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Monday, April 15, 2013

DELPHOS HERALD
The
50 daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
OH House sends less, not more,
to schools, p3

Scott claims Masters, p7
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Entertainment 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
www.delphosherald.com
Library kicks
off week with
taste-testing
The Delphos Public
Library will kick off its
celebration of National
Library Week today with
a taste-testing provided
by local pizzeria Marcos
Pizza from 3:30-5 p.m.
Taste-testing will con-
tinue from 3:30-5 p.m.
Tuesday through Thursday
with the Chik-n-House,
Baked to Perfection and
The Point, respectively.
Tuesday evening is
also Family Night with
Tyler Nygren and his
show Tyler does Magic
in Library Commons.
The Mother/Daughter
Tea will begin at 4 p.m.
Showers
likely Tuesday
and chance
of thunder-
storms. Highs
in the lower
60s. Lows in the upper
40s. Chance of precipita-
tion 60-70 percent. Mostly
cloudy Wednesday with a 50
percent chance of showers
and thunderstorms. Highs
in the mid 60s. Lows in
the mid 50s. See page 2.
TODAY
Baseball (5 p.m.):
Jefferson at Lincolnview
(NWC); St. Johns at
Kalida; Miller City at
Fort Jennings (PCL);
Continental at Ottoville
(PCL); Ayersville at Elida.
Softball (5 p.m.):
Jefferson at Lincolnview
(NWC); Ottoville at
Ada; Columbus Grove at
Spencerville (NWC).
Track and Field: St. Johns
at Elida Tri, 4:30 p.m.
Tennis (4:30 p.m.):
Elida at Sidney Lehman.
TUESDAY
Baseball (5 p.m.):
Ottoville at Jefferson;
St. Johns at Minster
(MAC); Wapakoneta at
Elida (WBL); Kalida at
Arlington; Columbus
Grove at P-G (PCL).
Softball (5 p.m.): Elida
at Wapakoneta (WBL);
Continental at Kalida
(PCL); Columbus Grove
at Miller City (PCL).
Track & Field (4:30
p.m.): Fort Jennings/Carey at
Kenton; Ottoville/Antwerp
at Ayersville; Lincolnview/
Paulding at Continental;
Columbus Grove at
Hardin Northern Quad.
Tennis (4:30 p.m.): Elida
PD trains for Active Shooter Response
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS While
many were spending a cloudy
spring Saturday indoors, the
Delphos Police Department
was hard at work train-
ing for an Active Shooter
Response.
The training was hosted at
St. Johns Schools due to the
complex nature of the layout
of the structure.
Patrolman Chad Cupples
of the Bluffton Police
Department conducted the
class which included a Power
Point presentation and 4-5
hours of live scenario train-
ing with student volunteers.
Cupples said the train-
ing is necessary even though
many have the mentality it
cant happen here.
Sandy Hook was not a
large community, Cupples
said. We become comfort-
able in our small communi-
ties and because not a lot
happens, we feel it cant or
wont. We need to change
the way we think. We need
to assume it can happen here
and be ready if and when it
does.
To put the training in per-
spective, Cupples said the
last fatality from a school fire
was in the 1950s compared to
numerous school shootings
in the past year.
We still hold nine fire
drills a year and we dont
practice for this, he said.
Officers learned about
documented statistics of an
active shooter compiled from
reports from actual events,
including mindset and goals.
Nearly 98 percent of
shooters work alone and in
90 percent of the incidents,
it ends in the shooter com-
mitting suicide, Cupples
said. The goal of the police
department is to minimize
the activity in between so
fewer, if any, lives are lost.
Cupples also stressed
the facts about small-town
departments and that in many
cases, the first-responding
officer is going to have to
go in because he may be the
only one on duty at the time
and the first line of defense to
diffuse the situation.
The danger is going
to be imminent, he said.
That officer isnt going to
be able to wait for SWAT to
come from Lima or maybe
even backup from a fellow
Delphos officer. They need
to be able to assess the situ-
ation, think on their feet and
react appropriately to neu-
tralize the shooter and save
lives.
There could be a number
of things going on at the
same time. There could be
fire alarms going off, sprin-
klers going off, students and
staff running and screaming.
The officer is going to have
to ignore all that, gather any
intel he can and move toward
the problem.
K-9 Officer Chad
Haunhorst said the training
was a must for him and fel-
low officers.
We are far enough away
from Lima and a SWAT team
that we are the going to be
the ones going in, Haunhorst
said. We know that and we
know this can happen here
just as it happens anywhere
else. Delphos is not immune.
Weve all had the book
training but a lot of us havent
done the simulation training.
This is a good way to train.
Haunhorst added that
while hes on duty, his K-9
is with him but in a situa-
tion like this, the dog may
be more of a hindrance than
a help.
I would only take the dog
in with me if I had no other
choice; if it was just me,
Haunhorst said. If there are
Delphos Police officers Dale Metzger, left, and Dave
Clark work their way up the stairs from the St. Johns Little
Theatre in the elementary building Saturday afternoon dur-
ing simulation training. Officers were training on response
to an active shooter. (Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer)
During the Wildflower Walk at Kendrick Woods on Sunday afternoon, Park Naturalist
Mark Mohr shows the group exploring the ecosystem what Bloodroot (inset) looks like in
bloom. He explained that Native American Indians used the red sap from the plants root
mixed with other natural ingredients to create the red-looking mosquito repellent used by
the natives every day. (Delphos Herald/Stephanie Groves)
Kendrick Woods boasts bald eagles,
rare flora, walking trails
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
sgroves@delphosherald.com
KENDRICK WOODS Located in
Allen County, Kendrick Woods State Nature
Preserve is the largest park in the Johnny
Appleseed Park District. There are 159 acres
of extensive woodland encompassing a com-
prehensive ecosystem comprised of the larg-
est number of plant species in the area.
Park Naturalist Mark Mohr said that near
the southern end of Kendrick Woods is where
two bald eagles are nesting and it is the first
time they have inhabited the area.
The birds of prey mate for life and will
have 2 or 3 eaglets, Mohr explained.
Among the abundant wildflowers are sev-
eral species uncommon to Allen County found
in the mixed swamp woods, including; Swamp
Saxifrage, Virginia Bluebells, Green Dragon,
Fire Pink and Blue Cohosh. Mohr said that
the ecosystem hosts plant species that are not
Van Wert County
911 goes all-digital
BY LINDSAY MCCOY
DHI Correspondent
VAN WERT - April once again represents 911 Education
Month and Van Wert County 911 marked this month by taking
a step forward in the world of 911 technology.
Residents can now contact 911 from almost every device out
there, including the traditional landline as well as a cell phone.
Although the callback information that accompanies these calls
may vary among these different technologies. 911 and telecom-
munications professionals are working hard to make sure that
it works the same on all devices in the future, and the Van Wert
County 911 Center is now one step closer to this goal.
The former equipment and systems in the center in the
Van Wert County Sheriffs Department was approaching
its end-of-life point in 2013. It was this major variable that
finally pushed the county to strive forward in the technologi-
cal world.
This forced us to move ahead, said Van Wert County 911
Coordinator Kim Brandt. We want to keep the equipment current
and have something all-around capable when that time comes.
The new system is completely digital and is compatible
for technology that is yet to be put in place across the country,
leaving Van Wert and Ohio one step ahead in the 911 world.
Van Wert County 911 centers are now ready to receive 911
calls through text message and video, a huge step from calls
made from the traditional landline. This new technology will
allow people to reach help when they may otherwise be unable
in the case of an emergency.
Five years down the road, we are hoping all technology
is in place to have this system working to its full potential,
noted Brandt. Our dispatchers are not yet trained with the
system and phones arent yet IP network ready, but the state
of Ohio is a bit ahead of the rest of the country and is looking
ahead to the next generation of changes. The state is working
towards a mixed generation of technology and legislation is
already underway.
This system has also eliminated the old and very large tele-
phone book that was used to reference numbers all across the
area. Now, all of these numbers are contained within the com-
puter for easier access when time is of the essence. Everything
a dispatcher needs is now right within the system, eliminating
outside resources and leaving everything just a click away.
We are very please with the transformations, remarked
Brandt. Our dispatchers are already catching on quickly.
People are really excited to have this new system in place, and
we are looking forward to the IP network coming into place to
make our system fully functional.
Officers Chad Haunhorst, left, and Ryan Kimmet move
through the elementary hallway at St. Johns looking for
the shooter during simulation.
See TRAINING, page 10
See WOODS, page 10
1
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2 The Herald Monday, April 15, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
FUNERAL
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 213
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will
be accepted in towns or vil-
lages where The Delphos Herald
paper carriers or motor routes
provide daily home delivery for
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WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Mostly
cloudy with a chance of
showers and isolated thun-
derstorms through midnight,
then cloudy with showers
likely and isolated thunder-
storms after midnight. Lows
in the lower 50s. Southwest
winds 10 to 15 mph. Chance
of precipitation 70 percent.
TUESDAY: Showers
likely and chance of thun-
derstorms. Highs in the lower
60s. Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph. Chance of precipitation
70 percent.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Showers likely. Lows in the
upper 40s. Northeast winds 5
to 15 mph. Chance of precipi-
tation 60 percent.
EXTENDED FORECAST
WEDNESDAY: Mostly
cloudy with a 50 percent
chance of showers and
Thunderstorms. Highs in the
mid 60s. East winds 10 to
15 mph.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a 50 per-
cent chance of showers and
thunderstorms. Lows in the
mid 50s.
One Year Ago
To show how large the Delphos Public
Library is for such a small town, Executive
Director Nancy Mericle said the number of
patrons is larger than the population of its
city. While Delphos has just a little more than
7,000 residents, the library has 9,922 regis-
tered patrons who borrowed a book, movie or
other item 222,454 times in 2011.
25 Years Ago 1988
Jefferson downed Van Wert 16-10 in
girls softball to keep its record perfect at 3-0.
Melissa Bowers was the winning pitcher.
Play was highlighted by a Jefferson double
play in the second inning. Shortstop Deana
Schmersal threw to catcher Kim Kohorst for
an out at the plate. Kohorst relayed the ball
to Audra Cano for the third out at third base.
Officers for Ohio Child Conservation
Leagues district to be held April 23 in Fort
Jennings are Sharon Calvelage, general chair-
lady; Pat Liebrecht, treasurer; Chris Trenkamp,
secretary; and Alice Swick, Dimples and
Grins president. Hosts of the conference are
Sue Irwin, district president of Hicksville and
Karen Maenle, chairlady.
St. Johns girls and boys track and field
teams placed second in a triangular meet at
Parkway. The boys team had two first-place
finishes coming from junior Kevin Wrasman
in the long jump and high jump. The girls team
had six first-place finishes. Liz Wrocklage
placed first in both the 100 and 300 hurdles,
Bev Fisher in the discus and Sharon Wilhelm
in the shot put. The 400 meter relay team of
Chris Hughes, Vicki Kunz and Wilhelm and
Wrocklage took first. The 800 relay team of
Wilhelm, Kunz, Kris Weber and Hughes also
placed first.
50 Years Ago 1963
Approximately 400 eager children and
parents were on hand Sunday for the annual
Jaycee Easter Egg Hunt, according to chair-
man Don Schweller. In the one to four age
group, Billy Greve and Nancy Miller both
won a prize for collecting the most eggs. Each
found 60 eggs. In the five to eight age group,
Louis Pierce and Susan Teman collected 46
and 39 eggs respectively. Each won prizes.
The first social event of the season for
members of the Delphos Country Club will
be a Post-Lenten party and dance this coming
Saturday night at the clubhouse. Those not
contacted for reservations by the committee
may call Mrs. Howard Sadler or Mrs. Jack
Whitaker. Ottoville members may call Mrs.
Richard Bernard and Fort Jennings members
are to call Mrs. Paul Menke.
St. Johns Rosary Altar Society will hold
a bake sale April 20 in the St. Joseph build-
ing of the school. Mrs. John Marsh is chair-
man of the sale and Mrs. Richard Mueller is
co-chairman. They will be assisted by Mrs.
Richard Young, Mrs. Ambrose Wannemacher
and Mrs. Bernard Kill.
75 Years Ago 1938
Plans have been made for the annual
Middle Point High School commencement
program which will be held May 25 at the
high school auditorium at Middle Point. A
total of 14 seniors will receive their diplomas.
Members of the class are: Helman Baldauf,
Billie Clawson, Robert Engel, Robert Hessian,
Herthel Jenkins, Ralph Renner, Ethel Ritchie,
Esther Runyon, Floyd Schlereth, John Scott,
Charles Stemen, Leah Summersett, Kenneth
Wolfe and Donald Wright.
Plans for the 1938 kittenball season were
started Wednesday night at a meeting held at
the home of Russell Judkins, East Seventh
Street, recreational director under the WPA.
Four teams were represented at the meeting;
Coombs Shoes, Millers Opticians, Star Caf
and Loetz Market.
A number of Delphos sportsmen are
planning to go to Fort Jennings April 21
when the Tri-County Sportsmen and Farmers
Protective Association stages a smelt dinner at
the Jennings Memorial Hall. The smelt will be
received from Escanaba, Michigan. Richard
Cummings and Alex Heinl, both of Fort
Jennings, members of the board of directors
of the association, have been placed in charge
of the arrangements for the affair.
Corn $6.74
Wheat $6.90
Soybeans $14.24
CLEVELAND (AP)
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $74
million
Pick 3 Evening
0-8-7
Pick 3 Midday
2-8-9
Pick 4 Evening
2-4-2-6
Pick 4 Midday
8-0-0-3
Pick 5 Evening
1-2-5-8-6
Pick 5 Midday
3-1-8-3-6
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $80
million
Rolling Cash 5
11-12-15-26-36
Estimated jackpot:
$253,000
IT WAS NEWS THEN
At 3:55 p.m. on Friday,
Delphos Police received a tele-
phone call of an accident in the
area of the 100 block of West
Clime Street. The caller stated
that a vehicle was in the Miami
Erie Canal.
Upon officers arrival, they
came into contact with the
driver of the vehicle, Larry
Brincefield, 50, of Delphos, at
which time it was found that-
Brince-
field was
operating
a motor
vehicle
while hav-
ing his
driving
privileges
suspended
for a prior
OVI con-
viction.
Brincefield was cited into
Van Wert Municipal Court
on the charges of operating a
motor vehicle while suspended
and failure to maintain reason-
able control of a motor vehicle.
At 11:37 p.m. that same
evening, Delphos Police were
called to 227 West Clime
Street Lot 57 in reference to a
domestic violence complaint at
that location.
Upon officers arrival,
they came into contact with
the victim who advised that
Brincefield had caused physi-
cal harm to the victim who is
a family or household member.
During the investigation,
officers found probable cause
to arrest Brincefield on the
charge of domestic violence.
While arresting Brincefield,
the victim became uncoop-
erative and refused to pur-
sue charges in this matter or
complete paperwork. Officers
advised the victim that signs
of physical harm were present
and officers had been to the
residence several times in the
past for complaints of domes-
tic related issues.
Brincefield was transported
to the Van Wert County Jail
and will appear in Van Wert
Municipal Court on the domes-
tic violence charge.
Man loses
control, drives
vehicle into canal
Brincefield
Delphos weather
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 63 degrees,
low was 38. Weekend rainfall
was recorded at .02 inch. High
a year ago today was 78, low
was 57. Record high for today
is 89, set in 2003. Record low
is 22, set in 1935.
ST. RITAS
A boy was born April 10
to Amy and Ryan Schnipke
of Kalida.
Former U.S.
Rep. Charlie
Wilson dies
COLUMBUS (AP)
Former U.S. Rep. Charlie Wilson,
a Democrat who represented
eastern Ohio in Washington
for two terms after winning a
write-in campaign, died Sunday
in a Florida hospital, the Ohio
Democratic Party announced. He
was 70.
Wilson had suffered a stroke
in February while vacationing
with his family and was recov-
ering at a rehabilitation center,
Democratic Party officials said.
He fell ill Saturday night and was
admitted to a hospital in Boynton
Beach, where he died at about
2:30 p.m. Sunday with his family
by his side, the officials said.
Wilson spent 14 years in
Columbus and Washington
championing for the people of
eastern and southeastern Ohio.
He secured federal funding
for police departments, airport
improvements and small busi-
ness incubators, among other
projects.
PATTON, Elvin A.J.
Dick, Patton, 90, of Delphos,
Mass of Christian Burial will
begin at 11 a.m. on Tuesday
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev. Stan
Szybka, officiating. Burial will
follow in St. Johns Cemetery,
where the Delphos Veterans
Council will conduct military
graveside rites. Visitation will
be from 2-8 p.m. today at
Strayer Funeral Home, 1840
E. Fifth St., Delphos, where
a Parish Wake Service will be
held at 7:30 p.m. Memorial
contributions may be made to
the St. Johns Athletic Boosters
or The Van Wert Inpatient
Hospice Center.
2
Saturday & Sunday, April 20 & 21, 2013
2:00-4:00 p.m.
We cordially invite you to our
Open House
at the new
Strayer Funeral Home
1840 East Fifth St., Delphos
1
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
419-692-0055
www.raabeford.com
Mon. - Fri. 9 am -7 pm
Sat. 9 am -5 pm 453-3438
4 miles north of
Ottoville on St. Rt. 66
to County Rd. N.
Then 1/2 mile west, or
Give us a call.
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5
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2
2
BEINING
Nursery & Landscaping
www.beiningnursery.com
Flowering Shrubs
Ornamental Trees
Evergreens
Perennials
Bedding Plants
Garden Seeds
Fountains & Statuary
Helping you get as much
enjoyment from the
outside of your home as
you get from the inside.
Think Spring
Tama Rd.
CELINA
419-363-2230
www.kernsfreplaceandspa.com
Fireplace Units Available in Wood, Pellet, Gas, Electric & Corn
Elida Rd.
LIMA
419-224-4656
Visit Our
Showrooms!
Over 200 Units
on Display
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www.mohrsmilesohio.com
Call for appointment
664 Elida Ave. Delphos
Dr. Jacob Mohr
General Dentist 419.692.GRIN (4746)
Weve been waiting for you...
and your smile.
With summer right around the corner, dont put off
scheduling your dental appointment. Remember a
healthy smile is a beautiful smile.
Most insurance plans accepted
and payment plans are available.
GOTTA GO?
Well be there when you need to go!
Graduations, Parties, Events,
Construction Sites
Rent by day-week-month
On-site cleaning available
GROTHOUSE PLUMBING & HEATING, INC.
Call 419-695-3081 to reserve - Its better than going in the bushes!
www.grothouseplumbingandheating.com State Lics. #25576 #14379
Monday, April 15, 2013 The Herald 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
ANDY NORTH
1122 Elida Ave.
(East Towne Plaza)
DELPHOS, OHIO 45833
Bus. (419) 695-0660
1-800-335-7799
Call or stop by today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
OH House sends less, not more, to schools
AKRON (AP) A closer look at
state figures shows the Ohio House
budget delivers less money to Ohio
school districts than the governor
originally proposed despite initial
