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We Train Men As if Lives Depended on It.

Dear prospective minister of the gospel, With excitement we present to you The Masters Seminary catalog. We believe that after you examine it carefully you will share our enthusiasm for the opportunities offered here. As a prospective seminarian, you will certainly agree with me that there is nothing more thrilling and, at the same time, humbling than to be called by the God of the universe to be one of His special representatives to His church and to a needy and lost generation.

John MacArthur If our wonderful Lord has laid His hand upon you for President such an exciting ministry, it is critical that you receive the very best training that is available. In fact, choosing a seminary is one of the most crucial ministry decisions you will ever make. This is true because your life, and later the lives of those to whom you minister, will reflect the character and quality of your study and experience in seminary.
At The Masters Seminary we offer theological education that is centered in the inerrant Word of God, sustained by scholarly study and research, nurtured in discipling relationships and ministry experiences, characterized by personal growth, and directed toward effectiveness in evangelism and edification. Here you will find seminary training that majors on personal holiness, exegetical study, and biblical theology and does so right in the context of a vital local church. If God is calling you to a special ministry, if you aspire to effectiveness in a ministry of the Word, if you are willing to submit yourself to the discipline of diligent study and to discipleship by godly men, then we invite you to prayerfully consider the exciting potential for study with us at The Masters Seminary. For the Master,

How to Contact The Masters Seminary


Campus & mailing address:

13248 Roscoe Blvd. Sun Valley, CA 91352 (818) 782-6488


Fax: (818) 909-5725

www.tms.edu

Office of the President John MacArthur (818) 909-5501 (661) 259-3540 Office of the Senior Vice President and Dean Richard L. Mayhue (818) 909-5632 Office of Academic Administration Irvin A. Busenitz (818) 909-5617

The Masters Grace Library Dennis M. Swanson (818) 909-5634 Office of Admission and Placement Ray Mehringer (818) 909-5627 (800) CALL-TMS Office of Development and Operations Robert M. White (818) 909-5630 Financial Aid Office (661) 259-3540

The Masters Seminary is accredited as a graduate seminary division of The Masters College and Seminary by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. WASC can be reached at 985 Atlantic Ave., Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501 or (510) 748-9001.

Contents
Introduction Statement of Faith Academic Programs & Policies Admission Policies & Procedures Financial Information Student Life Course Descriptions Personnel Academic Calendar Index
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Introducing The Masters Seminary


Educational Priorities The Masters Seminary offers graduate-level biblical, theological, and professional education designed to equip men for effectiveness in Christian ministry to the universal body of Christ, primarily through the local church. This educational task is accomplished through emphasis on the following:

Institutional Purpose
The Masters Seminary exists to advance the kingdom of the Lord Jesus Christ by equipping godly men to be pastors and/or trainers of pastors for excellence in service to Christ in strategic fields of Christian ministry. This is to be accomplished through an educational program and an environment of spiritual fellowship and relationships which emphasize unreserved commitment to the worship of God, submission to the authority of the Scriptures, a life of personal holiness, the priority of the local church, and the mission of penetrating the world with the Truth.

Introduction

Careful instruction in the Scriptures, including


the original languages

The study of various systems of theological


thought including exposure to both past and present movements in history and Christian missions with a view to embracing a comprehensive, coherent theology built from Scripture

A consistent focus upon involvement and


accountability within a local church

Ongoing efforts to challenge each student in developing a biblical philosophy/style of ministry The development and improvement of communication, relationship, leadership, and administrative skills for ministry. The objective is to produce graduates who are recognized as men of God and who are equipped to serve effectively as pastors, missionaries, teachers, evangelists, counselors, and leaders in evangelical ministries around the world (1 Tim. 3:17; Tit. 1:59).

Training Distinctives The seminary community and curriculum are designed with the following goals and ideals in view:

Excellence in academics is to be cultivated in an attitude of spiritual devotion The essential focus of all study at the seminary is to be biblical, exegetical, theological, expositional, and practical

Though other viewpoints are given careful consideration, the emphasis is to be positive in
building upon the certainties of Gods inerrant Word

Careful attention is to be devoted to the cultivation of Christian character qualities and living
skills which are essential for godly living, for leadership in ministry, and for effective involvement in serving others

Each program of study is to include a significant focus on the development of the appropriate
ministry skills which are necessary for effectiveness in the chosen areas of Christian service

The entire seminary community is to be characterized by the desire for the worship of God,
mutual edification, and by an evangelistic and missionary zeal.
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Personal Objectives The following characteristics portray an alumnus of The Masters Seminary in terms of the kind of person he should be, what he should know, and what he should be able to do.

Introduction

CharacterHe should be a godly man, notable for holiness of conduct in all his relationships (Ps. 1; 15; 1 Tim 3:17; Tit. 1:59). He should be caring, generous, wise, discerning, mature, secure, disciplined, accountable, humble, purposeful, empathetic, and teachable. He should be a loving and responsible husband and father (if married and if blessed by God with children1 Tim. 3:45; Tit. 1:6), and his heart should be moved by the compassion of Christ for others. He should readily acknowledge his own failures and deal honestly and humbly with sin in his own heart (Prov. 28:13; Matt. 7:15). His service for God should reflect the awesomeness and glory of ministry (2 Cor. 2:146:10) with awareness that God is concerned with attitudes as well as with actions (1 Sam. 15:2223; 1 Cor. 9:2427; 1 Pet. 5:17). His Christian life should reflect stability and maturity (1 Tim. 3:2, 67) as demonstrated by the exercise of good judgment in facing the trials of life and ministry in a contemporary context (1 Tim. 6:1112; 2 Tim. 2:113; 4:18). He should be one who establishes genuine, God-centered relationships with a wide range of people, encouraging and exhorting them according to their need in the mutual pursuit of God (Gal. 6:15). KnowledgeHe should have a general comprehension of the entirety of Gods written revelation and should have developed a well-formulated theological framework which adequately synthesizes the biblical and historical data. He should have a functional linguistic facility in biblical Hebrew and Greek, and a basic knowledge of the contributions of major Christian leaders, thinkers, and authors throughout church history (Ezra 7:10; 1 Tim. 4:1316; 2 Tim. 2:2, 1415; 3:1417; 4:14). He should have an understanding of the world, of culture, and of human problems, interests, and concerns. He should be able to address contemporary culture with a biblical worldview and confront unbiblical religious and philosophical thought in defending the Christian faith (Col. 2:8; Tit. 1:9; 1 Jn. 2:1517). He should know himself, including his strengths, weaknesses, responsibilities, and people skills (Matt. 20:2028; Acts 6:17; Eph. 4:1113; 1 Pet. 5:13). AbilitiesHe should be able to articulate a biblical philosophy of ministry that balances principles of worship, prayer, exposition, edification, evangelism, and discipleship. He should be able to lead with conviction, teach with authority, and preach with passion. He should be able to use appropriate tools for research, for record-keeping, and for writing. He should be sharpening those skills through the efficient use of research facilities, critical reading of current literature, and other forms of continuing education. He should be able to make decisions, to motivate, to listen, to empathize, to set priorities, and to defend the faith. He should be able to assess the needs of individuals and apply the Word of God to those needs in various ministry situations such as preaching, teaching, counseling, and witnessing (1 Cor. 2:15; 1 Tim. 2:2; 2 Tim. 2:1415; 4:15; Tit. 1:9). He should be able to equip and stimulate people to do the work of ministry (Eph. 4:1113; 2 Tim. 2:2). He should know how to lead in church activities, administer church ordinances, and conduct the services and ceremonies of the church in a God-focused manner.
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He should be deeply involved in the ministries of evangelism, discipleship, restoration, and edification with conviction and passion. He should have a deep concern for the lost and he should be challenged by the biblical command to proclaim the gospel to the ends of the earth. These concerns should be evidenced in his prayer life, in his evangelistic endeavors, and in his lifestyle. In all his roles, he should model the message he proclaims (1 Tim. 4:12; 2 Tim. 3:1014; Tit. 2:68; 1 Pet. 5:13).

Introduction

Educational Parameters To adhere unswervingly to the founding purpose of training pastors to shepherd and equip Christs church.
To keep The Masters Seminary faithful to its biblical foundations. All biblical content is to be based on Gods inerrant Word and developed through the exegetical process. The curriculum must constantly reflect scriptural absolutes to avoid deviation from Gods truth. To enrich faculty leadership. Every member of The Masters Seminary faculty fits a fivefold profile in that they are all men of God, men of the Word, men of scholarship, men of Christs church, and men of compassion. To insist on an educational philosophy that is consistent with Scripture by:

Majoring on biblical certainty, not doubt or theory Striving for spirituality in The Masters Seminary students, not intellectualism alone Preparing men to serve the Lord, not merely to know about the Lord Emphasizing a methodical, disciplined approach to studying Scripture rather than using a
haphazard approach

Encouraging excellence and never accepting mediocrity Expecting the faculty to be examples, not merely experts Stressing the imperative to function in the body of Christ, not merely function as an individual
To emphasize the well-articulated goals of The Masters Seminaryboth personal and pastoral: Personal:

To cultivate a holy, intimate relationship between every student and God To produce compassionate men who have gracious relationships with others
Pastoral:

To study Gods Word with precision To speak Gods message with power To serve Gods purpose with zeal To shepherd Gods flock with care To fight Gods battle with courage. Only by maintaining these personal and pastoral goals will
The Masters Seminary build the complete man of God

Location The Masters Seminary is located on the campus of Grace Community Church in the heart of the San Fernando Valley, a part of the metropolitan Los Angeles complex. The campus is fifteen miles north of downtown Los Angeles, twenty-five miles north of Los Angeles International Airport, five miles from the Burbank/Glendale/Pasadena Airport, and is easily accessible by major freeways, being one-half mile west of the intersection of the Hollywood and Golden State Freeways (Highway 170 and Interstate 5) and three miles east of the San Diego Freeway (Interstate 405). Facilities The spacious campus facilities of Grace Community Church, a church with approximately eight thousand in attendance each Sunday, are made available for seminary use. A 30,000-square-foot education building, providing additional classrooms, was completed in 1990. In 1998, TMS occupied a new 32,000square-foot library and faculty office complex.

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Library The Masters Grace Library presently contains holdings in excess of 160,000 volumes of books and bound periodicals. Auxiliary holdings include several microform collections and archives. Voyager Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) offers students powerful access to its own holdings as well as other strategic materials. Students are able to simultaneously search the holdings of TMS as well as the 140,000 volumes of The Masters College and the 1.1 million records of the American Theological Library Association (ATLA) database. The library also enjoys reciprocal borrowing privileges with other theological schools in southern California. Through the seminary Web page (www.tms.edu), the students have access to a growing collection of on-line full text publications.
Housed in a new 23,000-square-foot facility, the library is equipped with state-of-the-art provisions for research, study, and easy access to materials. Internet access is available at every study carrel, offering the user the capability to plug in his laptop and search local or remote databases and to utilize file storage and printing services. The library also provides a variety of important tools for electronic research as well as a strong CD-Rom and software collection related to biblical and theological studies. The library enjoys full accreditation with the Western Association of Schools and Colleges and is highly respected as an important resource center for biblical and theological studies in the West. A program designed to continually add important retrospective materials and special collections, including a repository of early biblical manuscripts and versions, is aggressively maintained. Ten major collections were purchased and merged to give it a rich depth and breadth of holdings in a
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wide spectrum of theological thought. Other important collections representing various disciplines have been acquired for the purpose of reaching back and obtaining one-time scholarship in the critical areas of biblical and theological studies with a view toward building a comprehensive collection in these areas. The seminarys administration is committed to building a strong library, one that balances traditional holdings with forward thinking and technical excellence. An efficient and knowledgeable staff is equally committed to providing assistance in accessing its rich holdings and services, and an environment conducive to using these resources in an effective and productive manner.

Introduction

Classrooms

TMS Offices & Library

Campus of Grace Community Church and The Masters Seminary

History of the Seminary


The Masters Seminary is a young seminary, having opened its doors in 1986 under the leadership and vision of Dr. John MacArthur, known worldwide as a master Bible expositor, church leader, and author. For a number of years, the elders of Grace Community Church, pastored by Dr. MacArthur, had envisioned a seminary program that would train men for ministry in the context of a local church. In 1977, Talbot Theological Seminary helped bring partial fruition to that vision by initiating an extension center offering seminary courses on the church campus. Several years later, Dr. MacArthur was chosen as President of The Masters College (1985). The college had a history of involvement with seminary education, having originally opened its doors in 1927 as the Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary. Building upon these foundationsthe heritage at the college and the extension courses at the churchthe time seemed right in 1986 for the birth of a new seminary. The Masters Seminary came into existence for the purpose of building men of God, thoroughly equipped for Bible exposition and local church ministry, through emphasis on careful biblical scholarship, pastoral training, and personal spiritual growth. Initially, this was accomplished through a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree program. Then, in 1992, a Master of Theology (Th.M.) degree program was inaugurated, focusing on the effective use of advanced exegetical and theological skills. A Doctor of Theology (Th.D.) was launched in 2000 and is based on the Th.M. degree. Its unique design combines the European model with the salient features of traditional American models and allows for a residency primarily consumed with researching, writing, and defending the dissertation. A Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) was launched in 2004 with an emphasis on expository preaching. Beginning with ninety-five students and four full-time faculty members in its inaugural year, the seminary has grown to its current level of three hundred twenty-five students and a faculty of eighteen full-time members. During this period of steady growth (approximately ten percent per year), the seminary has maintained its singular commitment to training men for a ministry of the Word. Over 1,000 alumni now minister on six continents of the world, with eighty-five percent ministering in a full-time capacity and approximately fifteen percent serving overseas.

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Introduction

Rediscovering Expository Preaching, our first faculty-written volume, which brings the seminary curriculum together at the confluence of Bible exposition, was released by Word Publishing in 1992. Rediscovering Pastoral Ministries, a companion volume released by Word Publishing in 1995, was also authored by our faculty and addresses the practical issues of ministry. The MacArthur Study Bible (enriched by TMS faculty) was released in 1997. Since 1998, a total of four anthologies of The Masters Seminary Journal articles have been released by Kregel. The Masters Seminarys regional accreditation was officially recognized in 1988. As a result of the second full accreditation visit, the regional accrediting association (Western Association of Schools and Colleges) stated in their February 1992 report: The seminary has been very intentional in its development of an M.Div. program with few analogies in the U.S., distinguished above all by its almost single-minded commitment to the preparation of ordained pastors for leadership in the local church.... Given the fundamental focus of the seminary, the structure of the M.Div. program seems well-oriented to its goals. The model itselfcombining church-based involvement, personal discipleship, and academic studyis worth applauding, and it is not insignificant that at the level of degree structure, the seminary is on the cutting-edge of reform in seminary education in this regard. In all three areas of the formal aspects of the academic curriculumBible, Theology, and Pastoral Ministriesa logical progression is detected, and discussions with the Faculty indicated a high degree of familiarity with how one aspect of the program integrates with other aspects. All of the interviewed alumni expressed high levels of satisfaction with the program, believing that the seminary prepared them well for the ministries in which they are currently involved (pp. 2324). The Masters Seminary completed a third full accreditation visit in Spring 2000 with full affirmation. The growth and advance of TMS created a pressing need for a facility to house the seminary library and an estimated faculty of twenty-two. The new Equipping Center, including the 23,000-squarefoot Masters Grace Library, was dedicated in 1998. Since the beginning of the seminary in 1986, the library has grown from a moderate church library of 7,000 volumes to a major theological collection numbering over 160,000 volumes. Plans are currently being implemented to increase these holdings to 175,000 volumes to adequately support the M.Div., Th.M., and Th.D. programs.

The Masters Seminary Journal The Masters Seminary Journal is a publication of the faculty of The Masters Seminary. It is published semiannually and contains scholarly articles dealing with the biblical text, theology, and pastoral concerns. It also contains reviews of current books and significant articles relating to these issues. A copy of the journal is provided to each student and alumnus. Interested friends are encouraged to subscribe. Legal Notices As the graduate seminary division of The Masters College and Seminary, The Masters Seminary is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. The institution operates under a charter granted by the State of California in 1927 and is qualified under the California Education Code Section 94310(a) to grant degrees. WASC can be reached at 985 Atlantic Ave., Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501 or (510) 748-9001.
Students and prospective students should read this catalog carefully.
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The appropriate catalog, along with other bulletins or distributed materials, determines student rights and responsibilities with respect to the seminary. Matriculation constitutes an agreement by the student to abide by the regulations and policies of The Masters Seminary. Information regarding the accessibility of facilities to handicapped students is available from the Administration office. The Masters Seminary does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, nationality, nondisqualifying handicap, or ethnic origin in its admissions policies, educational policies, employment policies, services, or scholarship and loan programs. The provisions of this catalog, including academic offerings, academic policies, and all financial charges are subject to unilateral change by The Masters Seminary. While the seminary attempts to keep costs at reasonable levels, it is anticipated that costs will increase in future years.

Introduction

Financial Resources The Masters Seminary was launched with the resources of the unfailing promises of God and the prayerful support of a small circle of loyal friends. Because tuition charges are kept at a reasonable level, there is a continuing need for an increasing number of regular supporters. The members of Grace Community Church have graciously and sacrificially provided facilities. Interested donors may be assured that all funds are invested in direct support of the mission of the seminary in building men of God for effective ministries.
Interested friends may support the seminary in any of the following ways:

Prayer partners Regular monthly giving Cash contributions in any amount Funding of a student scholarship program Memorial gifts/living honor gifts Matching gifts, (matched by employing
corporations)

Designation of the seminary as beneficiary of an insurance policy

Donations of real estate property Estate gifts by means of a will designating


the seminary as a beneficiary

Donation of securities, stocks, or bonds Endowment gifts Annuity programs

All gifts, bequests, or annuities should be designated for The Masters Seminary, with correspondence concerning these matters addressed to one of the men below: Dr. Richard Mayhue Senior Vice President and Dean 13248 Roscoe Blvd. Sun Valley, CA 91352 (818) 909-5632 rmayhue@tms.edu Mr. Robert White Vice President for Development and Operations 13248 Roscoe Blvd. Sun Valley, CA 91352 (818) 909-5630 bwhite@tms.edu.

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Statement of Faith
Preamble Members of the board of directors, administrators, and faculty members of The Masters Seminary recognize that any doctrinal statement is but a fallible human attempt to summarize and systematize the riches of an infallible divine revelation. But this in no way detracts from the importance of such a statement. In fact, members of the board of directors, administration, and faculty members are annually required to sign a statement affirming agreement with this Statement of Faith.

A Firm Foundation
The affirmations which follow carefully specify our teaching position with regard to the major biblical doc-

Statement of Faith

trines, and thus provide a framework for curriculum and instruction at the seminary. They also provide an anchor to protect the institution against theological drift.

The Holy Scriptures We teach that the Bible is Gods written revelation to man, and thus the 66 books of the Bible given to us by the Holy Spirit constitute the plenary (inspired equally in all parts) Word of God (1 Cor. 2:714; 2 Pet. 1:20, 21).
We teach that the Word of God is an objective, propositional revelation (1 Cor. 2:13; 1 Thess. 2:13), verbally inspired in every word (2 Tim. 3:16), absolutely inerrant in the original documents, infallible, and God-breathed. We teach the literal, grammatical-historical interpretation of Scripture, which affirms the belief that the opening chapters of Genesis present creation in six literal days (Gen. 1:31; Ex. 31:17). We teach that the Bible constitutes the only infallible rule of faith and practice (Matt. 5:18; 24:35; John 10:35; 16:12, 13; 17:17; 1 Cor. 2:13; 2 Tim. 3:1517; Heb. 4:12; 2 Pet. 1:20, 21). We teach that God spoke in His written Word by a process of dual authorship. The Holy Spirit so superintended the human authors that through their individual personalities and different styles of writing, they composed and recorded Gods Word to man (2 Pet. 1:20, 21) without error in the whole or in the part (Matt. 5:18; 2 Tim. 3:16). We teach that, whereas there may be several applications of any given passage of Scripture, there is but one true interpretation. The meaning of Scripture is to be found as one diligently applies the literal, grammatical-historical method of interpretation under the enlightenment of the Holy Spirit (John 7:17; 16:1215; 1 Cor. 2:715; 1 John 2:20). It is the responsibility of believers to ascertain carefully the true intent and meaning of Scripture, recognizing that proper application is binding on
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all generations. Yet the truth of Scripture stands in judgment of men; never do men stand in judgment of it.

Statement of Faith

God We teach that there is but one living and true God (Deut. 6:4; Is. 45:57; 1 Cor. 8:4), an infinite, allknowing Spirit (John 4:24), perfect in all His attributes, one in essence, eternally existing in three PersonsFather, Son, and Holy Spirit (Matt. 28:19; 2 Cor. 13:14)each equally deserving worship and obedience.
God the FatherWe teach that God the Father, the first person of the Trinity, orders and disposes all things according to His own purpose and grace (Ps. 145:8, 9; 1 Cor. 8:6). He is the Creator of all things (Gen. 1:131; Eph. 3:9). As the only absolute and omnipotent ruler in the universe, He is sovereign in creation, providence, and redemption (Ps. 103:19; Rom. 11:36). His fatherhood involves both His designation within the Trinity and His relationship with mankind. As Creator He is Father to all men (Eph. 4:6), but He is Spiritual Father only to believers (Rom. 8:14; 2 Cor. 6:18). He has decreed for His own glory all things that come to pass (Eph. 1:11). He continually upholds, directs, and governs all creatures and events (1 Chr. 29:11). In His sovereignty He is neither author nor approver of sin (Hab. 1:13), nor does He abridge the accountability of moral, intelligent creatures (1 Pet. 1:17). He has graciously chosen from eternity past those whom He would have as His own (Eph. 1:46); He saves from sin all those who come to Him; and He becomes, upon adoption, Father to His own (John 1:12; Rom. 8:15; Gal. 4:5; Heb. 12:59). God the SonWe teach that Jesus Christ, the second person of the Trinity, possesses all the divine excellencies, and in these He is coequal, consubstantial, and coeternal with the Father (John 10:30; 14:9). We teach that God the Father created the heavens and the earth and all that is in them according to His own will, through His Son, Jesus Christ, by whom all things continue in existence and in operations (John 1:3; Col. 1:1517; Heb. 1:2). We teach that in the incarnation (God becoming man) Christ surrendered only the prerogatives of deity but nothing of the divine essence, either in degree or kind. In His incarnation, the eternally existing second person of the Trinity accepted all the essential characteristics of humanity and so became the God-man (Phil. 2:58; Col. 2:9). We teach that Jesus Christ represents humanity and deity in indivisible oneness (Mic. 5:2; John 5:23; 14:9, 10; Col. 2:9). We teach that our Lord Jesus Christ was virgin born (Is. 7:14; Matt. 1:23, 25; Luke 1:2635); that He was God incarnate (John 1:1, 14); and that the purpose of the incarnation was to reveal God, redeem men, and rule over Gods kingdom (Ps. 2:79; Is. 9:6; John 1:29; Phil. 2:911; Heb. 7:25, 26; 1 Pet. 1:18, 19). We teach that, in the incarnation, the second person of the Trinity laid aside His right to the full prerogatives of coexistence with God, assumed the place of a Son, and took on an existence appropriate to a servant while never divesting Himself of His divine attributes (Phil. 2:58). We teach that our Lord Jesus Christ accomplished our redemption through the shedding of His blood and sacrificial death on the cross and that His death was voluntary, vicarious, substitutionary, propitiatory, and redemptive (John 10:15; Rom. 3:24, 25; 5:8; 1 Pet. 2:24). We teach that on the basis of the efficacy of the death of our Lord Jesus Christ, the believing sinner is freed from the punishment, the penalty, the power, and one day the very presence of sin; and that
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he is declared righteous, given eternal life, and adopted into the family of God (Rom. 3:25; 5:8, 9; 2 Cor. 5:14, 15; 1 Pet. 2:24; 3:18). We teach that our justification is made sure by His literal, physical resurrection from the dead and that He is now ascended to the right hand of the Father, where He now mediates as our Advocate and High-Priest (Matt. 28:6; Luke 24:38, 39; Acts 2:30, 31; Rom. 4:25; 8:34; Heb. 7:25; 9:24; 1 John 2:1). We teach that in the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the grave, God confirmed the deity of His Son and gave proof that God has accepted the atoning work of Christ on the cross. Jesus bodily resurrection is also the guarantee of a future resurrection life for all believers (John 5:2629; 14:19; Rom. 4:25; 6:510; 1 Cor. 15:20, 23). We teach that Jesus Christ will return to receive the church, which is His body, unto Himself at the Rapture and, returning with His church in glory, will establish His millennial kingdom on earth (Acts 1:911; 1 Thess. 4:1318; Rev. 20). We teach that the Lord Jesus Christ is the One through whom God will judge all mankind (John 5:22, 23): Believers (1 Cor. 3:1015; 2 Cor. 5:10); Living inhabitants of the earth at His glorious return (Matt. 25:3146); and the Unbelieving dead at the Great White Throne (Rev. 20:1115). As the mediator between God and man (1 Tim. 2:5), the head of His body the church (Eph. 1:22; 5:23; Col. 1:18), and the coming universal King who will reign on the throne of David (Is. 9:6, 7; Ezek. 37: 2428; Luke 1:3133), He is the final Judge of all who fail to place their trust in Him as Lord and Savior (Matt. 25:1446; Acts 17:30, 31). God the Holy SpiritWe teach that the Holy Spirit is a divine person, eternal, underived, possessing all the attributes of personality and deity, including intellect (1 Cor. 2:1013), emotions (Eph. 4:30), will (1 Cor. 12:11), eternality (Heb. 9:14), omnipresence (Ps. 139:710), omniscience (Is. 40:13, 14), omnipotence (Rom. 15:13), and truthfulness (John 16:13). In all the divine attributes He is coequal and consubstantial with the Father and the Son (Matt. 28:19; Acts 5:3, 4; 28:25, 26; 1 Cor. 12:46; 2 Cor. 13:14; and Jer. 31:3134 with Heb. 10:1517). We teach that it is the work of the Holy Spirit to execute the divine will with relation to all mankind. We recognize His sovereign activity in creation (Gen. 1:2), the incarnation (Matt. 1:18), the written revelation (2 Pet. 1:20, 21), and the work of salvation (John 3:57). We teach that a unique work of the Holy Spirit in this age began at Pentecost when He came from the Father as promised by Christ (John 14:16, 17; 15:26) to initiate and complete the building of the body of Christ. His activity includes convicting the world of sin, of righteousness, and of judgment; glorifying the Lord Jesus Christ and transforming believers into the image of Christ (John 16:79; Acts 1:5; 2:4; Rom. 8:29; 2 Cor. 3:18; Eph. 2:22). We teach that the Holy Spirit is the supernatural and sovereign agent in regeneration, baptizing all believers into the body of Christ (1 Cor. 12:13). The Holy Spirit also indwells, sanctifies, instructs, empowers them for service, and seals them unto the day of redemption (Rom. 8:911; 2 Cor. 3:6; Eph. 1:13). We teach that the Holy Spirit is the divine teacher who guided the apostles and prophets into all truth as they committed to writing Gods revelation, the Bible (2 Pet. 1:1921). Every believer possesses the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit from the moment of salvation, and it is the duty of all those born of the Spirit to be filled with (controlled by) the Spirit (Rom. 8:911; Eph. 5:18; 1 John 2:20, 27).
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Statement of Faith

We teach that the Holy Spirit administers spiritual gifts to the church. The Holy Spirit glorifies neither Himself nor His gifts by ostentatious displays, but He does glorify Christ by implementing His work of redeeming the lost and building up believers in the most holy faith (John 16:13, 14; Acts 1:8; 1 Cor. 12:411; 2 Cor. 3:18). We teach, in this respect, that God the Holy Spirit is sovereign in the bestowing of all His gifts for the perfecting of the saints today and that speaking in tongues and the working of sign miracles in the beginning days of the church were for the purpose of pointing to and authenticating the apostles as revealers of divine truth, and were never intended to be characteristic of the lives of believers (1 Cor. 12:411; 13:810; 2 Cor. 12:12; Eph. 4:712; Heb. 2:14).

Statement of Faith

Man We teach that man was directly and immediately created by God in His image and likeness. Man was created free of sin with a rational nature, intelligence, volition, self-determination, and moral responsibility to God (Gen. 2:7, 1525; James 3:9).
We teach that Gods intention in the creation of man was that man should glorify God, enjoy Gods fellowship, live his life in the will of God, and by this accomplish Gods purpose for man in the world (Is. 43:7; Col. 1:16; Rev. 4:11). We teach that in Adams sin of disobedience to the revealed will and Word of God, man lost his innocence; incurred the penalty of spiritual and physical death; became subject to the wrath of God; and became inherently corrupt and utterly incapable of choosing or doing that which is acceptable to God apart from divine grace. With no recuperative powers to enable him to recover himself, man is hopelessly lost. Mans salvation is thereby wholly of Gods grace through the redemptive work of our Lord Jesus Christ (Gen. 2:16, 17; 3:119; John 3:36; Rom. 3:23; 6:23; 1 Cor. 2:14; Eph. 2:13; 1 Tim. 2:13, 14; 1 John 1:8). We teach that because all men were in Adam, a nature corrupted by Adams sin has been transmitted to all men of all ages, Jesus Christ being the only exception. All men are thus sinners by nature, by choice, and by divine declaration (Ps. 14:13; Jer. 17:9; Rom. 3:918, 23; 5:1012).

Salvation We teach that salvation is wholly of God by grace on the basis of the redemption of Jesus Christ, the merit of His shed blood, and not on the basis of human merit or works (John 1:12; Eph. 1:47; 2:810; 1 Pet. 1:18, 19). Election We teach that election is the act of God by which, before the foundation of the world, He chose in Christ those whom He graciously regenerates, saves, and sanctifies (Rom. 8:2830; Eph. 1:411; 2 Thess. 2:13; 2 Tim. 2:10; 1 Pet. 1:1, 2).
We teach that sovereign election does not contradict or negate the responsibility of man to repent and trust Christ as Savior and Lord (Ezek. 18:23, 32; 33:11; John 3:18, 19, 36; 5:40; 2 Thess. 2:1012; Rev. 22:17). Nevertheless, since sovereign grace includes the means of receiving the gift of salvation as well as the gift itself, sovereign election will result in what God determines. All whom the Father calls to Himself will come in faith and all who come in faith the Father will receive (John 6:3740, 44; Acts 13:48; James 4:8).

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We teach that the unmerited favor that God grants to totally depraved sinners is not related to any initiative of their own part nor to Gods anticipation of what they might do by their own will, but is solely of His sovereign grace and mercy (Eph. 1:47; Titus 3:47; 1 Pet. 1:2). We teach that election should not be looked upon as based merely on abstract sovereignty. God is truly sovereign but He exercises this sovereignty in harmony with His other attributes, especially His omniscience, justice, holiness, wisdom, grace, and love (Rom. 9:1116). This sovereignty will always exalt the will of God in a manner totally consistent with His character as revealed in the life of our Lord Jesus Christ (Matt. 11:2528; 2 Tim. 1:9).

Statement of Faith

Regeneration We teach that regeneration is a supernatural work of the Holy Spirit by which the divine nature and divine life are given (John 3:38; Titus 3:5). It is instantaneous and is accomplished solely by the power of the Holy Spirit through the instrumentality of the Word of God (John 5:24), when the repentant sinner, as enabled by the Holy Spirit, responds in faith to the divine provision of salvation. Genuine regeneration is manifested by fruits worthy of repentance as demonstrated in righteous attitudes and conduct. Good works will be its proper evidence and fruit (1 Cor. 6:1920; Eph. 5:1721; Phil. 2:12b; Col. 3:1217; 2 Pet. 1:411). This obedience causes the believer to be increasingly conformed to the image of our Lord Jesus Christ (2 Cor. 3:18). Such a conformity is climaxed in the believers glorification at Christs coming (Rom. 8:16, 17; 2 Pet. 1:4; 1 John 3:2, 3). Justification We teach that justification before God is an act of God (Rom. 8:30, 33) by which He declares righteous those who, through faith in Christ, repent of their sins (Is. 55:6, 7; Luke 13:3; Acts 2:38; 3:19; 11:18; Rom. 2:4; 2 Cor. 7:10) and confess Him as sovereign Lord (Rom. 10:9, 10; 1 Cor. 12:3; 2 Cor. 4:5; Phil. 2:11). This righteousness is apart from any virtue or work of man (Rom. 3:20; 4:6) and involves the placing of our sins on Christ (Col. 2:14; 1 Pet. 2:24) and the imputation of Christs righteousness to us (1 Cor. 1:2, 30; 6:11; 2 Cor. 5:21). By this means God is enabled to be just, and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus (Rom. 3:26).

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Sanctification We teach that every believer is sanctified (set apart) unto God by justification and is therefore declared to be holy and is therefore identified as a saint. This sanctification is positional and instantaneous and should not be confused with progressive sanctification. This sanctification has to do with the believers standing, not his present walk or condition (Acts 20:32; 1 Cor. 1:2, 30; 6:11; 2 Thess. 2:13; Heb. 2:11; 3:1; 10:10, 14; 13:12; 1 Pet. 1:2).

