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Protocols for Measuring and Reporting on the Key Performance Indicators of the Forest Management Plan 2004-2013

Sustainable Forest Management Series

Department of Environment and Conservation SFM Manual No.2 2011

Department of Environment and Conservation


17 Dick Perry Av, Western Precinct Technology Park Kensington Western Australia 6151 Telephone (08) 9423 2333 Facsimile (08) 9423 2432 WEBSITE: www.dec.wa.gov.au
EMAIL: information@dec.wa.gov.au

Reference details The recommended reference for this publication is: Department of Environment and Conservation 2011, Protocols for Measuring and Reporting on the Key Performance Indicators of the Forest Management Plan 2004-2013, Department of Environment and Conservation, Sustainable Forest Management Series, SFM Manual No. 2.

Commenced: 1 March 2007 Effective from: 6 December 2011 Custodian: Manager, Forest Policy and Practices Branch Approved by: Director, Sustainable Forest Management Division

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Table of Contents
Sustainable Forest Management Series ...................................................................................... 1 Table of Contents........................................................................................................................... 3 Preamble......................................................................................................................................... 5 Responsibilities ............................................................................................................................. 7 1. 2. KPI 1 - The representation of forest ecosystems in formal reserves .............................. 9 KPI 2 - The status of (critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) forest-dwelling species and ecological communities as determined by listing.......................................................................................................... 16 KPI 3 - The status of selected threatened or conservation dependent species that are the subject of management actions to protect them ........................................ 22 KPI 4 - The area of native forest and plantations ............................................................ 27 KPI 5 - Annual removal of wood products compared to sustainable yield determined by the plan. ..................................................................................................... 32 KPI 6 - Area of forest cut over annually............................................................................ 39 KPI 7 - Removal of non sawlog timber ............................................................................. 43 KPI 8 - The presence of Sirex in softwood plantations ................................................... 47 KPI 9 - Time to regenerate harvested areas ..................................................................... 51 KPI 10 - Effectiveness of regeneration of native forest and plantation ......................... 56 KPI 11 - Forecast strategic timber yield versus actual timber yield. ............................. 62 KPI 12 - Achievement of early thinning schedules that underpin future yield ............. 63 KPI 13 - Direct and indirect employment in the timber industries ................................. 64 KPI 14 - Access for apiculture ........................................................................................... 67 KPI 15 - Wildflowers and seed picking ............................................................................. 71 KPI 16 - Risk to conservation life property and other forest values posed by wildfire ................................................................................................................................. 79 KPI 17 - Severity status of weeds and pests as determined by subjective survey ...... 85 KPI 18 - Effectiveness of dieback hygiene ....................................................................... 93 KPI 19 - Annual flow weighted mean salinity and trend for streams in fully forested catchment............................................................................................................. 94 KPI 20 - Percentage of water bodies (e.g. stream kilometres, lake hectares) with significant variance of biodiversity from the historic range of variability .................... 98 KPI 21 - The level of soil damage resulting from timber harvesting ............................ 102 KPI 22 - Water production ................................................................................................ 109 KPI 23 - The identification and protection of cultural heritage .................................... 115 KPI 24 - Consultation and involvement of Aboriginal people in forest management...................................................................................................................... 127 KPI 25 - The protection of heritage places through representation in reserves ........ 129 KPI 26 - Number, range and use of recreation/tourism activities available by proposed land category in the plan area........................................................................ 133

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

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27. 28. 29.

KPI 27 - Basic raw material supply ................................................................................. 139 KPI 28 - Adaptive management ....................................................................................... 152 KPI 29 - Provide for public involvement activities and public education, awareness and extension programs and make available forest-related information ........................................................................................................................ 155 KPI 30 - Develop and maintain human resource skills across relevant disciplines .. 162 KPI 31 - Development of scientific understanding of ecosystem characteristics and functions .................................................................................................................... 168 KPI 32 - Environmental management system ................................................................ 175 KPI 33 - Operational control ............................................................................................ 177

30. 31. 32. 33.

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Preamble
The Forest Management Plan 2004-2013 (hereafter referred to as the Forest Management Plan) requires the development of protocols for 33 Key Performance Indicators (KPI). These performance indicators have been developed to assess the effectiveness of the plan in meeting its objectives and to measure progress towards the implementation of its proposals. The Montreal Criteria for sustainability were considered a suitable framework for developing performance indicators. They are grouped according to the following criteria:

the conservation of biodiversity; the maintenance of productive capacity; the maintenance of ecosystem health and vitality; the conservation and maintenance of soil and water; the maintenance of heritage; the maintenance of socio-economic values; and plan implementation.

The Indicators are designed to measure any or all of the three elements of a management issue. These elements are:

the condition of the subject under consideration; the pressure(s) that might be affecting the subject; and the response to those pressures by management.

Principles are necessary to select the most appropriate key performance indicators. The principles used for the plan will relate to their capacity to:

represent community concerns; operate at a range of scales; satisfy other reporting requirements; measure critical elements necessary for adaptive management; and balance the provision of environmental and socio-economic benefits.

The extent to which a performance indicator can be implemented may be limited by the availability of data for reporting, capacity to obtain measurable data, and the cost of implementation. Performance indicators therefore target key aspects of the plan. This document provides the protocols for 20 of the 33 KPI in the Forest Management Plan. The other 13 KPI are not sufficiently developed to publish at this stage. This document will be updated to include the additional KPI as they become available for publication. The protocol for measuring and reporting each key performance indicator is divided into two sections. The first section details background information from the Forest Management Plan. This includes the overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to the broad criteria for sustainability, the specific objectives according to each criterion for sustainability, and relevant actions from the Forest Management Plan. Any text within this section of the document that is taken directly from the Forest Management Plan is shown in italics.

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The second section outlines the protocol for reporting. This includes the specific objective for the KPI, rationale, background and context, issues (data quality and interpretation), the entity to be measured, required data, calculation method, reporting timeframes, and data presentation. A work instruction section provides further information about data collection and data presentation for the relevant custodians. Some protocols will differ marginally from this format due to the type of data required. The overall objective and actions of the Forest Management Plan in relation to Plan Implementation is: Objective: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that forest management is undertaken in accordance with the plan and is continually improved so as to achieve best practice: (Forest Management Plan p61) Monitoring and audit Objective: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to monitor and audit the extent to which management of land to which the plan applies is undertaken in accordance with the plan: Most relevant actions: 32.6 The Department, in consultation with the Conservation Commission, will develop a protocol for each key performance indicator in the plan, which will: 32.6.1 identify the data to be collected and analysed in assessing the extent to which the key performance indicator has been achieved; and 32.6.2 specify the persons who are responsible for the collection and analysis of that data.

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Responsibilities
The Forest Policy and Practices Branch of the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) has undertaken the responsibility of developing the protocols for the KPI, in consultation with information custodians and the Conservation Commission, and will continue with this responsibility by completing this process for the remaining protocols as they become available. The Forest Policy and Practices Branch also has the role of collating the information provided by custodians for each of the KPI into an annual report. The responsibility for reporting against individual KPI falls to a range of custodians from within DEC and other agencies as identified in Table 1. Table 1: Reporting responsibilities for Key Performance Indicators for which approved protocols have been developed Title of KPI
The representation of forest ecosystems in formal reserves The status of (critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) forest dwelling species and ecological communities as determined by listing. The status of selected threatened or conservation dependent species that are the subject of management actions to protect them. The area of native forests and plantations Annual removal vs. Sustained yield Area cutover annually Removal of non - Sawlog timber

KPI
1

Reporting timeframe
Biennially

Relevant agencies/data custodians with reporting responsibilities


Information Management Branch Forest Management Branch Parks and Visitors Services Division Nature Conservation Division

Annually

Annually

Nature Conservation Division

4 5 6 7

Five years Annually. Annually. Five years.

Forest Management Branch Forest Products Commission Forest Products Commission Forest Management Branch Forest Management Branch Forest Policy and Practices Branch Forest Products Commission Regional Services Division. Forest Products Commission Forest Management Branch. Forest Management Branch Forest Products Commission Forest Products Commission Parks and Visitors Services Division Nature Conservation Forest Products Commission Nature Conservation Division Department of Water Water Corporation

8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 19

The presence of Sirex in softwood plantations. Time to regenerate Effectiveness of regeneration Employment in timber industry Access for apiculture. Wildflowers and seed picking. The presence of Sirex in softwood plantations. Weeds & pests severity by subjective survey Annual flow-weighted Mean salinity

Annually Annually. Annually. Biennially. Biennially Annually Annually Five years. Five years.

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KPI
20

Title of KPI
Percentage of water bodies (e.g. stream kilometres, lake hectares) with significant variance of biodiversity from the historic range of variability. The level of soil damage resulting from timber harvesting. Water production (streamflow)

Reporting timeframe
Five years

Relevant agencies/data custodians with reporting responsibilities


Science Division

21

Annually

22

Five years

23

The identification and protection of cultural heritage.

Annually

24

25 26

27 28

Consultation and involvement of Aboriginal people in forest management. The protection of heritage places through representation in reserves. Number, range and use of recreation/tourism activities available by proposed land category in the plan area. Basic raw material supply. Adaptive management.

Annually

Regional Services Division Forest Policy and Practices Branch Forest Products Commission Department of Water Water Corporation Science Division Information Management Branch Regional Services Division Forest Policy and Practices Branch Parks and Visitors Services Division Parks and Visitors Services Division

Biennially Annually

Information Management Branch Parks and Visitors Services Division Parks and Visitors Services Division Regional Services Division

Annually Five years

29

30

31

Provide for public involvement activities and public education, awareness and extension programs and make available forest- related information. Develop and maintain human resource skills across relevant disciplines. Development of scientific understanding of ecosystem characteristics and functions. Environmental management system. Operational control.

Annually

Regional Services Division Environmental Management Branch Forest Policy and Practices Branch Forest Management Branch Science Division Forest Products Commission Regional Services Division Parks and Visitors Services Division Strategic Development and Corporate Affairs Division Corporate Services Forest Products Commission Sustainable Forest Management Division Science Division Nature Conservation Division Parks and Visitor Services Forest Policy and Practices Branch Forest Policy and Practices Branch Forest Management Branch Fire Management Services Branch Nature Conservation Division Conservation Commission Forest Products Commission

Annually

Annually

32 33

December 2005 Annually

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1.

KPI 1 - The representation of forest ecosystems in formal reserves

1.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to biological diversity is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the whole of forest scale for the purpose of seeking to conserve biodiversity and seeking to conserve self-sustaining populations of native species and communities, and at the landscape scale for the purpose of seeking to allow for the recovery of biodiversity between one timber rotation and the next. (Forest Management Plan p23) Forest Management Plan extract (page 30) Key performance indicator 1 Performance measure Performance target(s) The representation of forest ecosystems in formal reserves. Area of each forest ecosystem by land category (existing and proposed separately). The Department and the Conservation Commission to complete all actions for which they are responsible in order to formally change the land category of areas proposed for the reserve system within ten years after the commencement of the plan. Biennially on progress. The Department to investigate lack of progress and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Department to address those impediments within its control and the Department and the Conservation Commission to advise the Minister for the Environment on measures to address other impediments.

Reporting Response to progress shortfall

The objective in relation to the establishment of formal reserves is: The plan proposes the following actions at the whole of forest scale for the purpose of seeking to conserve biodiversity and ecological integrity in all native forest ecosystems through the establishment and management of a system of reserves that is comprehensive, adequate and representative: (Forest Management Plan p24). Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 1.1 The Department will initiate the processes required for the land category changes proposed by the plan by: 1.1.1 undertaking fine scale reserve design for the parks proposed in the Protecting our old -growth forests policy so as to include within the parks old-growth forest adjacent to the nominal boundaries; 1.1.2 facilitating the Governments community consultation process on fine-scale reserve design; and 1.1.3 consulting with the Conservation Commission and then advising the Minister for the Environment on final reserve boundaries. Consultation with the community and affected government and local government authorities as contemplated by Action 1.1.2 may result in minor amendments to the boundaries of reserves shown on Map 3 and Map 5. 1.2 The Department will manage the areas proposed by Appendix 2 for inclusion in a national park, nature reserve or conservation park consistently with their proposed land category and purpose and relevant Departmental policies until such time as they are formally created. Timber production in these areas will not be permitted.

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1.3

The Department will cooperate with the Departments of Environment and Planning and Infrastructure and other agencies in relation to the establishment of a comprehensive, adequate and representative reserve system outside the RFA area, through Bush Forever or similar programs.

1.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 1


1.2.1. Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 1 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets for representation of forest ecosystems in conservation reserves, through tracking the progress in the establishment of formal reserves. 1.2.2. Rationale

Monitoring the status of implementation of reserve proposals is important to the successful establishment of the comprehensive, adequate and representative (CAR) reserve system. In the past, many proposals for conservation reserves have taken a long time before the process of establishing them is complete. Tracking the process of establishment and dealing with impediments to establishment will assist in the assessment of management activities so that appropriate actions to better achieve the objective can be identified. 1.2.3. Background and context

The establishment of a CAR reserve system is fundamental to the conservation of biodiversity. The CAR reserve system is comprised of formal reserves, Forest Conservation Areas and some informal reserves. This KPI focuses on the formal reserve component of the CAR reserve system. The formal conservation reserve system proposed in the Forest Management Plan is based on the National Reserve System principles to select areas to meet CAR criteria and additional reserves as a result of Government policy decisions, most notably the Protecting our old-growth forests policy. The Guidelines for the National Reserve System Program aim for the CAR reserve system to contain samples of all ecosystems identified at an appropriate regional scale. In doing so, the aim is to also consider the ecological requirements of rare or threatened species and ecological communities and ecosystems, special groups of organisms such as those with specialized habitat requirements, wide ranging or migratory species or species vulnerable to threatening processes. 1.2.4. Issues

Implementation of the proposed amendments to land category as detailed in the Forest Management Plan is a complex process that may be influenced by other agencies such as the Western Australian Land Information Authority, the Department of Water, the Department of Industry and Resources, and local government authorities. Additionally, the changes require Parliamentary approval. Each of these bodies may have concerns or objections that affect the capacity to achieve the proposed changes, including delays in the process while issues are addressed. Other causes of delays relate to consideration of the Commonwealths Native Title Act 1993 and the State Land Administration Act 1997 (principally concerning the closure of unwanted roads), and pastoral leases which extend beyond the time frame of the Forest Management Plan. Mapping of forest ecosystems is only available for land within the Regional Forest Agreement area and outside this area the Beard-Hopkins vegetation associations have been used as a guide to
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representation of ecosystems in conservation reserves. Forest ecosystem mapping is subject to refinement that may lead to minor variations in the data. 1.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI

Entity Target The area of each land category in the No target for plan period. Long-term target is the plan area. area of each land category when all proposed land category changes are completed. The percentage of the total distribution of No target for plan period. Long-term target is the each forest ecosystems in the Regional percentage achieved when all proposed land Forest Agreement Region of the plan category changes are completed. area that occurs in formal conservation reserves, being national parks, nature reserves, conservation parks and CALM Act section 5(1)(g) & (h) reserves. The number of individual reserve Of the total number of proposed changes (286), the proposals as set out in Appendix 2 of the nominal target is 70 per cent (200) to be fully Forest Management Plan (286 in total) implemented by December 2013. that have been fully implemented.

1.2.6.

Required data Data Custodians Geographic Information Section of Information Management Branch and Forest Management Branch

Required data Collection & storage method Current tenure base in the Obtain from Landgate via plan area Information Management Branch and import to Forest Management Information System prior to the calculation for each reporting period. Proposed tenure base in Forest Management Information System attribute the plan area Regional Forest Agreement Region Forest ecosystems distribution in the plan area Completion status of Status of each proposal to be proposed land category maintained in a database changes

Forest Management Branch Forest Management Branch Forest Management Branch

Land and External Funding Unit, Parks and Visitor Services Division

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1.2.7.

Calculation method Calculation method Import updates of the Landgate land base from Information Management Branch to the Forest Management Information System (FMIS) and calculate the area of each land category. Include information on land categories used in the national State of the Forest report and IUCN categories to facilitate reporting for other processes. Aggregate categories into formal conservation reserves and other. Overlay FMIS attribute Forest Ecosystem with the current Landgate land base for the Regional Forest Agreement Region to obtain the area of each forest ecosystem by land category. Amalgamate the area of each ecosystem in categories in the formal reserve system and express as a percentage of the total representation in the region. Maintain a register of the status of proposed land category changes (see Appendix 2 of the Forest Management Plan) and express the number completed as a percentage of the total of proposed land category changes (286).

Entity to be measured Area of each land category in the plan area

Representation of forest ecosystems in the formal reserve system within the Regional Forest Agreement Region of the plan area The status of each proposal by the stage of implementation

1.2.8.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Immediately following the close of each two-year reporting period. That is January 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, and 2014. Calculation frequency January 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, and 2014.

Required metric Area (hectares) of each land category in the whole plan area. The percentage representation of each forest ecosystem in the formal conservation reserve system. The implementation status of each land category change proposed in Appendix 2 of the Forest Management Plan. 1.2.9. Data presentation

Recording of the implementation status of each proposed land category change as it occurs.

January 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, and 2014.

Metric Area (hectares) of each land category applicable to formal conservation reserves in the whole plan area. The percentage representation of each forest ecosystem in the formal conservation reserve system. The number of individual land category changes proposed in Appendix 2.

Presentation Amalgamate the area of all land categories that make up the formal conservation reserve system. Present the total area in the formal reserve system as a table (table 1) and a line graph (figure 1) showing the progression at each reporting period toward the total when all proposals are implemented. Present as a table (table 2) showing the percentage representation of each forest ecosystem in the formal conservation reserve system at each reporting period and the percentage representation of each forest ecosystem that will occur when all proposed land category changes are fully implemented. Present the number of proposed changes in land category by implementation status graphically with the target for completion highlighted.

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Table 1:

Area (ha) by established land category for formal conservation reserves in the area of Forest Management Plan for each reporting period.
Total area (ha) in existing formal conservation reserves and proposals in Forest Management Plan 2012 2014 39,150 938,090 108,360

Land category

Total area (ha) for each reporting period

Nature reserves National parks Conservation parks CALM Act section 5(1)(g) & (h) reserves. Total

2004 26,870 375,490 21,350

2006

2008

2010

13,220

13,480

436,930

1,099,080

1,200,000 Nature reserves 1,000,000 Area (ha) 800,000 600,000 400,000 200,000 0 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 Time (years) National parks Conservation parks CALM Act section 5 (1)(g) & (h) reserves Total for FMP

* Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate progression for reporting intervals from 2006 to 2012 Figure 1: Area (ha) of established formal conservation reserves by land category in the area of Forest Management Plan for each reporting period

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Table 2:

Representation of each forest ecosystem in formal conservation reserves for each reporting period in relation to the percentage that will occur when all reserves are established.
Ecosystem representation in formal reserves (percentage of pre 1750 extent) Ecosystem representation in formal reserves (percentage of pre 1750 extent) as proposed in the Forest Management Plan (Sum of 8 numbers in appendix 8 for each ecosystem, converted to %)

Ecosystem type

2004
Jarrah dominant Jarrah Blackwood Jarrah Leeuwin Jarrah Mt Lindesay Jarrah North East Jarrah North West Jarrah Ratess Tingle Jarrah Red Tingle Jarrah Sandy Jarrah South Jarrah Unicup Jarrah Woodland Jarrah Yellow Tingle Sub total Karri dominant Karri Main Belt Karri Rates Tingle Karri Red Tingle Karri West Coast Karri Yellow Tingle Sub total Wandoo dominant Western Wandoo forest Western Wandoo woodland Sub total Other Bullich and Yate Darling Scarp Peppermint and Coastal Heath Rocky Outcrops Sand Dunes Shrub, Herb, and Sedgelands Swamps Sub total Total Total 2.4 4.6 1.2 4.4 7.7 66.0 43.0 8.0 9.4 6.4 11.0 15.3 6.3 19.2 71.8 68.3 27.0 15.3 21.2 7.4 8.4 7.7 53.9 4.7 66.9 17.0 97.8 21.9 33.8 28.8 10.6

2006

2008

2010

2012

2014
23.5 7.1 14.5 15.5 13.6 77 65.7 22.4 40.2 18.6 25.8 66.3 21.9 35.8 71.8 72.6 30.7 70.6 39.2 17.9 20.5 18.7 77.1 7.93 72.3 31.4 99.7 49.5 39.9 50.6 26.6 (81,510 / 347,200) (7,910) (18,320) (111,150) (90,870) (1,160) (230) (24,190) (223,830) (15,050) (27,480) (7,690) (609,400 / 2,783,950) (69,150) (790) (5,230) (4,450) (11,150) (90,770) (64,950) (33,360) (98,310) (2,160) (2,300) (57,880) (8,300) (11,070) (212,770) (6,100) (300,600) (1,099,080/4136350)

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Individual land category changes (total of 286)

350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0


2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014

Reporting period (2 year intervals)


Number of individual land category changes required to reach implementation of all proposed land category changes. Number of individual land category changes completed
* * The nominal target (70% of total proposals) for completion is shown in 2014 as 200 individual land categories. Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate progression for reporting intervals from 2006 to 2012

Figure 2:

Number of proposed land category changes that have been fully implemented by reporting period.

1.2.10. Responsibility Information Management Branch is responsible for collection of updated data from Landgate. Forest Management Branch is responsible for:

collection of data from Information Management Branch; input of updated data into Forest Management Information System; data collation and analysis for KPI; and data presentation and interpretation.

Parks and Visitor Services Division is responsible for maintaining a database of the completion status of proposed land category changes. Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and publication of its report.

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2.

KPI 2 - The status of (critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) forest-dwelling species and ecological communities as determined by listing

2.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to biological diversity is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the whole of forest scale for the purpose of seeking to conserve biodiversity and seeking to conserve self-sustaining populations of native species and communities, and at the landscape scale for the purpose of seeking to allow for the recovery of biodiversity between one timber rotation and the next. (Forest Management Plan p23) Forest Management Plan extract (page 30) Key performance indicator 2 The status of (critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) forest-dwelling species and ecological communities as determined by listing. List of species and ecological communities and their status that tracks movements of species between protection categories. No species or ecological community will move to a higher category of threat as a result of management activities. Annually with the review of the lists. The Department to investigate the cause of a change to a more threatened category and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices, in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to threatened species of flora and fauna and ecological communities is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the landscape scale for the purpose of seeking to protect, and assist the recovery of, threatened and priority species of flora and fauna and ecological communities: (Forest Management Plan p28) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 8.1 The Department will maintain a list identifying threatened and priority species of flora and fauna and threatened ecological communities. (Threatened species and communities are those under risk of extinction. Priority species and communities are those that may be threatened but for which there are insufficient survey data, and those that are rare but not endangered). The Department and the Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations having regard to the Departments Conservation of Endangered and Specially Protected Fauna in the Wild policy and Conservation of Threatened Flora in the Wild policy. The Department and Forest Products Commission will revise planning checklists to identify actions to be taken in specified circumstances in which declared rare flora species, threatened ecological communities, and other significant flora identified in Appendix 13 may be disturbed by their operations. The Forest Products Commission and the Department will undertake operations in accordance with guidelines for operations in the presence of fauna, to be developed as part

8.2

8.3

8.4

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of the Fauna Distribution Information System, which is to be completed by the Forest Products Commission: 8.4.1 to the satisfaction of the Department; and 8.4.2 in consultation with the Conservation Commission. 8.5 (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will advise the Department of its harvesting and management activities within plantations: 8.5.1 where those activities may impact on threatened species and threatened ecological communities, agreed protection measures is implemented. The Department will develop and implement recovery plans for selected threatened species and ecological communities, including: 8.6.1 the Western Shield fox baiting program (which seeks to reduce predation pressure on threatened and priority species of fauna).

8.6

2.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 2


2.2.1. Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 2 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets through monitoring the status (protection category) of threatened flora, fauna and ecological communities, so that ecosystem management activities can be assessed and appropriate actions to better achieve the objective can be identified. 2.2.2. Rationale

Monitoring the status of threatened flora, fauna and ecological communities is essential to identify those taxa and communities at most risk of extinction so that recovery actions can seek to prevent any further loss in biodiversity through an increased level of threat or extinction. 2.2.3. Background and context

The Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 provides for taxa of native plants (flora) and native animals (fauna) to be specially protected if they are under identifiable threat of extinction. Such specially protected fauna and flora are considered to be "threatened" and are officially listed through a Wildlife Conservation (Specially Protected Fauna) Notice or a Wildlife Conservation (Rare Flora) Notice in the Government Gazette. The Threatened Species Scientific Committee meets at least once a year to consider any nominations received since the previous meeting and the public is invited to submit nominations to add taxa to, or delete taxa from, the current Declared Rare Flora and Specially Protected Fauna lists. The Threatened Species Scientific Committee also make recommendations for change to the World Conservation Union (IUCN) ranking for listed taxa. The Threatened Species Scientific Committee reports to the Director General of the Department of Environment and Conservation and the Minister for the Environment. Ministerial approval is necessary before changes to the lists are given legal status with the amended rankings accepted and published in a notice in the Government Gazette. The Conservation Commission, established under the Conservation and Land Management Act 1984, also considers the advice of the Threatened Species Scientific Committee and, make recommendations to the Minister on wildlife conservation policies. Threatened ecological communities are recognised under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 but not the State Wildlife Conservation Act 1950. The proposed Biodiversity Conservation Act is expected to provide this recognition. However, while there is not currently State legislative protection for threatened ecological communities, the Environmental Protection Act 1986 recognises them and provides a mechanism for protecting them from clearing. The land clearing regulations and the Bush Forever program aim to retain all significant remnant vegetation including threatened ecological communities.
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The Declared Rare Flora and Specially Protected Fauna lists and the lists of Threatened Ecological Communities endorsed by the Minister is the basis for measurement of the KPI. 2.2.4. Issues

Changes in designated conservation status (critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) can be used as a crude indicator of the status of biodiversity. Some threats to species may be beyond the control of forest managers. The following issues should be considered in interpreting changes in conservation status:

whether the change in status is the result of human intervention and management; whether the change in status is the result of human activity largely unmanageable by forest managers; whether the change in status is the result of natural variations; whether the change in status is the result of threats outside of the forest or inside the forest; the effectiveness of the nomination and/or assessment of change process in reviewing the threatened species and community lists; implementation of agreed actions to manage threats and improve the status of the threatened species; and a determination will need to be made as to whether the taxa is forest dwelling. That judgment is made if any part of the life cycle is dependent on forest habitat. The entities to be measured for the KPI Target No species will move to a higher category of threat as a result of management activities or lack of appropriate management activities. No ecological community will move to a higher category of threat as a result of management activities.

2.2.5.

Entity Threatened forest-dwelling flora Threatened forest-dwelling fauna Threatened forest-dwelling ecological communities

2.2.6.

Required data Collection & storage method Custodians flora Senior Nature Conservation Division Threatened Species and to store state lists and to Botanist, intersect with area of Forest Communities Branch. Management Plan. Threatened FaunaSenior Zoologist, Species and Communities Branch. Threatened ecological communities- Species and Communities Branch.

Required data A list showing categories of threatened taxa of forest-dwelling flora, fauna and ecological communities for the area covered by the Forest Management Plan.

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2.2.7.

Calculation method Calculation method State-wide lists of threatened taxa and ecological communities to be refined to those taxa and communities that occur in the area of the management plan and for those that are forest-dwelling. Updated lists to be compared on an annual basis by data custodians to identify threatened taxa and ecological communities that have changed conservation status.

Parameter of measurement Change in conservation status for threatened taxa and ecological communities.

2.2.8.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Annual at the end of December. Calculation frequency Calculations to follow endorsement of amended lists by the Minister from the recommendations made by the Threatened Species Scientific Committee.

Required measurement Number of threatened taxa and ecological communities that have changed protection category including current and previous status.

2.2.9.

Data presentation Presentation Table showing number in each category as per Table 1 below. Text describing overall patterns of change in number of threatened taxa and communities.

Metric Number of taxa and ecological communities classified in each conservation status for each year of the life of the management plan. The data for flora and fauna is presented in major groups (Fungi, vascular plants etc). The data for ecological communities is presented by community name. Number of forest-dwelling taxa and ecological communities classified in each conservation status (presumed extinct, critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) at the start of the management plan and at the last update of the lists of conservation status within each reporting period.

Table showing number in each category as per Table 2 and 3 below. Text identifying any taxa or community elevated into a greater threat category, as determined by conservation status, and the reasons for this change. Text identifying any taxa or community reclassified to a lower threat category, as determined by conservation status, and the reasons for this change. Text describing any changes as a result of management practices or other causes of elevated or lowered threat.

The information is presented in the following format.

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Table 1:

Total number of forest-dwelling taxa and ecological communities in the area covered by the Forest Management Plan by conservation status for flora and fauna (presumed extinct, critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) and by conservation status for ecological communities (totally destroyed, endangered, vulnerable, critically endangered) for each reporting period.
Presumed extinct Year Critically endangered Year Endangered Year Vulnerable Year Conservation dependent Year

Taxon

Flora Vascular Non-vascular Fungi Sub-total Fauna Mammals Birds Reptiles Amphibians Invertebrates Sub-total Totally destroyed Year Ecological communities Critically Endangered Year Endangered Year Vulnerable Year

Total
An asterisk (*) indicates new additions to the lists that may not relate to management activities.

