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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Wednesday April 10, 2013 Vol XII, Edition 202


LANDMARK BILL
NATION PAGE 8
MILLS BEATS
EL CAMINO
SPORTS PAGE 11
4 A.M. LAST CALL
BILL FUELS TALKS
FOOD PAGE 19
TENTATIVE FARM WORKERS DEAL IN IMMIGRATION
TALKS
Stubborn Fat?
Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Dr. Carie Chui, M.D.
ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER
280 Baldwin Ave. Downtown San Mateo
(650)344-1121
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Three members on the Coastside
Fire Protection District board will
be booted from ofce after a land-
slide recall election last night, if
early election results hold up.
Directors Doug Mackintosh,
Mike Alifano and Gary Riddell will
be replaced on
the board by
three new mem-
bers who chal-
lenged their
decision last
year to re-estab-
lish a stand-
alone fire
department on
the coast and
ditch a ve-year
relationship with
Cal Fire, the
C a l i f o r n i a
Department of
Forestry and
Fire Protection.
The Keep
Cal Fire propo-
nents will quick-
ly move to nego-
tiate a new con-
tract with the
state agency as it
is set to expire at
the end of June,
Harvey Rarback
told the Daily
Journal last
night after it became clear the vast
majority of voters supported the
recall about 65 percent.
Karen Anderson is set to replace
Alifano on the board; J.B. Cockrell
will replace Mackintosh; and
Rarback will replace Riddell. Only
Rarback had a challenger to replace
Riddell, Lee McKusick, who was
Recall looks like landslide
Early results indicate three on Coastside Fire Protection District board will be ousted
Harvey Rarback
Drone wars?
Not really
Online article with wrong
information stirs debate
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The drones are coming, the drones are coming!
If you saw an article posted online Monday by NBC Bay
Area, as a local mayor did, you may have gotten the idea that
the San Mateo County Sheriffs Ofce was ready to start
patrolling the skies with unmanned aerial surveillance vehicles
or drones.
After San Mateo Mayor David Lim read
the article online, that attributed the
Oakland Tribune as the source, he immedi-
ately reached out to his own police chief
for details and eventually sent Sheriff Greg
Munks an email saying how dismayed he
was to rst read about the plan to use
drones locally in the media and not direct-
ly from county ofcials.
Munks quickly responded to Lim, how-
ever, assuring him there will be no drones patrolling local
skies at least not any time soon.
The NBC Bay Area article, written by Chris Roberts, that
caused all the confusion Monday contained the following
information:
Drones ying the friendly skies above the Bay Area is
about to become a real thing.
While law enforcement agencies in the East Bay and in San
Francisco dropped requests for drones for several reasons, San
Mateo has gone ahead with plans to buy an unmanned aerial
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Belmont Councilwoman Coralin
Feierbach announced at last
nights City Council meeting that
she has approached ofcials
with Crystal Springs Uplands
School to ask them to consider
resubmitting an application to
build a new middle school on
Davis Drive that was shot down,
3-2, in October when the
council said it was not
appropriate to amend the citys
general plan. CSUS had
previously wanted to purchase
an ofce building on 6-8 and 10
Davis Drive (above) that it was
leasing, demolish it and build a
new school campus with a
turfed athletic eld and one day
a pool. Left is a rendering of the
proposed school.
SEE FULL STORY PAGE 8
BACK ON THE TABLE?
Greg Munks
See DRONE, Page 16
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo Countys high school graduation
and dropout rates took a small dip this year but
overall remain higher than the state average,
according to numbers released by the
California Department of Education Tuesday.
Californias graduating class of 2012 had a
78.5 percent graduation rate and a 13.2 per-
cent dropout rate. Compared to last year, San
Mateo County took a slight dip in graduation
rates from 83.7 percent to 83.3 percent.
Similarly, it saw a slight increase in dropouts
from 10.5 percent to 11 percent, though San
Mateo Union High School District ofcials
Small dip for county grad rates
Disagreement on one schools numbers may change data
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The countys former chief probation ofcer
is headed straight to trial for allegedly pos-
sessing child pornography after waiving a pre-
liminary hearing on evidence prosecutors say
prove he was keeping illicit images on his per-
sonal computers.
The decision Tuesday by Stuart James
Forrest, 61, to forgo a judges evaluation of the
prosecutions case avoids a
public airing of the possi-
ble evidence against him
for its sufciency but also
propels him directly to
Superior Court on two
counts of felony posses-
sion of images of minors
exposing their genitals or
Former probation chief to trial for child porn
Stuart Forrest
See FORREST, Page 20 See RATES, Page 16
Karen Anderson J.B. Cockrell
See ELECTION, Page 18
www.smdailyjournal.com
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Steven
Seagal is 62.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1963
The fast-attack nuclear submarine USS
Thresher (SSN-593) sank during deep-
diving tests east of Cape Cod, Mass., in
a disaster that claimed 129 lives.
All fantasy should
have a solid base in reality.
Max Beerbohm, English critic and essayist (1872-1956)
Sportscaster John
Madden is 77.
Actor Haley Joel
Osment is 25.
Birthdays
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
North winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the
lower 60s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 40s.
Saturday through Sunday night: Partly cloudy. Breezy.
Highs around 60. Lows in the mid 40s.
Monday...Sunny. Highs around 60.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 05
California Classic in rst place; No. 07 Eureka in
second place; and No. 12 Lucky Charms in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:42.09.
(Answers tomorrow)
WEARY MILKY HUDDLE PLURAL
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: The pitchers son loved it when his father
WALKED HIM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CHEFT
TREEX
LOYPIC
BAYTUE
2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Ans:
1 0 4
17 30 41 48 54 13
Mega number
April 9 Mega Millions
Powerball
First drawing today Powerball
3 30 31 32 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 4 3 5
Daily Four
1 8 7
Daily three evening
In 1790, President George Washington signed into law the rst
United States Patent Act.
In 1866, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals was incorporated.
In 1912, the RMS Titanic set sail from Southampton, England,
on its ill-fated maiden voyage.
In 1925, the novel The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald,
was rst published.
In 1932, German president Paul Von Hindenburg was re-elected
in a runoff, with Adolf Hitler coming in second.
In 1947, Brooklyn Dodgers president Branch Rickey purchased
the contract of Jackie Robinson from the Montreal Royals.
In 1953, the 3-D horror movie House of Wax, produced by
Warner Bros. and starring Vincent Price, premiered in New York.
In 1957, Egypt reopened the Suez Canal to all shipping trafc.
(The canal had been closed due to wreckage resulting from the
Suez Crisis.)
In 1962, United States Steel Chairman Roger Blough informed
President John F. Kennedy of his companys decision to raise
steel prices an average of $6 a ton. (Under administration pres-
sure, Blough changed his mind.)
In 1974, Golda Meir told party leaders she was resigning as
prime minister of Israel.
In 1998, the Northern Ireland peace talks concluded as negotia-
tors reached a landmark settlement to end 30 years of bitter rival-
ries and bloody attacks.
In 2010, Polish President Lech Kaczynski, 60, was killed in a
plane crash in western Russia that also claimed the lives of his
wife and top Polish political, military and church ofcials.
Ten years ago: Iraqi television aired videotaped greetings from
President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony
Blair. Congress overwhelmingly passed a package of child safe-
ty protections, including a national Amber Alert network.
Actor Max von Sydow is 84. Actress Liz Sheridan is 84. Actor
Omar Sharif is 81. Reggae artist Bunny Wailer is 66. Folk-pop
singer Terre Roche (The Roches) is 60. Actor Peter MacNicol is 59.
Rock musician Steven Gustafson (10,000 Maniacs) is 56. Singer-
producer Kenneth Babyface Edmonds is 55. Rock singer-musi-
cian Brian Setzer is 54. Rapper Afrika Bambaataa is 53. Rock
singer Katrina Leskanich is 53. Actor Jeb Adams is 52. Olympic
gold medal speedskater Cathy Turner is 51. Rock musician Tim
Herb Alexander is 48. Rock musician Mike Mushok (Staind) is
44. Singer Kenny Lattimore is 43. Rapper Q-Tip (AKA Kamaal) is
43. Blues singer Shemekia Copeland is 34.
Scientist Barry Allen was struck by light-
ning while working in his lab. He was
splashed with chemicals that gave him
super-speed. He became The Flash.
***
An ongoing question about who was faster
Superman or The Flash was solved
in the 1970 DC Comic Book No. 198. In
that issue, Superman and The Flash raced
around the universe. Flash won.
***
The Silver Surfer absorbs life-maintaining
cosmic energy directly through his silver
skin. He does not need to eat, breathe or
sleep.
***
Bodybuilder Lou Ferrigno (born 1952)
stands 6 feet 5 inches tall and weighed 300
pounds when he starred as the Hulk on the
television show The Incredible Hulk
(1978-1982).
***
Aquaman was abandoned as a baby. He
was born with blonde hair, which was
believed to signify the Curse of Kordax.
The baby was rescued and raised by a
lighthouse keeper.
***
Many actors have portrayed Batman on
the big screen. Lewis Wilson (1920-2000)
starred in the 1943 movie The Batman.
The Caped Crusader has been played by
Michael Keaton (born 1951) in Batman
(1989) and Batman Returns (1992), Val
Kilmer (born 1959) in Batman Forever
(1995), George Clooney (born 1961) in
Batman and Robin (1997), and
Christian Bale (born 1974) in Batman
Begins (2005) and The Dark Knight
(2008) (born 1974).
***
Supermans alter-ego works for a newspa-
per. So does Spidermans and the Green
Hornets. Can you name the superheroes
secret identities and the newspapers they
work for? See answer at end.
***
When radio reporter Billy Batson shouted
SHAZAM!, he became Captain Marvel,
a superhero with the powers of several
Roman gods.
***
The Green Hornet debuted in a 1936 radio
series on WXYZ radio in Detroit. The
radio program ran until 1952.
***
The Atom, also known as the Mighty
Mite, can shrink himself and his clothing
to microscopic size.
***
Psychologist William Moulton Marston
(1893-1947) created Wonder Woman. He
also invented an early form of the lie
detector polygraph test.
***
Douglas Fairbanks Sr. (1883-1939) starred
as the swashbuckling hero in the 1920
silent lm The Mark of Zorro. The same
year, he married Hollywood sweetheart
Mary Pickford (1892-1979). The famous
couple was regarded as Hollywood
Royalty.
***
Filmmaker George Lucas (born 1944)
wanted to remake the Flash Gordon movie
serials from the 1930s into a feature length
movie. The rights to the comic book char-
acter were not available, so he went on to
make Star Wars (1977) which had many
inuences from Flash Gordon.
***
The original Doom Patrol was made up of
Robotman (a human brain in a robotic
body), Negative Man (he had a radioactive
body) and Elasti-Girl (she could grow and
shrink). They were led by The Chief, a
genius paraplegic that protected the inno-
cent with his team of crime ghters.
***
The Doom Patrol series ended very dra-
matically. The team was killed off in a
1968 comic book.
***
Captain America was a patriotic superhero
during World War II. His usual enemies
were Nazis and Japanese troops.
***
The Ant-Mans girlfriend was The Wasp.
***
Answer: Clark Kent, Supermans alter-
ego, works as a reporter at the Daily
Planet. Peter Parker works as a photogra-
pher for the Daily Bugle and sells pictures
of himself as Spiderman to the paper. Britt
Reid is the newspaper publisher of the
Daily Sentinel by day and crime ghter
Green Hornet at night.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
20 21 32 37 41 22
Mega number
April 6 Super Lotto Plus
REUTERS
People participate in a ash mob pillow ght during Pillow Fight Day in Brazil.
3
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event
to help you thrive in 2013
ATTENTION:
Small Business Resource Fair
Tuesday, April 30 9 am to 1 pm
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
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Network with other business
professionals in various industries
Meet representatives from companies that
cater to your business and personal needs
Free FOR OUR FIRST
200 ATTENDEES.
If you would like to be a presenter or vendor at this event,
please call 650-344-5200 x 121 or email info@smdailyjournal.com
Attend a schedule of helpful,
informative business seminars on various topics
that will help you grow your business.
REGISTER TODAY AT:
smallbusinessresourcefair.eventbrite.com
Or call 650-344-5200 x 121
for more information
Continental breakfast will be provided
MORE seminars will be added!!!
FOSTER CITY
Arrest. A man was arrested for shoplifting on Metro Center
Boulevard before 5:50 p.m. on Sunday, April 7.
Arrest. A person was arrested for driving under the inuence
on Shell Boulevard before 3:16 a.m. on Sunday, April 7.
Disturbance. A person complained of loud music from an
exercise class on Edgewater Boulevard before 8:23 a.m. on
Saturday, April 6.
Suspicious persons. Three men were seen riding bicycles
while looking into vehicles on Rock Harbor Lane before 10
p.m. on Friday, April 5.
Suspicious persons. A man and woman were seen drinking
and smoking in a vehicle on San Miguel Lane before 5:55 p.m.
on Friday, April 5.
Fraud. More than $2,000 was taken through the fraudulent use
of a credit card on Metro Center Boulevard before 3:14 p.m. on
Friday, April 5.
Grand theft. Four packages delivered by UPS were stolen
from a womans porch on Avalon Avenue before 1:24 p.m. on
Friday, April 5.
SAN CARLOS
Arrest. A person was arrested for being in possession of a con-
trolled substance on the 1100 block of Industrial Road before
1:31 p.m. on Sunday, April 7.
Hit-and-run. A hit-and-run accident occurred on the 1200
block of El Camino Real before 6:24 p.m. on Friday, April 5.
Arrest. A man was arrested for brandishing a weapon on the
1500 block of Walnut Street before 4 p.m. on Friday, April 5.
Burglary. Two vehicles were burglarized on the 600 block of
El Camino Real before 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 4.
Arrest. A man was arrested for an outstanding warrant on the
1100 block of Holly Street before 11:36 a.m. on Thursday,
April 4.
Drugs. A San Carlos man was arrested for possession of a con-
trolled substance at the intersection of Cedar Street and
Belmont Avenue before 10:49 p.m. Sunday, March 31.
Police reports
Just a little drive
A 6-year-old was seen driving a vehicle with an adult in
the passenger seat on Edgewater Boulevard in San Carlos
before 9:36 a.m. on Wednesday, April 3.
STATE GOVERNMENT
A bill to encourage use of the
California Whistleblower
Protection Act passed the
Assembly Judiciary Committee
this week.
The act establishes a process for
state employees to report improper
governmental activities or make anonymous tips to the
State Auditor about government waste, fraud or abuse.
The act also prohibits retaliation or reprisal against a state
employee or member of the public for ling such a report.
The bill, authored by Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-
South San Francisco, seeks to promote awareness of this
process and the protections provided to whistleblowers to
both state employees and the public. Even though the pub-
lic may le such complaints, they are generally not made
aware of the existence of the whistleblower program
through the most visited state websites, according to
Mullins ofce.
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
The Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to com-
mit funds from the now-dissolved redevelopment agencies
back into affordable housing. The RDAs were required to
put 20 percent of their gross tax-increment revenue into a
low-moderate housing fund but the money reverted to the
county after the state dissolved the RDAs. For San Mateo
County, that includes $58.9 million in LMHF money plus
$10.2 million currently in dispute. The money will now be
used to construct or renovate housing or contribute to hous-
ing projects in cities that lost RDA funding.
CITY GOVERNMENT
The Redwood City Council on Monday approved allo-
cating $450,000 in federal grant funds toward buying a
special needs affordable housing unit by the nonprot
Kainos Home and Training Center. The home will help
those with development disabilities by providing shelter
and staff who help with daily activities.
The San Carlos City Council Monday approved 4-1,
with Matt Grocott dissenting, to sell Wheeler Plaza to
developer Silverstone Communities for $1. The eventual
mixed-use project is estimated to bring in 17 percent to 27
percent more in revenue to the city, county and schools
through property taxes along with more than $600,000 in
one-time school impact fees.
The purchase includes a residential building on Walnut
Street, a business on San Carlos Avenue and a piece of the
Wheeler Plaza parking lot. In return for the purchase, along
with the revenue, the city will also get a 237-space parking
garage and housing ofcials hope it will draw people to
downtown living. The plan next goes to the oversight board
for review April 30.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
To the greater community, William H.
Royer was a man with a long list of
accomplishments in politics, sports and
real estate.
Royer was a Republican congressman
elected in 1979 after the assassination of
Leo J. Ryan at Jonestown, was also
twice mayor of Redwood City between
1950 and 1966 and two-term county
supervisor elected in 1972 and 1976.
But for Jim Hartnett, Royers nephew
and godson, and former Redwood City
mayor, Royer was mostly a man with a
love for life, family and community.
Royer died April 8, 2013, three days
shy of his 93rd birthday, of natural caus-
es. He was the 15th oldest surviving for-
mer member of the U.S. House of
Representatives.
It was a long and full life, Hartnett
said.
Royer was preceded in death by his
wife of 69 years, Shirley. He is survived
by sons, Dennis and Peter, and bunch-
es of grandchildren and great-grand-
children, Hartnett said.
Even in his last
months, Royer was
sharp as a tack and
always asked about
other family mem-
bers, Hartnett said.
As the son of hard-
working parents,
including a father
who could not read,
Royer pulled himself
up by his bootstraps
to attend Santa Clara University on a
baseball scholarship after graduating
from Sequoia High School in Redwood
City.
He played against baseball great
Jackie Robinson in college, served as a
first baseman and catcher for the
Redwood City Merchant fast-pitch soft-
ball team in the World Championship
Series and coached youth sports. He
counted Willie Mays among his golfing
partners and, in June, his contributions
to sports will be honored with induction
to the San Mateo County Sports Hall
of Fame. The accolade will join his
existing spot in the Sequoia High
School Sports Hall of Fame which
marked his skills in baseball.
After two years in the U.S. Army Air
Corps, Royer launched a real estate
career in which he was later joined by
his sons. Even after being elected coun-
ty supervisor, Royer was seen sweeping
in front of his ofce.
Thats what he did. He was a
straight-ahead guy, Hartnett said.
Royer was long out of ofce by the
time Hartnett entered politics but he
said Royer served as role model and lent
him credibility. Royer was a Republican
but kept an open mind and was never
hyper-partisan which are lessons demo-
crat Hartnett said he learned.