Statement of Faith

We teach that there is also by the work of the Holy Spirit a progressive sanctification by which the state of the believer is brought closer to the likeness of Christ through obedience to the Word of God and the empowering of the Holy Spirit, the believer is able to live a life of increasing holiness in conformity to the will of God, becoming more and more like our Lord Jesus Christ (John 17:17, 19; Rom. 6:122; 2 Cor. 3:18; 1 Thess. 4:3, 4; 5:23). In this respect, we teach that every saved person is involved in a daily conflictthe new creation in Christ doing battle against the fleshbut adequate provision is made for victory through the power of the indwelling Holy Spirit. The struggle nevertheless stays with the believer all through this earthly life and is never completely ended. All claims to the eradication of sin in this life are unscriptural. Eradication of sin is not possible, but the Holy Spirit does provide for victory over sin (Gal. 5:1625; Eph. 4:2224; Phil. 3:12; Col. 3:9, 10; 1 Pet. 1:1416; 1 John 3:59).

Security We teach that all the redeemed once saved are kept by Gods power and are thus secure in Christ forever (John 5:24; 6:3740; 10:2730; Rom. 5:9, 10; 8:1, 3139; 1 Cor. 1:49; Eph. 4:30; Heb. 7:25; 13:5; 1 Pet. 1:4, 5; Jude 24).
We teach that it is the privilege of believers to rejoice in the assurance of their salvation through the testimony of Gods Word which, however, clearly forbids the use of Christian liberty as an excuse for sinful living and carnality (Rom. 6:1522; 13:13, 14; Gal. 5:13, 16, 17, 25, 26; Titus 2:1114).

Separation We teach that separation from sin is clearly called for throughout the Old and New Testaments, and that the Scriptures clearly indicate that in the last days apostasy and worldliness shall increase (2 Cor. 6:147:1; 2 Tim. 3:15).
We teach that out of deep gratitude for the undeserved grace of God granted to us and because our glorious God is so worthy of our total consecration, all the saved should live in such a manner as to
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demonstrate our adoring love to God and so as not to bring reproach upon our Lord and Savior. We also teach that separation from any association with religious apostasy, and worldly and sinful practices is commanded of us by God (Rom. 12:1, 2; 1 Cor. 5:913; 2 Cor. 6:147:1; 1 John 2:1517; 2 John 911). We teach that believers should be separated unto our Lord Jesus Christ (2 Thess. 1:11, 12; Heb. 12:1, 2) and affirm that the Christian life is a life of obedient righteousness demonstrated by a beatitude attitude (Matt. 5:212) and a continual pursuit of holiness (Rom. 12:1, 2; 2 Cor. 7:1; Heb. 12:14; Titus 2:1114; 1 John 3:110).

Statement of Faith

The Church We teach that all who place their faith in Jesus Christ are immediately placed by the Holy Spirit into one united spiritual body, the church (1 Cor. 12:12, 13), the bride of Christ (2 Cor. 11:2; Eph. 5:2332; Rev. 19:7, 8), of which Christ is the head (Eph. 1:22; 4:15; Col. 1:18).
We teach that the formation of the church, the body of Christ, began on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:121, 3847) and will be completed at the coming of Christ for His own at the Rapture (1 Cor. 15:5152; 1 Thess. 4:1318). We teach that the church is thus a unique spiritual organism designed by Christ, made up of all born-again believers in this present age (Eph. 2:113:6). The church is distinct from Israel (1 Cor. 10:32), a mystery not revealed until this age (Eph. 3:16; 5:32). We teach that the establishment and continuity of local churches is clearly taught and defined in the New Testament Scriptures (Acts 14:23, 27; 20:17, 28; Gal. 1:2; Phil. 1:1; 1 Thess. 1:1; 2 Thess. 1:1) and that the members of the one spiritual body are directed to associate themselves together in local assemblies (1 Cor. 11:1820; Heb. 10:25). We teach that the one supreme authority for the church is Christ (Eph. 1:22; Col. 1:18) and that leadership, gifts, order, discipline, and worship in the church are all appointed through His sovereignty as found in the Scriptures. The biblically designated officers serving under Christ and over the assembly are elders (males, who are also called bishops, pastors, and pastor-teachers; Acts 20:28; Eph. 4:11) and deacons, both of whom must meet biblical qualifications (1 Tim. 3:113; Titus 1:59; 1 Pet. 5:15). We teach that these leaders lead or rule as servants of Christ (1 Tim. 5:1722) and have His authority in directing the church. The congregation is to submit to their leadership (Heb. 13:7, 17). We teach the importance of discipleship (Matt. 28:19, 20; 2 Tim. 2:2), mutual accountability of all believers to each other (Matt. 18:1517), as well as the need to discipline sinning members of the congregation in accord with the standards of Scripture (Matt. 18:1522; Acts 5:111; 1 Cor. 5:113; 2 Thess. 3:615; 1 Tim. 1:19, 20; Titus 1:1016). We teach the autonomy of the local church, free from any external authority or control, with the right of self-government and freedom from the interference of any hierarchy of individuals or organizations (Titus 1:5). We teach that it is scriptural for true churches to cooperate with each other for the presentation and propagation of the faith. Local churches, however, through their pastors and their interpretation and application of Scripture, should be the sole judges of the measure and method of their cooperation (Acts 15:1931; 20:28; 1 Cor. 5:47, 13; 1 Pet. 5:14). We teach that the purpose of the church is to glorify God (Eph. 3:21) by building itself up in the faith (Eph. 4:1316), by instruction of the Word (2 Tim. 2:2, 15; 3:1617), by fellowship (Acts 2:47; 1 John
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1:3), by keeping the ordinances (Luke 22:19; Acts 2:3842) and by advancing and communicating the gospel to the entire world (Matt. 28:19; Acts 1:8). We teach the calling of all saints to the work of service (1 Cor. 15:58; Eph. 4:12; Rev. 22:12). We teach the need of the church to cooperate with God as He accomplishes His purpose in the world. To that end, He gives the church spiritual gifts. He gives men chosen for the purpose of equipping the saints for the work of the ministry (Eph. 4:712) and He also gives unique and special spiritual abilities to each member of the body of Christ (Rom. 12:58; 1 Cor. 12:431; 1 Pet. 4:10, 11). We teach that there were two kinds of gifts given to the early church: miraculous gifts of divine revelation and healing, given temporarily in the apostolic era for the purpose of confirming the authenticity of the apostles message ( 2 Cor. 12:12; Heb. 2:3, 4); and ministering gifts, given to equip believers for edifying one another. With the New Testament revelation now complete, Scripture becomes the sole test of the authenticity of a mans message, and confirming gifts of a miraculous nature are no longer necessary to validate a man or his message (1 Cor. 13:812). The only gifts in operation today are those non-revelatory equipping gifts given for edification (Rom. 12:68). We teach that no one possesses the gift of healing today but that God does hear and answer the prayer of faith and will answer in accordance with His own perfect will for the sick, suffering, and afflicted (Luke 18:18; John 5:79; 2 Cor. 12:610; James 5:1316; 1 John 5:14, 15). We teach that two ordinances have been committed to the local church: baptism and the Lords Supper (Acts 2:3842). Christian baptism by immersion (Acts 8:3639) is the solemn and beautiful testimony of a believer showing forth his faith in the crucified, buried, and risen Savior, and his union with Him in death to sin and resurrection to a new life (Rom. 6: 111). It is also a sign of fellowship and identification with the visible body of Christ (Acts 2:41, 42). We teach that the Lords Supper is the commemoration and proclamation of His death until He comes, and should be always preceded by solemn self-examination (1 Cor. 11:2332). We also teach that whereas the elements of communion are only representative of the flesh and blood of Christ, the Lords Supper is nevertheless an actual Communion with the risen Christ who is present in a unique way, fellowshipping with His people (1 Cor. 10:16).

Statement of Faith

Angels Holy AngelsWe teach that angels are created beings and are therefore not to be worshiped. Although they are a higher order of creation than man, they are created to serve God and to worship Him (Luke 2:914; Heb. 1:6, 7, 14; 2:6, 7; Rev. 5:1114).
Fallen AngelsWe teach that Satan is a created angel and the author of sin. He incurred the judgment of God by rebelling against his Creator (Is. 14:1217; Ezek. 28:1119), by taking numerous angels with him in his fall (Matt. 25:41; Rev. 12:114), and by introducing sin into the human race by his temptation of Eve (Gen. 3:115). We teach that Satan is the open and declared enemy of God and man (Is. 14:13, 14; Matt. 4:111; Rev. 12:9, 10), the prince of this world who has been defeated through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ (Rom. 16:20) and that he shall be eternally punished in the lake of fire (Is. 14:1217; Ezek. 28:1119; Matt. 25:41; Rev. 20:10).

Last Things DeathWe teach that physical death involves no loss of our immaterial consciousness (Rev. 6:911), that there is a separation of soul and body (James 2:26), that the soul of the redeemed
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passes immediately into the presence of Christ (Luke 23:43; 2 Cor. 5:8; Phil. 1:23), and that, for the redeemed, such separation will continue until the Rapture (1 Thess. 4:1317) which initiates the first resurrection (Rev. 20:46), when our soul and body will be reunited to be glorified forever with our Lord (1 Cor. 15:3544, 5054; Phil. 3:21). Until that time, the souls of the redeemed in Christ remain in joyful fellowship with our Lord Jesus Christ (2 Cor. 5:8). We teach the bodily resurrection of all men, the saved to eternal life (John 6:39; Rom. 8:10, 11, 1923; 2 Cor. 4:14), and the unsaved to judgment and everlasting punishment (Dan. 12:2; John 5:29; Rev. 20:1315). We teach that the souls of the unsaved at death are kept under punishment until the second resurrection (Luke 16:1926; Rev. 20:1315), when the soul and the resurrection body will be united (John 5:28, 29). They shall then appear at the Great White Throne judgment (Rev. 20:1115) and shall be cast into hell, the lake of fire (Matt. 25:4146), cut off from the life of God forever (Dan. 12:2; Matt. 25:4146; 2 Thess. 1:79). The Rapture of the ChurchWe teach the personal, bodily return of our Lord Jesus Christ before the seven-year tribulation (1 Thess. 4:16) to translate His church from this earth (John 14:13; 1 Cor. 15:5153; 1 Thess. 4:155:11) and, between this event and His glorious return with His saints, to reward believers according to their works (1 Cor. 3:1115; 2 Cor. 5:10). The Tribulation PeriodWe teach that immediately following the removal of the church from the earth (John 14:13; 1 Thess. 4:1318) the righteous judgments of God will be poured out upon an unbelieving world (Jer. 30:7; Dan. 9:27; 12:1; 2 Thess. 2:712; Rev. 16), and that these judgments will be climaxed by the return of Christ in glory to the earth (Matt. 24:2731; 25:3146; 2 Thess. 2:712). At that time the Old Testament and tribulation saints will be raised and the living will be judged (Dan. 12:23; Rev. 20:46). This period includes the seventieth week of Daniels prophecy (Dan. 9:2427; Matt. 24:1531; 25:3146). The Second Coming and the Millennial ReignWe teach that after the tribulation period, Christ will come to earth to occupy the throne of David (Matt. 25:31; Luke 1:32, 33; Acts 1:10, 11; 2:29, 30) and establish His messianic kingdom for a thousand years on the earth (Rev. 20:17). During this time the resurrected saints will reign with Him over Israel and all the nations of the earth (Ezek. 37:2128; Dan. 7:1722; Rev. 19:1116). This reign will be preceded by the overthrow of the Antichrist and the False Prophet, and by the removal of Satan from the world (Dan. 7:1727; Rev. 20:16). We teach that the kingdom itself will be the fulfillment of Gods promise to Israel (Is. 65:1725; Ezek. 37:2128; Zech. 8:117) to restore them to the land which they forfeited through their disobedience (Deut. 28:1568). The result of their disobedience was that Israel was temporarily set aside (Matt. 21:43; Rom. 11:126) but will again be awakened through repentance to enter into the land of blessing (Jer. 31:3134; Ezek. 36:2232; Rom. 11:2529). We teach that this time of our Lords reign will be characterized by harmony, justice, peace, righteousness, and long life (Is. 11; 65:1725; Ezek. 36:3338), and will be brought to an end with the release of Satan (Rev. 20:7). The Judgment of the LostWe teach that following the release of Satan after the thousand year reign of Christ (Rev. 20:7), Satan will deceive the nations of the earth and gather them to battle against the saints and the beloved city, at which time Satan and his army will be devoured by fire from heaven (Rev. 20:9). Following this, Satan will be thrown into the lake of fire and brimstone
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Statement of Faith

(Matt. 25:41; Rev. 20:10) whereupon Christ, who is the Judge of all men (John 5:22), will resurrect and judge the great and small at the Great White Throne judgment. We teach that this resurrection of the unsaved dead to judgment will be a physical resurrection, whereupon receiving their judgment (John 5:28, 29), they will be committed to an eternal conscious punishment in the lake of fire (Matt. 25:41; Rev. 20:1115). EternityWe teach that after the closing of the Millennium, the temporary release of Satan, and the judgment of unbelievers (2 Thess. 1:9; Rev. 20:715), the saved will enter the eternal state of glory with God, after which the elements of this earth are to be dissolved (2 Pet. 3:10) and replaced with a new earth wherein only righteousness dwells (Eph. 5:5; Rev. 20:15, 21, 22). Following this, the heavenly city will come down out of heaven (Rev. 21:2) and will be the dwelling place of the saints, where they will enjoy forever fellowship with God and one another (John 17:3; Rev. 21, 22). Our Lord Jesus Christ, having fulfilled His redemptive mission, will then deliver up the kingdom to God the Father (1 Cor. 15:2328) that in all spheres the triune God may reign forever and ever (1 Cor. 15:28).

Statement of Faith

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Academic Programs & Policies


The Masters Seminary exists to equip godly men to be pastors and/or trainers of pastors for service to Christ in strategic fields of Christian ministry through an educational program and an environment of spiritual fellowship and relationships which emphasize unreserved commitment to the worship of God, submission to the authority of the Scriptures, a life of personal holiness, the priority of the local church, and the mission of penetrating the world with the Truth.

The Highest Calling


A low view of the functions of the ministry will naturally carry with it a low conception of the training necessary for it.And a high view of the functions of the ministry on evangelical lines inevitably produces a high conception of the training which is needed to prepare men for the exercise of these high functions. B.B. Warfield

Academic Programs & Policies

Since there is no higher calling in life than to be a proclaimer of Gods Word, there is no more worthy enterprise than training faithful men to carry out that charge. The Masters Seminary seeks to fulfill this charge by offering six degree programs:

Master of Divinity (M.Div.), Bachelor of Theology (B.Th.), Diploma of Theology (Dip.Th.), Master of Theology (Th.M.), Doctor of Theology (Th.D.), and Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.).

THE MASTER OF DIVINITY


Purpose The Master of Divinity curriculum provides a basic three-year program in graduate theological education for those preparing for church or mission vocations requiring ordination. The program is designed to provide a broad biblical, theological, and practical foundation for those entering pastoral, missionary, or other Christian education ministries. The program may also provide a basis for further graduate study leading to such degrees as Master of Theology (Th.M.), Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.), Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), or Doctor of Theology (Th.D.).
In fulfilling the mission of the seminary, as stated and elaborated earlier in this catalog, the Master of Divinity program focuses on three areas of special emphasis: biblical theological understanding, personal growth, and professional preparation. The emphasis on a thorough knowledge and understanding of the Bible is demonstrated throughout the curriculum, especially in direct Bible study courses, and in the biblical language, hermeneutics, and theology courses. The emphasis on personal growth is demonstrated in the required discipleship labs, chapels, and in significant portions of the field education and pastoral ministries courses. The emphasis on professional development is demonstrated primarily through the pastoral ministries, expository preaching, ordination, and counseling courses. Included in the three broad areas of emphasis outlined above, the Master of Divinity program also intends to:

Emphasize the primacy of the local church in commissioning for ministry and as the institutional focus for spiritual accountability

Cultivate an attitude of devotion and worship Instill and nurture a missionary and evangelistic zeal
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Encourage growth in godliness, especially as demonstrated in an attitude of love and ministry


as a servant, while developing the appropriate skills for leadership

Advance ability in independent and constructive thought in areas relating to ministry and
contemporary concerns

Promote growth in self-discipline, reading habits, and methodologies so that independent


study may be continued as a pattern of life and ministry

Academic Programs & Policies

Specifically, the Master of Divinity Program is designed to provide a broad biblical theological understanding, personal growth, and professional preparation for church or mission vocations requiring ordination, as detailed in the following Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs):

PLO 1: As a future elder, pastor, missionary, or educator, comprehend the significant areas of
biblical interpretation, biblical languages, Christian theology, and pastoral ministry.

PLO 2: As a future elder/pastor, construct a personal philosophy of ministry with application to


the desired vocational goals.

PLO 3: As a future teacher of the Scripture, synthesize the input of biblical languages, Bible backgrounds, and theological constructs to preach and teach the Bible to varied age levels and abilities within any ministry context.

PLO 4: As a future spiritual leader, exhibit the disciplines of holiness, prayer, leadership, and
compassion required for ministry.

Admission Requirements In addition to the general admission requirements listed later in this catalog, enrollment in the Master of Divinity program requires possession of a baccalaureate degree, or the academic equivalent, from an approved institution, with a cumulative grade point average of 2.75 or above (on a 4.0 scale) for all undergraduate work. Applicants who are graduates of unaccredited institutions or who present grade point averages lower than 2.75 may be considered for probationary admission status if their references include unusually high commendations for potential ministry.
Applicants to the program are also expected to present a full program of beginning Greek from the undergraduate level. Applicants without this prerequisite are required to take Beginning Greek at The Masters Seminary (either in the summer prior to or during the second year of the program) but these credits are in addition to the hours required for graduation. Graduates of Bible colleges, Christian liberal arts colleges, and secular colleges and universities are encouraged to apply. The seminary recommends that pre-seminary studies include a broad exposure to general education subjects. Normally this should include a minimum of 60 semester hours of liberal arts subjects. In particular, we recommend that adequate attention should be devoted to English composition, literature, speech, logic, and historyespecially ancient and world history. Bible courses are also recommended, providing the student is attending an institution where such courses are competently taught in a context of faith and obedience.

Candidacy Status All students anticipating graduation must first qualify by admission to candidacy status. Admission to candidacy status is the result of faculty evaluations, described below, and constitutes a faculty recommendation that the student be considered as a candidate for graduation, assuming the satisfactory completion of all graduation requirements.
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Candidacy Requirements Admission to the seminary and satisfactory completion of academic requirements are not a guarantee of graduation. Since the seminarys programs are designed to qualify its graduates for positions of pastoral leadership, the faculty and administration will also evaluate each semester a students personal, spiritual, doctrinal, and professional qualifications, qualifications without which any attempt to serve or fill a role in a ministry of the gospel can result in nothing but personal tragedy. The seminary reserves the right to withdraw the privileges of enrollment from those whom after admission may prove to be lacking in these necessary qualifications.

Academic Programs & Policies

The character qualities, knowledge, and skills described earlier in this catalog as personalized objectives will also serve as a standard for evaluation of progress and for admission to candidacy. Absolute fulfillment of these objectives is an ideal which will never be accomplished but should always be in process. What is expected is evidence of progress toward these objectives, continuing evidence of potential for such progress, increasing desire for such progress, and a genuine repentance when there is failure in evidencing such progress. Official admission to candidacy status involves two stages and must receive final approval by June 1 following completion of the second year of seminary studies or, for part-time students, by the same date, following completion of 60 hours of seminary credits. Following each year of seminary, the faculty will assess the appropriateness of the students vocational and educational goals in light of demonstrated abilities and attitudes. Academic records, field education evaluations, discipleship lab involvement, and evidence of continuing personal growth as demonstrated in chapel attendance, church ministries, etc., may all be examined in these candidacy evaluations. Following evaluation, the Vice President for Academic Administration, or another assigned faculty member will counsel with any students whose progress toward candidacy is questioned and will, by June 1, advise any students for whom candidacy and/or continued enrollment is denied.

Program Requirements ResidenceMaster of Divinity students must complete the prescribed curriculum, comprising a minimum of 98 semester hours of credit, with a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.5. Students transferring from other seminaries may be granted a maximum of 48 semester hours of credit, providing the work conforms to the academic and theological standards of the seminary. The last 12 hours of credit applied toward the degree must be earned in residence at The Masters Seminary unless the student has completed a total of 80 hours or more at The Masters Seminary.
Master of Divinity ThesisA thesis is optional for Master of Divinity students; however, those who earn a grade point average of 3.25 or higher during their first two years (60 hours) of seminary studies are encouraged to write an original thesis demonstrating their ability to perform biblical and theological research at a scholarly level. The thesis must involve the exegesis of Scripture, employing the original languages as appropriate, either for the purpose of clarifying the meaning of some term(s) or passage(s) in Scripture; or for the purpose of clarifying the biblical evidence relating to some issue(s) of theological or pastoral significance. The thesis must contain not fewer than 50 nor more than 70 pages of text material, with approval based upon literary quality and theological content. Four hours of academic credit, as a part of the 98 hours required for the Master of Divinity degree, will be granted for the thesis project. The student may select a faculty adviser for his thesis project, dependent upon the faculty members availability and consent, and upon approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration.

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Academic Programs & Policies

In fulfilling the thesis requirements the following deadlines must be observed: (1) The student must register for M.Div. Thesis (in the approved area of study) for the final semester prior to scheduled graduation; (2) Topic approval must be secured by the first Friday in September; (3) A first draft, including an adequate bibliographical listing, must be submitted by the second Friday in January; (4) An approved presentation copy, and a photocopy, must be submitted by the first Friday in April.The Master of Divinity thesis must be prepared in conformity with the most recent editions of the seminarys Guidelines for Theses and Dissertations and Turabians A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Where these sources differ, the seminarys Guidelines takes precedence. Program FlexibilityGraduates of Bible colleges and Christian liberal arts colleges are encouraged to apply to the Vice President for Academic Administration for a waiver of any course considered to be repetitious of previous education. When Old Testament Studies or New Testament Studies courses are waived it is required that they be replaced by advanced (preferably exegesis) elective courses in the same discipline. A waiver does not grant credit; it only allows an otherwise required course to be replaced by an elective course. In no case does The Masters Seminary grant credit for course work taken at the undergraduate level. English ProficiencyAll students are required to take a basic English proficiency exam as a part of orientation procedures for the first semester of their enrollment. Students who fail to demonstrate an adequate understanding of basic grammatical features such as the identification of parts of speech, grammatical inflections, and syntactical structures within sentences, will be required to take the English Refresher supplementary class during Orientation. The Vice President for Academic Administration must approve any exceptions. Students who pass the English proficiency exam but sense a need for more training in English will also be permitted to take these supplementary classes. No additional credit is given for this supplemental course work and no additional tuition is charged. Time LimitationAll work credited toward the Master of Divinity degree must be completed within six years from the time of matriculation. Any exceptions will be considered only in cases when the student is involved in a full-time ministry, and must receive the approval of Academic Administration.

Graduation Requirements In addition to the requirements specified in the preceding paragraphs, which include completion of 98 semester hours of credit with a grade point average of 2.5 or above, and admission to candidacy status, each candidate must submit an official Application for Graduation when registering for their final semester prior to graduation. Transfer students must complete at least 50 semester hours of credit at The Masters Seminary. All graduates must be present at the commencement ceremonies unless excused on the basis of a written appeal to the Vice President for Academic Administration. Graduation in absentia will be permitted only in cases of personal emergency or undue hardship. Master of Divinity Curriculum Students entering without Beginning Greek are encouraged to enroll in Hebrew Grammar I and II for the first year, enroll in Beginning Greek during the summer between the first and second year (this is in addition to the required 98 hours), and take Greek Exegesis I and II during the second year.
Students enrolling in The Masters Seminary have one opportunity to pass the Greek proficiency exam, that is the time when they first enter the seminary. Anyone not passing the proficiency exam at their first sitting or anyone not taking the exam when offered at the start of their first semester on
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campus will be required to enroll in and pass NT 401 and 402 as part of his seminary curriculum before enrolling in NT 603. Grades earned will be factored into the students grade point average. Those who pass the Greek proficiency exam are expected to enroll in Greek Exegesis I and II for the first year and in Hebrew Grammar I and II for the second year. Students are encouraged to apply for a waiver of any course considered to be repetitious of previous education. This is especially encouraged for BI 501, 502 and BI 601. If approved, a waiver grants no credit but allows the student to take elective credits instead of the required course(s). Successful completion of proficiency exams, given at the beginning of each school year, is necessary for waiving BI 501, 502, and BI 601. As with the Greek proficiency exam, students wishing to waive these courses must sit the exam when they first enter seminary. Taking the exams at a later time is not permitted. Students are encouraged to participate in a cross-cultural experience, either in another country or in an area ethnic church, during the senior year or the preceding summer.

Academic Programs & Policies

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Standard Three Year Master of Divinity Program Junior Year


Fall
BI 501 OT Studies I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 BI 505 Hermeneutics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 OT 503 Hebrew Grammar I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0

Spring
BI 502 OT Studies II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 BI 504 Prayer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 OT 504 Hebrew Grammar II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 TH 508 Historical Theology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 PM 512A Field Ed: Pastoral Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 PM 522 Discipleship Lab II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 15.5

Academic Programs & Policies

TH 507 Historical Theology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 PM 507A Introduction to Preaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 PM 511 Field Ed: Church Ministries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 PM 521 Discipleship Lab I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 16.5

Summer
NT 400 Beginning Greek I & II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 BI 506 The Pastors Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 6.0

Middler Year
Fall
BI 601 NT Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 OT 603 Hebrew Exegesis I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 NT 603 Greek Exegesis I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 TH 605 Theology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 PM 612A Field Ed: Worship & Ministry . . . . . . . . . 1.0 PM 621 Discipleship Lab III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 16.5

Spring
NT 604 Greek Exegesis II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 OT 604 Hebrew Exegesis II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 TH 606 Theology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 PM 606 Expository Preaching I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 PM 611 Field Ed: Discipleship & Leadership . . . . . 1.0 PM 622 Discipleship Lab IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 Elective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 15.5

Senior Year
Fall
BI 701 Ordination Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 TH 701 Apologetics and Evangelism. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 TH 705 Theology III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 PM 703 Expository Preaching II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 PM 712 Field Ed: Pastoral Ministries . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 PM 721 Discipleship Lab V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 16.5

Spring
OT 796 OT Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 NT 796 NT Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 TH 706 Theology IV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 PM 711 Field Ed: Church Administration . . . . . . . . 1.0 PM 722 Discipleship Lab VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 Elective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Elective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 15.5

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THE BACHELOR OF THEOLOGY


Purpose The Bachelor of Theology program has the same purpose as the Master of Divinity program. Like the Master of Divinity program, it is designed to provide a program for those planning to invest their lives in church or mission vocations which require ordination. The program offers a broad biblical, theological, and practical foundation for such ministries. The program, however, is offered only to a select number of applicants (limited to five percent of total enrollment) who are beyond the average age of college students (usually at least 30 years of age), who have not completed a baccalaureate degree program but have earned a minimum of 60 semester units of undergraduate general education credits, and who have a consistent record of commendable Christian ministry experience. The nomenclature, Bachelor of Theology, is designed to emphasize the fact that in no case does the seminary offer graduate degrees (masters degrees) for those who have not completed a baccalaureate program. Admission Requirements In addition to the requirements listed in the previous paragraph, and to the general admission requirements listed later in this catalog, applicants for the Bachelor of Theology program must present a letter of reference from a church board documenting effective ministry experience and recommending the applicant for intensive study and for continuing ministry. Program Requirements The admissions, curriculum, residence, and candidacy requirements for the Bachelor of Theology degree are the same as those for the Master of Divinity degree with the following exceptions:

Academic Programs & Policies

A grade point average of only 2.0 is required for graduation Writing a thesis is not permitted in the Bachelor of Theology program
THE DIPLOMA OF THEOLOGY
Purpose The Diploma of Theology program is designed with the same purpose as the Bachelor of Theology program. It is limited to a select number of applicants (limited to five percent of total enrollment) who are beyond the average age of college students and who have a consistent record of commendable Christian ministry experience. However, it differs from the Bachelor of Theology program in that it does not require the minimum of 60 units of undergraduate general education credits. In general, such applicants are older than the average seminary student and have circumstances of life that make the acquisition of an undergraduate education impractical. Admission Requirements In addition to the requirements listed in the previous paragraph, and to the general admission requirements listed later in this catalog, applicants for the Diploma of Theology program must present a letter of reference from a church board documenting effective ministry experience and recommending the applicant for intensive study and for continuing ministry.

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Program Requirements The curriculum, residence, and candidacy requirements for the Diploma of Theology are the same as those for the Master of Divinity degree with the following exceptions:

A grade point average of only 2.0 is required for graduation Writing a thesis is not permitted
THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY Academic Programs & Policies
Purpose The Master of Theology curriculum provides a flexible program extending one to three years at the post-Master of Divinity graduate level. It allows for a degree of specialized preparation in Bible Exposition, Old Testament, New Testament, or Systematic Theology beyond what is possible in the basic three-year M.Div. program. While it also may provide a basis for further graduate study leading to more advanced degrees such as Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) or Doctor of Theology (Th.D.), it is, in each case, designed for those preparing for church or mission vocations requiring ordination.
In addition, the purposes envisioned for the program include the following:

Preparation of equippers of pastors for foreign assignments in institutional settings where


doctorallevel credentials are not prerequisite. Such situations currently arising in thirdworld churches illustrate the need for teachers to train pastors at an advanced level, but without the need of formal accreditation recognition afforded by terminal educational degrees.

Advanced preparation for pastoral ministries in local church settings. The program provides
for a further sharpening of exegetical and theological skills for those sensing a further educational need beyond their M.Div. training. This would be particularly true for the ones who have no previous formal training in Bible and theology before their M.Div. programs.

Preparation of pastors who are also inclined toward a calling in theological writing that
requires a honing of exegetical and theological skills beyond what the standard M.Div. program offers. The Master of Theology Program is designed to provide a more focused and specialized study in a specific facet of biblical or theological studies. The program provides the platform for a student to gain the research skills necessary for theological writing and teaching. Upon completion the student will be able to engage in a teaching or training vocation where a doctoral degree is not required and/or will be equipped to enter into a doctoral level program. These Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) are detailed as follows:

PLO 1: As an advancing scholar, specialize in an area of biblical or theological studies, gaining


facility in its literature and scholarship

PLO 2: As an advancing exegete, employ a more refined skill set in Hebrew and Greek translation, exegesis, and interpretation.

PLO 3: As an advancing teacher, implement the skills of communication and effective teaching
of course content.

PLO 4: As an advancing contributor to the literature, demonstrate critical thinking, in-depth


interaction, thorough research, and excellence in writing.

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Because the Th.M. program is limited in its enrollment, faculty can devote personal attention to individual students in regard to continuing spiritual and practical development, research techniques, teaching techniques, formal writing style, and supporting areas of pedagogical methodology. These supplementary features will ensure the effective use of advanced exegetical and theological skills gained in the program.

Admissions Requirements Applicants must present an acceptable undergraduate baccalaureate degree and a Master of Divinity degree, with a 3.25 grade point average in his divinity program. Senior Master of Divinity students who have completed at least 80 semester credit hours by end of current semester are eligible to apply. Acceptance is based upon the applicants previous education, academic capability, character qualities, ministry involvement, and the recommendation of others. Prerequisite coursework, if any, is provided at no additional cost beyond the per-semester Th.M. tuition fee.
In addition, applicants must also give evidence of the personal, character, and spiritual qualifications necessary for a minister of Christ as outlined in the admissions standards for The Masters Seminary. Graduates of other seminaries must file a full application with the Office of Admissions. Students currently enrolled at The Masters Seminary may file for admission by submitting the abridged form available in the Admissions Office. Transfer CreditUp to four advanced graduate semester credit hours from an accredited theological institution may be applied toward fulfillment of Th.M. course requirements at The Masters Seminary.

Academic Programs & Policies

Program Requirements PrerequisitesApplicants must have successfully completed basic courses which parallel the following core classes of the Master of Divinity degree at The Masters Seminary:

Twelve semester credit hours of Bible courses, in addition to Old and New Testament
Introductions (OT 796 and NT 796).

Fourteen semester credit hours of Old Testament language courses (OT 503, OT 504, OT 603,
OT 604, OT 796, and a Hebrew Exegesis elective).

Ten semester credit hours of New Testament language beyond Beginning Greek (NT 603,
NT 604, NT 796, and a Greek Exegesis elective).