claims that a revised funding for-
mula would mean fewer districts saw
cuts.
During Tuesdays rollout, House
Finance Chairman Ron Amstutz told
reporters the revised K-12 budget
was to the point where no districts
would be receiving less operating
money next year and many of them
are receiving more.
Since then, legislative analysts
have released spreadsheets showing
how each district would fair under
the House plan figures different
experts are interpreting in different
ways.
Steve Dyer, the former state repre-
sentative who helped author the last
school-funding formula under then-
Gov. Ted Strickland, a Democrat,
estimates House education cuts at
more than $200 million. Dyer now
serves as an education policy adviser
to the liberal think tank Innovation
Ohio.
Veteran education-funding analyst
Howard Fleeter, of the Education Tax
Policy Institute in Columbus, esti-
mates the House budget spends $114
million less over the two-year budget
cycle that begins July 1 than Kasichs
budget would have.
Whichever figure is accurate, the
figures mean many of the 225 dis-
tricts the House said were exempt
from funding reductions under a state
guarantee may lose money, the news-
paper said. In all, the paper reported,
45 percent of Ohio schools or 275
school districts would receive cuts
totaling $291.6 million in the first
year of the House plan.
Trimming $82.2 million from
Kasichs education plan marks a
reduction of just half a percentage
point, with overall funding falling
from $16.3 billion to $16.2 billion.
Spreadsheets provided to the
Beacon Journal by the House show
133 districts could receive less fund-
ing in 2014 under the House proposal
than they are estimated to receive
this year, and 479 would receive
more. However, significant changes
in the funding formula, including
pass-throughs to charter and private
schools, make it difficult to determine
final funding amounts.
Confusion in analyzing the num-
bers stems in part from the fact that
multiple sets of spreadsheets were
released, none making a direct com-
parison of the two plans and their
relationship to the existing distribu-
tion rules.
A cap inserted by the House limits
school districts to a change of no
more than 6 percent in their funding,
resulting in about 364 school districts
losing about $901 million they would
have otherwise received.
Number of Ohio
millionaires
increasing again
DAYTON (AP)
Statistics show that the num-
ber of millionaires in Ohio is
on the way back up.
The Dayton Daily News
crunched the numbers and
found that nearly 6,300 tax-
payers who lived in Ohio in
2011 made more than $1 mil-
lion. Thats up 40 percent from
the 2009, which was the worst
year of the recession.
The number of wealthy
taxpayers did not return to
pre-recession levels in 2011,
but experts say the group is
expanding because of the
improving economy and rising
stock market.
By contrast, numbers
from the Ohio Department of
Taxation showed more than
seven in 10 taxpayers in the
state earned $60,000 or less in
2011. Another quarter of tax
filers earned between $60,000
and $175,000.
Last Ohio
bomb plot
suspect due for
psych hearing
AKRON (AP) The crim-
inal case against the last of five
Ohio bridge bomb-plotting
suspects could hinge on a psy-
chiatric competency hearing.
A federal judge in Akron
wants to hear evidence today
on whether 23-year-old Joshua
Stafford of Cleveland is men-
tally competent for trial.
His attorney says a foren-
sic psychologist who exam-
ined Stafford has found him
mentally competent, but the
decision is up to Judge David
Dowd. An earlier psych test
was inconclusive.
No bomb went off and no
one was hurt in the plot last
year. The four other defen-
dants have pleaded guilty and
landed prison terms of six to
11 years.
The intended target was
a highway bridge over the
Cuyahoga Valley National
Park between Cleveland and
Akron. The FBI said the
device was a dud provided by
an informant.
Information submitted
COLUMBUS The start
of spring ushers in Ohios
annual wild turkey hunt, and
hunters can enjoy the warm-
er weather in pursuit of this
popular game bird. According
to the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources (ODNR),
the 2013 Ohio spring hunting
season opens Monday, April
22, with the youth wild tur-
key season opening Saturday
and Sunday, April 20-21.
Ohio has a good popu-
lation of wild turkeys and
offers some great oppor-
tunities for a spring hunt,
said ODNR Director James
Zehringer. The wild turkey
is a true conservation success
story in Ohio, and we hope
to continue to build on our
turkey hunting tradition.
The 2012 hatch should
produce more jakes (1-year-
old male turkeys) this year
and help offset the poor 2011
hatch. However, woods may
be quieter with fewer 2-year-
old toms (male turkeys).
These turkeys are generally
the most vocal gobblers and
readily located by hunters.
Hunters harvested 17,657
wild turkeys during the 2012
youth and spring turkey sea-
sons. The total checked in
2011 was 18,162.
The ODNR Division of
Wildlife anticipates as many
as 70,000 licensed hunters,
not counting exempt land-
owners hunting on their own
property, will enjoy Ohios
popular spring wild turkey
season before it comes to a
close on Sunday, May 19. The
spring and youth turkey sea-
sons are open statewide with
the exception of Lake La Su
An Wildlife Area in Williams
County, which requires a spe-
cial hunting permit.
In a new tagging proce-
dure implemented this year,
hunters need to make their
own game tag to attach to
a wild turkey. Game tags
can be made of any mate-
rial (cardboard, plastic, paper,
etc.) as long as it contains the
hunters name, date, time and
county of the kill. Go to the
Turkey Hunting Resources
page at wildohio.com for
more info on changes to the
game check process.
All hunters must report
their turkey harvest using the
automated game check system.
Hunters have three options to
complete the game check:
Online at wildohio.com or
ohiogamecheck.com;
By telephone at 877-TAG-
ITOH (877-824-4864);
Any license agent. A list of
agents can be found at wildo-
hio.com or by calling
800-WILDLIFE (800-
945-3543).
Game-check transactions
are available online and by tele-
phone seven days a week and
during holidays. Landowners
exempt from purchasing a tur-
key permit, and any other per-
son not required to purchase a
turkey permit, cannot use the
phone-in option.
Hunters are required to
have a hunting license and
a spring turkey-hunting per-
mit. The spring season bag
limit is two bearded turkeys.
Hunters can harvest one
bearded turkey per day, and
a second spring turkey permit
can be purchased at any
time throughout the spring
turkey season. Turkeys must
be checked by 11:30 p.m. the
day of harvest.
The youth-only turkey
hunt is April 20-21 for those
possessing a valid youth
hunting license and youth
turkey permit. Youth hunters
must be accompanied by a
non-hunting adult, 18 years
of age or older.
Legal hunting hours are
one-half hour before sun-
rise until noon from April
22-May 5. Hunting hours
from May 6-19 will be a half-
hour before sunrise to sun-
set. Legal hunting hours are
one half-hour before sunrise
to sunset during the two-day
youth season.
Hunters may use shotguns,
longbows and crossbows to
hunt wild turkeys. It is unlaw-
ful to hunt turkeys using bait,
live decoys or electronic call-
ing devices, or to shoot a wild
turkey while it is in a tree. The
ODNR Division of Wildlife
advises hunters to wear
hunter orange clothing when
entering, leaving or moving
through hunting areas in order
to remain visible to others.
Wild turkey breeding
activity is primarily controlled
by the increasing amount of
daylight. Hens typically start
incubating eggs around May
1 in Ohio. Ohios current wild
turkey population is approxi-
mately 180,000.
Ohios Spring wild turkey hunting season begins April 22
Youth-only hunt
set for April 20-21
COLUMBUS (AP)
Ohios new license plate
design is out.
The state is phasing out its
old license plate and offering
the new design starting today.
Its called Ohio Pride and its
background features 46 slogans
describing the Buckeye State.
The Cincinnati Enquirer
reports that Ohio Gov. John
Kasich went to the Columbus
College of Art and Design to
recruit students to help design
the new plates.
Ohioans voted on the
slogans, which include
Americas Heartland,
Underground Railroad and
With God All Things Are
Possible.
The old Beautiful Ohio
plates will be available for
purchase until June 30, or until
they run out. Those replaced
the Sunburst plates over a
six-month period in 2010.
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4 The Herald Monday, April 15, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
By DAVID GERMAIN
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Baseball has scored a rare hit in
Hollywood, while another American institution Tom Cruise
has delivered his latest hit overseas.
The Jackie Robinson tale 42 took in $27.3 million to
claim the weekend box-office championship domestically,
according to studio estimates Sunday.
The film has yet to open overseas, where the sport is a
harder sell. But Cruise knocked it out of the park with a $61.1
million international launch in 52 countries for his sci-fi
thriller Oblivion.
That bodes well for the domestic debut of Oblivion next
Friday. The film stars Cruise as a workman on a devastated
future Earth who lands in a battle with aliens.
If Oblivion packs in comparable domestic crowds, it will
help maintain the action-star momentum Cruise regained with
2011s Mission: Impossible Ghost Protocol. That return
to box-office luster came after some fitful years that followed
odd turns in his personal life, culminating with the breakup of
his marriage to Katie Holmes last year.
Released by Warner Bros., 42 easily beat the domestic
start of an established franchise in Scary Movie 5. The
Weinstein Co. sequel opened in second-place with $15.2 mil-
lion, the smallest debut for the horror-comedy series.
Three of the previous four Scary Movie installments had
debuts of $40 million or more.
On the other hand, 42 outdid the usual expectations for
baseball movies, which usually do modest business at best.
Box-office trackers had expected 42 to pull in less than $20
million.
The previous weekends top draw, Sonys horror remake
Evil Dead, tumbled to No. 5 with $9.5 million, raising its
domestic haul to $41.5 million.
The $27.3 million opening for 42 is a record for a base-
ball flick in terms of straight dollars, topping the $19.5 mil-
lion debut of Moneyball in 2011. Factoring in higher ticket
prices, the $13.7 million debut of 1992s A League of Their
Own would have been on par with 42 in terms of inflation-
adjusted dollars.
The film stars Chadwick Boseman as Robinson and
Harrison Ford as Brooklyn Dodgers boss Branch Rickey, who
brought No. 42 onto the team in 1947 as the Major Leagues
first black player.
Its a story that has so much emotion to it. Jackie
Robinsons life had such an influence on our country, said
Dan Fellman, head of distribution for Warner Bros., who noted
that all Major League players will wear No. 42 on Monday
for Jackie Robinson Day, the 66th anniversary of his Dodgers
debut. Think of what a tribute that is for what he accom-
plished. Every player wearing 42 on his back.
With generally good reviews, 42 drew in older crowds,
with 83 percent of the audience over 25, Fellman said.
Scary Movie 5 was the franchises first installment in
seven years and had the same lukewarm reception as another
Weinstein series that returned after a long lag. In 2011,
Scream 4 opened 11 years after the franchises last movie
and took in just $18.7 million, a fraction of the $30 million-
plus debuts for the previous two sequels.
The previous low for the Scary Movie series was the
second one, which opened with $20.5 million in 2001. Scary
Movie 3 had the best debut, with $48.1 million in 2003,
though its total domestic haul of $110 million fell well short
of the $157 million take for the 2000 original.
Sometimes, when theres too big of a lag, people lose
interest. If its a Star Wars movie, nostalgia works in your
favor. The long lag works in your favor. People are loaded
with anticipation, said Paul Dergarabedian, an analyst for
box-office tracker Hollywood.com. Other franchises, if you
go too long, they lose that pop and excitement, and its hard
to get that back.
It didnt help that Scary Movie 5 got the franchises
worst reviews. Critics havent much cared for any of the
Scary Movie flicks, but reviews for the latest were almost
universally bad.
In limited release, director Terrence Malicks drama To
the Wonder had a modest start, taking in $130,000 in 18
theaters for an average of $7,222 a cinema. That compares to
a $9,074 average in 3,003 theaters for 42.
To the Wonder stars Ben Affleck, Olga Kurylenko,
Rachel McAdams and Javier Bardem in a dreamlike, poetic
musing on love.
Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S.
and Canadian theaters, according to Hollywood.com. Where
available, latest international numbers are also included.
Final domestic figures will be released today.
1. 42, $27.3 million.
2. Scary Movie 5, $15.2 million ($3.5 million interna-
tional).
3. The Croods, $13.2 million ($25.5 million interna-
tional).
4. G.I. Joe: Retaliation, $10.8 million ($15.6 million
international).
5. Evil Dead, $9.5 million ($2.9 million international)..
6. Jurassic Park in 3-D, $8.8 million ($1.3 million inter-
national).
7. Olympus Has Fallen, $7.3 million.
8. Oz the Great and Powerful, $4.9 million ($5.2 million
international).
9. Tyler Perrys Temptation, $4.5 million.
10. The Place Beyond the Pines, $4.1 million ($2.2 mil-
lion international).
42 scores big at home,
Cruise dominates overseas
BOX OFFICE
By SANDY COHEN
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES The
MTV Movie Awards spread
the golden popcorn prizes
around, and even included a
touch of Bollywood.
The Avengers won
three awards, including the
top prize, movie of the year.
Silver Linings Playbook
also collected three awards.
Several stars, including show
host Rebel Wilson, won a
pair of prizes.
Whats the opposite of
humbled? Were Biebered
to be standing here, said
Avengers writer-director
Joss Whedon as he accepted
the top prize Sunday. This
is the award that means the
most to me. I am so grateful
and very excited for 2015;
were going to bring you
Avengers 2.
The Avengers also won
best fight and best villain for
actor Tom Hiddleston.
Silver Linings Playbook
won best performance for
stars Bradley Cooper and
Jennifer Lawrence and best
kiss for the on-screen smooch
they share. Cooper accept-
ed his award and the kiss
prize. Lawrence was not at
Sundays ceremony.
Wilson, who opened
and closed the show wear-
ing Iron Man-style armor,
won breakthrough perfor-
mance for her work in Pitch
Perfect and shared in the
films award for best musi-
cal moment. Its stars, includ-
ing Brittany Snow and Skylar
Astin, opened the show with
a mash-up medley.
Other musical acts were
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis
and Selena Gomez, who
debuted her new song,
Come and Get It, with a
Bollywood-inspired perfor-
mance.
The MTV Movie Awards
are as much about the antici-
pated movies of the upcom-
ing summer season as they
are about the finest films of
last year. Fans vote online for
the winners in traditional and
irreverent categories such as
best fight, best kiss and best
shirtless performance.
Twilight heartthrob
Taylor Lautner won the shirt-
less award.
The show also includ-
ed new footage from next
months Iron Man 3 and
the world premiere of The
Hunger Games: Catching
Fire trailer, introduced
by one of its stars, Liam
Hemsworth. Stars from other
summer films including
Chris Pine, Zoe Saldana and
Zachary Quinto from the Star
Trek sequel and Vin Diesel
and Michelle Rodriguez from
the Fast & Furious fran-
chise appeared as present-
ers during the ceremony.
Other presenters included
Brad Pitt, Chris Rock, Adam
Sandler, Seth Rogen, Zac
Efron, Snoop Dogg/Lion and
Kim Kardashian.
Hollywood has increas-
ingly used the fan-driven
MTV Movie Awards as a
platform to promote its sum-
mer product. This year, the
show was moved up from
June to April to incorporate
the entire blockbuster season,
which begins in early May.
Honorees and presenters
represent upcoming movies,
and the ceremony is typically
peppered with commercials
for forthcoming films and
DVD releases.
Emma Watson, a star of this
summers The Bling Ring,
received the Trailblazer
Award. Will Ferrell wore a
three-piece suit covered in
dollar bills to accept the
Comedic Genius Award from
Game of Thrones star Peter
Dinklage.
The Avengers takes
top prize at MTV
Movie Awards
DALLAS (AP) Former President George W. Bush has
become a grandfather.
His twin daughter Jenna Bush Hager gave birth to her first
child, a daughter, on Saturday night in New York City.
The former president announced the birth in a statement
Sunday. The babys name is Margaret Laura Mila Hager.
Jenna Bush Hager is a contributing correspondent for the
Today show. Shes married to Henry Hager.
The former president says the baby was named for her
grandmothers.
He says he and former first lady Laura Bush met their
beautiful granddaughter today, adding, Jenna and Mila are
healthy. And our family is elated.
This is a big month for the family. The George W. Bush
Presidential Center will be dedicated April 25 on the campus
of Southern Methodist University in Dallas
By MICHAEL TARM
The Associated Press
CHICAGO Strains
of classical music echoed
on Sunday not inside an
august concert hall but in
a bleak Chicago jail where the
mostly teenage boys await trial
on charges ranging from dope
dealing to murder.
The concert was part of
a unique outreach thats the
brainchild of the Chicago
Symphony Orchestras musi-
cal director, the Italian-born
Riccardo Muti, who attended
the event at the Cook County
Juvenile Temporary Detention
Center on Chicagos West Side.
The concert included half a
dozen of the orchestras mem-
bers. But the center-stage per-
formers were some 10 inmates
who participated in a weeklong
musical workshop at the lock-
up. It culminated in the Sunday
concert featuring compositions
the inmates wrote in collabora-
tion with the professionals.
This is a wonderful begin-
ning for you and for us, Muti,
71, told the group after the
45-minute performance ended.
You will join society with the
sense of harmony you learned
here.
One composition began
with a double bass playing a
Bach cello suite. It changed
direction jarringly a minute
later as the teen inmates joined
in rapping. One sang about his
legal plight: I hope the judge
says I served my time. Im
praying God gets me out of
this jam.
Some of the boys parents
sat in the audience, several with
tears in their eyes.
When one of the organiz-
ers announced the inmates and
their families will receive CD
recordings of the concert, one
mother buried her head in her
hands.
Oh my God, this is so spe-
cial, she said aloud.
The goal of the outreach,
which has included other jail
visits, is to impart a wider
appreciation for music and to
inspire at-risk youth. It seemed
to work for at least some of the
teens.
I learned more about classi-
cal music, a teen named Ricky
told reporters after the concert.
He was identified only by his
first name because he is a juve-
nile charged with a crime. Id
heard of Beethoven and Bach. I
liked it. Some of the teens tak-
ing part showed less outward
enthusiasm as they performed.
Jenna Bush Hager gives birth
Chicago inmates, orchestra
members perform behind bars
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Monday, April 15, 2013 The Herald 5
www.delphosherald.com
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
Happy
Birthday
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Van Wert Bandstand
April 16
S. Scott Clarkson
Kathy Bonito
Ken Wise
Mya Conley
April 17
Erin Stewart
Bill Thompson
Erin Stokes
Andy Mox
TODAY
6:30 p.m. Shelter from
the Storm support group
meets in the Delphos Public
Library basement.
7 p.m. Washington
Township Trustees meet at the
township house.
Delphos City Council
meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
7:30 p.m. Jefferson
Athletic Boosters meet at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
Spencerville village coun-
cil meets at the mayors office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-3 p.m. Delphos Area
Visiting Nurses offer free