A former union leader speaking with
Hartnett years ago learned his Uncle
Bill was the former supervisor. The
man said, Id vote for him today. He
believed everybody should have a piece
of the American pie, Hartnett recalled.
Royer requested no memorial service.
In lieu of owers, the family suggests
donations to the Sequoia High School
Alumni Association at P.O. Box 2534,
Redwood City, CA 94064 or
www.sequoiahsalumniassoc.org.
Former Redwood City mayor, congressman dies
William Royer
4
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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property taxes and insurance
Two homes robbed in San Carlos
Two residential burglaries occurred
Monday morning in San Carlos, accord-
ing to the San Mateo County Sheriffs
Ofce.
One was located on the 900 block of
Rosewood Avenue and the other on the
1900 block of Howard Avenue, accord-
ing to the Sheriffs Ofce.
The crimes occurred between the
hours of 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. and both
of the residences were unoccupied at the
time of the thefts, according to the
Sheriffs Ofce.
Prior to the Rosewood burglary being
discovered, a nearby resident later told
police that a white sport-utility vehicle
was seen driving slowly back and forth
on the street, but did not call 911 and
report the suspicious activity, according
to the Sheriffs Ofce.
Earlier Monday, a vehicle described as
a white SUV, occupied by two Hispanic
males and one Hispanic female was seen
stopping at a residence in the area of
Cordilleras and Howard avenues. The
female exited the vehicle and went to the
front door of a residence, according to
the Sheriffs Ofce.
An alert next door neighbor, who saw
the female, called 911 and went outside
to get a better description. When the
female saw the neighbor, she ran back to
the SUV and it sped off south on
Cordilleras, according to the Sheriffs
Ofce.
Shots fired in mobile home park
Witnesses at a mobile home park in
unincorporated Redwood City reported
hearing gunshots and having seen vehi-
cles leaving the area at about 7:40 p.m.
Monday, according to the San Mateo
County Sheriffs Ofce.
When police arrived on scene, they
located expended shell casings and
located a storage shed with bullet holes
in it at the complex on the 700 block of
Barron Avenue.
Several witnesses reported having
seen an unidentied Hispanic male adult
in his early to mid-20s run from the
scene just after the shots were heard. The
unknown suspect then got into an await-
ing vehicle that drove away in an
unknown direction. The vehicle was
described as possibly being a silver or
gray sport-utility vehicle with chrome
rims, according to the Sheriffs Ofce.
Anyone with information on the inci-
dent should call 802-4238.
Prius driver robs Chuck E. Cheese
A man walked into the Chuck E.
Cheese in San Bruno Monday afternoon,
demanded money
from an employee
while ashing a gun
and got away with an
undisclosed amount
of cash, according to
police.
The man, in his
mid-40s, was wear-
ing a distinctive
black jacket with a
Harley-Davidson logo on the back, a
black baseball cap and escaped the
Towne Center complex at 1270 El
Camino Real in a newer silver Toyota
Prius with a partial license plate number
of 6VWX, according to police.
Anyone with information on the inci-
dent is encouraged to call San Bruno
police at 616-7100.
Local briefs
Suspect
San Mateo sued over
city zoning changes
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The former Borders Books & Music store across from the
Hillsdale Shopping Center in San Mateo is too large for most
retail uses, according to city zoning laws, which has prompted
a lawsuit against the city by the company that subleases the
25,000-square-foot building.
1998 Books Holdings LLC led a suit Friday against the
city seeking to have it issue a business license so it can move
a new tenant into the space, either discount retailer Gator Bob
or another company.
The city changed its zoning rules regarding the area around
the Hillsdale Caltrain station in May 2011, when an ordinance
passed that put the property into the citys Rail Corridor
Transit-Oriented Development Plan. Under the plan, retail
uses are limited to 15,000 square feet in the area, except for
supermarkets or drug stores, which do not have size limits.
The property has been subleased for a few months at a time
to the Spirit Halloween Store since Borders closed in 2011.
Books Holdings is hoping the use can be grandfathered in
for a new tenant but the city deemed recently that the use
would be non-conforming under city code since the retail use
was discontinued for six months.
The suit seeks to have a business license issued and for the
city to set aside its apparent determination that the propertys
status of legal non-conforming use was terminated.
The complaint led in San Mateo County Superior Court
also mentions the 7-Eleven dispute that caused the city to
reinterpret the discontinuance of use ordinance and argue,
after the fact, that the non-conforming use was terminated
before the Spirit store started operating.
The city is named in the suit as well as city ofcials Stephen
Scott and Ronald Munekawa, who work in planning, and
David Culver, the citys nance director.
5
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE Our
countrys economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families whove not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though Ive been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that confidence is not a term you would
use to coincide with funeral arrangements,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of The Great
Recession.
They say that the two things you cant
avoid are death and taxes. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of thrift and
prudence with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to cost shop at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
OF THE HIGHLANDS to handle funeral or
cremation arrangements. These families
found comfort with our service, and notably
with our more economic cost structure.
Now, lately the trend with families and
their funeral choices reminds me of the days
way before the recession hit. Its not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families Ive been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
and services will need competent employees
to create more goods, give more services,
and so onmaking a positive circle for a
healthy economy. In relation to that, after a
long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
work back to the United States. Real Estate
values on the Peninsula remained in a good
state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
Encouraging Hopeful and Positive
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
business and the enrichment of our
economic atmosphere. I hope Im right, so
lets all keep our fingers crossed.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Trends Indicate
Upswing in the Economy
Advertisement
S.F. Exploratorium set to
open in new $300M digs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO The Exploratorium, San Franciscos
interactive science and activities museum, is set to open at its
new $300 million digs along the bay with more space and new
exhibits, including a rain chamber that will allow people to
experience past storms.
The museum held a walk-thru for members of the media
Tuesday. It is scheduled to open to the public April 17.
The new, 330,000-square-foot museum at Pier 15 along the
Embarcadero has three times more space than the previous
location at the Palace of Fine Arts in the citys Marina neigh-
borhood, Exploratorium ofcials said.
The new facility includes an all-glass observatory and a
gallery with views of the waterfront and city.
This is a great way to learn about the Bay Area. Its a place
to launch your visit. We actually have exhibits about the two
different bridges, said Tom Rockwell, director of exhibits at
the museum.
We have exhibits that help you understand the tide and
the fog and all these things that are signature elements of
the San Francisco landscape. You can learn about them here
and then you can go out and experience them first hand, he
said.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Talks of opening a Tesla showroom in
Burlingame were postponed Monday
while the two sides work to better under-
stand how the company proposes to dis-
tribute sales tax revenue.
On Monday, the Burlingame Planning
Commission was scheduled to vote on a
conditional use permit application to
allow the electronic car company to
open a sales and service shop at 50
Edwards Court. Work is already being
done to use the space as a Tesla service
center. Mondays conversation was sup-
posed to focus on allowing the sale of
vehicles at the same location. Instead, it
wasnt discussed in hopes of allowing
the Burlingame city attorney to work
with Tesla regarding sales tax. The item
was rescheduled for Monday, April 22.
Burlingames position is it should get
tax revenue since the sales take place in
its city. On the other hand, Teslas model
has been to pay the tax to wherever the
car is delivered, Tesla representative
Matthew Mefford wrote in a January let-
ter to the city. For example, if a San
Mateo resident orders a car and, once
completed, the car is delivered to his or
her home, then that city would get the
sales tax. One of the conditions of the
permits approval, as suggested by staff,
is that Burlingame would get the tax rev-
enue from sales from this site.
The selected Burlingame location is
highly visible from Highway 101 in the
Rollins Road light industrial area north
of Broadway. Previously used as a distri-
bution facility, the new Tesla location is
proposed to have a 2,283-square-foot
showroom in the front of the building.
Up to ve vehicles could be displayed
indoors. Since vehicles are built to order,
no other vehicles will be stored on site,
according to the application. Finalized
orders are submitted and the vehicle is
then produced at the Fremont facility.
The car can then be delivered directly to
the customer or to the Burlingame facili-
ty using a truck and a 20-foot trailer.
Once open, there is estimated to be a
total of 16 employees on weekdays and
12 employees on weekends. Roughly 30
customers a day are anticipated and the
facility would be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays.
Burlingames Tesla conversation postponed
Rendering of the new Exploratorium at Pier 15.
6
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journals
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But rst and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer prociency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A San Mateo business owner convicted of
underreporting more than $10 million in pay-
roll to avoid hefty workers compensation
insurance had her jail term modied yesterday
to electronic home monitoring so she can care
for her children.
Teresa Reif, 34, must still repay $1,651,148
to the State Compensation Insurance Fund and
$451,310 to Berkshire Hathaway but will be
able to remain at home rather than serve the
year term in the womens jail. Prosecutors
strongly objected to the sentence modication
but defense attorney Chuck Smith argued that
Reifs three children need her present.
Smith did not return a call for comment.
District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe said his ofce
maintains that state prison
would be the more appro-
priate sentence.
She got a phenomenal
break in being able to stay
local. I dont think any cit-
izen in our community
would say going to jail is
the same as staying home.
Its a lower level of punishment, Wagstaffe
said.
The amendment comes a week before Reif
was scheduled to surrender to the jail.
Reif pleaded no contest in April 2012 to
eight various counts of fraud and faced up to 17
years in prison. Instead, she received the local
time followed by ve years supervised proba-
tion and the restitution order. At the time,
Smith expressed disappointment in the sen-
tence and said the nancial penalty is a bigger
hit to the Reif family than any stretch of incar-
ceration. Both Smith and the Probation
Department had recommended house arrest at
the initial sentencing. Prosecutors had been sat-
ised with the sentence.
Reif, with her brother, owned and operated
Genesis Building Services, a janitorial and pest
control business located in San Mateo.
Between 2004 and 2009, Reif purchased work-
ers compensation insurance through Redwood
Fire & Casualty Insurance Company and the
State Compensation Insurance Fund. In 2008,
the insurance company said it received con-
icting data from Genesis staff about the num-
ber of employees and began suspecting it was
under-reporting its payroll by approximately
$544,440. Further investigation by the
California Department of Insurance placed the
under-reported amount at $10,657,776.69
which resulted in Reif avoiding paying
$2,957,089.20 in insurance premiums.
The CDI claimed Reif misrepresented both
the number of employees and its payroll when
applying for insurance, while insured and dur-
ing annual audits conducted by the carriers.
Genesis allegedly employed more than 140
employees but Reif reported less than half the
staff and gave auditors fraudulent paperwork to
support the false monthly reports.
During a search of the business, investigators
actually found the fraudulent books, according
to prosecutors.
Insurance fraud sentence modified
Jail changed to monitoring; more than $2 million restitution stands
Teresa Reif
Former sanitary manager
charged with embezzling
MARIN A former sanitation manager in
Marin County who is facing multiple criminal
charges related to a $350,000 loan he received
from the sanitary district to buy a house.
District Attorney Ed Berberian said Monday
that an arrest warrant has been issued for Brett
Richards, the former general manager of the
Ross Valley Sanitary District.
Prosecutors say Richards never repaid the
housing loan, and apparently never bought a
house in the area as he was supposed to. He
allegedly used the money instead on living
expenses, a new truck, vacations and for cash
withdrawals.
The 45-year-old Richards has been charged
with nine felony counts, including misappro-
priation of public funds and embezzlement.
Richards resigned from his $197,000-a-year
job at the sanitary district in July. Authorities
say his whereabouts are unknown.
Brown trip gives Lt. Gov.
Newsom a chance to shine
SACRAMENTO As Jerry Brown begins
his rst trip out of the country as governor, the
man who might someday seek to replace him
nds himself overseeing the affairs of the
nations most populous state if only tem-
porarily.
Browns 10-day trip to China gives Lt. Gov.
Gavin Newsom his most extensive time in the
chief executives chair, although his ofce
says he has no plans beyond his normal
engagements.
Newsoms schedule this week includes an
announcement about online education at San
Jose State University, a speech on economics
in San Diego, and attending the weekend
California Democratic Party convention in
Sacramento, said his spokeswoman, Dierdre
Hussey.
By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO California lawmak-
ers are considering taking some tax exemp-
tions away from youth groups that do not
accept gay, transgender or atheist members
a move intended to pressure the Boy Scouts of
America to lift its ban on gay Scouts and troop
leaders.
Some cities have withdrawn free rent and
other subsidies from the Boy Scouts over the
years, but legislation introduced by state Sen.
Ricardo Lara would make California the rst
state to target the Scouts for its anti-gay policy.
The Long Beach Democrats bill, SB 323, is
scheduled for its rst committee hearing on
Wednesday.
Our state values the important role that
youth groups play in the empowerment of our
next generation; this is demonstrated by
rewarding organizations with tax exemptions
supported nancially by all Californians, Lara
said.
California tax bill seeks to
punish Scouts for gay ban
Around the state
LOCAL/NATION 7
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Selling a television station hasnt been easy,
but the San Mateo County Community
College District appears to be close to naliz-
ing a deal according to an update the board
will hear Wednesday.
After struggling for years to eliminate the
$1 million operating decit for KCSM-TV, the
college district decided to sell the station in
2011. Six bids were received the following
February. Negotiations with the two respon-
sive highest bidders were not successful. As a
result, the board rejected all bids in October
and decided to give it another go. Since then,
four bids were received from KMTP TV 32,
Oriental Culture and Media Center of
Southern California, Locus Point Networks
and Public TV Financing. On Wednesday, the
board will hear an update on the situation.
The team is currently working on best and
nal negotiations and hopes to bring to the
board a contract for review and approval in the
next few weeks, according to the staff report
penned by Jan Roecks, interim dean of busi-
ness, workforce and athletics at Caada
College.
This time, the bid process had a new twist.
The Federal Communications Commission
is considering changing how such a station
could be used by wireless mobile operators,
Trustee Dave Mandelkern explained previous-
ly. Such a change could also allow for the sta-
tion to be auctioned off, possibly bringing in
more than the most recent bids. With that in
mind, the request for proposals allows people
to be creative in their bids, he said.
KCSM-TV began operating in 1964 at its
current location at the College of San Mateo.
The non-commercial station broadcasts a vari-
ety of programs including television courses,
the numbers for which have dropped in recent
years in favor of online classes. The district
will be keeping its radio station, KCSM.
At the same meeting, the board will discuss
board President Helen Hausmans plans to
step down April 30. Hausman informed the
board of her plans to step down due to health
problems at the last meeting.
Vacancies are rare on the college board. Its
been more than 20 years since a trustee has
left prior to the end of his or her term.
Hausman joined the board in 1989. Her cur-
rent term expires in November. There are gen-
erally two options for lling such a vacancy:
appointing a person to ll the remainder of the
term or holding a special election, which
comes at an additional cost to the district.
However, the election could be held in
November, according to the staff report.
The board meets 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 10
at the District Ofce, 3401 CSM Drive, San
Mateo.
Student charged in
Texas college stabbing attack
CYPRESS, Texas A 20-year-old man
from suburban Houston has been charged in a
stabbing spree at a Texas
community college that
injured at least 14 people.
Sheriffs officials say
Dylan Quick is charged
with three counts of
aggravated assault in the
Tuesday attack at Lone
Star Community College
in Cypress. The city is
about 20 miles from
Houston.
The Harris County Sheriffs Ofce says in a
statement that Quick used a razor-type knife
to cut his victims, and pieces of the blade were
found at the scene.
Moniz backs natural gas revolution
WASHINGTON President Barack
Obamas choice to lead the Energy
Department pledged to increase use of natural
gas Tuesday as a way to combat climate
change even as the nation seeks to boost
domestic energy production.
Ernest Moniz, a physics professor at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said a
stunning increase in production of domestic
natural gas in recent years was nothing less
than a revolution that has led to reduced
emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases
that cause global warming.
The natural gas boom also has led to a dra-
matic expansion of manufacturing and job
creation, Moniz told the Senate Energy
Committee.
Federal budget cuts
ground Air Force aircraft
NORFOLK, Va. A third of the U.S. Air
Forces active-duty force of combat planes
including fighters and bombers will be
grounded due to federal budget cuts, and only
the units preparing to deploy to major opera-
tions, such as the war in Afghanistan, will
remain mission-ready, a top general said
Tuesday.
Other units would stand down on a rotating
basis, said Gen. Mike Hostage, commander of
Air Combat Command at Joint Base Langley-
Eustis in Virginia.
KCSM-TV sale details coming soon
Around the nation
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The Senates top
Democrat has set Congress rst showdown
vote for Thursday on President Barack
Obamas gun control drive as a small but
mounting number of Republicans appear will-
ing to buck a conservative effort to prevent
debate from even beginning.
Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada
announced his decision Tuesday as the White
House, congressional Democrats and relatives
of the victims of Decembers mass shooting in
Newtown, Conn., amped up pressure on GOP
lawmakers to allow debate and votes on gun
control proposals. Twenty rst-graders and six
educators were gunned down at Sandy Hook
Elementary School, turning gun control into a
top-tier national issue.
Meanwhile, participants from both parties
said a bipartisan deal was imminent on
expanding required federal background checks
to gun purchases conducted at gun shows and
online. The two chief negotiators, Sens. Joe
Manchin, D-W.Va., and Patrick Toomey, R-
Pa., were expected to announce the compro-
mise on Wednesday. Manchin and Sen. Chuck
Schumer, D-N.Y., told reporters late Tuesday
that a deal was close. A Toomey aide said the
same, speaking on condition of anonymity to
discuss closed-door bargaining.
An agreement on background checks the
cornerstone of Obamas plan to restrict
rearms could boost bipartisan support for
the overall effort, at least initially, because
Manchin and Toomey are among their parties
most conservative members. But the ultimate
fate of gun legislation remains unclear, cloud-
ed by opposition from many Republicans and
moderate Democrats in the Democratic-led
Senate and the GOP-run House.
The emerging deal would expand required
federal background checks to sales at gun shows
and online, but exempt transactions like face-to-
face, non-commercial purchases, said several
Senate aides and lobbyists who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity to describe the private talks.
Senate showdown vote on
gun curbs set for Thursday
REUTERS
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid holds a news conference on Capitol Hill.