Twenty semester credit hours of Theology (TH 507, TH 508, TH 605, TH 606, TH 705, TH 706).
Applicants deficient in any of these requirements may take the pre-requisite units while taking other Th.M. courses, but such deficiencies must be completed prior to or during the first year of Th.M. residency. Until these prerequisites are met, applicants will be admitted on a probationary status. Course work taken to fulfill deficiencies is not applicable toward the Th.M. residency requirements. While not a pre-requisite, it is recommended that students anticipating a Th.M. degree program write a thesis as a part of their M.Div. degree program. Students not writing a thesis must demonstrate the ability to do significant theological research. ResidencyA minimum of two semesters in residence at The Masters Seminary is required for the Master of Theology degree. Residency is understood to be a campus presence of at least one day per week for classes and an additional day per week for library research and consultation with your adviser. Most students would be able to complete most of their course work in one year which would
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allow them to take a minimal number of courses while working on their thesis project during their second year. For those students with deficiencies, a third year may be necessary. Program LengthAll course work, examinations, and thesis requirements (totaling 30 credit hours) must be completed within four years, beginning on the date of the students first registration for Th.M. courses at The Masters Seminary. Students may go beyond this four year period only by requesting permission in writing to the seminary faculty. Permission for extension is granted only in cases of extreme emergency. In any case, the student will be required to pay a continuing registration fee for each semester during which he is not enrolled; failure to do so will be viewed as withdrawal from the program. Concurrent EnrollmentSenior Master of Divinity students who have completed eighty or more semester credit hours and who have been admitted on a probationary status into the Th.M. degree program are permitted to take a maximum of four credit hours per semester of Th.M. courses (with faculty permission) for application to Th.M. program requirements. Such course work must meet all normal Th.M. standards and cannot be credited toward the requirements of other degree programs. Master of Theology ThesisAn acceptable thesis evidencing a high degree of scholarly competence in the students major field must be submitted by all Th.M. candidates. The thesis accounts for 4 hours of academic credit in the 26 hour curriculum and must contain not fewer than 100 nor more than 150 pages of text material. Approval will be based upon literary quality and theological content. Three copies are to be presented to the library for binding. Students who have completed their course work must register as a thesis-non-resident student for each semester the thesis remains outstanding. In fulfilling the thesis requirements, the following deadlines must be observed:

Academic Programs & Policies

Topic approval must be secured no later than the last Friday in May of the year prior
to graduation

A prospectus (title page, outline, bibliography, and synopsis of argument) is due the last Friday
of May of the year prior to graduation

The student must register for Th.M. Thesis in the approved area of study for the final semester
prior to scheduled graduation

A first draft must be submitted no later than the second Friday of January An approved presentation copy, and two photocopies, must be submitted by the first Friday in
April. The adviser may, at his discretion, interject additional deadlines within the broad dates listed above. However, failure to meet the deadline for either the first draft or the final draft will result in the postponement of your anticipated graduation date until the following year. The Master of Theology thesis must be prepared in conformity with the most recent editions of the seminarys Guidelines for Theses and Dissertations and Turabians A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Where these sources differ, the seminarys Guidelines takes precedence.

Th.M./Th.D. Track Graduation Requirements


Degrees are awarded to qualified candidates at the seminarys spring Commencement. To qualify for graduation, candidates must present an acceptable thesis (4 credit hours) and have completed 22 credit hours of required course work, with no grade less than B- credited toward the Th.M. degree. Candidates must also manifest promise of competency in Christian ministry, exhibit exemplary and
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consistent Christian character, and must be in accord with the ideals of the institution as recorded in its current catalog.

Cost Course work taken concurrently with Master of Divinity classes will be charged at the M.Div. rate. Otherwise, all courses taken for Master of Theology credit will be charged at the Th.M. course rate (See Financial Information section).

Academic Programs & Policies

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Curriculum Description for Master of Theology

Major: Bible Exposition


First Semester
Course # BI 847 BI 849 BI 851 BI 853 Course Title Pentateuch Samuel, Kings, Chronicles Matthew Hebrews OT Exegesis Elective* Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 10.0 Course # BI 852 BI 864 BI 874 BI 838

Second Semester
Course Title Isaiah Romans Revelation NT Exegesis Elective Elective* Elective Thesis Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 16.0

Academic Programs & Policies

* Students expecting to complete the program in one year should plan to complete these courses during the summer prior to residency.

Major: New Testament


First Semester
Course # NT 853 NT 855 Course Title Advanced Greek Grammar I NT Textual Criticism NT Exegesis Elective NT Exegesis Elective Elective* Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 10.0 Course # NT 854 NT 856 NT 838

Second Semester
Course Title Advanced Greek Grammar II Criticism of Synoptic Gospels NT Exegesis Elective Theology Elective* OT Exegesis Elective Elective Thesis Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 16.0

* Students expecting to complete the program in one year should plan to complete these courses during the summer prior to residency.

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Major: Old Testament


First Semester
Course # OT 832 OT 843 OT 871 OT 772 Course Title OT Research Seminar I OT Theological Methods* Advanced Hebrew Readings* Biblical Aramaic** OT Exegesis Elective Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 10.0 Course # OT 834 OT 840 OT 853 OT 838

Second Semester
Course Title OT Research Seminar II OT Textual Criticism Advanced Hebrew Grammar NT Exegesis Elective Theology Elective Elective Thesis Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 16.0

Academic Programs & Policies

* Students expecting to complete the program in one year should plan to complete these courses during the summer prior to residency. ** Students are encouraged to take this course for ThM credit during the final year of their M.Div program.

Major: Theology
First Semester
Course # TH 816 TH 819 Course Title Theology Proper Seminar Pneumatology Seminar Elective* Elective OT Exegesis Elective Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 10.0 Course # TH 824 TH 888 TH 838

Second Semester
Course Title Soteriology Seminar Eschatology Seminar TH Elective* TH Elective NT Exegesis Elective Elective Thesis Units 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 16.0

* Students expecting to complete the program in one year should plan to complete these courses during the summer prior to residency.

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THE DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY


Overview The Doctor of Theology is a three- to five-year program (including writing qualifying exams, dissertation, and completing residency) designed to give a select number of highly qualified Master of Theology (or equivalent) graduates, who have demonstrated the necessary academic abilities, ministry skills, and character qualities, the opportunity to pursue a terminal degree specializing in Old Testament, New Testament, Systematic Theology, or Historical Theology. The program is based on the study of the original language texts of Scripture and requires an awareness of the entire sweep of historical theology and biblical theology systematically expressed.
The program requires a minimum of twenty-four credit hours of study while in residence, the first of which is the Dissertation Prospectus course (four credit hours). The remaining study load is designed to assist in the research/writing and defense of the dissertation, the full-time load of which is four credit hours per semester. In cases of minor academic deficiency, additional coursework may be assigned (see Residency Requirements: Coursework below). Coursework is not dumbed-down to the M.Div. level, nor are doctoral students consigned to a traditional classroom environment. Rather, the delivery mode follows the one-on-one mentoring model, with coursework comprised of directed studies and research seminars.

Academic Programs & Policies

Objectives As with the Master of Divinity and the Master of Theology degree programs, the Doctor of Theology program is specifically designed for individuals preparing for those vocations requiring ordination, with special emphasis given to training the next generation of professors to staff seminary and college/university biblical studies faculties.
The purposes of the program include:

Preparing equippers of pastors for assignments in institutional settings where doctoral-level


credentials are a prerequisite

Providing pastors and equippers of pastors opportunity to further sharpen their exegetical and
theological skills beyond their Master of Theology studies

Equipping pastors who are also inclined toward a calling in theological writing that requires the
highest level of exegetical and theological training To achieve the above purposes, the program is designed to enable the student to:

Develop an expertise in a specialized area of biblical and theological study through original
research

Expand his breadth of knowledge beyond the scope of his specific discipline and dissertation
topic

Defend ideas and refute error among peers Enhance teaching ability Demonstrate proficiency in effective writing skills
The Doctor of Theology degree program seeks to prepare equippers of pastors for assignments in institutional settings where doctoral-level credentials are a prerequisite, to provide pastors and equippers of pastors opportunity to further sharpen their exegetical and theological skills beyond their Master of
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Theology studies, and to equip pastors who are inclined toward a calling in theological writing that requires the highest level of exegetical and theological training. These Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) are detailed as follows:

PLO 1: As a critical thinker, collect and analyze primary and secondary sources of information,
critique interpretations of the evidence, synthesize the evidence for future scholarly contributions to the field of study, and draw and integrate implications for professional practice.

PLO 2: As a theological exegete, apply exegetical skills to the biblical text, develop a theological
critique of views related to the text, and connect the issue with its historical precedents.

Academic Programs & Policies

PLO 3: As a teacher, design adult learning experiences, develop and implement a repertoire of
strategies for teaching, and assess student learning outcomes.

PLO 4: As a scholarly leader, contribute to the design and improvement of learning experiences,
disseminate personal scholarship to peer audiences, and develop mentoring skills.

Design The program is designed to permit the student to remain in his present location/occupation while completing the qualifying exams and the German language exam. For that reason, the exams are prerequisite to matriculation. Only after successfully completing these exams would the student need to relocate to begin his residency and to research and write the dissertation. Other programs often require students to relocate at the beginning of their doctoral studies, leaving students in the precarious position of not knowing if they will successfully complete the course work, pass the qualifying exams, or complete the dissertation. In contrast, this program allows students to complete the qualifying and language exams prior to interrupting family life and initiating residency. Then, once begun, residency focuses predominantly on researching, writing, and defending the dissertation a process that enjoys the benefits of frequent, personal interaction with ones mentor, unlimited access to the finest library resources, and uninterrupted concentration on research and writing. Administration The Director of Doctoral Studies gives oversight to the program. Working closely with each doctoral students mentor and the Doctoral Studies Committee (comprised of the Dean, the senior faculty member of each discipline, and the Director of Libraries), the Director of Doctoral Studies oversees the orderly and timely completion of each students program. Degree Nomenclature While the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) nomenclature has been applied in recent years to terminal degrees offered in biblical and theological studies, The Masters Seminary remains committed to keeping the purpose of the program central in both curricula content and degree nomenclature. Therefore, given the purpose and nature of the program, the Doctor of Theology (Th.D.) nomenclature is embraced, since it most accurately reflects the need of our constituency and the purpose for offering the degree. Prerequisites The program is based on the (post-Master of Divinity) Master of Theology degree, in which approximately twenty-two semester credit hours of course work plus a research thesis are required. Applicants without a Th.M. degree are encouraged to enroll in the Th.M.-Th.D. Track. Maintaining a good standing in this track will allow a student to accelerate his progress by initiating his Th.D.
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program (primarily involving the taking of qualifying exams and, in some cases, enrolling in the Dissertation Prospectus course) during the final year of his Th.M. studies.

Admission Requirements
The program, as outlined below, involves significant personal interaction between the faculty mentor and the student. Consequently, as a general rule, enrollment is limited to a maximum of two persons per discipline for each full-time faculty holding a terminal degree in that discipline. Permission to initiate application procedures is generally granted upon successful completion of the Master of Theology thesis. AcademicA recognized Master of Theology degree or its equivalent (consisting of approximately twenty-two semester credit hours of course work), with an acceptable research thesis, provides the academic basis for the program. In addition, a scholastic record that demonstrates superior ability and offers promise of success in studies at the doctoral level is expected. Normally, a grade point average of 3.5 or above in all previous seminary studies is required. When deemed appropriate, Graduate Record Examination (GRE, aptitude section) scores may be required. CharacterIn keeping with the purpose of The Masters Seminary and the qualifications necessary for a minister of Christ (see 1 Timothy 3:17 and Titus 1:69), the seminary requests references from the applicants pastor, former professors, and employers to evaluate his Christian testimony, spiritual vibrancy, and personal character. Failure in any of these areas after enrollment may constitute adequate grounds for disciplinary action or dismissal from the program. DoctrinalEssential agreement with the Statement of Faith of The Masters Seminary is required of applicants. Failure to disclose any significant doctrinal difference in the application itself will be regarded as a breach of the character requirements noted above. ExperienceIn order to expedite and achieve the purposes of the program, applicants must have demonstrated effective teaching and pastoral capabilities prior to admission into the program.

Academic Programs & Policies

Pre-matriculation Qualifying Exams The nature of the program specifies that the qualifying exams be successfully completed prior to matriculation. Although some class work may be required in cases where a deficiency in a students previous education is noted (see Residency Requirements: Course Work below), the completion of the qualifying exams prior to matriculation allows the student to focus primarily on writing the dissertation while in residence. Except for the Oral Interview, each of these exams may be taken offsite. The exams, including guidelines and study questions to assist preparation, are available from the Director of Doctoral Studies.
General BackgroundA series of five, four-hour exams are given to assess the applicants general academic ability in the areas representing his previous seminary studies. Weaknesses discovered in any of these five exams may require additional course work: Bible Knowledge Old Testament Hebrew and related introductory matters New Testament Greek and related introductory matters Christian Theology Church History Specialized BackgroundCovering the applicants chosen discipline, this exam is designed to determine his general awareness of the selected field of doctoral study, his current position on
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certain salient issues relevant to that discipline, and his ability to express himself cogently in writing. Weaknesses noted in this exam would be covered in the Directed Readings exam. Oral InterviewUpon successful completion of the Specialized Background exam, a personal interview will be arranged with the Doctoral Studies Committee. The interview, along with the application, transcripts and previous examinations, will be the basis for assigning additional course work (if any) due to academic deficiency and for determining the content of the Directed Readings exam. If married, the Committee may request an interview with the applicants wife as well. Directed ReadingsA major reading list with study guidelines, based on the weaknesses discovered in the Specialized Background exam and Oral Interview, will be sent to the applicant following the Oral Interview. Once the prescribed readings have been completed, an exam covering them will be given. German LanguageThe ability to read significant theological sources in German is deemed vital to research at the doctoral level. Consequently, the seminary offers GR 900 Theological German. This two credit-hour course, designed to prepare the student for the qualifying exam, introduces the vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure and enables the student to read, understand, and translate original sources written in German. The final exam, requiring a minimum passing grade of 86%, functions as a substitute for the German qualifying exam. Because the course is prerequisite, grades do not count toward ones grade point average.

Academic Programs & Policies

Academic Adviser At the time of admission into the program, the doctoral studies committee will assign an adviser to oversee the applicants qualifying exams and subsequent research and writing. The adviser will assess the students previous education and review his General Background and Specialized Background exams (cf. Oral Interview above), assigning additional course work as deemed necessary. At any time during residency, additional course work may be required of the student by his adviser. Residency Requirements Continuous EnrollmentBecause the nature of this program does not allow for non-residency or ABD (All But Dissertation) status, the student is expected to relocate to the area and to personally interact with his adviser on a bi-weekly basis. The program specifically requires that the student enroll for each semester successively (summers excluded) until the first draft has been accepted by his dissertation committee; premature departure will result in termination of the program.
Foreign Language ProficiencyIn addition to German, each student must demonstrate the ability to read relevant sources in a second non-biblical foreign language (e.g., French, Modern Hebrew, Latin, or Dutch) as determined by ones dissertation topic. The exam is based on material pertinent to the area of ones dissertation and must show proficiency. The exam is administered by the students academic adviser and must be completed prior to the start of the students second year of residence. Course WorkA student must enroll in a minimum of twenty-four credit hours of study (see Overview on page 38) during his academic residency, the first of which would be the Dissertation Prospectus course (four credit hours). These courses, the full-time load of which is four credit hours per semester, are selected in consultation with the adviser, and are designed to assist in the dissertation research. Any course work required due to deficiency would be additional. A grade of B- or higher is required.

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Dissertation ProspectusEach student begins his first semester of residence by enrolling in the Dissertation Prospectus course. This course will allow the student, under the advisers supervision, to refine the dissertation topic, defend its choice, establish its need, and outline the procedure for its undertaking. An extensive bibliography is also included. The Dissertation Topic Confirmation fee, payable at the time of enrollment in this course, authorizes the librarian to conduct a search of all known writings on the proposed topic and provides the student with significant bibliographic data. Approval of the prospectus by the adviser and eventual admission to candidacy status does not guarantee acceptance of the proposed dissertation, but merely grants permission to prepare and submit the first draft of the dissertation to the committee for evaluation. Length of ProgramAlthough the actual length of the program may vary, depending on ones capability and commitment, a three-year residency can usually be expected. The maximum time allowable to complete the program is four years from the date residency is initiated. Only in rare circumstances will this requirement be relaxed, and then the Doctoral Studies Committee must be fully satisfied that there is sufficient justification for an extension. Request for an extension must be made in writing to the Director of Doctoral Studies.

Academic Programs & Policies

Advanced Standing/Transfer Credit Students with previous training in the course to be pursued will be required to submit official transcripts upon enrollment. The transcripts will be evaluated and appropriate credit given. Credits allowed will be recorded on enrollment record and the length of the course shortened proportionately. In addition, the student and the Department of Veteran Affairs (DVA) will be notified. Admission to Candidacy Status Application to CandidacyUpon successful completion of the additional foreign language requirements, the Dissertation Prospectus course, and any additional course work assigned by the academic adviser due to deficiency (cf. Qualifying Exams above), the student may apply for formal admission to candidacy. An application for admission to candidacy status form is available from the Director of Doctoral Studies.
Dissertation CommitteeOnce admission to candidacy has been approved by the Doctoral Studies Committee, the Director of Doctoral Studies will, in consultation with the academic adviser, select the faculty members who will serve on the students dissertation committee. The committee will generally consist of the students academic adviser (serving as chair), a second faculty member from the area of specialization, and a faculty member from another discipline or institution. Any unforeseen changes in committee membership will be made by the Director of Doctoral Studies in consultation with the academic adviser.

Dissertation Requirements Dissertation ResearchThe dissertation is expected to embody the results of original research and make a significant contribution to knowledge in the field of concentration. In light of the structure and philosophy of the program, the dissertation should evidence a high level of scholarly competence and theological awareness. Special study carrels with computer hookups are available for the exclusive use of doctoral students. The librarian will conduct a search of all known writings on the proposed topic for each student and provide him with significant bibliographic data.
Dissertation LengthAn acceptable dissertation, consisting of not less than 250 pages or more than 400 pages of text material, must be submitted to the dissertation committee by the student prior
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to breaking residence. While the dissertation must adhere strictly to the length stipulations, approval is based on doctrinal integrity, literary quality, and academic competency. Dissertation FormatAll dissertation drafts must be prepared in conformity with the latest editions of the seminarys Guidelines for Papers, Theses, and Dissertations and Turabians A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Where these sources differ, the seminarys Guidelines takes precedence. Dissertation Deadlines & AcceptanceThe first draft of the dissertation is due no later than September 1 of the year prior to anticipated graduation and should be submitted in triplicate, plus one electronic copy as an institutional backup, to the Director of Doctoral Studies for proper tracking. If major revisions are required by the dissertation committee, the student should be prepared to delay graduation by a full year. Final acceptance is predicated upon acceptance of the first draft by the dissertation committee, successful oral defense of the dissertation, and an acceptable final draft. Dissertation DefenseOnce the dissertation committee deems the dissertation draft ready, the student is required to defend the dissertation before his academic adviser (acting as chair) and the dissertation committee. Scheduled no later than February 1 of the year of anticipated graduation, the date and place of the defense are announced to all faculty so that interested members may attend. Two copies of the table of contents with a ten-to-fifteen page annotated outline of the dissertation must be presented to the dissertation chair no later than two weeks prior to the oral defense. Following the defense, the faculty will be given opportunity to make suggestions to the students dissertation committee. Subsequently, the dissertation committee and the Director of Doctoral Studies will meet to decide upon one of the following actions:

Academic Programs & Policies

Approve the dissertation and its defense, subject to any minor revisions required by the
committee

Delay graduation by rejecting the dissertation and its defense until major revisions are
completed under the direction of the academic adviser, necessitating another defense for the following year

Reject the dissertation and its defense and terminate the students program
The chair of the students dissertation committee will immediately notify the student of the committees decision.

Graduation Specifics Once approval of the dissertation and its defense has been granted, the student must submit by the first Friday in April the following items:

An Application for Graduation (due in January) An approved original printed copy, three photocopies, and one electronic copy of the dissertation to the Director of Doctoral Studies; each copy must include a one-page single-spaced abstract (Additional personal copies may be submitted for binding.)

A vitae sheet, written in narrative style and including the date and place of birth, a summary of
the candidates professional and academic career and degrees earned, publications, memberships, and special honors

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THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY


Philosophy The program is designed to permit the student to remain in his present ministry while completing the degree program. However, the student should allot enough time to complete the work with excellence. The program will demand 600800 hours a year for three years to complete. Although many of these hours should already be scheduled in expository preaching preparation, some hours will have to be devoted to the program above and beyond ones present ministry. As much as possible, the seminar projects and Preaching Research Project will relate directly to the ongoing expository ministry in ones local church. Program Description PurposeThe Doctor of Ministry degree in Expository Preaching is designed to equip pastors and church leaders in the skills of sermon preparation and public exposition of Scripture. The program engages the classical disciplines of exegesis (principles and practice of interpretation), exposition (principles and practice of content synthesis), and eloquence (principles and practice of rhetoric) to enhance sermon preparation and delivery. The degree is intended for ministry professionals who desire further education but who simultaneously wish to remain on their respective fields of service. The D.Min. curriculum builds upon the Master of Divinity or Master of Theology degrees, but strongly focuses on the skills needed for the exposition of Scripture.
Character and CommitmentsBoth faculty and students involved in the TMS D.Min. program are to model the following characteristics and commitments of a master expositor: Four Characteristics of a Faithful Expositor: A true disciple of Christ A spiritually mature man A humble man with a shepherds heart An honest critic regarding the value and quality of his own ministry Four Commitments to Christ-exalting Preaching: A resolute commitment to a high view of Scripture An unwavering practice of a historical/grammatical approach to interpreting Scripture A firm devotion to an effective delivery style that is true to the text of Scripture yet relevant to his congregation A thorough familiarity with and adherence to the orthodox doctrines of the Christian faith as outlined in the TMS Statement of Faith The Doctor of Ministry Program in Expository Preaching is designed to equip pastors and church leaders in enhancing their skills in sermon preparation and public exposition of Scripture. The program engages in the classical disciplines of exegesis (principles and practices of interpretation), exposition (principles and practices of content synthesis), and eloquence (principles and practice of rhetoric) to enhance sermon preparation and delivery. These Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) are detailed as follows:

Academic Programs & Policies

PLO 1: As an experienced biblical expositor, to add further understanding, quality, and depth to
the exegetical skill needed in sermon preparation.

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PLO 2: As an experienced biblical expositor, to add further understanding, quality, and depth to
the sermon content synthesis. PLO 3: As an experienced biblical expositor, to add further understanding, quality, and depth to the rhetorical eloquence. PLO 4: As an experienced biblical expositor, to demonstrate enhanced expository preaching skills in a culminating program projects. FocusLike the TMS Master of Divinity program, the Doctor of Ministry program focuses on three areas of special emphasis: biblical/theological understanding, personal growth, and professional enhancement. A thorough understanding of the Bible and theology is further developed through the material prepared for D.Min. seminars. Hermeneutical practice, biblical language use, and contemporary discussion form the basis of the work done by the pastor before arrival on campus. Personal growth is fostered through interaction between the pastor, his professor, and fellow students at on-campus seminars and ongoing contacts. Professional enhancement is furthered by the application of the seminar material in a post-seminar ministry project with professional and peer feedback. A final Preaching Research Project reviews and applies the material of the program to a specific area of expository preaching. DistinctivesThe TMS Doctor of Ministry degree offers the following distinctives: Designed for the seasoned M.Div./Th.M. pastor who has the capabilities and desires to improve both the content and delivery of his expository preaching Uniquely focused curriculum on the exegesis and exposition of Scripture Taught by both seminary professors and full-time expositors Required elder qualifications, as taught in 1 Timothy 3:17 and Titus 1:59, as a basis for entrance into the program Design of the ProgramFollowing the historical design of D.Min. programs, the TMS D.Min. program is designed to permit the student to remain in his present ministry location. The seminars will be offered in a two-week period in July and a one-week period in January. Each of the seminar periods will commence on a Wednesday and end on a Tuesday. Consequently, the student will be absent from his pulpit three Sundays during the year. The seminar projects will necessitate that the student be preaching on a weekly basis in his home church. The oral defense of the Preaching Research Project will be on-campus, but will be scheduled mid-week to allow the student time to travel without missing a Sunday in his church. Overview of the ProgramThe overall program and individual seminars are intended to develop the student/preacher in the three classical disciplines of sermon preparation. Each seminar embraces one or more pedagogical goals relating to these three disciplines. The following table displays the pedagogical categorization of the individual seminars, without regard for curriculum sequence:

Academic Programs & Policies

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Seminars Categorized by Pedagogical Emphasis


Exegesis
(Principles & Practice of Hermeneutics) Doctoral Research & Methods

Exposition
(Principles & Practice of Content Synthesis) Doctoral Research & Methods Historical & Contemporary Models of Exp. Preaching

Eloquence
(Principles & Practice of Rhetoric) Doctoral Research & Methods Historical & Contemporary Models of Exp. Preaching

Academic Programs & Policies

Hermeneutics & Exposition Preaching the Old Testament Preaching the New Testament Theological Trends & Doctrinal Preaching

Hermeneutics & Exposition Preaching the Old Testament Preaching the New Testament Theological Trends & Doctrinal Preaching Homiletics & Sermon Delivery Preaching the Old Testament Preaching the New Testament Theological Trends & Doctrinal Preaching Homiletics & Sermon Delivery Forums 14

Forums 14

Forums 14

Each seminar is conducted to enhance the skills and knowledge relating to two or three of the sermon preparation disciplines respectively. The sequence of the curriculum is designed to be linear, progressing from seminars exploring the more general and historical issues of expository preaching to studies in specific biblical genres of Old and New Testaments, and culminating in an intensive examination of rhetorical/homiletical theory and models (see Seminars Categorized by Time Sequence).

Seminars Categorized by Time Sequence (and units earned)


FALL (July) Year 1
Beginning Personal Preaching Evaluation Doctoral Research & Methods Historical & Contemporary Models of Expository Preaching Hermeneutics & Exposition Forum One (1.0) (1.0) (3.0) (4.0) (0.5) (4.0) (4.0) (0.5) Forum Four (0.5) Homiletics & Sermon Delivery (4.0) Forum Two (0.5)

SPRING (January)
Preaching the Old Testament (4.0)

Year 2

Preaching the New Testament Theological Trends & Doctrinal Preaching Forum Three

Year 3
Preaching Research Project (4.0)

Final Personal Preaching Evaluation (1.0) Preaching Research Project (4.0)

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AssessmentsStudents will be assessed at each stage of learning through the program in knowledge and skills. The primary instrument for assessing knowledge is the seminar evaluation, while skills are assessed through personal preaching critiques. 1. Personal Preaching Critique EvaluationTo assess progress in preaching skills, each student is asked upon admission, but prior to the first on-site seminar, to preach assigned texts from the Old and New Testaments. Study files for each sermon are to be submitted, including lexical and syntactical studies, background and contextual observations, and expository assimilation. These initial sermons will be videotaped and archived by the student and TMS. After completion of the final seminar, the student will preach new sermons from the same texts. The final videotapes and study files will be reviewed and compared by a TMS faculty member. Assessments will be made on the degree of improvement in exegesis, exposition, and eloquence. 2. Seminar EvaluationEach seminar syllabus includes specific learning objectives, outlining what the student is expected to accomplished. Students are assessed by the quality of their completed assignments before, during, and after each seminar. Following each individual seminar, the student will involve leaders and congregants of his church in a simple but thorough assessment of the content and delivery of a sermon series of at least four to six weeks of sermons. The student will interact with written evaluations from the evaluators as well as a discussion group made up of the evaluators. While TMS faculty evaluations reflect an academic/professional assessment, those of church leadership and congregants reflect a most important aspect of a D.Min. degree, thereby impacting the vocation of the student.

Academic Programs & Policies

Admission to Candidacy Status Application to CandidacyFor a student to achieve candidacy all classes must be completed with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 (with no grade below B-). Additionally, the initial and final evaluation of the students assigned sermon tapes must receive a favorable review, reflecting significant improvement. The student must also have received approval of his D.Min. Preaching Research Project proposal. Upon completion of the above, the student may apply for formal admission to candidacy. An Application for Admission to Candidacy Status form is available from the D.Min. office. The D.Min. Committee will review the application and, upon evidence of the above stated requirements and the continuation of a biblical standard of character (ethos) as measured by the elder-qualification standards of 1 Timothy 3:17 and Titus 1:59, will advance the student to candidacy status. Length of ProgramThe D.Min. program is to be completed in two years (twice a year) of oncampus seminars plus one year for completing the Preaching Research Project. Exceptions are made only in cases of extreme emergency. Graduation RequirementsCandidates for the D.Min. degree must complete all seminar work and the Preaching Research Project with a minimum of a 3.0 GPA. The completion of the minimal requirements does not automatically qualify the student for the degree. The candidate must have demonstrated to the faculty both the continuation of a biblical standard of character, as measured by the elderqualification standards of 1 Timothy 3:17 and Titus 1:59, and an expository proficiency. All financial obligations to TMS must be met before the awarding of the diploma and the issuing of transcripts. Admissions Requirements 1. Normally, a minimum of five years of post-M.Div./Th.M. experience, including the weekly exposition of Scripture. 2. Completion of an application (available from the TMS admissions office or the TMS Web site), in which the following are required:
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Academic Programs & Policies

Personal history, academic history, and employment history Dated ministry history Doctrinal agreement section Personal testimony, ministry summary, and objectives for pursuing the D.Min. degree Three references Ministry associate Church leader Church member
3. Official transcripts verifying academic credentials: An M.Div. degree with at least a 3.0 GPA 4. A letter of support from the pastors leadership board 5. Successful completion of a personal interview 6. A videotape/DVD containing two of the applicants sermons, one from the Old Testament and one from the New Testament. The applicant is to include exegetical research notes and copies of the notes or manuscripts from which the sermons were preached. 7. Essays dealing with biblical, theological, and ministry topics to determine the applicants writing ability. Please note that the application, letter of support, and videotape(s)/DVD(s) must be received by December 15 of the year before the student plans to begin the program. By March 1, all transcripts, personal interview record, and admission essays must be in the TMS office. Once the applicant is officially accepted, he will begin his work in Personal Preaching Evaluation. This preparatory D.Min. course must be completed by June 15. The student will then begin his seminars with his cohort (715 students) in July at TMS. Be advised that each of the July seminars will require pre-seminar work, so it will be required that the applicant work ahead of these deadlines.

Initial Matriculation Requirements Doctoral Research and Methods SeminarEach student begins his on-campus seminar work in Doctoral Research and Methods. This seminar will give him guidance as to how to choose, develop, and complete his final project. The completion of this seminar will result in the students proposed Preaching Research Project and tentative schedule for completion.
Mentor/AdviserThe Director of the Doctor of Ministry program, based on the students chosen topic for his Preaching Research Project, will assign a mentor/adviser to oversee the applicants studies. This mentor/adviser will direct the research, evaluation, and writing of the students Preaching Research Project.

On-Campus Requirements Each student will be placed in a cohort of 7 (minimum) to 15 (maximum) students who will begin the on-campus seminars in July of each year. The student must take each seminar in the proscribed order with his cohort. Only an emergency, as approved by the D.Min. Director, would allow the student to delay his seminars with his assigned cohort and be assigned to a later group. The student is advised that once he enters the program he is committing himself to the orderly completion of all of the required seminars.

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Preaching Research Project Requirements The final phase of the D.Min. process involves the development and implementation of the Preaching Research Project. This component of the program is intended to demonstrate the students knowledge, preaching skills, research methods, theological understanding, and practical ministry abilities. The Preaching Research Project should exhibit the students ability to relate preaching knowledge (demonstrated in research) with his preaching skills.
Because valuable research and data will be accumulated during the seminar coursework, each student is expected to decide his project topic by the second on-site seminar visit to TMS (January term). The role of the students faculty adviser will be to insure a meaningful and significant project. Final approval for the Preaching Research Project must be gained by the third on-site seminar visit to TMS (July of second year). The D.Min. Director and project adviser must approve all projects. The length of the Preaching Research Project will be no less than 100 pages and no more than 200 pages. It must include doctoral level research as well as professional experience. Each thesis will be individually designed around the students preaching context. The Project FormatAll project drafts must be prepared in conformity with the latest editions of the seminarys Guidelines for Theses and Dissertations, Turabians A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, and Walker & Taylors The Columbia Guide to Online Style. Where these sources differ, the seminarys Guidelines takes precedence. An official Preaching Research Project Proposal is due no later than March 15 of the year prior to anticipated graduation. The Project Deadlines and AcceptanceThe outline, chapter one, and bibliography of the Preaching Research Project are due no later than July 1 of the year prior to anticipated graduation. A complete initial draft (DM 937) of the Preaching Research Project is due no later than November 1 of the semester prior to anticipated graduation. A final draft of the Project (DM 938), incorporating any corrections and/or suggestions of the readers, is due April 11 of the anticipated semester of graduation and should be submitted in duplicate, plus one electronic copy as an institutional backup, to the TMS Librarian for proper tracking. The Oral Defense of the ProjectOnce the project adviser deems the final draft is ready, a defense, chaired by the students mentor/adviser, will be conducted on the TMS campus. Scheduled no later than April 1 of the semester of anticipated graduation, the date and place of the defense will be announced to all faculty so that interested members may attend. Two copies of the table of contents, with a ten-to-fifteen page, annotated outline of the project, must be presented to the project chair no later than two weeks prior to the oral defense. Following the defense, the faculty will be given opportunity to make suggestions to the D.Min. candidate and his adviser. Subsequently, the project adviser and the D.Min. Director will meet to decide upon one of the following actions:

Academic Programs & Policies

Approve the project and its defense, subject to any minor revisions required by the committee; Delay graduation by rejecting the dissertation and its defense until major revisions are
completed under the direction of the mentor/adviser, necessitating another defense for the following year;

Reject the project and its defense and terminate the students program.
The project adviser will immediately notify the student of the groups decision.

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Academic Programs & Policies

Graduation Specifics Once approval of the Preaching Research Project and its defense has been granted, the student must submit by the first Friday in April the following items:

An Application for Graduation (due in January) An approved original printed copy, three photocopies, and one electronic copy of the final
project to the Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program. Each copy must include a one-page, single-spaced abstract. Additional copies for personal use may be submitted for binding.

A vitae sheet, written in narrative style and including the date and place of birth, a summary of
the candidates professional and academic career, degrees earned, publications, memberships, and special honors.

Payment of Accounts All tuition, fees, and charges are due and payable upon registration for all required seminars. Registration is required 30 days before a seminar(s) begins. Refunds Refunds of tuition payments will only be made in the case of an emergency. Please submit the request in writing to the D.Min. Director. Housing and Related Items To further encourage cohort community and peer exchange, TMS has arranged for a common living location and transportation provision. Meal arrangements are the responsibility of the student.
All required seminars will begin on Wednesday and end on Tuesday. It is the students responsibility to arrange his travel to arrive on the TMS campus by 7:00 A.M. on the Wednesday morning that the seminar begins. He should plan to be on campus through the end of the on-campus term. No early departures will be allowed, except for emergencies.

