATION:

Mr. Brimm called to find out about the Winters-Davis Flight Strip, Subbase of McClellan AFB during WW 11. He said to call back during the week of 27, and he would know by then if he had information. If he did, January 23 we could then pick it up on our archive visit on January 31.
*Note to Pam, get the rest of this interview from Jerry. others to insert from the site survey trip report.

He may also have

APPENDIX F
NEWSPAPERS/JOURNALS NOT USED

APPENDIX G
PRESENT SITE PHOTOGRAPB

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHNES SEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT FORMERLY WINTER-DAVIS FLIGHT STRIP
Yolo County, California

DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402


APPENDIX G SHEET Sheet G-1 Photo #1 Photo #2 Sheet 6-2 Photo #3 Photo #4 Sheet 6 - 3 Photo #5 Photo #6 Sheet 6-4 Photo #7 Photo #8 Sheet G-5 Photo #9 Photo #10

-- PRESENT SITE PHOTOGRAPHS


DESCRIPTION

Yolo Sportmen's Association - Small Arms Practice Range Mound north of Sportmen's Complex - view toward the northeast View of berm - Sportmen's Association is located beyond berm - view to southwest Former FUDS fire water supply concrete pit Tunnels under runwaydtaxiways turned out to be drainage structures with wing walls View looking west along Aviation Ave. - former bomb storage area located on right side of roadway (cultivated land) View to southwest from unimproved ground in former bomb storage area - depression and loose soil (cultivated land) Loose soil, rocks, and debris in former bomb storage area (surrounded by cultivated land) Berm on east boundary of FUDS (cultivated land) NOTE: Berm is unrelated to F'UDS Hanger facilities (cultivated land) - view to northwest from Aviation Ave.

Photo #1 Yolo Sportmen's Association - small arms practice range

Photo #2 Mound north of Sportmen's Complex - view to northeast

Photo #3 View of berm - Sportmen's Association is located beyond berm - view to southwest

Photo #4 Former FUDS fire water supply concrete pit

Photo #5 Tunnels under runways/taxiways turned out to be drainage structures with wing. walls

Photo #6 View looking west along Aviation Ave. - former bomb storage area located on right side of roadway (cultivated land)
G-3

Photo #7 View to southwest from unimproved ground in former bomb storage area - depression and loose soil (cultivated land)

Photo #8 Loose soil, rocks, and debris in former bomb storage area (surrounded by cultivated land)

Photo #9 Berm on east boundary of FUDS (cultivated land) NOTE: Berm is unrelated to FUDS

Photo #10 Hanger facilities (cultivated land) - view to northwest from Aviation Ave.

APPENDIX H
HISTORICAL MAPSLDRAWINGS NOT USED

APPENDIX I
RISK ASSESflMENT CODE PROCEDURE FORMS

18 Apr 94 Previous editions obsolete

RISK ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE FOR ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE (OEW) SITE Yolo Countv Airport JWinters-Davis Fliaht Strip\ Site Location Yolo County. California DERP Project# J09CA009402 Date Completed 9 March 1995 OEW RISK ASSESSMENT: This risk assessment procedure was developed in accordance with MIL-STD 882C and AR 385-10. The RAC score will be used by CEHND to prioritize the remedial action at Formerly Used Defense Sites. The OEW risk assessment should be based upon best available information resulting from records searches, reports of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) detachment actions, and field observations, interviews, and measurements. This information is used to assess the risk involved based upon the potential OEW hazards identified at the site. The risk assessment is composed of two factors, hazard severity and hazard probability. Personnel involved in visits to potential OEW sites should view the CEHND videotape entitled "A Life Threatening Encounter, OEW." Part I. Hazard Severity. Hazard severity categories are defined to provide a qualitative measure of the worst credible mishap resulting from personnel exposure to various types and quantities of unexploded ordnance items. TYPE OF ORDNANCE (Circle all values that apply) A. Conventional Ordnance and Ammunition
VALUE

Site Name

Rater's Name Phone No. Organization RAC score

Gerald V. Schwalbe 314-331-8788 CELMS-PM-M 4

Medium/Large Caliber (20mm and larger) Bombs, Explosive Grenades, Hand and Rifle, Explosive Landmines, Explosive Rockets, Guided Missiles, Explosive Detonators, Blasting Caps, Fuzes, Boosters, Bursters Bombs, Practice (w/spotting charges) Grenades, Practice (w/spotting charges) Landmines, Practice (w/spotting charges) Small Arms (.22 cal