blood pressure checks at
Delphos Discount Drugs.
6 p.m. Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
7:30 p.m. Elida School
Board meets at the high school
office.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
Fort Jennings Village
Council meets at Fort Jennings
Library.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Noon Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. Johns Chapel.
6:30 p.m. Delphos
Kiwanis Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. Bingo at St.
Johns Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street. Sons of
the American Legion meet at
the Delphos Legion hall.
The Ottoville Board of
Education meets in the ele-
mentary building.
The Fort Jennings Board of
Education meets in the library.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5:30 p.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission meets at
the museum, 241 N. Main St.
5-7 p.m. The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
The 2013 Endowment Fund Scholarship Recipients are, front from left, Grace
Mitchener, Maggie Allmandinger, Amanda Lobsiger and Katie Vorst; and back, Daniel
Thompson, Caleb Markward, Matt Oechsle and Adam Schumm. (Submitted photos)
Van Wert County 4-H holds Senior,
Volunteer and Donor Recognition banquet
Information submitted
The 2013 4-H Senior,
Volunteer and Donor Recognition
Banquet was held on April 6.
The banquet theme was 4-H
Memories Last a Lifetime. The
planning committee was com-
prised of Vickie Ingman, Kim
Brandt, Brenda DeLong, Vickie
Marbaugh, Lionel Enyart, Carrie
Jellison, Jill McCoy and Robin
Farris.
Seniors presented their own
unique reflections on their experi-
ences as 4-H members. Maggie
Allmandinger spoke about the
influence that her projects and
involvement have had on her own
development and how that will
make the transition to college eas-
ier. Daniel Thompson performed
a beautiful musical piece on the
trombone and Caleb Markward
gave his own rendition of the
4-H pledge and how the support
of the advisors make 4-H a great
experiences.
4-H Alumni Colby Boroff
Kuhn was the featured speaker
of the evening. She spoke about
her own fond memories of 4-H
and how they prepared her for
the many exciting challenges and
opportunities she has had in col-
lege and her adult career.
The 4-H program is possible
through the dedication and hard
work of around 100 volunteers.
Active volunteers in the program
range from months of experience
to almost 50 years.
This year recognized for
their service years were; Liz
Gerdeman (10 years), Lisa Line
(10 years), Ginny Marbaugh (10
years), Sue Hempfling (15 years),
Donna Pohlman (15 years), Ruth
Lape (20 years), Susan Mosier
(20 years), Rita Adam (35 years),
Judy Wortman (37 years), Carl
Lape (41 years), Mary Ann
Salway (43 years) and Carrie
Jellison (47 years).
The 2013 Richard Jellison
Advisor award was presented to
Ohio City Blue Ribbon Workers
advisor and 4-H Council member
Brenda Delong. She has volun-
teered with the program for 12
years and has given countless
hours of dedication to her club
and to the county program.
The 4-H Enrichment Fund
donors for 2013 were also rec-
ognized at the banquet. Gold
Clover donors were Central
Mutual Insurance and Cooper
Farms. Silver Clover donors
were P&R Home IV Service and
Ayers Mechanical Group. Bronze
donors were; Heffelfinger Farms,
Charles and Vickie Ingman,
Charles and Linda Matthew, Terry
and Patricia Offerle, Wareen and
Marilyn Reed, Stan and Marcia
Weldy, Larry and Gloria Wendel,
Advanced Biological Marketing,
Farmers Grain and Ag, LLC,
Kennedy Kuhn, State Wide Ford,
The R.L. Adam Family, Van Wert
Service Club, and E.A. Vorst,
Inc. Other contributors include;
James and Diane Arn, C.W. and
Cindy Harting ll, Nancy Johnson,
Deb and Steve Knapke, Ken
and Marie Markward, William
and Pauline Weldy, Farm Credit
Services of Delphos, Don and
Susan Mosier, Denny and Jill
McCoy and Earl and Dorris
Gerdeman. Without the support
of these donors and their contribu-
tions the Endowment fund would
not be able to support the schol-
arships, and community service
projects of the 4-H clubs in Van
Wert County. The Endowment
Board members are Robin Farris,
Kendra Heffelfinger, Marilyn
Jones, Dennis Miller, Sara Lape
and T. Jay Gamble.
Senior scholarships in the
amount of $250 dollars were
awarded to Daniel Thompson,
Caleb Markward, Matt Oechsle,
Adam Schumm, Grace Mitchener,
Maggie Allmandinger, Amanda
Lobsiger and Katie Vorst. The
scholarships are awarded through
the Van Wert Enrichment fund
interest income from the invest-
ed dollars through the Van Wert
County Foundation.
The Van Wert 4-H Senior Class includes, front from left, Katie Vorst, Maggie
Allmandinger, Grace Mitchener, Amanda Lobsiger and Courtney Gorman; and back,
Daniel Thompson, Caleb Markward, Evan Williams, Adam Schumm, John Medford,
Matt Oechsle, and Nick Leeth.
2
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POND STOCKING
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6 The Herald Monday, April 15, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Jefferson, Bath split baseball DH
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@del-
phosherald.com
DELPHOS Jefferson
and Bath split a baseball dou-
bleheader on a cold, damp,
windy and mostly dreary
Saturday afternoon at Wildcat
Field in Delphos.
The visiting Wildcats rode
the 13-strikeout 2-hitter of
southpaw Eric Jordan to a
12-0 5-inning shutout.
In the nightcap, the Red
and White got a complete-
game 4-hitter by Tyler Rice to
grab a 4-1 triumph.
In the opener, Jordan
tossed 92 pitches (60 for
strikes) and gave up singles
to Ross Thompson (leadoff)
and Seth Wollenhaupt, hitting
a batter (Zavier Buzard) and
walking one (Zach Ricker).
For the Bath attack, Jordan
(2-for-2, 2 runs scored,
walk, sacrifice) helped his
cause with a grand slam in
the 6-run third inning that
blew the game open, while
Doug Sanders went 3-for-4 (2
runs), Caleb Norton (2 runs,
3 RBIs) and Jared Davis each
went 2-for-3 and Eric Heffner
2-for-4.
Jefferson used three hurl-
ers: starter Jordan Herron
(0-2), Zach Kimmett and
Tyler Wrasman.
In the second contest, Rice
(4-0) was even better, throw-
ing 92 pitches (61 for strikes)
in fanning six and walking
none. He gave up an unearned
run.
Drew Kortokrax led the
Wildcats with a 2-for-4 game,
while Kimmett knocked in
two.
Doug Sanders took the
loss.
Both teams had a run-
ner reach second in their
respective half-innings in the
first: Heffner (1-out single
and Jordan sacrifice) and
Thompson (leadoff single and
an error on a pickoff play);
but both were stranded.
The visiting Wildcats put a
4 spot on the board in the sec-
ond against Herron (2 1/3 IPs,
7 hits, 8 earned runs, 2 walks,
2 Ks, 2 hit batters), compil-
ing them on two walks, a
sacrifice and four hits, includ-
ing a run-scoring double by
Seth Collins (Sanders), a
2-run single by Norton (Cody
Schuerman and Collins) and
an RBI 2-bagger to left by
Heffner (Norton). Nine men
went to the plate as Bath led
4-0 at the end of their half-
frame.
The Red and White Cats
mounted their final real chal-
lenge in the home half: a 2-out
hit batter (Zavier Buzard) and
a line single to left by Seth
Wollenhaupt, with Buzard
stealing third with Gage
Townsend-Schleeter up to
bat. However, he was retired
by Jordan.
Jordan retired nine of the
next 10 batters he faced in the
next three innings (a 1-out
free pass to Zach Ricker in
the third), with seven of them
strikeouts.
Bath put up a 6 spot in
the third, this time sending
11 to the dish. They garnered
three hit batters: Tyler Stahr
and then Schuerman with the
bases loaded (Herron) to plate
Jared Davis and Gossard
(Kimmett); two walks, a sac-
rifice fly by Collins (Sanders)
that finished Herron on the
mound (for Kimmett) and
three hits. The big blow was
a grand slam by the lefty-
swinging Jordan that got
caught up in the wind toward
right-center field and plated
Stahr, Schuerman and Norton
for a 10-0 edge.
Bath made it 11-0 in
the fourth on a 2-out run-
scoring double to left by
Norton (scoring Schuerman
after a hit and stolen base)
but he got tagged at third
on a Townsend-Schleeter to
Thompson to Herron relay.
The visitors tacked on their
final run in the fifth against
Wrasman with a bases-loaded
single up the gut by Sanders,
scoring Jordan.
Our bats werent there
the first game. We took five
called third strikes and that
isnt good, Jefferson coach
Doug Geary said. Last week
we didnt play well in the first
game, either. Bath hit the ball
well today; theyre a good
team and a good measure for
us.
With the sun attempting
to peak out on occasion as
the nightcap got underway,
Jefferson got off to a better
start, with Rice retiring the
Bath side in order.
In their half against Bath
starter Sanders (5-plus IPs, 7
hits, 4 runs, 2 earned, 4 Ks),
the Wildcats started it with
two down. Drew Kortokrax
got aboard on a 2-base error
on his fly ball, advanced on
a wild pitch and scored on
Kimmetts liner to left. Austin
Jettinghoff singled to center
but both were stranded.
Bath tied it 1-1 in the top
half of the second on a lead-
off double by Gossard and
a 2-out 2-base error on a fly
ball hit by Bronson Best.
Jefferson got a 2-out infield
hit to second by Kortokrax in
the third.
The visitors got a leadoff
single in the fourth by Jordan
but couldnt bring him home.
Herron lined a knock to
center with one down in the
fourth and advanced on a
grounder by Buzard but could
go no farther.
Jefferson went up 3-1 in
the fifth. Wrasman blooped
a hit to center to start it and
Thompson was hit by a pitch.
Ricker laid down a sacrifice
and an error on the play left
the bases juiced. Kortokrax
scored Wrasman on an
infield hit up the gut and
Kimmett was plunked, scor-
ing Thompson.
Bath tried to rally in the
sixth by getting a leadoff
bunt single by the speedy
Norton but he was eliminated
by a Heffner grounder. An
error on Jordans grounder
and then a 2-out wild pitch
(with Cam Jenkins up at bat)
moved them both up a base.
However, Rice got out of the
inning unscathed.
Delphos tacked on an
insurance run in the home
half. Wollenhaupt lined a hit
to left to finish Sanders (for
Norton), Wrasman sacrificed
him to second and he scored
as Thompson, who was
injured sliding back into third
in the fifth, stung a shot up
the middle for a 4-1 spread.
Bath again tried to chal-
lenge in the seventh, getting
a 1-out liner to center by Best
and a misplayed grounder
hit by Davis but Rice fanned
Collins and induced Norton
to fly out to left to end the
day.
I liked how we respond-
ed; we needed to bounce back
and we did. That shows a lot,
Geary added. Tyler gave us
the pitching we needed. He
is starting to move up in our
pitching ranks to second or
third. We made some plays
behind him and we created
enough offense to win the
game. Jefferson (7-3) visits
Lincolnview 5 p.m. today.
Jefferson senior Tyler Wrasman snags a shot down the
third-base line and eventually steps on the bag for the third
out of the Bath second inning in game 1 Saturday. The
host Wildcats split a twin-bill with Bath at Wildcat Field.
(Delphos Herald/Tom Morris)
Game 1
BATH (12)
ab-r-h-rbi
Caleb Norton cf 3-2-2-3, Eric
Heffner lf 4-0-2-1, Eric Jordan p 2-2-
2-4, Collin Gossard 1b 2-0-0-0, Jared
Davis 2b 3-1-2-0, Doug Sanders ss
4-2-3-1, Tyler Stahr rf 2-1-0-0, Cody
Schuerman c 2-3-1-1, Seth Collins 3b
2-1-1-2. Totals 24-12-13-12.
JEFFERSON (0)
ab-r-h-rbi
Ross Thompson ss 3-0-1-0, Zach
Ricker 2b/1b 1-0-0-0, Austin Jettinghoff
c 2-0-0-0, Zach Kimmett 1b/p 2-0-0-
0, Drew Kortokrax dh 2-0-0-0, Tyler
Wrasman 3b/2b/p 0-0-0-0, Jordan
Herron p/3b 2-0-0-0, Zavier Buzard cf
1-0-0-0, Seth Wollenhaupt rf 1-0-1-0,
Tyler Rice ph 1-0-0-0, Gage Townsend-
Schleeter lf 1-0-0-0, Dylan Haehn lf
1-0-0-0. Totals 17-0-2-0.
Score by Innings:
Bath 0 4 6 1 1 - 12
Jefferson 0 0 0 0 0 - 0
E: Gossard; LOB: Bath 8, Jefferson 4;
2B: Norton, Heffner, Collins; HR: Jordan
(GS); SB: Norton, Gossard, Buzard;
Sac: Jordan, Stahr; SF: Collins.
IP H R ER BB SO
BATH
Jordan(W) 5.0 2 0 0 1 13
JEFFERSON
Herron(L,0-2) 2.1 7 8 8 2 2
Kimmett 1.1 3 3 3 2 0
Wrasman 1.0 3 1 1 0 2
WP: Herron; HBP: Gossard 2 (by
Kimmett, Wrasman), Stahr (by Herron),
Schuerman (by Herron), Buzard (by
Jordan).
-----
Game 2
BATH (1)
ab-r-h-rbi
Caleb Norton cf/p 4-0-1-0, Eric
Heffner lf/cf 3-0-0-0, Eric Jordan 1b
3-0-1-0, Collin Gossard ss 3-1-1-0, Cam
Jenkins rf 3-0-0-0, Tyler Stahr rf 0-0-0-
0, Doug Sanders p/lf 3-0-0-0, Bronson
Best 2b 3-0-1-0, Jared Davis 3b 3-0-
0-0, Seth Collins dh 3-0-0-0, Cody
Schuerman c 0-0-0-0. Totals 28-1-4-0.
JEFFERSON (4)
ab-r-h-rbi
Ross Thompson ss 3-1-1-0, Gage
Townsend-Schleeter pr 0-0-0-0, Zach
Ricker 2b 3-0-0-0, Drew Kortokrax
rf 4-1-2-1, Zach Kimmett 1b 2-0-1-2,
Austin Jettinghoff c 3-0-1-0, Jordan
Herron dh 3-0-1-0, Tyler Rice p 0-0-
0-0, Zavier Buzard cf 3-0-0-0, Seth
Wollenhaupt lf 3-1-1-0, Tyler Wrasman
3b 2-1-1-0. Totals 26-4-8-4.
Score by Innings:
Bath 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 - 1
Jefferson 1 0 0 0 2 1 x - 4
E: Jenkins, Best, Thompson,
Wollenhaupt, Wrasman; LOB: Bath 6,
Jefferson 8; 2B: Gossard; SB: Buzard;
Sac: Ricker, Wrasman.
IP H R ER BB SO
BATH
Sanders(L) 5.0 7 4 2 0 4
Norton 1.0 1 0 0 0 0
JEFFERSON
Rice(W,4-0) 7.0 4 1 0 0 6
Sanders pitched to 1 batter in the 6th
WP: Norton 2, Sanders, Rice; HBP:
Thompson (by Sanders), Kimmett (by
Sanders).
Anna Track and Field
Invitational
Boys Team Scores: Minster
199.5, Anna 76, West Liberty-Salem
69, Lehman Catholic 55, New Bremen
54.5, Fairlawn 43, Troy Christian 34,
Houston 30.5, Russia 29.5, Dixie 29.5,
New Knoxville 24.5, Botkins 8, Fort
Jennings 5.
Girls Team Scores: Minster 159.5,
West Liberty-Salem 131, Russia 96,
Fort Jennings 51, Botkins 48, New
Bremen 38.5, Dixie 30, Fairlawn 29,
Anna 27.5, Troy Christian 14, New
Knoxville 12, Houston 11.5, Lehman
Catholic 11.
Girls 4x800m Relay: 1. Minster
10:16.21; 2. W. Liberty-Salem
10:27.05; 3. Russia 10:47.49; 4.
New Bremen 11:21.68; 5. Houston
11:48.14; 6. Anna 13:00.81; 7. Fort
Jennings 13:45.43.
Boys 4x800m Relay: 1. Minster
8:35.97; 2. Anna 9:02.38; 3. Russia
9:09.10; 4. New Bremen 9:11.92; 5.
Troy Christian 9:27.50; 6. W. Liberty-
Salem 9:28.17; 7. Fort Jennings
9:43.75; 8. Houston 9:56.48.
Girls 100m High Hurdles: 1.
Francis (R) 16.87; 2. Hauser (D)
17.12; 3. Rabenstein (W) 17.94; 4.
Meiring (M) 18.07; 5. Bornhorst (B)
18.30; 6. Nuss (FA) 18.32; 7. Richard
(M) 18.90; 8. Michael (A) 19.19.
Boys 110m High Hurdles: 1.
Cordell (W) 15.21; 2. Jackson (L)
15.68; 3. Everett (FA) 16.45; 4. Slater
(L) 16.95; 5. Nguyen (D) 17.27; 6.
Stoner (M) 17.28; 7. Dues (M) 18.10;
8. Ritchie (H) 18.38.
Girls 100m Dash: 1. Freyhof (W)
13.00; 2. Titterington (L) 13.15; 3.
Macy Schroeder (FJ) 13.37; 4. Lori
Bruskotter (FJ) 13.57; 5. Stewart (M)
13.68; 6. Haddad (T) 13.93; 7. Heuker
(B) 14.10; 8. Knoop (B) 14.35.
Boys 100m Dash: 1. Kauffman
(M) 11.69; 2. Uderman (A) 11.81; 3.
Wolf (M) 11.83; 4. Shinall (T) 11.83;
5. Mackie (NK) 11.84; 6. Gillem (FA)
11.96; 7. Coots (T) 11.99.
Girls 4x200m Relay: 1. Fort
Jennings 1:56.73; Minster 1:57.73;
3. Russia 1:58.00; 4. New Bremen
1:59.97; 5. W. Liberty-Salem 2:00.17;
6. Dixie 2:04.24; 7. Anna 2:04.30; 8.
Fairlawn 2:06.21.
Boys 4x200m Relay: 1. Minster
1:35.58; 2. Anna 1:36.21; 3. W.
Liberty-Salem 1:36.39; 4. New Bremen
1:38.11; 5. Dixie 1:41.04; 6. Russia
1:44.43; 7. Fort Jennings 1:55.00.
Girls 1,600m Run: 1. Vogel (W)
5:32.18; 2. Borchers (R) 5:43.19;
3. Boyle (NK) 5:44.81; 4. Flora (B)
5:48.93; 5. Slonkosky (M) 5:51.70; 6.
Barlage (M) 5:54.93; 7. Henault (W)
6:02.54; 8. Elking (NB) 6:08.48.
Boys 1,600m Run: 1. Slonkosky
(M) 4:41.34; 2. Fausey (M) 4:46.86;
3. Jester (H) 4:48.33; 4. Larger (A)
4:51.48; 5. Adams (W) 4:52.71; 6.
Jones (B) 4:56.98; 7. Steinke (A)
4:58.62; 8. Stickel (R) 5:03.21.
Girls 4x100m Relay: 1. Minster
53.75; 2. W. Liberty-Salem 53.82; 3.
Russia 56.25; 4. New Bremen 56.85;
5. Fort Jennings 57.12; 6. Anna 58.79;
7. Dixie 59.83; 8. Botkins 1:02.46.
Boys 4x100m Relay: 1. Anna
45.86; 2. Minster 46.00; 3. Fairlawn
46.82; 4. New Bremen 47.83; 5. Troy
Christian 48.17; 6. W. Liberty-Salem
48.37; 7. Russia 51.79; 8. Houston
51.96.
Girls 400m Dash: 1. Heaton
(R) 1:04.06; 2. Barga (M) 1:05.29;
3. Evans (D) 1:06.46; 4. Heuker (B)
1:08.88; 5. Brackman (NB) 1:09.00; 6.
Dues (R) 1:10.32; 7. Karg (W) 1:12.38.
Boys 400m Dash: 1. Mackie
(NK) 53.82; 2. Kauffman (M) 54.09;
3. Kremer (NB) 54.84; 4. Jackson
(L) 54.99; 5. Garver (T) 56.25; 6.
Rioch (A) 56.59; 7. Arling (A) 57.47; 8.
Funkhouser (D) 58.06.
Girls 300m Hurdles: 1. Meiring (M)
51.80; 2. W. Bornhorst (B) 52.22; 3. L.
Francis (R) 53.51; 4. Rabenstein (W)
53.91; 5. Voisard (R) 56.13; 6. Richard
(M) 57.24; 7. McClurg (NB) 59.58; 8.
Balster (NB) 1:03.77.
Boys 300m Hurdles: 1. Cordell (W)
43.00; 2. Tebbe (M) 43.13; 3. Slater
(L) 43.70; 4. Helman (T) 44.57; 5. S.
Dues (M) 45.90; 6. Nguyen (D) 47.02;
7. Ritchie (H) 47.07; 8. Kierman (NK)
48.31
Girls 800m Run: 1. Vogel (W)
2:28.06; 2. N. Fausey (M) 2:28.64;
3. Flora (B) 2:31.75; 4. Arnold (M)
2:36.52; 5. Borchers (R) 2:40.54; 6.
Kaitlin Stechschulte (FJ) 2:42.57; 7.
Henault (W) 2:43.62; 8. Voisard (R)
2:46.11.
Boys 800m Run: 1. D. Slonkosky
(M) 2:05.77; 2. A. Fausey (M) 2:08.54;
3. McClurg (NB) 2:11.69; 4. Jones (B)
2:13.88; 5. Rammel (NB) 2:15.28; 6.
Berning (A) 2:17.32; 7. McCarty (D)
2:18.30; 8. Clark (H) 2:21.02.
Girls 200m Dash: 1. Freyhof
(W) 27.57; 2. Macy Schroeder (FJ)
27.72; 3. Lori Bruskotter (FJ) 28.01; 4.
Haddad (T) 28.22; 5. Jutte (M) 28.34;
6. Heuker (B) 28.49; 7. C. Adams (NB)
29.31.
Boys 200m Dash: 1. Wolf (MI)
23.79; 2. P. Dues (MI) 24.21; 3.
Kremer (NB) 24.36; 4. Hickenbottom
(W) 24.41; 5. Coots (T) 24.43; 6.
Parker (D) 25.06.
Girls 3,200m Run: 1. K. Bornhorst
(M) 12:26.17; 2. Strickland (W)
12:30.48; 3. Smith (W) 12:41.51; 4.
Boyle (NK) 12:47.13; 5. Kearns (R)
12:53.47; 6. Hooks (H) 13:13.67; 7.
Niekamp (M) 13:24.38; 8. Privette
(NK) 13:37.38.
Boys 3,200m Run: 1. Dahlinghaus
(M) 10:29.36; 2. Scott (W) 10:33.18; 3.
A. Adams (W) 10:36.95; 4. Larger (A)
10:40.45; 5. Goodwin (M) 10:41.80;
6. Steinke (A) 10:48.58; 7. Jester (H)
11:01.07; 8. Stickel (R) 11:08.85.
Girls 4x400m Relay: 1. Minster
4:20.22; 2. W. Liberty-Salem 4:33.03;
3. Fort Jennings 4:33.52; 4. Russia
4:34.22; 5. Botkins 4:36.29; 6. New
Bremen 4:49.12; 7. Dixie 5:04.13.
Boys 4x400m Relay: 1. Minster
3:39.50; 2. Anna 3:43.01; 3. New
Bremen 3:48.41; 4. W. Liberty-Salem
3:53.08; 5. Troy Christian 3:55.47; 6.
Russia 3:59.27; 7. Houston 4:09.90; 8.
Fort Jennings 4:17.26.
Girls Discus: 1. Cummings (FA)
109-5; 2. Counts (B) 101-1; 3. Shell
(D) 91-11; 4. Will (M) 90-5; 5. Maurer
(NB) 87-11; 6. Gantz (W) 83-5; 7.
McGowan (M) 83-4; 8. Kuck (NB)
82-2.
Boys Discus: 1. Br. Montgomery
(L) 146-8; 2. Cummings (FA) 145-2;
3. Spicer (A) 140-9; 4. Hegemann (MI)
134-1; 5. Garnder (W) 130-5; 6. Be.
Montgomery (L) 126-10; 7. Douglas
(A) 126-3; 8. Shepherd (D) 122-2.
Girls High Jump: 1. Borchers
(R) 5-0; 2. McGowan (M) 4-10; 3.
Altstaetter (A) 4-8; 4. (tie) Booher (H)
and Albers (A) 4-6; 6. Poling (R) 4-6; 7.
Bertke (D) 4-4; 8. M. Francis (M) 4-4.
Boys High Jump: 1. Everett (FA)
6-2; 2. P. Dues (M) 6-1; 3. Isaac (NK)
5-9; 4. Martin (H) 5-6; 5. (tie) D. York
(R) and Mackie (NK) 5-6; 7. J. York
(R) 5-6; 8. (tie) Nguyen (D) and Otting
(M) 5-4.
Girls Long Jump: 1. Jutte (M)
15-7.50; 2. M. Francis (M) 15-6.50;
3. Haddad (T) 14-11.75; 4. Roe (FA)
14-1; 5. Etgen (W) 13-8.50; 6. Gorman
(L) 13-8.50; 7. Poling (R) 13-4; 8. Mara
Brown (F) 12-10.
Boys Long Jump: 1. Everett (FA)
19-8.25; 2. Manger (NB) 18-2.75; 3.
Jackson (L) 18-0.25; 4. Thobe (M)
17-11.75; 5. Cordell (W) 17-11; 6.
Pritchard (D) 17-10.50; 7. Shinall (T)
17-7.75; 8. Bruce (A) 17-4.75.
Girls Shot Put: 1. Olivia Cummings
(FA) 42-3.25#; 2. Fogt (A) 34-6.50;
3. Gantz (W) 33-8.25; 4. Eiting (M)
33-7.75; 5. Godwin (W) 31-9.25; 6.
McGowan (M) 30-10.75; 7. Jones (NB)
29-7.75; 8. Greve (B) 29-6.25.
Boys Shot Put: 1. Hegemann (M)
48-2; 2. Be. Montgomery (L) 47-6.75;
3. Hueker (M) 46-1.50; 4. Paulus
(R) 45-7.75; 5. Br. Montgomery (L)
43-5.50; 6. Shepherd (D) 42-8.25; 7.
Spicer (A) 39-9.50; 8. Gardner (W)
39-8.50.
Girls Pole Vault: 1. Etgen (W) 8-6;
2. Heckman (M) 8-0; 3. Magoto (R)
7-6; 4. Markin (W) 7-6; 5. (tie) Homan
(NB) and Huelsman (M) 7-0; 7. Poling
(R) 6-0; 8. (tie) Powers (D) and Spitler
(D) 6-0.
Boys Pole Vault: 1. A.J. Huelsman
(M) 13-9#; 2. Tebbe (M) 12-6; 3. Davis
(H) 12-0; 4. Nguyen (D) 12-0; 5. (tie)
Braun (H) and Ferguson (NB) 11-0; 7.
Lavy (R) 10-0; 8. Joying (R) 9-6.
# - New meet record