Table 2:

Change in conservation status (presumed extinct, critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, conservation dependent) of forest-dwelling taxa in the area covered by the Forest Management Plan between the current and the previous reporting period.
Conservation status at Dec 2005
Presumed extinct Presumed extinct Critically endangered Endangered Vulnerable Conservation dependent Not listed Critically Endangered Endangered Vulnerable Conservation dependent Not listed

Conservation status at Dec 2006

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Table 3:

Change in conservation status (totally destroyed, endangered, vulnerable, critically endangered) of forest-dwelling ecological communities in the area covered by the Forest Management Plan between the current and the previous reporting period.
Conservation status at Dec 2005
Totally destroyed Totally destroyed Endangered Vulnerable Critically endangered Not listed Endangered Vulnerable Critically endangered Not listed

Conservation status at Dec 2006

2.2.10. Responsibilities Nature Conservation Division is responsible for:


data collection and management; data collation and analysis; data presentation and interpretation; and preparing lists to describe the results of this KPI.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for the performance assessment, reviewing and publication of its report. 2.2.11. Work Instructions 1. Geographic Information Services to intercept map of the distribution of threatened taxa and ecological communities in Western Australian with the area of the Forest Management Plan. This is to identify all taxa and ecological communities on the threatened list within the area of the plan. 2. Geographic Information Services to provide lower level intercept to identify all potential forest dwelling taxa and ecological communities within Forest Management Plan area. 3. Custodians of the data, Species and Communities Branch to agree on methodology for identifying forest dwelling taxa and ecological communities and to develop those lists. 4. Species and Communities Branch to provide updated lists of taxa and ecological communities and to cross match data to identify changes in category or any new additions to the lists. Species and Communities Branch to provide reasons for change in category and provide data to Forest Policy and Practices Branch. 5. Forest Policy and Practices Branch to collate information in report to Conservation Commission. 6. The Conservation Commission to audit and review the report. The Conservation Commission will provide its response to the Minister and publish its report.

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3.

KPI 3 - The status of selected threatened or conservation dependent species that are the subject of management actions to protect them

3.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to biological diversity is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the whole of forest scale for the purpose of seeking to conserve biodiversity and seeking to conserve self-sustaining populations of native species and communities, and at the landscape scale for the purpose of seeking to allow for the recovery of biodiversity between one timber rotation and the next. (Forest Management Plan p23) Forest Management Plan extract (page 31) Key performance indicator 3 The status of selected threatened or conservation dependent species that are the subject of management actions to protect them. The trap success for animals at selected monitoring sites. As per recovery plans. Annually. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objectives in relation to retention of habitat elements in harvesting operations and threatened and priority species and ecological communities is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the landscape scale for the purpose of seeking to prevent any species moving to a higher category of threat or, in particular, declining to irretrievably low levels as a result of management actions. The plan proposes the following Actions at the landscape scale for the purpose of seeking to protect, and assist the recovery of, threatened and priority species of flora and fauna and ecological communities. (Forest Management Plan p28) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 7.1 The Department will publish a map by 1 January 2004 showing locations of indicative fauna habitat zones. The Department may change the locations and areas of indicative fauna habitat zones in a manner that: 7.2.1 has regard to the criteria specified in Appendix 4, where the change occurs prior to the approval of the Guidelines referred to in the following paragraph; and 7.2.2 is in accordance with Guidelines for the Selection and Management of Fauna Habitat Zones, which are to be: prepared by the Department with public consultation; and submitted to the Conservation Commission for advice and approved by the Minister for the Environment by 31 December 2004, when they will take effect and supersede Appendix 4.

7.2

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7.3

By 30 June 2004 the Department, in consultation with the Conservation Commission, will complete a review of the location of indicative fauna habitat zones having regard to the criteria specified in Appendix 4, with a view to making appropriate changes to those locations under Action 7.2.1. The Department and Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations in indicative fauna habitat zones, and in fauna habitat zones established under Appendix 4 and the Guidelines for the Selection and Management of Fauna Habitat Zones: 7.4.1 in a manner that has regard to the requirements set out in Appendix 4, where the operation occurs prior to the approval of the Guidelines; and 7.4.2 in accordance with the Guidelines after they are approved and supersede Appendix 4. The Department will maintain a list identifying threatened and priority species of flora and fauna and threatened ecological communities. (Threatened species and communities are those under risk of extinction. Priority species and communities are those that may be threatened but for which there are insufficient survey data, and those that are rare but not endangered). The Department and the Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations having regard to the Departments Conservation of Endangered and Specially Protected Fauna in the Wild policy and Conservation of Threatened Flora in the Wild policy. The Department and Forest Products Commission will revise planning checklists to identify actions to be taken in specified circumstances in which declared rare flora species, threatened ecological communities, and other significant flora identified in Appendix 13 may be disturbed by their operations. The Forest Products Commission and the Department will undertake operations in accordance with guidelines for operations in the presence of fauna, to be developed as part of the Fauna Distribution Information System, which is to be completed by the Forest Products Commission: 8.4.1 to the satisfaction of the Department; and 8.4.2 in consultation with the Conservation Commission. (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will advise the Department of its harvesting and management activities within plantations: 8.5.1 where those activities may impact on threatened species and threatened ecological communities, agreed protection measures will be implemented. The Department will develop and implement recovery plans for selected threatened species and ecological communities, including: 8.6.1 the Western Shield fox baiting program (which seeks to reduce predation pressure on threatened and priority species of fauna).

7.4

8.1

8.2

8.3

8.4

8.5

8.6

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3.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 3


3.2.1. Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 3 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets for conservation of biodiversity through protecting and assisting the recovery of threatened and conservation dependant species of fauna. 3.2.2. Rationale

Monitoring the status of threatened and conservation dependant species of fauna is essential to providing information on the success of measures such as Western Shield and fauna habitat zones designed to mitigate the impact of disturbances such as timber harvesting and fire, in protecting and assisting the recovery of threatened and conservation dependant species of fauna. 3.2.3. Background and context

Over the past 100 years there has been a decline in the population of many Western Australian mammals. The decline has been attributed to a number of major factors: land clearing and the redirection of environmental resources to human populations; reduction in environmental productivity due to the alteration of habitats by introduced grazing animals; altered fire regimes; and direct reduction in populations due to introduced predators and competitors. Research indicates that native mammals most at risk of being driven to extinction are easy prey medium-sized animals weighing between 35 grams and 4200 grams. These mammal species have been termed critical weight range (CWR). A number of actions to control predation by foxes and feral cats have been introduced by the Department as part of the Western Shield program to reverse the declining trend. This includes aerial fox baiting using 1080 poison, captive breeding programs and reintroduction programs for threatened taxa. Fauna habitat zones are also used as a strategy to meet the Forest Management Plans objective of ensuring that biodiversity recovers between timber harvest rotations. Fauna habitat zones provide an extensive network of areas within State forest and timber reserves that are excluded from timber harvesting in the mid-term. The aim is to maintain fauna populations within themselves, and to provide a source for the re-colonisation of nearby areas after timber harvesting. 3.2.4. Issues

The following issues should be considered in interpreting changes in populations of selected fauna subject to monitoring:

whether the change in capture rate is the result of human intervention and management; whether the change in capture rate is the result of human activity largely unmanageable by forest managers; whether the change in capture rate is the result of natural variations; or whether the change in capture rate is the result of threats outside of the forest or inside the forest.

Whilst it is desirable for reporting under this KPI to be based on the same taxa and location over the timeframe of the Forest Management Plan, it may not be possible to achieve this due to factors such as operational limitations resulting in other than annual monitoring and natural events such as wildfire that are beyond the control of the Department.
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3.2.5.

The entities to be measured for the KPI Target Increase in, or maintenance of, capture rate (in relation to success criteria as per recovery plans where recovery plans exist)

Entity Trap success

3.2.6.

Required data Collection & storage method Species and Communities Branch to arrange, through Regional Services, trapping at selected sites and record capture rate. Custodians Regional fauna conservation officers, Regional Services (initial data collection), and Species and Communities Branch, Nature Conservation Division (data collation and reporting).

Required data Trap success for selected threatened and conservation dependent species at selected monitoring sites for annual reporting periods.

3.2.7.

Calculation method Calculation method Capture rate (number of animals captured expressed as a percentage of traps) for selected threatened and conservation dependent fauna species at monitoring sites across the Forest Management Plan area. The indicative list of selected fauna will include: Woylie Brushtail possum Quenda Chuditch

Entity to be measured Trap success for selected fauna.

3.2.8.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Annually subject to availability of data. Calculation frequency Annually

Required metric Capture rate (expressed as a percentage of traps) 3.2.9. Data presentation

Metric Capture rate (expressed as a percentage of traps)

Presentation Data is presented as a column graph (Figure 1) showing capture rate for each trapping period for the life of the plan for selected fauna species at selected sites. Text to describe trends and interpret the success of management actions.

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Figure 1.

Capture rates for medium sized mammals at a selected monitoring site within the area of the Forest Management Plan. (Note: data in the graph is taken from 20032004 CALM Annual Report for the purpose of demonstrating data presentation)

3.2.10. Responsibility Regional Services (respective Regional offices) is responsible for data collection and management of primary data. Nature Conservation Division (Species and Communities Branch) is responsible for:

data collection and management; data collation and analysis; data presentation and interpretation; and text to describe data trends.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and publication of its report. 3.2.11. Further reading Burbidge, A.A., and N.L. McKenzie (1989). Patterns in the modern decline of Western Australias vertebrate fauna: causes and conservation implications. Biological Conservation 50: 143-198.

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4.

KPI 4 - The area of native forest and plantations

4.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 38) Key performance indicator 4 Performance measure The area of native forest and plantations. Change in: the area of native forest and plantations; area of forest by land category; area of forest cleared; and area of forest rehabilitated. No permanent loss of net area of forested land. After each five years. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment.

Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to maintaining the area of native forest and plantations is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to maintain the net area of forested land: (Forest Management Plan p32) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 10.1 The Conservation Commission and the Department will make submissions in relation to development proposals forwarded to them for comment or advice, with a view to: 10.1.1 seeking to reduce the permanent loss of forested areas as a result of development; 10.1.2 seeking the replacement of forested areas permanently lost to development; 10.1.3 promoting the construction of infrastructure such as roads, pipelines and other utilities at common locations, such as infrastructure corridors; and 10.1.4 reducing the impact of mining and petroleum operations on forested areas with a high productive capacity for timber production. The Department will, where reasonable and practicable, construct roads in a manner and at a location that will service multiple needs. The Department will seek to progressively rehabilitate redundant roads. (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will maintain the minimum area of plantation estate required to meet State Agreement Act supply requirements by: 10.4.1 replanting pines in all suitable areas of State forest and freehold (fee simple) land held in the name of the Executive Director that have previously been planted with pines and have been clear felled, except at Gnangara, Peel, Hamel and other areas determined consistently with the agreement ratified under the Wood Processing (Wesfi) Agreement Act 2000; and 10.4.2 establishing new plantations on appropriate cleared land to replace any plantation areas that are clear felled but not replanted with plantation species.

10.2

10.3 10.4

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4.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 4


4.2.1. Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 4 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets through tracking any change in the area of native forest and plantations. 4.2.2. Rationale

This indicator is helpful as it measures the amount of existing forest area and reveals if that area is increasing or decreasing as a result of management practices. Maintaining the net area of forested land after harvesting, mining and infrastructure is essential for maintaining the productive capacity, and other forest values, and the sustainable flow of benefits from the forests to society. A continual decline in the area of forest is likely to lead to a decline in sustainable yield of timber and impacts on biodiversity and other forest values. 4.2.3. Background and context

The loss of forest area is a major factor in diminishing the productive capacity of the forest. Productive capacity may be diminished as a result of Government decisions that address a broader social need, such as clearing forest for essential infrastructure like major power lines. Performance measurements from KPI 4 will reveal any change in forest areas and facilitate examination of the reasons for these changes. The Forest Management Plan defines forest as An area, incorporating all living and non-living components, that is dominated by trees having usually a single stem and a mature or potentially mature stand height exceeding two metres and with existing or potential crown cover of overstorey strata about equal to or greater than 20 per cent. The Forest Management Plan defines plantation as State forest and timber reserve planted with exotic species. 4.2.4. Issues

Changes in proposed land category over the period of implementation of the plan may confound measurement of the area of native forest and plantation by land category, so the proposed land category as mapped at January 2004 is used throughout. The ability to accurately measure the area of forest cleared and rehabilitated is limited by data quality provided by proponents to clear forest. Whilst some proponents such as Alcoa Australia provide high quality data at regular intervals, other proponents do not provide any information on cleared areas to the Department. 4.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI Target No permanent loss of net area of forested land.

Entity The area of native forest and plantations The area of forest by proposed land category The area of forest cleared The area of forest rehabilitated

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4.2.6.

Required data Required data Collection & storage method FMIS Custodians Forest Management Branch

Area of native forest as at December 2003, December 2008 and December 2013 Area of plantations as at December 2003, December 2008 and December 2013 Land category as at December 2003 as proposed in the Forest Management Plan. Area of native forest cleared and rehabilitated Area of plantation cleared and rehabilitated 4.2.7. Calculation method

FMIS

Forest Products Commission

Forest Management Branch

Forest Management Branch Forest Products Commission

Parameter to be measured Area of native forest by proposed land category Area of plantations by proposed land category Change in area of native forest

Change in area of plantations

Area of native forest cleared Area of plantations cleared Area of native forest rehabilitated Area of plantations rehabilitated 4.2.8.

Calculation method Intersect native forest data layer with land category data layer in FMIS and have results presented as a two-way table for each date (Dec 2003, Dec 2008, Dec 2013). Intersect plantations data layer with land category data layer in FMIS and have results presented as a two-way table for each date (Dec 2003, Dec 2008, Dec 2013). The change in area of native forest is calculated by subtracting the area of native forest at a particular date from the area of native forest at the preceding date. The change in area of plantations is calculated by subtracting the area of plantations at a particular date from the area of plantations at the preceding date Interrogate the native forest cleared data layer. Interrogate the plantations cleared data layer. Interrogate the native forest rehabilitated data layer. Interrogate the plantations rehabilitated data layer.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Yearly Yearly Yearly Yearly Yearly Yearly Yearly Yearly Calculation frequency Five yearly Five yearly Five yearly Five yearly Five yearly Five yearly Five yearly Five yearly

Required measurement Area of native forest by proposed land category Area of plantations by proposed land category Change of area in native forest Change of area in plantations Area of native forest cleared Area of plantations cleared Area of native forest rehabilitated Area of plantations rehabilitated

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4.2.9. Table 1:

Data presentation Area (ha) of native forest and plantation by land category at December 2003 and December 2008 and the change in area between these dates.
Total forest Other Total

December 2003 Land Native forest Plantation Category (including proposals) State forest, timber reserve or ED land National park Nature reserve Conservation park 5(1)(g) and (h) Total December 2008 Land Native forest Plantation Category (including proposals) State forest, timber reserve or ED land National park Nature reserve Conservation park 5(1)(g) and (h) Total December 2003 December 2008 Land Native forest Plantation Category (including proposals) State forest, timber reserve or ED land National park Nature reserve Conservation park 5(1)(g) and (h) Total

Total forest

Other

Total

Total forest

Other

Total

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Table 2:
Cleared Rehabilitated

Area (ha) of forest cleared and rehabilitated over the period December 2003 to December 2008.
Native forest Plantation Total forest Other Total

4.2.10. Responsibility Senior Forester, Forest Management Branch is responsible for:


archiving the Forest Management Plan proposed land category data layer; maintaining the native forest data layer; intersecting the native forest and plantations data layers with the land category data layer; maintaining the native forest cleared and rehabilitated data layers; data analysis and preparation of draft tabular information as shown in section 9 above; draft text describing and interpreting changes in the area of native forest and plantations.

Forests Products Commission is responsible for:


maintaining the plantations data layer; and providing a copy of the plantations, plantations cleared and plantations rehabilitated data layers at the end of each calendar year to the Senior Forester, Forest Management Branch.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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5.
5.1.

KPI 5 - Annual removal of wood products compared to sustainable yield determined by the plan.
Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 39) Key performance indicator 5 Performance measure Annual removal of wood products compared to the sustained yield determined by the plan. Cumulative removals for jarrah and karri first and second grade sawlogs compared to the average annual sustainable yield. Annual removal of jarrah and karri sawlogs below first and second grade. Annual removal of all logs. No more than 10 per cent more than the average annual yield of first and second grade sawlogs of each species to be removed in any one year. No more than 412,650 cubic metres of first and second grade jarrah sawlogs and 170,100 cubic metres of first and second grade karri sawlogs to be removed in any three consecutive years. No more than 1,310,000 cubic metres of first and second grade jarrah sawlogs and 540,000 cubic metres of first and second grade karri sawlogs to be removed over the 10 year life of the plan. Annual volume of jarrah and karri sawlogs other than first and second grade sold for value added products to show a positive trend. No more than 13,000 cubic metres of wandoo, 16,000 cubic metres of blackbutt and 19,000 cubic metres of sheoak sawlogs to be removed over the 10 year life of the plan. Annually. The Forest Products Commission to advise the Conservation Commission how it will manage removals to be under the end of plan target. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for a revision of harvesting levels in the context of its assessment and auditing functions, in consultation with the Department.

Performance target(s)

Reporting Response to target shortfall

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The objective in relation to sustained yield is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to provide for timber production of jarrah and karri sawlogs on a sustained yield basis and to maintain the quality of the sustained yield calculations for the next plan period (Forest Management Plan p34) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 11.1 The average annual yield of logs, calculated over the 10 year life of the plan, shall not exceed the maximum volumes stipulated in Tables 3 and 4, and given above for wandoo, blackbutt and sheoak. In addition to the yield referred to in 11.1, the Forest Products Commission may contract for the removal and sale of forest products of species other than jarrah, karri, marri, blackbutt, wandoo and sheoak that become available in small quantities from operations designed to produce the yield referred to in 11.1 or as a result of other operations such as mining. The Forest Products Commission and the Department will: 11.4.1 monitor the volume of all timber log categories removed from native forest in each year, separately recording for each of the commercial species the equivalent volume of: first and second grade sawlogs; lower grades of sawlogs; and residue logs; and 11.4.2 periodically audit the grading and removal of sawlogs. The Forest Products Commission will, where practicable and economically feasible, enter into contracts that are not confined to the supply of first and second grade sawlogs. For example, the Forest Products Commission may enter into contracts for the sale of bole sawlogs. When the Forest Products Commission enters into such a contract, the Forest Products Commission and the Department will calculate the equivalent volume of first and second grade sawlogs which would be derived from the volume of timber taken under the contract.

11.2

11.4

11.9

5.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 5


5.2.1. Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 5 is to report on the level of production of jarrah and karri sawlogs relative to the sustained yield determined for the period of the Forest Management Plan. 5.2.2. Rationale

The Forest Management Plan provides for an average annual sustained yield of sawlogs to be harvested from native forests over the ten year period. Monitoring of the annual quantity removed and periodic reconciliation with the sustained yield is an important measure of sustainability and the maintenance of productive capacity. In accordance with the Ministerial directive for approval of the plan, the performance targets set for this KPI were structured to address concerns from some stakeholders about the potential for consistent overcutting in the first five years of the Forest Management Plan (that might then need to be balanced by an under cut at the end of the ten years).

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5.2.3.

Background and context

Under the Forest Management Plan a sustained yield of jarrah and karri sawlogs was determined, and contracts of sale were subsequently negotiated by the Forest Products Commission with customers for these quantities (Forest Management Plan Table 3): Table 3. Sustained yield (cubic metres) of first and second grade jarrah and karri sawlogs under the Forest Management Plan. Approximate level of average annual Species Log grade Average annual yield woodflow by DEC forest region (m3) for 10 years Swan South West Warren (m3) Jarrah First and second 131,000 39,000 73,000 19,000 Karri First and second 54,000 2,000 52,000

The quantity of non-sawlog and marri bole volume that was projected to be made available as a consequence of the removal of jarrah and karri sawlogs and the follow-up silvicultural treatments to achieve silvicultural objectives was estimated on Table 4 of the Forest Management Plan: Table 4. Availability of non-sawlog volume (cubic metres) under the Forest Management Plan. Species Jarrah Karri Marri Log grade Average annual availability for 10 years (m3) 534,000 117,000 196,000

Bole logs other than first and second grade sawlog Bole logs other than first and second grade sawlog All bole logs

The yield from the jarrah and karri forests is regulated on the basis of sawlogs, so this KPI focuses on sawlog removals over annual and three-year rolling periods to monitor fluctuations, recognising that relatively small annual variations may be necessary in response to market and operational factors. Annual harvest plans are prepared that make available a sufficient mix of forest areas to meet the sustained yield targets. Each area cutover, or coupe, is separately identified and all log products removed by the Forest Products Commission contractors are tracked for accounting purposes in a computer system known as the Logging Operations Information System (LOIS). This system is regularly audited and has been used to report and monitor log removal and product sales over several successive Forest Management Plans. Each truckload of logs is issued with a Delivery Note that records the origin and product details of the load, and the net weight of the logs and customer information is subsequently obtained and uploaded into LOIS. All logs recovered and sold from State forest and timber reserves are tracked through LOIS (including logs arising from mining, road and infrastructure clearing). Because the sustained yield is determined in units of volume, and log deliveries are recorded in tonnes, appropriate weight: volume conversion factors have been determined and are applied to the various products. The reconciliation of sustained yield and removals is therefore undertaken on a volumetric basis.

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5.2.4.

Issues

LOIS provides an efficient and accurate basis for monitoring sawlog removals for this KPI, but generally provides an under-estimate of the total volume of non-sawlog products made available during harvesting if there are insufficient markets for all the material produced. The high demand and ready market for sawlogs maximises the recovery and removal of sawlogs from coupe operations, while a proportion of the other products may be sold, stockpiled for later sale, or retained on site (felled or standing) in the forest. The utilization monitoring plots that provide the basis for reporting on KPI 11 can be used to provide a separate sample estimate of that portion of the non-sawlog resource made available but not removed. There is a range of log products delivered to FPC customers that are equivalent to the first and second grade sawlog specifications. These include, for example, veneer logs, electricity poles and bridge piles. Consequently, for consistent reporting against the KPI and the Forest Management Plan over a series of years, a set of product groups have been defined and an appropriate weight: volume conversion factor allocated to each product. The annual volume figures reported in this KPI will differ from those published in Annual Reports and documents such as the State of the Environment (2007) Report. This is largely because the figures for this KPI are collated and reported by calendar years for direct comparison with the basis of the Forest Management Plan sustained yield calculations and planning period (2004 to 2013). In contrast, the Forest Products Commission is required to publish annual log production figures on a financial year basis. 5.2.5. . The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Annual target 131,000 cubic metres 54,000 cubic metres

Entity First and second grade jarrah sawlogs First and second grade karri sawlogs Jarrah sawlogs other than first and second grade Karri sawlogs other than first and second grade Wandoo sawlogs Blackbutt sawlogs Sheoak sawlogs Jarrah other logs Karri other logs Marri other logs 5.2.6. Required data

196,000 cubic metres

Required data Annual LOIS summaries recording log removals by product. Weight to volume scaling factors.

Collection and storage method Custodians LOIS records all product removals from Forest Products State forest, timber reserves and land Commission held under title by the Director General. Default and allocated factors. Forest Products Commission / Forest Management Branch

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5.2.7.

Calculation method Calculation method Allocate all products to a product group. Apply appropriate weight-volume scaling factors to convert tonnes to cubic metres. Apply whole - bole log conversion factors if relevant. Aggregate removals by product groups.

Entity to be measured Volume in cubic metres of 1 nominated products for each 2 species. 3 4 5.2.8.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Volumes Measurement frequency Daily via Delivery Note input Calculation frequency Annually on a calendar year basis

5.2.9.

Data presentation Presentation

Metric First and second grade jarrah sawlogs First and second grade karri sawlogs Wandoo Blackbutt Sheoak sawlogs

Tabular report depicting volumes by year relative to the performance targets

The following tables (Table A4 - Table A11) from the Mid-term Audit of the Forest Management Plan show the required presentation format for this data. Table A4. Jarrah first and second grade sawlog removals during 2004 to 2007 relative to the 131,000 m3 annual sustained yield.

Jarrah first and second grade sawlog volume (cubic metres) Annual volumes Cumulative volumes Year KPI upper Annual Variation Period KPI upper Periodic limit removals limit removals 2004 2005 2006 2007 144,100 144,100 144,100 144,100 120,251 135,677 120,507 122,598 - 23,849 - 8,423 - 23,593 - 21,502 2004 2006 2005 2007 to 412,650 to 412,650 376,435 378,782

Variation

- 36,215 - 33,868

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Table A5.

Karri first and second grade sawlog removals during 2004 to 2007 relative to the 54,000 m3 annual sustained yield. Karri first and second grade sawlog volume (cubic metres) Annual volumes Cumulative volumes KPI upper Annual Variation Period KPI upper Periodic limit removals limit removals 59,400 59,400 59,400 59,400 51,986 53,691 60,325 55,151* - 7,414 - 5,709 + 925 - 4,249

Year

Variation

2004 2005 2006 2007

2004 to 170,100 166,002 - 4,098 2006 2005 to 170,100 169,167 - 933 2007 * Figure incorporates an adjustment to the raw delivery data to reflect a change in the minimum sawlog size that was accepted by customers in 2007. Table A6. Wandoo sawlog volume (cubic metres) Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2004 -2013 Table A7. Blackbutt sawlog volume (cubic metres) Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2004 -2013 Table A8. Sheoak sawlog volume (cubic metres) Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2004 -2013 Annual removals 404 355 310 98 Cumulative total removals 404 759 1,069 1,167 KPI cumulative limit Annual removals 170 478 668 766 Cumulative total removals 170 648 1,316 2,082 KPI cumulative limit Annual removals 308 13 637 214 Cumulative total removals 308 321 958 1,172 KPI cumulative limit

13,000

16,000

19,000

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Table A9. Year

Jarrah other volume (cubic metres) Annual removals FMP upper limit Cumulative total removals 132,432 334,236 484,585 645,581 FMP cumulative limit 534,000 1,068,000 1,602,000 2,136,000 Cumulative variation (Actual FMP) - 401,568 - 733,764 - 1,117,415 - 1,490,419

2004 2005 2006 2007 Table A10. Year

132,432 201,804 150,349 160,996

534,000 534,000 534,000 534,000

Karri other volume (cubic metres) Annual removals FMP Upper limit Cumulative total removals FMP cumulative limit

Cumulative variation (Actual FMP) 2004 143,504 117,000 143,504 117,000 + 26,504 2005 147,252 117,000 290,756 234,000 + 56,756 2006 170,249 117,000 461,005 351,000 + 110,005 2007 148,727* 117,000 609,732 468,000 + 141,732 * Figure incorporates an adjustment to the raw delivery data to reflect a change in the minimum sawlog size (and hence proportion sold as other bole volume) that was accepted by customers in 2007. Table A11. Year Marri all logs volume (cubic metres) Annual removals FMP upper limit Cumulative total removals 8,889 16,215 34,427 60,416 FMP cumulative limit 196,000 392,000 588,000 784,000 Cumulative variation (Actual FMP) - 187,111 - 375,785 - 553,573 - 723,584

2004 2005 2006 2007

8,889 7,326 18,212 25,989

196,000 196,000 196,000 196,000

5.2.10. . Responsibility Forest Products Commission will be responsible for: maintaining the LOIS database and including data recording and input standards; and extraction of relevant operation and delivery summaries in consultation with Forest Management Branch. Forest Management Branch will be responsible for: product aggregation and weight: volume conversion in consultation with the Forest Products Commission; data collation and analysis for the KPI; and data presentation and interpretation. Forest Policy and Practices Branch will be responsible for collating information for this KPI for inclusion in a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for auditing, reviewing and the publication of its report.
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6.

KPI 6 - Area of forest cut over annually

6.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (FMP p32) FMP extract (page 39) Key performance indicator 06 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to reporting Area of forest cut over annually. Annual area of each forest type harvested according to each silvicultural objective. Not possible to set a realistic target for area cut over. Annual publication of areas cut over. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Forest Products Commission and the Department.

The objective in relation to sustained yield is:


The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to provide for timber production of jarrah and karri sawlogs on a sustained yield basis and to maintain the quality of the sustained yield calculations for the next plan period (FMP p34) Most relevant FMP actions: 11.3 The Forest Products Commission will prepare annual timber harvesting plans that are to be: 11.3.1 developed in consultation with, and to the requirements of, the Department; 11.3.2 consistent with the allowable timber yields referred to in Action 11.1; and 11.3.3 made publicly available. The Department will prepare rolling three-year indicative timber harvesting plans that are to be: 11.5.1 developed in consultation with the Forest Products Commission; 11.5.2 consistent with the allowable timber yields referred to in Action 11.1; and 11.5.3 made publicly available. The Forest Products Commission will conduct its silvicultural operations: 11.6.1 in accordance with the Departments Silviculture Guidelines; and 11.6.2 prior to the formal incorporation of the amendments identified in Appendix 5 into those Guidelines, in a manner that is consistent with those amendments. Any amendment to the Silviculture Guidelines following the incorporation of the amendments identified in Appendix 5 into those Guidelines will be prepared by the Department with public consultation, submitted to the Conservation Commission for advice and approved by the Minister for the Environment before they take effect. The Department and the Forest Products Commission will monitor and record the areas over which each different silvicultural treatment is achieved in each year.

11.5

11.6

11.7

11.8

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6.2.
6.2.1.