10 10 10 10 10

4 4
1

.50 cal)

Conventional Ordnance and Ammunition (Select the laraest sinale value1 What evidence do you have regarding conventional OEW? Within the last 1520 veara. Mr. Duane Chamberlain reD0rted his farm eauiment turned up miniature 3 or 4.5 ~racticebombs while ~lantinaundevelo~ed around on the airport. These practice munitions were painted blue.

B.

Pyrotechnics (For munitions not described above)

VALUE
Munition (Container) containing White Phosphorus or other Pyrophoric Material (i.e., Spontaneously Flammable) Munitions Containing A Flame or Incendiary Material (i.e., Napalm, Triethylaluminum Metal Incendiaries) Flares, Signals, Simulators, Screening Smokes (other than UP) Pyrotechnics /Select the laraest sinale value1 10

What evidence do you have regarding pyrotechnics? None C. Bulk High Explosives uncontainerized )

(Not an integral part of conventional ordnance;


VAtUE

Primary or Initiating Explosives (Lead Styphnate, Lead Azide, Nitroglycerin, Mercury Azide, Mercury Fulminate, Tetracene, etc.) Demolition Charges Secondary Explosives (PETN, Compositions A, B, C Tetryl, TNT, RDX, HMX, HBX, Black Powder, etc.) Military Dynamite Less Sensitive Explosives (Ammonium Nitrate, Explosive D l etc.) High Explosives (Select the laraest sinale value)
0

What evidence do you have regarding bulk explosives? None, there have been no incidents of HE OEW ever beina encountered on the Yolo County Airport. D. Bulk Propellants (Not an integral part of rockets, guided missiles, or other conventional ordnance; uncontainerized) VALUE Solid of Liquid Propellants Propellants
6
0

What evidence do you have regarding bulk propellants? The FUDS is a commercial airfield and fuel is stored on the site by Yolo County. Some fuel lines datina from WW I1 remain beneath the around surface, taxiways. and runways. DOD era fuel tanks have been removed. RAC Worksheet

Page 2

E.

Chemical Warfare Material and Radiological Weapons VALUE Toxic Chemical Agents (Choking, Nerve, Blood, Blister) War Gas Identification sets Radiological Riot Control Agents (Vomiting, Tear ) Chemical and Radiological Agents (Select the laraest sinale value1 What evidence do you have of chemical/radiologica1 OEW? none

Total Hazard Severity Value (Sum of the Largest Values for A through E--Maximum of 61). 6 Apply this value t o Table 1 t o determine Hazard Severity Category. TABLE 1