Lady Vikings
overwhelm Ottoville
OTTOVILLE Leipsic
only had eight hits in their
Putnam County League fast-
pitch softball clash Saturday
at Ottoville but made them
count, battering the Lady
Green 20-7 in six innings.
The Lady Vikings hit a pair
of long balls to back winning
pitcher Krienbrink against
Kenzie Martin. They also
received Ottoville visits Ada
5 p.m. today.
Leipsic 20, Ottoville 7
Score by Innings:
Leipsic 4 0 6 4 2 4 - 20 8 2
Ottoville 2 0 0 5 0 0 - 7 4 4
WP: Krienbrink (6 Ks, 4 BBs);
LP: Kenzi Martin (3 Ks, 8 BBs). HR:
Krienbrink (L), Escamilla (L).
-
Cougars split at Napoleon
NAPOLEON Van
Werts baseballers had a
mixed Saturday at Napoleon.
They beat Elida 9-5 but
fell 9-6 to the Wildcats.
Against the Bulldogs
(0-8), Brandt Henry got the
victory.
Against Napoleon,
Andrew Todd took the loss.
Elida hosts Ayersville this
afternoon and Van Wert (4-4)
is at Fairview.
Van Wert 9, Elida 5
Elida 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 - 5 9 2
Van Wert 0 5 0 1 0 3 x - 9 8 3
WP: Brandt Henry; LP: Kyle
Hambleton. 2B: Nickoli Sackinger (E),
Jesse Wheeler (E), Tyler Williams (V),
Jacob Braun (V).
Napoleon 9, Van Wert 6
Van Wert 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 - 6 10 2
Napoleon 4 0 0 0 1 4 x - 9 13 3
WP: Brian Flowers; LP: Andrew
Todd. 2B: Terin Contreras (V), Brian
Flowers (N), Zach Fielder (N).