Dylan Quick
LOCAL/NATION 8
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Timing
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635 South Claremont St. San Mateo, CA 94402
City turned down Crystal Springs Uplands School plan to build middle school in October
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Belmont Councilwoman Coralin
Feierbach announced last night that
she has approached ofcials with
Crystal Springs Uplands School to
ask them to consider resubmitting
an application to build a new middle
school on Davis Drive.
A fan of the project two years
ago, Feierbach voted against it in
October after a contentious process
that divided the city in two camps
one that contends a new school
in the hills will bring in too much
traffic and another that said the
renowned institution will be a big
plus for the city.
I know this is
an about turn for
me, Feierbach
said during
council com-
ments. She
intends to agen-
dize the item for
the April 23
meeting and a
CSUS trustee
told the Daily
Journal last night that school of-
cials will come to the meeting and
listen.
We have a duciary responsibil-
ity to our students and parents to
hear the proposal, Trustee Jill
Grossman said.
Meanwhile, the schools biggest
priority is to accommodate future
growth, Grossman said. School of-
cials have been looking at land and
properties in the area but invested a
lot of time and money into the Davis
Drive property leading up to
October, Grossman said.
Feierbach, Councilman Dave
Warden and current Mayor
Christine Wozniak voted against the
project as councilmen David
Braunstein and Warren Lieberman
voted for the project.
The council opted not to amend
its general plan to allow for a school
use on land currently zoned for
commercial office use on Davis
Drive.
The entire council gave CSUS
ofcials a general thumbs-up in a
preliminary design review of the
project back in April 2011.
But in the 18 months between that
meeting and the October meeting
when the project was shot down,
three of the ve on the council said
it was not appropriate to amend the
citys general plan to accommodate
just one applicant.
Lieberman and Braunstein were
ready to approve the amendment
and concentrate on a development
deal where the school offered the
city a one-time $1 million payment,
$250,000 a year and use of some of
its facilities, including a turfed ath-
letic eld. Since the school is a non-
prot, it is exempt from paying
property taxes.
The Hillsborough-based private
school wanted the city to amend its
general plan; change the zoning on
the Davis Drive property from
ofce use for a school use; approve
the developments concept; sign off
on a development deal that guaran-
teed $250,000 in annual payments;
and sign off on the environmental
review of the project.
CSUS wanted to purchase an
ofce building on 6-8 and 10 Davis
Drive that it was leasing, demolish
it and build a new school campus
with a turfed athletic eld and one
day a pool. CSUS had offered use of
its eld to youth sports groups in the
city during summer and on some
weekends the rest of the year, since
Belmont youth have a lack of suit-
able playing elds.
Will Belmont welcome private school?
Coralin
Feierbach
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON A tentative
deal has been reached between
agriculture workers and growers, a
key senator said Tuesday, smooth-
ing the way for a landmark immi-
gration bill to be released within a
week.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.,
whos taken the lead on negotiating
a resolution to the agriculture issue,
didnt provide details, and said
growers had yet
to sign off on
the agreement.
The farm work-
ers union has
been at odds
with the agricul-
ture industry
over worker
wages and how
many visas
should be
offered in a new program to bring
agriculture workers to the U.S.
But Feinstein said shes hoping
for resolution in the next day or
two.
Theres a tentative agreement on
a number of things, and were wait-
ing to see if it can get wrapped up,
Feinstein said in a brief interview at
the Capitol.
Im very hopeful. The train is
leaving the station. We need a bill.
The development comes as a
bipartisan group of senators hurries
to nish legislation aimed at secur-
ing the border and putting 11 mil-
lion immigrants here illegally on a
path to citizenship, while also
allowing tens of thousands of high-
and low-skilled foreign workers
into the U.S. on new visa programs.
The agriculture dispute was the
most prominent of a handful of
unresolved issues. Theres also still
some debate over plans to boost
visas for high-tech workers.
The group of four Republican
and four Democratic senators has
been hoping to release the land-
mark immigration bill this week,
possibly as early as Thursday. Sen.
John McCain, R-Ariz., a leader of
the group, said Tuesday that this
week remains the goal. But it also
looked possible it could slip into
next week.
Senators in the immigration
group met Tuesday with Senate
Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy,
D-Vt., who agreed to hold a hearing
April 17 on the legislation, Senate
aides said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because the delibera-
tions were condential.
Tentative farm workers deal reached in immigration talks
Dianne
Feinstein
OPINION 9
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Obamas apology
Editor,
At a fundraiser in Silicon Valley last
week, President Obamas gaff referring
to California Attorney General Kamala
Harris as the best-looking attorney
general only lead to his apology, that
Harris happens to be, by far, the best-
looking attorney general in the coun-
try. He prefaced the remark by saying
she is brilliant and she is dedicated
and she is tough, and she is exactly
what youd want in anybody who is
administering the law.
Its too bad he cant say that about
his own attorney general, Eric Holder,
who is anything but dedicated, tough or
brilliant in administrating the law.
Holder showed what a spineless lack-
ey Obama appointed to be his attorney
general. He is allowing war criminals
Bush and Cheney to walk free and not
be held to answer for the war crimes
they committed in Iraq and
Afghanistan. If it were Obama ordering
Holder not to pursue justice, then
Holder should have had the internal
fortitude to resign.
Frank Scafani
San Bruno
Hypocrisy
Editor,
Robert Bacons letter regarding Sue
Lempert, (Lempert for a day in the
April 1 edition of the Daily Journal)
while possibly too biting, clearly
expressed his anger over Lemperts
self-promoting advertorial for the
Bay Meadows development. Bacons
letter might have taken a different
approach, questioning the honesty of
what Lempert wrote as well as her
hypocrisy in condemning the evils of
gambling at Bay Meadows, an open air
venue where families could spend a
day together, while welcoming the
enclosed gambling venue at the fair-
grounds (the San Mateo Jockey Club).
Bacon might also have taken the
Daily Journal to task. Its a sorry day
when your newspaper, which covered
so very well the struggles citizens made
to have a voice in Bay Meadows
future, allows a politician to write a
fabled account of what happened at
Bay Meadows without asking other
voices to provide balance. It wasnt the
right thing to do.
Donna Bischoff
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
B
urlingame Avenue has always
had a nice feel to it. The built
environment is contained to a
small area so it is walkable and pleas-
ant. Its alleys and side roads create just
enough visual break to create interest
without being intrusive.
Its retail has changed signicantly
over the years into more chains and
fewer mom-and-pop businesses, but
there is very little anyone can do about
that now. Its restaurants are diverse and
plentiful.
But the built environment will be
going through signicant change over
the next 14 to 16 months and, while
that transitional period will be challeng-
ing, it will likely be a marked improve-
ment over what is there today.
Burlingame Avenue has a solid repu-
tation as a destination for both locals
and visitors and many come from other
cities to shop, dine or simply hang out
when the weather permits. But change
is inevitable and if it is not change for
the better, it is the slow downward
change to the worse.
And so it is with that sentiment that
the city is moving forward with the
most signicant change for the vaunted
avenue in years. It is no small task. It
entails moving the sidewalks out and
thinning the street while removing
slanted parking spots in exchange for
the sometimes more challenging paral-
lel spots. While some city ofcials have
compared the change to Parisian, that
may be a bit ambitious. Rather, it will
allow for more al fresco dining, will
have better seating and nicer sidewalks.
Nice, but not necessarily just the
province of the Parisians.
Still, there is much work to be done
and it wont be pretty. So if there is one
word to remember during the construc-
tion period, its patience. Those who
travel by car on Burlingame Avenue
already know the idea of endurance in
difcult times, but now it must spread
to all who currently enjoy the shopping
district.
The $16.5 million revamp has been
publicly vetted so the time to complain
about the thinned road or the loss of
slanted parking has ofcially passed.
Work will be done at all hours to speed
up the process and there will be street
closures, heavy equipment, digging and
dust. Businesses will be open during
the whole time. So patience. It will
look nice when its done. And you will
have more room to roam and there will
be more places to sit and enjoy the n-
ished product. In the meantime, you
may want to start practicing that paral-
lel parking. Youre going to need it.
With construction, comes ... patience
Iconic images
M
y biggest problem is what to do about all the
things I cant do anything about. Ashleigh
Brilliant
Sometimes in the middle of the night, when sleep eludes,
my mind wanders to images that have made an impression
from television, newspapers, books, etc. During the last
couple of weeks, there have been some Ive been wanting to
write about.
First, in the minds eye,
images appeared of all the
pope folderol a reminder
of how we indels view the
whole pageant as a display of
how many religions keep their
followers wallowing in the
dark ages and demand that
they not think for themselves.
As Anna Quindlen wrote in
Lots of Candles, Plenty of
Cake about why she left the
church: Catholicism is an
autocracy. It not only dismiss-
es questioning, it demonizes
it. Is this conductive to democracy?
I guess Pope Francis is a bit of an improvement. I mean,
really, hell wash and kiss the feet of not only males, but
also females. Yet, as reported in the Daily Journal March
30, the traditionalists want pomp restored to the papacy by
reviving the pre-Vatican II traditions of the Catholic
Church. Pope Francis priority is to bring the church and
its message of love and service to ordinary people without
the high church trappings of his predecessor. And he
emphasized, God is never tired of forgiving us. (The
pedophile priests must have found that one handy!).
Its a step in the right direction. Maybe, eventually, the
devotees will nally realize that popes are just fallible
human beings in pretentious attire. Maybe the pope and his
entourage will dispense of their ostentatious pageantry and
begin to live in the real world. But dont count on it. As Jon
Carroll reminded us on March 20: The church is proudly
medieval.
Next, consider the image of U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein
telling freshman Sen. Ted Cruz from Texas (where if you
dont carry a gun, youre a wuss) how she feels that assault
weapons should be banned. He is sitting there with this
smug look after he had lectured her on the Constitution as
he sees it. As Carolyn Lochhead wrote in the San Francisco
Chronicle on March 15, The sad and pathetic reality is that
three months to the day after the mass murder of 20 chil-
dren and six adults in Newtown, Conn., Congress has no
stomach for banning the class of weapons used in the mas-
sacre.
This exemplies the difference between a wise and expe-
rienced senator who feels empathy for others and an arro-
gant newcomer who is out looking for votes from Tea Party
types. One outrageous thing about this is that, since
Feinsteins assault weapons bill bans certain weapons, Cruz
asked her whether Congress should ban certain books. As
Feinstein irritatingly reminded Cruz, her bill specically
exempts 2,271 weapons by make and model. Unfortunately,
on March 19, it was reported that the assault weapon ban
will not be included in Senate gun control legislation (Chalk
another one up for the NRA!).
Third, when I recall The McLaughlin Group on PBS, I
am always impressed by the image of Eleanor Clift who
holds her own very well no matter who the right wing advo-
cates are on the show. On March 31, the subject of the need
for the Republican Party to reinvent itself arose. Seems
theyve spent millions of dollars on a Growth and
Opportunity Project. Ms. Clift covered it pretty well when
she said, The problem the Republican Party has is what
theyre selling is toxic.
Ultra-conservatives come across to voters who have the
best interests of all Americans at heart as arrogant, selsh
and clueless as to how anyone in this country besides the
mostly aging white male, Tea Party type of conservatives
think. They disregard the more moderate side of their party,
exemplied by Amy Thoma in the Chronicle on March 31.
If only the hard core would pay attention to advice from
this wise and compassionate young Republican. It includes:
Quit acting like government is the enemy. ... Instead of
rhetoric that slashes or starves the beast, gure out a way
to make our government sustainable and functional. We
should speak about those who need a little help with com-
passion, not disdain, and stop acting like we resent it when
they need our help. Work with Democrats to get things
done. I want to see pragmatic lawmakers willing to compro-
mise in order to actually move us forward. Stop signing no-
tax pledges, stop drawing hard lines where it isnt necessary
and show you can actually get something done. (It takes a
rational young woman to gure this out.)
As Mr. Brilliant also wrote, Come over to my side of the
argument. The view is always so clear from here.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 650
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
Charleston (W.Va.) Gazette
T
wo decades ago, conservatives
in Congress undercut compre-
hensive sex education, which
teaches teens how to avoid pregnancy
and venereal diseases, and instead
poured taxpayer money into abstinence-
only classes that advocate shunning sex
until marriage.
Well over $1 billion was spent to
preach abstinence and it didnt pro-
duce a dollars worth of results. Study
after study found that just say no
teaching had no effect on adolescents
except to harm them by keeping
them ignorant of ways to prevent preg-
nancy and V.D. Most U.S. medical
groups called for a return to compre-
hensive courses that protect teens.
In 2010, under President Barack
Obama, Congress ended two abstinence
programs, saving taxpayers $112 mil-
lion a year, but retained a third that
grants up to $50 million annually to
puritanical states wanting to keep teens
sexless.
An obstetrician, Dr. Stephanie Sober,
recently suggested that taxpayers
should save the $50 million, rather than
waste it on abstinence-only classes.
Southern West Virginia has a pathetic
rate of teen pregnancy up to three
times higher than the national average
which often dooms both mothers
and children to poverty and lost poten-
tial.
This state actually has good sex edu-
cation laws, requiring schools to protect
youths by giving them effective birth
control instruction. But puritanical
mountain taboos cause many rural
schools to shun this obligation, like
Dracula recoiling from a crucix. In
effect, some classes teach abstinence-
only, even though state law requires
comprehensive training.
All teenage girls deserve the best
future possible. Helping them avoid
unwanted pregnancy and sexually trans-
mitted diseases should be a solemn
commitment. America should stop
pushing futile abstinence-only training
and instead teach teens how to protect
themselves.
Abstinence-only classes
Other voices
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,673.46 +0.35% 10-Yr Bond 1.747 +0.48%
Nasdaq3,237.86 +0.48% Oil (per barrel) 93.99
S&P 500 1,568.61 +0.35% Gold 1,586.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
J.C. Penney Co., down $1.94 at $13.93
The troubled department store chain ousted CEO Ron Johnson and
replaced him with his predecessor, Mike Ullman.
Corrections Corp. of America, up $1.06 at $39.03
The prison operator said that its board declared a special dividend of
about $6.63 per share.
Cliffs Natural Resources Inc., up $1.66 at $20.45
Shares of the mining company rose after a weekend Barrons article said
its shares might double in the next year.
Suntech Power Holdings Co. Ltd., up 14 cents at 62 cents
Bloomberg News said a Chinese news service reported that Warren
Buffett may be interested in buying the solar company.
Nasdaq
A. Schulman Inc., down $3.82 at $25.93
The plastic compounds suppliers scal second-quarter results were hurt
by Europes economic problems.
Crocs Inc., down 45 cents at $15.06
A Stifel Nicolaus analyst said in a note to clients that the footwear makers
sales might be hurt by cool early spring weather.
Staar Surgical Co., up 60 cents at $6.11
The implantable lens maker expects to report about $18 million in sales
during the rst quarter, more than Wall Street expected.
Ziopharm Oncology Inc., up 9 cents at $1.71
The developer of cancer treatments reported encouraging results from
a preclinical trial of one of its cancer therapies.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Materials and energy
companies led the stock market higher
Tuesday, sending the Dow Jones indus-
trial average to its second all-time high in
a week.
The Dow closed at 14,673.46, a gain of
59.98 points, or 0.4 percent. The
Standard & Poors 500 index also rose
0.4 percent, closing less than two points
below its own all-time high set April 2.
The prices of metals like copper, gold
and silver have rebounded this week after
slumping for the rst three months of the
year on waning demand. Oil is also rising
following a sharp decline last week.
Youre seeing some pretty decent
action in the overall market, with todays
leadership coming from the basic materi-
als sector, said Robert Pavlik, chief mar-
ket strategist at Banyan Partners. Its an
area of the market that does represent
some value because its underper-
formed.
The rise in basic materials such as pre-
cious metals was caused by a weakening
of the dollar against other currencies,
HSBC analyst Howard Wen said.
Commodities are typically priced in dol-
lars and a decline in the currency allows
overseas buyers to purchase materials at
lower prices.
Materials companies were the biggest
gainers of the 10 industry groups in the
S&P 500, rising 1.1 percent. Energy
companies posted the second best return,
increasing 0.8 percent. Those two groups
have been among the weakest in the mar-
ket this year.
On Tuesday the S&P 500 rose 5.54
points to 1,568.61. The index closed at a
record high of 1,570.25 on April 2. The
Nasdaq composite gained 15.61 points,
or 0.5 percent, to 3,237.86.
The gains suggested that the Dow and
S&P 500 may be poised to break out of
a trading pattern theyve followed for
the last three weeks.
Stocks have mostly moved sideways
since the middle of March. The Dow has
alternated between small gains and loss-
es after starting the year on a tear. Signs
of slowing growth and concerns about
the outlook for Europe had checked
investors condence.
As companies report results this
week, investors will be looking to see
whether they are feeling any impact
from government spending cuts that
kicked in recently, said Jim Russell,
investment director at U.S. Bank. They
will also want to know what effect there
will might from the ongoing debt crisis
in Europe.
The market is looking for companies
to ll in those blanks, said Russell.
Alcoa, traditionally the rst company
in the Dow to report results, was at at
$8.39 after the company posted its earn-
ings late Monday. Online auto retailer
CarMax, home goods retailer Bed Bath
& Beyond and the banks Wells Fargo
and JPMorgan Chase report later this
week.
On Tuesday, Cliffs Natural Resources,
an iron ore mining company, rose $1.66,
or 8.8 percent, to $20.45. The companys
stock is still down 47 percent this year.
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold,
another mining company, was up $1.34,
or 4.1 percent, at $33.76.
First Solar soared after the solar panel
maker issued a better-than-expected fore-
cast for its 2013 results and solid predic-
tions for the following two years, helped
by continued growth in shipments. The
stock price rose $12.31, or 46 percent, to
$39.35.
Small company stocks lagged the mar-
ket. The Russell 2000 index two points,
or 0.2 percent, to 929.34. The index has
slumped this month after rising 12 per-
cent in the rst quarter and performing
better than both the Dow and S&P 500.
While stocks are struggling to extend
their gains from the start of the year,
bonds have rallied.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note
was unchanged at 1.75 percent Tuesday.