CATASTROPHIC

21 and greater

~~~
CRITICAL NEGLIGIBLE

Apply Hazard Severity Category to Table 3

**If Hazard Severity Value is 0, you do not need to complete Part 11. Proceed to Part I11 and use a RAC Score of 5 to determine your appropriate action.

RAC

Worksheet

Page 3

P a r t 11. Hazard Probabilitv. The p r o b a b i l i t y t h a t a hazard has been o r w i l l be created due t o t h e presence and o t h e r r a t e d f a c t o r s of unexploded ordnance o r explosive m a t e r i a l s on a formerly used DOD s i t e .
AREA,
A.

EXTENT, ACCESSIBILITY OF OEW HAZARD ( C i r c l e a l l values t h a t apply)

Location of OEW Hazards


VALUE

O n t h e surface Within Tanks, Pipes, Vessels o r Other confined l o c a t i o n s I n s i d e walls, c e i l i n g s , o r other p a r t s of Buildings and S t r u c t u r e s Subsurface Location J S e l e c t t h e s i n a l e l a r a e s t value1

What evidence do you have regarding l o c a t i o n of OEW? Past farm operations have uncovered a number of miniature p r a c t i c e bombs near former bomb s t o r a a e area.
B.

Distance t o n e a r e s t inhabited l o c a t i o n s o r s t r u c t u r e s l i k e l y t o be a t r i s k from OEW hazard (roads, parks, playgrounds, and b u i l d i n g s ) . VALUE Less than 1250 f e e t 1250 f e e t t o 0.5 m i l e s 0.5 m i l e s t o 1.0 m i l e s 1.0 miles t o 2.0 miles Over 2 miles Distance ( S e l e c t t h e s i n a l e l a r g e s t value)

0
4

2 1

What a r e t h e n e a r e s t inhabited s t r u c t u r e s ? Nearbv a r e residences and t h e normal commercial and r e c r e a t i o n a l business and s u ~ w r f t a c i l i t i e s associated with a i r ~ o r t use. The nearest residence i a a farm residence located within about 200 f e e t of t h e o r i a i n a l bomb s t o r a a e area south boundarv.

RAC Worksheet

Page 4

C. Numbers of buildings within a 2 mile radius measured from the OEW hazard area, not the installation boundary. VALUE 26 and over

Number of Buildings (Select the sinale laraest value) Narrative The immediate area has farms, residences. and airport facilities and businesses. D. Types of Buildings (within a 2 mile radius)
VALUE

Educational, Child Care, Residential, Hospitals, Hotels, Commercial, Shopping Centers Industrial, Warehouse, etc. Agricultural, Forestry, etc. Detention, Correctional No Buildings Types of Buildings (Select the laraest sinale value)
4
3

2
0

5
The

Describe types of buildings in the area. Residential, Commercial, Industrial, and Aaricultural all are within 2 mile radius of the airport. City of Davis boundarv is within 2 miles.

RAC Worksheet

Page 5

E. Accessibility to site refers to access by humans to ordnance and explosive wastes. Use the fol.lowing guidance: BARRIER No barrier or security system Barrier is incomplete (e.g. in disrepair or does not completely surround the site). Barrier is intended to deny egress from the site, as for a barbed wire fence for grazing.
VALUE

A barrier, (any kind of fence in good repair) but no separate means to control entry. Barrier is intended to deny access to the site.
Security guard, but no barrier Isolated site

0
1

A 24-hour surveillance system (e-g., television monitoring or surveillance by guards or facility personnel) which continuously monitors and controls entry onto the facility; or An artificial or natural barrier (e-g., a fence combined with a cliff), which completely surrounds the facility; and a means to control entry, at all times, through the gates, or other entrances to the facility (e.g., an attendant, television monitors, locked entrances, or controlled roadway access to the facility).
Acceaaibility (Select the sinale laraest value) Des~cribethe site accessibility. Althoucrh the site has some limited eecuritv, it is easilv accessed bv the public.

F. Site Dynamics - This deals with site conditions that are subject to change in the future, but may be stable at the present. Examples would be excessive soil erosion by beaches or streams, increasing land development that could reduce distances from the site to inhabited areas or otherwise increase accessibility.
VALUE

Expected None Anticipated Site Dynamics (Select laruest value)

Describe the site dynamics. A zero value is assianed, but periodic ex~ansionand develoment of airport support facilities and commercial on this FUDS. businesses would be ex-cted

RAC

Worksheet

- Page 6

-------.----------------------------------------------------------------------..............................................................................
Total Hazard Probability Value (Sum of Largest Values for A through F--Maximum of 30)
Apply t h i s value ,to Hazard Probability Table 2 t o determine Hazard Probability Level.

19

TABLE 2
HAZARD PROBABILITY
-------,-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Description

Leve 1 A

Hazard Probability Value


27 or greater

FREQUENT
PROBABLE

REMOTE IMPROBABLE E less than 8

Apply Hazard Probability Level t o Table 3 .

RAC Worksheet

Page 7

Part 111. Risk Assessment. The risk assessment value for this site is determined using the following Table 3 . Enter with the results of the hazard probability and hazard severity values. TABLE 3 Probability Level Severity Category : CATASTROPHIC CRITICAL I II

1 2

2
3

~~~i
NEGLIGIBLE IV

a
4

4 4
5

5 5

RISK ASSESSMENT CODE (RAC) RAC 1 RAC 2 RAC 3 RAC: 4 RAC 5 Part IV'. Expedite INPR Immediately call CEHND-ED-SY-Imminent Hazard commercial (205) 955-4968 or DSN 645-4968 High priority on completion of INPR by CEHND. Complete INPR Complete INPR

Recommend further action

Recommend further action by CEHND. Recommend further action by CEHND. Submit NOFA and RAC to CEHND.