Jefferson JVs 2-5


The Jefferson junior var-
sity baseball stands 2-5.
The Wildcats lost 13-0 to
Van Wert on April 5; lost twice
to Parkway 11-4 and 17-4 on
April 6; whipped Allen East
13-2 in five innings on April
8 behind winning pitcher Josh
Teman (2 hitter with 2 Ks)
and Jesse Stemen and Gage
Mercer (both 2-for-2 with a
triple); and split with Bath
Saturday - 10-8, 11-13. In
game 1, the Jeffcats came
back from five runs down
in the top of the seventh to
win. Teman, Ryan Bullinger
and Adam Rode combined
to strike out 14. Leading hit-
ters were Kurt Wollenhaupt
(2-for-3 with 2 runs scored)
and Tyler Talboom (1-for-3
with a double).
In the second game, lead-
ing hitters were Christian
Stemen (4-for-4 with a dou-
ble), Bullinger (3-for-4, dou-
ble), Mercer (2-for-4, double)
and Teman (2-for-4, double).
The Wildcats play next at
Perry 5 p.m. Tuesday.

Barons bash Newark


NEWARK The Ohio
State University-Lima/
Rhodes State College Barons
baseball crew bashed OSU-
Newark 8-1 Sunday in
Newark.
The Barons (7-12) out-hit
their foe (2-6) 9-4.
Score by Innings:
OSU-Lima/Rhodes 2 0 1 1 1 0 3 - 8 9 1
OSU-Newark 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 - 1 4 2
WP: Tyler Blumentritt (1-3);
LP: Eli Marietta. 2B: Dylan Clifton-
Lorton (L), Cody Dukes (L).

LOCAL ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 7
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
SAN DIEGO San Diego Padres
slugger Carlos Quentin on Sunday
dropped his appeal and began serving
an 8-game suspension for rushing the
mound and inciting a brawl in which
Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Zack
Greinke broke his left collarbone.
With the suspension starting with
Sundays game against Colorado,
Quentin will miss the Padres 3-game
series at Dodger Stadium beginning
tonight.
Quentin charged the mound after
he was hit in the upper left arm by a
pitch from Greinke. The two players
lowered their shoulders and Quentin
slammed into Greinke, who broke his
left collarbone in the wild fight that
ensued.
AUTO RACING
FORT WORTH, Texas A medi-
cal examiner ruled a man who died in
the infield during a NASCAR race at
Texas Motor Speedway shot himself in
the head. The Tarrant County medical
examiners office on Sunday said the
death of 42-year-old Kirk Franklin of
Saginaw was a suicide.
Fort Worth police reported a man
who was camping in the infield died of
a self-inflicted injury after getting into
an argument with other campers. The
incident happened late in the Sprint
Cup race. Police spokeswoman Cpl.
Tracey Knight has said alcohol may
have been a factor.
Knight added several people wit-
nessed the incident but nobody was
in danger.
FORT WORTH, Texas Kyle
Busch took advantage of a late cau-
tion to regain the lead and held on for
the final 16 laps after the last restart
Saturday night to win the Sprint Cup
race at Texas, completing a NASCAR
weekend sweep.
Busch followed Martin Truex Jr. for
about 50 laps before a yellow flag for
debris with 21 laps left. Busch took the
lead off pit road during the caution and
charged forward with a strong restart
in his Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota.
It was the second time this season
a NASCAR-record seventh time
in his career that Busch won Cup
and Nationwide races in the same
weekend.
ROCKINGHAM, N.C. Kyle
Larson picked up his first NASCAR
national series win by holding off Joey
Logano on the final restart of the
Truck Series race at Rockingham
Speedway.
Logano was closing in on Larson
when a collision between Timothy
Peters and Ryan Sieg brought out
the caution with two laps remaining.
Logano was second after flying to the
race from Saturdays nights fifth-place
finish at Texas.
Brendan Gaughan was third and
was followed by Johnny Sauter and
Chase Elliott.
PRO FOOTBALL
PITTSBURGH Emmanuel
Sanders is sticking with the Pittsburgh
Steelers.
The team announced Sunday it
matched the $2.5 million offer the
New England Patriots made to the
restricted free agent wide receiver last
week. Pittsburgh would have received
a third-round pick from the Patriots if it
let Sanders go to New England.
Instead Sanders will likely be sec-
ond on the depth chart behind Antonio
Brown when training camp opens in
July. The 26-year-old Sanders caught
44 passes for 626 yards and a touch-
down in 2012 and was the only wide
receiver to appear in all 16 games for
Pittsburgh in 2012.
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The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
y-New York 53 27 .663
x-Brooklyn 47 33 .588 6
x-Boston 41 39 .513 12
Philadelphia 33 47 .413 20
Toronto 32 48 .400 21
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
z-Miami 64 16 .800
x-Atlanta 44 36 .550 20
Washington 29 51 .363 35
Orlando 20 60 .250 44
Charlotte 19 61 .238 45
Central Division
W L Pct GB
y-Indiana 49 31 .613
x-Chicago 43 37 .538 6
x-Milwaukee 37 43 .463 12
Detroit 28 52 .350 21
Cleveland 24 56 .300 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-San Antonio 58 22 .725
x-Memphis 54 26 .675 4
x-Houston 45 35 .563 13
Dallas 40 40 .500 18
New Orleans 27 54 .333 31 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-OklahomaCity 59 21 .738
x-Denver 55 25 .688 4
Utah 42 38 .525 17
Portland 33 47 .413 26
Minnesota 30 50 .375 29
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
y-L.A. Clippers 54 26 .675
x-Golden State 45 35 .563 9
L.A. Lakers 44 37 .543 10 1/2
Sacramento 28 52 .350 26
Phoenix 24 56 .300 30
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference

Sundays Results
Miami 105, Chicago 93
New York 90, Indiana 80
Philadelphia 91, Cleveland 77
Toronto 93, Brooklyn 87
Denver 118, Portland 109
Dallas 107, New Orleans 89
Houston 121, Sacramento 100
L.A. Lakers 91, San Antonio 86
Todays Games
Miami at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
New York at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Washington at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Utah at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Denver at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden State, 10:30
p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 8 p.m.
Portland at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
NBA GLANCE
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OTPts GF GA
y-Pittsburgh 42 32 10 0 64 141 102
N.Y.Islanders 42 21 16 5 47 119 122
N.Y.Rangers 41 21 16 4 46 100 96
NewJersey 41 15 16 10 40 96 113
Philadelphia 41 17 21 3 37 108 126
NortheastDivision
GP W L OTPts GF GA
x-Montreal 41 26 10 5 57 128 100
Boston 41 26 11 4 56 116 91
Toronto 41 23 13 5 51 128 113
Ottawa 41 21 14 6 48 101 89
Buffalo 43 18 19 6 42 111 128
SoutheastDivision
GP W L OTPts GF GA
Washington 42 23 17 2 48 129 118
Winnipeg 42 21 19 2 44 109 123
TampaBay 42 17 22 3 37 133 131
Carolina 41 17 22 2 36 107 131
Florida 41 13 22 6 32 99 142
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CentralDivision
GP W L OTPts GF GA
y-Chicago 41 32 5 4 68 134 85
St.Louis 41 23 16 2 48 110 104
Detroit 42 20 15 7 47 106 107
Columbus 42 19 16 7 45 102 107
Nashville 43 15 20 8 38 98 118
NorthwestDivision
GP W L OTPts GF GA
Vancouver 41 23 12 6 52 112 100
Minnesota 41 22 16 3 47 105 103
Edmonton 41 16 18 7 39 103 115
Calgary 41 16 21 4 36 110 141
Colorado 42 14 22 6 34 100 131
PacificDivision
GP W L OTPts GF GA
x-Anaheim 42 27 10 5 59 125 105
LosAngeles 42 24 14 4 52 120 104
SanJose 41 21 13 7 49 102 102
Dallas 41 21 17 3 45 116 121
Phoenix 41 18 16 7 43 110 110
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sundays Results
Chicago 2, St. Louis 0
Buffalo 3, Tampa Bay 1
Detroit 3, Nashville 0
Todays Games
Ottawa at Boston, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 9 p.m.
San Jose at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Florida at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, 7:30
p.m.
Tampa Bay at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 11 1 .917
New York 7 4 .636 3 1/2
Washington 7 5 .583 4
Philadelphia 6 6 .500 5
Miami 2 10 .167 9
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 7 5 .583
Pittsburgh 6 6 .500 1
Cincinnati 5 7 .417 2
Chicago 4 8 .333 3
Milwaukee 3 8 .273 3 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 9 4 .692
Arizona 8 4 .667 1/2
Colorado 8 4 .667 1/2
Los Angeles 7 5 .583 1 1/2
San Diego 2 10 .167 6 1/2

Sundays Results
Philadelphia 2, Miami 1
Atlanta 9, Washington 0
Pittsburgh 10, Cincinnati 7
N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, ppd., rain
Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 3, 10 innings
San Francisco 10, Chicago Cubs 7, 10
innings
Colorado 2, San Diego 1
Arizona 1, L.A. Dodgers 0
Todays Games
St. Louis (Lynn 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Ja.
McDonald 1-1), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lee 2-0) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 2-0) at Miami
(LeBlanc 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 0-2) at Colorado (Nicasio
1-0), 8:40 p.m.
San Diego (Stults 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers
(Billingsley 1-0), 10:10 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Arizona (McCarthy 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 0-1), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 1-1) at Pittsburgh
(J.Sanchez 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 2-0) at Atlanta
(Medlen 1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 1-1) at
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 1-1) at Miami (Sanabia
1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 0-1) at Chicago Cubs
(Wood 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 2-0) at Milwaukee
(W.Peralta 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Laffey 0-0) at Colorado
(Francis 1-1), 8:40 p.m.
San Diego (Marquis 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers
(Capuano 0-0), 10:10 p.m.
-----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 7 4 .636
New York 6 5 .545 1
Baltimore 6 6 .500 1 1/2
Toronto 5 7 .417 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 4 7 .364 3
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 7 5 .583
Kansas City 7 5 .583
Cleveland 5 6 .455 1 1/2
Chicago 5 7 .417 2
Minnesota 4 7 .364 2 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 9 4 .692
Texas 8 5 .615 1
Seattle 6 8 .429 3 1/2
Houston 4 8 .333 4 1/2
Los Angeles 4 8 .333 4 1/2

Sundays Results
Chicago White Sox 3, Cleveland 1
Boston 5, Tampa Bay 0
Kansas City 3, Toronto 2
N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, ppd., rain
L.A. Angels 4, Houston 1
Detroit 10, Oakland 1
Seattle 4, Texas 3
N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 0
Todays Games
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 0-1) at Boston
(Dempster 0-1), 11:05 a.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 0-2) at Toronto
(Buehrle 0-0), 7:07 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Blanton 0-2) at Minnesota
(Correia 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 0-0) at Oakland (Milone
2-0), 10:05 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Arizona (McCarthy 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 0-1), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 0-0) at Cleveland
(U.Jimenez 0-1), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 0-2) at
Baltimore (Arrieta 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1) at
Toronto (Jo.Johnson 0-1), 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Guthrie 2-0) at Atlanta
(Medlen 1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 0-1) at Chicago Cubs
(Wood 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Vargas 0-1) at Minnesota
(Pelfrey 1-1), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (Peacock 1-1) at Oakland (Griffin
2-0), 10:05 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 2-0) at Seattle (Harang 0-0),
10:10 p.m.
MLB GLANCE
In 1891, the first major league baseball spring training
game in Florida was played between the Cleveland Spiders and
Pittsburgh Pirates.
The Associated Press
AUGUSTA, Ga. Adam Scott strolled
into the room, looking quite dapper in
green. He let out a deep sigh and struggled
to contain his emotions the
thoughts of Greg Norman, the
folks Down Under, the dad he
hugged so tight alongside the
10th green.
It sure felt a lot different
than the last time Scott was
summoned to the media room
at the end of a major champi-
onship.
That was Lytham, where
he had to answer for throwing
away a seemingly sure vic-
tory in the British Open with
bogeys on the last four holes.
This was Augusta, where he reveled
in the biggest win of his career Sunday
evening.
Less than eight months apart, every-
thing changed. Now, hes Adam Scott,
major champion.
What an incredible day, he said.
Everything fell my way in the end. You
just never know.
Using one of those big putters, Scott
became the first Australian to win the
Masters, beating Angel Cabrera on the
second hole of a stirring playoff played in
a steady rain and dwindling light, finally
settling down in the hollow that is the 10th
green, amid the towering Georgia pines.
Cabreras 15-foot putt rolled up right
next to the hole and stopped. When Scotts
12-footer dropped in the cup, he pumped
his arms furiously and screamed toward
the gray, darkening sky quite a celebra-
tion for a guy whos always been accused
of being a little too laid-back.
No one wouldve said that on this day.
For Scott, this victory was sweet on so
many levels.
Certainly, there was a measure of pay-
back for what happened last July at the
British Open, where Scott played beauti-
fully for three days and 14 holes and
seemed to have a stranglehold on the claret
jug. Then he bogeyed the 15th hole. And
the 16th. And the 17th. And, stunningly,
the 18th, surrendering the title to Ernie Els.
Scott handled the staggering defeat
with amazing grace, vowing to somehow
look back and take the positives from it.
But no one knew if he might go the way
of Ed Sneed or Jean Van de Velde, golfers
who threw away majors and never came
close to winning another.
For Scott, there are no such worries.
Lytham is redeemed. Golf gives, Cabrera
said, and golf takes.
No one knows that more
than Norman, a runner-
up three times at Augusta
National, a third-place fin-
isher three other times, but
never a winner. This one was
for him, too.
In a grander scheme, this
victory was for an entire
continent. Australia has pro-
duced some greats of the
game over the last half-
century but never a Masters
champion. Until now.
Norman was so nervous watching TV
at his home in south Florida that he went
to the gym when the final group made the
turn. He returned for the last four holes and
was texting with friends as his emotions
shifted with every putt. Coming down
the stretch, three Aussies Scott, Jason
Day and Marc Leishman actually had a
chance to win.
Scott brought it home.
For Cabrera, a burly, 43-year-old from
Argentina, the majors have been a big
giver. His last victory on the PGA or
European tours before Sunday? The 2009
Masters. Before that? The 2007 U.S. Open.
In other words, Cabrera doesnt win
often, but when he does, its usually a
pretty significant victory.
He almost got another one, trying with
Scott in regulation at 9-under 279. Cabrera,
who closed with a 2-under 70, made the
turn with a 2-stroke lead but stumbled on
the back nine, knocking his drive behind
the pine trees at the 10th and then sending
his ball into Raes Creek on the 13th, lead-
ing to bogeys at both. But a birdie at the
16th gave him a shot and he struck what
mightve been the best well, certainly
the most clutch shot of the day at the
72nd hole after Scott, playing just ahead in
the penultimate group, rolled in a 20-footer
for birdie and a 1-stroke lead.
For a split-second, I let myself think I
could have won, said Scott, who certainly
celebrated like his 69 was good enough.
Not so fast. Cabrera stuck a 7-iron from
163 yards to 3 feet, leaving a gimme of a
putt to force the playoff. Scott was watch-
ing a television in the scoring area.
I got to see Angel hit an incredible
shot, Scott added. Then it was try to get
myself ready to play some more holes.
They went back to the 18th tee box for
the first playoff hole. After matching drives
and approach shots, both rolling off the
front of the green, Cabrera chipped over
Scotts ball and nearly put it in the cup. Scott
pitched to 3 feet, both made their putts and
the playoff moved on to No. 10.
Again, two more booming drives
and two more nifty approaches, leaving
them both with a good shot at birdie. If
Cabreras ball had turned one more time,
they mightve been returning to the course
today to finish up. When it didnt, Scott
was determined to end before nightfall.
Scott got a big assist on the winning
putt from his caddie, who knows a thing
or two about winning at Augusta. Steve
Williams was on the bag for 13 of Tiger
Woods 14 major titles, a close friend
to the worlds top-ranked golfer before
Woods personal life fell apart. Williams
was among those cut loose in the after-
math, a bitter split that made this victory
about as satisfying to him as it was Scott.
Especially after Scott turned to Williams
to get a read on the putt.
Scott told Williams he thought the
right-to-left break would be about the
width of a cup. Williams set him straight.
Its at least two cups, the caddie told
Scott. Its going to break more than you
think.
Scott took the advice. A short time later,
he was trying on a green jacket.
For the caddies former boss, there
was more major misery. Woods was at
the center of a firestorm for an improp-
er drop during the second round, which
led to a 2-stroke penalty and complaints
that Woods had actually gotten off easy
because he couldve been disqualified for
signing an improper scorecard.
Four strokes behind going to the final
round, Woods struggled with the speed of
the greens on the first eight holes they
werent nearly as quick because of the
rain and was too far behind by the time
he got something going. He finished with
a 70 and tied for fourth, four shots out of
the playoff.
Web.com Tour
MIDLAND, Texas Alex Aragon had a 6-under
66 and came from five shots back in the final round
to win the WNB Golf Classic. Aragon finished at
16-under 272, one better than Byron Smith (70) and
three in front of Brice Garnett (71).
Aragon won the TPC Stonebrae Championship
this same week one year ago.
Will MacKenzie (72) tied for fourth place, four
back along with third-round leader Edward Loar (75)
and his playing partner Nick Flanagan (74).
Great Scott: Aussie finally
dons green at Augusta
Beavers score 12 in 10th for
19-7 win and sweep at MSJ
By Kyle Stover
Sports information assistant
CINCINNATI The
Bluffton University baseball
team may have been away
from the friendly confines of
Memorial Field this weekend
but they looked right at home
in Cincinnati, finishing off a
3-game sweep of Mount St.
Joseph on Sunday afternoon by
a score of 19-7 in 10 innings.
The Beavers squandered an
early lead,but came back to tie
it in the ninth and blew things
open with 12 runs in the 10th
for a big victory.
Todd Stover (Tipp City/
Tippecanoe) was the starting
pitcher for the final game of the
series, turning in a pedestrian
performance in comparison to
his starts earlier in the season.
He was strong for the majority
of the game but struggled in the
fourth inning, giving up five
runs to the Lions. Stover (0-1)
worked 6.1 innings, allowing
nine hits and seven runs, six
earned, while striking out two.
Brad Schl abach
(Fredericksburg/Hiland) and
Hunter Ewing (Loveland)
combined for 3.2 innings of
scoreless relief with Ewing
(3-0) picking up the win.
Blufftons offense picked
up right where it left off on
Saturday, scoring in the top
of the first. A 1-out walk to
Anthony Cianci (Ravenna/
Southeast) followed by a single
for Kyle Niermann (Napoleon),
put runners on first and sec-
ond. Greg Franks (Smithville)
delivered the big blow with
two outs, driving a double to
left-center which plated the
two runs for the inning.
Beavers got another run in
the top of the second thanks
to an RBI single by Miles
Richardson (Granville/Newark
Catholic) which scored Jake
Townley (Mansfield/Madison)
who led off the inning with a
double.
Bluffton built the lead to
four runs in the top of the
third with an RBI single by
David Ianiro (Highland
Heights/Mayfield), plating Tim
Webb (Delaware/Worthington
Christian).
After falling behind by two
going into the top of the fifth,
the Beavers rallied back to tie
the game up. Despite two outs
to open the inning, Bluffton
would manufacture two runs
off the bat of Townley on a sin-
gle, scoring Webb and Franks
to knot up the score at six.
Things got interesting from
that point on in the game, espe-
cially after Mount St. Joseph
took a 1-run lead in the sev-
enth. Going into the top of the
ninth, Bluffton trailed by one
and the Beavers were down
to their last out before Franks
came through, stroking an RBI
single up the middle to send the
game to extra innings.
The top of the 10th was
where Bluffton broke the tie
and eventually opened the flood
gates, pouring it on against
the Lion pitchers. The inning
opened with Townley reaching
on an error by the Lion short-
stop, followed by a single for
Mike Castro (Reynoldsburg).
The scoring took off when Jeff
Roth (Bellevue) reached on a
fielders choice bunt, scoring
Townley on a throwing error by
the first baseman. Following an
intentional walk to Richardson,
Doug Paullin (Jeromesville/
Hillsdale) singled through the
right side, scoring Castro while
Roth scored on a fielding error
on the right fielder for the
Lions. The hit parade contin-
ued after that when Niermann
smacked an RBI single to right
field to plate Richardson. After
Webb reached base on a catch-
ers interference call, Franks
was the first out in the inning
but in a productive way, hitting
a sacrifice fly to right which
picked up Paullin.
Ianiro then stepped to the
plate and promptly drove a
single up the middle to score
Niermann. MSJ swapped pitch-
ers but that did not faze the
Bluffton offense as Townley
drove a double down the
left-field line to score Webb.
After Ianiro crossed the dish
on a wild pitch, nothing could
seem to slow down the Beaver
offense as Castro hit a double
of his own down the line in left
to bring in Townley. Following
the second out of the inning,
Richardson re-ignited the
offense with a single, moving
Castro to third base. The next
batter was Paullin, who again
stroked a single to plate Castro.
Rounding out the scoring in
the inning was Niermann when
he singled to drive in both
Richardson and Paullin.
Franks led the Beaver offen-
sive explosion, going 3-of-4
with four RBIs, including what
was probably the most impor-
tant run which tied up the game
in the ninth. Niermann was
3-for-6 on the day, capping
a terrific weekend and rais-
ing his batting average to an
HCAC-best .447 on the year.
Richardson, Franks, Townley,
Ianiro and Castro all had three
hits in the win as well.
With the sweep of MSJ,
Bluffton improved to 17-12
overall, including an 8-6 mark
in the Heartland Collegiate
Athletic Conference. Mount St
Joseph fell to 6-19 and 2-11 in
conference play.
The Beavers are currently
tied for third place in the HCAC
and have another big game on
Tuesday when they welcome
rival Defiance to Memorial
Field. The Strike Out Cancer
Day contest is scheduled to
begin at 4:15 p.m. in Bluffton.