Draft Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 06


Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 6 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in providing information on timber production of jarrah and karri sawlogs on a sustained yield basis. 6.2.2. Rationale

This KPI addresses the issue that the volume of logs removed each year presents an incomplete picture of harvesting trends. For example the area of forest harvested and consequently disturbed each year could rise significantly even though the annual volume of logs removed remains constant. This KPI shows trends in the total area harvested for each silvicultural objective in the context of the total forest area available for timber production. 6.2.3. Background and context

The native forest available for timber production comprises a broad range of forest structure and composition, on sites of varying productivity. Consequently, when areas are cut over, the Silvicultural Guidelines seek different silvicultural objectives according to the existing stand structure and condition. For example, where there is a predominance of vigorously growing trees, the stand may be thinned to promote growth on the retained trees whilst providing a yield of log products; where this is not the case, the stands are harvested with the object of regenerating them. The total area that is cut over each year to the various silvicultural objectives provides a general indication of the rate of harvest across that portion of the forest that is available for timber production. Changes in the relative proportion of area cutover to the different objectives will reflect variations in the structure and composition of the forest made available on an annual harvest plan, as well as the degree of consistency in the application of the Silviculture Guidelines. The sustained yield of sawlogs made available under the Plan is set on the basis of an annual supply of log volume, not area cut over, due to the inherent variability in the structure, composition and regeneration status of the forest. Nevertheless, in calculating a sustained yield, broad assumptions are necessary about the longer term average composition and the range of silvicultural objectives obtained on present and future stands. Consequently, comparisons of the longer-term trends in areas cutover with the areas assumed in the calculation of the sustained yield provide useful feedback at a strategic level. 6.2.4. Issues

Annual targets for the area cut over to each objective have not been set. This is for several reasons. The placement of coupes onto an annual harvest plan is influenced by a number of operational and planning factors aside from the structure and composition of the forest, including the seasonal prescribed burning program and the need for geographic spread across timber supply zones. Annual fluctuations in the areas cutover to each silvicultural objective are therefore expected due to the variation inherent in the mix of forest in coupes in annual and three-year harvest plans. The month of harvest completion can also influence the year for which figures are recorded, with apparent spikes in the total area for one year sometimes being partly an artefact of the size of the coupes and lengthy period that harvest operations may have taken to completion. However, over the 10-year period of a Forest Management Plan the trends within each objective provide an indication of consistency of the operational level harvest outcomes with the assumed strategic level wood-flows contributing to the sustained yield. This is particularly relevant to assumed future forest structure arising from the creation of regeneration and thinning during the period of this plan. For example, significant variations in the area of jarrah regeneration released
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over the period of the Management Plan would affect future projected availability of sawlogs from regrowth stands over the next century. The level of precision in the cut over area measurements, silvicultural categories aggregated for reporting, and the timing of coupe completion can give rise to some data quality issues, but the data collection and reporting standards have been diligently maintained for over a decade and the SILREC system provides reliable statistics for reporting on this KPI. 6.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Target No target

Entity Area of forest type cut over to each silvicultural objective for jarrah Area of forest type cut over to each silvicultural objective for karri Area of forest type cut over to each silvicultural objective for wandoo 6.2.6. Required data Collection and storage method Data for the silvicultural objective applied within harvested patches of forest to be provided by Forest Products Commission to the Department for recording and storage in the Silvicultural Recording System (SILREC). Net area harvested in the period determined by DEC Forest Management Branch.

Required data Area of forest harvested for each silvicultural objective relevant to: jarrah karri wandoo

Custodians Forest Management Branch

6.2.7.

Calculation method Calculation method Areas will be calculated within SILREC following capture from maps or images produced at a relevant scale.

Entity to be measured Area of each forest type harvested according to each silvicultural objective 6.2.8.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Annual Calculation frequency Annual

Required measurement Area of forest harvested 6.2.9. Data presentation

Measurement Area (hectares) of each forest type harvested according to silvicultural objectives

Presentation Present the area of forest cut according to each silvicultural objective as a table with annual reporting periods. Text to describe and interpret data presented in the table.

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Table.

Annual area (hectares) of native forest cut over to each silvicultural objective Silvicultural objective Promote growth on retained trees (thinning) Release regeneration (gap) Establish regeneration eastern jarrah (shelterwood) Establish regeneration western jarrah (shelterwood) Single tree selection (retention in dieback areas) Selective Area cut over (ha)

Forest type Jarrah

Karri Establish jarrah/karri regeneration Establish regeneration (clearfall karri) Establish regeneration (partial karri clearfall) Promote growth on retained trees (thinning)

Wandoo

Establish regeneration Promote growth on retained trees (thinning) Other (clearing for mining and utilities)

Other

6.2.10. Responsibility Forest Products Commission will be responsible for: providing boundaries of interim (proposed) and final silvicultural objectives applied to all areas of forest harvested; and forwarding data to Forest Management Branch to update SILREC. Forest Management Branch will be responsible for: determining the net area harvested (area of coupe minus the area of informal reserves and other unharvested patches); managing and updating the SILREC system; data collation and analysis for this KPI; and data presentation and interpretation. Forest Policy and Practices Branch will be responsible for collating information for this KPI for inclusion in a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for the auditing, reviewing and publication of its report.

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7.
7.1

KPI 7 - Removal of non sawlog timber


Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest (Forest Management Plan p32). Forest Management Plan extract (page 39) Key performance indicator 7 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall The removal of non-sawlog timber. Total removals of firewood compared to the authorised removal through contract and licence. Authorised removals more than 70 per cent of estimated total removals based on survey information. After each five years. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

The objective in relation to the removal of non-sawlog timber is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to manage the removal of forest produce, other than sawlogs and residue logs, in a manner that, so far as is practicable and sustainable, satisfies public demand for that produce (Forest Management Plan p36): Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 13.3 The Department will conduct research and undertake public consultation with a view to determining the environmental management requirements for the production of domestic firewood.

7.2
7.2.1

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 7


Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 7 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets through tracking any change in the supply of firewood from the forest. 7.2.2 Rationale

This indicator is helpful as it measures the amount of firewood taken from the forest, and reveals if that volume is increasing or decreasing as a result of market requirements or management practices. 7.2.3 Background and context

State forest and timber reserves are the major source of firewood. Knowledge of supply and demand of firewood is not as well understood as for sawlogs. Performance measurements from KPI 7 will reveal any change in the firewood demand and facilitate examination of the reasons for these changes.
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7.2.4

Issues

The Forest Products Commission sells firewood to commercial suppliers via Contract of Sale. These sales can be relatively easily tracked and reported. With respect to domestic firewood collection, Regulation 98 of the Forest Management Regulations provides that Public Firewood Areas may be set aside by the publishing of an order in the Govt. Gazette. For Public Firewood Areas to be enforceable and have the desired effect of directing the public to specified areas to collect firewood, they must be gazetted. Removal of firewood by the public is undertaken on the basis that a member of the public may not remove more than one tonne of firewood within a 60 day period between 1 June and 30 September; or on any one occasion between 1 October and 31 May. A firewood survey conducted in the Swan Region in 2005 provided a basis for estimating the actual removal of firewood. It is intended to repeat this survey in the second half of the FMP. 7.2.5 The entities to be measured for the KPI

Entity Target Surveyed volume of firewood collected under Authorised removals more than 70 per cent of authorizations from DEC in the Swan Region. estimated total removals based on survey information. Volume of firewood sold under Contract of Sale Trend no target by FPC. Number and volume of firewood authorizations Trend no target. sold by DEC in Swan, South West and Warren Regions. 7.2.6 Required data Collection & storage method Firewood Surveillance Survey Custodians Forest Policy and Practices Branch Forest Products Commission

Required data Estimate of firewood removal by the public in the Swan Region. Volume of firewood sold under Contract of Sale by FPC. Number of firewood authorizations issued by DEC. 7.2.7 Calculation method

LOIS

Authorization returns from Regional Services Swan, South West and Warren South West and Region. Region)

(Swan, Warren

Calculation method Parameter to be measured Use a firewood surveillance survey for Estimate the volume of firewood removed by the public the Swan Region to estimate firewood from for the survey period, and then determine the per removal by the public. cent of estimated total removals based on survey information. Firewood removal under FPC List the number of Contracts of Sale and the total Contract of Sale. volume of firewood removed by FPC contractors for the reporting period. Report the number of Firewood Provide a summary of the total number of Firewood Authorizations issued by DEC in Authorizations issued by DEC and the associated total Swan, South West and Warren volume. Region.
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7.2.8

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required measurement Measurement frequency Five Yearly Yearly Yearly Yearly Calculation frequency Five Yearly Yearly Yearly Yearly

Estimated volume of firewood removed in Swan Region using a surveillance survey. Firewood removal under FPC Contract of Sale. Number of Firewood Authorizations issued by DEC. Estimated volume of firewood authorised by DEC. 7.2.9 Data presentation

Table 1:

Survey of firewood removals from Swan Region. Vehicles from public firewood areas Volume of Number firewood of [% of vehicles [% of total] total] 122 [54] 101 [53] 103 [46] 90 [47] 225 191 Vehicles from outside public firewood areas Volume of Number firewood of [% of vehicles [% of total] total] 5 [6] 4 [6] 83 [94] 62 [94] 88 66

Year

Record type

All vehicles recorded Number of Volume of vehicles firewood [% of total] [% of total] 127 [41] 186 [59] 313 105 [41] 152 [59] 257

2005

2010

Authority No authority Survey total Authority No authority Survey total

% variation from previous survey Table 2: Summary of firewood sales and removals by FPC. Year 2008 2009

Component No. of Contract of Sale. Contract volume. Removed volume. % removal. Table 3:

2004

2005

2006

2007

2010

2011

2012

2013

Summary of firewood licences issued by DEC

3 (a) - Number of licences issued. Source Region Swan South West Warren Total Year 2008 2009

2004

2005

2006

2007

2010

2011

2012

2013

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3 (b) - Volume authorised for removal by DEC licences. Source Region Swan South West Warren Total Year 2008 2009

2004

2005

2006

2007

2010

2011

2012

2013

7.2.10 Responsibility Forests Products Commission is responsible for:


providing a list of Contracts of Sale for firewood for the reporting period; providing a summary of the contracted volume of firewood for each Contract of Sale for the reporting period; providing reports on the actual volume of firewood removed under each Contract of Sale for the reporting period from LOIS; and providing explanatory notes for trends.

Regional Services (Swan, South West and Warren Region) are responsible for:

providing the number of firewood authorizations issued by DEC for the reporting period; and providing the volume of firewood authorised to be removed on firewood authorizations issued for the reporting period.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for:


planning and conducting a firewood surveillance survey in the second half of the FMP period; providing a summary report for the survey including an estimate of the volume of firewood removed by the public; and collating this information together with other information into a report to the Conservation Commission.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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8.
8.1.

KPI 8 - The presence of Sirex in softwood plantations


Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 40) Key performance indicator 8 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall The presence of Sirex in softwood plantations. Evidence of Sirex in trap trees. No evidence of Sirex in trap trees. Annually. The Forest Products Commission to initiate a control program.

The objective in relation to weeds pests and diseases is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to reduce the impact of weeds, pests and diseases on the productive capacity of the forest: (Forest Management Plan p36) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 14.1 In addition to the measures referred to in Action 18.4, the Department will: 14.1.1 establish a process for the identification and investigation of weed, pest and disease outbreaks that threaten productivity; and 14.1.2 where appropriate, prescribe measures in Silviculture Guidelines to limit the impact of weeds, pests and diseases on productivity. (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will: 14.2.1 maintain an early warning system for Sirex in pine plantations; and 14.2.2 monitor weeds, pests and diseases affecting productivity and, where reasonable and practicable, take measures to control them.

14.2

8.2.
8.2.1.

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 8


Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 8 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its target of not allowing Sirex to become established in plantations, and thus minimising the impact of Sirex on the productive capacity of pine plantations in the plan area. 8.2.2. Rationale

Sirex outbreaks have the potential to seriously reduce the productive capacity of the States softwood plantations. Early detection of Sirex is vital if biological agents are to be successfully introduced to prevent its spread and minimise damage. Monitoring undertaken in association with KPI 8 will provide for the early detection of Sirex in softwood plantations so inoculation management plans can be implemented effectively.

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8.2.3.

Background and context

Sirex noctilio is a wood wasp species native to Europe that infests pine trees. It was accidentally introduced into New Zealand in 1945 and has since been discovered in Australia where outbreaks have been recorded in Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia. Sirex will normally complete one generation per year. Female wasps deposit eggs (oviposition) and toxic mucus together with a symbiotic dry rot fungus into the bark of the tree. Sirex larvae then feed on the fungus as they tunnel through the wood. The combination of the fungus and the toxic mucus together causes the death of the tree. Adults emerge from December to May and live for only a few days. Pinus radiata is highly susceptible to Sirex attack. Trees attacked by Sirex begin showing symptoms that include beads of sap on the bark as a result of oviposition and tree crown colourchanges as the tree is weakened. Crowns will change from green to light green, yellow then reddish-brown. Trees that are part of un-thinned stands or stressed from wind, fire or logging tend to be more susceptible to attack than healthy trees in well thinned stands. Biological agents have been introduced to control Sirex with varying success. The parasitic nematode, Deladenus siricidicolahas has been highly successful with populations of Sirex collapsing as a result of its introduction. Some parasitic wasps (parasitoids) have been introduced including the species Ibalia, Rhyssa, Megarhyssa, and Schletterarius and have been moderately effective but their activity alone is not sufficient to quash Sirex outbreaks. Sirex has been intercepted occasionally in Fremantle and vigilant quarantine has ensured it has not established itself in Western Australia softwood plantations. 8.2.4. The entities to be measured for the KPI Target No evidence of Sirex in trap trees.

Entity Presence of Sirex 8.2.5. Required data

Required data Indicative data for the area of the Forest Management Plan from the establishment of trap trees in Pinus radiata plantations.

Collection & storage method A network of trap trees to be established at a sufficient number of locations in Pinus radiata stands. Full monitoring procedures, trap tree preparation and data collection to be undertaken and recorded by FPCs Softwood Silviculturist.

Responsibility Forest Products Commission

8.2.6.

Calculation method

Entity to be measured Calculation method Presence of Sirex in trap Calculation for KPI reporting requires Yes/No for Sirex detection at all trees. monitored sites. 8.2.7. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Calculation frequency

Required metric Presence of Sirex infestation in trap trees (Yes/No)

Assessment of trap trees for any Sirex Annually infestation to be conducted at periodic intervals between autumn and early winter following the preparation of trap

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trees between November and December. 8.2.8. Data presentation Presentation Data to be presented in a table (table 1) including number of plantations assessed, number of tress assessed and number of infested trees. Text to describe the monitoring process and any Sirex infestation if detected in trap trees.

Metric Presence of Sirex infestation in trap trees (Yes/No)

Table 1:

Sirex detection in trap tree plots for reporting period 2004-2005.


No. of Trees Assessed No. of infested Trees

No. of Plantations Assessed

8.2.9.

Responsibility

Softwood Silviculturist, Forest Products Commission is responsible for:


establishing a network of trap trees to detect Sirex; undertaking trap tree poisoning; periodic assessment of trap trees; data collation and analysis for KPI; and data presentation and interpretation.

These procedures to be conducted each year as stipulated in KPI reporting. Forest Products Commission is responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPI that require reporting by FPC into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and publication of its report. 8.2.10. Work Instructions Stages for establishing a network of detection using trap trees attractive to Sirex. 1. Site Selection for trap trees:

approximately five trees from un-thinned plantations 10-25 years old; selected from trees that are under stress from fire, drought/moisture stress and pine needle blight; trees that are near to all weather access roads; and trees with poor form to minimise wastage of quality timber.

2. Timing of trap tree poisoning requires injecting herbicide into trap trees mid-November to midDecember to weaken trees and make attractive to Sirex over their peak flight season (JanuaryMarch). 3. Poisoning technique requires:

selection of appropriate herbicide; tree butts to be made accessible by thoroughly trimming branches; and herbicide to be injected into sapwood (not bark) 20cm from the ground using a tree injector with an injection rate of 2ml of undiluted chemical every l5 cm around the stem.

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4. Assessing results Trees to be examined during autumn and early winter for:

signs of stress from herbicide injection; signs of Sirex attack (brown staining of the cambium layer beneath the bark); and identification to be confirmed by Forest Entomologist if infestation is suspected.

5. Results to be recorded for each trap tree as demonstrated in table 2 below. Table 2:
Date Tree 1 Tree 2 Tree 3 Tree 4 Tree 5

Detection of Sirex in trap tree compartments


Poison date Assessment of poison success Trees infested

Y/N Y/N Y/N Y/N Y/N

N N N Y Fell tree and inoculate N

8.2.11. Further reading Department of Conservation and Land Management Western Australia (1988). Sirex Plan. National Sirex Coordination Committee (1999). National Sirex Control Strategy (Operations Worksheet). Neumann, F.G, P. Andrew, R. Shepherd, and H. Stewart (1989). Guidelines for the Control of Sirex Wasp in Victoria. Lands and Forest Division, Report to Regional Management. Neumann, F.G, J.L. Morey, and R.J. McKimm (1987). The Sirex Wasp in Victoria, Lands and Forest Division, Department of Conservation, Forests and Lands.

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9.

KPI 9 - Time to regenerate harvested areas

9.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 40) Key performance indicator 9 Performance measure Time to regenerate harvested areas. The time between completion of native forest harvesting of a coupe for regeneration and the completion of post- harvest regeneration treatment. For karri and planted jarrah: achieve more than 75% of areas treated to be completed within 18 months; and achieve 100 per cent of areas treated to be completed within 30 months. For other jarrah: achieve 100 per cent of areas treated to be completed within 18 months. Annually. The Forest Products Commission to advise the Department how it will rectify the shortfall. The Department to determine the need for a revision of management practices, in consultation with the Conservation Commission.

Performance target(s)

Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to regeneration and rehabilitation of disturbed forest is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to regenerate or rehabilitate disturbed forest so as to maintain the productive capacity, flora composition and structural attributes of that forest in the long term (Forest Management Plan p 37): Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 15.1 The Forest Products Commission will conduct regeneration operations in a manner that: 15.1.1 is in accordance with the Departments Silviculture Guidelines; and 15.1.2 prior to the formal incorporation of the amendments identified in Appendix 5 into those Guidelines, is consistent with those amendments.

9.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 9


9.2.1. Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 9 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets in regard to the time taken to regenerate harvested areas. 9.2.2. Rationale

Completing regeneration treatments following harvesting operations is essential in maintaining the long term productive capacity, flora composition and structural attributes of native forests. Time delays between harvesting and regeneration reduce the ability to achieve prescribed burn outcomes and may lead to site degradation. Ensuring that areas are regenerated within target
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timeframes increases the likelihood of achieving effective regeneration and potentially reduces the time taken for biodiversity to return to pre-disturbance levels. 9.2.3. Background and context

Regeneration of harvested areas involves the completion of a sequence of tasks, and delays are possible at any step within this sequence e.g. extended harvesting time due to access restrictions, lack of available machinery to complete burn boundary track construction, culling works not completed, lack of suitable burning days to undertake the burn, or lack of suitable seedlings for planting. The date of the last operation in the sequence of regeneration treatments is seen as the date regeneration treatments were completed. This operation may or may not result in effective regeneration however the effectiveness of regeneration will be monitored through KPI 10 effectiveness of regeneration of native forest and plantation.) Although delays may occur at any stage in the regeneration sequence there are important milestones within the sequence that will aid in the identification of the cause if unacceptable regeneration delay occurs. The date that all fallers blocks are certified as complete is considered to be the harvesting completion date for a coupe, not when transportation of timber products to customers is complete. 9.2.4. Issues

Harvesting Completion Delays in harvest completion may be extensive and due to a variety of factors, some manageable (e.g. removal of timber) and some not (access restrictions due to risk of soil damage). This KPI does not address delays in harvesting. Records are kept of the completion of harvesting by block (FPC 104). Although record keeping standards have improved over time, records are not available for all harvesting coupes. Only those coupes with records available are possible to include in reporting of regeneration delay. Regeneration Operations The silviculture objective of a harvesting area may not necessarily be to create regeneration e.g. thinning or dieback selection. The area reported under this KPI will not equate to the total area harvested in a year, rather it will be a subset of this area. Availability of Seed Where the silvicultural objective is to establish regeneration, the regeneration burn should only occur when there is an adequate seed crop present. Some delays in regeneration establishment are therefore desirable to ensure that regeneration effectiveness is not compromised. 9.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Target For karri and planted jarrah: achieve more than 75% of areas treated to be completed within 18 months; and achieve 100 per cent of areas treated to be completed within 30 months. For other jarrah: achieve 100 per cent of areas treated to be completed within 18 months.

Entity Harvesting completion date.

Regeneration completion date.

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9.2.6.

Required data

Required data Area harvested silviculture type.

Collection & storage method Custodians by Maps to be digitised by Forest Forest Management Branch Management Branch and stored in Silvicultural Recording System (SILREC). Area regenerated by SILREC to be updated when Forest Management Branch silvicultural type and date regeneration operations of regeneration completed completion. Date of harvesting Forest Products Commission to Forest Management Branch completion. record date of harvest completion for all coupes by fellers blocks. Information to be entered into SILREC 9.2.7. Calculation method Calculation method Determine the area harvested by each silvicultural type for a calendar year. Classify the regeneration area by completion categories Calculate the proportion of program in each category.

Entity to be measured Regeneration delay.

9.2.8.

Entity measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Annually on a calendar year basis Calculation frequency Annually on a calendar year basis Annually on a calendar year basis

Required metric Harvest area Date of completion. 9.2.9.

regeneration Annually on a calendar year basis

Data presentation

Metric Presentation Proportion of forest Present the area of forest regenerated by regeneration objective regenerated within target against the target completion timeframes. Text to interpret and timeframes. analyse data. Table 1. Proportion of sampled jarrah harvest coupes in various categories of harvest and completion of regeneration treatments. Year harvest Less than 18 18 to 30 Greater than Regeneration completed months months 30 months not recorded at 30/6/08 2004 % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) 2005 % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) 2006 % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) Total % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) Target 100% time between Total

100% 100% 100% 100%

(n) (n) (n) (n)

Numbers in parentheses refer to the number of coupes contributing data for that year.

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Table 2.

Proportion of sampled karri harvest coupes in various categories of time between harvest and completion of regeneration treatments. Year harvest Less than 18 18 to 30 Greater than Regeneration Total complete months months 30 months not recorded at 30/6/08 2004 % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) 100% (n) 2005 % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) 100% (n) 2006 % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) 100% (n) Total % (n) % (n) % (n) % (n) 100% (n) Target 75% 100 %

Numbers in parentheses refer to the number of coupes contributing data for that year. The following tables (Table 6 - Table 7) from the Mid-term Audit of the Forest Management Plan show the required presentation format for this data. Table 6. Per cent of sampled jarrah harvest coupes in various categories of time between harvest and completion of regeneration treatments. The sample covers coupes in which harvesting was completed during the period 2004-2006, in which regeneration was not based on planting of seedlings and hence where the performance target is 100 percent of areas treated to be completed within 18 months. Numbers in parentheses refer to the number of coupes contributing data for that year. Less than 18 18 to 30 Greater Regeneration Total months months than 30 not recorded months at 30/6/08 13% (1) 38% (3) 38% (3) 13% (1) 100% (8) 29% (2) 57% (4) 0% (0) 14% (1) 100% (7) 50% (8) 6% (1) 6% (1) 38% (6) 100% (16) 35% (11) 26% (8) 13 (4) 26% (8) 100% (31) 100% Per cent of sampled karri harvest coupes in various categories of time between harvest and completion of regeneration treatments. The sample covers coupes in which harvesting was completed during the period 2004 to 2006, in which regeneration was based on planting of seedlings and hence where the performance target is 75 percent of areas treated to be completed within 18 months and 100 percent of areas treated to be completed within 30 months. Numbers in parentheses refer to the number of coupes contributing data for that year. Less than 18 18 to 30 Greater than Regeneration Total months months 30 months not recorded at 30/6/08 50% (2) 50% (2) 0% (0) 0% (0) 100% (4) 70% (7) 30% (3) 0% (0) 0% (0) 100% (10) 100% (7) 0% (0) 0% (0) 0% (0) 100% (7) 76% (16) 24% (5) 0% (0) 0% (0) 100% (21) 75% 100 %

Year harvest completed 2004 2005 2006 Total Target Table 7.

Year harvest complete 2004 2005 2006 Total Target

9.2.10. Responsibility Forest Products Commission will be responsible for: maintaining records of all regeneration areas i.e. karri regeneration, jarrah establishment and jarrah release;

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maintaining records of all harvesting completion dates for regeneration operations; forwarding of records of all regeneration areas and completion dates for regeneration operations at least 6 monthly to Forest Management Branch to update SILREC systems; and provide feedback as to why delays may have occurred in treatments.

Forest Management Branch will be responsible for: managing and updating of SILREC system; data collation and summarisation for KPI; and data presentation. Policy and Practice Branch will be responsible for: liaison with the Forest Products Commission and DEC Fire Management Services Branch to determine the cause of delays; analysis and interpretation of data and preparation of text for report; and collating information for this KPI together with other KPIs into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for the auditing, reviewing and publication of its report.

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10.

KPI 10 - Effectiveness of regeneration of native forest and plantation

10.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 40) Key performance indicator 10 Performance measure Effectiveness of regeneration of native forest and plantation. The proportion of the sampled annual regeneration release program that does not meet the stocking standard set out in the Silviculture Guidelines. No more than five per cent of the area regenerated requiring remedial action. Annually. The Forest Products Commission to advise the Department how it will rectify the shortfall. The Department to determine the need for a revision of management practices, in consultation with the Conservation Commission..

Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to regeneration and rehabilitation of disturbed forest is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to regenerate or rehabilitate disturbed forest so as to maintain the productive capacity, flora composition and structural attributes of that forest in the long term (Forest Management Plan p 37): Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 15.1 The Forest Products Commission will conduct regeneration operations in a manner that: 15.1.1 is in accordance with the Departments Silviculture Guidelines; and 15.1.2 prior to the formal incorporation of the amendments identified in Appendix 5 into those Guidelines, is consistent with those amendments. (Plantations) The Forest Products Commission will: 15.4.1 regenerate areas of plantation that are clearfelled and are able to be replanted with exotic species in accordance with the Forest Products Commissions Plantation Management Guidelines; 15.4.3 where regeneration or rehabilitation operations do not result in regeneration or rehabilitation to a standard specified in the relevant guidelines, investigate the cause and if necessary, repeat the regeneration or rehabilitation operations in order to achieve that standard.

15.4

10.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 10


10.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 10 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets in regard to effective regeneration of forest and plantation areas.

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10.2.2. Rationale In order to maintain the productive capacity of forest and plantation areas and to provide for a range of other forest values, forest and plantation areas must be regenerated after particular types of disturbance. 10.2.3. Background and context DEC and FPC silviculture guidelines detail a number of survey requirements to assess the effectiveness of native forest regeneration following harvesting. Reporting for this KPI will involve summarising this information for each calendar year. Karri Regeneration Karri regeneration surveys are required on each and every hectare of karri forest regenerated. The success criteria is for 85 per cent of sample points in a specified patch or area stocked at least at the rate of 1666 stems per hectare. Areas that fall below this standard are to be infill planted to ensure the target of 85 per cent is achieved in the following year. Additionally all areas of 1 ha or more that are stocked below 1666 stems per hectare will require infill planting. Jarrah Regeneration- release All jarrah regeneration release areas require inspection for regeneration adequacy and regeneration surveys are required on a 5 per cent sample of areas greater than 2 ha. The table below outlines the success criteria for these surveys. Western Jarrah Eastern Jarrah 65 percent of sample points stocked at the rate 60 percent of sample points stocked at the of: rate of: 500 or more stems/ha of saplings; 200 or more stems/ha of saplings or stool coppice from stumps <30 cm OR diameter; 1000 or more stems/ha of jarrah or marri OR saplings/stool coppice + jarrah ground coppice or marri advance growth. 350 or more stems/ha of jarrah or marri saplings/stool coppice + jarrah ground coppice, marri or wandoo advance growth.

Greater than 20 percent of the regeneration is required to be jarrah where the overstorey is predominantly jarrah.

Cells that are under-stocked at this rate will require infill planting with jarrah seedlings. Additionally all areas of 0.5 ha or more that are stocked below these rates will require infill planting. Plantation establishment All plantation areas established on DEC-managed lands require survival surveys to be conducted. Areas not achieving at least an 85 per cent survival rate require remedial treatment. 10.2.4. Issues Jarrah forest The jarrah forest consists as a mosiac of different forest structures and as such the silviculture objective may change from patch to patch as determined by the treemarker. Attempts are made to capture and record this variation both during treemarking and following harvesting, however the mapped information in some cases is only indicative. Identifying the boundaries of patches that require surveying is therefore difficult, and not suited to the survey technique currently identified in the silviculture guidelines.
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The current regeneration survey method assumes that boundaries between regeneration objectives are clearly defined and occur in large aggregarates. The silviculture objective may vary as frequently as patches every 50 m in diameter. The regeneration objective selected at the time of treemarking may not be achieved due to the prevalence of a large number of cull trees. Where the basal area of cull trees is greater than 12 m2/ha the silvicultural outcome will be different to the treemarking objective, and recorded as selective. These areas often occur as part of the mosaic and are difficult to exclude from the regeneration survey. Areas of forest subject to mining ie within the 25 year bauxite mining envelope do not receive postharvest treatment and therefore need to be excluded from regeneration effectiveness calculations. Karri forest Regeneration effectiveness reporting in the karri forest is not complicated by the fine mosaic that is associated with the jarrah forest. The current guidance documents require that all regenerated areas be sampled to determine regeneration success. Backlog treatments The silviculture recording system (SILREC) records a substantial area of harvested forests in which surveys have not been completed. Reporting on the current year regeneration program does not capture the level to which the backlog has either been reduced or increased. 10.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Entity Area of regeneration surveyed. Actual requiring remedial action. 10.2.6. Required data Collection & storage method Required data Area regenerated by Maps to be digitized by Forest silviculture objective. Management Branch and stored in Silvicultural Recording System (SILREC). Area surveyed by patch Surveys to be completed by Forest with survey results. Products Commission, reviewed for standards by the DEC Senior Silviculturist and results to be recorded in SILREC. Area requiring remedial Forest Products Commission to complete action. regeneration surveys as specified in the silviculture guidelines, including determination of areas requiring remedial action. 10.2.7. Calculation method Entity to be measured Karri infill area. Calculation method Total area of karri forest regenerated plus previous years infill programs (excluding landings and gravel pits). Complete regeneration surveys for each coupe/cell identified and identify areas requiring infill. Summarise area surveyed and areas requiring remediation. Calculate proportion of program requiring remedial treatment. (release) Total area of jarrah forest cut to regeneration release with patch size Custodians Forest Management Branch Forest Branch Management Target No more than five per cent of the area regenerated/established requiring remedial action.