Recommend no further action. Narrativq.

..............................................................................
-------,------------,-----------------------------------------------------------

Summarize the documented evidence that supports this risk assessment. If no documented evidence was available, explain all the assumptions that you made.

A hiah priority should not be assianed to further OEW remedial action on this FUDS. Conditions ~ermittina, and assumina availabilitv of fundina, it would

probab1.v be ap~ropriateto perform maunometer sweep investiuations: or other around penetratina survevs (infrared thermoaravhv, sonar, etc.) in the area of the former bomb storaae area. Althouah none have been found in manv years,

practice munitions have previouslv been uncovered durina farmina operations. This survev would be a~pro~riate, ~articularlvif U ~ O U D with ~ ~ a number of other next phase investiaations. potential OEW hazard.
RAC Worksheet

Local official have no real concern for the

- Page 8

APPENDIX J
REPORT DISTRIBUTION LIST

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHIVES SEARCH REPORT FOR YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (FORMERLYWINTER-DAVISFLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY,CALWRNIA DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009402
APPENDIX J

- REPORT DISTRIBUTION LIST


No. of

Addressee: Co~ies: Commander, U. S. Army Engineer Division Huntsville, ATIN: CEHND-ED-SY-A P.O. Box 1600 Huntsville, Alabama 35807-4301 Commander, U. S. Army Chemical Materiel Destruction Agency Attn: SFIL-NSM, Bldg. E4585 Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 2 1010 Commander, U S , Army Chemical & Biological Defense Command Attn: AMSCB-CIH, Bldg. E5 183 Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5423 U.S. Army Technical Center for Explosives Safety Attn: SMCAC-ESh4 Savanna, IL 61074-9639 Commander, Corps of Engineers - Sacramento District 1325 J Street A t t n : CESPK-ED-M Sacramento, CA 95814-2922 CELMS-ED-G CELMS-ED-H CELMS-PD-A CELMS-PM-M

Appendices J- 1

APPENDIX K
ARCMlVE ADDRESSES

ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVE WASTE CHEMICAL WARFARE MATERIALS ARCHNES SEARCH REPORT FOR

YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT (FORMERLYWINTER-DAVISFLIGHT STRIP) YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA


DERP-FUDS PROJECT NO. J09CA009401

APPENDIX K - ARCHIVE ADDRESSES


1. National Archives And Records Administration. D.C. Branch Eighth and Pennsylvania Washington D. C. 20408

2. National Archives And Records Administration. Suitland Branch 4205 Suitland Road Suitland, MD 20409

3. Washington National Records Center 4205 Suitland Road Suitland, MD 20409


4. National Archives And Records Administration. College Park Branch 8601 Adelphi 'Road College Park, MD 20740

5. National Personnel Records Center Military Records 9700 Page Avenue St. Louis, MO 63132
6. Chemical and Biological Defense Agency Historical Office AMSCB-CIH Aberdeen Proving Ground Edgewood, MD 21010

7. U.S. Air Force Historical Center Bldg . 1405, Chennault Circle Maxwell AFB, AL 36112
Appendices K- 1

8. National Archives And Records Administration-Pacific Sierra Region 1000 Commodore Drive San Bruno, CA 94066

9. Sacramento H ~ S ~ O Center N Sacramento, CA 95814


10. California State Library California Section 9th and Capitol Mall Sacramento, C.A 95809 11. California State Archives 201 N. Sunrise: Avenue Roseville, CA 12. University of California. Berkeley Main Library Berkeley, CA 94704 13. Universitv of California. Berkeley Bancroft Library Berkeley, CA 94704 14. Sacramento Public Library Sacramento, CA 95809 15. Universitv of California. Sacramento Main Library Sacramento, CA 95809 16. Woodland Public L i b r a ~ Woodland, CA 95695
17. Universitv of California. Davis Main Library Davis, CA 95616