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GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES


Academic Load The minimum full-time M.Div. load is 12 hours of credit. The minimum full-time load for a Th.M. student is 4 semester hours of credit. The minimum full-time D.Min. load is 8.5 hours of credit for fall (July) semester and 4.5 hours of credit for spring (January) semester. The D.Min. program does not have part-time status. Any M.Div. student enrolled for fewer than 12 hours of credit or any Th.M. student enrolled for less than 4 credit hours during a regular semester will be classified as a parttime student. Students enrolled part-time may be ineligible to have student loans deferred.
The normal unit of credit consists of one class hour (50 minutes) a week for a semester. In some cases, such as with Beginning Greek, some Expository Preaching classes, and Discipleship Labs, a unit of credit may require more than one hour of class time per week. Students who find it necessary to work more than 20 hours per week should plan to carry a lower academic load than the normally scheduled 15.5 to 16.5 hours. Students on academic probation may be required to limit the number of hours of enrollment. Those on final academic probation are not permitted to take more than 12 hours of course work in any semester.

Academic Programs & Policies

Class Scheduling Most seminary classes are scheduled between 7:30 A.M. and 4:50 P.M. on Tuesday through Friday. The Pastors Home course (PM 506) is generally scheduled in the evenings to allow wives to attend with their husbands.
A block system of class scheduling is used, so that two-hour classes meet only once per week and four-hour classes meet twice per week. Depending on subject matter, three-hour classes meet either once or twice per week. This block system offers an advantage for commuters since it makes it possible to carry a significant class load even when it is impossible to be on campus for more than one or two days per week.

Regular Student Classifications Depending on the number of semester hours of course work completed, students are generally classified as follows:
Junior: Senior: Fewer than 32 hours Above 62 hours Middler: 32 to 62 hours The primary exception to the above is that classification as a senior requires an expected May graduation within one year. Students completing graduation requirements at the end of a summer session (except for those completing 4 hours or less) and those completing graduation requirements during the fall or winterim sessions are counted as members of the senior class graduating the following May.

Part-Time Students Any M.Div. student enrolling for fewer than 12 semester hours of credit during a regular semester will be classified as a part-time student. Applicants intending to enroll on a part-time basis should be aware that, while part-time enrollment is permitted as space allows, admission preference is
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given to those applying for full-time status. Full-time enrollment (completing at least 12 semester hours of credit each semester) is required for students receiving full benefits as veterans, for students receiving social security benefits, and for all students receiving financial aid (cf. Academic Load above).

Academic Programs & Policies

Special Students Students who are not intending to complete a program or who have not been officially admitted to a degree program are classified as special students. For purposes of class organization they are counted as members of the Junior class. Enrollment as a special student is permitted for no more than 12 credit hours for one semester. Permission to enroll for an additional 12 credit hours must be requested by the student and approved by the Director of Admissions. Enrollment with special student status is especially encouraged for winterim and summer sessions. Auditors Auditing is not encouraged and rarely permitted. Busy pastors, missionaries on furlough, or other Christian workers may occasionally be admitted as auditors to selected courses after making proper application to the Administration office. Though no credits or grade points are involved, auditors are required to pay regular tuition charges and other appropriate fees. They are also expected to meet class attendance requirements. Those who do not do so will receive the grade of Wwhether or not they have officially withdrawn.
At the discretion of the administration, or the professor involved, auditing is not permitted for some courses, especially for seminar, laboratory, or practicum classes. In other courses, auditing may be permitted only if the student is willing to complete certain course assignments as specified by the professor. An auditor may enroll for only one semester as a full-time auditor (12 hours or more), or for a cumulative maximum of 24 semester hours of course work. A student may change from credit to audit only during the first two weeks of the semester.

Recording of Lectures and Chapels No personal audio or video recordings of any class sessions may be made without securing the permission of the professor. Professors may legitimately choose not to allow such recording. When permission is granted, unless special permission is also secured from the Vice President for Academic Administration, it is understood that the recording is to be used only by the student(s) registered in the course involved. No public use or reduplication is permitted without permission of both the professor and the seminary Vice President for Academic Administration. The recording of one class, or several classes, or portions of classes, when absence is necessary, may generally be permitted, but such recordings should not be collected, copied, or preserved for other uses. In no case should the professor be expected to arrange for the recording or asked to operate the recording devices. Occasionally, when daily recording is helpful for a student attending the course, as with certain handicapped persons, it is understood that the cassettes (or other recording materials) are to be re-used on a regular basis and not collected or preserved for later use after the course. Some professors will not permit individual or personal recording but will instead loan officially prepared recordings for use in case of emergency absences. These may not be duplicated.
In rare cases may a student record, or have recorded, an entire course or a major portion of a course in lieu of attending classes or as a way to solve a scheduling conflict. Exception may be granted in the case of unavoidable scheduling conflicts during the final two semesters before graduation, but not even then if one of the two conflicting classes is an elective.
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Personal recording of chapel sessions is not permitted. With rare exceptions (such as in cases when an author presents copyrighted material), audio recordings of chapel messages are available from the seminary website.

Arranged Courses Students who have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours may occasionally wish to pursue an elective course or topic of interest that is not currently offered in a classroom setting. In such cases, the student is encouraged to discuss the possibility of arranging an independent study course with a professor from that discipline. In no case may a required course be so arranged unless it is in the students final year, and then only if it conflicts with another required course. All petitions for Arranged Courses must be approved by the Vice President for Academic Administration. Advising Each regular student will be assigned a faculty adviser. The adviser will provide academic counsel at all preregistration and registration periods and will also be available for personal and vocational counseling. Academic and other advising is also available from the Vice President for Academic Administration. Although the seminary attempts to provide adequate academic advising, final responsibility for meeting all program, residence, and graduation requirements, including conformity with all assigned deadlines, rests with the student. Attendance All students are expected to be prompt and faithful in class attendance. Unexcused absence for the equivalent of one week of the class time for any class is allowed without penalty in a given course to provide for absences due to personal reasons or to fulfill ministry opportunities. Students are responsible for all work required, including any assignments missed because of absence. Professors are not under obligation to review missed assignments or provide supplementary instruction for students who miss classes. Whenever possible the student should consult with the professor for any instructions or assignments in advance of a foreseeable absence. Excused absence is permitted in cases of sickness or emergency, but in no case may the number of absences for any course exceed the equivalent of three weeks of class time. When absences exceed this limit, a grade of W, WP, WF, or F is required as appropriate. Individual faculty members are responsible to clarify any additional attendance policies, and corresponding penalties, for each class. Examinations
Except in cases of illness or family emergency, students are expected to be present for any scheduled examination. Requests to take an examination at any time other than the time scheduled must be addressed to and approved by the class professor.

Academic Programs & Policies

Class Changes To drop or add classes after registration, students must have the approval, on the appropriate form, of the professor. Courses may be dropped (without remaining on the transcript record) and new courses added only within the first two weeks of the semester. A fee of $5.00 is charged for each change of program.
Grading policies for withdrawing after the second week of a semester are found later in this catalog under the heading Withdrawal.

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Course Papers All assigned course and term papers are to be submitted in thesis form unless the professor indicates otherwise. All papers should be prepared in conformity with the latest editions of the seminarys Guidelines for Theses and Dissertations and Turabians A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Where these sources differ, the seminarys Guidelines takes precedence. Public Information The Masters Seminary complies with the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The seminary does not permit access to, or the release of, personally identifiable information, or educational records, to any individual without the written consent of the student, with the following exceptions:
All records are available to the administrators, faculty, or staff of the seminary, having legitimate educational concerns Appropriate information is released to medical personnel when the health of the student or others would be endangered by the withholding of information Appropriate information is supplied to financial aid personnel in connection with an application for such aid Specified data is given to the governmental officials and agencies designated by law, or in compliance with a judicial order Additionally, the seminary may release directory information unless the student withholds permission. Directory information is defined as: the students name, address, telephone number, previous institutions attended, program of enrollment, honors, and degrees conferred. The seminary recognizes the right of the student to limit or prohibit disclosure of this information. In view, however, of this statement of disclosure, the seminary assumes that failure on the part of any student to request the withholding of this information indicates permission for such disclosure. Requests to limit or withhold this information should be submitted to the Administration office.

Academic Programs & Policies

Winterim and Summer Sessions A limited selection of courses is offered in winterim and summer sessions. Except for Beginning Greek, which is scheduled each summer, students should not plan for a substantive part of curriculum requirements to be offered in these sessions. One elective course each winterim will usually be offered by an outstanding guest lecturer (list of past lecturers is noted on the following page). Winterim students are permitted to pay for it by adding it to their spring semester bill. However, one must enroll in a minimum of 12 units in the spring semester (in addition to the winterim units) to maintain full-time status.
Pastors, missionaries, and other Christian workers are encouraged to take advantage of the Winterim courses as special students.

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Winterim Distinguished Scholars Series 1990 S. Lewis Johnson, Jr., Use of the Old Testament in the New Testament 1991 Homer A. Kent, Jr., Exposition of Acts 1992 Robert L. Saucy, Dispensational Theology 1993 Kenneth L. Barker, Scope of OT Theology as Fulfilled in Christs First and Second Advents 1994 John A. Sproule, Exposition of Hebrews 1995 John Woodbridge, History of Evangelicalism and Fundamentalism 1996 Stanley D. Toussaint, Galatians 1997 Walter C. Kaiser, Old Testament Ethics 1998 George W. Knight, III, Studies in the Pastoral Epistles 1999 John S. Feinberg, Continuity & Discontinuity between the Testaments 2000 Thomas R. Edgar, Gifts of the Holy Spirit in Acts & 1 Corinthians 2001 Eugene Merrill, Theology of the Pentateuch 2002 Harold Hoehner, Ephesians 2003 Wayne Grudem, Biblical Manhood and Womanhood 2004 Steven Lawson, Preaching from the Psalms 2005 R. Kent Hughes, Pauls Concept of Ministry in Second Corinthians 2006 Ralph Alexander, Ezekiel 2007 John D. Hannah, Life of Jonathan Edwards 2008 Douglas Moo, Epistle of James 2009 Daniel Block, Worship in the Old Testament 2010 Bruce Ware, Universal Reign of the Triune God 2011 Charlie Dyer, Jeremiah and Lamentations Israel Studies The Masters Seminary, through the Israel Bible Extension (IBEX) program of The Masters College, offers graduate and post-graduate training in the fields of biblical history, geography, customs, archaeology, and Modern Hebrew while studying in Israel. Study at the IBEX campus, located just west of Jerusalem in the beautiful Judean hills, affords the student extensive cross-cultural exposure and interaction, and provides an excellent foundation for additional biblical studies. Whether for an entire semester or for an intensive, three-week overview each May, course work is designed to interface with the seminarys general education requirements. Information is available from the IBEX office at The Masters College or from Prof. Swanson in the seminary library. Lands of Paul Studies The Masters Seminary offers seminary credit for a Masters College study trip offered each summer (MayJune), retracing the missionary journeys of Paul in Turkey and Greece, including the seven churches of Revelation. The trip also includes visits to 44 major biblical and historical sites, including Istanbul, Tarsus, Ephesus, Troy, Athens, Corinth, Thessalonica, and Philippi. Students will receive information regarding this trip via email. Foreign Studies in Missions In order to expand the world-vision of its students, The Masters Seminary encourages students to participate in ministry trips in foreign countries and in study programs sponsored by the seminary, by Grace Community Church, or by other approved missions agencies or churches that sponsor foreign internship programs. These programs are designed to introduce students, both practically
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Academic Programs & Policies

and academically, to both specialized and non-specialized missionary service while under the direction of approved missiologists. In all cases where seminary credit is approved, special course assignments designed by the seminary faculty must be fulfilled. Approval will be granted for more than four hours of credit only when the foreign stay involves actual in situ class work.

Academic Programs & Policies

Grading System To distinguish various levels of achievement in the mastery of subject material, in effectiveness of research, in fulfillment of assignments and responsibilities, or in improvement in personal and ministry skills, as appropriate for each course, the seminary employs the following grading symbols:
A and A- = Exceptional achievement B+, B, and B- = Above average achievement C+, C, and C- = Fair or average achievement D+, D, and D- = Below average, minimally acceptable achievement F = Unacceptable achievement, failure I = Incomplete work W = Withdrawal during the third through the sixth weeks of regular semesters WP = Withdrawal while passing during the seventh through the twelfth weeks WF = Withdrawal while failing during the seventh through the twelfth weeks, or any withdrawal after the twelfth week Grade points are awarded according to the following scale: A = 4 points for each semester hour A- = 3.7 points per credit hour B+ = 3.3 points per credit hour B = 3 points per credit hour B- = 2.7 points per credit hour C+ = 2.3 points per credit hour C = 2 points per credit hour C- = 1.7 points per credit hour D+ = 1.3 points per credit hour D F I = 1 points per credit hour = 0 points per credit hour = Not counted until changed D- = 0.7 points per credit hour WF = 0 points per credit hour

The grading symbols W and WP do not affect grade point averages and the courses for which they are assigned do not count in computing credit hours attempted. A failing grade (F or WF) is never removed from the students transcript. Any student who receives a grade of C or below may retake the course. However, when the course is repeated, the second grade is recorded in such a manner as to delete any negative effect of the failing grade (F or WF) when computing grade points.
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The following system for converting number grades or percentages to letter grades, where appropriate, is in general use:

Withdrawal A grade of W indicates withdrawal during the third through the sixth weeks of the semester (or failure to meet attendance or other requirements as an auditor). Withdrawal during the second six weeks of the period results in a WP if the student is passing, or a WF if the student is not passing at the time of withdrawal. All withdrawals after the twelfth week of the semester are recorded as Failures (F). Information on refunds and penalties for failure to withdraw officially may be found later in this catalog. Incomplete A grade of I may be granted only in instances of unusual circumstances such as an extended serious illness. An Incomplete (I) indicates that the work done for the course has been acceptable but that some portion of the required work is incomplete for an excusable reason. Requests for an Incomplete must be addressed, in writing, to the Vice President for Academic Administration, and must be approved, or rejected, by a faculty committee. An Incomplete (I) automatically becomes a Failure (F) unless the requirements are satisfactorily completed within 60 days after the end of the semester. No exceptions or additional extensions will be granted except upon written petition by the student and special action by the Vice President for Academic Administration. Probation A student may be admitted on academic probation for a variety of reasons, including an inadequate academic record or graduation from an unaccredited institution.
The term probation refers to a status, assigned by institutional regulations or administrative decision, which indicates that the student has failed to meet the stated expectations of the seminary. In the majority of cases it is the result of unsatisfactory academic performance. Unless the probationary status is removed at the end of the semester of probation the student will be placed on final probation. A student may be on probation for one semester only, and on final probation for one semester only. A student on probation may, at the discretion of the Vice President for Academic Administration, be limited in hours of enrollment and thus required to lengthen the time required for completing the remainder of his program. A student on final probation is not permitted to enroll for more than 12 hours of course work in any semester. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 2.5 (or 2.0 for Bachelor of Theology and Diploma of Theology students, and 3.0 for Master of Theology students) will be placed on probation for the following semester. If the minimum grade point average is not achieved at the end of the semester of probation the student will be placed on final probation. A student on final probation for any regular semester must terminate his program at the end of that semester if the final probationary status is not removed by achieving the cumulative grade point average required for graduation from his program. A student whose program has been terminated for academic reasons may appeal this action. Such an appeal must be addressed to the faculty, through the Administration office, in writing, and must include an explanation of why the minimum academic requirements were not met and why consideration of an exception is warranted. The appeal must be received within two weeks of notification of termination. The faculty decision with regard to the appeal is final.
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Academic Programs & Policies

An application for admission after termination for academic reasons may be considered only after a full academic year of non-enrollment. A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96100 A- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9495 B+. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9293 B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8891 B- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8687 C+. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8485 C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8083 C- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7879 D+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7677 D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7275 D- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7071 F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 and below

Academic Programs & Policies

A student whose program has been terminated for academic reasons may appeal to the faculty, through the Administration office, for permission to enroll as a special student for a maximum of one full semester (or 16 hours).

Satisfactory Progress For a full-time student satisfactory academic progress is defined as requiring completion of a minimum of 12 semester hours of credit per semester with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher (or 2.0 for B.Th. and Dip.Th. students). Full-time students are expected to complete all graduation requirements within three-to-five years from the date of matriculation.
For a part-time student satisfactory academic progress is defined as requiring completion of a minimum of 6 semester hours of credit in any semester with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher (or 2.0 for B.Th. and Dip.Th. students). Part-time students are expected to complete all graduation requirements within six years from the date of matriculation.

Application for Graduation Students anticipating graduation in May must complete an Application for Graduation form available from the Administration office. This must be completed when registering for the final semester prior to graduation. Academic Honors Any student in the Master of Divinity, Bachelor of Theology, and Diploma of Theology programs who completes at least sixty hours of his program at The Masters Seminary with a high grade point average is eligible, upon graduation, for academic honors as follows:
3.7003.799 3.8003.899 3.9004.000 Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Summa Cum Laude

All grade point averages are based exclusively on course work completed at The Masters Seminary.

Registration The seminary designates a period during each fall and spring semester for registration for the following semester. These periods provide opportunities for students to meet with their faculty adviser to catch up with each other, update the students academic plans, and pray together. All students will be notified by e-mail regarding the registration information (i.e., class schedules,

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instructions, adviser list, and any other reminders). The dates for the registration periods are included in the academic calendar at the back of this catalog. The following events are especially important components of the registration procedures: Each student is assigned a faculty academic adviser who will advise him throughout his time at the seminary. The required meeting each semester and subsequent online enrollment in classes serves as the adviser permission of the students schedule. Any changes to a students class schedule after the registration period will require the signature of his adviser on an add/drop slip. All students are expected to register on the assigned day(s) and during the assigned hours. A late fee of $50 will be added to the registration fees of students registering after the registration period is over. Registration cannot be completed until financial obligations have been completed with the student finance office. Students must have their tuition bill paid in full in order to register for the following semester.

Academic Programs & Policies

Continuing Registration A student enrolled in any program is expected to register for each successive semester until graduation from that program. To maintain active student status a student who does not register for credits, either class or thesis credits, during any regular semester must register for Continuing Registration. This may be viewed as a non-credit course which is required whenever there would otherwise be an interruption in the students program. A student may register for Continuing Registration for no more than two successive semesters. Continuing Registration counts as regular enrollment and does not lengthen the six-year maximum time allowed for graduation. Continuing Registration is not required for students who skip a semester of enrollment in order to be involved in an approved cross-cultural or missionary internship.
The fee for Continuing Registration is $50. A student who fails to register for either course credits, thesis credits, or Continuing Registration during any semester regularly scheduled for his program will be dropped from the program and must re-apply for admission prior to any subsequent registration. If re-admission is granted, the student must meet any changed program requirements (i.e., he is admitted under the requirements given in the current catalog).

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Academic Programs & Policies

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Admission Policies & Procedures


Personal Qualifications Enrollment in The Masters Seminary is limited to those who give testimony of faith in Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord, who demonstrate submission to the will of God and obedience to the Word of God, who evidence possession of the personal and spiritual gifts necessary for ministry, and who are in essential agreement with the seminarys statement of faith.

Professional Degree Programs


The purpose of all programs offered at The Masters Seminary is to (1) prepare or better equip candidates for ordination for pastoral ministries or (2) additionally equip ordained men for more effective ministry. Because the board of directors, the seminary administration, the faculty, and the church constituency understand the Scriptural criteria for the role of pastor-teacher as limiting candidacy for such roles to biblically qualified males only, only men are admitted to seminary programs.

Admission Policies & Procedures

As outlined in a previous section of this catalog, it is the conviction of the seminary faculty that there are personal, spiritual, doctrinal, and professional qualifications which an educational process alone cannot produce, and without which any preparation for an entrance into the ministry of the gospel can result in nothing but personal tragedy. The seminary administration and faculty reserve the right to withdraw the privilege of enrollment from any student who, after admission, may prove to be lacking in these essential qualifications. In evaluating all applications, the Admissions Committee will look for evidence of increasing Christian maturity, normally with at least two years of growth as a Christian. Persons with any history of divorce for either spouse should be aware that their applications will be given special scrutiny.

Academic Prerequisites The admission requirements for each of the programs have been outlined in the previous chapter. Recommendations concerning pre-seminary studies may also be found in the specific admission requirements for the Master of Divinity program included in the previous chapter. Application Procedures All who are contemplating admission to the seminary should make formal application, available on the seminary website, as early as possible, but at least two months prior to the date of intended enrollment. Applications received within two months of the desired enrollment date will be considered only at the discretion of the Admissions Committee.
Materials to be submitted include the following:

The seminarys application forms with all applicable questions answered in full A non-refundable application fee; the $50 fee is increased to $60 if within 30 days of desired
enrollment

A recent photograph of the applicant (and spouse, if married) Official transcripts of all college and graduate work should be requested of the schools involved
and should be sent directly from the schools to the Admissions Office
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If married or engaged, a completed Spouses Biographical Form A brief account of the applicants salvation A brief statement of career goals and reasons for applying Four personal reference forms, including pastoral, church leader, academic, and employer
references; the pastoral reference must include an affirmation of the applicants fitness and giftedness for Christian ministry

International students should note the special requirements listed below


Enrollment in all programs is selective and limited. The Admissions Committee may grant admission on the basis of the above credentials alone, or may request the submission of additional materials, and/or may require an interview with the Vice President for Academic Administration or another representative of the seminary.

Admission Policies & Procedures

International Students Life at The Masters Seminary is enriched and missionary vision is enlarged by the presence of international students. The seminarys purpose for existence is expanded by the opportunities to equip international students for ministry and to have ones world-vision enlarged.
Prospective students from other countries who have completed a baccalaureate degree or its equivalent with a high level of academic achievement are encouraged to apply. In addition to the usual application materials and procedures, applicants from other countries must meet the following requirements: Each applicant is required to furnish a completed certification evidencing that he has adequate resources for his program of study as well as for any dependents. Applicants who are unable to certify adequate personal funding may secure a statement from some responsible individual or organization willing to guarantee the necessary funding for the educational expenses, living expenses, and transportation expenses to, from, and within the United States, as well as the expenses for the support and care of any dependents. The seminary is unable to issue a Certificate of Eligibility (Form I-20) until a Financial Certificate guaranteeing these funds has been received, and all application forms, transcripts, and other necessary materials have been received and officially approved. Each international applicant whose native language is other than English may be required to present a test score of 550 or higher (paper based test) or 213 or higher (internet based test) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). This examination is administered several times annually in major cities throughout the world. Applicants may make arrangements for taking the examination by contacting Educational Testing Service at www.ets.org. Test results should be sent directly to The Masters Seminary Where necessary, the applicant may be required to attend an interview with a designated seminary representative in his home country. A report from the interviewer, using one of the seminarys reference forms, will become a part of the required application credentials. International students who are admitted to The Masters Seminary on a student visa are required by law to be registered for a minimum of 10 semester credit hours. Additionally they are required to show that they will be able to afford the costs of school and living expenses prior to entry and should not plan on being allowed to work off-campus. Off-campus employment is authorized only in cases of severe economic hardship occuring subsequent to a students enrollment in an academic
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program. Application for approval must be submitted to The Masters Seminary and the Department of Homeland Security. All tests, certifications, and approvals must be completed by six weeks prior to enrollment.

Transfer Students Applicants transferring into the Master of Divinity, Bachelor of Theology or Diploma of Theology programs from other seminaries with recognized theological and academic standards will ordinarily be given full credit for course work satisfactorily completed (C or above) up to a maximum of 48 semester hours of applicable credits. The last 12 hours must be completed at The Masters Seminary unless the student has completed 80 hours or more at The Masters Seminary. Official transcripts must be sent directly from the institutions involved. In no case is credit granted for course work taken at the undergraduate level or for life experiences.
Applicants transferring into the Master of Theology program may apply up to four advanced graduate semester credit hours from an accredited theological institution toward fulfillment of Th.M. course requirements at The Masters Seminary.

Admission Policies & Procedures

Greek Prerequisite Though not required, it is expected that applicants will have completed a program of Beginning Greek at the undergraduate level. All who have done so must take a Greek proficiency examination as a part of the orientation procedures for the first semester of enrollment. Those who pass the examination should enroll in Greek Exegesis I and II for the first full year of their seminary programs. Those who do not pass the exam are required to enroll in and pass NT401/402 at The Masters Seminary.
Students enrolling without having taken Beginning Greek should take Hebrew Grammar I and II during their first year and Beginning Greek during the summer between the first and second years. An alternative is to enroll in Beginning Greek during the summer prior to the first year, then take Greek Exegesis I and II during the first year and Hebrew Grammar I and II the second year. Beginning Greek credits do not count toward the 98 hours required for graduation; however, grades earned are factored into the students grade point average.

Tuition Deposit An advance tuition payment of $250 is required of all approved applicants. This payment is due upon acceptance to ensure his matriculation. If an approved applicant has paid the tuition deposit and decides not to enroll, $150 will be refunded if he notifies the seminary 60 days before classes begin. No refunds will be made if notification of withdrawal is received after these dates, respectively. Orientation At the beginning of each semester orientation is held for incoming students. Attendance is required for all new students entering the seminary. An unexcused absence usually requires postponement of matriculation until the following semester. Orientation sessions are critical for adequate matriculation into the seminary and include devotional messages, introductions, tours, various student instructions, consultation time with your adviser, an opportunity to get to know your fellow incoming students, and an evening for new students and wives to meet the faculty in a social setting.

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The following events are especially important components of the orientation procedures:

All students are required to take an English proficiency examination as a part of orientation
(see also p. 27). Failure of the first examination will result in attendance at an English refresher class and re-examination. Students who do not pass the second exam will be required retake the exam during orientation the following semester.

All students will be required to take proficiency assessments in Old and New Testament during
this time.

Hebrew and Greek proficiency examinations are scheduled for orientation week. These are not
required; students may opt to take these exams if they have had prior instruction in these areas. Those who pass these examinations may enroll into Greek or Hebrew Exegesis courses and will not be required to enroll in beginning language courses. Those who do not pass must enroll in beginning level language courses. These language proficiency examinations may only be taken at orientation in a students first year and cannot be rescheduled or retaken.

Admission Policies & Procedures

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Financial Information
Student Charges Tuition charges paid by students cover slightly more than one-half the cost of the normal operating expenses. The continuing support of individuals and churches is necessary for the ongoing ministry of the seminary.
The charges listed here are those anticipated for the next two academic years. The seminary reserves the right to change these charges and it is possible that some increases will be necessary in succeeding years.

Providing an Education of Substance and Worth


Because of the generosity of faithful Christian friends, and in particular the members of Grace Community Church in providing facilities, The Masters Seminary is able to offer a quality theological education for all its students at a moderate cost.

Application fee (not refundable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Late application fee; within two months of desired enrollment (not refundable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60 Advance tuition deposit (not refundable within 60 days of expected matriculation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250 M.Div., B.Th., Dip.Th. programs: Tuition per credit hour for full-time students (12 credit hours or more) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $290 Tuition per credit hour for part-time students (under 12 credit hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $330 Tuition per credit hour for required classes taken by arrangement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $330 Tuition per credit hour in winterim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $275 Tuition per credit hour in summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $290 Tuition per credit hour in summer for beginning Greek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $150 Continuing registration/Thesis non-resident fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Th.M. program: Tuition per semester in fall or spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,000 Tuition per credit hour in summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $320 Tuition per credit hour in winterim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $275 Continuing registration/Thesis non-resident fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Th.D. program: Application fee (non-refundable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Qualifying Exams fee (per semester) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $350 Language Class fee (per unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $290 Tuition fee (per semester of residency) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,300 Library fee (per semester of residency) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100 Carrel rental fee (optional, per semester of residency) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75
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Financial Information

Dissertation topic confirmation fee (due upon initial matriculation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $150 Dissertation fee (due upon submission of first draft) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,000 Shepherds Conference fee (spring semester only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100 Student services fee (per semester of residency). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $110 Graduation fee: cost of diploma, cap and gown, and related expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $175 Dissertation binding & filming (original plus two copies). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Additional personal copies (each). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25 D.Min. program: Application fee (non-refundable) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Tuition fee (per semester hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $425 Project (DM 937) confirmation fee (due at time of topic confirmation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 Project (DM 938) submission fee (due upon submission of final draft) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,400 Project binding & filming (original plus two copies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75 Additional personal copies, each . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25

Financial Information

Graduation fee: cost of diploma, cap, gown, and related expenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $175 General Fees (M.Div., B.Th., Dip.Th., Th.M.) Audit fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . same as tuition charges Registration/Materials fee; for each fall, spring, winterim, and summer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35 Late registration/Materials fee; after open registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $85 Library fee (fall and spring semesters only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75 Student services fee (fall and spring semesters only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $110 Shepherds Conference fee (spring semester only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100 Late payment fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25 Extended payment plan (5-month plan) Semester set-up fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75 Thesis (M.Div., Th.M.) binding & filming (original plus two copies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $50 Additional personal copies (each) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25 Graduation fee: cost of diploma, cap and gown, and related expenses (for all graduates, including absentia) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $175 Transcript fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3

Computer Upon enrollment, all regular students are required to own a personal computer with approved word processing and record-keeping software. Estimated cost: $1,000 to $1,500.

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Housing and Other Costs The seminary does not provide housing for either married or single students; students are responsible for making their own living arrangements (cf. Student Life section).
With the exception of housing and automobile insurance, which are somewhat higher than the national average, other living expenses are comparable with costs elsewhere in the nation. The following estimates of typical annual costs may be of help in budget planning.

Single Student Budget Item Tuition (32 hours) Fees Books and Supplies Housing and Food Transportation (Including insurance) Personal Expenses Minimum Medical Insurance 12 Months $ 9,280 $ 540 $ 500 $10,000 $ 3,000 $ 2,000 $ 1,100*

Married Student 12 Months $ 9,280 $ 540 $ 500 $ 18,000 $ 4,000 $ 4,000 $ 1,100 *

Financial Information

*Medical Insurance is required for all students. Those who do not have coverage through employment or other means are required to purchase minimum coverage at the approximate cost of $1,100 per year. (Information on medical insurance coverage for dependents is available from the Administration office.) With careful budgeting or special management, many students are able to reduce these budget figures. Married students who have children should anticipate the additional expenses involved.

Payment of Accounts All tuition, fees, and charges are due and payable at registration. Students who are unable to pay their entire semester charges may elect to use the Extended Payment Plan (5-month payment plan). This plan allows students to budget more easily, reducing the size of the tuition payments by spreading them over the semester. Actual monthly payments are automatically adjusted when courses are added or dropped, or when enrollment plans change.
For those who choose this plan, a students semester tuition charges, based on his enrollment, are paid over a five-month period, beginning in July and ending in November for the fall semester, and beginning in December and ending in April for the spring semester. No interest is charged in this plan. There is a $75 per semester set-up fee and a charge of $25 for each payment received after the due date. Each payment is due on the tenth of each month. Any balance remaining after the final payment date will be charged interest at the rate of one percent per month. Student tuition accounts must be paid in full by the following deadlines: November 10 for the fall semester April 10 for the spring semester June 10 for the first summer session August 10 for the second summer session Winterim tuition costs can be rolled into your spring tuition payment plan. However, summer tuition costs cannot be rolled into your fall tuition payment plan.
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Students with unpaid balances after these dates will be immediately suspended from classes, receive an F for those classes, and forfeit the opportunity to enroll in courses for the subsequent school term, participate in graduation or the seminarys annual Israel trip. Transcripts and diplomas may also be withheld. Note: If your tuition is being paid by another person or organization, it is your responsibility to make sure your tuition is paid on time to avoid the penalties listed above. Questions regarding the payment of accounts should be addressed to the Student Accounting office, The Masters College and Seminary, 21726 W. Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall, California 91321, or at (661) 259-3540, ext. 3227.

Refunds A student who chooses to withdraw from a class or classes, or from all classes for which he has registered, whether he has attended them or not, must officially withdraw by completing the forms which are available from the Administration office. Failure to withdraw officially will result in a W, WP, or WF, on the students transcript, as appropriate, even though the student may never have attended the class(es), and a student who does not withdraw officially will not be entitled to any refund.

Financial Information

Refunds of tuition payments are based upon the week that the official withdrawal form is signed by the Administration office, not on the time the student ceases to attend the class(es). Withdrawal during the first two weeks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100% During the third week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75% During the fourth week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60% During the fifth week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45% During the sixth week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30% During the seventh week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15% During the eighth week. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5% During the ninth week or later. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0% * The registration fee is non-refundable. Summer school and Winterim refunds: 100 percent refund if dropped prior to or during the first two days of class. There is no refund if dropped after the second day of classes. The date used to establish the amount of refund will be the date that the drop slip is signed by the Office of Academic Administration. Students who receive federal or state loans will receive a refund of the amount remaining after tuition has been paid. The refund will be processed the week after the official add/drop period has ended.

On-Campus Student Employment There are limited opportunities for student employment, often for work in The Masters Grace Library or at Grace Community Church. Hourly wages are above the minimum wage but usually not competitive with common industry or commercial averages. The Admissions Office works with students in directing them to employment opportunities.

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The seminary is fortunate to be located in the greater Los Angeles area which offers many excellent opportunities for employment both in secular and church related areas. As a general guideline, it is recommended that students who find it necessary to work more than 20 hours per week should reduce their seminary course work.