Forest Commission

Products

Jarrah

infill

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Entity to be measured area.

Plantation infill area.

Calculation method greater than 2 ha, outside of mining envelope. Exclude landing and gravel pit areas. Sub-totalled for eastern and western jarrah. Complete survey on 5% by area of each coupe. Identify areas requiring infill. Summarise area surveyed and areas requiring remedial treatment. Calculate proportion requiring remedial treatment. Area of plantation re-established. Survival surveys to be completed. Summarise program results. Identify proportion of the program requiring infill.

10.2.8. Entity measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Karri infill % Jarrah infill (release) % Plantation infill % Measurement frequency Annually on a calendar year basis. Annually on a calendar year basis. Annually on a calendar year basis. Calculation frequency Annually on a calendar year basis. Annually on a calendar year basis. Annually on a calendar year basis.

10.2.9. Data presentation Metric Presentation Area of forest / plantation Present the area of forest/plantation requiring follow-up treatment for requiring follow-up plantations, jarrah and karri regeneration/establishment area against treatment. the target at annual reporting periods. Text to interpret and analyse data. Table 1. Annual area of karri forest regenerated that was surveyed and required remediation to achieve stocking density standards specified in the silviculture guidelines. Area (ha) Area (ha) Area requiring Year regenerated in Area (ha) understocked remedial previous year surveyed treatment (% of area surveyed)

2004 2005 2006 2007 Table 2. Annual area of jarrah forest regenerated that was surveyed and required remediation to achieve stocking density standards specified in the silviculture guidelines. Area (ha) Area (ha) Area (ha) Area requiring Year regenerated in surveyed understocked remedial previous year treatment (% of area surveyed)

2004 2005 2006 2007

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Table 3.

Annual area of plantation (pine) forest regenerated that was surveyed and required remediation to achieve stocking density standards specified in the silviculture guidelines. Area (ha) Area (ha) Area requiring Year regenerated in Area (ha) understocked remedial previous year surveyed treatment (% of area surveyed)

2004 2005 2006 2007 The following tables (Table 8 - Table 10) from the Mid-term Audit of the Forest Management Plan show the required presentation format for this data. Table 8. Annual area of karri forest regenerated that was surveyed and required remediation to achieve stocking density standards specified in the Silviculture Guidelines. Area (ha) regenerated in previous year 1,409.6 1,323.0 737.5 674.5 Area (ha) surveyed 1,381.5 1,314.6 731.6 673.5 Area (ha) understocked Area requiring remedial treatment (% of area surveyed) 0.6 0.4 0.1 0.6

Year

2004 2005 2006 2007 Table 9.

8.4 5.9 1.0 4.0

Annual area of jarrah forest regenerated that was surveyed and required remediation to achieve stocking density standards specified in the Silviculture Guidelines. Area (ha) regenerated in previous year 1,614.7 962.6 287.7 302.9 Area (ha) surveyed 952.1 512.2 222.4 173.8 Area (ha) understocked Area requiring remedial treatment (% of area surveyed) 0 0 0 0

Year

2004 2005 2006 2007 Table 10.

0 0 0 0

Annual area of plantation (pine) forest regenerated that was surveyed and required remediation to achieve stocking density standards specified in the Silviculture Guidelines. Area (ha) regenerated in previous year 1,418.1 1,455.8 1,432.7 1,511.5 Area (ha) surveyed 1,418.1 1,455.8 1,432.7 1,511.5 Area (ha) understocked Area requiring remedial treatment (% of area surveyed) 7.4 9.8 3.1 3.4

Year

2004 2005 2006 2007

105.0 143.0 45.0 52.0

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10.2.10. Responsibility Forest Products Commission will be responsible for: (Native Forests) compiling records for area of karri regeneration, and jarrah release; forwarding of records to Forest Management Branch to update SILREC systems; completion of regeneration and rehabilitation surveys; and forwarding surveys to DECs Senior Silviculturist for review. (Plantations) compiling records for area of plantation establishment; completion of establishment surveys; and forwarding summary of surveys to DECs Senior Silviculturist for inclusion in report. Forest Management Branch will be responsible for: managing and updating of SILREC system; and data collation. Policy and Practice Branch will be responsible for: review of survey data standards; forwarding survey data to FMB for collation; data presentation; interpretation of data and development of text; and collating information for this KPI together with other KPIs into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for the auditing, reviewing and publication of its report.

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11.

KPI 11 - Forecast strategic timber yield versus actual timber yield.

Not yet completed.

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12.

KPI 12 - Achievement of early thinning schedules that underpin future yield

Not yet completed.

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13.

KPI 13 - Direct and indirect employment in the timber industries

13.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 41) Key performance indicator 13 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall Direct and indirect employment in the timber industries. The numbers employed in native timber harvesting, processing and downstream manufacture. No target, trends to be reported. Forest Products Commission to report biennially. The Department to investigate the cause and report to Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment.

The objective in relation to is: There is no specific objective in the Forest Management Plan dealing with employment, however this Key Performance Indicator will enable changes in the level of employment and employment categories to be recognised and investigated if required.

13.2

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 13

13.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 13 is to assess the level of employment in timber in native forest and State owned plantations within the area covered by the Forest Management Plan through tracking the change in the number of personnel and their work category. 13.2.2. Rationale This indicator is helpful as it measures the number of persons employed directly and indirectly by the Forest Products Commission (FPC) in work associated with native forest management, harvesting and sawmilling, and management, harvesting and sawmilling from State owned plantations. The key performance indicator will reveal if that number is increasing or decreasing as a result of management structures or market requirements. 13.2.3. Background and context State forest and timber reserves supply a range of sawlog, residue and other products. Performance measurements from KPI 13 will reveal any change in number of persons employed in the timber harvesting and sawmilling sectors and facilitate examination of the reasons for these changes. 13.2.4. Issues The wording of the key performance indicator focuses on the numbers employed in native timber harvesting, processing and downstream manufacture. Collation and reporting on the numbers employed in timber industry (which includes forest operations, processing and downstream
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manufacture) is a component of the Australias State of the Forests Report, and collected as part of Australian Bureau of Statistics census surveys. There appears to be little value in attempting to break this down for native forest timber in WA every two years. Given previous experience from DEC staff and FPC in trying to collate employment information from within the sector it was decided that the most appropriate way of examining and reporting on employment numbers in the south-west forests was to require the FPC to report every two years using a qualitative statement outlining trends in employment in native forest management, harvesting and sawmilling plus opportunistic use of data sourced from national statistics. 13.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Entity Target A qualitative statement outlining trends in employment in native forest No target management, harvesting and sawmilling plus opportunistic use of data sourced from national statistics 13.2.6. Required data Collection & storage method A qualitative statement outlining trends in Biennially employment in native forest management, harvesting and sawmilling Data sourced from national statistics As available Required data Custodians

Forest Commission Forest Commission

Products

Products

13.2.7. Calculation method Entity to be measured No calculations are required. Calculation method N/A

13.2.8. Entity measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Measurement frequency A qualitative statement outlining Biennially trends in employment in native forest management, harvesting and sawmilling. 13.2.9. Data presentation Metric Presentation A qualitative statement outlining Present the trend in the number of persons employed in trends in employment native forest native forest management, harvesting and sawmilling. Statement to include a comparison between current period trends and the data from the previous reporting period, and interpretation and explanation for categories that have undergone significant changes from the preceding period. Calculation frequency Biennially

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13.2.10

Responsibility

Forest Products Commission will be responsible for: Data collection and analysis; Comparison between current period trends and the data from the previous reporting period; Providing interpretation and explanation for categories that have undergone significant changes from the preceding period; Sourcing and incorporating data from national statistics into the statement for the reporting period; and Providing the statement and supporting information to Forest Policy and Practice Branch.

Forest Policy and Practice Branch will be responsible for: Collation of information on this KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for the auditing, reviewing and publication of its report.

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14.

KPI 14 - Access for apiculture

14.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to productive capacity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 41) Key performance indicator 14 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall Access for apiculture. The number of registered sites by land category. No target, trends to be reported. Biennially. The Department to investigate the cause and report to Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

The objective in relation to apiary sites is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to manage the removal of forest produce, other than sawlogs and residue logs, in a manner that, so far as is practicable and sustainable, satisfies public demand for that produce: (Forest Management Plan p36) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 13.1 The Department will: 13.1.1 regulate the supply of forest produce, other than sawlogs, residue logs, and craftwood (other forest produce) through the administration of licensing legislation; 13.1.2 maintain and, where appropriate, prepare guidelines for the management of other forest produce that: are to be periodically reviewed, with public consultation, and in the case of new guidelines or revisions to guidelines, are to be submitted to the Conservation Commission for advice and approved by the Minister for the Environment before they take effect; 13.1.3 where reasonable and practicable, monitor supply patterns for signs of non sustainability; and 13.1.4 facilitate the salvage of forest produce generated by management actions the primary purpose of which is not timber production, or natural events where salvage activities can contribute to rehabilitation and do not significantly increase the level of disturbance or the risk of environmental impacts to the forest area.

14.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 14


14.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 14 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan through the management of the production of honey and by providing information on the number of apiculture sites.

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14.2.2. Rationale This KPI measures the number of registered apiary sites in relation to land categories in the area of the Forest Management Plan and provides information on the change in number of sites over time, particularly as a result of area management plans for conservation reserves that prescribe the removal of sites. From this information, management activities can be assessed and appropriate actions to better achieve the objective can be identified. 14.2.3. Background and context The Department of Conservation and Land Management manages beekeeper access to all Crown land (excluding Commonwealth land) through the Conservation and Land Management Act 1984 and the Forest Management Regulations 1993. Registered apiary sites occur on all types of State managed land. At September 2004, there were 3046 current apiary site permits on all Crown land tenures throughout the State, including 1633 permits for land vested in the Conservation Commission. Some 75% of the honey resource in the State is located on land vested in the Conservation Commission. Of the 96 beekeepers registered to collect honey from these sites almost 80 of them operate about 1000 registered apiary sites in State forests and timber reserves. The Beekeeping Consultative Committee was created to facilitate discussion and consultation between the Department, industry groups and other Government agencies on issues that may affect the beekeeping industry. The Committee normally meets twice a year in May and November. The Beekeeping Consultative Committee provides industry input to DEC on beekeeping matters and consists of representatives from the WA Apiarists' Society, Wescobee Limited, Swan Settlers Limited, WA Farmers' Federation, WA Beekeepers Association, Pollination Association of WA as well as a member from the Department of Land Administration, Water Corporation, Pastoral Lands Board, and Pastoralists and Graziers Association. Ecological principles suggest that introduced honey-bees adversely affect native plant pollinators through competition for pollen and nectar resources. Research is being undertaken to quantify these effects. It is policy that existing apiary sites in nature reserves, national parks, and conservation parks are retained, except where their removal has been prescribed in an area management plan. The policy also places a moratorium on new site development that will affect those sites in State forest that are now proposed to become a conservation reserve. The number and distribution of apiary sites is based on land categories at the time of each reporting of the KPI. This will provide for the interpretation of any changes in the number of apiary sites over reporting periods. 14.2.4. Issues Data for the number of unregistered apiary sites on private land is unknown. There is no requirement for beekeepers to register sites on private land. 14.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Target Number of registered apiary sites in each No target, trends to be reported. Crown land category for the area of the Forest Management Plan.

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14.2.6. Required data Required data Number of registered apiary sites in the area of the Forest Management Plan by land category at the time of each reporting of the KPI. Collection & storage method Custodians The apiary site management Apiary Sites Officer, Parks and database is used to store and Visitor Services Division. manage information including the number and location of registered apiary sites. Apiary Sites Officer to update database on an ongoing basis as further data of number and location of apiary sites is forthcoming. Geographic Information Section Geographic Information Section. maintains current land category information for Crown land at any point in time, as provided by Landgate.

14.2.7. Calculation method Parameter to be measured Change in number of apiary sites by land category within the area of the Forest Management Plan. Calculation method Overlay map of all registered apiary sites in the area of the Forest Management Plan over the map of current land categories at the time of each reporting of the KPI. Enumerate the registered apiary sites in each land category and the total number of apiary sites. . Change in the number of sites in each land category is to be recorded and trends are to be identified.

14.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Number of registered apiary sites by current land category 14.2.9. Data presentation 1. A table showing the number and breakdown of apiary sites into current land categories in the area of the Forest Management Plan (see Table 1 below); and 2. Text interpreting any changes or trends and the reasons for the number and distribution of registered apiary sites in each land category. Measurement frequency Biennially Calculation frequency Biennially

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Table 1:

Number of apiary sites on each land category in the area of Forest Management Plan.
Number of sites in Forest Management Plan area January 2004 January 2006 January 2008 January 2010 January 2012

Land category

State forest, timber reserve Nature reserve National park Conservation park CALM Act section 5(1)(g) & (h) reserve Total for Forest Management Plan area

14.2.10. Responsibilities Apiary Sites Officer from Parks and Visitor Services Division is responsible for:

apiary site data collection and management; apiary site data collation and analysis; data presentation and analysis; and draft text describing and interpreting trends in apiary site number and distribution.

Geographic Information Section is responsible for:


management of land category information; intersection of apiary site data with current land category information; and providing the information on number of apiary sites in each land category to the Apiary Sites Officer.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report. 14.2.11. Work Instructions 1. Apiary Sites Officer to provide apiary site information for Forest Management Plan area to Geographic Information Section and request intersection with current land category information on a biennial basis. 2. Geographic Information Section to provide the information on number of apiary sites in each land category to the Apiary Sites Officer. 3. Apiary Sites Officer to produce table showing number of apiary sites on each land category in the area of Forest Management Plan (see Table 1). 4. Apiary Sites Officer to interpret changes and trends between biennial reporting periods and over the period of the Plan.
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15.
15.1

KPI 15 - Wildflowers and seed picking


Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to biological diversity is: The overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and, where applicable, enhance the productive capacity of the forest. (Forest Management Plan p32) Forest Management Plan extract (page 41): Key performance indicator 15 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall Wildflowers and seed picking. The level of activity measured by picking endorsements and returns. No target, trends to be reported. Annually. The Department to investigate the cause and report to Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

The objective in relation to other forest produce: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to manage the removal of forest produce, other than sawlogs and residue logs, in a manner that, so far as is practicable and sustainable, satisfies public demand for that produce: (Forest Management Plan p36) Most relevant Forest Management Plan Actions: 13.1 The Department will: regulate the supply of forest produce, other than sawlogs, residue logs, and craftwood (other forest produce) through the administration of licensing legislation; maintain and, where appropriate, prepare guidelines for the management of other forest produce that: are to be periodically reviewed, with public consultation, and in the case of new guidelines or revisions to guidelines, are to be submitted to the Conservation Commission for advice and approved by the Minister for the Environment before they take effect; where reasonable and practicable, monitor supply patterns for signs of non-sustainability; facilitate the salvage of forest produce generated by management actions the primary purpose of which is not timber production, or natural events where salvage activities can contribute to rehabilitation and do not significantly increase the level of disturbance or the risk of environmental impacts to the forest area.

13.1.1

13.1.2

13.1.3 13.1.4

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15.2

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 15

15.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 15 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in seeking to sustain the productive capacity of the forest through monitoring the removal of wildflowers and seed. 15.2.2. Rationale This KPI is useful as it measures the change in the number of wildflower and seed picking licenses issued and picking returns in the area of the Forest Management Plan over time. This information will help in the sustainable allocation of wildflower and seed picking endorsements and the protection of forest values. 15.2.3. Background and Context All native flora is protected under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 and licenses are required to harvest protected flora on Crown land. General conditions are placed on harvesting through licenses and specific conditions are set for some species to ensure their sustainable harvest. Flora harvesting is monitored in the field by District staff and Wildlife Officers and by Nature Conservation Division through desktop analysis of picker returns. Certain species have specific management programs that entail more intensive control through measures including quotas. All Crown land in the plan area that is managed by the Department for flora harvesting is vested in the Conservation Commission. Pickers require three-monthly endorsements from the Department to collect flora on land vested in the Conservation Commission. This involves written permission for pickers to operate on lands specified under the CALM Act, or land on which DEC manages flora by agreement with the managing authority or landowner. These endorsements are provided by staff at DEC District Offices. Harvesting is not permitted in national parks, nature reserves and conservation parks or proposed conservation reserves unless endorsed by the Director Nature Conservation, as having direct conservation value to the land from which the flora was taken. The majority of harvesting will take place within State forest, timber reserves and forest conservation areas. Harvesting in informal reserves is considered on a case-by-case basis using a risk-based approach to manage the risk to target species conservation, and threat of dieback and other processes. 15.2.4. Issues Data stored in the Flora Industry Data Management System (FIDMS) is based on the returns from licenses issued to pickers on a yearly basis. It is currently not possible to use endorsements as a basis for reporting. The issue of endorsements through use of the FIDMS database is not used in all Districts in the Forest Management Plan area, and considerable work would be required to have this implemented consistently by Districts. Data entered into the FIDMS database from picking returns is only as accurate as the information provided by the licensees, and the interpretation of returns by the person entering data. DEC officers suggest that while licensees generally have a good understanding of licence requirements in the field,
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73 picking returns are not always filled out accurately or consistently. The data serves only as an indicator of the level of activity of wildflower and seed picking. Picking return forms are not always returned by the required date. Some pickers do not submit returns at all, and due to lack of resources within DEC, these licensees are only picked up as missing returns if trying to renew a licence. This may result in incomplete data for reporting of this KPI. 15.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Entity Target Number of Commercial Purposes Licences for No targets set, trends to be reported. each grid square in the area encompassing the Forest Management Plan. Commercial Purposes Licence returns for each grid square in the area encompassing the Forest Management Plan. The 10 most heavily harvested species for both wildflowers and seed in the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area. The list of wildflower / seed species with a greater than 30% change in harvested quantities between annual reporting periods. 15.2.6. Required data Required data A list showing the number of Commercial Purposes Licenses used in the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area. Quantity of wildflowers cut by species in the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area collated from licence returns. Quantity of seed picked by species in the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area collated from licence returns. 15.2.7. Calculation method Parameter to be measured Change in the level of activity of wildflower harvesting and seed collection in the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area over reporting periods (calendar years) for the duration of the Forest Management Plan.
Commenced: 1 March 2007 Effective from: 6 December 2011 Custodian: Manager, Forest Policy and Practices Branch Approved by: Director, Sustainable Forest Management Division

Collection & storage method Data custodians Nature Protection Branch to Nature Protection Branch. collect and store data from picking returns in the Flora Industry Data Management System.

Calculation method Calculate the total number of licenses used, and quantity of wildflowers and seed collected to establish the level of activity. Annual figures to be compared with data from previous years to establish trends.

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74 15.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required measurement Measurement frequency Change in the total number of Annually (for a calendar year). licenses used for the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area. Change in the quantity of wildflowers picked in the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area. Change in the quantity of seed collected for the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area. 15.2.9. Data presentation Metric Presentation Number of Commercial Data to be presented in a table (table 1) identifying each grid Purposes Licenses for each grid square and the number of licences used for current period. square in the area encompassing the Forest Management Plan. Trend in Commercial Purposes Data to be presented in a table (table 2) for identifying each grid Licenses for each grid square in square and the number of licences used for each reporting period. the area encompassing the Forest Management Plan. Quantity of wildflowers collected Data to be presented in a table (table 3) with quantity of wildflowers harvested from picking returns (in number of stems or other unit) for grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area for annual reporting periods. Data to be presented in a table (table 4) with quantity of seed collected from picking returns (kg) for grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area for annual reporting periods. Calculation frequency Calculations to follow annual review of wildflower and seed collecting licences issued and picking returns (when returned, see issues section).

Quantity of seed collected.

A list of top ten most heavily Data to be presented in a table (table 5) with data from the harvested wildflower species previous period and the current period. Text to describe and that are harvested in the grid interpret changes and trends. squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area.

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75 Metric A list of top ten most heavily harvested seed species that are harvested in the grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area. A list of wildflower / seed species with a greater than 30% change in harvested quantities between annual reporting periods. 15.2.10. Responsibility Licensing Coordinator, Nature Protection Branch will be responsible for: data collection and management; data collation and analysis; data presentation and analysis; and preparing draft text in consultation with the Species and Communities Branch Senior Botanist and District staff, describing and interpreting changes and trends in wildflower and seed harvesting. Presentation Data to be presented in a table (table 6) with data from the previous period and the current period. Text to describe and interpret changes and trends.

Data to be presented in a table (table 7) with data from the previous period and the current period. Text to describe and interpret changes and trends.

Policy and Practice Branch of Sustainable Forest Management Division will be responsible for collating this information into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for the auditing, reviewing and publication of its report.

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76 Table 1 Number of Commercial Purposes Licences used in grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan for the current reporting period. Grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area
1811 1812 1813 1814 1911 1912 1913 1914 2004 2011 2012 2013 2014 2102 2111 2112 2113 2114 2123

Total

Table 2 Year
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Number of Commercial Purposes Licences in grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan for annual reporting periods. Grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area
1811 1812 1813 1814 1911 1912 1913 1914 2004 2011 2012 2013 2014 2102 2111 2112 2113 2114 2123

# Total

Percentage change between previous and current period

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77 Table 3 Wildflower collection in grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan for current reporting period. Grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area
1811 1812 1813 1814 1911 1912 1913 1914 2004 2011 2012 2013 2014 2102 2111 2112 2113 2114 2123

Species / Product
Stirlingia latifolia Stems

# Total

Grid total

Table 4

Seed collection (kg) in grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan for current reporting period. Grid squares encompassing the Forest Management Plan area
1811 1812 1813 1814 1911 1912 1913 1914 2004 2011 2012 2013 2014 2102 2111 2112 2113 2114 2123

Species / Product
Stirlingia latifolia Seed

# Total

Grid total

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Table 5

Comparison of changes in wildflower collection (stems) for the top 10 species in the area encompassing the Forest Management Plan relative to the last annual reporting period. Species Species total (Previous period) 913,900 1924 Species total (Current period) 587,369 2012 Percentage Change - 35.7 % + 4.6 %

Stirlingia latifolia Banksia grandis

Table 6

Comparison of changes in seed collection (kg) for the top 10 species in the area encompassing the Forest Management Plan relative to the last reporting period. Species Amount Collected (Previous period) 0 6.44 Amount Collected (Current period) 0 13.9768 Percentage Change 0 + 117%

Stirlingia latifolia Banksia grandis

Table 7

A list of wildflower / seed species with > 30% change in harvest in the area encompassing the Forest Management Plan for annual reporting periods. Product Stems Seed Unit Single Kg Percentage Change - 35.7 % + 117% Comments Area available reduced by wildfire. Based on small quantity change does not warrant investigation.

Species Stirlingia latifolia Banksia grandis

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16.
16.1

KPI 16 - Risk to conservation life property and other forest values posed by wildfire
Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to ecosystem health and vitality is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain forest ecosystem health and vitality. (Forest Management Plan p43) Forest Management Plan extract (page 46) Key performance indicator 16 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to reporting The risk to conservation, life, property and other forest values posed by wildfire. The area of forest by fuel age classification. Target to be determined following the Environmental Protection Authoritys review of fire management. Annually. The Department to high risk areas and incorporate into fuel reduction planning for subsequent years.

The revised performance target following the Environmental Protection Authoritys review of fire management has been determined to be General conformance with the theoretical distribution of time since fire for the whole-of-forest and for each Landscape Conservation Unit. The FMP objective in relation to fire is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the whole of forest and landscape scale for the purpose of seeking to use and respond to fire in a manner that: optimises the maintenance of forest ecosystem health and vitality; promotes the conservation of biodiversity; controls adverse impacts of fire on the social, cultural and economic values of land managed by the Department and adjoining land; and minimises the risk of smoke emanating from prescribed burns impacting on population centres and other sensitive areas. (Forest Management Plan p43)

Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 17.1 The Department will: 17.1.1 maintain a competent fire management, suppression and response capability; 17.1.2 prepare and maintain a fire management plan and smoke management guidelines; 17.1.3 undertake an annual prescribed burning program in a manner that: is in accordance with the fire management plan; is in accordance with the smoke management guidelines; has regard to the Goals for Understorey Structural Diversity referred to in Action 4.1; and considers any special vulnerability of fauna and flora known to exist in a particular area to burning in that area; and 17.1.4 consult with stakeholders and interested community members in a manner that seeks to develop community understanding of and support for, and enable constructive discussions and deliberations on, the planning and implementation of prescribed burning and other fire management programs.
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17.2 The Forest Products Commission will: 17.2.1 undertake an analysis of the risk from fire to its native timber production resources; and 17.2.2 provide to the Department funding sufficient to enable the Department to control the risk to acceptable levels, so far as is reasonable and practicable. 17.3 The Department and the Conservation Commission will: 17.3.1 participate in the proposed public review of fire management by the Environmental Protection Authority; and 17.3.2 incorporate the recommendations made in the review that are endorsed by the Minister for the Environment into the Departments fire management policy, plan (see Action 17.1.2) and fire management guidelines. 17.4 (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will: 17.4.1 undertake an analysis of the risk from fire to its plantation timber production resources; 17.4.2 undertake an analysis of the risk from fire emanating from its plantations moving into surrounding land; and 17.4.3 cooperate with the Department and other organisations in seeking to control the risks to acceptable levels, so far as is reasonable and practicable.

16.2

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 16

16.2.1 Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 16 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets in relation to the management of fire by providing information on the temporal diversity of time since fire within each Land Conservation Unit (LCU). 16.2.2 Rationale This KPI is useful in identifying the extent to which the observed frequency distribution of time since fire conforms to a theoretical frequency distribution for each of the LCUs located across the forest. The theoretical frequency distribution is based on the vital attributes of vegetation occurring within each LCU and is assumed to represent the optimal and sustainable distribution that will deliver diversity in understorey vegetation structure sufficient to meet the Goals for Understorey Vegetation Structure and therefore provide a level of diversity in functional habitats sufficient to provide the conservation of biodiversity. In achieving this goal the resulting fire history and the spatial distribution of fuel ages will provide mitigation of wildfire risk sufficient to protect life, property and other forest values from unacceptable impacts. 16.2.3 Background and context Fire has an impact on forest ecosystems. For example, fire can facilitate the regeneration of vegetation, the release of nutrients required for plant growth, the production of habitat niches such as tree hollows and woody ground habitat (logs) etc. Fire produces a diversity of post-fire seral stages in understorey vegetation across the landscape that provides a diversity of functional habitats for biota occurring in that landscape. The maintenance of this habitat diversity is essential to the persistence of biota at a landscape scale. However, the inadequate or excessive use of fire can limit the spatial and temporal diversity of these habitats and be detrimental to biodiversity conservation. Prolonged suppression of wildfire over large areas can result in the gradual build-up of fuel on the forest floor. This will increase the probability of large and intense fires, which are difficult, unsafe and costly to suppress and result in significant loss of economic and biological assets that take extended periods of time to recover. These fires also pose a significant threat to life and property
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values associated with the forest. In Mediterranean ecosystems such as the south-west of Western Australia, it is difficult to prevent fire for long periods over large areas. To attempt to do so may be detrimental to biodiversity conservation and the protection of the community. There are strongly held and often opposing views in the community. For example, that more prescribed burning is required to reduce the risk of wildfire and conversely that less and a different type of burning is required to protect biodiversity. The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) undertook a review of fire management in the south west of WA and released its findings to the public in Review of the Fire Policies and Management Practices of the Department of Conservation and Land Management, EPA, Bulletin 1151, October 2004. The report indicated support for the existing approach to prescribed fire management: The EPA recognises that a fuel reduction programme is a key strategy used by CALM to reduce the extent and damage to biodiversity and other assets, which might otherwise be caused by wildfires. The value of a prescribed burning programme is not in reducing the number of wildfires, but rather their intensity, to assist in their suppression, and to reduce the damage they cause to biodiversity. However the EPA identified room for improvement and made a recommendation to increase the significance of biodiversity outcomes in the fire planning models and procedures used by the department: The EPA considers that CALM has developed and implemented advanced fire management practices which are rated highly both nationally and internationally. There is, however, room for improvement in some aspects. The EPA recommends that, in planning the annual burn programme, assessment of fire requirements for biodiversity outcomes be given first consideration, and that any shortcomings from this approach for the other objectives be taken into account in a second round process to achieve all priority objectives. This recommendation has been achieved and the planning approach used to develop the prescribed fire program known as the Master Burn Plan is now focussed on achieving biodiversity conservation outcomes in LCU across the forest. This planned fire program is modified, if necessary, to achieve the other land management and strategic protection outcomes required of fire management. LCUs have been defined across the forests of the south-west. The boundaries were determined after considering climate, vegetation and geomorphology and are based on amalgamation of the 315 vegetation complexes developed by Mattiske and Havel (1998). Some land within the scope of the FMP is not covered by the LCUs developed by Mattiske and Havel, in particular the Swan Coastal Plain. For these areas the land system classification developed under the System Six study that are also based on vegetation and geomorphology, has been used to delimit LCU boundaries. LCUs provide fire management planning units at a landscape scale that are sympathetic to how fire behaves in these landscapes and how the biota and ecosystems within the units interact with fire. Managing fire to achieve biodiversity conservation outcomes at the LCU scale, based on the vital attributes of vegetation within each LCU, will ensure that the habitat diversity required to conserve biodiversity at the whole of forest scale can also be achieved and that the resulting spatial fuel age distribution is sufficient to mitigate the risk of wildfire to life, property and forest values. 16.2.4 The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Target Frequency distribution of Observed frequency distribution for fuel age will approximate the fuel age for the entire forest theoretical distribution for the entire forest
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Entity Frequency distribution fuel age for each LCU 16.2.5 Required data Required data Time since fire data

Target of Observed frequency distribution for fuel age will approximate the theoretical distribution for each LCU

Collection & storage method Fire Management Services to collect and store time since fire data for areas affected by wildfire and areas treated with prescribed fire for the area of Forest Management Plan. Fire Management Services to collect and store time since fire data for areas affected by wildfire and areas treated with prescribed fire for the area of each LCU.