Beavers pull out game one


with 10-run sixth inning
By Keisha Holtsberry
Sports information assistant
BLUFFTON The
Bluffton University soft-
ball team spilt the series with
Franklin College on Saturday.
The Beavers are now 16-14
overall and 8-4 in the HCAC,
while Franklin is 12-22 over-
all and 6-6 in the HCAC fol-
lowing its first victory over
Bluffton since 2005.
The Beavers were not ready
for the Franklin offense in
the first inning of game one,
allowing the Grizzlies to score
three runs. Bluffton managed
just one run in the home half
of the frame. Ashley Knippen
(Wapakoneta) hit a double and
came around to score thanks
to two wild pitches. In the top
of the second inning, Franklin
added two more runs to make
the score 5-1.
In the top of the fourth
Franklin put up two more runs
for a 7-1 advantage. Bluffton
put one run on the board in
the bottom of the fourth, when
Brittany Baker (Springboro)
crossed the plate after opening
the half with a leadoff walk.
Beavers cut into Franklins
8-2 lead with three tallies in the
bottom of the fifth. Following
a solo home run from Ariana
Muffo (New Athens, Ill.),
Natalie Nikitas (Jeffersonville,
Ind.) came up to bat and hit a
two-run bomb, pulling Bluffton
within three at 8-5.
The sixth inning everything
turned around for the Beavers
despite trailing 10-5 after two
more Franklin scores. Beavers
had six hits in the inning, com-
ing in the form of a single, four
doubles and a home run from
Knippen. Helping the Beavers
to their season-best 10-run
inning were two walks, two wild
pitches, a couple Franklin errors
and a stolen base.
The Beavers were led by
Knippen who went 4-of-5 at the
plate, had five RBI and crossed
the plate three times. Emily
Kolesynski (Strongsville) got
the win for the Beavers with
help coming from Chloe Shell
(Covington) who tossed five
innings and had two strikeouts.
The second game for the
Beavers started out better
than the first with the home
team putting five runs on the
board in the bottom of the first
inning. The Beavers hit two
singles and a double in the
inning. They were also aided
by two errors, a hit batter and a
stolen base.
Roundup
1
Prices good 8am Saturday, September 12 to midnight Sunday, September 13, 2009 at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations.
Save up to $2.00 lb.
FreshMarket
Sandwich Spread
$
1
99
12 pk.
lb.
lb.
lb.
Double Coupons Every Day www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
Product of the United States
Save up to $3.00 lb.
Kretschmar
Virginia Brand
Honey Ham
$
3
99
Save up to $1.81
Arps or Deans
Cottage Cheese
selected varieties
$
1
68
Save $3.42 on 2
Seyferts
Potato Chips
Save up to $1.00
Angelfood
Cake
Iced or Lemon
Angelfood Cake
Save $2.11; select varieties
Super Dip
Ice Cream
Great food. Good neighbor.
$
2
99
8.5-9 oz. ea. 4 qt.
In the Bakery
Sale starts Saturday!
24 oz.
Save up to $5.00 lb.
USDA Choice
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Ribeye Steak
Regular or Thick Cut
$
6
99
Save $7.96 on 4
All Varieties
Super Chill Soda
2/$
3
16 oz.
Save $1.80 on 3
Flavorite
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79

Limit 3 - Additionals $1.29


Limit 4 - Additionals 2/$5
95% Fat Free, No MSG, Filler or Gluten
In the Deli
$
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$
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1102 Elida Ave., Delphos 419-692-5921
www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
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Open: 24 Hours Monday-Friday
Saturday & Sunday: 7am-midnight
Great
Service!
Thats what you get
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ATES
Greg Gunnell - Since 1996
ROOFING & SIDING
Attention Homeowners!!
ROOFING
SHINGLE & METAL
SIDING
VINYL & STEEL
If you suspect that your roof was damaged by
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8 The Herald Monday, April 15, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
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Saturdays paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Mondays paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
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Each word is $.30 2-5 days
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Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
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DEBTS: Ad must be placed in person by
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Repairs
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney
Repair
419-204-4563
Tree Service
SPEARS
LAWN CARE inc.
419-695-8516
NEW AT
FREE ESTIMATES
Tree Trimming
Stump Grinding
Tree Removal
419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping
& Removal
L.L.C.
Trimming & Removal
Stump Grinding
24 Hour Service Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMANS
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
Trimming Topping Thinning
Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arbys
Style
Trends
Hair & Tanning Salon
413 Skinner St. Delphos
(419)692-7002
Tanning
10 sessions $30
15 sessions $35
20 sessions $40
Get 5 FREE
DAYS PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
LLC
Brent Day
567-204-8488
Mowing
Landscaping
Lawn Seeding
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
Pass Code Lighted Lot
Affordable 2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Home Improvement
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
You buy, we apply
Hohlbeins
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens &
Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
Harrison
Floor Installation
Carpet, Vinyl, Wood,
Ceramic Tile
Reasonable rates
Free estimates
harrisonfoorinstallation.com
Phil 419-235-2262
Wes 567-644-9871
You buy, we apply
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
automatic transmission
standard transmission
differentials
transfer case
brakes & tune up
Construction
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing Remodeling
Bathrooms Kitchens
Hog Barns Drywall
Additions Sidewalks
Concrete etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
AMISH
CARPENTERS
ALL TYPES OF
CONSTRUCTION
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
260-585-4368
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Is Your Ad Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
Ft. Jennings Propane is accepting
applications for a full-time employee.
Must have a Class B CDL with hazmat
or willing to obtain. Send in resume or
stop in to fll out an application.
Ft. Jennings Propane , 460 W. 4
th
St.
Ft. Jennings, Ohio 45844
or
Van Wert Propane,10763 US 127 S
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
FT. JENNINGS
PROPANE, INC.
ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
30 ton & 35 ton up to 135
Crane - Millwright - Welding
419-305-5888 419-305-4732
B&S Crane Service
Articles 07.p65 2/19/2013, 10:48 AM 12
CHEVROLET BUICK
1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos
VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00
Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 8:30 to 5:30;
Sat. 8:30 to 1:00
IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015 TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
Wed. 7:30 to 7:00
Closed on Sat.
USED VEHICLES
2012 DODGE AVENGER #13C26......................................................
$
13,950
2012 CHEV IMPALA #13C28...............................................................
$
15,400
2012 CHEV CRUZE #13D40....................................................................
$
17,900
2012 CHEV EQUINOX #13A12...........................................................
$
25,900
2012 CHEV IMPALA #13A2..................................................................
$
17,900
2012 CHEV SILVERADO 1500 #13B20......................................
$
26,900
2012 CHEV SILVERADO 1500 #13B23......................................
$
25,900
2012 GMC ACADIA 13A7....................................................................
$
30,500
2012 CHEV IMPALA #12G55A............................................................
$
14,500
2012 DODGE AVENGER #13C26......................................................
$
13,950
2011 CHEV MALIBU #13C32...............................................................
$
14,400
2011 CHEV IMPALA #13D39,.1.LT,.5K.mi............................................
$
16,500
2011 FORD FOCUS #12I108...................................................................
$
15,500
2011 FORD FUSION #13A8...................................................................
$
16,900
2011 HONDA CIVIC SEDAN #12I110..............................................
$
15,500
2011 HYUNDAI SANTE FE #12I100..................................................
$
16,900
2011 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA SEDAN #12I111............................
$
13,500
2011 BUICK ENCLAVE #12K124........................................................
$
35,900
2011 CHEV IMPALA #12I97.................................................................
$
14,500
2011 CHEV IMPALA #13A6..................................................................
$
14,900
2010 CHEV IMPALA #12E58...............................................................
$
14,200
2010 CHEV TAHOE #13B22..................................................................
$
43,900
2009 CHEV MALIBU #13C31.2.LT......................................................
$
13,700
2009 CHEV SILVERADO 1500 #13B24.....................................
$
20,900
2009 PONTIAC G6 #12E66..................................................................
$
11,900
2009 TOYOTA RAV4 #13A13..............................................................
$
21,900
2008 NISSAN QUEST #12L113A.........................................................
$
10,500
2008 CHEV HHR #12G73A.........................................................................
$
8,995
2006 BUICK LUCERNE #13B18.............................................................
$
8,995
2006 CHEV IMPALA #12K127..................................................................
$
7,995
2005 GMC YUKON XL #12K128........................................................
$
14,900
2005 FORD FREESTYLE #13A112A.......................................................
$
5,995
2003 FORD TAURUS SE #13C30..........................................................
$
5,795
2003 BUICK CENTURY #13D37.............................................................
$
4,595
2003 CHEV TRAILBLAZER #12E42A..................................................
$
7,995
2000 DODGE INTREPID #13C11A.......................................................
$
2,995
2000 PONTIAC GRAND AM GT 4.dr..#BB67A..............................
$
5,595
1999 PONTIAC GRAND AM GT Cpe..#12K51B.............................
$
3,995
1999 MERCURY MYSTIQUE #13D45................................................
$
2,295
1966 BUICK 225 #06G134...................................................................
$
11,900
2012 Buick
Enclave
#NB215..Heated.leather.seats,.chrome.
wheels,.7.passenger.&.more
MSRP $42,420
Delpha Discount & Rebate $4,647
$
37,773
YOUR
DEAL
ONLY
2012 Chevy
Cruze
#12NC144..2.LT.pkg.,.RS.pkg.,.auto.
transmission,.1.4.4.cyl..turbo,.sunroof
MSRP $24,455
Delpha Discount & Rebate $3,005
$
21,450
THE LAST 2012
NEW CARS HAVE TO GO!
YOUR
DEAL
ONLY
Do you need to know what is
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The Delphos Herald, a fve-day, award
winning DHI media company with
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405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833
BLACK & Decker cord-
less 12 Volt trimmer,
used a few times, excel-
lent condition. $45.
280 Work Wanted
Fitzgerald
Power Washing
& Painting
419-303-3020
Interior, Exterior, Residential,
Commercial, Decks, Fences,
Houses, Log Homes, Stripping,
Cleaning, Sealing, Staining,
Barn Painting, Barn Roofs
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A+ rating with the Better
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105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU
can place a 25 word
classified ad in more
than 100 newspapers
with over one and a half
million total circulation
across Ohio for $295. Its
easy...you place one or-
der and pay with one
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Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you.
No other classified ad
buy is simpler or more
cost effecti ve. Cal l
419-695-0015 ext. 138
125 Lost and Found
FOUND: SET of keys
found on W. Seventh St.
Call 567-259-5161
125 Lost and Found
FOUND: TIGER striped
small cat with bell on col-
lar. Found near Lima
Avenue. 419-236-3546.
305
Apartment For
Rent
1BR APARTMENT.
Stove and refrigerator,
No smoking or pets.
321 E. Cl evel and.
$400/mo plus deposit.
Call 419-692-6478
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$425/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
320 House For Rent
604 S. Clay St, Delphos.
2BR Washer / Dr yer
hook-up. No pet s.
$475/mo+deposit. Avail-
abl e now. Cal l
419-647-6271.
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951
RENT OR Rent to Own.
2 bedroom, 1 bath mo-
bile home. 419-692-3951
425 Houses For Sale
CAPE COD 3 bedroom,
2-1/2 bath House for
Sale on 1-1/2 acres. Del-
phos/Spencerville line.
Huge 3-Car garage, full
basement, large walk in
attic. $179,900. Ph.
419-604-2072
430
Mfg./Mobile
Homes For Sale
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath,
Mobile Home. Good con-
dition. Make offer. Call
419-692-2629
510 Appliance
Denny
Metzger
Major
Appliance
Service
419-286-8387
419-692-8387
32 Years Experience
METZGERS
APPLIANCE SERVICE
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders, Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
080 Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS a
local Trucking Company
is looking to hire a dis-
patcher who has the
ability to self initiate and
follow practices that
management currently
has in place. An ability to
multi-task, and motivate
drivers. It is also neces-
sary to have good Cus-
tomer service and com-
munication skills. Com-
puter skills a must.
If interested please send
resume or come to office
and fill out application @
Dancer Logistics
900 Gressel Drive
Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-692-1435
Ask for Shawn
GRILL COOKS, &
SERVERS apply in
person at Mayflower-
Hong Kong Restaurant,
301 N. Main-Delphos.
Receptionist/clerical:
IMMEDIATE OPENING for
a family practice located in
Lima Ohio. Seeking a full
time Medical Assistant or
Medical Administrative As-
sistant: electronic medical
records system, detail ori-
ented, organized, able to
prioritize tasks, computer
knowledgeable and eff-
cient. Please send refer-
ences and resume to: P.O.
Box 108, c/o The Delphos
Herald, 405 N. Main St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
080 Help Wanted
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+years OTR expe-
rience! Our drivers aver-
age 42cents per mile &
higher! Home every
weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annu-
ally. Benefits available.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with re-
spect! PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
HOME HEALTH AIDE
Part-time. STNA wel-
come, not required.
Training provided. Must
be flexible, work week-
ends, pick up extra
shifts. Prompt, reliable,
dependable, good work
ethic. Application online
or pick-up at: Community
Health Professionals
602 E. Fifth St.,
Delphos, OH 45833
ComHealthPro.org
HOTEL HIRING
Part-time Front Desk
Agent at Delphos hotel.
Computer experience
preferred.
2nd shift/weekends.
Apply in person at:
480 Moxie Lane
Now hiring
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facility
providing skilled reha-
bilitation services, as-
sisted living, post acute
medical care and more.
We currently have first
shift opening for part
time housekeeping/
laundry position. Ap-
proximately 42 hours
per bi-weekly pay pe-
riod. Please stop by our
Delphos location and
fill out an application.
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k.
Home weekends, & most
nights. Call Ulms Inc.
419-692-3951
OWNER OPERATORS:
100% No-Touch. Dedi-
cated Loads. Lima, OH
to Chicago, IL. 2000 or
newer tractor, CDL-A,
18mo exp. Tabi tha:
800-325-7884 x4.
SHAWNEE POOLS is
looking for construction
worker. Full-time posi-
tion. Apply at 4580
Spencerville Rd., Lima
Now hiring
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facility
providing skilled reha-
bilitation services, as-
sisted living, post acute
medical care and more.
We are looking for
caring, outgoing, en-
ergetic STNAs to join
our team. We currently
have full time and part
time positions available
for skilled STNAs.
Please stop by our Del-
phos location and fill
out an application.
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
TOPP CHALET Restau-
rant is accepting applica-
tions for an experienced
bartender & server.
These positions are
part-time and applicant
must be willing to work
weekends. Please apply
in person on Tuesday,
Thursday or Friday after
1:00. No phone calls
please. 229 W. 5th St.,
Delphos.
953
Free and Low
Priced Merchandise
Is Your Ad Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
REAL
ESTATE
TRANSFERS
Allen County
Village of Elida
Stephen A. and
Rachelle A. Lane to
Kathleen M. Herpich,
113 Henry St., $76,000.
Spencer Township
Jerry and Cheri R.
Sites to Lewis J. Modic,
1144 Spencerville Road,
$22,500.
Sugar Creek Township
Robert W. Rumble to
David and Lily A. Bear,
4696 N. Kemp Road,
$60,500.
Village of Spencerville
Beatrice J. Adams to
Ashley L. and Joshua J.
Gallimore, 110 S. Canal
St., $4,100.
Federal Home Loan
Mortgage Corp. to
Michael R. Miller, 109 S.
College St., $20,300.
Laverne and Janet
Gales II to Michael C.
Thompson, 309 Birch
Drive, $99,000.
Merl Heil to Bryan
and Pat Radcliffe, 613 N.
Canal Ave., $1,500.
Secretary of Housing
& Urban Development
to Creative Home
Buying Solutions, 108 N.
College, $20,000.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Tuesday Evening April 16, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Splash Dancing With Stars Body of Proof Local Jimmy Kimmel Live Nightline
WHIO/CBS NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS Golden Boy Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
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WOHL/FOX Hell's Kitchen New Girl Mindy Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint Flashpoint
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A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Storage Storage
AMC The Breakfast Club Sixteen Candles Breakfast
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BRAVO Housewives/Atl. Tardy Tardy The Kandi Factory Happens Tardy Tardy Factory
CMT Jeff Dunham: Arguing Salute to the Troops 2013 Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Jeff Dunham: Arguing
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Monday Evening April 15, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Dancing With Stars Castle Local Jimmy Kimmel Live Nightline
WHIO/CBS How I Met Rules 2 Broke G Mike Hawaii Five-0 Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
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WOHL/FOX Bones The Following Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
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A & E Bates Motel Bates Motel Bates Motel Bates Motel Bates Motel
AMC Willy Wonka Groundhog Day
ANIM River Monsters River Monsters River Monsters
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FX The A-Team Tropic Thunder
HGTV Love It or List It Love It or List It Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It Love It or List It
HIST American Pickers American Pickers Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars American Pickers American Pickers
LIFE The Client List Dirty Teacher The Client List The Client List
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NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
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TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Conan Office Conan
TCM Winchester '73 Colt .45 Springfield Rifle
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TNT Castle Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas
TOON Regular MAD King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
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Monday, April 15, 2013 The Herald 9
Tomorrows Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013
The year ahead could bring about
growth in your material hopes and
expectations. Several advantageous
opportunities could develop in
unexpected quarters.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- To achieve some of your bigger
objectives, you might have to do
things in a circuitous way. Just be
sure not to charge into walls, hoping
they will crumble on impact.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Argumentative individuals will
frustrate you, but the solution is
obvious. Dont involve yourself
with companions who overreact to a
difference of opinions.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Take nothing for granted in both your
commercial and personal dealings. If
you play things too loose, you might
think you have an agreement, when
all youve got is a maybe.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
To get along well with someone who
is pertinent to your plans, it might
be necessary for you to make some
concessions. Failing to do so could
bring things to a halt.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- When
sharing a job with others, be sure that
no one person has more work to do
than the others. Each must do his or
her share.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Be
prepared to operate on your own if it
becomes necessary. A friend upon
whom you can usually depend might
let you down.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Be
a good sport and pick up all the pieces
after someones temper tantrum. This
person needs to be consoled, not
chastised.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Its rarely a good idea to get angry
with someone just because he or she
disagrees with you. Its important to
keep an open mind and a forgiving
heart.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Guard against inclinations to
suddenly change course, especially
when your goal is within reach. A
shift in direction will do nothing
except take you off track.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- If you are not successful, it isnt
due to a lack of good ideas. Although
your imagination is excellent, your
implementation might not be.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Be careful that you do not trip
over your own shoelaces. The only
obstacles in your path are the ones
you put there yourself.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- If its up to you to make plans
for a get-together with friends, give
thought to who is involved. Dont
invite anyone who hasnt been
getting along with everyone else.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2013
There is a strong possibility you
might do something in the year ahead
that will be of great import. Good
luck will be vital to your enterprise,
and youll have it in spades.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- The more progressive you
are, especially when dealing with
intangibles, the luckier youll get.
The same cannot be said if you bog
yourself down in traditional methods.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Your financial prospects look to
be promising, especially if youre
promoting something unusual.
Dont be scared off by questions of
expense.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Helpful contacts can be established
through a club or professional
affiliation. Whats important is
spending some quality time with the
right people.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Things others deem too challenging
wont intimidate you in the slightest.
Being in tune with your inner self
gives you the ability to do anything
you choose.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- There
is no need to treat your inspirations
indifferently. Anything you imagine
you can accomplish, if you believe
in yourself. So have faith and get to
work.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Dont be timid if you have to make
a critical change. For best results,
go full throttle and dont fall prey to
second thoughts.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
When change is called for on the
home front, you should take your
better halfs suggestions seriously.
He or she is likely to spot some
nuances that youre overlooking.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Youll spot a new way to make
some additional earnings. It might
be similar to something that has been
generating extra income for a friend.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Should you happen to meet
someone whom youd like to know
better, make your intentions known.
Dont wait for this person to make
the first move.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- If you think the timing is right to
wrap up a matter that could enhance
your prestige and/or security, go for
it. Stop dragging your feet.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- You could end up learning a lot
by trying to teach something. If you
have some constructive information
to pass on, now is the time to do it.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
The well-intentioned tips of others
can often be of little value. However,
should a family member or colleague
tell you something today, it might
pay to be a good listener.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature
Syndicate, Inc.
2
A TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS WITH A COMBINED 47 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SNAPPYS OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE, LLC
2120 N. Dixie Hwy., Lima, OH 45801 419 879 1196
WE SELL, REPAIR AND STOCK ALL PARTS FOR ALL BRANDS OF SNOW PLOWS, SALT SPREADERS AND MOWERS!
*We have hired the staff & purchased all of the inventory from Fowler & Hadding ~
so stop in today to visit with Judy; Sparky (Mike); Chuck; & Trevor and
let them help take care of your winter equipment.****
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SNAPPY'S OUTDOOR
EQUIPMENT SALES &
SERVICES, LLC
A Team of professionals with a combined 47 years experience
2120 N. Dixie Hwy.
Lima, OH 45801
419.879.1196
WE SELL, REPAIR & STOCK PARTS
for most brands of snow plows, salt spreaders and mowers!
A TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS WITH A COMBINED 47 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SNAPPYS OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE, LLC
2120 N. Dixie Hwy., Lima, OH 45801 419 879 1196
WE SELL, REPAIR AND STOCK ALL PARTS FOR ALL BRANDS OF SNOW PLOWS, SALT SPREADERS AND MOWERS!
*We have hired the staff & purchased all of the inventory from Fowler & Hadding ~
so stop in today to visit with Judy; Sparky (Mike); Chuck; & Trevor and
let them help take care of your winter equipment.****
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w w w . f e r r i s i n d u s t r i e s . c o m