Home Church Assistance Assistance from your home church does more than help meet the budgetit provides an accountability for the student and a prayer commitment by the church. Consequently, students are encouraged to discuss financial assistance possibilities with their pastor and church leaders. Applications are available at the reception desk. Veterans Educational Assistance The Masters Seminary has been approved for the training of veterans and eligible persons under the provision of Title 38. Eligible persons should submit Form DD2-14, available from the Veterans Administration. An original or certified copy of release papers is needed. Scholarships Scholarships and tuition grants come through the endowment funds and sacrificial gifts provided by friends of TMS. As it is, tuition covers only slightly more than half of the costs, so each student automatically receives a 40 percent scholarship due to reduced tuition. Beyond that, a limited number of scholarships, based on merit and need, are available only for tuition expenses of full-time students, and only after the applicant has pursued assistance from his home church. To qualify, students must demonstrate that their home church has been approached for matching funds. Scholarship funding, reserved for those enrolled in a minimum of 12 units and maintaining a grade point average of 2.5 or above, is rarely available for students in their first year at TMS. Stafford Student Loans This is a California state, long-term 810 percent interest guaranteed student loan. Applications must be filed with the Financial Aid Office by March 1 for the fall semester, November 1 for the spring semester. Bachelor of Theology Program Those students enrolled in the Bachelor of Theology program may be eligible for additional Federal scholarships and grants. For further information, contact the Financial Aid office at (661) 259-3540.

Financial Information

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Student Life

Growth of Heart and Mind


There is no legitimate antagonism between the heart and the mind, between spirituality and scholarship. Scholarship which is truly biblical will evoke true spirituality. For every significant new step in increasing knowledge there should be a corresponding advance in spiritual maturity.

Devotional Life The most important aspect of life for a student at The Masters Seminary is his personal relationship with God. The seminary seeks to provide an environment which encourages spiritual growth that is commensurate with academic and intellectual growth. In order to promote an atmosphere conducive to such development, the seminary provides various programs and pursues various approaches designed to emphasize worship, spiritual discernment, and devotion to the Lord. Because of the biblical requirements for a role in Christian leadership (1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1) and in view of the character qualities which are the goal for all maturing believers (Galatians 5:2223), it is the conviction of the seminary that every administrator, faculty member, and student must zealously pursue these qualifications. In an effort to assist in achieving these objectives, the seminary desires that all activities be pervaded by an atmosphere of prayer so that not only chapel services and prayer meetings, but also every class, every committee meeting, every task, and every ministry might become, by Gods grace, an avenue of spiritual blessing and growth. Chapel The seminary community meets together each Tuesday and Thursday morning for a one hour chapel service. The purpose of the chapel is for worship and exposure to current issues and ministries. Speakers include pastors, missionaries, faculty members, and other Christian leaders. Each fall a series of chapel sessions is dedicated to missions; each spring a faculty series is devoted to the development of a particular theme of current theological interest. Because chapel services are considered to be an integral part of the pastoral training and educational experience, enveloping both the corporate and individual growth of the student body, attendance is required. Students who are enrolled for nine semester credit hours or more are required to attend both chapels each week and are allowed two unexcused absences per semester. Those taking between 4 and 8 credit hours are required to attend one chapel per week and are allowed one unexcused absence per semester. Chapel exemptions are granted to those students who: Are enrolled for four semester credit hours or less Have no class before 1:00 P.M. on Tuesday and/or Thursday
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Student Life

Any exemption from chapel attendance, except for the reasons listed above, requires a written application to the Vice President for Academic Administration (forms available in the Administration Office). Students should plan their work schedule around their class and chapel requirements. After the third unexcused absence, a student must meet with the Vice President for Academic Administration to explain his absence. After the fourth unexcused absence, the student will automatically receive a Fail for that semester, resulting in closer scrutiny in the candidacy process. A second Fail in chapel attendance will result in automatic expulsion. Absences due to illness or emergency are excused. Please notify the Administration Office the first day back to class.

Faculty Chapel Series (Spring) 1996 Spiritual Warfare


1997 Premillennialism 1998 Hell: Never, Forever, or Just for Awhile? 1999 Biblical Covenants 2000 Major Ethical Issues Facing the Church at the end of the Twentieth Century 2001 The Openness of God Issue 2002 Rapture Issues 2003 Cessationism 2004 Authority and Sufficiency of Scripture 2005 New Perspective Theology 2006 The Emerging Church 2007 New Covenant Theology 2008 Homosexuality 2009 Atonement: Scripture on Penal Substitution 2010 Biblical Sanctification 2011 The Church

Student Life

Field Education Effective preparation for the ministry of the gospel requires on-the-job training. Therefore the seminary requires significant ministry involvement under faithful church and pastoral supervision. Ministry involvement projects are included in the course work for the required Pastoral Ministry courses, and special projects may be arranged for elective credit. The distinctive nature of the schools presence on the campus of Grace Community Church and its location in the ethnically-diverse Los Angeles area provide students with opportunities to be involved in a wide variety of ministries. Our location also gives students varied employment opportunities in church-related ministries.
Six semesters of Field Education courses are required. While attending these courses, each student is required to be involved in a local church ministry. At the end of each semester, Student Ministry Assessment evaluation forms are submitted by the leadership of their local church. These assessments enable the student, his church leadership, and the seminary faculty to monitor his progress in issues of character, biblical knowledge, and ministry abilities.
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Ministry observation and involvement, when coupled with seminary studies, provides opportunity for the student to be involved in specific aspects of ministry that will help prepare him to shepherd Gods flock with excellence. Each course requires particular observations or involvements (e.g., attend elders/leadership meetings, preaching/teaching assignments, attend premarital training sessions) that are attested to and evaluated by the student and his ministry leader. Upon completion of his seminary training, these ministry evaluation forms help confirm the maturation progress of each student and assist the Director of Placement in guiding the graduate into appropriate ministry opportunities.

Special Series Each year the seminary presents three special series to augment classroom instruction. In the fall semester, the month of October is set aside to focus on missions, with missions leaders presenting ministry opportunities from around the world. A distinguished scholar from another seminary is invited each Winterim to offer a two-unit elective of significant biblical and theological import. In spring, the faculty presents an extended chapel series on a theological topic of contemporary relevance. Cross-cultural Training The seminary has a high level of commitment to overseas ministry. When possible, ministry teams travel to one or more countries conducting leadership seminars and visiting missionaries. In most cases the student will be involved with experienced pastors who will guide the student throughout the cross cultural experience. The student may be eligible to receive two units of elective credit for the overseas involvement, providing that the assignments are satisfactorily completed.

Student Life

Discipleship Labs Discipleship Labs focus on discussions relating to the development of Christian living skills and character qualities. Students meet in small groups for two hours weekly with a faculty member or a church leader for seven weeks per semester. Individual giftedness, personal and ministry experiences, and goals are discussed and evaluated.
Labs are not primarily academic in nature, but instead are designed to promote self-examination, growth in Christian character qualities, and increased ability in encouraging and motivating others toward deeper devotion to God, greater love for others, and a more effective ministry to others. The rationale for these practicums is based on the fact that most failures in pastoral ministry are not because of a lack of knowledge but because of moral failure and the inability to work well with others. The Discipleship Labs are thus designed as a major part of the seminarys commitment to be involved in the ministry of Building Men of God. Specifically, Discipleship Labs are designed to:

Strengthen personal relationships between the students Focus on the personal character and giftedness of each student Evaluate and hone each students people skills Mentor each student Entertain questions that classroom time does not allow Validate the candidacy process by which the faculty can determine a students suitability for
ministry
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Provide time to pray with students and see how God answers Create a lifetime friendship between students and faculty members
The Masters Seminary Online The Masters Seminary Online is a doorway to the world via the Internet. The seminary web page provides access to information on all of the programs and activities of the seminary. Since its inception, The Masters Seminary Online has received numerous awards from evaluative services, including the Lycos Top 5% and Best of the Christian Web. Additionally, the Magellan and Excite Services have given the seminary its Four Star Award, one of only four such awards given to college and university web pages in California. In addition to seminary information, the web page provides access to full-text articles and book reviews from The Masters Seminary Journal, over 200 links to sites pertaining to biblical and theological studies, biographies and e-mail access to the faculty, alumni news, and online access to the librarys Online Public Access Catalogue. Graduation & Placement Since its inception, the TMS graduation rate has averaged approximately 70%, with more than 90% of graduates placed within the following three months. Twice each year, the Placement Office hosts a one-day seminar designed to prepare students for finding ministry employment. The Director of Placement also works with denominational leaders and interdenominational ministries, and receives inquiries from churches regarding openings in their pulpits. Students are encouraged to use their internship and ministry involvements as opportunities to build a resume of experiences which will lead naturally toward their ministry goals. Following placement, during the crucial early years of ministry the seminary and the pastoral staff of Grace Community Church will gladly respond to any request for help and pastoral support.
In addition to assisting in placement for graduates, the seminary is often able to find part-time or interim ministries for advanced students. The seminary is unable to make recommendations or seek placement for applicants or first year students, except in rare instances when there has been extensive ministry experience.

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Student Housing
While the seminary does not own housing facilities, there is an ample selection of apartments and homes available for rent nearby. A listing giving an indication of the apartment rental environment in the area is available and, in addition, the seminary is often able to provide information regarding special rental opportunities offered by seminary and church friends. For students visiting the area, the seminary has instituted a H.O.S.T. (Helping Others Simplify Transition) program. This program is often able to assist students with temporary housing when visiting and also when moving into the area, giving them opportunity to hunt for their own lodging. Requests for information on housing should be addressed to the Seminary Admissions Office.

Employment Most students find it financially necessary to work part-time while in seminary. After the first year some are able to find paid positions within local churches. The Placement Office can occasionally assist second or third year students in securing such part-time employment in churches or other Christian ministries. It is usually not difficult to find a wide variety of employment opportunities within the business sector. Whenever possible, students should plan to arrive in the area early enough to interview and secure employment prior to the beginning of classes. The local office of the State of California Department of Employment can be very helpful in the location of these job openings. Medical Insurance Coverage Adequate health insurance coverage is mandatory for all part-time and full-time students. A health insurance policy may be obtained through an insurance company of the students own choosing or through participation in a plan where the student or spouse is employed. A group hospitalization plan for seminarians and their families is available through the seminary. Further information regarding the reasonable premiums and the extent of coverage is available from the Administration Office. Associated Student Body The students of The Masters Seminary maintain an organization designed to serve the student body. Through example and direction, the Associated Student Body (ASB) officers promote unity and fellowship among the students by leading in humility, stimulating one another to love and good deeds (Hebrews 10:24). They minister to the students spiritually through leading student body chapel services; socially through organizing times of fellowship, and physically through arranging accommodations for new and prospective students when they arrive. The activities of the ASB are supported through a Student Activities Fee. Associated Student Body officerspresident, vice-president and secretary-treasurerare selected annually by the members of the student body. The ASB officers are encouraged to seek wisdom and counsel from the faculty and the administration, and are occasionally asked to represent the students in various institutional functions. Seminary Wives Discipleship Program The Seminary Wives Discipleship Program is an association of the wives of students, faculty, and staff. The purpose of the organization is to:

Student Life

Enrich each wifes devotion to God Enrich her marriage and family through study of the Word and profitable literature Enrich her personal development through small group discipleship, accountability, and support
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Equip her for future ministry alongside her husband by providing materials, resources, and
practical training in womens ministry Meetings are held weekly for ten weeks each semester. In typical meetings, time is devoted to each of the following:

Encouragement and motivation through a period of worship and devotion Instruction with regard to a particular skill Participation in a study of Gods Word and in discussion of a book relating to a topic of practical
value for wives

Mutual support in a period of prayer for one another; additional special activities are occasionally sponsored by the group

Grace Books International For the convenience of faculty and students, Grace Community Church, in cooperation with The Masters Seminary, maintains a bookstore, Grace Books International, where books and supplies may be purchased at a substantial discount. All required textbooks as well as a diverse selection of additional theological and practical volumes are available. Books not in stock may be ordered. Shepherds Conference Each spring Grace Community Church sponsors its annual Shepherds Conference. Regular classes for this week are dismissed so that students may be involved in workshops and in interaction with pastors and church leaders from all over the world. Students are required to attend at least as many conference hours as class hours they normally attend each week. A nominal fee is charged to each student for the conference. Missions Emphasis The atmosphere at The Masters Seminary is charged with enthusiasm and energy directed toward fulfillment of our Lords Great Commission. All courses, chapels, and discipleship labs are intended to enhance our worship and increase our effectiveness in obedience to this Commission. Exposure to missions opportunities is a regular emphasis in chapel programming. A significant aspect is the opportunity to interact with missionaries and mission agency representatives. Annual Social Activities Early in each fall semester seminary faculty and students with their spouses and children gather for an afternoon and evening of enjoyable food and fellowship. The event is designed to provide a special opportunity for all members of the seminary family to become better acquainted.
Each spring the Associated Student Body (ASB) sponsors a Seminary Banquet, providing students and their wives an opportunity for fellowship with each other. Before Christmas, a special chapel is held annually to commemorate the birth of our Savior. Following a time of Scripture reading and the singing of Christmas carols, the students together with their wives and children enjoy a time of fellowship and refreshments. Other social activities include occasional pizza lunches for students and faculty sponsored by the ASB.

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Dress Because the seminary is preparing men for professional occupations as ministers of the gospel, conformity to certain professional standards of dress and appearance is required. These standards are prescribed in order to strengthen the testimony of the seminary and to promote morale by emphasizing the importance and dignity of the ministry. Cleanliness and neatness in appearance are indispensable for effectiveness in Christian testimony and impact in lives. Specifically, during class and chapel hours students are required to wear dress shoes and socks (no tennis shoes), dress slacks (no jeans), dress shirts, and ties. Hair should be worn conservatively and neatly groomed.
Dress requirements for summer school, winterim, and finals week are more relaxed. Students are asked to wear slacks, dress shoes, and a collared shirt. Tennis shoes, blue jeans, and flip-flops are not appropriate attire.

Grievances Open communication between students, faculty, and administration is encouraged and solicited. Whenever a student has a concern or grievance he should first discuss it with the person directly involved. If no satisfactory resolution is reached he should then approach either the Vice President for Academic Administration or the Dean. If the concern is still unresolved a formal grievance procedure may be initiated. This procedure is outlined in the Faculty Handbook and copies of the procedure are available from the Administration office. Code of Conduct In view of the high calling of the ministry and the great responsibility of example which must be assumed by Christian leaders, and by those aspiring to such leadership, it is expected that students at The Masters Seminary will maintain the highest of standards in personal conduct and biblical conviction. The seminary does not presume to be a monitoring or censoring agency for all activities but does expect personal testimony and outward evidence of maturing Christian convictions, concern for the conscience of others, and a willingness to submit to the authority of mature Christian leaders. Accordingly, as examples of the numerous ways to enhance the testimony of the individual and of the institution, the seminary requires conformity to the following Code of Conduct:
Each student is expected to be faithful, committed, and involved in the ministry of a local church. The seminary standards for appearance and dress are to be fully respected. See the previous pages for seminary standards in these areas. Personal discipline in the discerning use of radio, television, and the printed page is expected. This includes total avoidance of pornographic programming, films, and literature.

Student Life

Students are required to abstain from such practices as gambling, the use of beverages for
intoxication, the misuse of prescription drugs, the use of illegal drugs, and tobacco.

Students must avoid all forms of dishonesty, including lying, plagiarism, cheating on exams or
assignments, failure to meet financial obligations, and negligence in the performance of educational, employment, or ministry responsibilities.

Family relationships and responsibilities are to be given a place of highest priority. Students are
required to maintain a biblical pattern in family relationships, and to abstain from unbiblical sexual activities or relationships.
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The Masters Seminary reserves the right to discipline or dismiss any student who does not conform to this code of conduct or any other of the seminarys principles, policies, or required procedures. By virtue of his enrollment, a student agrees to live within the framework of these standards and principles.

Plagiarism
In order to maintain the highest standards of academic integrity and personal ethics, The Masters Seminary has adopted the following policy regarding plagiarism. General Policy Plagiarism is defined as the act of taking and using the thoughts, writings, inventions, etc., of another person as your own. This definition requires what is called intent. The most serious forms of plagiarism will manifest some level of knowledge of the act and generally display an effort to conceal the plagiarism. This is not to say that the I didnt know defense is valid, since at this point in your academic career the assumption is that you do know. Even after graduation, the consequences of plagiarism do not simply evaporate. Should serious plagiarism be discovered in a thesis or dissertationeven years after graduationthe seminary may move to revoke the offenders degree. Common Types of Plagiarism Secondary Source PlagiarismPlagiarism often involves the problem of claiming the results of otherstaking a quotation from ones reading and placing it into your paper without using a cited in notation. When using a quotation in another work, you are under an ethical obligation to go to the original source, verify the citation and context, only then listing it in a footnote or bibliography. If unable to view the original source, a cited in reference must be used for this quotation. This ethical consideration may well save the student from the embarrassment of perpetuating a misquotation or taking a quotation out of context. Paraphrase PlagiarismSimply paraphrasing a quotation (without attribution) from a source is still plagiarism. This type of plagiarism is avoided by doing the hard work of taking research, distilling it, and then writing ones own thoughts, interpretations, and conclusions, giving attribution as often as necessary. Facts widely available in reference books, newspapers, magazines, etc., are common knowledge and need no citation.

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Penalties When an act of plagiarism is discovered or suspected (even after graduation), the matter will be reported to the Vice President for Academic Administration who will move to investigate the matter. Penalties for those found guilty of plagiarism can be as follows: 1. Reduced or failing grade 2. An official letter of reprimand 3. A defined period of probation, with or without the attachment of conditions 4. Withdrawal of seminary scholarship funding 5. A defined period of suspension, with or without the attachment of conditions 6. Expulsion from the seminary 7. Revocation of an awarded degree To avoid the temptation of the sin of plagiarism, allow for the proper amount of time to research and write your papers. Lack of time is the most common excuse for engaging in plagiarism.

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Course Descriptions
OVERVIEW
Course Identification System The alphabetical components of each course identification indicate the subject area as follows:
BI OT NT TH MI PM DM Bible Exposition (English texts) Old Testament Language and Literature New Testament Language and Literature Christian Theology World Missions and Evangelism Pastoral Ministries Doctor of Ministry

The Masters Seminary offers more than 200 courses in the following subjects:
Bible Exposition Old Testament Language and Literature New Testament Language and Literature Christian Theology World Missions and Evangelism Pastoral Ministries.

The first of the three numbers in each course identification indicates the curriculum year in which the course is normally scheduled. This is not necessarily an indication of content level. 4 5 6 7 8 9 Prerequisite or non-credit courses First year of seminary (Junior year) Second year (Middler year)

Course Descriptions

Third year (Senior year) Th.M. courses Doctoral courses

The third number indicates the semester in which the course is normally offered:

Odd numbers=Courses normally offered in the fall Even numbers=Courses normally offered in the spring
Class Schedules A schedule of courses offered for any given semester, including winterims and summers, is made available well in advance of each registration period. The seminary reserves the right, however, to cancel any course for which enrollment is insufficient to justify offering the course. Courses may also be canceled in cases of faculty illness or other unforeseen circumstances. When such cancellations would cause unusual hardship for students, the seminary may arrange or allow for alternative requirements or electives.

DIVISION OF BIBLE EXPOSITION


Bible Expostion courses include survey studies in both testaments, intensive studies of specific books, syntheses of biblical teaching relating to important themes, topics, and genres, and background studies relating to such issues as biblical cultures, geography, and chronology. These provide
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background materials which are essential for Old Testament and New Testament courses in exegesis as well as for theological studies. The meaning of Hebrew and Greek terms and grammatical constructions are discussed when they make special contributions to an understanding of the biblical text, but the courses listed under this heading, and designated by BI in the course identification, do not require prerequisite study or facility in the biblical languages unless otherwise noted.

Division of Bible ExpositionM.Div. The Division of Bible Exposition (M.Div.) is designed to equip students for a foundational comprehension and accurate explanation of Scripture, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a future biblical expositor, implement a literal grammatical-historical interpretive practice within a comprehensive understanding of the Bible. DLO 2: As a future biblical expositor, identify the background and context of each book of the Bible. DLO 3: As a future shepherd of the flock, model and teach a biblical pattern of prayer and family leadership

BI 501, 502 Old Testament Studies I and II Includes a survey of the entire Old Testament, with a focus on understanding the major contents of each book. Examines literary structure, historical backgrounds, geographical settings, and parallel passages to enhance comprehension and application to contemporary issues and concerns. The first semester covers Genesis through Esther. The second semester covers Job through Malachi. Prerequisite: 501.

Course Descriptions

Four hours each.

BI 504 Biblical Exposition of Prayer A study of Old and New Testament prayers and of the scriptural teaching regarding prayer. The course is designed to impact the personal prayer life of the students and also to equip them for the responsibility of leading a congregation of believers in its prayer worship and ministry. Issues relating to the tensions with regard to the sovereignty of God, the responsibility of humans to pray and respond, and the role of the Holy Spirit, are evaluated.
Two hours.

BI 505 Hermeneutics An introduction to the science and art of hermeneutics. Surveys the major interpretive approaches to the Bible, both historical and contemporary. Attempts to establish both general and special principles of interpretation by examining parables, types, prophecies, poetry, and a great variety of figurative constructs. Elucidates the principles of normal, cultural, and historical interpretation.
Two hours.

BI 506 The Pastors Home After introducing the biblical blueprint for a model home, the class proceeds from the drawing board to actual construction. Each couple develops a personalized plan to build the home of Gods design. Marriage, parenting, pasturing, and contemporary challenges are considered, using Gods
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Word as the primary textbook and the pastors home as the construction site. For married students the course involves current on the job training and for singles it is preparatory. Two hours.

BI 601 New Testament Studies A survey of the entire New Testament, devoting special attention to the major lessons of each book. Also examines the historical, cultural, and geographical setting for the New Testament and for each book. Emphasizes both the understanding of the text and the applications to Christian living, and evaluates the major problems associated with each book. Prerequisite: B1502.
Four hours.

BI 651 Old Testament Backgrounds An orientation to the world of the Old Testament in which the cultural and political history of the ancient Near East is surveyed from the perspective of its contributions to understanding the Old Testament. Includes a survey of important geographical and archaeological considerations.
Two hours.

BI 652, 653 Historical Geography of Israel A careful study of the geographical layout of ancient Israel with a view to understanding the changes that occurred throughout Israels history. The topographical and geological features of Israel will also receive treatment.
Two hours each.

BI 655 Genesis An expositional treatment of this foundational book of biblical revelation. The key events that shaped the remainder of history, such as creation, the fall, the flood, and the Abrahamic covenant, are given special attention.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

BI 656 Exodus and Leviticus An analytical exposition of these two key Old Testament books, with special consideration of historical background, theme, interpretational difficulties, and the redemptive plan of God as evidenced and illustrated in the various aspects of the law, the priesthood, and the tabernacle. The theological dimensions of the books will be evaluated in the light of textual, historical, archaeological, and cultural perspectives.
Two hours.

BI 657 Numbers and Deuteronomy An expositional study of the books relating to Gods preparation of Israel for entrance into the land of Canaan. Major interpretive issues will be considered, along with personal and homiletical applications.
Two hours.

BI 658 Ezekiel A study of the life and times of Ezekiel, together with an exposition of the book. Solutions to key interpretive problems are evaluated, with applications to believers today highlighted.
Two hours.
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BI 659 The Minor Prophets A study of the role and significance of the prophets in Israels history, a survey of each book, including its political, social, and religious milieu, and an exposition of the message of each prophet.
Two hours.

BI 662 Ezra and Nehemiah An expository study of the post-exilic experience of Israel as described by Ezra and Nehemiah. The major interpretive and applicational issues of these books will receive special attention.
Two hours.

BI 665 Proverbs An expositional study of the Book of Proverbs, with attention to the nature of Hebrew wisdom literature, the genre of proverbs, and the various hermeneutical approaches to this literature. Also emphasizes personal and homiletical applications to contemporary issues and relationships.
Two hours.

BI 668 Ecclesiastes A verse by verse exposition of the book of Ecclesiastes, with a view to understanding its basic meaning and theological significance. The course gives attention to authorship, the nature of wisdom literature, and the different schools of thought regarding its interpretation. Personal and homiletical applications are also emphasized.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

BI 672 New Testament History A study of the historical backgrounds for understanding the New Testament, including an introduction to the literature, culture, and history of New Testament times. Special attention is given to understanding the political and social milieu of the Hellenistic period. Requires reading in both primary and secondary sources.
Two hours.

BI 675 Life of Christ Examines the earthly life of our Lord, using a harmony of the Gospels as a basis for study. Evaluates historical, chronological, political, and geographic factors, but devotes primary attention to the theological issues relating to each event and discourse in the Gospels (see NT 675).
Two hours.

BI 677 Gospel of Mark A study of the second Gospel with special emphasis on Marks portrayal of Jesus as the Christ, the Son of God and the Suffering Servant. The concept of discipleship seen in this gospel will also receive detailed consideration.
Two hours.

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BI 678 Gospel of Luke A study of the third Gospel with special attention devoted to the infancy narratives, the kingdom of God as in the parables, the journey of Jesus to Jerusalem, and the events leading to Christs crucifixion and resurrection.
Two hours.

BI 679 Gospel of John A study of the fourth Gospel in the light of the authors stated purpose (20:31), with emphasis on the self-revelation of Christ with regard to His own person and His saving and sanctifying ministries.
Two hours.

BI 681 Parables Surveys the use of parables in Scripture with primary attention to the parables of Jesus. Examines dispensational and alternative interpretations of the parables and evaluates proposed hermeneutical principles for understanding their meanings and applications.
Two hours.

BI 701 Ordination Preparation Beginning with the biblical basis for ordination, the practical process for ordination is outlined. A thorough review is conducted of the students biblical knowledge, including code outlining, code themes, key chapters, key verses, and important people. It is designed to functionally prepare the TMS senior to enter ministry after graduation at the highest level of excellence. This class, without exception, is limited to those who will graduate the following May. Prerequisites: BI 501, 502; 601 (See PM 701).
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

BI 738 M.Div. Thesis in Bible Exposition Students who have completed 60 hours of seminary studies with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher may write a thesis dealing with a propaedeutic issue such as central themes, historical or chronological studies, or geographical, cultural, and archaeological contributions to biblical studies. This may not be a general commentary on a Bible book or passage. All seminary policies and deadlines for the thesis project must be strictly observed.
Four hours.

BI 745 Biblical Manners and Customs A close look at manners and customs in the biblical setting and their contribution toward interpreting and understanding specific passages. The focus is directed toward aspects of culture in the habits of the people, not aspects of physical geography such as topography, climate, and rivers.
Two hours.

BI 750 Epistle of James: Call to Wholistic Worship Course centers on an in-depth study of the background, text, and implications of this practical NT epistle. Students can expect to advance in their exegetical and expositional skills and be challenged afresh to live the whole Christian life.
Two hours.

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BI 751 Acts A course designed to acquaint the student with the genesis and progression of early Christianity. Devotes special attention to evangelistic methodologies and to the tensions and confusions with regard to that which is normative or commanded versus that which is transitional or occasional. Also includes a study of the chronology of key events in the life of the Apostle Paul.
Two hours.

BI 754 1 Corinthians An expository examination of this key epistle in the light of the social and moral issues of its time. Special focus is directed on the theological, ethical, and practical issues addressed in the book, such as those which involve the roles of men and women. Application to contemporary ecclesiastical and social issues is also evaluated.
Two hours.

BI 755 1 and 2 Thessalonians An expositional approach to these early epistles with careful attention to their context in culture and history. Special emphases focus on the personal, pastoral, and prophetic elements that combine for a unique study. Appropriate applications for the contemporary church will be drawn.
Two hours.

BI 756 Selected General Epistles A study of James, 1 Peter, and Jude, with special attention given to the occasion, purpose, structure, contents, and message of each epistle.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

BI 757 Galatians An exposition of the book, including the date, historical situation, and purpose. Special emphasis is given to the development of the argument and its relationship to the book of Romans.
Two hours.

BI 758 Johannine Epistles An in depth study of these three epistles with special attention to Johns tests of life for identifying and evaluating true fellowship and false pretense or personal deception. A treatment of the authorship of Johns Gospel and his Epistles is included.
Two hours.

BI 762 Daniel An expository study, including an examination of the historical background, literary structure, prominent system of interpretation, and thematic development. Emphasis is placed on the prophetic chronology presented, and on the relationship with other prophetical portions of Scripturein particular with the Olivet Discourse of our Lord.
Two hours.

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BI 765 Biblical Archaeology An introduction to the history, methodology and apologetic value of biblical archaeology, including a survey of the most significant finds in the last century. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of the archaeological data and its proper role in the exegetical process.
Two hours.

BI 766 Jerusalem Studies Seminar (IBEX) A seminar covering historical, archaeological, and cultural aspects of the city of Jerusalem, both ancient and modern. Readings and primary sources related to the city sites, visits, classroom lectures and student participation are required.
Two hours.

BI 777 Pastoral Epistles An expositional analysis of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, with emphasis on the practical application of the instruction of these epistles for contemporary Christian living and pastoral responsibilities.
Two hours.

BI 778 James and Jude A study of these general epistles. Special attention is given to the occasion, purpose, structure, content, and message of the interpretive and theological issues.
Two hours.

BI 779 History of Israel An examination of the history of Gods chosen nation, Old Testament chronology, international relations, great national leaders, and the place of the prophets, beginning with the call of Abraham and ending with the Persian period (see OT 779).
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

BI 780 Biblical Ethics This course treats both the theory and the practice of ethical and moral decision-making. An examination is also made of the key ethical passages in the Scriptures with special application to the issues raised in modern life.
Two hours.

BI 784 History of the English Bible The English Bible, both in scope and volume, has been the most significant translation of the Bible in the history of the Church. With new versions of the Bible in English appearing almost annually, this course is designed to study the history of the Bible in English, examining genuine copies of the eight significant English Bibles. Additionally, the theological and practical issues related to Bible translation, evaluation of Bibles, and the Bible in worship will be engaged.
Two hours.

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BI 788 Analysis of Significant New Testament Churches Twelve churches receive detailed attention to determine what Christ commends and condemns in first century churches which all started with a right ecclesiology. Areas to avoid and areas to emphasize are incorporated into a twentieth century ecclesiology (see PM 788).
Two hours.

BI 799 Research in Bible Exposition A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary course work, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office. Prerequisite: two years of seminary study (60 hours) with at least one year at The Masters Seminary (30 hours). Number of hours (not to exceed four) to be determined, prior to registration, by the faculty member involved.
On demand, one to four hours.

Course Descriptions

Division of Bible ExpositionTh.M The Division of Bible Exposition(Th.M.) is designed to offer students advanced specialized training leading to a greater comprehension and more accurate explanation of Scripture and expertise in a specific area of Bible exposition through the writing of a thesis, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a Christian exegete, articulate the purpose(s), structure, and interpretation of selected biblical books. DLO 2: As a Christian expositor, explain the meaning and significance of selected biblical books. DLO 3: As a Christian scholar, write master-level research papers on selected biblical passages culminating in the writing of a thesis.

BI 821 Evaluation/Utilization of Research Tools (seminar) The student is led to assess the usefulness of tools for biblical study by inquiring into the kinds of information they provide, the reliability in the languages, use of interpretive principles, acquaintance with recent studies, and other considerations.
Two hours.

BI 822 Hermeneutics in Contemporary Issues Based on BI 505 (Hermeneutics), this course develops and hones the students skill in using principles of interpretation. Principles are applied to contemporary issues such as the Health and Wealth Gospel, Signs and Wonders, Spiritual Warfare, the New Age Movement, Womens Lib Movement and other relevant issues. Prerequisite: BI 505
Two hours.
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BI 829 New Testament Use of the Old Testament An examination of how the New Testament writers quote and apply the Old Testament. This course looks at the ramifications of New Testament uses of the Old Testament for both hermeneutics and theology (see TH 829). Prerequisites: BI 505, OT 504 and NT 603.
Two hours.

BI 834 The Pastoral Epistles (seminar) A penetrating investigation of passages in the Pastoral Epistles pertaining to church matters, e.g., eldership, womens role in Christian service, discipline, marriage and divorce among leaders, principles of godliness and leadership, and other crucial areas.
Two hours.

BI 838 Th.M. Thesis Four hours. BI 842 Resolving Problem Passages Views and solutions on selected key passages in both testaments in a variety of problems are dealt with. Examples include alleged contradictions, passages that have been interpreted various ways, matters of history, chronology, grammar and science.
Two hours.

BI 847 Pentateuch Study of the major biblical and historical development of the first five books of the Old Testament.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

BI 849 Samuel, Kings & Chronicles An expositional study of the prophetic record and evaluation of the rise and decline of the monarchy of Israel. Particular emphasis will be given to the Davidic Covenant as it is revealed, and lessons to benefit a life of godliness.
Two hours.

BI 851 Gospel of Matthew An analysis of the first Gospel with special attention devoted to the kingdom concept, the person of Christ, the Sermon on the Mount, the parables of the kingdom, and the Olivet Discourse.
Two hours.

BI 853 Hebrews An analysis and exposition of the text, with attention given to authorship, date, theme, and interpretive difficulties. Special emphasis is also given to Christs fulfillment of the types and shadows of the Old Testament sacrificial system. BI 862 Isaiah An analytical study of the words of this great prophet. Examines his life and character, as well as the historical background of his message, with special emphasis on messianic predictions.
Two hours.
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BI 864 Romans An exposition of the book, with careful attention given to background, theme, and doctrinal issues and solutions. Relevant practical applications are also presented.
Two hours.