Custodians Fire Management Services

Fire Management Services

16.2.6 Calculation method Parameter to be measured The area in each fuel age class for area of Forest Management Plan as at annual reporting periods. Calculation method

Overlay annual updates of time since fire data with area of Forest Management Plan to calculate area by fuel age classification for each reporting period. Compare updated data with previous data to establish change over reporting periods. Compare updated data with the theoretical fuel age frequency distribution to determine the degree of conformity. The area in each fuel age Overlay annual updates of time since fire data for the area of class for each LCU as at each LCU to calculate area by fuel age distribution for each LCU. annual reporting periods. Compare updated data with the theoretical fuel age frequency distribution for each LCU to determine the degree of conformity. 16.2.7 Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Measurement frequency Area of land by fuel age Annually at the end of December class 16.2.8 Data presentation Metric Proportion of land by fuel age class expressed as a percentage of the area of the whole forest. Presentation Histogram graph showing proportion of areas according to fuel age classes for the area of the Forest Management Plan for annual reporting periods with the theoretical frequency distribution curve overlayed. Graph to indicate the proportion of each fuel age within reserved and production forest (Figure 1). Text to explain graphs and incorporate any other relevant data available that provides further information on any significant variance from the theoretical frequency distribution and the risk to conservation, life, property and other forest values posed by wildfire. Area of land by fuel age Histogram graph showing frequency distribution of fuel age classes class expressed as a for each LCU for annual reporting periods with the theoretical percentage of the area of frequency distribution curve overlayed. Graph to indicate the each LCU proportion of each fuel age within reserved and production forest (Figure 2).
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Calculation frequency Annually following updates to time since fire data.

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Figure 1: Illustration of the fuel age frequency distribution and the desired theoretical frequency distribution for all DEC-managed land in the Forest Management Plan. Note - Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation

Figure 2: Illustration of the frequency distribution of fuel age classes for an individual LCU indicating the desired theoretical frequency distribution and the proportion of State forest and formal conservation reserve in each age class.

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16.2.9 Responsibility Fire Management Services is responsible for: 1. collection and management of time since fire data; 2. collation and analysis of data; 3. data presentation and analysis; and 4. draft text describing and interpreting trends for key performance indicator and relevant indicators. Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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17.
17.1

KPI 17 - Severity status of weeds and pests as determined by subjective survey


Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to ecosystem health and vitality is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain forest ecosystem health and vitality. Forest Management Plan extract (page 46). Key performance indicator 17 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall The severity status of weeds and pests as determined by subjective survey. List of important weeds and pests and their severity status that tracks movements of species between severity categories. No weed or pest to increase in severity status as a result of management actions. Every five years. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

The objective in relation to weeds, pests and diseases is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to (Forest Management Plan p 44): minimise, as far as is reasonable and practicable, the impact on the health and vitality of forest ecosystems of pathogens and their associated diseases; protect from infestation those areas currently free from P. cinnamomi; and control weeds and pests in forest ecosystems.

Most relevant Forest Management Plan Actions: 18.4 The Department will: 18.4.1 maintain records of weeds, pests and diseases that are known to have a significant impact on the health and vitality of forest ecosystems; 18.4.2 develop and implement weed, pest and disease control programs; 18.4.3 eradicate, wherever reasonable and practicable, localised infestations of weeds, pests or diseases before they are securely established; 18.4.4 encourage the coordinated involvement of industry, the community and other land managers in addressing weeds, pests and diseases; and 18.4.5 investigate, and where reasonable and practicable take action to control the identified cause of, any significant decline in the health and vitality of forest ecosystems. The Forest Products Commission will, so far as is reasonable and practicable, maintain their nurseries free from weeds, pests and pathogens that could be transported into the forest with planting stock. (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will:

18.5

18.6

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86 18.6.1 monitor for the presence of significant weeds, pests and diseases in plantations, and where reasonable and practicable undertake control measures; 18.6.2 develop and implement weed, pest and disease control programs for identified weeds, pests and diseases; 18.6.3 where there is an identified risk that plantation operations may result in transport of Phytophthora cinnamomi, conduct its operations having regard to the policy and in accordance with the Guidelines referred to in Action 18.2; and 18.6.4 take reasonable and practicable measures to control the spread of plantation species into adjacent native vegetation.

17.2

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 17

17.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 17 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan 2004-2013 through tracking the severity status of weeds and pests so that management activities can be assessed and appropriate actions to better achieve the objective can be identified. 17.2.2. Background and context Weed invasion is a major threat to natural ecosystems and the native species within them. Weeds threaten biological diversity by disrupting ecosystem processes and functions. The impacts of weeds on ecosystems include: resource competition; prevention of seedling recruitment; altered morphological processes, hydrological cycles and fire regimes; and changes in soil nutrient status, abundance and diversity of native fauna, and the genetics of native flora. Most Western Australian ecosystems are vulnerable to some extent to invasion by plant species and this is most evident where the natural system is disturbed and there is a source of weeds, such as areas close to farmland or a plantation of trees that will readily spread. The Departments Draft Policy Statement Environmental Weed Management guides the approach and priority setting for the control of environmental weeds in State forest and timber reserves and is consistent with the objectives of the State Weed Plan. The approach is to define the problem in terms of impacts on environmental values, develop a management plan to reduce impacts, implement the plan and monitor results. The starting point is information on weed occurrence and the threats they pose. Similarly, the invasion of ecosystems by pest animals can pose a major threat to the native species within them, and has been a major contributing factor to many species extinctions and increase in vulnerability status in Western Australia. The Department is committed to major pest animal control programmes including Western Shield targeted to the European Red fox and feral cat, control of goats and camels in the rangelands and control of feral pigs in forests. This KPI may help to define the problem in terms of impacts on environmental values, and encourage the development and implementation of management plans to reduce impacts, and monitor results. 17.2.3. Rationale This KPI is essential for monitoring the severity status of weeds and pests so that high-risk areas can be identified and actions can be implemented to reduce future threat to the health and vitality of natural ecosystems. 17.2.4. Issues Currently there is no coordinating mechanism for the monitoring and control of weeds across DECmanaged lands. Weed control programs are currently developed on a local scale based on the
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87 judgment and knowledge of district staff. There is no consistent method for data storage across districts. Recording the existence, distribution and severity of weeds relies on staff to fill out weed identification forms if infestations are spotted. Not all districts use a priority rating system to identify the severity status of weeds. Weeds targeted in any operational weed control programs reflect the priority weeds for each district. In 2008, the Department commenced a weed risk management project that will prioritise weeds within each of the 26 bioregions defined by the Interim Biogeographical Regionalisation of Australia (IBRA). This project will involve the prioritisation of weed species through the assessment of their invasiveness, impacts, potential and current distribution and feasibility of control. It will also investigate the use of an asset protection based approach for the prioritisation of established weeds. This approach looks at prioritisation of management actions aimed at protection of environmental assets from the threat posed by established weeds within each bioregion. This is a long-term project reliant on the availability of Regional and District staff for completion. Monitoring the scale and distribution of potential and existing environmental weeds from wholesale and retail outlets does not currently occur due to lack of resources. Quantitative data is often presented with no reference to land tenure, forest use or level of disturbance. This is problematic, as weed management will differ in the context of State forest, timber reserves, nature reserve, conservation parks and national parks. Data from private lands is difficult to gather and weed infestations on private land can be beyond department control. Even though the KPI requires reporting every 5 years, it is intended to conduct the initial survey in 2009, to repeat it in 2 years and again in 5 years to record change over time. 17.2.5. Entities to be measured for the KPI are: Entity Weed severity status Target No species will move to a higher severity result of management activities or lack of management activities. No species will move to a higher severity result of management activities or lack of management activities.

status as a appropriate status as a appropriate

Pest severity status

17.2.6. Required data: Required data A list showing important weeds and severity status for each district for the area covered by the Forest Management Plan for each reporting period. A list showing important pests and severity status for each district for the area covered by the Forest Management Plan for each reporting period. Collection & storage method District officers to collect data by subjective survey. Nature Conservation Division and districts to store data sets. District officers to collect data by subjective survey. Nature Conservation Division and districts to store data sets. Data Custodians District Offices and Environmental Management Branch, Nature Conservation Division. District Offices and Environmental Management Branch, Nature Conservation Division.

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88 17.2.7. Calculation method: Parameter of measurement Calculation method Change in severity status of Weed species to be given a severity status rating for each land weeds category and in the case of state forest and timber reserves a separate reading for native forest and plantations in each district within the area of the Forest Management Plan. Updated lists to be compared on a five yearly basis by data custodians to identify number of weeds species that have changed severity status. Change in severity status of Pest species to be given a severity status rating for each land pests category and in the case of state forest and timber reserves a separate reading for native forest and plantations in each district within the area of the Forest Management Plan. Updated lists to be compared on a five yearly basis by data custodians to identify number of pest species that have changed severity status. 17.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency: Required measurement Measurement frequency Number of weeds that have Every five years changed severity status including current and previous status. Number of pests that have Every five years changed severity status including current and previous status. 17.2.9. Data presentation: Metric The severity status of weeds and pests registered in each district Presentation Each district will keep a list of weeds and severity status. This information to be presented in a table showing number of weeds in each severity category according to tenure. Text will be used to explain changes in severity status and the reasons for these changes. Calculation frequency Calculations to follow fiveyearly review of data by Nature Conservation Division Calculations to follow fiveyearly review of data by Nature Conservation Division

a)

b)

Table 1:

Severity status of weeds and pests in the area covered by the Forest Management Plan as at December 2004 Severity Status December 2004
Weed / Pest Species State Forest & Timber reserves Native forest Plantation Nature reserve Conservation park National park CALM Act section 5(1)(g) & (h) reserves.

Blackberry* Arum Lily* Pig*

3 2 2

3 5 2

1 0 0

1 0 0

3 2 2

1 2 0

*Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation

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89 Table 2: Severity status of weeds and pests in the area covered by the Forest Management Plan as at December 2009 Severity Status December 2009
Weed / Pest Species State Forest & Timber reserves Native forest Plantation Nature reserve Conservation park National park CALM Act section 5(1)(g) & (h) reserves.

Blackberry*

Arum Lily* Pig*

3 2 2

2 5 2

1 0 1

1 0 0

3 2 2

1 2 1

*Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation The tables will be compared and a list of species that have changed in severity will be developed on a regional basis and subsequently aggregated for the FMP area, and where appropriate further investigation and reporting of severity by tenure will be carried out. The tables will be supported by discussion of the issues surrounding the changes in status with particular attention on areas where management by the Department has affected the status of the species in a particular area. 17.2.10. Responsibilities:

District staff will be responsible for: collection and assessment of weeds and pest species and their severity status; and input of data into the weeds and pest species severity survey spreadsheet.

Environmental Management Branch, Nature Conservation Division will be responsible for: collation of the weeds and pest species severity survey spreadsheet; management of weeds and pest species severity survey spreadsheet information; data presentation and interpretation; and preparing lists to describe the results.

Forest Policy and Practice Branch of Sustainable Forest Management Division will be responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPIs into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for auditing, reviewing and the publication of its report. 17.2.11. Work instructions:

Rating the severity of weeds and pests and their impact on forest values will be done by district officers and will be based on their knowledge and experience in the area. The criterion for assessing the severity of occurrence of a weed or pest is presented below.

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90 Severity impact score 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 # Description # No data, or not known to be present. Reported present but not problematic. Occurs but restricted distribution, has little impact. Restricted distribution and adverse impact. Widespread distribution but having minimal impacts. Widespread distribution and having adverse impacts locally. Very widespread and having widespread adverse impact.

Adapted from the severity impact scores used in Appendix D - State of the Forests 2008 (Montreal Process Implementation Group for Australia (2008). Australias State of the Forests Report 2008. Bureau of Rural Sciences, Canberra. Author: Montreal Process Implementation Group for Australia

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Table 1:

Survey of severity impact status of weed and pest occurrence in the area covered by the Forest Management Plan by district
DISTRICT NAME:SPECIES COMMON NAMES LISTING State Forest & Timber reserves Native forest Plantation Nature reserve DATE: Conservation park National park Section 5(1) (g) & (h) reserves. COMMENTS

SEVERITY IMPACT SCORE BY TENURE CATEGORY

Aquatic Weeds Alternanthera philoxeroides Sagittaria montevidensis Elodea canadensis Cabomba caroliniana Hydrocotyle ranunculoides Egeria densa Myriophyllum aquaticum Sagittaria platyphylla Salvinia molesta Hydrocotyle verticillata Eichhornia crassipes Pistia stratiotes Terrestrial Weeds Acacia spp. Acaena novae-zelandiae Asparagus asparagoides Carthamus lanatus Chasmanthe floribunda Chrysanthemoides monilifera Cortaderia selloana Datura leichhardtii Dipogon lignosus Echium plantagineum Ehrharta calycina Emex australis Eragrostis curvula Gomphocarpus fruticosus Homeria breyniana Homeria flaccida Homeria miniata Hypericum perforatum Lantana camara Leptospermum laevigatum Lycium ferocissimum Onopordum acaulon Pinus pinaster Pinus radiata Rubus fruticosus / R. laudatus Salix babylonica* Salix cinerea* Salix daphnoides* Salix exigua* Salix. reichardtii* Salix x sepulcralis* Salix triandra* Silybum marianum Solanum linnaeanum

Alligator Weed Arrowhead Canadian Pond Weed Fanwort, Green Cabomba Hydrocotyle Leafy Elodea Parrots Feather Sagittaria Salvinia Shield Pennywort Water Hyacinth Water Lettuce All species not native to Australia Bidgee Widgee Bridal Creeper Saffron Thistle African Corn-flag Boneseed or Bitou Bush Pampas Grass Native Thorn Apple Dolichos Pea Patersons Curse Perennial Veldgrass Doublegee African Lovegrass Narrow Cottonbush Cape Tulip One-leaf Cape Tulip Two-leaf Cape Tulip St Johns Wort Lantana Victorian Tea Tree African box-thorn Stemless Thistle Pinaster Pine Radiata Pine Blackberry Weeping Willow Grey Sallow. Daphne Willow, Violet Willow Narrowleaf Willow Pussy Willow Ornamental Willow Almond-leaved Willow Variegated Thistle Apple of Sodom

P1, P2 P1, P2 P1, P2 P1,P2 P1, P2 P1, P2 P1, P2 P1 P1, P2 P1, P2 P1, P2 P1, P2 P1, P2 Not listed P1 P1, P3, P4 Not listed P1, P2 Prohibited P1, P3, P4 Not listed P1, P3, P4 P1, P2 P1, P3, P4, P5 Prohibited P1, P3, P4 P1, P3, P4 P1, P3, P4 P1, P3, P4 P1, P2 P1 Not listed Prohibited P1, P2, P3, P4 Not listed Unassigned P1, P2, P4 Not listed P1 P1 P1 Not listed P1 Prohibited P1, P2, P3, P4 P1, P2, P3, P4

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SEVERITY IMPACT SCORE BY TENURE CATEGORY


SPECIES Trachyandra divaricata Typha orientalis Ulex europaeus Watsonia bulbillifera / W. meriana Xanthium occidentale Zantedeschia aethiopica Invasive Species Bufo marinus Canis familarius dingo Capra hircus Cervus elaphus Cervus timorensis Dama dama Felis catus Oryctolagus cuniculus Sus scrofa Vulpes vulpes Carduelis chloris / C. sinica / C. spinoides Passer domesticus / P. montanus Sturnus vulgaris Trichoglossus haematodus Turdus merula Chortoicetes terminifera Hylotrupes bajulus Vespula germanica COMMON NAMES South African Onion Weed Bullrush Gorse Watsonia Noogoora Burr Arum Lily Cane Toad Dingo / Wild Dog Feral Goat Red Deer Rusa Deer Fallow Deer Cat Rabbits Feral Pig Fox Greenfinch Sparrow Starling Rainbow Lorikeet English Blackbird Plague Locust European House Borer European Wasp LISTING Not listed Not listed P1, P2, P3 Prohibited P1, P2, P4 P1, P4 A1, A2, A3 A5, A7 A4, A5, A6 A4, A5, A6 A4, A5, A6 A4, A5, A6 No listed A1, A3, A5 A4, A5, A6 A5 A1, A2, A3 A1, A2, A3 A1, A2, A3 A2, A5 A1, A2, A3 A5 A2, A3 A1, A2, A3 State Forest & Timber reserves Plantation Native forest Nature reserve Conservation park National park Section 5(1) (g) & (h) reserves. COMMENTS

Listing categories under the Agriculture and Related Resources Protection Act 1976 P1 Prohibits movement of plants or their seeds within the State. This prohibits the movement of contaminated machinery and produce including livestock and fodder: P2 Eradicate infestation to destroy and prevent propagation each year until no plants remain. The infested area must be managed in such a way that prevents the spread of seed or plant parts on or in livestock, fodder, grain, vehicles and/or machinery: P3 Control infestation in such a way that prevents the spread of seed or plant parts within and from the property on or in livestock, fodder, grain, vehicles and/or machinery. Treat to destroy and prevent seed set all plants: P4 Prevent the spread of infestation from the property on or in livestock, fodder, grain, vehicles and/or machinery. Treat to destroy and prevent seed set on all plants: P5 Infestations on public lands must be controlled.

Listing categories under the Agriculture and Related Resources Protection Act 1976 A1 Entry prohibited. A2 Subject to eradication in the wild. A3 Keeping prohibited. A4 Entry subject to Department of Agriculture permits and/or conditions. A5 Numbers will be reduced / controlled. A6 Keeping subject to Department of Agriculture permits and/or conditions. A7 A management programme for each species outlines the area and conditions under which controls may be applied. Programmes are for the whole of the State or as indicated for each species.

Severity impact score 0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Description # No data, or not known to be present. Reported present but not problematic. Occurs but restricted distribution, has little impact. Restricted distribution and adverse impact. Widespread distribution but having minimal impacts. Widespread distribution and having adverse impacts locally. Very widespread and having widespread adverse impact.

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18.

KPI 18 - Effectiveness of dieback hygiene

Not yet completed.

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19.

KPI 19 - Annual flow weighted mean salinity and trend for streams in fully forested catchment

19.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to soil and water is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to protect soil and water resources on land to which the plan applies. Forest Management Plan extract (page 50) Key performance indicator 19 Performance measure The annual flow weighted mean salinity and the trend for streams in fully forested catchments. The annual flow weighted mean salinity and the trends for gauging stations on the following rivers: Mitchell River (603005) Weld River (606002), (606195) Carey Brook (608002) Barlee Brook (608151) Harvey River (613002) Tallanalla Creek (613005) Falls Brook (613008) South Dandalup (614007) Little Dandalup (614017) Wilson Brook (614021) Salinity trends to be neutral. Every five years subject to information being provided by the Department of Water. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Performance target Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to water is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to protect the ecological integrity and quality of streams, wetlands and their associated vegetation Most relevant FMP Actions: 21.1 The Department and the Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations: 21.1.1 in a manner that has regard to the provisions for stream zones in Appendix 3 where the operation occurs prior to the approval of the Guidelines referred to in the following paragraph; and 21.1.2 in accordance with the Guidelines for the Management of Informal Reserves referred to in Action 3.1.2 and the Soil and Water Conservation Guidelines referred to in Action 20.1.2.

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19.2
19.2.1.

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 19


Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 19 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan 2004-2013 (FMP) in maintaining the low concentration of salinity in streams of forest catchments. 19.2.2. Rationale

This KPI is important for monitoring the salinity of streamflow from forested catchments that supply a large portion of water supply to Perth and the south west. The ecological integrity of forested streams is high whereas most streams in the South West Land Division are in a poor ecological condition as a result of salinisation because of clearing for agriculture. Maintaining the ecological condition of the remaining high quality streams is therefore of high importance. This KPI will provide the Department with the necessary information so that management activities can be assessed and appropriate actions to better achieve the objective can be identified. 19.2.3. Background and context

Degradation of surface water quality by salinity is a risk for aquatic ecosystems and for human use. The risk is higher in the eastern parts of the FMP area where salt storage is moderate to high. Stream salinity occurs when a saline water table rises to intersect the ground surface and discharges salt into streams. The major cause of unnaturally high groundwater level is reduced water use by transpiration when native perennial vegetation is cleared and replaced with annual agricultural crops. Where evapotranspiration levels are restored quickly by regenerating native vegetation, the risk of increasing stream salinity is low (Borg et al. 1988). The FMP adopts a number of strategies to manage this low risk of increasing stream salinity associated with timber harvesting activities. These strategies include: informal reserves around all permanent and intermittent streams; limits to the intensity of timber harvesting; limits on the extent of timber harvesting on a catchment by catchment basis; and identification of high salt risk catchments where further precautions are applied to timber harvesting activities. In recent years, the risk of forest management activities causing increased stream salinity has reduced due to the effects of climate change (reduced rainfall). The decreased risk is due to declining groundwater levels and disconnection between groundwater and streams in areas that were historically at greater risk. 19.2.4. Issues

Reporting on this KPI will depend on the ongoing monitoring of stream gauging stations by the Department of Water. Monitoring at a number of gauging stations within the area of the Forest Management Plan reduced in the 90s and 00s but has improved in recent years with the reopening of a number of stations. Reporting for this KPI will depend on data being available within the Department of Water and may not match the list of streams identified in the KPI performance measure from the extract of the FMP shown above. 19.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are:

Entity Target Trend in flow-weighted annual Salinity trends to be neutral stream salinity

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19.2.6.

Required data Collection & storage method Stream water level measured continuously using a V-notch weir, stilling basin, float and pulley, and data recorder. Water level converted to discharge using a rating curve. Stream electrical conductivity (EC) measured continuously immediately upstream from the stilling basin. The relationship between stream Total Dissolved Solids (TDS mg/L) and electrical conductivity (mS m-1) derived from water samples collected periodically. Flowweighted annual stream salinity calculated as: S=(SiQi)/Qi where Qi is the instantaneous streamflow volume and Si is the instantaneous TDS (Bari and Boyd 1993; Mayer et al 2005). Custodians Department of Water and Water Corporation.

Required data Flow-weighted annual stream salinity from selected gauging stations in streams within forested catchments distributed throughout the area of the Forest Management Plan. Annual stream salinity may be derived from continuous data or discrete data that is sufficient to establish a long term trend.

The gauging stations used to assess this KPI will be a sub-set of the stations used for KPI 22 which are to be primarily selected using the following catchment criteria: Large enough to represent broad landscape scale management activities (e.g. greater than 10 km2); Distributed across FMP area and rainfall zones; Available salinity and flow records are sufficient to determine trends; Rainfall records in or adjacent to the catchment are available; The custodian intends to continue operating the gauging stations into the future; Less than 5% cleared (ideally less than 3%); Predominantly within FMP tenure (e.g. > 95%); Where mining has occurred in a catchment, the mined area has been rehabilitated, the regenerated vegetation is established, and the catchment is representative of the northern jarrah forest within the FMP area.

As there are very few catchments that meet all of the criteria above, some stations that fall short of some of the criteria may be used to supplement the analysis to increase the number and geographical coverage of sites. These supplementary stations must still be 5% cleared and have sufficient data to establish long term trends. 19.2.7. Calculation method Calculation method See 19.2.6 above Interpretation of trends in mean annual stream salinity over at least five year periods (longer where data exists).

Entity to be measured Salinity level Salinity trends

19.2.8.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Streamflow and stream electrical conductivity (EC) is measured continuously and measurements of stream salinity are taken periodically from gauging stations. The water year to be used for streamflow analysis will be April-March. Calculation frequency Streamflow and stream salinity is summarised on an annual basis. These summaries and longerterm historical trends will be analysed and interpreted on a five yearly basis to facilitate reporting on the KPI, with the first report due in 2009.

Required metric Salinity level in (mg/L) Streams where mean salinity levels are: a) increasing b) steady c) decreasing

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19.2.9.

Presentation of the entities

Metric Presentation Data will be presented as graph with salinity level, Salinity level (mg/L) Trends in streams salinity levels over salinity trends and salinity status for each gauging station over the five-year reporting period (or longer the previous five years: where possible). Text will be included to describe trends a) increasing and provide an interpretation for trends. b) steady c) decreasing 19.2.10 Responsibility The Department of Water is responsible for: data collation and analysis from selected gauging stations; presentation of the data; and interpretation of data and description of trends (in conjunction with DECs Forest Policy and Practices Branch of the Sustainable Forest Management Division and Water Corporation).

The Water Corporation is responsible for: data collection and management from selected gauging stations; and contributing to the Department of Waters interpretation of data and description of trends.

DECs Forest Policy and Practices Branch of the Sustainable Forest Management Division is responsible for: provision of data on forest status and historical management activities within the catchments to support data analysis; contributing to the Department of Waters interpretation of data and description of trends; and preparing a report on this KPI and collating this information together with information from other KPIs into a report to the Conservation Commission and where necessary the Minister for Environment.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for the auditing, reviewing and publication of its report.

Reference Bari, M.A. and Boyd, D.W. (1993). Streamflow and salinity response to logging and regeneration in the southern forest of Western Australia. Water Authority of Western Australia Report No. WS116 Mayer, X.M., Ruprecht, J.K. and Bari, M.A. (2005). Stream salinity status and trends in south-west Western Australia, Department of Environment, Salinity and Land Use Impacts Series, Report No. 38.

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20.

KPI 20 - Percentage of water bodies (e.g. stream kilometres, lake hectares) with significant variance of biodiversity from the historic range of variability

20.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to soil and water is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to protect soil and water resources on land to which the plan applies. (Forest Management Plan p48) Forest Management Plan extract (page 50) Key performance indicator 20 Percentage of water bodies (e.g. stream kilometres, lake hectares) with significant variance of biodiversity from the historic range of variability. The diversity of aquatic macro-invertebrate fauna at a selected number of monitoring sites. No sites with fauna significantly different from the reference condition. Every five years. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to water is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to protect the ecological integrity and quality of streams, wetlands and their associated vegetation, and increase the flow of water to surface and groundwater reservoirs (Forest Management Plan p49) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 21.1 The Department and the Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations: 21.1.1 in a manner that has regard to the provisions for stream zones in Appendix 3 where the operation occurs prior to the approval of the Guidelines referred to in the following paragraph; and 21.1.2 in accordance with the Guidelines for the Management of Informal Reserves referred to in Action 3.1.2 and the Soil and Water Conservation Guidelines referred to in Action 20.1.2. The Department will review the extent and condition of public access ways leading to public water catchment areas, with a view to considering whether the number of access ways ought to be reduced or their condition improved. The Department and the Forest Products Commission, in consultation with the Conservation Commission, will evaluate with the Water Corporation and the Water and Rivers Commission any proposal seeking to employ silvicultural treatments to increase the flow of water to surface and groundwater reservoirs.

21.2

21.3

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21.4

The Department: 21.4.1 will provide advice and assistance to bodies seeking access to the potential subsurface aquifers and surface reservoirs located on land to which the plan applies; 21.4.2 will facilitate access to land to which the plan applies for the purposes of water extraction and the development of associated infrastructure for public water supply purposes where this is consistent with the CALM Act; 21.4.3 will take and use water sustainably from land to which the plan applies; 21.4.4 may issue permits, after consultation with the Conservation Commission, for the sustainable taking of water from land to which the plan applies; and 21.4.5 will assist the Conservation Commission to develop a policy to provide guidance when proposals to take water from land to which the plan applies are considered. (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will: 21.5.1 conduct its plantation operations in a manner that is in accordance with guidelines for water protection in the Code of Practice for Timber Plantations and the relevant plantation manual, which is revised in consultation with the Department by 31 December 2005; 21.5.2 consult with the Water and Rivers Commission prior to undertaking plantation operations in a public water catchment area; and 21.5.3 evaluate with the Department, the Water Corporation and the Water and Rivers Commission any proposal seeking to employ silvicultural treatment to increase the flow of water to surface and groundwater reservoirs.