However, the benchmark rate has fallen
from a high of 2.06 percent reached
March 11 as demand for low-risk assets
increases.
Dow Jones average closes at record high
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Microsoft is
skewering Google again with ads and reg-
ulatory bashing that say as much about the
dramatic shift in the technology industrys
competitive landscape as they do about
the animosity between the two rivals.
The ads that began Tuesday mark the
third phase in a 5-month-old marketing
campaign that Microsoft Corp. derisively
calls Scroogled. The ads, which have
appeared online, on television and in print,
depict Google as a duplicitous company
more interested in increasing prots and
power than protecting peoples privacy
and providing unbiased search results.
This time, Microsoft is vilifying Google
Inc. for sharing some of the personal
information that it gathers about people
who buy applications designed to run on
smartphones and tablet computers pow-
ered by Googles Android software.
Earlier ads have ripped Googles long-
running practice of electronically scan-
ning the contents of peoples Gmail
accounts to help sell ads. Other ads
attacked a recently introduced policy that
requires retailers to pay to appear in the
shopping section of Googles dominant
search engine. We think we have a better
alternative that doesnt do these kinds of
nefarious things, said Greg Sullivan,
Microsofts senior manager for Windows
Phone, the business taking aim at
Googles distribution of personal informa-
tion about buyers of Android apps.
As Microsoft attacked Google in the
United States, a group led by Microsoft
asked European authorities to investigate
whether Google has been using its free
Android operating system to stie compe-
tition from other mobile services besides
its own.
Microsoft assault on Google shows industry shift
Gas prices sliding down
Prices at the pump are on a downward trend, with the aver-
age cost of a gallon of gas in San Mateo dropping 12 cents to
$4.08, according to AAA Northern California, which tracks
prices as a customer service.
The local drop mimics the decrease across the state which
saw the average price for a gallon of unleaded gas drop 15
cents to $4.02 since last months AAA report March 12.
Northern California gas prices are now averaging $4.11 per
gallon, a change of 16 cents from last months report. In the
Bay Area, motorists can expect to pay an average price of
$4.23, which is up 20 cents from last month. Todays national
average price for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline is
$3.58, 12 cents less than the average price one year ago,
according to AAA.
However, gas prices today are 24 cents less expensive than
Californias average price on this date last year. Among all 50
states, California has the second highest state average price for
regular unleaded gasoline. Hawaii is the highest at $4.39,
according to AAA.
The recent decline has been a product of lower crude oil
prices and a now completed switchover to summer-blend
gasoline, said Cynthia Harris, AAA Northern California
spokesperson. Declining retail gas prices have been the result
of an increase in renery production and economic concerns,
which have created less of a demand among consumers.
Report: 3M Californians qualify for health subsidy
SACRAMENTO A health care advocacy organization
says nearly 3 million Californians will become eligible next
year for federal assistance to pay for health insurance.
The report released Tuesday by Families USA examined
how tax credits will help low- and middle-income residents
pay for private health coverage.
It says people with annual incomes between $47,100 and
$94,200 for a family of four will make up half of the
Californians eligible for tax credits.
About 50 percent of eligible Californians will be Hispanic,
about 30 percent will be white and another 5 percent will be
black.
Under the federal law taking effect next year, those with the
lowest incomes will receive the largest tax credits.
Based in Washington, D.C., Families USA promotes cover-
age benets under the Affordable Care Act.
Affymetrix expects 1Q revenue below Streets view
SANTA CLARA The genetic testing instrument busi-
ness Affymetrix Inc. expects rst-quarter revenue below Wall
Street expectations.
The Santa Clara, Calif., company said Tuesday it expects
total revenue of about $78 million for the quarter that ended
March 31. That includes about $19 million from its
eBioscience segment. Affymetrix will report full results April
30 after markets close.
Analysts expect, on average, revenue of $83.3 million,
according to FactSet.
The company also said Tuesday it expects to report cash on
hand of at least $38 million as of March 31.
Business briefs
Peninsula
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<< Sharks road trip starts out poorly, page 12
Tiger primed for another Masters title, page 13
Wednesday, April 10, 2013
PLAYOFF BOUND: WARRIORS WIN, COUPLED WITH UTAH LOSS, SENDS GOLDEN STATE TO POSTSEASON >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Because the Peninsula Athletic League
baseball schedule uses home-and-home
games against one team each week, the
importance of picking up a win in the opener
of a two-game series is important.
Its absolutely huge, said Mills manager
Tony Adornetto. Two and oh (for the week)
is a bonus. Worst case is a split. Ill take a
split, but you go for 2-0.
The Vikings will get a chance to go for the
series victory against El Camino Thursday as
Mills jumped out to a quick 4-0 lead on its
way to a 7-5 win over the Colts Tuesday in
South San Francisco.
The win keeps Mills (5-0 PAL Ocean) atop
the Ocean Division standings as the last unde-
feated team in the division, while handing El
Camino (4-1) its rst league loss of the year.
The Vikings did it with clutch hitting and
strong pitching. They had four extra base hits
two homers and two doubles while
starting pitcher Aram Moshkounian kept the
Colts off balance and pounding the ball into
the ground. Moshkounian pitched into the
sixth inning, allowing ve runs (four earned),
scattering seven hits in the process. Of the 17
outs Moshkounian recorded, 10 were ground-
outs.
He competes. Hes not going to overpower
guys, Adornetto said of Moshkounian. He
locates his fastball and he throws a little
knuckleball as a changeup. (When hes right)
he gets a lot of ground balls. He hides (the
ball) a little, which is denitely an advantage.
Robert Sanchez came on in relief of
Moshkounian and allowed one hit over 1 1/3
innings of work to pick up the save. With run-
ners on the corners and two outs in bottom of
the sixth, Sanchez threw one pitch for a
groundout to end the inning.
The Vikings didnt wait long to put the pres-
sure on the Colts, getting back-to-back
homers in the rst inning to take a 4-0 lead.
With two outs in the top of the rst inning,
Sereno Esponilla walked and Kyle Vallans hit
a ground-rule double off the top of the netting
in left-center field to bring up Mike
McWhirter who jumped on the rst pitch
he saw, an eye-high fastball, and tomahawked
it over the fence in left eld for a 3-0 Mills
lead.
If [McWhirter] thinks its a strike, hell
swing at it, Adornetto said. He thinks every
pitch is a strike.
Before anyone had a chance to catch their
breath, Sean McHugh followed with a solo
blast to left eld as well.
Scoring the rst runs it really helps,
said McHugh, who was 3 for 4 with three
RBIs. We dont get to relax but settle in.
Moshkounian cruised through the rst two
innings before running into trouble in the
third. With one out, Harley Torres legged out
an ineld hit for the Colts. Steve Pastora
Mills gets big
win over Colts
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Mills Mike McWhirter swats an eye-high fastball for a three-run homer in the top of the rst
inning of the Vikings 7-5 win over El CaminoTuesday in South SanFrancisco.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Peninsula Athletic League softball fans are
used to having Carlmonts Rebecca Faulkner
save the day with her arm in the circle.
But in 2013, the PALs best pitcher has proven
that she might also be the leagues best hitter
and its most dangerous.
With two outs, two strikes, two runners on and
the score tied at 2-2, Faulkner launched an inside
fastball over the left eld fence for a three-run,
walk-off home run that saved Carlmonts bid for
a perfect league season. Up until that pitch,
Burlingame High School, behind Meagan
Ailands strong effort in the circle, put some
serious doubt in that bid. The Panthers led twice
but ultimately could not hold on, falling to the
Scots 5-2.
I have a tendency to be ahead of the ball a
lot, Faulker said of the blast that sent everyone
home. But, I knew they were going to throw me
inside because she kept getting closer and closer
in so, I just set up outside and kind of went for
it. It was kind of like a do-or-die situation. I was
hitting for the home run or a big hit because with
two outs, I just wanted to see where this goes.
Rebecca is a good part of our team, said
Carlmont head coach Jim Liggett. Shes de-
nitely an outstanding ball player be it pitching or
hitting. Shes just an exceptional hitter and an
exceptional pitcher. Were lucky to have her.
Despite the dramatics of the home run, there
was a sense across the entire Carlmont team that
they were lucky to have come away with the
win. As late as the top of the sixth, after
Burlingame went ahead 2-1 on a throwing error
by the Carlmont outeld following a single to
right, the Scots hardly looked like a team ranked
in the top 35 nationally by Maxpreps.com.
I think when you play someone you feel you
should beat and you let them get off to a start, it
puts more pressure on your team, Liggett said.
We didnt play well in that rst inning. We gave
them the run. I dont think we were in the ball
game to begin with. Our kids werent focused
and we tried to tell them any team can knock you
off if you have a bad day. Give Burlingame cred-
it they played well today, they made a lot of
plays, they stuck with us and could have won the
ball game.
Scots walk off with win over Burlingame
See MILLS, Page 14
Shes denitely an outstanding ball player be it
pitching or hitting. Shes just an exceptional hitter
and an exceptional pitcher.Were lucky to have her.
Jim Liggett, Carlmont softball coach about Rebecca Faulkner
See SCOTS, Page 14
By Doug Feinberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW ORLEANS Geno Auriemma and
Connecticut are back on top. With freshman
Breanna Stewart leading the way, it might be
a while before they relinquish that spot.
Stewart scored 18 of her 23 points in the
rst half and Connecticut won its eighth
national championship with a 93-60 rout of
Louisville on Tuesday night. It was the most
lopsided victory in a title game.
The title tied Auriemma
and the Huskies (35-4)
with Pat Summitt and
Tennessee for the most in
womens basketball histo-
ry.
It might not take long
for Auriemma to pass
UConn dominates
womens title game
UConn 93, Louisville 60
GenoAuriemma See UCONN, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Rusty Miller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS, Ohio Sergei Bobrovsky
picked up his fourth career shutout all in
his last 15 games and newcomer Marian
Gaborik had a goal and an assist Tuesday
night, leading the Columbus Blue Jackets to a
4-0 win over the San Jose Sharks.
Matt Calvert, James Wisniewski and Ryan
Johansen also scored for the Blue Jackets,
who had lost their last two games.
Bobrovsky didnt have a shutout in his rst
98 NHL appearances. He has put up a brick
wall in front of the net since Columbus went
on a late tear to rise from last in the league to
contention for a playoff spot. He made 30
saves, including stopping Patrick Marleaus
point-blank wrister in the third period and
Dan Boyles hard, power-play slap shot in the
second.
The game was crucial for both teams, but
particularly the Blue Jackets, who began the
night in a tie for 10th in the West, four points
behind eighth-place Detroit. San Jose came in
fth in the West with 47 points, but just seven
points from falling out of the race.
The Blue Jackets have gotten points in 17 of
their last 21 games (12-4-5). They had a four-
game home winning streak ended Sunday
night by Minnesota, 3-0. That defeat also
snapped a club-record 12-game points streak
at home (9-0-3).
The Sharks were coming off a seven-game
homestand on which they picked up 13 of 14
possible points, losing in overtime to Dallas
on Sunday before hitting the road. The game
Tuesday opened a four-game swing that will
also take them to Detroit, Dallas and Phoenix.
Columbus had been manhandled in the sec-
ond period 48 hours earlier by Minnesota, but
this time it was the Blue Jackets who took
charge. Up 1-0, they had 11 of the rst 12
shots while scoring twice.
Wisniewski made it 2-0 just 3:09 in, taking
a pass from defense partner Adrian Aucoin to
blast a rising one-timer past Antti Niemi from
the middle of the blue line.
Less than 2 minutes later, Gaborik, playing
his second home game for the Blue Jackets,
set up Johansen to make it 3-0.
Gaborik was being guarded by two Sharks in
the right circle when he slid a backhand pass to
Johansen in the slot. He went down to one knee
on the one-timer high into the net.
Sharks shut
out in Ohio
Blue Jackets 4, Sharks 0
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Klay Thompson scored 30
points, Stephen Curry added 24 points and 10
assists and the Golden State Warriors clinched a
playoff berth by routing the
Minnesota Timberwolves
105-89 on Tuesday night.
David Lee nished with
15 points and 12 rebounds
to propel the Warriors to
their rst postseason
appearance since 2007 and
just their second in 19 years.
Andrei Kirilenko scored
15 points and reserve Chase
Budinger had 17 points for the depleted
Timberwolves, who were outshot 43 to 37 per-
cent. Ricky Rubio missed all 10 shots from the
oor to go with six assists and ve rebounds as
Minnesota watched the Warriors celebrate
something it had hoped to accomplish this sea-
son.
Chants of Playoffs! Playoffs! rang out from
the fans in the nal seconds. The public address
announcer then told the crowd: The Warriors
are heading to the 2013 NBA Playoffs! Co-
owner Joe Lacob shared hugs and handshakes
with fans from his courtside seat, raising his
right hand to the 30th straight sellout crowd
announced at 19,596.
This is what we came here to do, Lee told
the crowd during an interview at half court after
clinching his rst playoff berth in eight NBA
seasons.
At long last, Bay Area basketball fans have
reason to cheer again.
After blowing a chance to seal a playoff spot
against Utah on Sunday night, the Warriors
needed a win and a loss by the Los Angeles
Lakers or the Jazz to clinch this time. Golden
State knew it had a chance before halftime,
when Utahs 90-80 loss to Oklahoma City
Thunder ashed across the corner scoreboards.
Thompson scored 25 points in the rst half
and made his rst nine shots from the oor,
including ve from beyond the arc, before Curry
and Co. found their rhythm. The Warriors went
ahead by 18 early in the fourth quarter and left
little doubt about what this win meant.
Golden State (45-33) remains a game ahead of
Houston (44-34) for the Western Conferences
sixth seed. Both teams have four games remain-
ing.
Warriors clinch playoff spot
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Angel Pagan hit a
tiebreaking single in the eighth inning to cap
San Franciscos rally from a four-run decit
and the Giants went on to beat the Colorado
Rockies for the eighth straight time, 9-6 on
Tuesday night.
Brandon Crawford hit a three-run homer to
start the comeback and Hunter Pence had a
pair of RBI singles for the Giants, who have
won the rst two games of the series.
Dexter Fowler and Josh Rutledge each drove
in two runs in a ve-run second inning against
Tim Lincecum, and Troy Tulowitzki added a
solo homer off the former Giants ace to help
the Rockies build a 6-2 lead.
But the Giants scored four runs in the sixth
to tie the game and then won it in the eighth
against Matt Belisle (0-1).
Pinch-hitter Andres Torres started the win-
ning rally with a double to right eld and
Pagan followed with a single up the middle
that almost hit Belisle in the face.
Pablo Sandoval and Gregor Blanco added
RBI singles to give the Giants insurance.
Santiago Casilla (1-0) pitched a perfect
eighth for the win and Sergio Romo got three
outs for his fth save.
The Rockies appeared to be in control until
Juan Nicasio walked the rst two batters of the
sixth to end his night after 95 pitches, marking
the 110th straight game a Rockies starter has
failed to reach the 100-pitch mark.
Adam Ottavino came in and allowed
Crawfords second career homer at AT&T
Park. The Giants then loaded the bases with
one out before Belisle relieved and allowed a
tying single by Pence that gave him 1,000
career hits. Belisle escaped the jam without
further damage when he got Brandon Belt to
hit into an inning-ending double play.
Lincecum, a two-time NL Cy Young Award
winner, is still trying to nd his groove follow-
ing a disappointing 2012 season when he had
a career-high 15 losses and an NL-worst 5.18
ERA.
After matching a career high with seven
walks in his rst start last week against the Los
Angeles Dodgers, Lincecum was hurt again by
a lack of command against the Rockies.
He needed just nine pitches to work through
a perfect rst inning before being able to nd
the plate in a ve-run second. He walked three
batters, including the pitcher for the second
straight start, and also threw a wild pitch.
But he might have come out of that inning
unscathed if not for a bad decision by second
baseman Marco Scutaro, who threw wildly
trying to get a force at second base instead of
taking a sure out at rst. That helped set up the
big inning that featured a two-run double by
Fowler and a two-run single by Rutledge.
Lincecum wobbly, Giants rally for win
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM Pinch-hitter John Jaso had a
go-ahead, three-run homer in the seventh
inning, and the Oakland Athletics blew a four-
run lead before rallying to beat the Los
Angeles Angels 9-5 Tuesday night in the
majors nal home opener.
Brandon Moss had three hits and drove in
four runs, delivering an early two-run single
before adding a two-run homer after Jasos
shot. Coco Crisp also hit his fourth homer for
the As, who have won six straight after an 0-
2 start.
Josh Hamilton went 0 for 4 with a sacrice
y in his home debut for the big-budget
Angels, who dropped to 2-5.
Howie Kendrick had three hits and capped
Los Angeles three-run rally in the sixth with
a tiebreaking triple off Ryan Cook (1-0).
Oakland picks up big win in Anaheim
Warriors 105, Wolves 89
Giants 9, Rockies 6
As 9, Angels 5
Clay Thompson
SPORTS 13
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
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9) Kimberly Byrne, San Mateo 120 points, tiebreaker 178
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By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUGUSTA, Ga. Around every corner at Augusta National
is another reminder that Tiger Woods isnt getting any younger.
He played a practice round with a teenager from China who
wasnt even born when Woods won his rst Masters. He was
introduced at his news conference Tuesday as playing the
Masters for the 19th time, which caused Woods to bow his head
and cover his eyes.
Among dozens of photographs on the walls of the club is one
of defending champion Phil Mickelson helping Woods with a
much fuller head of hair into the green jacket after Woods won
the Masters in a playoff.
That was from 2005. And that was the last
time Woods won the Masters.
Woods says at least hes contending, so
hes not about to panic.
He conceded that it feels a lot longer than
eight years ago, though he is not the least bit
discouraged that the Masters is the major he
has gone the longest without winning.
Since that Sunday evening, Woods has
won the British Open twice, the PGA
Championship twice and another U.S.
Open.
Could he have imagined in 2005 that seven Masters would
come and go without him winning?
I wouldnt have been happy with that, Woods said. I put
myself in the mix every year but last year, and thats the mis-
leading part. Its not like Ive been out there with no chance of
winning this championship. Ive been there, and unfortunately
just havent got it done.