BI 872 Old Testament Keys to Godliness An integration of the vital concepts and an exposition of key passages in the Old Testament which indicate how God desires the believer to live in the various aspects of his relationships with God, himself, other believers, the unsaved, family members, employers, employees, leaders, and others.
Two hours.

BI 873 New Testament Keys to Godliness An integration of the vital concepts and an exposition of key passages in the New Testament relating to the spiritual lifestyle, featuring a study of such subjects as sanctification, confession, forgiveness, perfection, Christian liberty, interpersonal relationships, and the relationship between law and grace.
Two hours.

BI 874 Revelation An expository study of this book, including an examination of the historical backgrounds, literary structures, prominent systems of interpretation, and thematic development. Emphasis is placed on the prophetic chronology presented by the book, and on the relationships with other prophetical portions of Scripturein particular with the Olivet Discourse of our Lord. Two hours.

Course Descriptions

BI 886 Concept of the Overcomer The Johannine passages referring to overcomers and overcoming are studied with a view to comprehending the significance of this important biblical concept and integrating the conclusions with the biblical teaching regarding Christian living, security, duties, and future rewards. Two hours. BI 887 Biblical Exposition of Reward An exposition of the salient passages in both testaments which deal with the believers future reward. Includes a comparison with the concepts of reward found in the Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, Dead Sea Scrolls, and Rabbinic Judaism. The issue of conditionality receives primary consideration. Two hours. BI 899 Research in Bible Exposition A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary coursework, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty
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member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office. On demand, one to four hours.

BI 901 Th.D. Qualifying Exam I Following acceptance into the Doctor of Theology degree program, a student must register for this course during any semester he intends to write one or more qualifying exams.

DIVISION OF OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES


Because the Old Testament contains the foundational revelation of God to man in written form and since these thirty-nine books, in our present divisions and numbering, constituted the Bible of our Lord, His apostles, and the early church, a basic understanding of these books is indispensable for any thoroughly equipped minister of the gospel. Accordingly, all candidates for graduation are required to acquire a broad familiarity with the contents of the Old Testament as seen against its historical and cultural backgrounds, an ability to translate biblical Hebrew with the use of appropriate language tools, and some practical skills in exegetical and expositional methodologies. All of the courses listed under this heading, and designated by OT in the course identification, require extensive use of the Hebrew language.

Division of Old Testament StudiesM.Div. The Division of Old Testament Studies(M.Div.) is designed to advance critical thinking skills in linguistic, exegetical, and apologetical aspects of Old Testament study and to promote growth in disciplined habits for ongoing independent study of the Old Testament, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a translator, demonstrate competency with vocabulary, basic grammar, and standard tools to translate simple biblical Hebrew texts. DLO 2: As a scholar, implement a sound research methodology to interpret the Hebrew Bible. DLO 3: As an exegete, produce an exegetical project reflecting accuracy in critical thinking and writing. DLO 4: As an expositor, write a sermon combining accurate translation and exegesis of the Hebrew text with reliable practical and theological implications.

Course Descriptions

OT 503 Hebrew Grammar I An introduction to biblical Hebrew designed to equip the student with a basic vocabulary and an understanding of the essential principles of phonology, morphology, and syntax.
Four hours.

OT 504 Hebrew Grammar II A continuation of the grammatical studies begun in OT 503 with emphasis on reading selected portions of the Hebrew Old Testament (with a view towards greater dexterity in handling the Hebrew text), increasing vocabulary, learning the basic use of language tools, and providing exposure to the major genres of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT 503.
Four hours.

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OT 505 Modern Hebrew (IBEX) An introduction to modern Hebrew with attention given to reading and conversation skills.
Two hours.

OT 603, 604 Hebrew Exegesis I & II Designed to prepare the student for independent exegesis of the Hebrew text. Emphasizes principles of translation, syntactical analysis, and procedures in lexical word studies. Includes introduction to textual criticism, literary analysis, and relationship of ancient near eastern backgrounds to exegesis. Focuses on exegetical methodology with exposition as the goal. Prerequisite: OT 504.
Two hours each.

OT 650 Worship in the Old Testament An examination of worship in the Bible, both Old and New Testaments, with a view to develop a theology of worship that is consistent with the teachings of Scripture and applicable for the church in our own time.
Two hours.

OT 686 Hebrew Readings Geared for students having completed first year of Hebrew, this course emphasizes reading, translation and parsing, with attention given to exegetical observations. Prerequisite: OT 504.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

OT 738 M.Div. Thesis in Old Testament Exegesis Students who have completed 60 hours of seminary studies with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher may write a thesis dealing with the exegesis of some brief portion of the Old Testament or with some technical topic of significance to Old Testament studies. A general commentary on an Old Testament book or passage is not permitted. All seminary policies and deadlines for the entire thesis project must be strictly observed. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Four hours.

OT 741 Old Testament Theology A systematic study of the revelation of God through the religion, life, and history of Israel as contained in the Old Testament. Special attention is given to the development of Old Testament theology, revelation, inspiration, sin, redemption, and eschatology.
Two hours.

OT 752 Exegesis of Amos An exegetical study of this significant book dealing primarily with social injustice in the time of Amos. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

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OT 753 Exegesis of Zechariah Careful exegetical and theological procedures are employed in examining the text of this important prophetic book for the purpose of exposing its meaning and significance for Zechariahs day, for the present, and for the future. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 754 Exegesis of Great Texts A study designed to introduce and illustrate intensive exegetical study of the Hebrew texts of selected key passages in the Old Testament. Combines insight from lexical studies, syntactic phenomena, and systematic theology. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 755 Exegesis in Isaiah Exegesis of selected portions of this book, one of the major literary and prophetic works of the Old Testament. The issues concerning historical background, authorship, and style are evaluated, but primary attention is focused on the key Messianic sections of the book. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 756 Exegesis in Habakkuk and Selected Readings An exegetical and theological study of Habakkuk and other Old Testament texts dealing with sovereign providence. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 757 Exegesis of Deuteronomy Exegesis of selected portions, with special emphasis upon Gods covenantal dealings with Israel. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

OT 758 Exegesis of Kings Exegesis of selected portions of 1 and 2 Kings with an emphasis on clues for interpreting narrative/historical literature. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 760 Exegesis of Jonah and Obadiah An exegesis of these books with careful attention to historical and theological issues. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 761 Exegesis of Genesis 111 An exegetical analysis of the first eleven chapters of Genesis with emphasis on problems having interpretive and theological significance. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

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OT 765, 766, 767, 768 Exegesis of Selected Psalms IIV An examination of the structure of the Psalter, the nature and forms of Hebrew poetry, and an exegesis of a number of consecutive psalms. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 769 Exegesis of Haggai and Malachi An exegetical examination of these post-exilic books. Careful attention is given to introductory, exegetical, and theological issues. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 774 Exegesis of Selected Proverbs Selected Proverbs are examined in relation to biblical wisdom and law. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 775 Exegesis of Ecclesiastes An exegetical examination of the text, with comparisons to other wisdom literature, especially to Job. Special attention is given to the numerous textual allusions to Genesis 3, as well as the introductory matters of authorship and historical milieu. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 776 Exegesis of Ruth and Judges An exegetical study of the Book of Ruth and Judges chapters 12, 17, 18 and 19. Attention is given to their common historical and geographical setting. Other studies include the elements of the Hebrew short story and the concepts of levirate marriage and kinsman-redeemer. Prerequisite: OT 603.

Course Descriptions

Two hours.

OT 779 History of Israel An examination of the history of Gods chosen nation, Old Testament chronology, international relations, great national leaders, and the place of the prophets, beginning with the call of Abraham and ending with the Persian period (see BI 779).
Two hours.

OT 796 Old Testament Introduction The course addresses the historical and cultural environment of the OT (Hebrew Bible), the composition of the OT and its literary genres, and the canonical development of the OT. Major contemporary interpretive and theological issues are discussed, including an examination and evaluation of the contribution of the modern critical approaches. Prerequisite: OT 503.
Three hours.

OT 799 Old Testament Exegetical Research A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are
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significant elements of seminary course work, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office. Prerequisite: OT 603, one OT exegesis course, and two years of seminary study (60 hours) with at least one year at The Masters Seminary (30 hours). Number of hours (not to exceed four) to be determined, prior to registration, by the faculty member involved. On demand, one to four hours.

Division of Old Testament StudiesTh.M. The Division of Old Testament (Th.M.) advances specialized academic opportunities to develop maturity in critical thinking skills related to exegetical and apologetical aspects of Old Testament studies, refinement of disciplined habits for ongoing independent study of the Hebrew Bible, and writing a thesis, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a scholar, articulate a broad familiarity and understanding with the contents of the OT as seen against its historical and cultural backgrounds. DLO 2: As a translator, demonstrate an advanced ability in translating the Hebrew Bible in all its major literary styles. DLO 3: As an exegete, make a contribution to an area of OT studies by writing a thesis demonstrating competence in researching primary sources and dexterity in the use of sound exegetical methodologies.

OT 825 Ancient Near Eastern History A summary of the historical, cultural, and geographical context of ancient Israel.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

OT 832, 834 Old Testament Research Seminars I & II A specific topic of contemporary significance in the area of Old Testament studies will be selected by the Old Testament faculty for each seminar. Students will present assigned papers with responses by fellow students and faculty. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 838 Th.M. Thesis Four hours. OT 840 Old Testament Textual Criticism A study of the history of the Old Testament text in the Hebrew manuscripts and in the ancient translations. Various theories of textual criticism will be evaluated and a viable methodology developed. Application will be made to a variety of Old Testament textual problems. Prerequisite: OT 603 and one OT exegesis course.
Two hours.

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OT 842 Septuagint Introduction to the Greek grammar of the Septuagint and selected readings in the text of the Septuagint. The contribution of the Septuagint to both Old and New Testament studies is presented. Prerequisites: NT 853, NT 854, OT 603 and one exegesis course in both NT and OT. (See NT 842.)
Two hours.

OT 843 Old Testament Theological Research Methods An introduction to accessing primary and secondary source materials essential to Old Testament research. The course is designed to initiate the Th.M research. Prerequisite: OT 603 and one OT exegesis course.
Two hours.

OT 853 Advanced Hebrew Grammar Advanced studies in exegetically significant elements of Hebrew grammar and syntax. Readings in major Hebrew grammatical materials including periodical literature. Illustrated by selected readings in the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: OT 603 and one OT exegesis course.
Two hours.

OT 868 Studies in Qumran Literature A survey of the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the origin of the Qumran community, and its beliefs and practices. Readings in selected Qumran texts. Special attention is given to the literature found at Qumran and its relationship to Old and New Testament studies. Prerequisite: OT 603, OT 686, and one OT exegesis course.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

OT 871 Advanced Hebrew Readings Translation of various passages in the Old Testament selected from various genres including narrative, prophetic, poetic, and apocalyptic. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 872 Biblical Aramaic An introduction to the grammar of biblical Aramaic. Includes translation of the Aramaic portions of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT 603.
Two hours.

OT 873 Akkadian I Introduction to Akkadian cuneiform signs and grammar. Contributions of Akkadian studies to the interpretation of the Old Testament are presented and evaluated. Prerequisite: OT 853.
Two hours.

OT 874 Akkadian II Reading in selected Akkadian texts and additional studies in signs and grammar. Prerequisite: OT 873.
Two hours.

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OT 875 Ugaritic Introduction to Ugaritic grammar and reading in selected texts. Contributions of Ugaritic studies to the interpretation of the Old Testament are presented and evaluated. Prerequisite: OT 853.
Two hours.

OT 878 Advanced Old Testament Introduction Seminar An in-depth examination of the critical problems of the canon and text of the Old Testament, along with a consideration of the composition, authorship, date and design of each book. Prerequisite: OT 796.
Two hours.

OT 888 Contemporary Old Testament Theology An examination of the basis, task, and method of Old Testament theology as conceived by certain influential contemporary Old Testament theologians along with a survey of the contributions of these individuals to the understanding of the theological content of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT 796.
Two hours.

OT 899 Old Testament Exegetical Research A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary course work, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office.
On demand, one to four hours.

Course Descriptions

Division of Old Testament StudiesTh.D. The purpose of the Old Testament major in the Doctor of Theology program is to produce the next generation of OT scholars and expositors who will advance OT studies and maintain the biblical integrity and vitality of the discipline. Graduates with an OT major must produce a significant dissertation and become stewards of the discipline, entrusted with preserving and developing scholarly literature as well as communicating Hebrew Bible knowledge in the classroom, from the pulpit, and in publishing, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a specialist, demonstrate a deep, active knowledge of a specialized area of OT study. DLO 2: As a scholar, make a significant contribution to the literature of that specialty by means of a dissertation reflecting honed skills in research, critical thinking, translation, exegesis, and writing. DLO 3: As a steward, construct and implement learning experiences in the classroom and/or the pulpit to propagate the knowledge of the Hebrew Bible and to prepare future stewards of the discipline.
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OT 902 Th.D. Qualifying Exam II Following acceptance into the Doctor of Theology degree program, a student must register for this course during any semester he intends to write one or more qualifying exams. OT 941 Doctoral Dissertation Prospectus This course is designed to launch the students doctoral residency. Under the advisers supervision, the student is expected to refine the dissertation topic, establish its need, defend its choice, and outline the procedure for its undertaking. Preparation of an extensive bibliography is also one of the course requirements.
Four hours.

OT 942, 943, 944, 945, 946 Dissertation Research IV Once the Dissertation Prospectus Course has been completed, the student is expected to register for this course for each subsequent semester of residency during which the dissertation is being researched and written.
Four hours each.

OT 947 Doctoral Dissertation

DIVISION OF NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES


Because the New Testament is the culmination of divine revelation in written form, and therefore the major source of Christian truth, it is important for students to invest intensive study in comprehending and applying its vital contents. For this reason a significant part of the seminary curriculum focuses on a study of the Greek language in which the New Testament was written. Grammatical and syntactical studies are emphasized with the goal of equipping students for lifelong effectiveness in the study and exposition of this essential part of Gods revelation to man. As a part of the orientation program beginning each semester, a Greek Proficiency Exam is given to all entering students who have taken Greek at the undergraduate level. Students have one opportunity to pass the Greek proficiency exam, that is the time when they first enter the seminary. Anyone not passing the proficiency exam at their first sitting or anyone not taking the exam when offered at the start of their first semester on campus will be required to enroll in and pass NT 401/402, or NT 403 as part of his seminary curriculum before enrolling in NT 603. Grades earned will be factored into the students grade point average. Those who pass the exam are expected to enroll in Greek Exegesis I and II for the first year and in Hebrew Grammar I and II for the second year. Those entering seminary without having taken Greek, as well as those who do not pass the exam, are expected to enroll in Hebrew Grammar I and II for the first year, in Beginning Greek during the summer between the first and second year, and in Greek Exegesis I and II during the second year. All of the courses listed under this heading, and designated by NT in the course identification, require extensive use of the Greek language.

Course Descriptions

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Division of New Testament StudiesM.Div. The Division of New Testament Studies (M.Div.) is designed to advance critical thinking skills in linguistic, exegetical, and apologetical aspects of New Testament study and to promote growth in disciplined habits for ongoing independent study of the New Testament, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a translator, demonstrate competency with vocabulary, basic grammar, and standard tools to translate simple biblical Greek texts. DLO 2: As a scholar, implement a sound research methodology to interpret the Greek New Testament. DLO 3: As an exegete, produce an exegetical project reflecting accuracy in critical thinking and writing.

NT 400 Beginning Greek I and II (Summer only) An introductory study of the basic elements of New Testament Greek designed for those who have not had Greek and for those who have had some exposure to Greek but are unable to pass the proficiency examination. Emphasizes vocabulary, grammar, the basic principles of Greek syntax, and the effective use of lexical, grammatical, and syntactical tools. Includes translation of portions of the Greek New Testament. Permission to enter NT 603 is granted only when a minimum grade of C is achieved for both the final exam and the course. Credits are viewed as prerequisite and are not applicable toward degree requirements.
Four hours.

NT 401/402 Beginning Greek I and II (Fall and Spring only) An introductory study of the basic elements of New Testament Greek designed for those who have not had Greek and for those who have had some exposure to Greek but are unable to pass the proficiency examination. Emphasizes vocabulary, grammar, the basic principles of Greek syntax, and the effective use of lexical, grammatical, and syntactical tools. Includes translation of portions of the Greek New Testament. Permission to enter NT 603 is granted only when a minimum grade of C is achieved for both the final exam and the course. Credits are viewed as prerequisite and are not applicable toward degree requirements.
Two hours each.

Course Descriptions

NT 603, 604 Greek Exegesis I and II These courses are designed to make Greek a useful tool for interpreting the New Testament. The first semester builds Greek vocabulary, increases confidence in translation, highlights the significance of important grammatical features and syntactical structures, and introduces the practice of exegetical procedures. The exegetical method employed is both synthetic and analytical, with primary applicability to the didactic and epistolary literature of the New Testament. The second semester provides extensive opportunity for the application of exegetical methodologies in careful study of several epistles from the following list: 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, James, and 1 Peter. Prerequisite: passing the Greek Proficiency Exam, or NT 401, 402.
Four hours each.

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NT 655 New Testament Translations An examination of various important New Testament translations, with particular emphasis on their textual bases and method of translation, to determine advantages and disadvantages of each. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 656 Selected Greek Readings Various passages from the Greek New Testament are selected for translation. The passages selected are chosen on the basis of their contribution to Greek vocabulary, exposure to various syntactical features, or theological and devotional significance. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 675 Life of Christ Examines the earthly life of our Lord, using a harmony of the Gospels as a basis for study. Evaluates historical, chronological, political, and geographic factors, but devotes primary attention to the theological issues relating to each event and discourse in the Gospels (see BI 675).
Two hours.

NT 738 M.Div. Thesis in New Testament Exegesis Students who have completed 60 hours of seminary studies with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher may write a thesis dealing with the exegesis of some brief portion of the New Testament or with some technical topic of significance for New Testament studies. A general commentary on a New Testament book or passage is not permitted. All seminary policies and deadlines for thesis projects must be strictly observed. Prerequisite: NT 604.
Four hours.

Course Descriptions

NT 741 Exegesis of Mark This course involves a detailed study of the Greek text of Mark with an examination of important introductory matters as well as major interpretive, grammatical and theological issues. Prerequisite: NT 603
Two hours.

NT 745 Exegesis of John 112 A detailed study of the Greek text of the first twelve chapters of Johns gospel with an examination of important introductory matters as well as major interpretive and theological issues. Special emphasis will be given to the distinctive contribution of the gospel to the theology of the NT. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 746 Exegesis of John 1321 A detailed study of the Greek text of the last nine chapters of Johns gospel that deal with the Upper Room Discourse and the last days of Jesus on earth. A discussion of interpretive and theological issues and their distinctive contribution to the theology of the NT. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

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NT 747 Exegesis of Luke 112 This course involves a detailed study of the Greek text of Luke with an examination of important introductory matters as well as major interpretive, grammatical, and theological issues. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 748 Exegesis of Luke 1324 This course involves a continuation of a detailed study of the Greek text of Luke (see Luke 112 NT 747) with an examination of important interpretive, grammatical and theological issues. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 749 Exegesis of Acts 112 This course involves a detailed study of the Greek text of Acts with an examination of important introductory matters as well as major interpretive, grammatical, and theological issues. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 750 Exegesis of Acts 1328 This course involves a continuation of a detailed study of the Greek text of Acts (see Acts 112 NT 749) with an examination of important interpretive, grammatical and theological issues. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 754 Exegesis of Matthew 14, 812, 1423, 2628 An examination of the Greek text in portions of Matthew not covered by NT 755. A detailed study of the Gospel of Matthew with particular attention given to introductory matters, discourses, and narrative portions. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

NT 755 Exegesis of Synoptic Discourses A study of the major discourses of Christ in the Synoptic Gospels. Principal attention is devoted to the Sermon on the Mount, the parables of the mysteries of the kingdom, and the Olivet Discourse. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 756 Exegesis of Romans 18 A detailed analysis of the Greek text of Romans 18, noting the structure and theological orientation of the chapters, and with special emphasis on the important teaching of the chapters with regard to man, sin, and salvation. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 757 Exegesis of Romans 916 A detailed analysis of the Greek text of Romans 916, noting the structure and theological orientation of the chapters, and with special emphasis on the important teaching of the chapters with
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regard to the role of Israel in Gods plan and with regard to Christian deportment. Prerequisite: NT 603. Two hours.

NT 759 Exegesis of 1 Corinthians 16 A detailed study of the Greek text of 1 Corinthians 16. Attention is focused upon the meaning and significance of important foundational truths necessary for effective ministry and leadership in the church. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 761 Exegesis of 1 Corinthians 711 An exegetical analysis of 1 Corinthians 711. The course is designed to take an in-depth look at Pauls response to extremely relevant questions concerning marriage, Christian liberty, and proper roles and responses in worship. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 762 Exegesis of 1 Corinthians 1214 A careful study of 1 Corinthians 1214, particularly the controversial passages, and suggestions regarding practical implementation of the lessons on spiritual gifts that are indicated therein. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

NT 763 Exegesis of Galatians A careful consideration of the text of Galatians in the original language with special attention to the problems being addressed in the historical situation. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 764 Exegesis of Ephesians A critical and exegetical study of the Epistle to the Ephesians, designed to emphasize theological, expository, and practical values. Special attention is given to the major exegetical and theological problems. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 766 Exegesis of Philippians A careful analysis of the Greek text of the epistle, including an examination of each alternative solution in passages where interpretations differ. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 768 Exegesis of Colossians A detailed exegesis of the Greek text, with special attention to the nature of the error to which the Colossian church was exposed. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

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NT 771, 772 Exegesis of 2 Corinthians A critical and exegetical study, with special attention given to the theological, expository and practical values. Careful consideration is also given to the major exegetical and theological problems. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours each.

NT 777 Exegesis of the Pastoral Epistles An exegetical analysis of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, with emphasis on the practical application of the instruction of these epistles for contemporary Christian living and pastoral responsibilities. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 782 Exegesis of NT Gender Passages An exegetical study of NT gender passages with special attention given to the significance of the role of women in the church. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 784 Exegesis of Hebrews An examination of the Greek text with a view toward definitive interpretation. Special attention is given to linguistic style and to the interpretation of the important warning passages. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 785 Exegesis of James A critical and exegetical study of the epistle, designed to emphasize theological, expository, and practical aspects. Special attention is given to the major interpretive issues. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

NT 786 Exegesis of 1 Peter A detailed exegetical study of 1 Peter. Special attention is given to the examination of major syntactical and lexical problems as well as to the structure, argument and overall message of the book. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 787 2 Peter and Jude An exegetical analysis of 2 Peter and Jude. Special emphasis is given to the structure, argument and message of 2 Peter with an additional focus on the uniqueness and similarities of Jude. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 790 Theology of Peter A detailed study of theological truths taught in 1 & 2 Peter. The course will be based on exegetical digests of these two epistles. It will include a study of Peters sermons in Acts and related doctrinal truths found in the epistles of James and Jude. Prerequisite: NT 604.
Two hours.
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NT 791 Theology of Paul This course involves a first-hand study of the New Testament letters of the Apostle Paul as well as a critical reading of recent scholarly literature on these writings with a view to discovering the background, nature and distinctive of Pauls theology. Prerequisite: NT 604.
Two hours.

NT 792 Theology of John A firsthand study of the New Testament literature of the Apostle John as well as a critical reading of recent scholarly literature on these writings with a view to discovering the background, nature, and distinctives of Johns theology. Prerequisite: NT 604 and one NT exegesis elective.
Two hours.

NT 793 Exegesis of the Johannine Epistles A detailed analysis of the Greek text of Johns epistles, noting important introductory matters as well as major interpretive and theological issues in the epistles. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

NT 795 Exegesis of the Apocalypse A study based on the original text and emphasizing the literary structure, prominent systems of interpretation, exegetical problems, and theological values of this major apocalyptic book of the New Testament. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

NT 796 New Testament Introduction A study of General Introduction and Special Introduction to the New Testament, including the fields of canonicity, textual criticism, criticism of the Synoptic Gospels, and special introductory matters pertaining to the books of the New Testament. Prerequisite: NT 603.
Three hours.

NT 799 New Testament Exegetical Research A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary coursework, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office. Prerequisite: NT 603 and two years of seminary study (60 hours) with at least one year at The Masters Seminary (30 hours). Number of hours (not to exceed four) to be determined, prior to registration, by the faculty member involved.
On demand, one to four hours.

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Division of New Testament StudiesTh.M. The purpose of the Master of Theology Program in the Division of New Testament Studies is to provide advanced mastery in the skills and research of New Testament language as well as the grammaticohistorical interpretation and exegesis of its literature, culminating in the writing of a thesis. The Master of Theology Program provides the foundation as well as preparation for the Doctor of Theology program. Specific Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs) are as follows:
DLO 1: As a scholar, articulate a broad familiarity and understanding with the contents of the NT as seen against its historical and cultural backgrounds. DLO 2: As a translator, demonstrate a advanced ability in translating the Greek New Testament in all its major literary styles. DLO 3: As an exegete, make a contribution to an area of NT studies by writing a thesis demonstrating competence in researching primary sources and dexterity in the use of sound exegetical methodologies.

NT 838 Th.M. Thesis in NT Exegesis Four hours. NT 842 Septuagint Introduction to the Greek grammar of the Septuagint and selected reading in the text of the Septuagint. The contribution of the Septuagint to both Old and New Testament studies will be presented. Prerequisites: NT 853, NT 854, OT 603 and one exegesis course in both NT and OT (See OT 842).
Two hours.

NT 851 Advanced Hermeneutics A study and evaluation of recent trends in the field of hermeneutics, along with new questions they raise regarding biblical inerrancy and interpretation. Prerequisites: BI 505 and NT 604.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

NT 853, 854 Advanced Greek Grammar I and II A detailed study of the definitive works on the grammar of NT Greek with a view to providing a more confident approach to New Testament interpretation. Prerequisite: NT 604 and two NT exegesis electives.
Two hours each.

NT 855 New Testament Textual Criticism A study of the history of the New Testament text and an evaluation of various theories regarding choosing correct variants in the text. Prerequisites: NT 603 and NT 796.
Two hours.

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NT 856 Criticism of the Synoptic Gospels An explanation and analysis of various theories regarding source, form, redaction, and canon criticism as they pertain to the Synoptic Gospel. Prerequisite: NT 796.
Two hours.

NT 867 History of Synoptic Discussion A critical, in-depth analysis of the history of the Synoptic discussion, with special attention to any alleged literary relationships between the Synoptic Gospels, as well as the driving philosophies and/or evidences involved that have impacted such assertions. Coloring of a synopsis to highlight verbal agreements/disagreements is included. Prerequisites: NT 604 and one NT exegesis elective.
Two hours.

NT 868 History of New Testament Interpretation A critical and historical review of the history of interpretation of the New Testament with an emphasis on the modern historical period, from the Reformation through the Enlightenment to contemporary issues of NT theology and interpretation. Prerequisite: NT 604 and one NT exegesis elective.
Two hours.

NT 896, 897 Research Seminar Principles of thorough research. Supervised research into a problem related to New Testament studies. Periodic reports to other members of the seminar. Either one or two semesters devoted to the research. Elective for Th.M. students. Two hours each. NT 899 New Testament Exegetical Research A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary coursework, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office. On demand, one to four hours. Division of New Testament StudiesTh.D. The purpose of the ThD New Testament program is provide the highest skills in mastery and academic research of New Testament language, literal grammatico-historical interpretation and exegesis of its literature as well as its history of interpretation throughout the centuries for the purpose of teaching in institutions of higher learning or in other advanced ministry settings. The culmination of this major is the production of a dissertation which makes a unique contribution to the field. The Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs) are as follows:
DLO 1: As a specialist, demonstrate a deep, active knowledge of a specialized area of NT study.

Course Descriptions

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DLO 2: As a scholar, make a significant contribution to the literature of that specialty by means of a dissertation reflecting honed skills in research, critical thinking, translation, exegesis, and writing. DLO 3: As a steward, construct and implement learning experiences in the classroom and/or the pulpit to propagate the knowledge of the Greek New Testament and to prepare future stewards of the discipline.

NT 903 Th.D. Qualifying Exams III Following acceptance into the Doctor of Theology degree program, a student must register for this course during any semester he intends to write one or more qualifying exams. NT 941 Doctoral Dissertation Prospectus This course is designed to launch the students doctoral residency. Under the advisers supervision, the student is expected to refine the dissertation topic, establish its need, defend its choice, and outline the procedure for its undertaking. Preparation of an extensive bibliography is also one of the course requirements. Four hours. NT 942, 943, 944, 945, 946 Dissertation Research IV Once the Dissertation Prospectus Course has been completed, the student is expected to register for this course for each subsequent semester of residency during which the dissertation is being researched and written. Four hours each. NT 947 Doctoral Dissertation

Course Descriptions

DIVISION OF THEOLOGICAL STUDIES


The theological approach at The Masters Seminary emphasizes the exegetical and systematic rather than the philosophical, creedal, or sociological. The analytical and synthetic contributions of Bible exposition, the data drawn from exegesis of the Old Testament and the New Testament, and the insights gained from church history, are all combined in comparing, exhibiting, and defending the theological truths revealed in the Christian Scriptures. Theology courses at The Masters Seminary are not taught merely for the purpose of satisfying intellectual curiosity, but for the purpose of helping students grasp the significance of theology for Christian living, for the ministry of Bible-believing churches world-wide, and for insightful interaction with contemporary issues. Courses are offered in both Systematic Theology and Historical Theology.

Division of Theological StudiesM.Div. The Division of Theological Studies (M.Div.) is designed to advance critical engagement in theology and apologetics through critiquing and refuting non-biblical systems along with promoting biblical doctrines as a foundation for teaching and godly living, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a future spiritual leader, demonstrate how systematic theology (rooted in Scripture and in conversation with historic orthodox Christianity) is fundamental to the individual and corporate Christian life.
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DLO 2: As a future shepherd of the flock, critically evaluate the major Christian theological and apologetical systems in order to defend the truth and refute error. DLO 3: As a future evangelist and apologist, critically engage the major non-Christian worldviews from an evangelical Christian perspective that is founded on presuppositional apologetics. DLO 4: As a historically informed Christian, trace the rich spiritual heritage of evangelicalism in order to understand the development of doctrine and its practical implications for ministry today. DLO 5: As a future theologian, accurately express the major biblical themes in doctrinal formulations and apply them to current theological and cultural issues.

Systematic Theology TH 605 Theology I A study of prolegomena, dealing with the essence and source of systematic theology, and reasons for its study; theology proper, including revelation, trinitarianism, and Gods relation to the universe; and bibliology, emphasizing inspiration and inerrancy. Prerequisite (or concurrent enrollment): BI 505. Three hours. TH 606 Theology II A study of Christology, the person and work of Jesus Christ; pneumatology, the person and work of the Holy Spirit; and angelology, including the nature and ministry of angels, Satan, and demons. Includes an introductory examination and critique of the charismatic movement. Prerequisite: TH 605
Three hours.

Course Descriptions

TH 701 Apologetics and Evangelism A careful biblical and theological development of a consistent apologetic. The course provides a basis for the evaluation of various empirical systems as well as a working knowledge of presuppositionalism for use in all aspects of practical ministry. Evangelism is then studied within this framework to present the student with a consistent gospel presentation for biblical evangelism (see MI 701). Prerequisite (or concurrent enrollment): TH 705.
Four hours.

TH 705 Theology III A study of anthropology, focusing on the origin and nature of man; hamartiology, dealing with the fall and its consequences, especially total depravity; and soteriology, dealing with the atonement of Christ, election, regeneration, conversion, justification, sanctification, and glorification. Prerequisite: TH 606.
Four hours.

TH 706 Theology IV A study of ecclesiology, focusing on the inception, organization, ordinances, and ministry of the church; and eschatology, including a study of the biblical covenants, the rapture, tribulation, the millennial reign of Christ, the resurrections, the eschatological judgments, the eternal state, and personal destiny. Prerequisite: TH 705.
Four hours.

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TH 738 M.Div. Thesis in Theology Students who have completed 60 hours of seminary studies with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher may write a thesis dealing with a topic of systematic or historical theology. All seminary policies and deadlines for thesis projects must be strictly observed. Prerequisites: NT 604, and TH 706.
Four hours.

TH 743 Readings in Biblical Cosmology Substantial reading in the literature on origins and dual revelation are discussed and critiqued in the light of the Scriptural teaching on Creation and the Flood and biblical chronology. The influence of prevailing scientific hypotheses on exegetical and theological conclusions and the question of intelligent design are also given consideration. Recent Creationism, or Young Earth Creationism, is affirmed and defended against alternative proposals such as Theistic Evolution, Progressive Creationism, PreCreation Chaos, and Ruin-Reconstructionism. Preferred prerequisites: OT 603 and TH 605
Two hours.

TH 757 Biblical Theology of Emotion Human beings are emotional beings who are accountable to God for their feelings as well as their thoughts and actions. Furthermore, God is presented in Scripture as having emotions, and believers are called to imitate God. This class seeks a biblical theology of emotion from Gods relationships with people in the OT, through the emotional life of the Son of God incarnate, to the related commands of the NT epistolary literature. Prerequisite: OT 504
Two hours.