21.5

20.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 20


20.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 20 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets in regard to protecting the ecological integrity and quality of streams. 20.2.2. Rationale Monitoring the response of animals to their aquatic environment provides a useful measure of the health of streams. This measure is important in providing information on the ecological condition of streams so that potential environmental impacts such as salinity and turbidity can be monitored and if necessary better managed. 20.2.3. Background and context Biomonitoring assesses the response of plants and animals to any change in their environment. Biomonitoring is widely regarded as a better and more direct indicator of the health of a river or stream than chemical measurements. In 1994 the Commonwealth Government funded CALM to set up a biomonitoring program for rivers and streams in Western Australia as part of AUSRIVAS (Australian Rivers Assessment Scheme). The program was run by the Department and assisted by some of the States universities. The program was set up in three stages. Stage 1 (sample collection) involved collecting samples of macro-invertebrate communities from rivers and streams across Western Australia. Stage 2 (computer modelling) involved the development of models using the samples collected. Environmental descriptors such as geographical position, seasonality of flow, annual discharge and the position of the monitoring site along the stream were used to determine the environmental characteristics of sites. The computer models were developed using macro-invertebrate communities with similar environmental characteristics to create models for three habitat zones:
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channel habitat, streambed habitat and macrophyte habitat. This modelling allows for the prediction of expected macro-invertebrate numbers (reference condition). Stage 3 (model validation) involved an assessment of the validity of the ecological rating provided by the biomonitoring models. The accuracy assessment provided a percentage error rate for the biomonitoring models from the results of a number of tested sites. The percentage error rate was low (<10%) for pristine or minimally disturbed river and stream sites and higher for disturbed sites. The measurements for this KPI is based on the development of the models for pristine streams that will provide a comparative benchmark on which to judge the degree of disturbance in streams subject to monitoring under this KPI. 20.2.4. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Aquatic macro-invertebrate diversity. 20.2.5. Required data Required data List of monitoring sites for measuring aquatic macro- invertebrate diversity. Reference condition for selected monitoring sites. Collection & storage method Custodians List to be selected from: Science Division a) sites subject to timber harvesting and other disturbances in their catchments; and b) sites that fall within the plan area. The reference condition is the expected Science Division condition of a river or stream according to bio-monitoring models developed by the Department (see background section) Science Division to conduct assessment of Science Division sites prior to mid-term and final reporting and record aquatic macro-invertebrates collected. Target No sites with fauna significantly different from the reference condition.

Aquatic macroinvertebrates collected from selected monitoring sites. 20.2.6. Calculation method Entity to be measured Aquatic macroinvertebrates observed and expected (O/E score) Ecological rating

Calculation method O/E score: Observed macro-invertebrates score divided by expected macro-invertebrates based on pristine stream condition for each monitoring site where the expected macro-invertebrate score is the reference condition. An ecological rating of undisturbed, marginally disturbed, or disturbed is assigned to each monitoring site on the basis of the O/E score.

20.2.7. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Aquatic macroinvertebrates O/E score Ecological rating Measurement frequency Annual for selected sites Calculation frequency Five-yearly

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20.2.8. Data presentation Metric Aquatic macroinvertebrates O/E score and ecological rating Presentation Data is presented in a table (table 1) showing O/E score for macroinvertebrates based on pristine stream condition for each monitoring site and ecological rating with text to describe trends and provide analysis for sites where there is a significant difference from the reference condition.

Table 1:

Aquatic macro-invertebrates observed over expected score (O/E) and ecological rating at selected monitoring sites based on pristine streams within the area of the Forest Management Plan.
Observed divided by expected score based on pristine stream condition Ecological rating (undisturbed, marginally disturbed or disturbed)

Site 1 Site 2 Site 3 Site 4 Site 5 Site 6 Site 7 Site 8 Site 9 Site 10

20.2.9. Responsibility Science Division is responsible for:


data collection and management from selected monitoring sites; data collation and analysis; presentation of the data; and interpretation of data and text to explain trends.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report. 20.2.10. Further reading Halse, S.A., D.J. Cale, E.J. Jasinska, and R.J. Shiel (2002). Monitoring change in aquatic invertebrate biodiversity: sample size, faunal elements and analytical methods. Aquatic Ecology 36: 395-410. Smith, M.J., W.R. Kay, D.H.D. Edward, P.J. Papas, K.St.J. Richardson, J.C. Simpson, A.M. Pinder, D.J. Cale, P.H.J. Horwitz, J.A. Davis, F.H. Yung, R.H. Norris, and S.A. Halse (1999). AusRivAS: using macroinvertebrates to assess ecological condition of rivers in Western Australia. Freshwater Biology 41: 269-282. Smith, M., W. Kay, A. Pinder, and S. Halse (1997). Spineless indicators. Landscope 12(3): 49-53.

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21.

KPI 21 - The level of soil damage resulting from timber harvesting

21.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to soil and water is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to protect soil and water resources on land to which the plan applies. (Forest Management Plan p48) Forest Management Plan extract (page 51) Key performance indicator 21 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall The level of soil damage resulting from timber harvesting. Soil damage by risk category as measured by survey. Soil damage not to exceed prescribed maximum levels (see Appendix 6). Annually. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

The objective in relation to soil damage is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to reduce soil damage: (Forest Management Plan p48) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 20.1 The Forest Products Commission and the Department will conduct their operations involving the use of heavy machinery in a manner that: 20.1.1 has regard to the requirements of Appendix 6 where the operation occurs prior to the approval of the Guidelines referred to in the following paragraph; and 20.1.2 is in accordance with the Soil and Water Conservation Guidelines which are to: be prepared by the Department with public consultation; provide for the manner in which the requirements of Appendix 6 are to be met; and be submitted to the Conservation Commission for advice and approved by the Minister for the Environment by 31 December 2005, when they will take effect and supercede Appendix 6. The Department and the Conservation Commission will review the operation of the implementation of Appendix 6 and any Guidelines approved under Action 20.1.2, 12 months after the commencement of the plan. The Department will investigate the development of a soil hazard assessment system to help planning to protect soil from damage. The Forest Products Commission and the Department will rehabilitate soil damaged in the course of their operations by: 20.4.1 identifying and mapping damaged soil; and 20.4.2 undertaking rehabilitation work as soon as is reasonable and practicable after the completion of the operation.

20.2

20.3

20.4

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20.5 (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will: 20.5.1 conduct its plantation operations in a manner that is in accordance with guidelines for soil protection in the Code of Practice for Timber Plantations and the relevant plantation manual, which is revised in consultation with the Department by 31 December 2005; and 20.5.2 rehabilitate damaged soil resulting from plantations operations to the standards specified in the Code of Practice for Timber Plantations and the relevant plantation manual.

21.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 21


21.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 21 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets by providing information on the amount of soil damage as a result of timber harvesting. 21.2.2. Rationale The use of heavy vehicles, such as those used in timber harvesting operations, can damage forest soils and it may take decades or longer for the soils to recover. The Forest Management Plan incorporates a preventative approach to soil damage. The information will contribute to continuous improvement in the use of heavy vehicles so that future soil damage is minimised. 21.2.3. Background and context Formal surveys of soil disturbance are required to be undertaken in areas subjected to timber harvesting operations. Formal surveys of soil disturbance are carried out along several transects which are distributed across the harvested cell and laid out at right angles to the general direction of the snig tracks. The soil disturbance is visually assessed over a small area (a 20 cm diameter circle) at one metre intervals along each transect. The assessment of soil disturbance is based on the visual evidence of soil and litter movement and mixing, and the soil horizon that is involved in the disturbance. Light disturbance typically involves disturbance of the litter layer. Moderate disturbance typically involves disturbance of the topsoil, and severe disturbance involves the subsoil. Visual soil disturbance indicators are shown in table 1 below. A detailed description of the assessment and survey procedures is given in the Interim Manual of Procedures for the Management of Soils Associated With Timber Harvesting in Native Forests (CALM, 2005). Table 1: Visual soil disturbance indicators for moderate, severe and very severe soil disturbance. Soil disturbance Description category Moderate visible Moderately disturbed, characterised by the topsoil mixed with subsoil or soil disturbance the topsoil partially removed Severe visible soil Severely disturbed, characterised by the topsoil completely removed and disturbance subsoil exposed or the topsoil mixed with subsoil, or the subsoil disturbed, or subsoil mixed with parent material, or the subsoil partially removed Very severe visible Very severely disturbed, characterised by the subsoil removed and soil disturbance parent material exposed or mixed with subsoil parent material

21.2.4. Issues There are potentially many surveys conducted over the duration of harvesting a fellers block. If this is the case then the last survey for each coupe becomes the performance measure that is
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entered into the survey records. Survey methods have developed over the first two years of plan implementation so a consistent methodology providing comparable results that would readily identify trends is not yet available. 21.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Entity Soil damage for each soil disturbance risk category. 21.2.6. Required data Required data Number of fellers blocks that exceed the prescribed maximum limits (according to Appendix 6 of the Forest Management Plan) Collection & storage method Forest Products Commission and DEC staff to undertake formal visual surveys of soil disturbance at prescribed intervals in areas where timber harvesting is active. Staff to conduct surveys according to the requirements of the Interim Manual of Procedures for the Management of Soils Associated With Timber Harvesting in Native Forests and forward to DEC Regional SFM Coordinators. The Soil and Water Conservation Guidelines, being developed under the Forest Management Plan, will replace the Interim Manual of Procedures for the Management of Soils Associated With Timber Harvesting in Native Forests. Custodian Monitoring to be undertaken by trained officer in both Forest Products Commission and Regional Services Division and Forest Policy and Practices Branch. Target Soil disturbance to stay within permissible disturbance levels.

21.2.7. Calculation method Calculation method Entity to be measured Fellers blocks exceeding Total number of fellers blocks that exceed allowable limits to allowable limits in each risk be recorded and calculated as a percentage of the total period for each harvest type. number of surveys completed for each harvest type in each risk period. Full survey results to be summarised in Table 3 (shown in work instructions section) before being refined to Table 2 (shown in presentation section) as required for KPI reporting.

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21.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding allowable limits in each risk periods for each harvest type. Measurement frequency Soil disturbance surveys to be undertaken as required by the Interim Manual of Procedures for the Management of Soils Associated With Timber Harvesting in Native Forests. Calculation frequency Annually, following the collation of surveys completed.

21.2.9. Data presentation Metric Presentation Percentage of fellers blocks Data is presented in table format (table 2) to document the exceeding allowable limits in each percentage of fellers blocks that exceed prescribed soil risk period for each harvest type. disturbance limits in each risk period, for each harvest type. Text to analyse data and describe trends. Table 2:
Harvest type

Soil damage in each risk period as at reporting period 2004.


Moderate disturbance Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding allowable limit Severe disturbance Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding allowable limit Very severe disturbance Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding allowable limit Landings Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding allowable limit Rutting Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding allowable limit

High risk

jarrah karri thinning karri prelogging karri clearfell (including prelogging) Sub-total

5.6%

0%

Medium high risk

jarrah karri thinning karri prelogging karri clearfell (including prelogging) Sub-total

0%

0%

Medium risk

jarrah karri thinning karri prelogging karri clearfell (including prelogging) Sub-total

0%

0%

Total
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21.2.10. Responsibility The Forest Products Commission is responsible for:


conducting surveys in fellers blocks; and forwarding survey results to the appropriate DEC Regional Coordinator for Sustainable Forest Management.

Regional Coordinators for Sustainable Forest Management are responsible for:


seeing that DEC officers conduct surveys in fellers blocks; storage and maintenance of survey data; collation of data into tables for reporting; and forwarding of data to Forest Policy and Practices Branch prior to annual reporting.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for:


data presentation and analysis; drafting text describing and interpreting trends; and collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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21.2.11. Work Instructions Information from monitoring is to be collated in the following format to assist interpretation. Table 3: Soil damage in high-risk, medium-high risk and medium risk categories.
Moderate disturbance
Harvest type Allowable limit (% of fellers block) Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding limit

Severe visible disturbance


Allowable limit (% of fellers block) Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding limits

Very severe disturbance


Allowable limit (% of fellers block) Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding limits

Landings
Allowable limit (% of fellers block) Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding limits

Rutting
Allowable limit for rutting=150 mm maximum depth for gravel and sand soils, 300 mm maximum depth for other soils; depths not to be exceeded over 20m length of feeder snig tracks. Percentage of fellers blocks exceeding limits

High risk

jarrah karri thinning karri prelogging karri clearfell (including prelogging) Sub-total jarrah karri thinning karri prelogging karri clearfell (including prelogging) Sub-total

8 8 5 15

1/18= 5.6% 0/28= 0%

2 1 1

0/18= 0% 0/28= 0%

0 0

1.5 1 N/A

0/1= 0%

3.5

2/2= 100%

Medium high risk

8 8 5 15

0/16= 0% 0/20= 0%

2 1 1

0/16= 0% 0/20= 0%

0 0 0

1.5 1 N/A 3.5

0/1= 0%

18

18

1/1= 100%

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Moderate disturbance Medium risk jarrah karri thinning karri prelogging karri clearfell (including prelogging) Sub-total
8 8 5 15 8 0/15= 0% 0/6= 0%

Severe visible disturbance


2 1 2 N/A 8 0/15= 0% 0/6= 0%

Very severe disturbance


0 0 0 N/A

Landings
1.5 1 N/A 3.5

Rutting

Total

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22.

KPI 22 - Water production


Background information from the Forest Management Plan

22.1. 22.1

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to soil and water is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to protect soil and water resources on land to which the plan applies (FMP p48) Forest Management Plan extract (page 51) Key performance indicator 22 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Water production. Streamflow of selected forest streams. Streamflow to be maintained. Every five years subject to information being provided by the Water Corporation and the Department of Water (linked to KPI 19). The Department and the water authorities to identify the reasons for the trend and the Department to report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Response to target shortfall

22.1.1. The objective in relation to water is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to protect the ecological integrity and quality of streams, wetlands and their associated vegetation, and increase the flow of water to surface and groundwater reservoirs (FMP p49) Most relevant FMP actions: 21.1 The Department and the Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations: 21.1.1 in a manner that has regard to the provisions for stream zones in Appendix 3 where the operation occurs prior to the approval of the Guidelines referred to in the following paragraph; and 21.1.2 in accordance with the Guidelines for the Management of Informal Reserves referred to in Action 3.1.2 and the Soil and Water Conservation Guidelines referred to in Action 20.1.2. The Department will review the extent and condition of public access ways leading to public water catchment areas, with a view to considering whether the number of access ways ought to be reduced or their condition improved. The Department and the Forest Products Commission, in consultation with the Conservation Commission, will evaluate with the Water Corporation and the Department of Water any proposal seeking to employ silvicultural treatments to increase the flow of water to surface and groundwater reservoirs. The Department: 21.4.1 will provide advice and assistance to bodies seeking access to the potential subsurface aquifers and surface reservoirs located on land to which the plan applies;

21.2

21.3

21.4

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21.4.2 will facilitate access to land to which the plan applies for the purposes of water extraction and the development of associated infrastructure for public water supply purposes where this is consistent with the CALM Act; 21.4.3 will take and use water sustainably from land to which the plan applies; 21.4.4 may issue permits, after consultation with the Conservation Commission, for the sustainable taking of water from land to which the plan applies; and 21.4.5 will assist the Conservation Commission to develop a policy to provide guidance when proposals to take water from land to which the plan applies are considered. 21.5 (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will: 21.5.1 conduct its plantation operations in a manner that is in accordance with guidelines for water protection in the Code of Practice for Timber Plantations and the relevant plantation manual, which will be revised in consultation with the Department by 31 December 2005; 21.5.2 consult with the Department of Water prior to undertaking plantation operations in a public water catchment area; and 21.5.3 evaluate with the Department, the Water Corporation and the Department of Water any proposal seeking to employ silvicultural treatment to increase the flow of water to surface and groundwater reservoirs.

22.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 22


22.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 22 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan 2004-2013 to maintain the flow of water to surface reservoirs and to protect the ecological integrity of streams, wetlands and their associated vegetation. 22.2.2. Rationale

This KPI is important for monitoring the amount of streamflow from catchments that support aquatic ecosystems and supply a large portion of water supply to Perth and the south west. This KPI will provide the Department with the necessary information so that management activities can be assessed and appropriate actions to better achieve the objective can be identified. 22.2.3. Background and context

Declining rainfall in the south west region has resulted in significantly reduced runoff, with some streams changing from perennial to ephemeral in the past 20 years. Streamflow depends on a number of factors including rainfall parameters, catchment hydrologic parameters, groundwater levels and the amount of water used or intercepted by vegetation. Forest disturbances such as wildfire, mining, timber harvesting and disease such as jarrah dieback caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi may initially increase streamflow. Disturbances that result in regeneration such as mining and timber harvesting may be followed by the development of a relatively dense regrowth forest and a decrease in streamflow. In addition to the impact of climate change resulting in reduced rainfall and consequently reduced streamflow for water supply purposes, there may also be effects of reduced streamflow on aquatic biodiversity. 22.2.4. Issues

Reporting on this KPI will depend on the ongoing monitoring of stream gauging stations and timely data processing, summary, analysis and interpretation by the Department of Water or Water Corporation. Monitoring at a number of gauging stations within the area of the Forest Management
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Plan reduced in the 90s and 00s but has improved in recent years with the re-opening of a number of stations. Since the mid 1970s rainfall has significantly declined. This reduction in rainfall increases the difficulty in assessing the FMP target of maintaining streamflow and identifying reasons for trends in observed streamflow in relation to management practices. For the purposes of this KPI the performance target to maintain streamflow will be assessed relative to rainfall. It is important to note that a reduction in rainfall generally results in a proportionately larger reduction in streamflow. 22.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI are: Entity Streamflow 22.2.6. Required data Collection & storage method Streamflow is measured using a V-notch weir and a stilling basin. A float well installed in the stilling basin uses a recorder to supply a continuous record of water level in the stilling basin. The water level is converted to discharge using a rating curve (see Bari and Boyd 1993). Custodians Water Corporation, Department of Water and Department of Environment and Conservation (See Attachment 1). Target Streamflow to be maintained.

Required data Streamflow taken from a selection of gauging stations in streams within forested catchments located throughout the area of the Forest Management Plan.

22.2.7.

Calculation method Calculation method See 22.2.6 above. Interpretation of trends in streamflow relative to rainfall over five year periods.

Entity to be measured Streamflow Streamflow trends.

22.2.8.

Entity measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Streamflow is measured continuously. The water year to be used for streamflow analysis will be April-March. Calculation frequency Streamflow is summarised on a daily, monthly, and annual basis. These summaries and longer-term historical trends will be analysed and interpreted on a five yearly basis to facilitate reporting on the KPI, with the first report due in 2009.

Required metric Streamflow Streams where streamflow is: a) increasing b) steady c) decreasing

22.2.9.

Presentation of the entities

Metric Presentation Annual streamflow shown graphically as a time series Streamflow (mm) Trends in streamflow over the for at least the past five years. Accompanying text previous five years, in the context of describing and interpreting the trends in streamflow. the long term record: a) increasing b) steady c) decreasing
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22.2.10. Responsibility The Department of Water is responsible for: data collation and analysis from selected gauging stations; presentation of the data; and interpretation of data and description of trends (in conjunction with DECs Forest Policy and Practices Branch of the Sustainable Forest Management Division and Water Corporation).

The Water Corporation is responsible for: data collection and management from selected gauging stations; and contributing to the Department of Waters interpretation of data and description of trends.

DECs Forest Policy and Practices Branch of the Sustainable Forest Management Division is responsible for: provision of data on forest status and historical management activities within the catchments to support data analysis; contributing to the Department of Waters interpretation of data and description of trends; and preparing a report on this KPI and collating this information together with information from other KPIs into a report to the Conservation Commission and where necessary the Minister for Environment.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for the auditing, reviewing and publication of its report.

References Bari, M.A. and Boyd, D.W. (1993). Streamflow and salinity response to logging and regeneration in the southern forest of Western Australia. Water Authority of Western Australia Report No. WS116

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Attachment 1:

Work instructions for methodology supporting KPI 22

The gauging stations for this KPI are to be selected using the following criteria: Large enough to represent broad landscape scale management activities (e.g. greater than 10 km2); Distributed across FMP area and rainfall zones; Available historical streamflow records are sufficient to determine trends; Rainfall records in or adjacent to the catchment are available; There is an intent within the water agencies for continued monitoring of the selected gauging stations into the future; The catchments are less than 5% cleared (ideally less than 3%); The catchments are predominantly within FMP tenure (e.g. > 95%); and Where mining has occurred in a catchment, the mined area has been rehabilitated, the regenerated vegetation is established, and the catchment is representative of the northern jarrah forest within the FMP area.

The following gauging stations will be used for this KPI: AWRC ref. 603005 606001 606002 606195 608002 609001 610008 612004 612014 613002 613005 613008 614044 616002 616009 616010 616012 616013 616023 616216 Waterway Mitchell River Deep River Weld River Weld River Carey Brook Rosa Brook Margaret River North Hamilton River Bingham River Harvey River Tallanalla Creek Falls Brook Yarragil Brook Darkin River Pickering Brook Little Darkin River Helena Brook Helena River Waterfall Gully Helena River AWRC name Beigpiegup Teds Pool Wattle Block Ordnance Road Crossing Staircase Road Crouch Road Whicher Range Worsley Palmer Dingo Road Blackbutt Point Dee Tee 59 Yarragil Formation Pine Plantation Slavery Lane Hairpin Bend Road Trew Road GS Ngangaguringuring Mount Curtis Poison Lease GS Agency responsible for data collection Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Water Corporation Water Corporation Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water

In addition to the stations listed in above, the following gauging stations have been identified as strategically or scientifically important and may be used to assist in supporting analysis and interpreting trends observed in the gauging stations listed above.

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AWRC ref. 612008 614007 614019 614021 614036 614037 614048 614049 614057 614060 614062 614093 616021 616022 616026 616041 616058 616065
*

Waterway Bingham River Trib. South Dandalup Trib.. Little Dandalup Trib. North Dandalup Trib. North Dandalup Big Brook Yarragil Brook Trib. Yarragil Brook Trib. Yarragil Brook Trib. South Dandalup R. Trib. Little Dandalup Trib. Big Brook Seldom Seen Creek More Seldom Seen Creek 31 Mile Brook Wungong Brook Wungong Brook Canning River

AWRC name Ernies Catchment Del Park Hansens Catchment Lewis Catchment North Road O'Neil Road Yarragil 4X Yarragil 6C 4L Sub Catchment Gordon Catchment Bates Catchment Jayrup Travellers Arms Ceriani Farm 31 Mile Road Vardi Road Cobiac Glen Eagle

Agency responsible for data collection Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Environment and Conservation Department of Environment and Conservation Department of Environment and Conservation Department of Water Department of Water Mining Companies JIRZRP* Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water Department of Water

Joint Intermediate Rainfall Zone Research Program

The following data has been identified as potentially useful for interpreting trends in observed streamflow: Long term changes in the timing and intensity of rainfall events in or adjacent to the gauged catchment; Physical features of the catchment such as slope and soil type; Forest structure by species including non-forest types and age of regeneration; Timber harvesting history including (where available) silvicultural outcome, intensity, proportion of catchment and frequency of harvest; Fire history including fuel age and where available season and intensity of burn; and Forest health including where available dieback presence, history and impact.

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23.
23.1

KPI 23 - The identification and protection of cultural heritage


Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to natural and cultural heritage is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to maintain natural and cultural heritage. (Forest Management Plan p54) Forest Management Plan extract (page 55) Key performance indicator 23 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall The identification and protection of cultural heritage. The number of existing and new heritage sites identified in management planning and the number protected. No disturbance of a registered place without formal approval. Annually. The Department or the Forest Products Commission to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and in the case of the Department, to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

The objective in relation to natural and other cultural heritage is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to identify, record, assess and manage places of natural and cultural heritage significance on land to which the plan applies: (Forest Management Plan p54) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 25.1 The Department will: 25.1.1 maintain and, where reasonable and practicable, enhance databases of cultural heritage places and values; and 25.1.2 cooperate with Commonwealth and State agencies, local government authorities and non-statutory organisations in relation to cultural heritage identification and conservation. The Department and the Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations in a manner that has regard to the Indigenous Heritage Management Guidelines and NonIndigenous Heritage Management Guidelines after those Guidelines have been prepared.

25.2

25.3 (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will: 25.3.1 undertake its operations in a manner that is in accordance with guidelines in the Code of Practice for Timber Plantations and the relevant plantation manual for the identification of significant heritage sites, which are to be revised in consultation with the Department; and 25.3.2 share information relating to identified heritage sites with the Department.

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23.2
23.1.1

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 23


Objective of the KPI

The objective of KPI 23 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets by providing information on registered heritage sites identified in management planning and the adequacy of their protection during disturbance operations. 23.2.2 Background and context

Indigenous Cultural Heritage The Department of Indigenous Affairs maintains a list of indigenous cultural heritage sites in Western Australia as part of the Register of Aboriginal Sites. DEC and the Department of Indigenous Affairs have an agreement where DEC receives monthly updates of listed sites through the Information Management Branch where the data is mapped. A yearly snapshot of indigenous sites is available through Data Druid and monthly updates can be sought through Information Management Branch. Non-indigenous Cultural Heritage The Recreation and Tourism Information System (RATIS) Cultural Heritage Database and the associated Users Manual form part of the hierarchy of DEC processes to identify and protect nonindigenous cultural heritage values. Other databases that need to be accessed are the National Heritage List, Register of the National Estate, WA Register of Heritage Places and the Municipal Inventory for the local Shire. This data assists proponents of potential disturbance operations to ensure that places on DEC-managed lands and waters with cultural heritage value are identified, and the information about them is available for use in the planning and management processes for disturbance operations. 23.2.3 Rationale

The performance measure for KPI 23 will help ensure the identification of heritage sites in operations planning so that assessment and management of those sites can prevent any disturbance without formal approval. 23.2.4 Issues

For the purposes of identifying cultural heritage values there are two distinct nomenclature protocols used when referring to indigenous and non-indigenous values. The term site is used in relation to indigenous cultural heritage values, and places when referring to non-indigenous values (as per the Burra Charter). In the context of this KPI protocol both are used where specifically relating to one or other group of values, and site is used where both groups are being jointly referred to. The performance measure for KPI 23 will help ensure the identification of heritage places in operations planning so that the assessment and management of those places can prevent any unauthorized loss as a result of disturbance operations. A list of which places are considered to be registered for the purpose of this KPI is provided below:

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List National List World Heritage List World Biosphere Reserve State Register of Heritage Places National Trust Statutory Database Municipal Inventory Register of National Estate Regional Forest Agreement Heritage Council Database Town Planning Scheme Large Timber Structures of WA Other RATIS Cultural Heritage Sites database HCWA Assessment scheme

Consider as Registered for KPI 23 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No

The places contained on the RATIS Cultural Heritage Sites database (as at 2nd February 2010) have been assessed and a table containing all of the places meeting the above criteria has been generated (Appendix 1-3) for each of the districts within the area covered by the Forest Management Plan. At the time of preparation there are no places within the area covered by the Forest Management Plan that are listed on National List, World Heritage List or as a World Biosphere Reserve. 23.2.5 The entities to be measured for the KPI

Entity Target Registered indigenous cultural heritage sites No disturbance of a registered place without identified within the area of proposed formal approval. operations. Registered non-indigenous cultural heritage places within the area of proposed operations. 23.2.6 Required data Collection & storage method Custodians Administrator, List of registered indigenous are collected Database from the Department of Indigenous Affairs Information Management Register of Aboriginal Sites and stored in Branch Departmental database. A yearly snap shot is taken of all registered sites on DECmanaged lands and is available on Data Druid. However the Register of Aboriginal Sites is updated on a monthly basis and newly registered sites are available through the Database Administrator, Information Management Branch.

Required data The location of indigenous heritage sites that are listed in the Register of Aboriginal Sites for the area of the Forest Management Plan.

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118 The location of nonindigenous cultural heritage places in the area of the Forest Management Plan. National Heritage List, World Heritage List, World Biosphere Reserve list, the WA State Register of Heritage Places, Municipal Inventory for the local Shire and the RATIS Cultural Heritage Database. Research and Information Management Section of Parks and Visitor Services Division for RATIS, Commonwealth Department of Environment and Water Resources, WA Heritage Council and local Shires.

23.2.7

Calculation method

Parameter to be measured Calculation method Number of registered indigenous sites Proponent of disturbance operation is to identify any identified prior to disturbance sites registered within an area where operations are operation. proposed. Regional staff to maintain a register of sites identified by proponents within operational areas. Number of registered non-indigenous Proponent of disturbance operation is to identify any heritage places identified prior to places registered within an area where operations are forest operation. proposed. Regional staff to maintain a list of places identified by proponents within operational areas. Number of registered sites that were Regional staff from DEC to keep record of identified sites not disturbed. that have not been disturbed during disturbance operations. Number of registered sites disturbed Regional staff from DEC to keep records of sites that with formal approval. have been disturbed (with formal approval) during disturbance operations. Number of registered sites disturbed Regional staff from DEC to keep records of sites that without formal approval. have been disturbed (without formal approval) during disturbance operations. 23.2.8 Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Number of registered indigenous sites identified. Number of registered non-indigenous cultural heritage places identified. Number of registered sites that were not disturbed. Number of registered sites disturbed with formal approval. Number of registered sites disturbed without approval. 23.2.9 Data presentation Measurement frequency Annually Calculation frequency Annually

Metric Presentation Number of sites identified, Data is presented in a table (table 1) and will include: not disturbed or disturbed number of registered indigenous cultural heritage sites within approved identified; operations. number of registered non-indigenous cultural heritage places identified;
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number of registered heritage sites avoided; number of registered heritage sites disturbed with formal approval; and number of registered heritage sites disturbed without formal approval.

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Table 1:

Disturbance of heritage sites on DEC-managed lands for (reporting period).


Sites identified in planning for disturbance operations Indigenous Non-indigenous Not disturbed Registered heritage sites Disturbed with approval Disturbed without approval

Disturbance operations managed by DEC Disturbance operations managed by FPC Disturbance operations managed by other proponents Total

23.2.10 Responsibility Proponents of disturbance operations on DEC-managed lands are responsible for identifying any sites registered within an area where disturbance operations are proposed. Regional staff from DEC are responsible for:

maintaining a list of sites identified within proposed disturbance operations, and whether the site was not disturbed, disturbed with formal approval or disturbed without formal approval; additional information about any sites disturbed without formal approval; and forwarding the above information to Forest Policy and Practices Branch for annual reporting.