Obviously, Im not real happy with the fact that I havent won
more, he said. But the whole idea is to give myself opportuni-
ties. And as of right now, Im tied for second on the all-time win
list here. So thats not too bad, either.
Woods has changed his practice routine at this major. For years
known as a dew sweeper for playing his practice rounds at the
crack of dawn, Woods hasnt shown up at the course until after
lunch this week.
He played Monday afternoon with 14-year-old Guan Tianlang
and Dustin Johnson. After his news conference, he headed to the
practice range before going out for nine holes with Fred Couples.
Asked about the change, he was coy, telling a reporter with
whom hes familiar, Just wanted to mess with you. He smiled,
never giving an explanation, so that much hasnt changed about
Woods.
The biggest difference is his health and his game, which are
connected.
There has been so much activity off the golf course the
scandalous revelations of extramarital affairs that ended his mar-
riage, changing swing coaches to rebuild his swing for the fourth
time, a move to South Florida to a mansion so large he has his
own practice range in the backyard that it was easy to over-
look the injuries.
It all started to turn the corner last year when Woods began
winning again three times on the PGA Tour and getting
back into contention at the majors.
It was early last summer when he could nish a round and
spend an hour on the range, and when his tness plan was more
about building strength then rehabilitating his left leg.
The No. 1 concern was rst of all, get health, get strong
enough where I can practice, he said. And once I started to be
able to practice, things turned. And they turned quickly. I feel
comfortable with every aspect of my game. I feel that Ive
improved, and Ive gotten more consistent, and I think the wins
show that. Thats something that Im proud of so far this year.
And hopefully, I can continue it this week and the rest of the
year.
The wins are piling up, and they are impressive.
He led by as many as eight shots on the back nine at Torrey
Pines. He was never seriously challenged over the nal hour at
Doral and Bay Hill, two more wins that marked the rst time in
10 years he had three wins before going to the Masters. And hes
back to No. 1 in the world.
To no ones surprise, he is the overwhelming favorite when the
Masters gets under way on Thursday.
Mickelson came within a fraction of an inch from shooting 59
this year when he won the Phoenix Open, and while hes a bit
nervous about not playing the week before the Masters as he usu-
ally does, he can contend at Augusta even when hes not on form.
A win this year would give him as many green jackets as Woods.
Rory McIlroy is getting his game together at the right time, n-
ishing second last week in the Texas Open. There are challengers
all around, and yet most players would agree that Woods is the
man to beat this week.
Even at times where has not played his best, you know what
hes capable of, and so youre always looking at his score,
Mickelson said.
Youre always worried about him making that big run the way
hes always done throughout his career. And now that hes doing
it and winning tournaments in such dominating fashion, it does
have the feel of what we expect to see from Tiger.
Tiger ready to
win Masters
Tiger Woods
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Peninsula Gymnastics out of San Mateo is three weeks
away from taking Henderson, Nev. by storm.
The Level 7 team placed fth as a team at the state cham-
pionships and qualied a total of eight gymnasts for the
Northern California Regionals held at the end of April.
Ariana Young, Isabella Love and Brittany Mason won indi-
vidual events and thus named state champions.
Mason had an overall exceptional day. She took rst place
in the beam (9.5) and second place in the bars and oor
(9.375 and 9.475) to nish second in the all-around competi-
tion.
Love took rst in the vault with. a 9.475.
Young nished third in the all-around.
Other regional championship qualifiers include Grace
Hedrick, Abby Carpenter, Te'a Leiro, Madeleine Parker and
Kristen Kuhn.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
With their second straight Coast Conference North
Division title in hand, the next four games are all about mak-
ing a statement for the College of San Mateo softball team.
And the Bulldogs did just that with a 12-2, ve-inning
mercy rule shelling of Mission College. The win was the 33rd
of the season for CSM the most in the state.
Amelia Shales and Michelle Pilster combined for ve
innings of two-hit softball each faced 10 batters.
The Bulldogs scored nine runs in the rst inning to all but
put the game away early.
Natalie Saucedo (Burlingame), Kaylin Stewart (Hillsdale),
Selina Rodriguez (El Camino) and Mikayla Conlin had
multi-hit games for the Bulldogs.
Saucedo also had four RBIs. Stewart drove in three. CSM
only left four runners stranded.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Skyline College snapped a three-game losing streak
Tuesday with one of its best offensive showings of the sea-
son, downing No. 7-ranked Mission 10-5 at the Skyline dia-
mond.
The Trojans (7-11, 10-20) scored four runs in the rst and
ve more in the third to stake Nick Paton to an early lead. The
right-hander went ve-plus innings to earn the win, improv-
ing his record to 3-5.
Skyline sophomore Daniel Loppiparo earned the save, his
second of the year.
In the rst, Skyline set the table with small-ball, then went
big. Robin Lausen started the four-run rally with an ineld
single, before A.J. Santiago bunted him to second. After Joey
Carney reached on an ineld error and Cory Faubel walked to
load the bases, Lucciano Molina got Skyline on the board
with a two-run double. Lance Montano followed with a two-
run single to give the Trojans a 4-0 lead.
In the fth, Skyline sent 10 batters to the plate amid a ve-
run rally. After Carney drew a one-out walk, Faubel singled
and Molina followed with an RBI single. With runners at rst
and third, Faubel scored on a wheel-steal of home. After a
walk to Montano, Michael Thompson singled, allowing
Molina to score on a throwing error. Nine-hitter Nick Serrata
followed with an opposite-eld double to right to score a pair,
giving Skyline a 9-0 lead.
Molina paced the Trojans with a 3-for-4 day at the plate,
moving him into the team-lead with 23 hits on the season.
The freshman inelder notched four RBIs and scored two
runs.
Skylines 10-run outpouring is its second best single-game
run total of the season, after its 15-3 win over Caada on
March 21.
CSM 6, Ohlone 1
A big four-run fth inning was the catalyst in a 6-1 for the
College of San Mateo over Ohlone College.
Over a solid start against Monterey Peninsula College to
start last weeks action, Zac Grotz was just as good against
Ohlone. The former Burlingame Panther pitched 8 1/3
innings of six-hit, one-run baseball to earned his sixth win of
the year. Grotz walked one and struck out three.
CSM got multi-hit games from Brandon Defazio, Kailen
Robinson and Jeff Vonmoser.
The Bulldogs four-run fth was aided by a pair of Ohlone
errors.
The win moves CSM to 11-5 in the Coast Conference
Golden Gate Division.
Caada 10, San Francisco 5
The Colts jumped out to a 5-0 lead in the rst inning behind
extra base hits by Justin Gubse and Maurice Full en route to
a 10-5 win over City College of San Francisco.
Mitch Labbie, formerly of San Mateo High School, pitched
six innings of eight-hit, ve-run baseball to earn the win for
the Colts.
Gubser and Andrew Vanisi (Aragon), in the middle of
Caadas order, went a combined 6-for-10 with four RBIs
including a home run by the former Don.
Greg Bildhauer and Dominic Deesta had multi-hit games
for the Colts.
CCSF stranded 14 men on base.
Gymnasts performwell at state
SPORTS 14
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-365-1668
walked and Josh Eclevea singled to load the bases.
Dominic Giuliani followed and stroked a single to left that
got by the leftelder for an error that cleared the bases and
cut the Vikings lead to 4-3.
But in a theme that played out over and over again, Mills
responded right back. Each time the Colts got within a run
of the Vikings, Mills would tack on another.
After El Caminos three-run third, Mills came right back
with a pair of unearned runs in the top of the fourth. With
one out, Esponilla, who reached base four times with two
hits and a pair of walks, doubled to left. Kyle Vallans then
hit a ball off the top of the netting in center eld for a long
single, but Esponilla scored when the Colts could not han-
dle the cutoff throw. With the ball rolling slowly toward the
plate, Esponilla broke for home and scored, with Vallans
going to second. He moved to third on a groundout and
scored on a McHugh ineld hit.
The Colts, again, cut the Mills lead to one, 6-5, with a
pair of runs in bottom of the fth. Evan Giacomino drew a
one-out walk and went to second on a sacrice bunt.
Giuliani followed with a ground-rule double to center to
drive in Giacomino. Emiliano Rios then followed with a
bloop single to left to drive in Giuliani.
The Vikings reestablished its two-run lead in the top of
the sixth when McHugh singled to center to drive in
Esponilla for his third RBI of the game.
The last three or four games, [McHugh] nally stopped
trying to pull everything, Adornetto said.
Adornetto said the key to the victory was his team never
settling. The Vikings were always looking to add runs.
Everytime they scored, we didnt settle for that,
Adornetto said. We came right back with a run. Put the
pressure right back on [El Camino].
Continued from page 11
MILLS
We came in with a lot of energy and we feel that when were
cheering as a team we are more in the game, said Burlingame catch-
er Dana Lenardon. And it showed. Everyone had a positive attitude
and we played really well.
Burlingame put that pressure on Carlmont right out of the gate.
Nicki Lunghi singled and advanced to second after the Scots could
not handle the ensuing sacrice bunt. Two batters later, Kristin
Chaney put together a tremendous 11-pitch at-bat that culminated
with an RBI single to centereld to make it 1-0 Burlingame.
Carlmont failed to respond until the fourth when the Scots made
the Panthers pay for an error. With two runners on and two outs,
Danielle Giuliacci singled up the middle to tie the game.
Meagan was just hitting her spots really well, Lenardon said.
She was throwing hard and she battled all the way through.
The Scots hit another defensive lapse in the sixth when with two
outs, Melissa Guevara singled. Lexie Elia then came up and singled
to right eld and on the throw back into the ineld, directed at no on
in particular, Guevara raced around the bases to score the go-ahead
run.
Denitely, Faulkner said when asked if her Scots were feeling
the pressure after Burlingames second run. They put up a good
ght. But I think those are the best games to play. We didnt have our
best game on eld. Defensively, we usually dont have any errors in
the game and I feel that as a pitcher, I have a high expectation for the
defense as well because we have such a good team defensively. So,
Im glad we pulled through.
Carlmont got a bit of help from the Burlingame defense in order
to do that. It was Faulkner who led the sixth off with a single and
then a elders choice got her into scoring position. After a ground
out to short, up came the reigning Daily Journal Athlete of the Week,
Jacey Phipps, who lined a shot to centereld that was dropped by the
Panther defense allowing Faulkner to score.
After Faulkner held Burlingame scoreless in the seventh, a one-
out rally began with singles by Melissa Pekarek and Taylor
Yzaguirre. Following a strikeout and two more strikes to Faulkner,
No. 3 sent Carlmont Nation home happy with the bomb to left.
I think its a matter of staying within yourself, Faulkner said.
Staying in the game. You just have to make sure youre giving 100
percent when you step out on the eld.
Continued from page 11
SCOTS
Summitt the way Stewart and the rest of his Huskies played.
His prized freshman was unstoppable, hitting shots from
everywhere on the court.
The loss brought to the end an unprecedented tournament
run by Louisville. The Cardinals became the rst No. 5 seed to
make the championship game, pulling off the greatest upset in
tournament history when they beat Brittney Griner and Baylor
in the regional semifinals. Jeff Walzs team then beat
Tennessee in the regional nal before topping Cal in the Final
Four.
The Cardinals just didnt have enough to beat their Big East
foe. Louisville was trying to become just the second school to
win both the mens and womens championship in the same
season and the rst since UConn in 2004.
Louisville mens coach Rick Pitino, fresh off his teams 82-
76 win in the title game over Michigan on Monday night, was
sitting behind the Cardinals bench, trying to spur on the
womens team. He talked to the players at their pregame meal
and told them to just enjoy the moment and have fun in the
game.
Continued from page 11
UCONN
SPORTS 15
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Detroit
4:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
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vs. Sharks
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CSN-CAL
4/23
vs. Wild
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@Portland
7:30 p.m.
CSN-BAY
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7:30 p.m.
TNT
4/11
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/15
@Phoenix
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
vs. Kings
7:30 p.m
CSN-CAL
4/16
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/11
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
4/17
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/10
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/16
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/14
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
@Cubs
10:05a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/13
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11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/14
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/16
vs. Rockies
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/10
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/11
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Tigers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/12
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Portland
7:30p.m.
NBCSPORTS
4/14
vs. Portland
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
WEDNESDAY
BASEBALL
Crystal Springs at Menlo School, Burlingame at
Carlmont,Menlo-AthertonatTerraNova,Half Moon
Bay at Aragon, Capuchino at Hillsdale, 4 p.m.
SOFTBALL
Menlo-Atherton vs.El Camino at Terrabay Field,Jef-
ferson at Mills,Woodside at San Mateo, 4 p.m.
BADMINTON
Crystal Springs at Capuchino, 4 p.m.
BOYSTENNIS
Priory at Menlo School, 3:30 p.m.
TRACKANDFIELD
Valley Christian at Serra, 3 p.m.; WBAL Meet #3 at
Bellarmine, 3:30 p.m.
SWIMMING
Notre Dame-SJ/Castilleja/Mercy-Burlingame at Sa-
cred Heart Prep, Kings Academy at Menlo School,
4 p.m.
BOYS LACROSSE
Los Gatos at Menlo School, Menlo-Atherton at Sa-
cred Heart Prep, 4 p.m.; Palo Alto at Burlingame, 7
p.m.
WHATS ON TAP
BASEBALL
Mills 7, El Camino5
Mills 4002010 7103
El Camino0030200 583
WP Moshkounian.S Sanchez.LP Cormi-
can.HR McWhirter,McHugh (M).2B Vallans,
Esponilla(M);Giuliani (EC).Multiplehits Esponilla
2,Vallans 3, McHugh 3 (M); Giuliani 2 (EC). Multiple
RBIs McWhirter 3,McHugh 3 (M);Giuliani 2 (EC).
Records Mills 5-0 PAL Ocean, 6-9 overall; El
Camino 4-1, 7-9.
Sequoia4, SouthCity1
Sequoia0002002 441
SouthCity0000001 132
WP Smith (3-1).LP Rangel (2-5).2B Ortiz
(S).Multiple hits none.Multiple RBIs Ortiz 2,
Avelar 2 (S). Records Sequoia 4-1 PAL Ocean, 8-
8-1 overall; South City 1-4, 4-12.
SanMateo9, Westmoor 7
SanMateo0500130 991
Westmoor 0100006 732
WP Sanft.S Fuginaga.LP Palitin. Multiple
hits Fuginagi 2, Sanft 2, Clayton 2 (SM). Multi-
pleRBIs Fuginagi 3,Sanft 2(SM).Records San
Mateo 1-4 PAL Ocean, 2-9 overall; Westmoor 0-5.
BOYSTENNIS
Aragon5, SanMateo2
SINGLES Hughes(A) d.D.Pantuso5-0,retired;Kr-
ishna (SM) d. Wang 6-3, 2-6, (10-8); Joshi (A) d. S.
Pantuso 6-1,6-0; Liu (A) d.Young 6-0,6-1.DOUBLES
Bellon-Ngrichemat (A) d. Hu-Bhamdipit 6-3, 6-
2; Fowler-Ilyin (A) d. Loew-Yeh 6-0, 6-0;
Ghosh-Huang(SM) d.Jain-Gallardo7-5,7-5.Records
Aragon 9-2 PAL Bay, 11-4 overall; San Mateo 4-
7.
Menlo-Atherton5, Burlingame2
SINGLES R. Fratt (MA) d. Taggart 5-7, 6-2, 6-3;
Miller (B) d.Menjivar 4-6,6-1,6-4; Matthews (MA) d.
Tsu 7-6(4), 6-4; Anderson (B) d.Volpe 6-1, 6-3. DOU-
BLES Iyer-LaPorte (MA) d. Stevenson-Yee 6-3,
6-0; Finn-Wentz (MA) d. Battat-Martinucci 4-6, 7-
6(6), 6-2; Novak-Cole (MA) d.Yu-Zhang 6-2, 6-2.
SOFTBALL
SacredHeart Cathedral 10, ND-Belmont 6
NotreDame2022000 6135
SHC134020x 1092
WP Gallegos.LP Mifsud.HR Lynch (SHC).
2B Gallegos (SHC). Multiple hits Gallegos 3
(SHC); Cosgrave 3, O.Vierra 2 (ND). Multiple RBIs
Gallegos 3,Lynch 3 (SHC);Cosgrave 2 (ND).Records
Notre Dame-Belmont 0-5 WCAL, 8-10 overall.
COLLEGEBASEBALL
CSM6, Ohlone1
Ohlone010000000 162
CSM01104000x680
WP Grotz (6-2).LP Harper (3-4).2B Crowl
(O). Multiple hits Kalawaia 2, Everhart 2 (O); De-
Fazio2,Robinson2,Vonmose2(CSM).MultipleRBIs
none. Records CSM 11-5 Coast Conference,
17-13 overall; Ohlone 9-8, 14-15.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
Raiders sign four
defensive free agents
ALAMEDA Oakland Raiders general
manager Reggie McKenzie is looking for bet-
ter luck this season with his free-agent corner-
back additions.
The Raiders signed Mike Jenkins on
Tuesday to team with the recently added Tracy
Porter to add experience to an untested sec-
ondary. Oakland also signed free agent safety
Usama Young and brought back free agent
defensive end Andre Carter and cornerback
Joselio Hanson for their second seasons with
the team.
Before these latest additions of former
starters in the NFL, the other cornerbacks on
the Raiders roster had combined for four
career starts.
Jenkins entered the league in 2008 as a rst-
round pick out of South Florida. He emerged
as one of the leagues best cornerbacks in his
second year when he had the ve intercep-
tions, 19 passes defensed, held opposing
receivers to catches on less than half the balls
thrown his direction and made the Pro Bowl.
But since then, Jenkins struggled in cover-
age and eventually lost his starting job with
the Cowboys. Over the past three seasons,
Jenkins has allowed quarterbacks to complete
61.8 percent of their passes thrown his direc-
tion with 11 touchdowns for a passer rating of
108.4, according to Pro Football Focus.
Sports brief
16
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
are contesting specic numbers at one high
school which might positively impact the
county tally.
Most individual districts saw an increase in
graduation rates and a decrease in dropouts
except for Sequoia Union. Sequoia Unions
class of 2011-12 cohort showed a graduation
rate of 80 percent and a 12.4 percent dropout
rate. The year before, the class had an 84.9
percent graduation rate and a 7.8 percent
dropout rate.