TH 762 Apologetic Methodology A study of the major historical and contemporary methodologies for defending the truths of Christianity and for positive presentation of Christian evidences. Emphasizes the exegetical and theological superiority of an acknowledged presuppositionalist approach. Prerequisite: TH 701
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

TH 776 Rapture Systems An analysis from a pretribulational viewpoint of other rapture systems and their interpretation of key eschatological passages in Scripture. Prerequisite: TH 706.
Two hours.

TH 778 Theology of Missions A study of the biblical teaching and principles defining and undergirding the reality of missions, as well as consideration of the missionary practices which arise therefrom. Includes an examination and critique of those issues affecting missions today, namely religious pluralism and ethnotheology, contextualization and indigenization, and power-encounters and spiritual warfare (see MI 778). Prerequisite: TH 606.
Two hours.

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TH 795 Fundamentals of Theological Method The purpose of this course is to demonstrate the philosophical and theological underpinnings of the methodology of systematic theology, in contrast to evangelical postmodernistic methodology. Prerequisite: TH 605.
Two hours.

TH 789 Christian Theology of Worship A historical overview of the development of Christian worship, a biblical exploration of worship in the Old and New Testaments, and a resulting theological basis for individual and corporate worship. The class will seek to equip pastors to shepherd their congregations to live lives of comprehensive worship that exhibit biblical fidelity and historical awareness.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

TH 799 Research in Theology A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary coursework, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office. Prerequisite: BI 505, NT 604, TH 606, and two years of seminary study (60 hours) with at least one year at The Masters Seminary (30 hours). Number of hours (not to exceed four) to be determined, prior to registration, by the faculty member involved.
On demand, one to four hours.

Division of Theological StudiesTh.M. The Division of Theological Studies (Th.M.) is designed to offer students advanced specialized training in the major categories of theology and promote expertise in a specific area of theology through the writing of a thesis, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1:As a theologian to the church, express advanced knowledge of major biblical themes and doctrinal formulations. DLO 2: As a scholarly writer, compose well-written and biblically accurate essays and a thesis that make a contribution to the field of theology. DLO 3: As a leader of other Christian leaders, demonstrate scholarly expertise that qualifies one for potential doctoral studies.

TH 808 Seminar in Ethics A study of the various systems of ethics, plus student papers analyzing current ethical problems such as biomedical ethics, abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, homosexuality, civil disobedience, divorce and remarriage.
Two hours.

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TH 811 Seminar in Christology An in-depth study of selected topics relating to Christology, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important historical debates. Prerequisite: TH 606.
Two hours.

TH 813 Seminar in Bibliology Selected issues concerning revelation, inspiration, canonicity, and illumination are researched, presented, and evaluated. Prerequisite: TH 605.
Two hours.

TH 816 Seminar in Theology Proper An in-depth study of selected topics relating to theology proper, with student papers concentrating on exegesis of key passages and on research relating to important historical debates. Prerequisite: TH 605.
Two hours.

TH 819 Seminar in Pneumatology A study of the person and work of the Holy Spirit in both testaments, with special emphasis on His ministries in the present age. Prerequisite: TH 606.
Two hours.

TH 823 Seminar in Anthropology and Hamartiology A careful review of the biblical teachings about man and sin, with analysis of historical and current issues. Prerequisite: TH 705.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

TH 824 Seminar in Soteriology An advanced study of the doctrine of salvation, focusing on the cross-work of Christ and the divine plan of salvation. Various viewpoints are critically analyzed. Prerequisite: TH 705.
Two hours.

TH 828 Seminar in Dispensational Theology A study of contemporary issues in dispensational interpretations of Scripture, and critical interaction with other systems of theology. Prerequisite: TH 706.
Two hours.

TH 836 Seminar in Sanctification A careful study of key issues involved in Gods work of progressive sanctification in the life of the believer. Prerequisite: TH 705.
Two hours.

TH 838 Th.M. Thesis in Theology Four hours.

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TH 888 Seminar in Eschatology An advanced study of eschatology, including student papers on kingdom of God, heaven, hell, the rapture, tribulation, the millennial reign of Christ, the resurrections, the eschatological judgements, and the eternal state. Prerequisite: TH 706.
Two hours.

TH 899 Research in Theology A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary coursework, research courses are permitted only when a particular course that is needed for graduation or for additional expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office.
On demand, one to four hours.

Historical Theology TH 507, 508 Historical Theology I and II A survey study designed to give the student a sense of perspective and appreciation of the church since the time of Christ. Primary attention is devoted to the major events, individuals, and issues which have played significant roles in the history of the church. The courses are constructed around three major periods: (1) Pre-reformation, A.D. 331500; (2) The Reformation period, A.D. 15001648; and (3) The Modern Age, A.D. 1648 to the present. Gnosticism, Arianism, Nestorianism, Church Councils, Anabaptism, Catholicism, the Reformation, the Puritans, and the Great Awakening, are examples of the subjects discussed. The last period is devoted to a survey of American Christianity.
Three hours each.

Course Descriptions

TH 682 Roman Catholic Theology A study of the tenets and representative literature of Roman Catholicism. Special attention is given to its distinctiveness compared with Protestant theology. Prerequisite: TH 507, TH 508.
Two hours.

TH 655 Contemporary Cults An examination of the historical roots, origin, development, doctrines, leading personalities, and practices of the major religious cults in America. Also suggests approaches for presenting the historic Christian faith to the members of various cults.
Two hours.

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TH 715 Anabaptist Theology A study of the origin, development, and distinctive theological perspectives of the Anabaptist movement, with special attention given to a comparison of its theology with Reformed theology. Prerequisite: TH 507, TH 508
Two hours.

TH 786 Charismatic Theology The major tenets of the contemporary charismatic movement are examined and critiqued in the light of Scriptural teaching on spiritual gifts, signs and wonders, revelation, tongues, prophecy, and healings, health and wealth, inter alia. Apostolic period and praxis is also given consideration as well as the importance and superiority of doctrine over experience and mysticism. Includes an overview of the historical background and development of the charismatic movement. Substantial readings make the student aware of the literature available on this important subject. Students are required to draw up position statements on selected issues.
Two hours.

TH 787 History of Fundamentalism A study of the fundamentalist movement from 1875 up through the present. Focus will be on an analysis of its historical roots, theology, leaders, battles, and impact. Prerequisite: TH 508.
Two hours.

TH 788 Contemporary Evangelicalism An historical and theological analysis of the Evangelical movement as it distinguished itself from fundamentalism beginning in the 1940s. Prerequisite: TH 508.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

TH 803 Arminian Theology A study of Arminian theologians and their theology, noting their influence on contemporary theology. Prerequisites: TH 507, TH 508.
Two hours.

TH 804 History and Theology of Pietism An analysis of the European and American pietist movement, with special emphasis on its impact on contemporary theology. Prerequisites: TH 507 and TH 508.
Two hours.

TH 815 Puritan Theology A study of the theological system emerging from the English Puritan tradition with emphasis given to the unique contributions made by the Puritans, and a biblical evaluation of their thought. Prerequisite: TH 508.
Two hours.

TH 859 Contemporary Theology A survey of the significant theological developments and positions which have achieved prominence during the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasizes the contribution of the Renaissance and the
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Enlightenment to the development of modern religious liberalism, as well as an analysis of specific schools and representative theologians: Classic Modernism, Neo-Orthodoxy, Lundensianism, NeoLiberalism, Existentialism, and the radical theologies of the last three decades. Prerequisite: TH 508. Two hours.

TH 860 Theological Systems A comparative study of the various systems of theology by evaluating leading representative theologians. Student reports are included. Prerequisite: TH 706.
Two hours.

TH 863 Seminar in Liberation Theology A study of the history of Liberation Theology, with an analysis and critique of its theological system.
Two hours.

TH 866 Seminar in Christian Classics Reading and discussion of selected classics from church history with an emphasis on the classics of spirituality. Prerequisites: TH 507 and TH 508.
Two hours.

TH 869 Seminar in Reformation Theology A study of the major theologians of the Reformation and their theology, with special attention given to a comparison of its theology with Anabaptist theology. Prerequisite: TH 507, TH 508.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

Division of Theological StudiesTh.D. The Division of Theological Studies (Th.D.) is designed to offer students in the Doctor of Theology Program advanced, specialized training in the major categories of theology and promote expertise in a specific area of theology through the writing of a dissertation which advances or makes a unique contribution to field, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a teacher of Christian theology, train other Christians in the area of Christian theology. DLO 2: As a scholar, make a significant contribution to the literature of that specialty by means of a dissertation reflecting honed skills in research, critical thinking, translation, exegesis, and writing which advances Christian theology. DLO 3: As a leader of the next generation of theologians, train others who desire to become leaders in the area of Christian theology.

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TH 904 Th.D. Qualifying Exam IV in Church History Following acceptance into the Doctor of Theology degree program, a student must register for this course during any semester he intends to write one or more qualifying exams. TH 905 Qualifying Exam V in Theology Following acceptance into the Doctor of Theology degree program, a student must register for this course during any semester he intends to write one or more qualifying exams. TH 941 Doctoral Dissertation Prospectus This course is designed to launch the students doctoral residency. Under the advisers supervision, the student is expected to refine the dissertation topic, establish its need, defend its choice, and outline the procedure for its undertaking. Preparation of an extensive bibliography is also one of the course requirements. Four hours. TH 942, 943, 944, 945, 946 Dissertation Research IV Once the Dissertation Prospectus Course has been completed, the student is expected to register for this course for each subsequent semester of residency during which the dissertation is being researched and written. Four hours each. TH947 Doctoral Dissertation

Course Descriptions

WORLD MISSIONS AND EVANGELISM COURSES


In view of the explicit command of Christ, the entire curriculum at The Masters Seminary is permeated with a thematic emphasis on worldwide evangelism. In addition, specific courses have been designed to highlight this emphasis. The purpose of these courses is to equip students with a biblically based concern for the world mission of the church and to expand their understanding of missions activities, needs, and opportunities. The goal is to better prepare some for lifetime involvement in missions and others for lifetime support for missions in both their personal and pastoral roles.

MI 682 Intercultural Communication A study of the principles, processes, and pitfalls of communicating from one culture to another, designed to assist the student in working effectively across cultures. Emphasizes the importance of understanding the world-view of both the source culture and the receptor culture. Includes a treatment of diverse perceptions, values, expressions, logic, and linguistic difficulties.
Two hours.

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MI 701 Apologetics and Evangelism A careful biblical and theological development of a consistent presuppositional apologetic. The course provides a basis for the evaluation of various empirical systems as well as a working knowledge of presuppositionalism for use in all aspects of practical ministry. Evangelism is then studied within a presuppositional framework to present the student with a consistent gospel presentation for biblical evangelism (see TH 701).
Four hours.

MI 758 Church Planting Evaluates various kinds of church planting opportunities and methodologies. Offers step-by-step procedures, and calls upon successful local church planters for suggestions from their own experiences (see PM 758).
Two hours.

MI 778 Theology of Missions A study of the biblical teaching and principles defining and undergirding the reality of missions, as well as a consideration of the missionary practices which arise therefrom. Includes an examination and critique of those issues affecting missions today, namely religious pluralism and ethnotheology, contextualization and indigenization, and power-encounter and spiritual warfare (see TH 778). Prerequisite: TH 606.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

MI 783 History of the Expansion of the Christian Church A study of the history of Christian outreach from the apostolic age to the present, with special emphasis on contemporary growth dynamics in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Also evaluates historical methodologies and changing strategies in world missions. Prerequisite: TH 508.
Two hours.

MI 784 Major Religions Surveys the origins, growth, doctrines, and practices of the major religions of the world. Also examines their historical relationships and confrontations with Christianity, as well as suggested strategies for effective evangelism.
Two hours.

MI 785 Cross-Cultural Ministry Practicum Through the lens of theological study and cross-cultural research, this course focuses on developing an applied theology of missions. The worldview of various foreign cultures and their understanding of soteriology will be identified and examined by personally engaging different ethnic people groups within the Los Angeles area. Visits to ethnic churches in Los Angeles will afford students the opportunity to consider how the church can make disciples among different people groups. (See PM 785.)
Two hours.

MI 789, 790 Internship in Missions A specialized field involvement program designed to encourage interest and experience in crosscultural ministries. Each student will be accountable to both on-campus and off-campus supervision
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and will be given exposure to as many aspects of missions as possible in view of the particular field assignment and the maturity of the student. Mission internship programs may be sponsored by The Masters Seminary, Grace Community Church, or other approved mission agencies. In all cases preparatory study is required with both reading and writing assignments, an agreed upon subject will be researched while on the field, and a report or research paper must be submitted after the internship. No more than four hours of credit may be granted unless the internship program requires actual course work on the field. When such course work is involved the student may register, with the permission of the Vice President for Academic Administration, for the specific courses involved. On demand, one to four hours each.

DIVISION OF PASTORAL MINISTRY


Because the local church serves as Gods primary agency for Christian worship and nurture, pastoral ministries courses begin to translate the information and skills learned in biblical and theological studies into relevant application for pastoral ministry. Whether this application is to be demonstrated by public ministries in the pulpit, in the evangelistic and educational ministries of the church, in the ordinances and ceremonies of the church, in church worship and music, in administrative leadership in the church, or by the more private modeling of personal godliness in the private devotional life, in counseling sessions, in leadership within the family, and in all other relationships, careful and prayerful preparation is necessary. In all of these settings there is no necessary dichotomy between thorough preparation and prayerful reliance on the Holy Spirit. Though many of these courses necessarily focus on skills and methodologies, all are also concerned with the preparation of the inner person with the development of those character qualities necessary for effective ministry and spiritual leadership. Expository Preaching courses are designed to channel the students academic training, personal giftedness, and individual personality toward effectiveness in expositional preaching from Gods Word. This training often interfaces with the Hebrew and Greek courses so as to take full advantage of exegetical assignments for developing pulpit materials. Preaching courses also require practicum sessions which include video taping of student preaching experiences for individual evaluation.

Course Descriptions

Division of Pastoral MinistryM.Div. The Division of Pastoral Ministry (M.Div.) is designed to advance on the knowledge base of biblical and theological studies, translating them into preaching and leadership skills necessary for effective ministry, as detailed in the following Division Learning Outcomes (DLOs):
DLO 1: As a future pastor-teacher, effectively communicate the Scriptures through expository preaching. DLO 2: As a future pastor/elder/church leader, demonstrate a strong comprehension of core church organizational and administrative functions. DLO 3: As a future teacher and counselor, competently engage diverse groups in the church in the teaching and application of Biblical principles. DLO 4: As a future spiritual leader, effectively shepherd individual believers into Christian maturity.

PM 500 Continuing Registration


Zero Hours
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PM 506 The Pastors Home After introducing the biblical blueprint for a model home, the class proceeds from the drawing board to actual construction. Each couple develops a personalized plan to build the home of Gods design. Marriage, parenting, pasturing, and contemporary challenges are considered, using Gods Word as the primary textbook and the pastors home as the construction site. For married students the course involves current on the job training and for singles it is preparatory.
Two hours.

PM 507 Introduction to Preaching Introduction to Preaching will expose the student to the initial elements of lesson and sermon preparation, research, and delivery. It will afford students at an early stage in their seminary career the opportunity to learn the foundational elements of public speaking and provide the groundwork for subsequent classes in expository preaching. The class will develop the students skills in recognizing and organizing the proposition of a given passage for delivery with accuracy, clarity, and relevance. A high level of attention will be given to class discussion, evaluation, application, and personal feedback.
Two hours.

PM 511 Field Ed: Church Ministries Involves preparation and accountability for field education or internship assignments. Emphasizes an introduction and exposure to the diversified ministries within a local church. Pastoral staff members of Grace Community Church present overviews of their areas of ministry responsibility.
One hour.

Course Descriptions

PM 512A Field Ed: Pastoral Counseling This course covers topics such as the theological basis of discipleship/counseling, the definition of biblical counseling, the essentials for the discipler/counselor, a comparison of counseling philosophies, and the biblical view of change, guilt, and self-image. Also included are the key elements of the counseling process, handling ones past and ones attitude (case studies are also discussed). Prerequisite: PM 511.
Two hours.

PM 521, 522, 621, 622, 721, 722 Discipleship Lab IVI Discipleship Labs focus on discussions relating to the development of Christian living skills and character qualities. Students meet in small groups for two hours weekly with a faculty member or church leader. Individual giftedness, personal and ministry experiences, and goals are discussed and evaluated. Particular emphasis is devoted to the evaluation of relationship styles as these have impact on relationships with God, family, church members, and others.
Assignments are not primarily academic in nature but instead are designed to promote growth in Christian character qualities and increased ability in encouraging and motivating others toward deeper devotion to God, greater love for others, and more effective ministry relationships. The rationale for these practicums is based on the fact that most failures in pastoral ministry are not because of a lack of knowledge but because of moral failure and the inability to work well with others. The Discipleship Labs are thus designed as a major part of the seminarys commitment to be involved in the ministry of Building Men of God. Half hour each.
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PM 605 Christian Writing When God chose to reveal Himself in detail, He did so in writing. Appropriately, this course involves the written medium in areas of both unpublished and published writings. Both content and style receive attention to enhance the pastoral capacity to communicate clearly and effectively.
Two hours.

PM 606 Expository Preaching I An introduction to homiletical methodology which emphasizes basic principles of sermonic organization. Requires actual preaching experiences. Prerequisites: OT 603, NT 603.
Three hours.

PM 611 Field Ed: Discipleship and Leadership Focuses on the personal life, family responsibilities, time management priorities, and other key relationship responsibilities in ministry. Emphasizes qualities for leadership and principles for developing leaders within the church. Also provides continuing accountability for field education and internship assignments. Prerequisite: PM 511.
One hour.

PM 612 Field Ed: Worship and Music An introduction to worship and music ministries in the church, including instruction in planning, song leading, hymnology, and selection of music for worship, evangelism, Christian education, and special services. Requires accountability for field education and internship assignments. Prerequisite: PM 511.
One hour.

PM 612A Field Ed: Worship and Ministry An introduction to worship and music in the church, including instruction in planning, song leading, and selection of music for worship and special services. This course also provides instruction for using computer templates in sermon preparation, preparing inductive Bible studies, and learning the basics of dialogue teaching. Prerequisite: PM511.
One hour.

Course Descriptions

PM 613 Hymnology This study addresses the importance of music in the worship service, the language of music, and how pastors must exercise careful oversight of the churchs music ministry. Also included is a survey of worship from early Jewish music to the present day, with an evaluation of the latest paradigms.
Two hours.

PM 668 Adult Bible Teaching A study of the principles involved in a Christian philosophy of learning and teaching, and an evaluation of models for Bible lesson plans. Also includes experience in the use of visual aids and practice in becoming a vibrant teacher of the Bible to adults. Maximum of 8 students.
Two hours.

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PM 701 Ordination Preparation Beginning with the biblical basis for ordination, the practical process for ordination is outlined. A thorough review is conducted of the students biblical knowledge, including code outlining, code themes, key chapters, key verses, and important people. It is designed to functionally prepare the TMS senior to enter ministry after graduation at the highest level of excellence. This class, without exception, is limited to those who will graduate the following May. Prerequisites: BI 501, 502; 601 (See BI 701).
Two hours.

PM 702 Expository Preaching III As a continuation of PM 703 Expository Preaching II, this course is designed to help the student increase his effectiveness in moving from exegesis to exposition and delivery. With an emphasis on public speaking skills, it provides additional opportunities for the student to hone his sermon delivery. Prerequsite: PM 703
Two hours.

PM 703 Expository Preaching II Continues the study of homiletical methodology with special emphasis on expositional preaching and the development of communication skills. Video recordings are used as an aid allowing more personalized evaluation of effectiveness of communication in both content and style. Prerequisite: PM 606.
Three hours.

Course Descriptions

PM 706 Preaching Dynamics Continues the study of homiletical methodology with special emphasis on expositional preaching and the development of communication skills. Video recordings are used as an aid allowing more personalized evaluation of effectiveness of communication in both content and style. Prerequisite: PM 703.
Three hours.

PM 708 Preaching Historical Narrative This course is designed to enhance the preaching of Historical Narrative, which comprises the largest amount of the biblical text. Special attention is given to transforming description (narrative discourse) into prescription (sermonic exhortation). How to preach longer and more difficult narrative sections is explored as well. The course also briefly surveys the history of preaching this genre, illustrating pitfalls to be avoided and examples to be emulated. Prerequisite: PM 606.
Two hours.

PM 709 Effective Sermon Delivery This course is designed to improve ones skill in handling and communicating the Word of God. The sermons of Jesus and great preachers of history are examined for the purpose of studying the reasons for their effectiveness. Many practical assignments help the student make his exegetical data more understandable, memorable and applicable to the hearers. Prerequisite: PM 703.
Two hours.

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PM 711A Field Ed: Church Administration Application of Biblical principles to local church policy, structure, and management. Surveys the multitude of administrative tasks the pastor deals with in the daily operation of the local church. Also provides continuing accountability for field education and internship activities.
One hour.

PM 712 Field Ed: Pastoral Ministries Provides a foundation for the development of a personal philosophy of ministry. Integrates pastoral concerns and responsibilities with regard to evangelism, Christian education, discipleship, missions, developing church leadership, leading in worship and special services, long-range planning, community relations, and church ordinances. Also provides continuing accountability for field education and internship assignments. Prerequisites: PM 511, 711A.
Three hours.

PM 713 Church and Law The growing number of legal issues facing the local church and its leadership are addressed.
Two hours.

PM 756 Church Growth Qualitative and quantitative factors of growing a church from a biblical perspective receive attention. A twentieth century philosophy which remains biblical and is also contemporarily relevant highlights this course.
Two hours.

PM 757 Pastoring the Small Church A study of the characteristics of small churches, with an evaluation of their potential for ministry and impact. Addresses the questions of congregational dynamics, staffing, finances, and programming. Local pastors supplement the regular class lectures with advice and first-hand accounts of experience.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

PM 758 Church Planting Evaluates various kinds of church planting opportunities and methodologies. Offers step-by-step procedures, and calls upon successful local church planters for suggestions from their own experiences (see MI 758).
Two hours.

PM 761 Church Leadership Seminar Beginning with leadership in the home and extending to a broad range of issues in the church, this seminar touches on practical topics, such as strategic planning and staff development, conflict resolution, unity and diversity, power struggles, and principles of delegation. Case studies are conducted on the major leaders in Scripture as well.
Two hours.

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PM 768 Marriage and Family Counseling This course is focused on the specific areas of marriage and the family. Topics covered include the purpose of marriage, divorce and remarriage, roles of husband and wife, physical intimacy within marriage, communication and conflict resolution, spouse and child abuse, stewardship of time and priorities, preventing and rebuilding after adultery, parenting, and family counseling (case studies are also discussed). Prerequisite: PM 512A.
Two hours.

PM 769 Advanced Biblical Counseling This course is designed for those desiring to pursue a more in-depth understanding of discipleship/counseling. Topics covered include anger, worry, fear, depression, medical issues, counseling children, eating problems, decision making, incest, sexual abuse, crisis counseling, and other specific subjects (case studies are also discussed). Prerequisite: PM 512A.
Two hours.

Course Descriptions

PM 772 Biblical Conflict Resolution An investigation into the nature of conflict, the divine perspective of it, and the biblical principles that should guide the believer in responding to it. Special attention is focused on understanding and handling interpersonal struggles in business, the church, and marriage in a way that honors the Lord.
Two hours.

PM 788 Analysis of Significant New Testament Churches Twelve churches receive detailed attention to determine what Christ commends and condemns in first century churches which all started with a right ecclesiology. Areas to avoid and areas to emphasize are incorporated into a twentieth century applied ecclesiology (see BI 788).
Two hours.

PM 794 Military Chaplaincy Residency This program offers an opportunity to minister in a military environment alongside one of the U.S. Navy chaplains at the Chapel of Hope in Yokosuka, Japan. Interns engage in the various aspects of international mission work among the 24,000 American sailors and their dependents of the Navys 7th fleet. Responsibilities include preparing ministry materials, sermons, Bible studies, and building relationships with sailors and their families.
Two hours.

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PM 795 Counseling Residency The goal of this course is to help the student learn, evaluate, and sharpen his discipleship/counseling skills. Practical application of biblical principles to human problems and relationships is promoted. Opportunities for observing counseling are offered along with interactive follow-up with the counselor. Prerequisite: PM 512A.
Two hours.

PM 796 Hospital Chaplaincy Residency A study of the role of the pastor in hospital chaplaincy, including legal restrictions, etiquette, ministering to both the sick as well as to their families, and relating to the hospital staff. Considerable hands-on training is included. Two hours. PM 797 Teaching Residency For exceptional students who desire teaching as a ministry focus, opportunities will be provided to teach in Logos Bible Institute. This course will be conducted as directed study under faculty supervision. Two hours. PM 798 Pastoral Residency Occasionally students are afforded significant ministry opportunity and responsibility that is over and above the normal pastoral ministry involvement and field education duties expected of all students. To be considered for enrollment in this course, the student must present, in consultation with a Pastoral Ministries faculty member and the pastor providing oversight, a detailed proposal describing how this ministry responsibility fits within the above parameters and what kind of assignments one would undertake to fulfill the academic requirements (research papers, reading, book reviews, etc.). Two hours. PM 799 Research in Pastoral Ministries A limited number of credit hours may be earned by satisfactory completion of guided independent research. The special problem or area of investigation must relate closely to the course title, must be precisely stated in written form and must be pursued under faculty supervision and with the approval of the Vice President for Academic Administration. A fully documented research paper and a reading report are required. Because instruction and interaction within a classroom setting are significant elements of seminary course work, research courses are permitted only when a particular course needed for graduation or important for needed expertise is not offered, or when a faculty member recommends such a course as an aid both to himself and to the student. Information regarding requirements, procedures, and grading is available from the Administration office. Prerequisites: two years of seminary study (60 hours) with at least one year at The Masters Seminary (30 hours). On demand, one to four hours.

Course Descriptions

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DOCTOR OF MINISTRY COURSES


The hallmark of the evangelical movement throughout its history has been the priority of expository preaching. Because The Masters Seminary exists to advance Gods kingdom by equipping godly men to be pastors and/or trainers of pastors for excellence in service to Christ, the seminary is committed to making every effort to enable evangelical pastors to develop into master expositors through a doctoral program that is singularly focused on the exposition of Scripture. The seminary, through the Doctor of Ministry program, is committed to enhancing the expositors ability in the three classical disciplines of sermon preparation: exegesis, exposition, and eloquence. Each component of the curriculum relates clearly and specifically to the other elements of the program and is conducted with a view toward increasing the students knowledge, understanding, and skills in these disciplines. The sequence of the seminars is designed to be linear, progressing from seminars that explore the more general and historical issues of expository preaching to studies in specific biblical genres of the Old and New Testaments, and culminating in an intensive examination of rhetorical/homiletical theory and models.

Course Descriptions

DM 900 Personal Preaching Evaluation Upon acceptance into the program, the new student will be asked to preach assigned texts from the Old and New Testaments. Study files for the two sermons will be turned in and will include lexical and syntactical studies, background and contextual observations, and expository assimilation. These sermons will be videotaped and archived by the student and by TMS. An initial self-evaluation of 57 pages will be prepared by the student summarizing strengths on which to build and weaknesses to address. After completion of the final seminar at the end of his second year, the student will preach new sermons from the same texts. New videotapes and study files will be reviewed and compared by a TMS faculty member. A final 57 page self-evaluation will be completed as well. Assessments will be made on the students improvement in exegesis, exposition, and eloquence. One hour each. DM 913 Doctoral Research and Methods This seminar is designed to prepare the student for doctoral-level research, supporting both seminar work and the D.Min. Preaching Research Project. It also provides the opportunity to select the specific project topic to determine the best utilization of the subsequent seminars for project work. One hour. DM 914 Preaching the Old Testament This seminar is designed to provide an introduction to the interpretation of the Old Testament with the view to discovering, translating, and communicating in sermonic form the authors intended messages. Following a general introduction to the interpretation of the Old Testament, attention will be devoted to appropriate hermeneutical strategies to be applied to different genres of biblical literature. The relevance of the Old Testament message for the church and the world today will be justified and demonstrated. Four hours. DM 915 Historical and Contemporary Models of Expository Preaching This seminar involves an examination of the nature, history, and current state of expository preaching. Attention is given to the biblical/theological basis for expository preaching, the history
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and important examples of its practice, and an assessment of its present state. The seminar employs various methods of research, evaluation, and analysis, thus enabling the student to fully develop a biblical model of expository preaching, informed by the best practiced models, whether ancient or contemporary. Three hours.

DM 917, 918, 927, 928 Expository Preaching Forums These four courses are designed to integrate objective class knowledge with the practical ministry experiences of a master expositor. The forums will take place toward the end of each seminar period. Guest preachers who have distinguished themselves as models of expository preaching will lecture on the application of the respective seminar emphasis and show how they produce an expository sermon related to the seminar. This sermon will be preached at Grace Community Church by the guest preacher on Sunday, and then discussed with him by the D.Min. students on the following Monday. Half hour each. DM 917 DM 918 DM 927 DM 928 Forum One: A Methodology for the Expository Process Forum Two: Applications of Old Testament Preaching Forum Three: Applications of New Testament Preaching Forum Four: A Methodology for Sermon Delivery

DM 919 Hermeneutics and Exposition This seminar focuses attention on the interface between hermeneutics and exposition. Following a general introduction to traditional and contemporary hermeneutics, attention will be devoted to how hermeneutical theory and practice impacts sermon preparation and presentation. Four hours. DM 920 Final Preaching Evaluation After completion of the final seminar at the end of his second year, the student will preach new sermons from the same texts he used in DM900. New videotapes and study files will be reviewed and compared by a TMS faculty member. A final 57 page self-evaluation will be completed as well. Assessments will be made on the students improvement in exegesis, exposition, and eloquence.
One hour.

Course Descriptions

DM 923 Preaching the New Testament This seminar emphasizes the study of the New Testament backgrounds for preaching. Emphasis will be placed on the selection of a preaching unit and the steps involved in sound exegesis and faithful exposition. Four hours. DM 924 Homiletics and Sermon Delivery This seminar is designed to explore the nuances of sermon delivery and self-evaluation in homiletics. Classical and contemporary canons of rhetoric will be examined and used to critique the students delivery styles. Special attention will be given to the two major homiletical methods: the deductive, or propositional, method and the inductive, or narrative/sermonic plot, method. Preachers modeling these methods will be evaluated through their writing and videotapes. Four hours.
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DM 925 Theological Trends and Doctrinal Preaching This seminar focuses attention on the theological truths that form the foundation of, and are to be reflected in, expository preaching. Following a general review of evangelical systematic theology, a number of contemporary trends in evangelical theology will be presented and critiqued. This discussion will serve as the basis for insights into how the expositor can present theological content and address theological issues in his teaching and preaching ministry. Four hours. DM 937, 938 Preaching Research Project The Preaching Research Project is the students major research and evaluation project in the degree program. The project must be related to the students ministry and make a significant contribution to his expository preaching effectiveness. The length of the project is to be appropriate to the subject as judged by the students mentor/adviser. The specific topic of the Preaching Research Project will normally be determined by the completion of the Doctoral Research and Methods seminar in July of the first year. Four hours each.

DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY COURSES


GR 900 Theological German Introduces the basics of the German language, including vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure. With a focus on theological German, the course is designed to prepare the student for the qualifying exam in German. Th.M. students are welcome to enroll in the course for elective credit, upon instructor approval. LT 900 Theological Latin Designed to introduce the student to the vocabulary and grammar of Latin as a preparation for reading and writings of the Church Fathers and Reformation theologians. Th.M. students are welcome to enroll in the course upon instructor approval. FL 900 Foreign Language

Course Descriptions

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PERSONNEL
ADMINISTRATION
John MacArthur, B.A., M.Div., Litt.D., D.D. President Richard L. Mayhue, B.S., M.Div., Th.M., Th.D. Senior Vice President and Dean Irvin A. Busenitz, B.A., M.Div., Th.M., Th.D. Vice President for Academic Administration Robert M. White, Jr., B.Th. Vice President for Development and Operations

A Focused Faculty
The faculty of The Masters Seminary is committed to training men, both while theyre enrolled as students and after theyre established in areas of ministry. This method of ongoing instruction is modeled by the Apostle Paul, who after pouring his life into faithful men such as Timothy, Titus, and Philemon, further equipped them through letters of instruction and personal interaction.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Executive Committee Jim Rickard Chairman Tom Pennington Vice Chairman David Wismer Secretary Rich Riddle Treasurer Jack Babbitt Louis Herwaldt William H. Koptis Steven Lawson John MacArthur John van Wingerden

Personnel

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Board Members Jack Babbitt (1997) Tulsa, Oklahoma, Businessman Darrell Beddoe (1973) Bremerton, Washington, Pastor Philip DeCourcy (2004) Anaheim Hills, California, Pastor Larry Epperson (2007) Montogmery, Alabama, Physician David Gillies (1982) San Jose, California, Teacher, Retirement Counselor Louis Herwaldt (1988) Fresno, California, Businessman Bryan Hughes (2000) Bozeman, Montana, Pastor William Koptis (1985) Cleveland, Ohio, Businessman Tom Pennington (2007) Southlake, Texas, Pastor Robert Provost (1994) Loves Park, Illinois, Missions Executive Lance Quinn (2007) Little Rock, Arkansas, Pastor Jim Rickard (1981) Santa Clarita, California, Businessman Rich Riddle (1995) Bradbury, California, Businessman George Sanders (2007) West Hills, California, Physician John van Wingerden (2001) Oberlin, Ohio, Businessman Harry Walls (2001) Birmingham, Alabama, Pastor David Wismer (1993) Colorado Springs, Colorado, Businessman William Zimmer (1986) Canoga Park, California, Retired Aerospace Engineer

Personnel

Steve Lawson (2002) Mobile, Alabama, Pastor John MacArthur (1985) Santa Clarita, California, President Felix Martin del Campo (1992) Visalia, California, Dentist

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RESIDENT FACULTY
William D. Barrick
Director of Th.D. Studies Professor of Old Testament B.A., Denver Baptist Bible College M.Div., Th.M., San Francisco Baptist Theological Seminary Th.D., Grace Theological Seminary Before joining The Masters Seminary faculty in Spring 1997, Dr. Barrick served with the Association of Baptists for World Evangelism (ABWE) in Bangladesh. Beginning there in 1981, Dr. Barrick served as the exegetical consultant for Bible translation projects, theological consultant for the literature division, and adjunct faculty member of the Baptist Bible Institute of Bangladesh Theological Seminary. Prior to joining ABWE, Dr. Barrick was Professor and Chairman of the Old Testament department at Denver Baptist Theological Seminary. Beyond his teaching and Bible translation work, Dr. Barrick has been active in pastoral ministry, including three years as Director of Church Planting in Chittagong, Bangladesh. He also has had a varied writing ministry, having published scholarly journal articles as well as adult Sunday School materials.