Database Administrator, Information Management Branch is responsible for:


maintaining and updating the information from the Aboriginal Sites Register System as maintained for use by DEC officers; and providing information to regional staff from DEC and the Forest Products Commission on request of any updates to the Register of Aboriginal Sites.

Research and Information Management Section of Parks and Visitor Services Division is responsible for maintaining the RATIS database. Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for:

data collation; data presentation and interpretation; and collation of information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and publication of its report.

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Appendix 1 - Registered places for Swan Region.


REGION DISTRICT LGA PLACENAME HCW A No. Register of Heritage Places Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Municip al Inventor y Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Natio nal Trust Yes Statutory Database

Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan

Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills

Mundaring (S) Kalamunda (S) Mundaring (S) Waroona (S) Waroona (S) Murray (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Boddington (S) Mundaring (S) Murray (S) Toodyay (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) Beverley (S) SerpentineJarrahdale (S) Beverley (S) Mundaring (S) Wandering (S) SerpentineJarrahdale (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) Mundaring (S) SerpentineJarrahdale (S) SerpentineJarrahdale (S) SerpentineJarrahdale (S) Murray (S) Murray (S) Murray (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Armadale (C) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S)

Eastern Railway Deviation Tunnel Mason and Bird Timber Tramway Bridge Eastern Railway - Three Bridges Waterous Townsite Hamel Nursery Marrinup Prisoner of War Camp Victoria Reservoir (fmr) Barton's Mill Prison (ruins) Blackboy Hill Commemoration Site John Forrest National Park Chauncy's Cairn Lake Leschenaultia Paxwold Girl Guides Camp Perth Observatory Statham's Quarry (fmr) Asquith (Long Gully) Bridge over Murray River Traveller's Inn (fmr) (ruins) Pinjarra to Boddington Railway Route Clackline To Toodyay Railway Line Canary Island Pine Oak Tree King Jarrah Russell Management Area Jarrahdale Railway Cutting Halfway Shop Chauncy Spring Gleneagle School Site Italian Prisoner of War Camp Site of No. 2 Pumping Station Portagabra Gorries - Malmalling ruins Old Well - Sawyers Valley Two CALM Houses Jarrahdale Eight CALM Houses Jarrahdale CALM House Marrinup Townsite (ruins) Barrajup Crossing Island Point Crossing Ashendon Road McCaskill Grave Munday's Brook Diversion Channel Lesmurdie Falls National Park Hummerston Road Weston Grave Mason Mill (site of) Mt Gungin Fire Tower Site, Hackett's Gully

2660 2662 2663 3082 3084 3103 3510 3580 4479 8561 8565 8568 1041 1 1055 1 1057 0 1542 4 1684 3102 3858 4372 4373 4374 4402 4503 4577 4614 7050 8486 8539 8541 8579 8581 8612 8613 8616 9014 9018 9069 1035 0 1036 1 1037 6 1040 3 1044 9 1048 6 1048 7 1049 8

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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REGION

DISTRICT

LGA

PLACENAME

HCW A No.

Register of Heritage Places

Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan

Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Perth Hills Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal

Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Kalamunda (S) Toodyay (S) Chittering (S) Chittering (S) Chittering (S) Cockburn (C) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S)

Sam Burkhardt's gold mine & shaft Weston Rd Zig Zag Scenic Drive Site of Morangup Spring Community Paper Box Wannamal Well Burroloo Wells and Sawmill Quarantine Station (former) YNP - Gloucester Lodge and Pool YNP - Yanchep Inn YNP - Tram Cottages YNP - McNess Guest House YNP - Ghost House Ruin, Chauffeur's Room and Garage YNP - Army Bunkers - radar installation YNP - Administration Building Hamel Nursery Hamel Nursery - Cork Oak East Perth Cemetery YNP - Beach House YNP - Recreation Hall Site Penguin Island Yanchep National Park Reserve Penguin Island Kitchen/Store Cave Penguin Island Well Hamel Nursery -Camellia Forrestdale Lake & Adjacent Wetlands Leda West (inc Sloans Reserve) The WA Herbarium & Herbarium Garden Dept of Conservation & Land Management (CALM) Complex Milyu Nature Reserve and Marine Park Lake Clifton Tunnels Lime Works Stromatalites Neerabup Lake National Park YNP - Crystal Caves

1053 5 1056 0 1057 1 1224 2 1415 8 1416 1 1417 8 499 2677 2678 2679 2680 2681

Municip al Inventor y Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Natio nal Trust

Statutory Database

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan

Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Waroona (S) Waroona (S) Perth (C) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Rockingham (C) Wanneroo (S) Rockingham (C) Rockingham (C) Waroona (S) Armadale (C) Kwinana (T) South (C) South (C) Perth Perth

2682 2683 3084 4394 2164 2684 2685 3164 4151 4287 4303 4395 4403 4468 4800 4824

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan

South Perth (C) Waroona (S) Waroona (S) Mandurah (C) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S)

4839 8636 8637 9071 9483 9529

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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REGION

DISTRICT

LGA

PLACENAME

HCW A No.

Register of Heritage Places

Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan Swan

Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal Swan Coastal

Wanneroo (S) Cockburn (C) Cockburn (C) Kwinana (T) Kwinana (T) Kwinana (T) Kwinana (T) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S) Wanneroo (S)

YNP - Avenue of Trees Tuart Forest - Brownman Swamp Tuart Trees - Coogee Lake The Spectacles Wetland Wandi Nature Reserve Wellard Swamp Bulrush Swamp The Spectacles / Bollard

9531 1019 9 1020 0 1209 8 1210 4 1210 7 1210 8 1427 8 1429 1 1429 5 1795 0

Municip al Inventor y Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Natio nal Trust

Statutory Database

YNP - Generator Bunkers Radar Installation Neerabup Lake Caves Sheep Dips YNP Yanchep Golf Clubhouse YNP - Yanchep National Park Precinct

Yes

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Appendix 2 - Registered places for South West Region.


REGION DISTRICT LGA PLACENAME HCWA No. Register of Heritage Places Yes Municipal Inventory National Trust Statutory Database

South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West

Blackwood

Blackwood

Blackwood

Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood

AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) Busselton (S) Nannup (S) Busselton (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) Nannup (S) Nannup (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) Busselton (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) Busselton (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) Boyup Brook (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) Busselton (S)

Cape Leeuwin and Quarters Leeuwin Waterwheel Wallcliffe Landscape

Lighthouse

104

Yes

Yes

Yes

Spring

&

106

Yes

Yes

Yes

House

&

114

Yes

Yes

Yes

Ferndale Homestead Golden Valley Homestead Southampton Homestead Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse and Quarters Jalbarragup Bridge (ruin) Lime Kilns Ellensbrook Farmhouse, Dam & Waterfall Old Karridale Chimney Ellis Creek Mill site. Barrabup Strongroom site Watering Trough Lucy Isaacs Graveyard Cape Leeuwin Conservation Area Tuart Forest Landscape Area 'Georgette' Memorial Townsite

702 707 710 2914 3364 4622 115

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Blackwood

124

Yes

Yes

Yes

Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood

255 2983 3037 3440 4415

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Blackwood Blackwood

4416 4957

Yes Yes

Blackwood

Hamelin Bay Gravesite

4961

Yes

Blackwood

Jarrahdene Mill

4963

Yes

Blackwood

'Lovespring' Anchor

4967

Yes

Blackwood

Memorial "HMAS Nizam"

4976

Yes

Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood

Gregory Tree Eucalyptus Marri - red flowering form Golden Valley Tree Park Lewana Park Ballarat Tramline Plaque and Wheel (Locomotive) Raubon Rd Site of House buried under Sand Dunes Mt Seaview (Happy Valley) Firetower

4994 5001 5003 5006 5333

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Blackwood

Blackwood

AugustaMargaret River (S) Busselton (S)

5339

Yes

5349

Yes

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REGION

DISTRICT

LGA

PLACENAME

HCWA No.

Register of Heritage Places

Municipal Inventory

National Trust

Statutory Database

South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West South West

Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood

Busselton (S) Busselton (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) AugustaMargaret River (S) Capel (S) Capel (S) Capel (S) Capel (S) Capel (S) BridgetownGreenbushes (S) Collie (S) Collie (S) Collie (S) DonnybrookBalingup (S) Williams (S)

Reserve C28683 Nature Reserve 28665 & Big Rock Nature Reserve Sugar Loaf Rock

5352 5353 5363

Yes Yes Yes

Blackwood

Canal Rocks Footbridge

13486

Yes

Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood Blackwood

Forestry Houses - Ludlow Single Men's Quarters Ludlow Dinny Connell's House -

14872 14874 15144 15147 15152 18621

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Formation Road - (existing alignment) Picnic Tree Dalgarup Priority Area Management

Wellington Wellington Wellington Wellington Wellington

Buckingham Mill Precinct Surface Management Priority Area Wellington Dam Mungalup Dam Hillman Dam

3367 4461 6344 6348 8808

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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Appendix 3 - Registered places for Warren Region.


REGION DISTRICT LGA PLACENAME HCWA No. Register of Heritage Places Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Municipal Inventory National Trust Statutory Database

Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren Warren

Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Donnelly Frankland Frankland Frankland Frankland Frankland Frankland Frankland Frankland Frankland Frankland

Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Nannup (S) Manjimup (S) Nannup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Nannup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Nannup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Nannup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Denmark (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Manjimup (S) Denmark (S) Denmark (S)

Dingup Anglican Church St Erney's Homestead Donnelly River Mill Pemberton-Northcliffe Railway Donnelly River Mill & Townsite Precinct St Mark's Anglican Church One Tree Bridge Paling's Bridge - Donnelly Bridge 1 Muir's Hut and Yards Karri Trees - (The Four Aces) Jarrah Trees Gordon Block Gloucester Tree Brockman's Sawpit Windy Harbour Cliffs Black Point Moon's Crossing "One Mile" picnic ground Grave & Campsite Hydro-electric Scheme Ruins Brockman's Cattle Yards Site of Timber Railway D'arcy Lefroy's property Site of first Giblett family property Tramway Viaduct Site of Graphite Mine Soap Stone Quarry Balganup (Bolghinup) Slab Hut & Stockyards Coodamurrup Homestead Shannon River Bridge on the old Chesapeake Rd Scotsdale Road Bridge Banksia Camp Hut Wreck site of the "Mandalay" Crystal Springs hut and cattle yards House ruins - Deep River Rest Point Sawpits Sandy Beach Monastery Landing Harewood Forest Tree Top Walk - Valley of the Giants

1505 1510 2966 4637 8198 1511 1716 1721 3140 4368 4369 4370 4471 4472 4483 11388 11401 11402 11406 11412 11417 11418 11419 11420 11422 11425 11426 11428 4636 11391 11393 11394 11395 11398 11399 11400 14314 14411

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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24.

KPI 24 - Consultation and involvement of Aboriginal people in forest management

24.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to natural and cultural heritage is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to maintain natural and cultural heritage. (Forest Management Plan p54) Forest Management Plan extract (page 55) Key performance indicator 24 Performance measure Consultation and involvement of Aboriginal people in forest management. Establishment of the Nyoongar working group. Issues addressed by the Nyoongar working group. Statutory referrals required under native title legislation. Nyoongar working group to be established by 31 December 2004. All statutory referrals made. Annually. The Department or the Forest Products Commission to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and in the case of the Department, to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Performance target(s)

Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to Aboriginal heritage is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to work with Aboriginal people to identify, interpret, protect, and manage significant cultural heritage sites: (Forest Management Plan p54) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 24.1 The Department will: 24.1.1 seek to establish a formal Nyoongar consultative working group to advise on issues relating to Aboriginal cultural heritage in the plan area; 24.1.2 identify Nyoongar women and men with authority and knowledge relating to Aboriginal cultural heritage in the plan area, and provide for their involvement in the management of the forest; and 24.1.3 facilitate cross-cultural awareness and interpretive activities to inform and educate the wider community regarding Aboriginal culture.

24.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 24


24.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 24 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan through monitoring progress towards the establishment and performance of the Nyoongar working group.
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24.2.2. Rationale Working and consulting with Aboriginal people will help to continue the practicing of traditional cultures on lands in the area of the Forest Management Plan. Establishment of a Nyoongar working group will assist in the effectiveness of this consultation to meet indigenous heritage requirements under the terms of the Forest Management Plan. 24.2.3. Background and context Heritage in forests includes Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal cultural values and natural values. The plan provides for the management of the range of heritage values. Management and interpretation of Aboriginal cultural heritage is carried out jointly with Aboriginal people. Progress towards establishment of the Nyoongar working group involves:

contacting the Southwest Land and Sea Council to initiate process; liaising with the Southwest Land and Sea Council regarding suitable nominations and potential committee members, and terms of reference for the Nyoongar working group; contacting those people nominated as committee members for the Nyoongar working group; and establish administrative structure for the Nyoongar working group.

24.2.4. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Establishment of the Nyoongar working group. Issues addressed by the Nyoongar working group. Statutory referrals required under native title legislation. 24.2.5. Performance target The performance target for the KPI (Issues addressed by the Nyoongar working group, and Statutory referrals required under native title legislation) can be addressed once the Nyoongar working group has been established and the administrative processes put in place. The presentation for the KPI will consist of a list of:

Target Nyoongar working group to be established by 31 December 2004. No target All statutory referrals made.

all issues addressed by the Nyoongar working group annually; and the number of statutory referrals made annually. Responsibility

24.2.6.

Parks and Visitor Services Division is responsible for collection and collation of the information on this KPI. Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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25.

KPI 25 - The protection of heritage places through representation in reserves

25.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to natural and cultural heritage is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to maintain natural and cultural heritage. (Forest Management Plan p54) Forest Management Plan extract (page 56) Key performance indicator 25 Performance measure Performance target(s) The protection of heritage places through representation in reserves. Representation of heritage values in the existing and proposed formal and informal reserve system. The Department and the Conservation Commission to complete all actions for which they are responsible in order to formally change the land category of areas proposed for the reserve system within 10 years after the commencement of the plan. Biennially on progress. The Department to investigate the lack of progress and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Department to address those impediments within its control and the Department and the Conservation Commission to advise the Minister for the Environment on measures to address other impediments.

Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to natural and other cultural heritage is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the operational scale for the purpose of seeking to identify, record, assess and manage places of natural and cultural heritage significance on land to which the plan applies: (Forest Management Plan p54) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 25.1 The Department will: 25.1.1 maintain and, where reasonable and practicable, enhance databases of cultural heritage places and values; and 25.1.2 cooperate with Commonwealth and State agencies, local government authorities and non-statutory organisations in relation to cultural heritage identification and conservation. The Department and the Forest Products Commission will conduct their operations in a manner that has regard to the Indigenous Heritage Management Guidelines and NonIndigenous Heritage Management Guidelines after those Guidelines have been prepared. (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will: 25.3.1 undertake its operations in a manner that is in accordance with guidelines in the Code of Practice for Timber Plantations and the relevant plantation manual for the identification of significant heritage sites, which are to be revised in consultation with the Department; and 25.3.2 share information relating to identified heritage sites with the Department.

25.2

25.3

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25.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 25


25.2.1. Objective of the KPI. The objective of KPI 25 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets for the protection of heritage places/sites in the conservation reserve system. 25.2.2. Rationale The inclusion of a heritage place in the conservation reserve system is likely to improve its protection status. 25.2.3. Background and context Heritage comprises the things we value and want to keep as a community and as a culture. It includes indigenous and non-indigenous cultural values and natural values. The Forest Management Plan provides for the management of the range of heritage values. Indigenous heritage Sacred sites are an integral part of Aboriginal Culture. There is also a rich lore, traditions and the ongoing use of and care for country. There are approximately 23,000 sacred sites registered in Western Australia. A number of these sites are situated within the area of the Forest Management Plan and belong to the Nyoongar people of south-west Western Australia. A register of these sites is maintained by the Department of Indigenous Affairs. This register is periodically updated and the information is provided to DEC. Cultural heritage European exploration and colonisation of Western Australia has brought with it a wealth of cultural heritage. In the south-west there is evidence of past activities including timber towns, sawmills, transport systems, dams and weirs, tree nurseries, buildings, structures and other sites. There is also a rich folklore, traditions and the ongoing use and care for the land and forests. Natural heritage Natural heritage values include old-growth forest; representative vegetation; natural landscapes; rare, threatened or restricted flora and fauna; forest communities; remnant vegetation; important wetlands; species richness; refugia and centres of endemism; flora at the limit of their range; and geological heritage. The Commonwealth Australian Heritage Council Act 2003 provides a register and process for the identification and listing of these places. 25.2.4. Issues The protection of heritage places/sites through their representation in reserves requires the location details for each place/site so they can be overlaid with land category. Not all heritage places registered in the RATIS database have location coordinates attached. The process of registering coordinates to heritage places is currently being undertaken. This will have an impact on the amount of data available for presentation for this KPI particularly through the early stages of the Plan.

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25.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Number of heritage places/sites in the conservation reserve system. Target Formally change the land category of areas proposed for the conservation reserve system within 10 years after the commencement of the plan to increase the level of representation of heritage places in the conservation reserve system.

25.2.6. Required data Required data Number of heritage places/sites in area of Forest Management Plan in existing land categories for biennial reporting periods. Collection & storage method Number of heritage places from Register of Aboriginal Sites, State Register of Heritage Places, National Register of Heritage Places and RATIS (Recreation And Tourism Information System). Custodians Department of Indigenous Affairs, Western Australia Heritage Council, Australian Heritage Council, Parks and Visitor Services Division and Information Management Branch.

25.2.7. Calculation method Parameter to be measured Change in the number of heritage places/sites over time in the formal and informal reserve system. Calculation method Intersect Register of Aboriginal Sites, National Register of Heritage Places, State Register of Heritage Places and RATIS with the gazetted area of the formal conservation reserve system, Forest Conservation Areas and the informal reserve system. Assess representation of heritage places in the conservation reserve system over biennial reporting periods.

25.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Number of heritage places/sites in the conservation reserve system as at biennial reporting periods. Measurement frequency Biennially Calculation frequency Biennially

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25.2.9. Data presentation


The representation of heritage places in the conservation reserve system December 2004 No of % of places/ target site December 2006 No of % of places/ target site December 2008 No of % of places/ target site December 2010 No of % of places/ target site December 2012 No of % of places/ target site December 2014 No of % of places/ target site Target No of places/ site % of target

Land category

Formal reserves Forest Conservation Areas Informal Reserves Total

25.2.10. Responsibility Geographic Information Section of Information Management Branch is responsible for:

obtaining updated information on a biennial basis from the Register of Aboriginal Sites, (DEC receives monthly updates of this list from the Department of Indigenous Affairs. This is done through a contract with the Geographic Information Section of the Information Management Branch), State Register of Heritage Places, National Register of Heritage Places and RATIS. overlaying updated information on heritage places/sites with the formal and informal reserve system biennially; and presenting results in a table (see table 1).

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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26.

KPI 26 - Number, range and use of recreation/tourism activities available by proposed land category in the plan area

26.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to socio-economic benefits is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and enhance socio-economic benefits obtained from the forest to meet community needs. (Forest Management Plan p57) Forest Management Plan extract (page 60) Key performance indicator 26 Performance measure Number, range and use of recreation/tourism activities available by proposed land category in the plan area. Type and number of recreation and tourism facilities available in the plan area (e.g. picnic sites, campsites, toilets, visitor centres, walking trails, or major tourism developments). The number of visits to selected recreation areas. The satisfaction visitors express with their experience. Visitor satisfaction maintained at high levels. Annually. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to recreation and tourism is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the whole of forest scale for the purpose of seeking to provide opportunities for active and passive recreation and tourism that will meet public demand, so far as is practicable and sustainable, and provide regional economic benefits (Forest Management Plan p57) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 26.1 The Department will: 26.1.1 prepare, in consultation with the Conservation Commission, and progressively implement a strategic framework plan for recreation and tourism on land to which the plan applies; 26.1.2 issue and administer licences, leases and permits for commercial tourism uses in accordance with the provisions of the CALM Act; 26.1.3 issue permits and take other action to enable organised non-commercial recreation and educational groups to undertake appropriate activities; 26.1.4 undertake research in relation to the knowledge, attitudes, skills and activities of visitors to land to which the plan applies; and 26.1.5 where appropriate, provide designated areas where camping may take place or where dogs and horses may be taken.

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26.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 26


26.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 26 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets through the provision of recreational opportunities and tourism. 26.2.2. Rationale This indicator is important for monitoring the provision of recreation and tourism facilities by the Department and, will help determine whether the range and quality of those facilities are being maintained or improved as a result of management practices. 26.2.3. Background and context Expanding the range of visitor facilities within the south-west region is anticipated to encourage visitors to stay longer and spend more, thereby increasing the economic benefits associated with nature-based tourism. Some of the new facilities being developed include the Karri Tingle Visitor Centre in the Walpole-Nornalup National Park, as well as a number of tourist drives and private sector low impact accommodation developments. Departmental Policy Statement No. 18 Recreation, tourism and visitor services (1991) and operational guidelines prescribe visitor services provided by the Department. Programs are implemented by Departmental regions and districts based on a five-year strategic plan, and twoyear business plans. Visitor services are funded through recurrent and capital budget allocations to the three regions, and through the retention of park entrance, camping, lease and licence fees. 26.2.4. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Type and number of recreation and tourism facilities Number of visits to selected recreation/tourism areas Level of visitor satisfaction Target No target Maintained or increase level of visitor satisfaction.

26.2.5. Required data Required data Type of recreation and tourism facilities for the area of the Forest Management Plan. Number of recreation and tourism facilities for the area of Forest Management Plan. The number of visits to selected recreation sites for the area of Forest Management Plan. Collection & storage method Data collect by district staff and stored in Recreation and Tourism Information System (RATIS). Custodians Relevant district staff and Research & Information Management Section of Parks and Visitor Services Division.

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135 Visitor satisfaction level for managed recreation sites for the area of the Forest Management Plan.

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136

26.2.6. Calculation method Parameter to be measured Type of recreation and tourism facilities for the area of the Forest Management Plan. Number of recreation and tourism facilities for the area of the Forest Management Plan. Number of visits to selected recreation areas for each proposed land category. Mean level of visitor satisfaction for the area of Forest Management Plan. Calculation method Recreational facilities to be aggregated into approximately 10 type categories. RATIS database administrator to refine list of facilities in each type category by proposed land category for annual reporting periods. Total number of recreational facilities provided by the Department in proposed land categories.

Number of visits to selected recreational areas provided by the Department for proposed land categories. Visitor satisfaction surveys are conducted as part of annual reporting requirements. RATIS Database Administrator to collate survey results of all sites within the Forest Management Plan and calculate mean visitor satisfaction levels over annual reporting periods.

26.2.7. Parameter to be measured, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Type of recreation and tourism facilities provided by the Department as at annual reporting periods. Number of existing recreation and tourism facilities provided by the Department as at annual reporting periods. Number of visits to selected recreation areas for each proposed land category. Mean level of visitor satisfaction over annual reporting periods. 26.2.8. Data presentation Metric Type and number of facilities provided by the Department. Presentation Type and number of recreation and tourism facilities by proposed land category for the area of the Forest Management Plan as at annual reporting periods (table 1). Text to explain changes and trends in data. Number of visits to selected recreation areas by proposed land category for the area of the Forest Management Plan as at annual reporting periods (table 2). Text to explain changes and trends in data. Mean level of visitor satisfaction expressed for all recreation and tourism facilities to be presented as a line graph (figure 1) for the area of the Forest Management Plan over annual reporting periods. Measurement frequency Annually Calculation frequency Calculation to follow annual updates of RATIS.

Number of visits to selected recreation areas.

Mean level of visitor satisfaction.

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Table 1:

Type and number of recreation and tourism facilities by proposed land category for the area of the Forest Management Plan as at annual reporting period 2004.
Number of recreation facilities for each type of recreational facility Type 1 Type 2 Type 3 Type 4 Type 5 Type 6 Type 7 Type 8

Proposed land category National park Nature reserve Conservation park State forest, timber reserve CALM Act section 5 (1)(g) & (h) reserves Total

Table 2:

Number of visits to selected recreation areas by proposed land category for the area of the Forest Management Plan over the period 2004 to 2006.
2004 2005 2006

Recreation area 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Mean level of visitor satisfaction (percentage)

100 90 80 70 60 50 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Time (years)

Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation Figure 1: Mean level of visitor satisfaction for managed recreation/tourism sites for the area of the Forest Management Plan over annual reporting periods.

26.2.9. Responsibility District staff are responsible for collecting and entering of relevant information from recreation and tourism sites.
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138 Research & Information Management Section of Parks and Visitor Services Division is responsible for:

updating and maintaining RATIS Database with information; collation and analysis of data; data presentation and analysis; and draft text describing and interpreting trends.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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27.
27.1

KPI 27 - Basic raw material supply


Background information from the Forest Management Plan

The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to socio-economic benefits is: An overall aim of the plan is to seek to sustain and enhance socio-economic benefits obtained from the forest to meet community needs. (Forest Management Plan p57). Forest Management Plan extract (page 60): Key performance indicator 27 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Basic raw material supply. The number of notices of entry served to the Department under the Local Government Act. No target, trends to be reported. Annually.

The objective in relation to basic raw material supply is: The plan proposes the following Actions at the whole of forest scale for the purpose of seeking to manage basic raw materials (BRM) and promote the rehabilitation of areas to which the plan applies where BRM have been extracted: (Forest Management Plan p59). Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 29.1 The Department will extract and use gravel and other BRM required for the management of land to which the plan applies. The Conservation Commission will review its policy on BRM extraction as a matter of priority. The Department will make submissions in relation to proposals to extract basic raw materials on land to which the plan applies that are forwarded to it for comment or advice, with a view to seeking: 29.3.1 to have the cost of rehabilitation of areas from which BRM are extracted borne by the organisation responsible for the extraction of those materials; and 29.3.2 the lodgement of a rehabilitation performance bond. The Department and the Forest Products Commission will maintain a database of areas from which BRM have been extracted and will progressively develop plans and works programs for the rehabilitation of these areas.

29.2

29.3

29.4

27.2

Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 27

27.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 27 is to recording and reporting on the supply of basic raw materials from within the Forest Management Plan area. 27.2.2. Rationale This KPI is important for monitoring the supply of basic raw materials (BRM) from DEC-managed lands. The information will assist in the sustainable allocation of notices of intended entry through
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140 an annual review process that will determine quantities being extracted and set acceptable levels and targets for each region. 27.2.3 Background and context Under the Local Government Act 1995 (LG Act) basic raw materials may be removed by a local government or Main Roads Western Australia (MRWA) for road maintenance or construction requirements from any land. The material that may be removed includes earth, sand, stone and gravel. The appropriate legal mechanism for local governments or MRWA to secure access for the purpose of extracting and removing gravel from land managed by the Department is through the service on the Department of a 'notice of intended entry' (NOE) under sections 3.27 and 3.32 of the LG Act. Draft Policy Statement No. 2 (Part 1 of 2) Access to Basic Raw Materials from State Forest and Timber Reserves, and Draft Policy Statement No. 2 (Part 2 of 2) Access to Basic Raw Materials From The Conservation Estate are currently under review and will cover the new legislative requirements. Consistent with CALM Policy No 2, gravel and other basic raw materials are made available to local government and MRWA free of charge for road works that service the Departments management objectives for up to 5 km from State forest (or timber reserve) boundaries unless other reasonable alternatives are available. Access to basic raw materials from conservation estate will only be granted where the proposal meets the conditions specified in Conservation Commission of Western Australia Policy Statement 3 - Basic Raw Materials: Government and Local Government Access to Conservation Estate (National Parks, Nature Reserves and Conservation Parks) [July 2006]. The Regional Manager has the authority to enter into an agreement with the local government / MRWA with conditions for access if local government / MRWA serves a notice of entry under sections 3.27 and 3.32 of the LG Act. 27.2.4 Issues There is no pre-existing centralized management system or database that records the information required to facilitate reporting on this KPI. At present there is no consistent requirement for operators of pits established under NOE to provide annual returns about the quantity of material removed from the pit. Pits that are operated over a number of years only appear on record in the year that they are established. It is possible that Environmental Management Branch could develop guidelines and conditions for NOE to require the submission of annual returns for removals. Similar requirements can be placed on removals by Main Roads WA from pits on DECmanaged land. In the Mid-term Audit of the Forest Management Plan the Conservation Commission has recommended that The Department and Forest Products Commission should develop a process to provide access to basic raw materials for the Forest Products Commission roading requirements associated with timber harvesting in State forest, which is within the current institutional framework. The process should ensure that there is adequate planning for access to the anticipated amount of gravel required over time on a regional basis, conditional approval for access is obtained from the Department prior to operations commencing, and that pit management and rehabilitation is undertaken to standards approved by the Department. This issue is being addressed with intent that records will be provided to facilitate reporting for this KPI. With the introduction of the updated Guidelines for the Management and Rehabilitation of Basic Raw Material Pits (2008) by Environmental Management Branch requiring the preparation of Pit Management Plans and the allocation of a BRM Site Number will allow easier tracking of the
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141 sources of BRM. For comprehensive data to be collected the Regional Manager should require that all BRM for DEC use be recorded against the pit from which it is obtained, and returns provided as part of the project conditions. 27.2.5 The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Notices of intended entry. 27.2.6 Required data Required data A list of all notices of intended entry served to the Department for the area of the Forest Management Plan for each annual reporting period. Collection & storage method Information from notices of intended entry schedules to be collected for Swan, South West and Warren Regions. This information to be forwarded on request to Environmental Management Branch and stored in lists ready for annual reporting. Custodians Swan, South West, and Warren Regions, Environmental Management Branch of Nature Conservation Division. Target No target, trends to be reported.