18. Yolo Countv Public Library Davis, CA 95616

19. Yolo Countv Archives Woodland, CA 95695 20. Yolo County Planning; Department Woodland, CA 95695
Appendices K- 2

SITE SURVEY SUMMARY SHEET FOR DERP-FUDS SITE NO. J09CA009400 YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT SITE NAME: Yolo County Auport. The site was formally known as the Winters-Davis Flight Strip and the Yolo County International Air Port. LOCATION: The site is located in Yolo County, CA approximately 8 miles northwest of downtown Davis, California. More specifically it is located between county roads 95 and 96 running north south and roads 29 and 31 running east west. See location and vicinity maps at attachments 1 and 2. SITE HISTORY: Between 1942 and 1943 the U.S. Government acquired by declaration of taking 308.57 acres and by transfer 201.58 acres, for a total of 510.15 acres, for use as a flight smp to provide alternate basing for B25 aircraft normally located at McClellan Air Force Base. Site improvements included a runway, taxiways, two aircraft fueling areas, an operations area, control tower, bomb storage area, and housing area. In 1946, the use permit for 201.58 acres was relinquished to the Public Roads Administration (PRA) and the remaining 308.57 acres transferred to the War Assets Administration (WAA). In 1948 the WAA transferred 294.40 acres, along with the 201.58 acres from the PRA, to the County of Yolo for use as an airport. The remaining 14.17 acres horn the WAA reverted to the original owners. SITE VISIT: a. On 26 Jan 87, Mr. Kent R Westover from the Sacramento Dismct visited the site to assess the current conditions and met with the following persons: Director of Parks, Museum and Grounds Mr. Earl Balch County of Yolo 625 Court St., Room B-03 Woodland, CA 95695 (916) 666-8115
Mr. Ron Marley
Caretaker, Yolo County Airport, CA (916) 756-0120

b. On 27 Mar 87, Mr. Westover and Mr. Marley met with on site with Mr. Lamy Curtis, of Curits & Associates, concerning the disposition of underground storage tanks. Curtis & Associates Mr. Lamy Curits P.O. Box 924 Woodland, CA 95695 (916) 753-4950 c. On 23 May 91, Ms. Sharon Bruno met on site with Messrs. Earl Balch, Ron Marley and Frank Hildebrand, Managing Partner, Yolo Aviation.

The site has experienced considerable development since the initial site visits in 1987. Messrs. Marley and Hildebrand reported both of that the two original 25,000 gal underground storage tanks,along with a new 10,000 gal tank, have been removed from the airport. Further, one smoke device (OEW) was found on a farm south of the airport and was destroyed by the County. The bomb storage area at the south end of the field is essentially under cultivation, except for a strip of ground covered by trees. Among the trees is a ridge of earth, approximately 5 feet high, strewn with concrete rubble. No intact structures were visible. CATEGORY OF HAZARDS: CON/HTW, OEW PROJECT DESCRIPTION: -CON/HTW: Removal of underground piping and ~ 0 ~ e c t f e i l l d stands and fueling pit boxes at 4 locations. Test sites where tanks have been previously removed. --OEW.: There are 16 known locations for either Bomb Storage Revetments or Fuse Storage Magazines. AVAILABLE STUDIES AND REPORTS: None PA POC: Larry M. Bergmooser, CESPK-ED-M, 916/557-7671

FINDISCS AND DETERMINATION OF ELIGIBILITY YOLO COUNTY AlRPORT YOLO, CALIFORNIA SITE NO. J09CA009400

FINDIYGS OF FACT
1. By use permit from the U.S. Public Roads Administration, dated 3 November 1943, 201.58 acres were transferred to the War Department. An additional 308.57 acres in total were acquired by the War Department by Declaration of Taking between 1942 and 1943, for a total 510.15 acres. 2. The site was used as a flight smp to provide alternate basing for B25 aircraft normally located at McClellan Air Force Base. Site improvements included a runway, taxiways, two aircraft fueling areas, an operations area, control tower, bomb storage area, and housing area. 3. The use permit for 201.58 acres was relinquished to the Public Roads Administration (PR4) on 12 April 1946. The remaining 308.57 acres transferred to the War Assets Admnistration (WAA) on 2 1 September 1946. A total of 294.40 acres were transferred by quitclaim deed from the WAA on 13 June- 1948, along with the 201.58 acres from the PR4, to the County of Yolo for use as an airport. The remaining 14.17 acres from the WAA reverted to the original owners, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Reardon. The quitclaim deed includes a recapture clause. The 495.98 acre site is currently owned by the County of Yolo and ualized as the Yolo County Airport. The 14.17 acre portion of the site is owned by St. Mary's College and used for agriculture.