www.ferrisindustries.com
Special Pricing through January
Financing Available
A TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS WITH A COMBINED 47 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SNAPPYS OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT SALES & SERVICE, LLC
2120 N. Dixie Hwy., Lima, OH 45801 419 879 1196
WE SELL, REPAIR AND STOCK ALL PARTS FOR ALL BRANDS OF SNOW PLOWS, SALT SPREADERS AND MOWERS!
*We have hired the staff & purchased all of the inventory from Fowler & Hadding ~
so stop in today to visit with Judy; Sparky (Mike); Chuck; & Trevor and
let them help take care of your winter equipment.****
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w w w . f e r r i s i n d u s t r i e s . c o m

www.ferrisindustries.com
Special Pricing through January
Financing Available
***We have hired the staff
& purchased all of the inventory
from Fowler & Hadding ~
so stop in today to visit with Judy; Sparky
(Mike); Chuck; & Trevor and let them help
take care of your outdoor equipment ****
YOUR
OUTDOOR
EQUIPMENT
NEEDS
ATTENTION:
Delphos Community
Midwest Rehab has partnered with Heritage Health Care
and New Vision Nursing & Home Care to be your
Home Health Therapy Provider in Delphos
and the surrounding communities
If you want Midwest Rehab, you must ask your doctor to
refer to one of these agencies or call Midwest Rehab directly.
B
e
t
t
e
r
.
.
.
S
t
r
o
n
g
e
r
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F
a
s
t
e
r
MIDWEST REHAB, INC.
485 MOXIE LANE, DELPHOS
(P) 419-692-3405; (F) 419-692-3401
HERITAGE HEALTH CARE
(P) 419-222-2404; (F) 419-222-2786
NEW VISION NURSING &
HOME CARE
(P) 567-356-5113; (F) 567-356-5106
Jenny Geier, Offce Manager;
Katie Greathouse, OT;
Steve Zuber, PT & Owner;
Mary Vorst, Billing Manager;
Heather Bockrath, DPT
10 The Herald Monday, April 15, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Fridays questions:
In the world of computer programs, CAPTCHA is an
acronym for completely automated public Turing test to
tell computers and humans apart. The Turing test, named
for British scientist Alan Turing, is used to elevate the
intelligence level of machines.
The tiny town of Walkabout Creek in the Australian
outback was home to Mick Dundee, the title character of
the 1986 film comedy Crocodile Dundee.
Todays questions:
What well-known drug was called Oculinum when it
was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
in 1989?
What international airport has a wedding planner
available for travelers who want to get hitched in a han-
gar or some other aviation-related venue?
Answers in Mondays Herald.
Woods
Training
(Continued from page 1)
would be more of a liability
than an asset.
More than a dozen local
high school students volun-
teered, with parental permis-
sion, to portray victims and
even the shooter during live
scenario training. All the stu-
dents said they have had con-
cerns about a shooter entering
their school but only when
it has happened other places
and becomes a major news
story.
I do worry about it when
I see it on the news but its
not something I sit around and
think about, Tyler Kline said.
Blake Kimmet agreed.
Ive seen coverage on
the news but I hadnt really
thought about it. Were in
a small town and it doesnt
seem like it could happen
here, Kimmet said.
Kaitlyn Slate said she has
already started sharing the
information with her friends
and fellow classmates.
I thought the training
went really well and it made
me feel good that our local
police officers will be ready if
it does happen, Slate said. I
feel better knowing the police
are training to deal with this.
All three students said the
officers were very profession-
al and they appreciated what
the officers have to do to be
ready to face any situation.
St. Johns Elementary
School Principal Nathan Stant
was on hand to watch the
training from the schools new
video-monitoring system. The
school has installed more than
a dozen cameras with the live
feed going to computers in
the offices. Others can also
access the system through
smart phones.
This system is a great
communication tool in the
case of an emergency, Stant
said. We see everything that
is going in real time and can
help if a situation ever aris-
es.
(Continued from page 1)
normally found in the area and
are indigenous to Kendrick
Woods.
The Marsh Marigold and
Skunk Cabbage only grow
here, Mohr detailed. This is
the only park designated as
an Ohio State Nature Preserve
because of the 300-year-old
White Oak growing along the
south trail.
Since it has been cooler this
spring, wildflowers and their
foliage are just beginning to
emerge. During a walk through
Kendrick Woods at this time,
nature lovers will see Blood
Root, Cut-Leaved Toothwort,
Dutchmans Breeches,
Trillium, Rue Anemone, White
Trout Lily, Wood Anemone
and Spring Beauty.
Since 1994, Mohr and crews
of volunteers have worked to
eradicate Garlic Mustard, an
invasive species from Europe,
which secretes a toxin into the
soil and damages the ecosys-
tem, particularly wildflowers.
The waterways, the
Auglaize River and Six Mile
Creek and larger unbroken
tracts of forests to connect
different wood lots have pro-
moted a larger bird migration
through the area. Warblers and
Pileated Woodpeckers, which
are the size of a hawk, have
been seen more frequently the
last 10 years. The park is also
home to Great Horned, Barn
and Screech owls and Wild
Turkeys.
The preserve is home to an
array of aquatic life: Leopard,
Western Chorus, Green and
Spring Peeper frogs and a pure-
bred population of salamanders.
To really appreciate the
park, people need to come out
and visit more frequently,
Mohr said with conviction.
Kendrick Woods is located
approximately 10 miles west
of Lima. Take SR 81 west to
Defiance Trail. The preserve is
located 1/2-mile north on the
west side of Defiance Trail.
Visitor parking, nature trails
and restrooms are available.
Contact Mohr at 419-223-
1025 for further details or to
register to help with Garlic
Mustard pulls. The dates for
the project are 9 a.m. to noon
on Mondays, including April
22 and 29 and May 6 and 20.
For more information,
please visit dnr.state.oh.us/
location/kendrick_woods.
St. Johns Elementary School Principal Nate Stant looks at the display in the elemen-
tary office of live video feed from cameras recently installed through the building.
Our local, national and international news
coverage is insightful and concise, to keep you in the
know without keeping you tied up. It's all the information
you need to stay on top of the world around you,
delivered straight to your door everyday.
If you aren't already taking advantage of our
convenient home delivery service, please call us at
419-695-0015.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
405 N. Main St. Delphos
PUTTING YOUR
WORLD IN
PERSPECTIVE