As a district, South San Francisco Unied
boasted the best rates with 94.1 percent of the
2012 class graduating and a 3 percent dropout
rate.
Superintendent Alejandro Hogan was excit-
ed about the numbers.
There has been a deliberate and compre-
hensive effort on the part of our high school
counselors to guide our students so that they
can stay the course and on track for gradua-
tion, he said.
In terms of graduation rates for the compre-
hensive schools, Aragon High in San Mateo
had the highest with 98.1 percent followed by
El Camino High in South San Francisco with
97.7 percent. Pescadero High has the lowest
graduation rate at 80.8 still above the state
average.
On the other hand, Capuchino High in San
Bruno has the highest reported dropout rate at
17.6 percent. However, the San Mateo Union
High School District is contesting the number.
A group of 41 students were included in the
assessment who were not students, explained
Andy Parsons, associate superintendent of
instruction for the San Mateo Union High
School District. Those students showed up as
dropouts skewing the numbers. A request has
been made to the state to adjust the statistics.
The district estimates Capuchinos graduation
rate to be 94.3 percent and the dropout rate to
be 4 percent. Adjusting these numbers should
cause a boost to both San Mateo Union and
the county-wide numbers.
Graduation and dropout rates for counties,
districts and schools across California were
calculated based on four-year cohort informa-
tion using the California Longitudinal Pupil
Achievement Data System, known as CAL-
PADS. This is the third time this four-year
cohort information was calculated, meaning
data can only be compared to graduation rates
starting with the class of 2010. Rates for ear-
lier classes were calculated differently.
Graduation and dropout rates do not show the
whole picture, which causes some numbers to
not add up to 100 percent. Some students who
are not counted are still enrolled in school, are
non-diploma special education students or
took and passed the General Educational
Development Test. Also, the rates are calcu-
lated for high school students in grades nine
through 12 and do not include students who
drop out in middle school.
There are great things happening in
Californias schools every day, and the
upward climb of our graduation rate bears that
out, State Superintendent Tom Torlakson
wrote in a prepared statement. While I am
glad to announce that we are moving in the
right direction, the fact remains that we must
keep moving to ensure that every California
student graduates ready to succeed in the
world they will nd outside our classrooms.
To download state, county, district and
school graduation and dropout rates visit the
California Department of Education
DataQuest website at
http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
RATES
On Tuesday, the California Department of
Education released cohort graduation and
dropout rates collected from 2008 to 2012
using the California Longitudinal Pupil
Achievement Data System. Percentages for
each district during that period are listed
below, then for the comprehensive schools
within those districts. The rst is the
graduation rate followed by the dropout
rates for the class of 2011-12. The
percentages do not add up to 100 since
some students are still enrolled in school,
are non-diploma special education students
or passed the General Educational
Development Test.*Numbers for San Mateo
Union High School District and Capuchino
High School are being contested.
San Mateo County 83.3/11
Cabrillo Unied 85.2/9.1
Half Moon Bay 89.8/15
Jefferson Union High 88.7/9.2
Jefferson 83.1/12.9
Oceana 85.7/7.6
Terra Nova 95.4/3.4
Westmoor 92.8/5.6
La Honda-Pescadero Unied 80.8/7.7
Pescadero 80.8/7.7
San Mateo Union High 90.3/6.6*
Aragon 98.1/1.5
Burlingame 93.8/3.3
Capuchino 81/17.6*
Hillsdale 90/5.5
Mills 96.4/2.4
San Mateo 90.3/6.6
Sequoia Union High 80/12.4
Carlmont 92.8/5
Menlo-Atherton 86.3/9.3
Sequoia 83.1/10.4
Woodside 85.5/4.6
Summit Prep 92.1/5
South San Francisco Unied 94.1/3
El Camino 97.7/1.5
South San Francisco 95.4/2.6
*Source: California Department of Education
Graduates and dropouts
surveillance vehicle or, in other words, a
drone, according to the Oakland Tribune.
Roberts also writes for the San Francisco
Examiner and posted an article with it that
contained the correct information, that
$70,000 in federal funding was approved but
that the Sheriffs Ofce has no plans now to
actually purchase a drone due to the federal
sequester.
Roberts called the Daily Journal Tuesday to
explain the mistake.
It was a logical leap, Roberts said about
the NBC article.
An editor allegedly assumed that since the
funding was approved that the county would
make the purchase, he told the Daily Journal.
That logical leap, however, turned into a big
headache for the public information ofcer at
the Sheriffs Ofce who elded questions
about the drone story most of Tuesday morn-
ing.
The Bay Area Urban Areas Security
Initiative approved the $70,000 grant request
last month for the Sheriffs Ofce to purchase
a small surveillance drone called a fully
autonomous first responder made by
Lockheed-Martin.
But drones, Lim wrote to Munks in the
email, as you know ... carry legitimate issues
regarding privacy rights and civil liberties.
Munks replied to Lim that he understands
the concern.
While it is true that we considered the
acquisition of a drone for search and
rescue/homeland security activities some time
ago when they rst became commercially
available to law enforcement, we chose not to
advance the request in recognition of the
unsettled political and civil liberties land-
scape. I dont anticipate this proposal resur-
facing anytime soon, Munks wrote Lim in an
email.
Lim hopes the proposal does not resurface
any time soon but wants some assurance from
the county that the drone idea has been
dropped, especially after contacting staff at
the Bay Area Urban Areas Security Initiative
himself yesterday.
According to UASI staff who I spoke with
this morning, while the drone is currently list-
ed as a below the line project, your approval
authority representative, Undersheriff Carlos
Bolanos, has the authority to move that item
above the line and give it priority for funding
at any time, Lim wrote in a second email to
Munks. If the county is truly not seeking to
purchase a drone, I would ask that you remove
the AirCover QuadRotor Unmanned Air
System from the list of West Bay Hub
Projects to remove any confusion.
Munks wrote in an email to the Daily
Journal, however, that seeking money for a
drone is not in the departments foreseeable
future.
We have already decided not to pursue this
project, Munks wrote the Daily Journal in an
email.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
DRONE
FOOD 17
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Sara Moulton
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The best-tasting veggie burger Ive ever met
is falafel. A product of the Middle East, falafel
are deep-fried fritters made from ground
chickpeas or fava beans that are tucked into
pita pockets and drizzled with tahini. They are
delicious, hearty, inexpensive and relatively
healthy.
And if youre lucky enough to live in a city
like New York, they are sold by street vendors
on nearly every corner.
But if youre a home cook and want to make
your falafel from scratch, you face at least a
couple of challenges. The classic recipe calls
for dried chickpeas or fava beans, which must
be soaked in water overnight, a time-consum-
ing requirement that may persuade you to call
the whole thing off.
Happily, fava beans are in season now, so
my recipe calls for fresh ones, which saves
you from having to mess with the dried ver-
sion the night before. However, because fresh
beans have more moisture than dried, getting
them to hold their shape when pureed and
formed into patties means adding a binder, in
this case, an egg.
The second hurdle for the home cook is the
frying. Apart from the inherent unhealthiness
of deep-fried anything, the process itself is
really a pain. I gured there had to be a health-
ier and easier way to cook falafel, a way that
kissed off the deep-frying and yet somehow
retained their trademark crunchiness.
Panko, those wonderful, super-crispy,
Japanese breadcrumbs, were the answer. After
I pureed the fava beans and added the avor-
ings, I chilled the mixture in the refrigerator to
help it rm up. Then I shaped the puree into
burgers, coated them with the panko, and
placed them in a hot skillet with just a little
oil. They crisped up great.
Finally, I topped the falafel with a garlicky
cucumber yogurt sauce, which is just as
refreshing and avorful as tahini, but has far
fewer calories. I was pleased to note that the
family attacked these burgers with their usual
gusto, even though they contain no animal
protein. Now theres a triumph.
FAVA BEAN FALAFEL BURGERS
WITH CUCUMBER YOGURT SAUCE
If you buy fresh fava beans, youll need to
peel and cook them. To do this, remove the
beans from the pods and cook in boiling salt-
ed water until just tender. Depending on the
size of the bean, this should take 2 to 8 min-
utes. Drain and transfer to a bowl of ice water.
When cool, slip the skins off the beans and
proceed with the recipe. Some grocers also
sell fresh or frozen peeled favas. If you cant
nd favas, substitute frozen lima beans.
Start to nish: 1 hour (30 minutes active)
Servings: 4
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
1/2 cup nely chopped yellow onion
1 1/2 teaspoons minced garlic, divided
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/4 teaspoon hot smoked paprika or cayenne
pepper
1 3/4 cups shelled peeled fresh fava beans or
frozen lima beans (thawed)
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons tahini (stir well before meas-
uring)
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
A fry-free take on fava bean falafel burgers
See BURGER, Page 18
Falafel is delicious, hearty, inexpensive and relatively healthy.
18
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD/LOCAL
EXPIRES: April 30, 2013
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1 cup plain non-fat Greek yogurt
4-inch slice seedless cucumber,
coarsely grated (about 1/2 cup, packed)
3/4 cup panko breadcrumbs
In a large skillet over medium, heat 1
tablespoon of the oil. Reduce the heat to
medium low, add the onion and cook
until softened, about 5 minutes. Add 1
teaspoon of the garlic, the cumin, corian-
der and paprika, then cook for 1 minute,
stirring. Transfer to a medium bowl.
In a food processor, pulse the fava
beans just until they are coarsely
chopped. Transfer 1/2 cup of the
chopped favas to the onion mixture.
To the food processor, add the egg,
tahini, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and pepper to
taste. Process the mixture until nely
ground, then stir it into the onion mix-
ture. Cover the mixture and chill it for 30
minutes.
While the mixture is chilling, in a
small bowl combine the yogurt, the
remaining 1/2 teaspoon garlic, the
cucumber and salt to taste. Set aside.
Shape the chilled falafel mixture into
4 patties (the mixture will be loose).
Spread the panko on a sheet of parch-
ment paper and dip the patties into the
crumbs to coat on all sides.
In a large nonstick skillet over medi-
um, heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of the
remaining oil. Add the falafel patties and
cook until crisp and golden on one side,
about 3 minutes. Add the remaining 1
1/2 tablespoons of oil and turn the pat-
ties; cook for another 3 minutes, or until
crisp and golden.
To serve, transfer the patties to serving
plates and top with yogurt sauce.
Nutrition information per serving: 620
calories; 200 calories from fat (32 per-
cent of total calories); 22 g fat (3.5 g sat-
urated; 0 g trans fats); 45 mg cholesterol;
76 g carbohydrate; 21 g ber; 30 g
sugar; 34 g protein; 670 mg sodium.
Continued from page 17
BURGER
trailing Rarback by a wide margin last
night after the 10 p.m. results provided
by the San Mateo County Elections
Ofce.
It was an ugly race but its over now
and we have to get back to living togeth-
er, Rarback told the Daily Journal last
night.
The overwhelming victory, he said,
shows that the people have nally got-
ten their say.
Alifano will run again for the board,
he told the Daily Journal last night.
Im a little bummed out right now,
Alifano said. Their message save mil-
lions really kicked our ass.
Alifano hopes Cal Fire will be more
accommodating to the district in going
forward.
The three moved to ditch the contract
with Cal Fire because they said the state
agency was not fullling its obligations
but a San Mateo County Civil Grand
Jury report last year criticized the move,
saying the agency served the coast well.
Most voted by mail-in ballot for the
election as about 4,000 of those were
counted by the elections ofce before
precincts started reporting after 8:30
p.m.
The Coastside Fire Protection District
serves Half Moon Bay, the unincorporat-
ed areas of Half Moon Bay and the unin-
corporated communities of Miramar, El
Granada, Princeton-by-the-Sea, Moss
Beach and Montara.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
ELECTION
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
By Holly Ramer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEE, N.H. Unlike maple syrup-drenched
Vermont and lobster-rich Maine, New
Hampshire doesnt have much to call its own
in the food world. But it could nd a future
claim to fame in birch syrup, a nontraditional
but increasingly popular product pulled from
New Hampshires state tree.
For now, New Hampshire has just one
known commercial producer of birch syrup,
which is made in a similar manner as maple
syrup but tastes completely different and
commands a signicantly higher price. But
the industry is growing in western Canada and
Alaska, and its being studied as a possible
add-on venture for maple syrup producers
across the northeastern United States.
Cornell University researchers tapped 400
birch trees in Lake Placid, N.Y., last year and
300 more this year to determine everything
from optimum tapping times and collection
practices to consumer preferences. Similar
work is under way at the University of
Vermonts Proctor Maple Research Center,
where professor Abby van den Berg is study-
ing whether it makes economic sense for
maple syrup producers to expand into birch.
The rst step is guring out how much sap
can be extracted from the average birch tree in
the Northeast using modern practices, she
said. Then comes number-crunching to gure
out how many birch trees would have to be
tapped to turn a prot. Given that much of the
same equipment and techniques can be used
to make both syrups, and the fact that birch
sap generally starts to ow just as maple sap
dries up, it does present a tantalizing possi-
bility, van den Berg said.
Michael Farrell, director of Cornells
Uihlein Sugar Maple Research and Extension
Field Station, also sees a big opportunity for
northeastern maple producers.
We have all the infrastructure. So as soon
as the seasons over for maple, you clean up
your maple stuff, start tapping your birch and
make your birch syrup, he said. Where its
made in Alaska and western Canada espe-
cially in Alaska the cost of materials is
very high, and your shipping costs to get
everything in there are high. ... So we should
be able to make it at a lower price in the east-
ern U.S. than what is currently produced.
While interest in birch syrup is growing,
there are a few reasons why it has yet to catch
on, Farrell said. The maple season is short but
exhausting, he said, so many producers may
not relish the prospect of starting all over
again with birch. And though birch trees are
plentiful, they may not be growing close
enough to maple trees to make it worthwhile
for established maple producers. Finally,
theres the taste: Those accustomed to the
sweetness of maple are often shocked by the
fruity, tangy avor of birch, which is more
suited to marinades and savory dishes.
If you were to put birch syrup on pan-
cakes, you would regret that, Farrell said.
Birch syrup does have a following among
high-end chefs, and Alaskan producers have
seen success selling it overseas, particularly in
Italy, he said. Closer to home, the syrup sells
well in small containers as a novelty item or
souvenir, he said.
How you collect the sap and process it
really determines the avor of it, so if youre
skilled and know what youre doing, you can
make good-tasting birch syrup. Ive had it, he
said. Its way different than the bad stuff. It
doesnt have that bitter molasses avor to it.
And when youre making the syrup, that
smells incredible. It actually smells like
youre making raspberry jam.
David Moore, New Hampshires only
known commercial birch syrup producer, got
his start in 2008, when he was a student at the
University of New Hampshire. His senior
project involved testing the sugar content of
various birch varieties, and he found that
white birch New Hampshires state tree
was the sweetest.
Birch syrup explored as add-on to maple industry
We have all the infrastructure. So as soon as
the seasons over for maple, you clean up your maple
stuff, start tapping your birch and make your birch syrup.
Michael Farrell,director of Cornells Uihlein Sugar Maple Research and Extension Field Station
FOOD 19
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO The last call for
drinks is 2 a.m. in California, but one law-
maker believes thats just too early to set
down the shot glasses and beer steins.
State Sen. Mark Lenos proposal to let the
liquor ow until 4 a.m. as a way to draw more
tourists and with them more revenue and
jobs is already spawning a sharp debate
from Sacramento to watering holes in San
Francisco and Los Angeles.
Leno said the measure would make the state
more competitive with other hotspots like
New York, Las Vegas and Miami that serve
alcohol later into the wee hours of the morn-
ing or 24 hours a day.
Night-spot owners say a later last call will
be good for business, but law enforcement
ofcials argue that it increases the chances
that cities will see more public drunkenness,
violence, drunken driving and possibly fatali-
ties.
Lenos proposal, however, wouldnt set a
uniform standard across the state. Instead, it
would give each municipality the option to
push their last call back to 4 a.m.
It will be up to the cities whether they want
to participate or not, said the San Francisco
Democrat, whose district encompasses clubs
in the trendy South of Market district. His bill
is expected to get its rst public committee
hearing on April 23.
At Steffs, a sports bar near the San
Francisco Giants AT&T Park, patron Armand
Gaerlan liked the idea of a 4 a.m. last call.
Ive lived in New York City. If its working
there, it can denitely happen here, said
Gaerlan, who thinks the move would allow
for making later dinner reservations.
At nearby Nova Bar and Restaurant, cus-
tomer Kendra Chrysler said it was a bad idea.
Ill pass. I feel like nothing good happens
after 2 a.m., she said.
In Los Angeles, there is a buzz about a later
last call, said Barbara Jacobs, chief operating
officer at a 1920s-themed downtown
nightspot, The Edison. She said the bar is
making plans for a midnight breakfast and
cocktail menu in case the proposal passes.
Were creatively driven and so were going
to take advantage of it, she said.
Industry groups such as the California
Restaurant Association and the Hollywood
Hospitality Coalition are endorsing the 4 a.m.
last call.
Los Angeles hosted a record 41.4 million
visitors last year, one million more than in
2011. And, the city said, guests spent more
than $16 billion in 2012. The San Francisco
Travel Association said the city drew 16.5
million tourists who spent nearly $9 billion in
2012, up from the previous year.
Californias 4 a.m. last call bill already fuels debate
Although San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr said he thinks the extended hours are a bad
idea, state Sen. Mark Lenos bill has the support of Mayor Ed Lee, who said that if the bill
becomes law he would seek input from police, local bar owners and neighborhood leaders
before the city opts for a late last call.
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The internet is blossoming into quite
the virtual vineyard.
Online wine options are everywhere,
from ash sale sites like Lot18 offering
daily deals to Facebook prodding you to
send a little something for Aunt Suzys
birthday. And now theres a new genera-
tion of startups such as Club W, which
adds a little algorithm to your albarino,
using surveys and ratings to gure out
what you might like to drink next.
The click-and-sip approach seems to
be catching on, says Jeff Carroll of
ShipCompliant, a Boulder, Colo.-based
company that helps wineries comply
with shipping laws. Wine is a unique
product and it lends itself well to the
social aspects of the Internet in terms of
discovery.