DETERMINATION
Based on the foregoing findmgs of fact, the site has been determined to be formerly used by the DOD. Therefore, it is eligible for the Program for Formerly Used Defense Sites, established under 10 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.

9 D-t 1
Date Brigadier General, U.S.A m y Cornmanding

STATE INDEX

CONTOUR INTERVAL 5 FEET

VICINITY
0

MAP
. --.

SCALE\rr MILLS
F=
b \

4-3

STATE INDEX

1
F -

loo0

4 - - ,
5

SCALE l:24000
o
1 MILE 1
1 4 I I[lUHIETCR

c-1

1 3 0 0 X X X ) Y R O r O Q ) U X X ) 6 0 4 ) m m

CONTOUR INTERVAL 5 FEET

VICINITY

MAP

LAYOUT

PLAN

Sea\. I-. foe'

Figure 1 Regional Map

Yolo County Airport

Figure 2 - Site Location Map

5
RIFLE RANGE

BALLOON LAUNCH AREA

AIRPORT MANAGER TE

CROP DUSTER LANDING AREA

/
LlLLARD HALL FIRE STATION

COUNTY ROAD 95

FlRE STATION CARETAKER QUARTERS LIGHTED SIREN TOWER

YOLO C O U N N AIRPORT

FIGURE 3- YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT, YOLO COUNTY. CALIFORNIA

Z
GRAPHIC SCALE 500'

1000'

PARKING AREA

25.000 GALLON UST

(PREVIOUSLY REMOVED)
NATIVE SOlL (DIRT)

WOODLAND AVIATION INC.

POST *
I

FUEL LINES (NPICAL)


CONCRm ENTRANCE ROAD

CONCRETE SEE NOTE 1

ELECTRICAL SEWER MANHOLES

y - r

I I
GRASS AREA

CONCRETE APRON

CONCRETE

SEE NOTE 1

BE REMOVED

NATIVE SOlL (DIRT)

NATIVE SOlL (DIRT)

NOTE 1: PIPING UNDER CONCRETE TO BE

TAXIWAY

CLOSED IN PLACE

AMENDMENT
'

91

20'

I I I I

40' I

60'

GRAPHIC SCALE: 1" =60' 120' 180'

240'

300'

1
FIGURE 4-

1
SOUTH END OF AIRPORT WOODLAND AVIATION BUILDING

CONCRETE

CONCRETE CONCRETE

BEHIND HANGAR STOCKPILE OF SOll AND REMOVED 4-INCH PIPING

'ONCRETE FUEL DISPENSING

4-INCH UNDERGROUND
(TYPICAL)

-SEE NOTE 1

4
FUEL PlTS 4'6" x 7'4") BE REMOVED

i
SEE NOTE 1 .

-------=PRNIOUSLY REMOVED PIPING FUEL PlTS TO BE REMOVED (4'6" x 7'4") UNDERGROUND FUEL LINES

NATIVE SOIL (DIRT)

NOTE 1: PIPING UNDER CONCRETE TO BE CLOSED IN PLACE

-z

GRAPHIC SCALE: 1" =60'


40'
I

TAXIWAY
240'
I

AMENDMENT
3?0'
I

81
R T

TAXIWAY

0'

20'

60'
I

120'
I

180'
I

I I I I I

PRESTAR BUILDING

... -.

..

"::

'!

t?,),'
TWRR

mmaw

YOLO COUNTY

-3
STATE' INDEX

4:

CAUTICN-

'r.,,,

, ;si .,;-.

:-

SEC. 33 B 3 4 , T . 9 N . , R . 1 E . , M . D . B . B M .

..

,Q

I..

Yolo County Airport


Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) Site No. J09CA0094

I
.

Site Area

U.J.

Army Corps of Engineers

Public FUDS GIs Property Location Check Sheet

To: GERALD VINCENT J09CA0094


YOLO COUNTY AIRPORT
Latitude

3 8 O 35' 56" N
51' 46" W

Longitude 121

Location of FUDS propeny accurate Updated Property Coordinates have been entered into FUDSMIS