Irvin A. Busenitz
Vice President for Academic Administration Director of Th.M. Studies Professor of Bible and Old Testament B.A., Grace University M.Div., Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary Th.D., Grace Theological Seminary During residency for his Master of Divinity studies, Dr. Busenitz served as youth pastor and associate pastor in Downey, California. He subsequently served for two years as a representative for Evangelism-In-Depth, a ministry involving leadership in church growth seminars in the Southwest. From 1974 to 1986 he was a member of the Bible Exposition faculty at Talbot Theological Seminary, and from 1977 to 1986 served as director of their Valley Extension Campus. Dr. Busenitz also studied at the American Institute of Holy Land Studies in Jerusalem. He has published journal and periodical articles, and an exegetical commentary on Joel and Obadiah. He became a founding member of The Masters Seminary administration and faculty in 1986 and is active in his local church and in Bible conference ministries.

Personnel

129

Nathan Busenitz
Instructor of Theology B.A., The Masters College M.Div., Th.M., The Masters Seminary Th.D., in preparation, The Masters Seminary Professor Busenitz began teaching at The Masters College in 2000 as an adjunct faculty member. In summer 2004, he taught at TMCs Center for Professional Studies, and that same year began teaching English grammar at The Masters Seminary. From 20032009 he served as a full-time member of the pastoral staff at Grace Community Church. During this time, he worked as the director of the Shepherds Fellowship, the managing editor of Pulpit magazine, and as personal assistant to John MacArthur. In 2008 Professor Busenitz began teaching historical theology at TMS, and joined our faculty full time in 2009. He is currently working to complete his Th.D. in church history, with a specific focus on patristic theology. He has written and contributed to several books, including Living a Life of Hope (Barbour 2003), Reasons to Believe (Crossway 2008), and Right Thinking in a World Gone Wrong (Harvest House 2009). He and his wife, Beth, have four children.

Keith H. Essex
Associate Professor of Bible Exposition A.B., California State University, Long Beach Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary D.Min., The Masters Seminary During his residency for his Master of Theology degree, Dr. Essex ministered with Campus Crusade and later as a student pastor in Dallas, Texas. Following graduation, he served as Academic Dean at Grace Bible Institute in Long Beach, California. During this time he was also involved as a church planter, interim pastor, and later as an associate pastor. For nine years he pastored in Redondo Beach. He came to The Masters Seminary as an adjunct professor in 1992, joining the faculty full-time in 1994.

Personnel

F. David Farnell
Professor of New Testament B.A., Christian Heritage College M.Div., Th.M., Talbot School of Theology Ph.D., Dallas Theological Seminary Dr. Farnell came to The Masters Seminary in 1997 from Southeastern Bible College, where he taught Pastoral Theology and Biblical Studies and served as Academic Dean. He pastored the Brook Highland Community Church during that time as well. Earlier, while completing his Masters degrees, he served as a teaching assistant before taking a position at Christian Heritage College as Instructor of Biblical Studies and performing the duties of Registrar. He has also pastored a number of churches and published books and periodicals.

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Paul W. Felix, Sr.


Associate Professor of New Testament B.A., University of Redlands M.A., Talbot Theological Seminary M.Div., Th.M., Th. D., The Masters Seminary Upon completion of his undergraduate studies, Mr. Felix worked in the Data Processing profession as a Senior Systems Programmer for a number of years. It was during this time that he studied at Talbot Theological Seminary. Since 1982, Mr. Felix has served as the Assistant Pastor in his local church, as well as teaching numerous classes at the Los Angeles Bible Training School where he also served as Vice President for Academic Affairs. He began teaching in the New Testament Greek department at The Masters Seminary in 1992. After four years in Denver, Colorado, pastoring the Berean Bible Church, he returned to The Masters Seminary full-time in 1999. Dr. Felix also serves as President of the Los Angeles Bible Training School.

Michael Grisanti
Professor of Old Testament B.A., Pillsbury Baptist Bible College M.Div., Th.M., Central Baptist Theological Seminary Ph.D., Dallas Theological Seminary Prior to joining The Masters Seminary in 1997, Dr. Grisanti taught at Central Baptist Theological Seminary, majoring in the areas of Old Testament Language and Literature. During this time, he also studied at the Institute of Holy Land Studies in Jerusalem, Grace Theological Seminary, Luther Seminary, and the University of Minnesota. In addition to his educational training, Dr. Grisanti has enjoyed extensive pastoral experience, serving as an interim pastor, childrens pastor, and church planter. He also conducted a number of pastors conferences in Romania from 199396. He has authored numerous journal and periodical articles and assisted in various editorial projects, including contributions to the New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis and Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible.

Personnel

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Gregory H. Harris
Professor of Bible Exposition B.A., Campbell University M.A., North Carolina Central University M.Div., Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary Th.D., Dallas Theological Seminary While pursuing his graduate and post-graduate education, Dr. Harris was actively involved in pastoring various churches in California and Texas. In 1989, following the completion of his doctoral studies, he joined the faculty of Washington Bible College, a position he held for seven years. Then for ten years, Dr. Harris taught Bible and Greek at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He continues to serve as an international faculty member of the Jordan Evangelical Theological Seminary in Amman, and maintains an ongoing conference and pulpit ministry. Dr. Harris has also completed short-term graduate study at the Institute of Holy Land Studies in Jerusalem. He is the author of The Cup and the Glory and numerous journal articles and is an active participant in scholarly societies. He joined the TMS family in 2006.

Richard Holland
Assistant Professor of Pastoral Ministries Director of D.Min. Studies B.S., University of Tennessee M.Div., The Masters Seminary D.Min., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Dr. Holland is the staff elder and director of Student Ministries, as well as the college pastor at Grace Community Church. He has served in youth ministry for 25 years and teaches as Adjunct Professor of Youth Ministries at The Masters College. In 1997, he joined The Masters Seminary faculty as an instructor of Pastoral Ministries and Expository Preaching. Dr. Holland was appointed Director of D.Min. Studies in 2003.

John MacArthur
President Professor of Pastoral Ministries B.A., Los Angeles Pacific College M.Div., Talbot Theological Seminary Litt.D., Grace Graduate School D.D., Talbot Theological Seminary Dr. John MacArthur is pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, author, conference speaker, president of The Masters College and Seminary, and featured teacher with Grace to You. Since coming to Grace Community Church in 1969, the emphasis of his pulpit ministry has been the careful study and verse-by-verse exposition of the Bible. In 1985, Dr. MacArthur became president of The Masters College (formerly Los Angeles Baptist College), an accredited, four-year, liberal arts Christian college in Santa Clarita, California. In 1986, he founded The Masters Seminary, a graduate school dedicated to training men for full-time pastoral roles and missionary work. In addition to his administrative responsibilities, Dr. MacArthur regularly teaches
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Personnel

Expository Preaching at the seminary and frequently speaks in chapel. Since completing his first best-selling book The Gospel According to Jesus, in 1988, Dr. MacArthur has written over 100 books including The MacArthur Study Bible and the MacArthur New Testament Commentary series. His books have been translated into numerous languages including Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Marathi, Polish, Romanian, Russian, and Spanish.

Richard L. Mayhue
Senior Vice President and Dean Professor of Pastoral Ministries and Theology B.S., Ohio State University M.Div., Th.M., Th.D., Grace Theological Seminary Prior to enrolling in seminary, Dr. Mayhue served with the United States Navy from 1966 to 1971, including a tour of duty in Vietnam. After seminary he ministered from 1975 to 1977 as an assistant pastor at Grace Brethren Church in Columbus, Ohio, where he also served as director of the Worthington Bible Institute. From 1977 to 1980 he taught in the areas of New Testament and Pastoral Ministries at Grace Theological Seminary in Winona Lake, Indiana, where he also enjoyed an active weekend Bible conference ministry. From 1980 to 1984 he was a member of the pastoral staff at Grace Community Church where he served as an associate to Dr. MacArthur in a teaching ministry and as director for the wellknown Shepherds Conferences. From 1984 to 1989 he pastored the historic Grace Brethren Church of Long Beach, California. Dr. Mayhue has authored, contributed to, or edited over twenty books, including How To Interpret the Bible for Yourself, The Healing Promise, What Would Jesus Say About Your Church?, Seeking God, and Practicing Proverbs, plus numerous periodical and journal articles. Dr. Mayhue also served as the Managing Editor for The MacArthur Study Bible project. He is active in Bible conference ministries. He joined the faculty of The Masters Seminary in 1989 and was appointed as Dean of the Seminary in 1990. In late 2000, Dr. Mayhue also became Senior Vice President and Provost of The Masters College.

Ray S. Mehringer
Director of Admissions and Placement B.S., Texas Tech University M.S., University of North Dakota M. Div., The Masters Seminary Professor Mehringer joined the Masters Seminary faculty in 2002, having completed more than fifteen years as an officer in the United States Air Force. In addition to his operations experience with the Air Force, he also served as a local Bible study leader and Area Coordinator in the Washington D.C. area with the Officers Christian Fellowship. Having lived in various places throughout the United States with the Air Force, he gained significant experience in pastoral ministry as a lay leader in several local churches. While completing graduate studies at The Masters Seminary, Prof. Mehringer utilized his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Educational Administration as a ministerial resident in Childrens Ministries at Grace Community Church and as an Associated Student Body officer in the seminary. He continues an active ministry preaching in area churches and serving as a deacon at his church.
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Personnel

Alex D. Montoya
Associate Professor of Pastoral Ministries B.A., Biola University M.Div., Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary D.D., The Masters Seminary After serving for two years as a local church Visitation Minister and Director of Outreach in Los Angeles, Dr. Montoya became the senior pastor of the First Fundamental Bible Church of Monterey Park. Beginning with just forty members, the church has grown to more than 900 members, and under his leadership has maintained a strong evangelistic and church planting emphasis, beginning fifteen branch churches during this time. In addition to his full-time teaching at The Masters Seminary since 1991, he has also taught biblical studies courses at Biola University, New Testament language classes at Talbot Theological Seminary, and pastoral ministry courses at Southern California School of Ministry, a school he founded for Hispanic students. He has also served as Visiting Professor in Church Growth and Church Planting at Dallas Theological Seminary. He is a highly sought after guest lecturer and conference speaker. Dr. Montoya has written numerous journal and periodical articles, and has authored Hispanic Ministry in North America and Preaching with Passion.

Kelly T. Osborne
Associate Professor of New Testament B.A., University of Washington M.Div., Th.M., Talbot Theological Seminary M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington Prior to joining The Masters Seminary faculty in 2007, Dr. Osborne taught fourteen years as the Associate Professor of Classics at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. While his primary teaching responsibilites included Classical Greek language, literature and textual criticism, New Testament language and interpretation, and Ancient Greek history, he provided instruction in Latin language and literature and Roman history as well. Dr. Osborne also served as a teaching assistant while pursuing post-graduate studies at Biola University, Talbot Theological Seminary, and University of Washington. Dr. Osborne authored a chapter in The Jesus Crisis, edited by Robert L. Thomas, and is a frequent contributor to journals and magazines.

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Andrew V. Snider
Associate Professor of Theology B.A., Cedarville College M.Div., Th.M., Th.D., The Masters Seminary After completing his undergraduate work in Communications, Dr. Snider worked for a number of years in the financial services industry. During this time he gained experience in pastoral ministry as a lay leader in his local church. After moving to California to attend seminary he ministered in various administration and teaching capacities while serving on the part-time pastoral staff of Grace Community Church, and also worked as broadcast editor for Grace to You. Dr. Snider joined the seminary faculty full-time in 2002.

Dennis M. Swanson
Seminary Library Director, Director of Educational Assessment A.S., College of the Canyons B.A., The Masters College M.Div., The Masters Seminary M.L.I.S., San Jose State University D.Min., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary After nearly 15 years as an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department, Dr. Swanson entered the ministry, serving in associate and senior pastoral positions in Southern California. In 1992 he joined The Masters College as Director of Academic Assessment and Assistant Professor of Bible. In 1994 he joined The Masters Seminary as head Librarian. He continues an active ministry, having served as interim pastor in several area churches and as an adjunct professor at The Masters College and the Logos Bible Institute. He has also studied at the American Institute of Holy Land Studies and Moody Bible Institute. Dr. Swanson also directs the seminarys Study in Israel summer program.

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Michael J. Vlach
Associate Professor of Theology B.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln M.Div., The Masters Seminary Ph.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Before joining The Masters Seminary faculty in 2006, Dr. Vlach functioned as a Professor of Humanities at Southeast Community College in Lincoln, Nebraska. He also taught Bible, Theology, and Hermeneutics for Grace University in Omaha, Nebraska. While working on his doctorate, Dr. Vlach was the Senior Researcher/Writer at Church Initiative, a church-equipping ministry in Wake Forest, North Carolina. An ordained minister, Dr. Vlach served as an assistant pastor for five years in Lincoln, Nebraska, where he headed up a church-based Bible training institute. He speaks regularly at churches and conferences and has appeared on several national radio broadcasts. He has also published numerous articles in Christian magazines and scholarly journals.

Robert M. White, Jr.


Executive Assistant to the Senior Vice President & Dean Vice President for Develoment and Operations Director of Field Education A.A., Kansas City, Kansas Community College B.Th., The Masters Seminary From 1967 to 1971, Mr. White served with the United States Navy, including a tour of duty in Vietnam. From 19721991, he was involved in business, including ten years as president and general manager of an automobile dealership in Northern California. While in business, Mr. White served in the same local church as a deacon and elder, and as a board member of a Christian day-school. After completing graduate studies at The Masters Seminary, Mr. White joined the administrative staff as the personal assistant to Dr. Mayhue in 1995. He also studied with Moody Bible Institute, and at the American Institute of Holy Land Studies in Jerusalem. In addition to his seminary duties, Mr. White serves as a deacon at Grace Community Church, ministering as senior staff in the college department and in the premarital and counseling ministries.

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FACULTY ASSOCIATES
Miguel Anaya
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries B.A., University of Washington M.Div., The Masters Seminary For more than a decade, Mr. Anaya taught English and Spanish in Seattle, Washington and in Pachuca Hidalgo, Mexico. While working in the Pacific Northwest, he also served as Bible teacher and worship leader at Grace Community Baptist Church in Seattle. Following his graduation from seminary in 1993, Mr. Anaya joined the staff of the First Fundamental Bible Church (FFBC) of Monterey Park, California ministering alongside TMS Professor Allex Montoya as pastor of the Spanishlanguage ministries. He also serves as director of the Seminario Biblico Fundamental, a Bible school founded by FFBC for Hispanic students.

Scott Ardavanis
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries B.A., Los Angeles Baptist College (now The Masters College) M.Div., The Masters Seminary D.Min., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School Raised in the San Fernando Valley, Scott Ardavanis graduated from Los Angeles Baptist College (now The Masters College) in 1985. He earned his Master of Divinity from The Master's Seminary in 1988, and his Doctor of Ministry at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. After graduation, Pastor Ardavanis served as an associate pastor for five years at Grace Community Church and as an adjunct faculty member at The Master's Seminary, teaching Pastoral Ministry and Preaching. He spent nine years as the senior pastor of Grace Church of DuPage in Chicago, Illinois, before beginning his pastoral ministry at Placerita Baptist Church in Santa Clarita, California, in 2003. Pastor Ardavanis met his wife, Patty, at Grace Community Church. They have been married 20 years and have seven children.

Personnel

Ernest H. Baker
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries B.A., Washington Bible College M.Div., Capital Bible Seminary D. Min., Westminster Theological Seminary Dr. Baker has been in ministry since 1980 with extensive experience in his last pastoral ministry of 13 years in Blacksburg, Virginia, training and equipping pastors and laymen in the skills of Biblical Counseling. He has completed two levels of training with Peacemaker Ministries and developed a conflict resolution course for IFCA International. He has Level II certification with the National Association of Nouthetic Counselors and is currently seeking Fellow status with NANC. He and his wife, Rose Marie, have been married since 1981 and are parents of three boys and three girls. Dr. Baker has taught at The Masters College since 2005.
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M. Scott Bashoor
Faculty Associate, Old Testament and Bible Exposition B.A., Bob Jones University M.Div., Th.M., The Masters Seminary Th.D., in preparation, The Masters Seminary Raised in a godly Baptist pastors home near Washington D.C., Scott Bashoor graduated from Bob Jones University with a Bachelors degree in Bible and then went on to receive Master of Divinity and Master of Theology degrees from The Masters Seminary. Before becoming the pastor of Bible Church of Buena Park in 1999, Pastor Bashoor served as a camp chaplain, a pulpit supply and event speaker, and interim pastor. He and his wife, Heidi, live in Anaheim with their daughter.

Clayton P. Erb
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries D.D., The Masters Seminary Dr. Erb studied music theory and composition with Dr. David Ulrich of Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, choral and orchestral conducting with Dr. Neil Fichthorn of Kings College, Briarcliff Manor, New York, and vocal technique with Dr. Tom Cleveland of the University of Southern California. He is a member of American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) and has published compositions with Word, Singspiration, Percy B. Crawford, Fred Bock Music, and Sparrow Records. He has musical strengths in conducting, vocal pedagogy, arranging, and keyboard skills, and is credited with numerous recordings. Dr. Erb has served as Minister of Music and Worship at Gilead Baptist Church, Detroit, Michigan (19601969); at First Baptist Church of Eugene, Oregon (19691977); at Westminster Chapel of Bellevue, Washington (19771979). Since 1979 he has served as Minister of Music and Worship at Grace Community Church, and since 1991 has taught at The Masters Seminary.

Carl A. Hargrove

Personnel

Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries B.A., University of Cincinnati M.Div., The Masters Seminary Th.M., The Masters Seminary Before attending seminary, Mr. Hargrove was an active member of First Baptist Church of Orlando, Florida, where he taught adult Sunday School and was an area trainer in Evangelism Explosion. During seminary, he was on the staff of Grace Community Church, where he pastored the single adult Career Fellowship group. He was one of the initial instructors in Graces counseling ministry and is a member of the National Association of Nouthetic Counselors. After graduation in 1993, he was ordained and commissioned by Grace to plant a church in the urban community of Inglewood, California. From that endeavor, Westside Bible Church was born, where he continues to minister as senior pastor. In addition, Mr. Hargrove has been a professor for the past five years at the Los Angeles Bible Training School and began teaching at The Masters Seminary in 1998.
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Jack Hughes
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries A.A., B.A., Boise State University M.Div., The Masters Seminary D.Min., Westminster Theological Seminary (Escondido, CA) Before going to seminary, Dr. Hughes was highly involved in singles ministry, college ministry with Campus Crusade for Christ, and later in youth ministry at Treasure Valley Bible Church in Boise, Idaho. From 1988 to 1991, Dr. Hughes ministered to young married couples, taught adult Sunday school classes, and served as an elder at Church of the Canyons in Canyon Country, California. During seminary, he helped plant Grace Bible Church in Boise, Idaho, where he served as interim pastor and later as copastor. During his ten year ministry there, he helped plant two other churches. In August of 2000, he began serving as the pastor-teacher of Calvary Bible Church in Burbank, California. Dr. Hughes is the author of the book Expository Preaching with Word Pictures, and has a passion for training leaders and teaching them how to preach and teach Gods Word with excellence. Dr. Hughes began serving as adjunct professor at The Masters Seminary in 2003.

Jesse Johnson
Faculty Associate, Missions B.A., University of New Mexico M.Div., The Masters Seminary Th.M., The Masters Seminary During his residency for the Master of Divinity degree, Mr. Johnson was active in Grace Community Churchs Outreach Ministries. Today he serves there as pastor of Local Outreach, leading the ministry to drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers, local hospitals, and homeless shelters. In addition, he oversees the churchs evangelism training program and teaches various classes in evangelism. Before assuming this position, he taught at Christ Baptist Seminary in South Africa. Prior to coming to seminary, Mr. Johnson was a Major League Soccer referee, a sport that continues to provide community outreach opportunities.

Personnel

139

Bryan Murphy
Faculty Associate, Old Testament B.A., Temple Baptist College M.Div., Th.M., Th.D., The Masters Seminary Dr. Murphy spent 13 years in the computer industry working as a programmer and then as a financial planner before coming to The Masters Seminary 1997. He began serving as a pastoral intern at Grace Community Church under Dr. Stuart Scott during his M.Div. studies and was ordained in 2000. In May of 2000 he became the Pastor/Teacher of Roosevelt Community Church in Lancaster, California, where he continues to serve. He has taught in an adjunct capacity at both The Masters Seminary and The Masters College. He has also been a Bible conference speaker in Canada, Brazil, and the South Pacific.

Paul T. Plew
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries B.S.M., Baptist Bible College M.M., Pacific Lutheran University Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University Since 1979, Dr. Plew has been serving as the Chair of the Music Department and Director of Choral Music at The Masters College. Under his direction, The Collegiate Singers, The Masters Chorale, and Majesty have toured throughout the United States, Europe, Russia, and Israel, and have recorded more than twenty albums with leading publishers and composers. Dr. Plew is a member of the American Choral Directors Association, the National Association of Schools of Music, and is the book editor for the Choral Conductors Guild. He is one of the founding members of the Santa Clarita Choral Educators Association and Southern California Christian College Music Faculty Conference. Dr. Plew, who has been lecturing at The Masters Seminary since 1998, also serves as Minister of Music at Santa Clarita Baptist Church in Santa Clarita, California.

Personnel

Robert W. Provost
Faculty Associate, World Missions and Evangelism B.A., Syracuse University M.Div., Grace Theological Seminary D.D., The Masters College Dr. Provost served in the U.S. Air Force with duties as an interpreter in the Security Service Intelligence Branch in West Germany. From 1966 to 1974 he held middle and upper-level management positions in major corporations with national and international operations. Soon after his salvation at age 28 he entered seminary, and while in seminary became founding pastor of an independent evangelical church in northern Indiana. In addition, during his seminary career he served as Director of Supporting Services at Grace College and Grace Theological Seminary. From 1977 to 1985 he was associate pastor at The Chapel in University Park, Akron, Ohio. There he served as administrative pastor with general supervision of ministries and business affairs for a church family of nearly 10,000. He is presently serving
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on the executive council of the International Coalition of Sports Ministries, and on the U.S. council of SEND International. From 1985 to 1989 he served as Executive Vice President of The Masters College and Seminary with responsibility as chief operating officer. In 1989 he accepted a position with SEND International as Managing Director for their ministries in the U.S.S.R., Eastern Europe, and China, and in 1994 became the President for Slavic Gospel Association. He continues to serve The Masters College and Seminary as an international representative in furthering the missions emphasis on both campuses, and is a board member.

James E. Rosscup
Professor of Bible Exposition B.A., Arizona State University Th.M., Th.D., Dallas Theological Seminary Ph.D., University of Aberdeen, Scotland Dr. Rosscup has received awards for several facets of writing, such as feature writing, essays, and scholarly dissertations. After completing his Master of Theology program in 1961 he served on the staff of Campus Crusade for Christ for one year, with responsibilities for their Collegiate Challenge magazine. From 1965 to 1987 he served as chairman of the department of Bible Exposition at Talbot Theological Seminary. He has also served as an adjunct faculty member for Grace Theological Seminary. Dr. Rosscup has written a number of journal articles and books, among which are Abiding in Christ: Studies in John 15 and Commentaries for Biblical Expositors. He contributed several entries for the Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible and chapters in several books produced by The Masters Seminary. He is active in his local church, as well as in conference and church ministries throughout the southwest He joined the faculty of The Masters Seminary in 1987.

Robert S. Scott
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries B.A., University of California, Los Angeles M.Div., Th.M., The Masters Seminary While completing his undergraduate studies at UCLA, Mr. Scott began serving on the staff of Grace Community Church as a pastoral intern in the college department. He continued that ministry while attending seminary and gave leadership to the seminarys associated student body as president during his senior year as well. Upon graduation in 1993, he joined the staff of Grace Community Church in Los Angeles, where he ministered as the associate pastor for one year before becoming the senior pastor of the Community Bible Church in South Central Los Angeles. For the past five years, Mr. Scott has also served as a professor at the Los Angeles Bible Training School and is an active speaker at conferences and retreats. He began teaching at The Masters Seminary in 1998.

Personnel

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John D. Street
Faculty Associate, Pastoral Ministries B.A., Cedarville University M.Div., Grand Rapids Theological Seminary D.Min., Westminster Theological Seminary Dr. Street currently serves as the Chair of the Master of Arts in Biblical Counseling and Professor of Biblical Counseling at The Masters College. He has given more than 25 years to academic and pastoral ministry. He was the founding pastor of Clearcreek Chapel in Springboro, Ohio, and has taught at both Cedarville and Cornerstone Universities. Dr. Street is a regular contributor to The Biblical Counselor and The Journal of Biblical Counseling and is an editor of The Journal of Modern Ministry. He authored chapters to the books Think Biblically and An Introduction to Biblical Counseling and is a Fellow and board member of the National Association of Nouthetic Counselors (NANC).

Aaron K. Tresham
Faculty Associate, New Testament B.A., Lewis and Clark College M.S., University of Oregon M.Div., Th.M., The Masters Seminary Th.D., in preparation, The Masters Seminary Mr. Tresham studied Mathematics as an undergraduate and graduate student before beginning his theological studies at The Masters Seminary in 2003. After completeing his Th.M. in New Testament in 2008, he was accepted into the Th.D. program to continue his study of the New Testament. He currently serves with his wife in Childrens Ministries at Grace Community Church. Mr. Tresham began teaching Greek at the seminary in 2007.

William C. Varner
Faculty Associate, Bible Exposition B.A., Bob Jones University M.A., Dropsie College M.Div., Th.M., Biblical Theological Seminary Ed.D., Temple University Studies in Modern Hebrew at Gratz College Dr. Varner began teaching at The Masters College after seven years in the pastorate and seventeen years of ministry with the Friends of Israel in New Jersey. The last ten of those years he served as Dean of their Institute of Biblical Studies, where he taught and led study tours to Israel. Dr. Varner also served as an adjunct professor at Philadelphia College of the Bible. In addition to teaching Bible Exposition and Greek Exegesis courses, Will serves as Director of the TMC IBEX semester in Israel program, a country he has visited more than 40 times. In 1999 and in 2005 Dr. Varner was honored as The Masters College Teacher of the Year. He has been selected for Whos Who in Americas Colleges for 19982009 and was recently selected into Whos Who in America. He is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society and the Society of

Personnel

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Biblical Literature, and has written five books, contributed to two others, and published more than 100 journal and periodical articles. He recently published an academic commentary on James. Dr. Varner serves as pastor of the Sojourners Fellowship at Grace Community Church and often ministers in conferences and churches nationwide. He and his wife, Helen, have three grown children, one of whom is with the Lord, and three grandchildren.

Matt Waymeyer
Faculty Associate, Bible Expostion B.A., University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh M.Div., Th.M., The Masters Seminary Th.D. in preparation, The Masters Seminary While completing his M.Div. and Th.M., Matt Waymeyer served as a pastoral resident at Grace Community Church and taught English Grammar at The Masters Seminary. Since graduating in 2003, Pastor Waymeyer has served as a visiting professor of theology at Southeastern Europe Theological Seminary in Albania, Samara Theological Seminary in Russia, and The Cornerstone Seminary in Vallejo, California. He began teaching hermeneutics at The Masters Seminary as an adjunct faculty member in spring of 2010, and is currently pursuing his Th.D. in systematic theology at TMS. Since 2004, he has served as pastor of Community Bible Church in Vista, California. Pastor Waymeyer and his wife, Julie, have five children.

Personnel

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR
Fall Semester
Orientation Faculty Retreat Classes Begin Holiday (Labor Day) Fall Picnic Final day for late registration and adding classes Spring and Winterim Registration ETS (National) Last day to withdraw while passing Thanksgiving recess Final day of semester Fall grades due

2010
August 2327 August 2627 August 31 September 6 September 11 September 10 November 111 November 1719 November 19 November 2226 December 17 December 24

2011
August 2226 August 2526 August 30 September 5 TBA September 9 Oct 31Nov 10 November 1618 November 18 November 2125 December 16 December 23

Winterim
Dr. Charlie Dyer, Jeremiah/Lamentations Dr. John Feinberg, Contemporary Issues Doctor of Ministry Classes

2011
January 37

2012
January 914

January 511

January 410

Spring Semester
Orientation Holiday (MLK Day) Classes Begin Final day for late registration and adding classes Holiday (Presidents Day) Spring Banquet Shepherds Conference Alumni Dinner Easter Recess Last day to withdraw while passing

2011
January 1114 January 17 January 18 January 28 February 21 March 4 March 913 March 11 April 1115 April 22

2012
January 1013 January 16 January 17 January 27 February 20 February 24 March 711 March 9 April 913 April 20
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Academic Calendar

Fall and Summer Registration ETS (Far West Region) Final Day of semester Graduation Banquet Commencement Spring grades due Summer Session 1 Begins Summer Session 2 Begins Doctor of Ministry Classes

April 1828 April 8 May 13 May 14 May 15 May 20 May 16 July 5 July 619

April 1626 TBA May 11 May 12 May 13 May 18 May 14 July 2 July 1124

Academic Calendar
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INDEX
Academic Load. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Academic Programs/Policies . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Accreditation Notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Admission Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Admission Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Advising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Application for Graduation. . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Application Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Arranged Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Associated Student Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Auditors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Bachelor of Theology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Bible Exposition Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Board of Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Bookstore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Candidacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chapel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Class Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Class Schedules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Class Scheduling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Classification of Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Conduct Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Continuing Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Course Identification System . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Course Papers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Cross-cultural Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Devotional Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Diploma of Theology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Discipleship Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Doctor of Ministry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Doctor of Theology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Dress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Educational Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Educational Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 75 English Proficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Faculty Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Faculty, Resident . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Field Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Financial Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Foreign Studies in Missions . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Grading System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Greek Prerequisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Grievances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 History of the Seminary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Housing and Other Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Incomplete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Insurance, Medical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 International Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Israel Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Journal, The Masters Seminary . . . . . . . . . 12 Legal Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Location. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Master of Divinity Program . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Master of Theology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
147

Index

Missions Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Missions Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 New Testament Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Old Testament Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Online, The Masters Seminary . . . . . . . . . 74 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Part-Time Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Pastoral Ministries Courses . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Payment of Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Personal Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Plagiarism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Prerequisites for Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Probation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Public Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Purpose Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Satisfactory Progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Shepherds Conference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Social Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Special Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Statement of Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Student Charges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Student Employment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 75 Student Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Student Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Student Loans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Summer Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Telephone Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Theology Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Thesis, M.Div. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Thesis, Th.M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
148

Time Limitation, M.Div. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Training Distinctives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Tuition Deposit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Veterans Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Waivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Winterim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Wives Discipleship Program. . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Index

Aug 2010 - July 2011


August 2010
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 S

September 2010
M T W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25 3 10 17 24 31 S

October 2010
M 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 W 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 28 S

November 2010
M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27

December 2010
S 5 12 19 26 M 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 F 3 10 17 24 31 S 4 11 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 S

January 2011
M 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 W 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 F 7 14 21 28 S 1 8 15 22 29 6 13 20 27 S

February 2011
M 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 W 2 9 16 23 T 3 10 17 24 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 S

March 2011
M T 1 8 15 22 29 14 21 28 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26

April 2011
S 3 10 17 24 M 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 W 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30 S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30

May 2011
T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 S M

June 2011
T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25 3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 S M

July 2011
T 5 12 19 26 W 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30

Aug 2011 - July 2012


August 2011
S 7 14 21 28 M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 S

September 2011
M T W T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 2 9 16 23 30 S

October 2011
M 3 10 17 24 31 T 4 11 18 25 W 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 F 7 14 21 28 S 1 8 15 22 29 6 13 20 27 S

November 2011
M 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26

December 2011
S 4 11 18 25 M 5 12 19 26 T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 31 S 1 8 15 22 29

January 2012
M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 S

February 2012
M 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 W 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25 4 11 18 25 5 S

March 2012
M T 6 13 20 27 W 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 12 19 26 F 2 9 16 23 30 S 3 10 17 24 31

April 2012
S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 S M

May 2012
T 1 8 15 22 29 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 31 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 24 4 11 18 25 S M

June 2012
T 5 12 19 26 W 6 13 20 27 T 7 14 21 28 F 1 8 15 22 29 S 2 9 16 23 30 S 1 8 15 22 29 M 2 9 16 23 30

July 2012
T 3 10 17 24 31 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28