Online sales have been around for a
while, with individual wineries selling
wine through their websites, a practice
that has become more prevalent as more
states relax Prohibition-era laws that had
banned alcohol shipments.
Today, only seven states have an out-
right ban on direct-to-consumer ship-
ping, though some of the states that do
allow shipping have various restrictions,
and 89 percent of the U.S. population
has access to direct-to-consumer sales,
according to Steve Gross of the San
Francisco-based Wine Institute, a trade
association.
Whats changed is the rise of third-
party sites run by companies that dont
make wine, like Lot18.com, which
offers special deals on wine. These sites
got a boost in 2011 when the California
Alcohol Beverage Control officials
issued guidelines allowing third-party
providers to act as agents in the sale of
alcohol but requiring wineries to stay in
control of the wine, making them
responsible for following all the relevant
laws. The advisory applies only to
California, but was seen as creating a
framework that others could follow.
That really changed the dynamic, says
Carroll.
Since the guidelines were issued,
major Internet retailer Amazon has got-
ten back in the wine business, its third
attempt, and Facebook has added wine
to the gifts friends can send each other.
Meanwhile, a number of smaller compa-
nies have jumped into the market.
Thanks to the data-gathering and
interactive capabilities of the new tech-
nology, online sites serve as more than a
digital catalog. Relative newcomer Club
W tries to anticipate what customers
want by basing selections on informa-
tion gathered from surveys on customer
avor preferences along with their rat-
ings of wines already purchased.
Club W CEO and co-founder Xander
Oxman says the idea is to combine the
convenience of a traditional wine club
shipment with the personalized experi-
ence made possible by tools that capture
a buyers likes and dislikes.
Click, swirl, sip? Interest in online wine surges
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tuesday, April 16
5:30-8:00
The Lagoon Room
Foster City Rec Center
650 Shell Boulevard
Come meet some of the vacation worlds top experts
in active, specialized, intensive, hobby-oriented travel.
Indulge your passions while traveling the globe.
Specialists will be presenting their unique
offerings in safaris, biking, wine and food tours,
eco-adventures and many more.
t4QFDJBMQSJDJOHGPS&YQPHVFTUT
t'SFFDBUBMPHTBOEUZQJDBMJUJOFSBSJFTUPUBLFIPNF
t%PPSQSJ[FTIPSTEPFVWSFTBOEXJOF
Your host is Travel Wizards,
serving the Bay area for more than 32 years.
Admission and parking are free.
Please RSVP at 650.696.6900 or
info@travelwizards.com now to save your place!
TRAVEL WIZARDS INVITES YOU TO THE
INDULGE
Y O U R P A S S I O N
TRAVEL EXPO
www.travelwizards.com
info@travelwizards.com
190 Primrose Road
Burlingame, CA 94010
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10
RSVP Deadline for San Mateo
County Newcomer Club Luncheon.
Noon. Luceti Restaurant, 109 W. 25th
Ave., San Mateo. $25. Installations of
officers for 2013-14 by Donna
Chambers and Round Square Table
discussion about new activities and
current ones. Checks must be received
by April 10. The luncheon is at noon
on April 16. Send $25 checks to Janet
Williams, 468 Shoreline Drive, San
Mateo. For more information call 286-
0688.
Computer Coach. 10:30 a.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Computer class for adults on
Wednesday mornings. Open to all.
Free. For more information go to
http://www.smcl.org/content/belmon
t.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Speido Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. Free, lunch is $17. For
more information call 430-6500.
City Talk Toastmasters Club
meeting. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Redwood City Main Library,
Community Room, 1044 Middlefield
Road, Redwood City. Learn how to
improve your leadership and
communication skills. For more
information contact
jason_maseld@hotmail.com.
Downtown Abbey Class: Victorian
Dreams and Edwardian Realities.
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Little House, 800
Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Local
historian Michael Svanevik will reveal
painful truths about both Queen
Victoria and King Edward VII.The class
will be held on Wednesdays through
May 29. $50. For more information call
326-0665 or go to
www.peninsulavolunteers.org.
Speak and Lead with Pride
Program. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Borel
Estate Building, 1700 S. El Camino Real,
San Mateo. OCA San Mateo hosts
annual Speak and Lead Competition
for local high school students.
Highlighting the talents of local high
school students, four finalists will
compete by speaking on the topic In
our evolving world, what is the value
of a college education and how might
I use it to benefit the community?
Open to the public. Light refreshments
will be available. For more information
call 533-3065.
Alpha Class Introductory Meeting.
6:30 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Fellowship Hall
of First Presbyterian Church of
Burlingame, 1500 Easton Drive,
Burlingame. Classes explore the
meaning of life in a relaxed setting and
include an informative video
presentation followed by small group
discussions. Meetings are held on
Wednesday meetings through June 5.
Classes are free. Optional dinner at
5:45 p.m. with a suggested donation
of $8. For more information go to
www.burlpres.org.
Team Communications,
Organization and Management
Class. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Skyline
College, 3300 College Drive, San Bruno.
Free. Please wear comfortable shoes
and clothing. For more information call
616-7096.
Millbrae Library Program on Family
Law. Presented by attorney Elaine
Frase, of Harris & Fraser. 7 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave., in
Millbrae. For more information call
697-7607.
Author Event: J.A. Jance. 7 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. The author will
read from her latest best-selling books,
Deadly Stakes. For more information
call 591-8286.
Mitch Woods Hosts the Club Fox
Blues Jam. 7 p.m. The Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For more
information go to
www.rwcbluesjam.com.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Redwood City Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455 Madison
Ave., Redwood City. Soil preparation
for roses. Master Consulting Rosarians
Steve and Diana Steps will share tips
on preparing and fertilizing your soil
to produce beautiful roses at this next
meeting of the Peninsula Rose Society.
Free. For more information call 465-
3967.
THURSDAY, APRIL11
Free Workshop Weigh less, live
more. Noon. 981 Industrial Road, Suite
C, San Carlos. There will be a lecture
on weight loss problems in America,
why diets dont work, healthy recipes,
quick tips and more.There will be also
be snacks. Free. For more information
call 224-7021.
Student debt. Noon. San Mateo
County Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Attorney Jonathan
Larsen will discuss ways to deal with
student debt, including what legal
steps may be taken to reduce or
eliminate the debt all together. For
more information call 363-4913.
Film Noir Movie Series: Sunset
Boulevard. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. City of San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 522-7490.
Music and dance of Bali: CSM Dance
Department Fundraiser. 7 p.m.
College of San Mateo Theater, Building
3, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo.
The event will feature Gamelan Anak
Swarasanti from Santa Cruz and a
documentary by Sasha Friedlander.
Suggested donation of $10. $5 for
students. For more information go to
smccd.edu.
Scholarships, Fellowships and
Loans Search. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. San
Bruno Public Library, Childrens Room,
701 W. Angus Ave., San Bruno. Free.
Learn how to search and quickly
locate scholarships, fellowships and
student loans at all levels of study,
using the Gales Scholarships,
Fellowships and Loans online
database. The class is ideal for
students, parents and education
professionals. For more information
call 616-7078.
FRIDAY, APRIL 12
Passenger Arrival and
Naturalization Workshop. 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. The National Archives at San
Francisco, 1000 Commodore Drive, San
Bruno. Genealogical workshop on how
to locate passenger arrival and
naturalization records. $15 payable in
advance. For more information or to
reserve a space call 238-3488.
Variety Show with Emcee Raoul
Epling & a BakedLunch. 10:30 a.m. to
1 p.m. The San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Tickets available. For more information
call 616-7150.
Reservation Deadline for Meet the
Artists Evening Reception at Filoli. 4
p.m. Filoli, 86 Caada Road, Woodside.
Free. Reservations are required for this
event, which will take place on April
18 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. For more
information call 364-8300.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Sign up for a
20 minute appointment with a
member of the San Mateo County
Library Association. Lawyers speciality
will be small claims and civil litigation.
For more information email
gard@smcl.org.
Shakespeares Twelfth Night. 7:30
p.m. Notre Dame de Namur University,
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. $10. For more information or
for tickets call 508-3456.
OperaRocks! 7:30 p.m.Taube Center,
Notre Dame de Namur University,
1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. The
Department of Music and Vocal Arts
at Notre Dame de Namur University
invites you to explore the unique
world of Opera Rocks! Draws from
400-year tradition of operatic
repertoire and mixes up familiar
stories with their contemporary
musical theatre counterparts. General
admission $10. Tickets can be
purchased online at
brownpapertickets.com.
Broadway By the Bay Presents
Cats. 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Starting
ticket price $35. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Fox
Theatre Box Ofce, 2219 Broadway St.,
Redwood City. Tickets may also be
ordered by phone at 369-7770. For
more information go to
www.broadwaybythebay.org.
Diablo Ballet performs at Hillbarn
Theatre. 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre, 1285
E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Diablo
Ballet presents classical and
contemporary dance works including
the Web Ballet, the worlds rst ballet
created online. For more information
call 349-6411 or go to
www.hillbarntheatre.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
engaging or simulating sexual conduct. He
will enter a Superior Court plea May 7 and
possibly set a jury trial date although attor-
neys in court yesterday indicated a plea bar-
gain may be possible. Meanwhile, Forrest
remains free on $100,000 bail posted imme-
diately after he surrendered in February.
Although the case is being heard in the
local court, Johnette Jauron of the state
Attorney Generals Ofce is prosecuting and
visiting Judge Robert Atack presided yester-
day because of Forrests close relationship to
local criminal justice ofcials.
Forrest, who served as chief of the countys
Probation Department since 2009, retired
from the post Dec. 31, 10 days after federal
agents searched his office at the Youth
Services Center and the San Mateo County
Superior Court placed him on administrative
leave.
According to search warrant records,
Forrest reportedly told federal investigators
who searched his ofce and home that he was
conducting his own investigation. Those
same records also indicated that investigators
recovered more than 400 pornographic
images from a USB drive and laptop and that
Forrest, when confronted by sheriffs
deputies in December, tried to kill himself on
the steps of a San Mateo church. He was
placed on an extended psychiatric hold but
later released.
Although Forrest reportedly possessed
hundreds of illegal images, the law typically
allows a person only to be charged for each
incident of possession rather than the total
number of photographs or videos. The Feb.
21 complaint filed by the state Attorney
Generals Ofce alleged that Forrest pos-
sessed child pornography once on Dec. 20
and another Dec. 21.
The Probation Department has a $76 mil-
lion budget, approximately 400 employees
and is the lead agency in implementing state
inmate realignment. Forrest joined the
department in 1977 and after assignments
that included work with juveniles was named
chief following his predecessors retirement.
An interim chief, Cal Remington, is heading
the department while the court recruits a per-
manent replacement.
Forrest, who earned $140,004 in 2012,
could still collect his county pension unless
the investigation proves his alleged illegal
conduct involved work-related locations or
property, such as an ofce computer.
Defense attorney Jaime Leanos did not
return a call for comment but previously told
the Daily Journal the situation is very stress-
ful for his client.
The Attorney Generals Office declines
public comment on the case.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
FORREST
By Ryan Nakashima
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS Television stations that
relay Fox programming are on board with a
threat to transition the over-the-air network to
cable and satellite TV if Internet startup Aereo
keeps reselling Foxs signal without paying for
rights, the chairman of a Fox group said
Tuesday.
Foxs parent company, News Corp., owns
just 27 of the 205 stations that carry Fox shows
such as American Idol and Glee. The rest
are afliates that are independently owned or
are part of chains of station owners. Steve
Pruett, the chairman of the Fox afliate board of
governors, spoke about the stations support in
an interview with the Associated Press on
Tuesday at the annual gathering of broadcast-
ers, the NAB Show.
Chase Carey, the chief operating ofcer of
News Corp., raised the threat Monday amid a
legal battle with Aereo. Carey said that if courts
cant stop Aereo from taking its signals for free
and reselling them to customers, the company
would have to make Fox a subscription-only
network.
Haim Saban, chairman of the Spanish-lan-
guage Univision network, echoed Careys sen-
timent.
To serve our community, we need to protect
our product and revenue streams, and therefore
we too are considering all of our options
including converting to pay TV, Saban said in
a statement.
Pruett said that Fox TV stations could send
out two signals one to cable and satellite
providers and another out over the free air-
waves. Premium Fox programs could be
reserved for paying customers, while the free-
to-air broadcasts could be of lesser quality.
Pruett said it was too early to go into details.
We are completely on board with Chases
statement, Pruett said. We are joined at the
hip, so to speak.
There wasnt an entirely united front.
Bill Reyner, chief executive of Mission TV,
which operates two Fox afliate TV stations in
Rapid City, S.D., said that while he understands
Careys position and believes Aereo is infring-
ing on Foxs copyrights, he regretted that cus-
tomers could be caught in the middle.
The real loser in all of this are those that
cant afford pay TV, Reyner said. Everyone
forgets that over-the-air television is free and it
serves a very important function. If you go to a
cable model, then all those people get disen-
franchised and that would be very sad.
Currently, anyone with an antenna can pick
up a TV stations signals for free. But cable and
satellite companies typically pay stations and
networks for the right to distribute their pro-
gramming to subscribers. Industrywide, those
retransmission fees added up to $3 billion last
year and are expected to double by 2018,
according to research rm SNL Kagan.
Last week, that business was shaken after the
2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York
issued a preliminary ruling siding with Aereo,
which contends that it doesnt have to pay those
fees because it relies on thousands of tiny
antennas personalized to each customer.
Exec: Fox affiliates on board with pay TV plan
COMICS/GAMES
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tuesdays PuZZLe sOLVed
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sudOku
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Jumble Page 2 La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Young chicken
6 After sunset
11 Take me to your --
13 Noted canal
14 Downhill skiing
15 Clear, as a drain
16 Speaker pro --
17 Victrola maker
18 Caustic solution
21 Feel anxious
23 Female whale
26 Charged particle
27 Blvds.
28 Sanskrit dialect
29 Worked with clay
31 Irrationally extreme
32 Collins and Donahue
33 Deliberately vague
35 Untold centuries
36 Lowest high tide
37 Zilch
38 Family pet
39 Camels backs
40 Utter
41 Belly dance instrument
42 Electrical unit
44 Prone to
47 Gives feedback
51 Brats opposites
52 Emailer
53 Approves
54 Physicist Nikola --
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1 Marlins st.
2 Aunt or bro.
3 Sharp bark
4 Amend
5 Extensions
6 Skater -- Kerrigan
7 Cuzco founder
8 Hoedown partner
9 Insurance gp.
10 Give a ticket to
12 Weed out
13 Happy rumbles
18 Walked favoring one leg
19 Anyone home? (hyph.)
20 Novel part
22 Cash in coupons
23 Cruise quarters
24 Ms. Newton-John
25 Over a broad range
28 Faux --
30 Loop trains
31 List of prior arrests (2
wds.)
34 Fog and steam
36 Birthday-suit wearers
39 Popcorn nuisances
41 Submit
43 Currycomb target
44 -- -tzu
45 Squid fuid
46 Turkish title
48 IRA investments
49 Util. bill
50 Mexican Mrs.
diLBert CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
future sHOCk
PearLs BefOre swine
Get fuZZy
wednesday, aPriL 10, 2013
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Youll do your
best work with enterprises you originate or
can personally control. Stick to these sorts of
undertakings, and youll go far.
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- The beginning of a
very interesting cycle could be under way. The frst
instance of it will be someone going out of his or her
way to repay a kindness.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- An endeavor that you
have high hopes for is likely to take a turn for the
better. Even if it isnt as huge as you envisioned,
relax and give it time to develop.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- Dont despair if one of
your projects isnt turning out to be as grandiose as
you hoped. It may just need a bit more tweaking to
make it perfect.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- This might be the perfect
day to light the fuse on something that you expect to
be very infuential. Timing is everything.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Transformations are
developing that could have a good effect on your
fnancial status. Though youll have little control over
them, the results will be pleasant.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Someone whose
infuence exceeds yours is beginning to view you as
a possible partner for an important project. Theres
a chance a benefcial alliance could develop.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Continue to perform
in ways that could impress your superiors, because
they likely have their eyes on you. If you do your
best, a promotion or raise might be forthcoming.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- People of all
types are likely to be drawn to you because, perhaps
without you even realizing it, youll have an exciting
charisma. A rise in popularity is inevitable.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- The lucky feeling
you have is likely to be accurate. Rely on it, even if
surface indicators dont appear to be supporting it.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you have some
innovative ideas or plans that you would like to
develop, go for it. Make this a day for thinking and
operating on a grand scale.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Although your
fnancial trends may have been erratic lately,
you should relax. Some stabilizing infuences are
starting to enter the picture.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday Apr. 10, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday Apr. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
LGBT PROGRAM COORDINATOR
Peer Counseling Program
Coordinate peer counseling services
to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and
Transgender clients. Duties include
recruiting volunteers to become peer
counselors and LGBT clients for peer
counseling services, and co-supervise
LGBT Program senior peer counse-
lors. Responsibilities include providing
outreach and sensitivity training in the
community.
Email: hr@peninsulafamilyservice.org
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROCESS SERVER - Swing shift, car &
insurance, immediate opening,
(650)697-9431
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
SERVERS/HOST WANTED. Apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos.
TRABAJO INMEDIATO
Esta buscando excelentes
Personas de limpieza.
Horas y buenas condiciones
de trabajo.
Buen pago!!
Uso de carro de compania.
MOLLY MAIDte puede
Ofrecer esto y mucho mas!
Bi-linque. Por favor llamar al
(650) 837-9788
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #320
San Mateo, CA 94402
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520511
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Antonia Garcia Arroyo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Antonia Garcia Arroyo filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Jose Manuel Medina
Arroyo
Proposed name: Jose Manuel Garcia
Arroyo
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/29/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 3/27/13
(Published, 04/10/13, 04/17/13, 4/24/13,
05/01/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255301
The following person is doing business
as: 1) COBRAhealth-Info, 2) COBRA In-
formation Packet, 3) COBRA Health
Coverage, 4) COBRA Health Insurance
Quotes, 5) Advisor, 6) COBRA Health
Coverage, 7) COBRA-Info, 8) _COBRA-
healthinfo_, 433 Airport Blvd., Ste. 550,
Burlingame, CA 94010 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Bankrate,
Inc a Delaware Corporation, DE. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ James Gilmartin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520744
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Yadira Rodriguez
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Yadira Rodriguez filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Estrella Ailyn Castillo
Proposed name: Streya Ailyn Rodriguez
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 17,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/25/2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/25/2013
(Published, 03/27/13, 4/03/13, 04/10/13
04/17/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255142
The following person is doing business
as: The Law Offices of Francoise Espino-
za, 840 Hinckley Rd., Ste. 101, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Francoise Caro-
line Espinoza, 16 West Barrymore St.,
Stockton, CA 95204. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/25/2013.
/s/ Francoise Espinoza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255000
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Clear Drain Plumbing, 2)Clear
Drains Plumbing, 3)Clear Drain, 4)Clear
Drains, 19515 Beardsley Road, Los Ga-
tos, CA 95033 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Clear Drain Corpo-
ration, CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 03/30/2004.
/s/ Jason Bayard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255240
The following person is doing business
as: Mancora Cebicheria Peruvian Res-
taurant, 2319 South El Camino Real,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Felipe Va-
lenzuela, 1225 S. B St., Apt. #2, San Ma-
teo CA 94402. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Felipe Valenzuela /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255202
The following person is doing business
as: The Olde Tonsorial Parlor, 245 S.
Airport Blvd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Joshua Lecannon Togia,
1206 Mariner Dr., Apt. C, San Francisco,
CA 94130. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Joshua Togia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254924
The following person is doing business
as: DCS International, 1098 #4 San Ma-
teo Avenue, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Troyer Automatic Doors,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
09/30/2008.
/s/ John T. Booth /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254687
The following person is doing business
as: Ocean Technology, 1461-3 San Ma-
teo Avenue, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Giada Technology, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/01/2010.
/s/ Sam Chu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254288
The following person is doing business
as: Reynas Housecleaning/Janitorial
Services, 15 South Idaho St., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Reyna Sandoval,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Reyna Sandoval /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254647
The following person is doing business
as: Premium Auto Service, 230 Old
County Road, #A, BELMONT, CA 94002
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Shady Awadallah, 888 Foster
City Blvd., F5, Foster City, CA 94404.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Shady Awadallah /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254929
The following person is doing business
as: SM Global Freight Forwarding, 145
E. Court Ln., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Tseng International Freight For-
warding, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/28/2008
/s/ John Tsang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254796
The following person is doing business
as: JCL Company, 3 Serramonte Center,
Ste. 621, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Charina Pedron, 401 Concord Street,
Vallejo, CA 94591. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Charina Pedron /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254910
The following person is doing business
as: Ampontheair, LLC, 3551 Exeter
Drive, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Am-
pontheair, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
01/15/2013.
/s/ Marissa L. Ampon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/20/13, 03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255141
The following person is doing business
as: Saigon Barber and Nail Shop, 35
South B Street, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Ji Hua Sun, 1692 Hubbard Ave.,
San Leandro, CA 94579. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Ji Hua Sun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254909
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Doggy Babies, 2)Doggy Buddies,
3)Bones Daycare, 1485 Beach Park
Blvd., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Doggy Babies, Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/17/2012.
/s/ Donna Biermann /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254801
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Al Carbon Pollos a la Brasa,
1531 Lago Street, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Cintya Heredia & Julio He-
redia, same address. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Cintya Heredia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
23 Wednesday Apr. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journals
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But rst and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer prociency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255224
The following person is doing business
as: VT Database Solutions, 317 Garden-
side Avenue, SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Tatyana Khmar-
skaya, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Tatyana Khmarskaya /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255377
The following person is doing business
as: Padgett Business Services, 951 Mari-
ners Island, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Christopher DeLong, 230 Amherst Ave.,
San Mateo, CA 94402. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Karen Jane Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255406
The following person is doing business
as: Glorias Beauty Salon, 148 N. B St. ,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Lucia Marti-
nez 1120 Folkstone Ave., #8, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94402. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 04/01/2013.
/s/ Lucia Martinez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254956
The following person is doing business
as: Balls That Listen, 9 Daffodil Lane,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: David
Wilkes Bourland, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ David Wilkes Bourland /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254997
The following person is doing business
as: Clean Drains Plumbing, 1440 Hud-
son St., #3, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Charles Mendoza, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Charles J. Mendoza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255005
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Photo Academy, 655 Skyway
Road, #202, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Renzo A. Gianella, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Renzo A. Gianella /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/27/13, 04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255267
The following person is doing business
as: Skillet Art, 139 Comstock Road,
WOODSIDE, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Ellen K.
Martinich, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ellen K. Martinich /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254795
The following person is doing business
as: Little Love Press, 12 Athlone Court,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Chihiro
Jameson, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/14/2013.
/s/ Chihiro Jameson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/03/13, 04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255384
The following person is doing business
as: B&B Services, 934 Evergreen, MILL-
BRAE, CA 94030 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Robert Lee Bone-
break, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Robert Lee Bonebreak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255270
The following person is doing business
as: 1) CoaStanoa, 2) California Crafted
14002 Skyline Blvd., WOODSIDE, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Kevin Allan, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Kevin Allan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255332
The following person is doing business
as: Stone Barn Farm, 1249 Cabrillo Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Kokera
North, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ John Disereons /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255281
The following person is doing business
as: El Taller De Los Muertos, 48 North-
umberland Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Edel Tapia, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Edel Tapia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255257
The following person is doing business
as: BP Traveling Notary, 1193 Beach
Park Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Olena Sigal, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/11/2013.
/s/ Olena Sigal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255404
The following person is doing business
as: Eric Anthony Fleming, 2319 Trenton
Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Eric
Anthony Fleming, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 04/04/2013.
/s/ Eric Anthony Fleming /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255386
The following person is doing business
as: Leo Yogis, 2207 Allegheny Way,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Lyana Blo-
khina, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Lyana Blokhina /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/10/13, 04/17/13, 04/24/13, 05/01/13).
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
TS No. 11-0123486
Title Order No. 11-0103739
APN No. 039-220-360
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 05/04/2006.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby giv-
en that RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant
to the Deed of Trust executed by MA-
HARRAM MAMMADOV, A MARRIED
MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE
PROPERTY, dated 05/04/2006 and re-
corded 5/12/2006, as Instrument No.
2006-071813, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of
Official Records in the office of the Coun-
ty Recorder of San Mateo County, State
of California, will sell on 05/14/2013 at
1:00PM, San Mateo Events Center, 2495
S. Delaware Street, San Mateo, CA
94403 at public auction, to the highest
bidder for cash or check as described
below, payable in full at time of sale, all
right, title, and interest conveyed to and
now held by it under said Deed of Trust,
in the property situated in said County
and State and as more fully described in
the above referenced Deed of Trust.
The street address and other common
designation, if any, of the real property
described above is purported to be:
1116 WEST HILLSDALE BOULEVARD,
SAN MATEO, CA, 94403. The under-
signed Trustee disclaims any liability for
any incorrectness of the street address
and other common designation, if any,
shown herein. The total amount of the
unpaid balance with interest thereon of
the obligation secured by the property to
be sold plus reasonable estimated costs,
expenses and advances at the time of
the initial publication of the Notice of Sale
is $888,461.56. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less
than the total indebtedness due. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept
cashier's checks drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state. Said sale will be made,
203 Public Notices
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand
that there are risks involved in bidding at
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on a property itself. Placing
the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you
are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to
the property. You are encouraged to in-
vestigate the existence, priority, and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county record-
er's office or a title insurance company,
either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware
that the lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and, if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 1-800-281-
8219 or visit this Internet Web site
www.recontrustco.com, using the file
number assigned to this case 11-
0123486. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled
sale may not immediately be reflected in
the telephone information or on the Inter-
net Web site. The best way to verify
postponement information is to attend
the scheduled sale. DATED:
01/22/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-
01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063
Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219
By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECON-
TRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt col-
lector attempting to collect a debt. Any
information obtained will be used for that
purpose. FEI # 1006.152149 Published
in the San Mateo Daily Journal on 4/03,
4/10, 4/17/2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
294 Baby Stuff
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5 AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30 downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24 wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
298 Collectibles
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. SOLD!
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, SOLD!
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17 Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, SOLD!
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14 x 21, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
24
Wednesday Apr. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Tons o
6 Blows, as a script
line
11 Has permission
14 One may be
passed around at
a reunion
15 Like the Vegas
strip
16 Honest prez
17 One of
Beethovens 32
19 Molls leg
20 More pitiful
21 Channeling
state
23 Gas from the
past
24 Rants and raves
27 Charitys URL
ending
29 Change to zeros
30 Social service
item?
34 Wing
measurement
38 More than
impress
39 Debit card ID
40 Where to get off:
Abbr.
43 __ Deco
44 Sweet root
46 Proverbial
nonexistent
meal
49 Davis who was
married to Ruby
Dee
52 Collages author
Anas
53 Place of central
interest, man
57 Dog in the FDR
Memorial
61 Hang up the
gloves
62 Hollered
64 Slick-whistle
connector
65 Has a meal, and
as the circles
show, what 17-,
24-, 30-, 46- and
53-Across each
does
68 Chi follower
69 Farsi speaker
70 Edible little
sphere
71 Oeuf seasoning
72 He bested
Alexander in
1804
73 Fragrant
compound
DOWN
1 Brain freeze
2 Jumbles
3 Snowboarders
aids
4 Venting car option
5 Parisian
possessive
6 Apt name for a
woman with a
green thumb?
7 Jeremy in the
2012 NBAs
Rising Stars
Challenge
8 Acting teacher
Hagen
9 Steep-sided hills
10 Spread out
11 __ Carta
12 Bead counters for
bean counters
13 Arabian republic
formed in 1990
18 Composer
Prokofiev
22 Creates some
drama?
25 Like the vb. to
be, in most
languages
26 Hunch
28 Sales __
30 Oft-grabbed ride
31 Be in hock to
32 Admission price
33 Not up to snuff
35 Part-goat deity
36 __ de Triomphe
37 Extreme degree
41 Some odometers
show them
42 Clay, since 1964
45 Songwriter Amos
47 Matter in court
48 Displays, as a flag
50 Montenegro
neighbor
51 __ Club:
conservation
group
53 Completes a shoot
54 1946 Literature
Nobelist
Hermann
55 Cybersales
56 Invite to enter
58 Took the hit,
financially
59 Time off
60 Venomous snake
63 Double-reed
instrument
66 Musical talent
67 Its __-brainer!
By Peter A. Collins
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/10/13
04/10/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
303 Electronics
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 (650)283-0396
304 Furniture
1940S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) , SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
304 Furniture
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31
Tall, 61 wide, 18 deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36x58 with one leaf 11 1/2. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5x2 $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
304 Furniture
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42H, 27 W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
306 Housewares
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
8 BY 11 CARPET, 100% Wool, Hand-
made, in India. Beige with border in pas-
tel blue & pink cosy, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
310 Misc. For Sale
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SHOWER STOOL, round, 14" diameter,
revolves, and locks in place, SOLD!
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31 x 70 and (1) 29 x 69,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " - GONE!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
25 Wednesday Apr. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
10 BOTTLES of Dutch Boy interior paint.
Flat white (current stock) $5.00 SOLD!
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3 & 4, approx.
20 of 3, 40 ft. of 4, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16 wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5 high by 10 long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Furniture,
Dishes, Art,
Tools, Books,
& More
no kids stuff
April 13th & 14th
9am-3pm
At the corner of
Carmellita
&
Armsby
in Hillsborough
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
430 Rentals
2 ARTIST STUDIOS for rent in Down-
town RWC. $310 & $327 monthly. Con-
tact Tom at (650)369-1823 Mon-Fri 9am-
4pm
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800, Pre month, Near Shop-
ing center, (650)697-4758
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
630 Trucks & SUVs
1989 CHEVY L10 Tahoe - 4w/d, Pick-Up
$2500., (650)341-7069
DODGE 06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4 wide, 6
1/2 long & 2 1/2 deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
318 Sports Equipment
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete Brickwork Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers Landscaping
Tile Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Concrete
Construction
BURICH CONSTRUCTION CO.
Carpentry Drywall Tile
Painting Exterior/Interior
Small Jobs Welcome
Free Estimates
(650)701-6072
All Work Guaranteed
Lic. # B979435
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
I do them all!
Construction Construction
26
Wednesday Apr. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
Housecleaning
Gutters
O.K.S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
ALS HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
Fences Decks Patios
Power Washes Concrete
Work Maintenance
Clean Ups Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing Drain
Cleaning Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES
HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior Roof Re-
pair Base Boards New Fence
Hardwood Floors Plumbing Tile
Mirrors Chain Link Fence Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST
HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)518-1173
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
All kinds of Concrete Stamp
Retaining Wall Tree Service
Brick Roofing Fencing
New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
Trimming Pruning
Shaping
Large Removal
Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Entryways Kitchens
Decks Bathrooms
Tile Repair Floors
Grout Repair Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPHS INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAYS
HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
27 Wednesday Apr. 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
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155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
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Home Care
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Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
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Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AUTO HOME LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
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DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
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(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
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& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
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1211 Burlingame Ave.
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Legal Services
LEGAL
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preparation: Divorce,
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Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
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legaldocumentsplus.com
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provide self help services at your
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Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
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Marketing
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Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Body $40/hr
Open 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
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ASIAN MASSAGE
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for Aurora Spa
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1685 Broadway Street
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951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
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2500 S. El Camino
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Needlework
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Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
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Wachter Investments, Inc.
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Licensing System ID #348268
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Real Estate Services
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DRE LIC# 1254368
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Lic.#4105088251/
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sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 28
Wednesday April 10, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT Al-Qaidas branch in Iraq
and the most powerful rebel extremist
group in Syria have ofcially joined
ranks against President Bashar Assad to
forge a potentially formidable militant
force in the Middle East.
The merger of the Islamic State in Iraq
and Jabhat al-Nusra forms a new entity
that could be an even stronger opponent
in the ght to topple Assad and become
a dominant player in what eventually
replaces his regime.
The new group, called the Islamic
State in Iraq and the Levant, underscores
the growing condence and muscle of
Islamist radicals ghting on the rebel
side in Syrias civil war. It also bolsters
the Syrian governments assertions that
the regime is battling terrorists and that
the uprising is a foreign-backed plot.
While the U.S. and its European and
Gulf allies are concerned about the ris-
ing prominence of Islamists among the
rebels, the merger is unlikely to prompt
a shift in the international support. Late
last year, Washington declared that
Jabhat al-Nusra had ties to al-Qaida and
designated it a terrorist organization.
To try to counter the rising inuence
of Jabhat al-Nusra and other Islamic
extremists in the civil war, the U.S. and
its allies have boosted their support for
rebel factions deemed to be more mod-
erate.
On the political front, they helped cre-
ated the opposition umbrella group, the
Syrian National Coalition, in the hope
that it will serve as the united face of
those trying to unseat Assad and admin-
ister much of the territory in northern
Syria that rebels have managed to pry
away from regime forces in the past
year.
The U.S. and other countries also have
stepped up covert support for rebels on
the ground by helping to coordinate
shipments of new weapons and training
rebels in Jordan, ofcials say. Those
receiving training are mainly secular
Sunni Muslim tribesmen from central
and southern Syria who once served in
the army and police.
The force is seen as a counterbalance
to the Islamic militant groups chief
among them Jabhat al-Nusra that
have proven to be among the most effec-
tive of the myriad rebel factions ghting
Assads forces, ofcials say.
The merger was announced by the
leader of the Islamic State of Iraq, Abu
Bakr al-Baghdadi, in a 21-minute audio
message posted on militant websites late
Monday. A website linked to Jabhat al-
Nusra known as al-Muhajir al-Islami
the Islamic emigrant conrmed the
merger.
Together, the groups will now be
known as the Islamic State in Iraq and
the Levant, al-Baghdadi said. The
Levant is the traditional name referring
to the region from southern Turkey to
Egypt on the eastern Mediterranean.
Syrian rebel extremist group
joins ranks with al-Qaida in Iraq
Egypts revolutionary
cleric suspended over sermon
CAIRO A Muslim cleric who became known as the
preacher of the revolution for his sermons in Tahrir Square
during the uprising against ousted
President Hosni Mubarak and subsequent
anti-government protests said he was sus-
pended Tuesday by a ministerial decree
following a citizens complaint about his
criticism of the current Islamist president.
Sheik Mazhar Shahin told the
Associated Press that an inspector from the
Religious Endowments Ministry, which
oversees mosque preachers, informed him
that he was been suspended while the min-
istry investigates the complaint.
Sheikh Salamah Abdel-Qawi, a spokesman for the ministry,
didnt return calls seeking comment.
Admiral says U.S. ready if North Korea strikes
WASHINGTON U.S. defenses could intercept a ballistic
missile launched by North Korea if it decides to strike, the top
American military commander in the Pacic said Tuesday, as
the relationship between the West and the communist govern-
ment hit its lowest ebb since the end of the Korean War.
Amid increasingly combative rhetoric from Pyongyang,
Adm. Samuel Locklear, commander of U.S. Pacific
Command, said North Koreas pursuit of nuclear weapons and
long-range ballistic missiles represents a clear threat to the
United States and its allies in the region.
The admiral said Kim Jong Un, the countrys young and still
relatively untested new leader, remains unpredictable after
using the past year to consolidate his power.
Iran says 37 killed in earthquake in south
TEHRAN, Iran A 6.1 magnitude earthquake killed at
least 37 and injured hundreds more in a sparsely populated
area in southern Iran on Tuesday, Iranian ofcials said, adding
that it did not damage a nuclear plant in the region.
The report said the earthquake struck the town of Kaki some
96 kilometers (60 miles) southeast of Bushehr, a town on the
Persian Gulf that is home of Irans rst nuclear power plant,
built with Russian help.
No damage was done to Bushehr power plant, Bushehr
provincial governor Fereidoun Hasanvand told state TV. He
said 37 people had died so far and 850 were injured, including
100 who were hospitalized.
Around the world
REUTERS
Residents and a Free Syrian Army ghter walk along a street lined with damaged
buildings in Deir al-Zor.
Mazhar Shahin