27.2.7 Calculation method Parameter to be measured Number of notices of intended entry served to the Department over annual reporting periods. Number of notices of intended entry served to the Department in existing and proposed formal conservation reserves over annual reporting periods. Volume removed in tonnes under each notice of intended entry. Calculation method Sum of notices of intended entry for area of Forest Management Plan and, sum of notices of intended entry for existing and proposed formal conservation reserves for each reporting period. Sum of volume removed for area of Forest Management Plan and, sum of volume removed for existing and proposed formal conservation reserves for each reporting period Sum of number of pits and volume used for area of Forest Management Plan and, sum of the number of pits and volume removed for existing and proposed formal conservation reserves by FPC for each reporting period. Sum of number of pits and volume used for area of Forest Management Plan and, sum of the number of pits and volume removed for existing and proposed formal conservation reserves by DEC for each reporting period.

Number of pits used or established for FPC by tenure category over annual reporting periods. Volume removed in tonnes for FPC by tenure category over annual reporting periods. Number of pits used or established by DEC by tenure category over annual reporting periods Number of pits used or established by DEC by tenure category over annual reporting periods.

27.2.8 Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Number of notices of intended entry. Volume removed under each notice of intended entry. Number of pits used for FPC. Measurement frequency Annually on a calendar year basis Annually on a calendar year basis Annually on a calendar year basis Calculation frequency Annually on a calendar year basis Annually on a calendar year basis Annually on a calendar year basis

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142 Quantity removed for FPC Number of pits used by DEC. Quantity removed by DEC Annually on a calendar year Annually on a calendar year basis basis Annually on a calendar year Annually on a calendar year basis basis Annually on a calendar year Annually on a calendar year basis basis

27.2.9 Data presentation Metric Number of pits used for total area of the Forest Management Plan. Quantity of BRM extracted from existing and proposed formal conservation reserves. Presentation Data to be presented as a line graph (Figure 1) to demonstrate change in the number of pits used, and volume removed over annual reporting periods. Text to describe any change or trends over annual reporting periods (see work instruction section).

Figure 1:

Trends in the extraction of basic raw materials over annual reporting periods.
BRM Removals

60

120000

State Forest & Timber Reserves No. of pits Conservation Lands No. of pits

50

100000

Other DEC Lands No. of pits Total No. of pits

40 No. of Pits

80000 Quantity (M 3) State Forest & Timber Reserves quantity removed Conservation Lands quantity removed Other DEC Lands quantity removed Total quantity removed

30

60000

20

40000

10

20000

0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Year

* Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate presentation of the data to be collated in table 6.

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27.2.10

Responsibility

Swan, South West and Warren Regions are responsible for collection and storage of relevant information from the schedule attached to notices of intended entry, FPC removals and BRM for DEC use. Environmental Management Branch of Nature Conservation Division is responsible for:

collation and analysis of data; data presentation and analysis; and draft text describing and interpreting trends.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch are responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report. 27.2.11. Work Instructions

5. SFM Officer in each District to provide information on removals from BRM pits to the SFM Regional Leader. This will include relevant information from the returns from pits operated under NOE, returns associated with FPC and removals of BRM for DEC use (Use Tables 1-3 as s guide). 6. SFM Regional Leader in each Region (Swan, South West, Warren) to maintain database of removals from BRM pits. This will include relevant information from the returns from pits operated under NOE, returns associated with FPC and removals of BRM for DEC use (Use Tables 1-3). 7. Environmental Officer of Environmental Management Branch to request data from Swan, South West and Warren Regions prior to annual reporting date, and collate this into summary sheet (Table 1d, Table 2d, and Table 3d). Table 4a and Table 4b will be collated to summarize the removals by the various agents for each land category. 8. Environmental Officer to collate information from notices of intended entry schedules, FPC and Regional returns and present for total area of the Forest Management Plan the number of pits used, type of material extracted and the quantity removed. This information to be provided for each land category as shown in Table 5 (below) and is used to assist interpretation of the more general information that is presented for this KPI. 9. Environmental Officer to collate information from Table 6 (below) and use this to produce Figure 1 (above).

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Table 1a:

Extraction of basic raw materials by Notice of Entry by land category for Swan Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of NOE Quantity removed

National Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of NOE Quantity removed No. of NOE Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Product extracted Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of NOE

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

Table 1b:

Extraction of basic raw materials by Notice of Entry by land category for South West Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of NOE Quantity removed

National Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of NOE Quantity removed No. of NOE Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of NOE

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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Table 1c:

Extraction of basic raw materials by Notice of Entry by land category for Warren Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of NOE Quantity removed

National Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of NOE Quantity removed No. of NOE Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of NOE

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP. Summary of extraction of basic raw materials by Notice of Entry by land category for area of Forest Management Plan Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Table 1d:

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of NOE Quantity removed

Plantation
No. of NOE Quantity removed

National Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of NOE Quantity removed No. of NOE Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of NOE Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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Table 2a:

Extraction of basic raw materials for FPC by land category for Swan Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

Table 2b:

Extraction of basic raw materials for FPC by land category for South West Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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Table 2c:

Extraction of basic raw materials for FPC by land category for Warren Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act reserves CALM Act CEO - s5 (1) (g) & (h). lands
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

Table 2d:

Summary of extraction of basic raw materials for FPC by land category for area of Forest Management Plan Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act reserves CALM Act CEO - s5 (1) (g) & (h). lands
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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Table 3a:

Extraction of basic raw materials by DEC by land category for Swan Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

Table 3b:

Extraction of basic raw materials by DEC by land category for South West Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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149

Table 3c:

Extraction of basic raw materials by DEC by land category for Warren Region Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

Table 3d:

Summary of extraction of basic raw materials by DEC by land category for area of Forest Management Plan Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Native forest Plantation
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


No. of pits Quantity removed

National Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Park
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands CALM Act CEO CALM Act reserves lands - s5 (1) (g) & (h).
No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits Quantity removed

Total By Product
No. of pits Quantity removed

Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

No. of pits

Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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Table 4a:

Summary of entries for extraction of basic raw materials by agent by land category for area of Forest Management Plan Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Conservation Lands Nature Reserve
No. of pits DEC NOE FPC DEC NOE

Product extracted
Agent

Native forest
No. of pits NOE FPC DEC

Plantation
No. of pits NOE FPC

National Park
No. of pits FPC DEC

Conservation Park
No. of pits NOE FPC DEC

Other DEC Lands CALM Act reserves CALM Act CEO - s5 (1) (g) & (h). lands
No. of pits NOE FPC DEC NOE No. of pits FPC DEC

Total By Product
No. of pits NOE FPC DEC

Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP. Summary of extraction of basic raw materials by volume by agent by land category for area of Forest Management Plan Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves Product extracted
Agent

Table 4b:

Conservation Lands Nature Reserve


Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC

Native forest
Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC

Plantation
Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC

National Park
Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC

Conservation Park
Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC

Other DEC Lands CALM Act reserves CALM Act CEO - s5 (1) (g) & (h). lands
Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC

Total By Product
Quantity removed NOE FPC DEC

Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Total by Categories

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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Table 5:
Product extracted Shale Sand Clay Gravel Limestone Annual Total#

Summary of extraction of basic raw materials by land category for area of Forest Management Plan Land Categories in FMP Area*
State Forest & Timber Reserves
No. of pits Quantity removed

Conservation Lands
No. of pits Quantity removed

Other DEC Lands


No. of pits Quantity removed No. of pits

Total
Quantity removed

* #

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP. Totals in grey shaded area to be used for the line graph in Figure 1.

Table 6:
Reporting period 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Trend in extraction of basic raw materials by land category for area of Forest Management Plan over annual reporting periods. Land Categories in FMP Area* Annual Total
State Forest & Timber Reserves No. of pits Quantity removed Conservation Lands No. of pits Quantity removed Other DEC Lands No. of pits Quantity removed All land categories and products No. of pits Quantity removed

Land categories are as proposed in the Forest Management Plan and as subsequently amended as provided for in the FMP.

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28.

KPI 28 - Adaptive management

28.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to plan implementation is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that forest management is undertaken in accordance with the plan and is continually improved so as to achieve best practice: (Forest Management Plan p61) Forest Management Plan extract (page 64) Key performance indicator 28 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall Adaptive management. The number and topic of formal adaptive management trials. Within five years, trials will be held into at least two separate issues detailed in the plans action statements. Five years. Department to report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment on measures required to address achievement.

The objective in relation to adaptive management is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to provide for adaptive management to improve forest management (Forest Management Plan p62) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 33.1 The Department and the Forest Products Commission will, in cooperation with the Water and Rivers Commission and the Water Corporation, and in consultation with the Conservation Commission, conduct research in relation to the extent to which stream zones in informal reserves adequately protect biodiversity, water quality and water quantity in areas subject to timber harvesting. The Department will, in consultation with the Conservation Commission, conduct trials, where reasonable and practicable, of improvements to silviculture and fire management practices. The Forest Products Commission will test methods to increase the utilisation of sawlogs below first and second grade standards.

33.2

33.3

28.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 28


28.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 28 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets through undertaking adaptive management trials aimed at improving forest management. 28.2.2. Rationale Adaptive management is a key component of the management system envisaged in the Forest Management Plan, recognising that there is an incomplete knowledge of the effects of management practices on ecosystems. This performance measure is important for monitoring the continual improvement of knowledge in forest management practices, through adaptive management trials.
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28.2.3. Background and context Knowledge can be gathered by experimentation (research), adaptive management trials, formal and informal monitoring programs and compliance checking through supervision and audit. The research, adaptive management trials, monitoring and performance assessment proposed in the Plan is used to provide the knowledge to adapt management. Results from adaptive management trials are expected to become available at the mid-term review of the plan. Decisions on the implications for management is made in the second half of the plan period and may be implemented immediately or built into planning for the subsequent plan period. 28.2.4. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Formal adaptive management trials. Target Trials to be held into at least two separate issues detailed in the plans action statements within five years.

28.2.5. Required data Required data The number of formal adaptive management trials conducted. Collection & storage method Formal adaptive management trials to be conducted and recorded by relevant custodians. Custodians Custodians according to the topic of the trials may include Forest Policy and Practices Branch, Forest Management Branch, Science Division or Forest Products Commission.

28.2.6. Calculation method Entity to be measured Number of formal adaptive management trials conducted relating to issues referred to in the plans action statements. Calculation method Adaptive management trials are to be conducted according to the plans action statements. Forest Policy and Practices Branch to collate the trials with DEC involvement into a list detailing the topic, title (issue) and a description of each trial prior to five-year reporting. FPC is to collate the trials with FPC involvement into a list detailing the topic, title (issue) and a description of each trial prior to five-year reporting.

28.2.7. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Number and topic of trials conducted 28.2.8. Data presentation Metric Topic of trial Title of trial Description of trials conducted 28.2.9. Responsibility Custodians in DEC are responsible for:
Last updated: 1 March 2007 Effective from: 6 December 2011 Custodian: Manager, Forest Policy and Practices Branch Approved by: Director, Sustainable Forest Management Division

Measurement frequency Five-yearly

Calculation frequency Five-yearly

Presentation Description of each adaptive management trial to be provided.

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conducting trials according to the plans action statements; recording results of trials; and providing Forest Policy and Practices Branch with the topic and title (issue) of trials and a description of each trial prior to five-year reporting.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for coordinating the information for trials involving DEC, in terms of:

data collation; data presentation and interpretation; and collation of information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission.

Forest Products Commission is responsible for coordinating the information for trials involving FPC, in terms of:

data collation; data presentation and interpretation; and collation of information for this KPI together with other KPI that require reporting by FPC into a report to the Conservation Commission.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and publication of its report.

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29.

KPI 29 - Provide for public involvement activities and public education, awareness and extension programs and make available forest-related information

29.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to plan implementation is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that forest management is undertaken in accordance with the plan and is continually improved so as to achieve best practice: (Forest Management Plan p61) Forest Management Plan extract (page 65) Key performance indicator 29 Provide for public involvement activities and public education, awareness and extension programs and make available forestrelated information. Compilation of programs for public involvement, education, awareness and extension programs. Available programs and numbers of the community exposed to programs increases over time. Annually. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment.

Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to community involvement is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to provide opportunities for Government agencies, non-government organisations and the community to participate in plan implementation: (Forest Management Plan p63) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 35.1 The Department and the Forest Products Commission will, when required by the provisions of the plan, undertake public consultation in relation to the development and review of management policies and guidelines. The Department will: 35.2.1 develop and implement programs that seek to provide the community with educational opportunities and information on ecologically sustainable forest management, in particular 35.2.2 establish public consultation processes; 35.2.3 provide opportunities for community participation in voluntary activities and educational and social development programs relating to ecologically sustainable forest management; and 35.2.4 provide a range of opportunities for volunteers to be involved in forest management activities.

35.2

29.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 29


29.2.1. Objective of the KPI

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The objective of KPI 29 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets by tracking progress in the number of programs for public involvement and the numbers of the community exposed to forest-related programs. 29.2.2. Rationale The information from this KPI is important in assessing the achievement of the commitment to increasing public participation, knowledge and awareness through continued development and coordination of community education programs. Building community awareness and support is essential for sustainable forest management. Tracking the number of programs and the numbers of the community exposed to forest-related programs will help determine if community involvement is increasing, which is the objective of the Forest Management Plan. 29.2.3. Background and context Public participation is an ongoing process that can improve communication, interaction and joint decision-making between different stakeholders. Through public participation, all parties become better informed about the range of views on proposals and issues. Most importantly, a good public participation process will result in better decisions that are more sensitive and responsive to public concerns and values. The Department is committed to public participation and supports the right of members of the public to have a meaningful role in conserving Western Australias natural environment to ensure healthy ecosystems, social and economic well-being and conservation of biological diversity for present and future generations. This is based on recognition that providing a range of educational opportunities will contribute to a more informed public and increase the communitys appreciation of the natural environment and capacity to participate in public land management. 29.2.4. Issues Not all programs are readily measurable but the Department will report on those programs where information can be reasonably gathered. 29.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Forest-related programs available to the community. Community involvement in those programs Target Programs available to the public increase over time. Numbers of the community exposed to programs increase over time.

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29.2.6. Required data Required data Number of forest-related programs available to the public from: Regional Services Urban Nature Nearer to Nature Swan Region Southwest Region Warren Region Parks and Visitor Services; Interpretation and Visitor Information Services Tracks & Trails Unit Indigenous Heritage Unit Community Involvement Unit Strategic Development & Corporate Affairs; Eco-education Programs and Publications Section eMedia. Numbers of the community involved in those programs through: direct active participation direct education/awareness programs education/awareness via Internet (hits per site) education/awareness packages Collection & storage Custodians method Custodians to identify Regional Services forest-related community Urban Nature involvement programs and Nearer to Nature record the number of those Swan Region programs provided to the Southwest Region public annually Warren Region Parks and Visitor Services; Interpretation and Visitor Information Services Tracks & Trails Unit Indigenous Heritage Unit Community Involvement Unit Strategic Development & Corporate Affairs; Eco-education Programs and Publications Section eMedia Custodians of forest-related community involvement programs to maintain register of numbers of the community involved in those programs annually

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29.2.7. Calculation method Calculation method Parameter to be measured Number of forest-related programs Sum of all forest-related programs that were made available available over annual reporting over annual reporting periods from periods Regional Services Urban Nature Nearer to Nature Swan Region Southwest Region Warren Region Parks and Visitor Services; Interpretation and Visitor Information Services Tracks & Trails Unit Indigenous Heritage Unit, Community Involvement Unit Strategic Development & Corporate Affairs Eco-education Programs and Publications Section eMedia Numbers of the community Sum of members of the community involved in those involved in forest-related programs. programs over annual reporting periods. 29.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Number of programs Numbers of community 29.2.9. Data presentation Metric Number of programs Number of people Presentation Data to be presented as a line graph to show progression over reporting periods. Text to explain data and describe any trends. Measurement frequency Annually Annually Calculation frequency Calculations to coincide with annual review process for the DEC Annual Report.

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100 Community programs 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Time (years)
Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation

Figure 1:

Number of forest-related community programs available over annual reporting periods

10000 9000 8000 Number of people 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Time (years)
Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation

Figure 2:

Number of people involved in DEC initiated forest-related programs over annual reporting periods.

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29.2.10. Responsibility Regional Services: Urban Nature, Nearer to Nature, Swan Region, Southwest Region and Warren Region. Parks and Visitor Services: Interpretation and Visitor Information Services, Tracks & Trails Unit, Indigenous Heritage Unit, Community Involvement. Strategic Development & Corporate Affairs: Eco-education, Programs and Publications Section, eMedia. The above groups are responsible for:

collection and management of data for forest-related community involvement programs provided annually; and drafting text to describe and interpret trends.

Visitor and Regional Services in the Parks and Visitor Services Division is responsible for:

collation of information provided by the different custodians; analysis of data; data presentation and analysis; and draft text describing and interpreting trends.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating this information together with information from other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for auditing, reviewing and the publication of its report. 29.2.11. Work Instructions Relevant custodians are required to: 1. Compile a list of all public involvement activities, public education programs, public awareness programs and extension programs that are forest-related. See table 1 (below). * Definitions of a) the various fields of public communication and b) the meaning of forestrelated are provided below to assist in refining the data consistently across the Department. 2. Attribute numbers of the community involved in each of the communication fields according to Table 1 (below). 3. Forward lists annually to Visitor and Regional Services in the Parks and Visitor Services Division prior to annual reporting so that data from across the Department can be collated and presented according to Figure1 and Figure 2 (above). 4. Text to explain data and provide any additional information on the quality of those programs listed, the success of those programs in achieving set outcomes and increasing public awareness. Additional information provided by custodians might focus on:

the level of recurrent participation of school communities; the number of new teachers participating in the programs; and changes in responses to attitudinal surveys.

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29.2.12. Definitions Term Forest-related Definition Forest-related is defined as the area which is the main focus of the Forest Management Plan which is the area within the Regional Forest Agreement boundary within the area to which the Forest Management Plan applies (see Map 5 of the Forest Management Plan). Forest-related encompasses the seven criteria for sustainability as described in the Forest Management Plan:

biodiversity; productive capacity; ecosystem health and vitality; soil and water; global carbon cycles; natural and cultural heritage; and

Public involvement activities Public education

Public awareness Extension programs

socio-economic. Activities that seek personal interaction with individuals and groups considering issues in planning and management and partaking in activities to address those issues (also called community involvement). Programs that involve establishing learning programs for special interest groups with defined outcomes embraced as a contract between the learning facilitator and the learner or their representative. Also called community education and includes but is not the exclusive domain of schools programs. It can also include interpretation programs for visitors to sites and attractions where the focus is on conveying values. Providing basic factual information, usually a one-way communication to attract attention and pass on information about an issue to the general public. Also called public information, publicity, promotion, or public relations. A communication strategy embracing professional liaison with specific individuals and groups. Advisory services are usually of a technical nature and consultation often involves a fee-for-service.

Table 1:

Community involvement programs (forest-related) and number of people involved over annual reporting periods.
2005 P C 2006 P C 2007 P C 2008 P C 2009 P C 2010 P C Total Programs People

Communication field Public involvement activities Public education Awareness Extension programs Total

P = Number of programs provided C = Community involvement (number of people)

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30.

KPI 30 - Develop and maintain human resource skills across relevant disciplines

30.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to plan implementation is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that forest management is undertaken in accordance with the plan and is continually improved so as to achieve best practice: (Forest Management Plan p61) Forest Management Plan extract (page 65) Key performance indicator 30 Performance measure Develop and maintain human resource skills across relevant disciplines. The extent to which the Department demonstrates the capacity and commitment to develop and maintain the essential skills of staff. Persons responsible for undertaking key tasks on average meet 80 per cent of the competency requirements for key tasks indicated in the environmental management system. Annually. The Department and the Forest Products Commission to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and in the case of the Department, to the Minister for the Environment.

Performance target(s)

Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to developing and maintaining human resource skills across relevant disciplines is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to generate and transfer knowledge and develop the necessary skills and competencies in staff of the Department and staff and contractors of the Forest Products Commission, with a view to leading to improvements in forest management: (Forest Management Plan p64) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 38.1 The Department will develop and implement research programs, in cooperation with the Conservation Commission, including the research referred to in Actions 9.1 and 9.2. The Department and the Forest Products Commission will take reasonable and practicable steps to: 38.2.1 identify the skills required to competently undertake the key tasks referred to in Action; 38.2.2 review the skills and competency levels of persons responsible for undertaking those tasks; and 38.2.3 initiate training and other programs to increase skill and competency levels where they are deficient.

38.2

30.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 30


30.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 30 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets by examining the extent to which the Department and Forest Products
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Commission demonstrate the capacity and commitment to develop and maintain the essential skills of staff. 30.2.2. Rationale Data gathered from this KPI will assist the Department and Forest Products Commission to develop appropriate training programs to enhance skills acquisition for staff so that the objectives of the Forest Management Plan can be more effectively achieved. 30.2.3. Background and context Full and effective implementation of many of the actions identified in the Forest Management Plan will require improvement in knowledge and understanding in relation to the range of forest values and systems for implementation of the plan. In order to implement management strategies effectively, the workforce should be appropriately skilled. Formal skills development through training is one element of establishing competence. However, acknowledgement of other sources of skills development through experience and education is important. 30.2.4. Issues The performance target for this KPI (average of 80 per cent staff competency) is based on the expected completion of a fully accredited Environmental Management System. KPI 32 of the Forest Management Plan includes the development of a Departmental Environmental Management System. This protocol is an interim measure for KPI 30 in order to address the objectives of the Forest Management Plan for initial reporting periods, in the absence of an accredited Environmental Management System in the Department. The protocol for measuring this KPI will be reviewed after the Environmental Management System is developed. It is necessary to develop criteria to allow measurement of competence for particular tasks. 30.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Expenditure on staff training and development related to implementation of the plan. Competency of staff Target No target

Staff responsible for undertaking key tasks on average meet 80 per cent of the competency requirements for key tasks.

30.2.6. Required data Required data Number of full time equivalent staff for each financial year related to implementation of the plan. Total expenditure on training and development across the department for each financial year related to implementation Collection & storage method Data collected and stored by Workforce Systems Analyst. Custodians People Services Branch, DEC. Forest Products Commission

Data collected and stored by the Co-coordinator of Organisational Learning and Development.

People Services Branch, DEC. Forest Products Commission

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of the plan. Yearly competency measure for all staff related to implementation of the plan (see work instructions below). 30.2.7. Calculation method Entity to be measured Expenditure on training and development.

Data collected by relevant staff and supervisors and forwarded to Co-coordinator of Organisational Learning and Development.

People Services Branch, DEC. Forest Products Commission

Expenditure on training and development per Full Time Equivalent employee. Mean level of competency for staff.

Calculation method Sum of DEC expenditure on training and development related to implementation of the plan. Sum of FPC expenditure on training and development related to implementation of the plan. Total expenditure by DEC and FPC respectively on training and development divided by the total number of Full Time Equivalent positions to provide average expenditure per person related to implementation of the plan. Calculate the mean competency for all staff related to implementation of the plan in completing the key tasks identified in their job descriptions over annual reporting periods. Internal competency validation to be conducted by peers or supervisors according to electronic assessment tool (to be developed). For more information on competency evaluation see work instructions below.

30.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Expenditure Competency Measurement frequency Yearly Yearly Calculation frequency Calculated according to budget figures at close of financial year. Calculated at the end of each reporting period for the Forest Management Plan.

30.2.9. Data presentation Metric Expenditure ($) Presentation A line graph demonstrating total expenditure by DEC and FPC respectively on training and development related to implementation of the plan and the mean expenditure for Full Time Equivalent positions over reporting periods. Text to explain the data and analyse trends. A line graph to demonstrate the percentage of staff achieving competency requirements for key tasks related to implementation of the plan according to job description forms. Text to describe the data and analyse the success of training and development programs.

Competency (%)

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Total expenditure on training and development of human resource skills Expenditure on training and development of human resource skills per employee

Expenditure 2004

2006

2008 Time (years)

2010

2012

* Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate predicted progression

Figure 1.

DEC's expenditure on staff training and development and trainee programs related to implementation of the plan over reporting periods for each financial year.

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Time (years)

* Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate predicted progression

Figure 2.

Competency (%)

Competency of staff in relation to key tasks for implementation of the Forest Management Plan.

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30.2.10. Responsibility Staff involved in the implementation of the Forest Management Plan are responsible for conducting internal competency validation with peers or supervisors annually. Organisational Learning and Development Section of People Services Branch, DEC, is responsible for coordinating information related to DEC in terms of:

data collection and management; data collation; data presentation and analysis; draft text describing and interpreting trends; and forwarding data to Forest Policy and Practices Branch for annual reporting.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. FPC is responsible for coordinating information related to FPC in terms of:

data collection and management; data collation; data presentation and analysis; text describing and interpreting trends; and collation of information for this KPI together with other KPI that require reporting by FPC into a report to the Conservation Commission.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report. 30.2.11. Work Instructions Staff Competency Pilot This assessment process has been designed as an interim measure to meet the requirements of the Forest Management Plan until a comprehensive system for evaluating competency is undertaken by the Department. The process is based on the performance criteria used in assessing for Units of Competence (UoC) in order to align the process with national standards. *Note: This is a monitoring process and it will not provide staff with any UoC accreditation. Competency assessment process: 1. Identify core business areas for staff involved in the implementation of the Forest Management Plan. 2. Determine individual UoCs that are relevant to the core business of staff involved in the implementation of the Forest Management Plan (see list 1 below). 3. Develop assessment tools that measure performance against elements of competence / performance criteria for the relevant UoCs. For DEC, assessment tools to be developed by Forest Policy and Practices Branch (PPB) and Organisational Learning and Development in co-ordination with qualified trainers/assessors.

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4. Select a sample group of staff involved in the implementation of the Forest Management Plan (as an indicator group) to test competency in completing key tasks. For DEC, the sample size and type of jobs assessed is decided by FPPB and Organisational Learning and Development. 5. Staff to conduct self-assessment on competency using self-assessment tool. 6. Manager / supervisor or peer to undertake independent assessment of selected staff member to identify gaps. 7. Establish levels of competency and present results as an interim performance measure to address part requirement of KPI 30 of the Forest Management Plan. List l. List of Units of Competency from DEC training package that could be used to establish performance standards in undertaking key tasks for staff within the Department.* Protect places of cultural significance Collect and preserve biological samples Monitor projects in a program Lead work teams Read and interpret maps Produce maps for land management purposes Recognise plants * This list is not comprehensive at this stage. It is likely that other Units of Competency is drawn from training packages such as Forest Industries, Outdoor Recreation and others yet to be determined.

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31.

KPI 31 - Development of scientific understanding of ecosystem characteristics and functions

31.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to plan implementation is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that forest management is undertaken in accordance with the plan and is continually improved so as to achieve best practice: (Forest Management Plan p61) Forest Management Plan extract (page 65) Key performance indicator 31 Performance measure Development of scientific understanding of ecosystem characteristics and functions. Expenditures on research and development related to ecologically sustainable forest management; Person years of scientific research, by ecosystem or disciplinary area of study, in the field of ecologically sustainable forest management; and/or Number of peer-reviewed articles published annually on ecologically sustainable forest management. No target. Annually. The Conservation Commission to review the scientific effort in forests in relation to the total Departmental effort and discuss priorities with the Department.

Performance target(s) Reporting Response to report

The objective in relation to knowledge is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to generate and transfer knowledge and develop the necessary skills and competencies in staff of the Department and staff and contractors of the Forest Products Commission, with a view to leading to improvements in forest management: (Forest Management Plan p64) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 38.1 The Department will develop and implement research programs, in cooperation with the Conservation Commission, including the research referred to in Actions 9.1 and 9.2. developing scientific understanding of ecosystem

The objective in relation to characteristics and functions is:

The plan proposes the following Actions at the whole of forest scale for the purpose of seeking to develop an improved understanding of the biodiversity of forest regions and the response of forest ecosystems to natural and human induced disturbance, with a view to improving forest management practices: (Forest Management Plan p29) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 9.1 The Department will undertake biological surveys, which is: 9.1.1 of priority areas determined in consultation with the Conservation Commission; and 9.1.2 used, where appropriate, to assist in evaluating the extent to which biodiversity is being conserved and the need for any review of the reserve system. The Department will:

9.2

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9.2.1 9.2.2 9.2.3

9.2.4

continue to monitor the effect of disturbance from timber harvesting on fauna and flora in the Kingston study3 area; implement the species, community and process monitoring program, FORESTCHECK; conduct a monitoring trial using a specific species sampling approach and review the comparative effectiveness of this and the monitoring protocol adopted for FORESTCHECK since its inception in 2001; and maintain a research program on ecologically sustainable forest management which is prepared in a manner that has regard to advice from the Conservation Commissions Research Advisory Committee.

31.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 31


31.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 31 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan through monitoring the development of scientific understanding in relation to sustainable forest management. 31.2.2. Rationale Full and effective implementation of many of the actions identified in the new forest management plan will require improvement in knowledge and understanding of southwest forests. This KPI will assist in monitoring the progress and development of scientific research needed to improve this knowledge. 31.2.3. Background and context The annual Output Purchaser Provider process includes an agreement between Sustainable Forest Management Division and Science Division for each financial year on the expenditure on scientific research in the area of forest management. Included in the Output Purchaser Provider documentation is an attachment that details expenditure to the project level. Output Purchaser Provider documents between Science Division and Nature Conservation Division will need to be scrutinized to ensure all projects related to sustainable forest management are included. Science Division produces an Annual Research Activity Report that contains a list of publications for the financial year that includes publications relating to sustainable forest management. This information is made available on the Science Division internet website. Forest Management Branch and Forest Policy and Practices Branch may also be involved in research projects, or contract research and development projects to consultants or universities. 31.2.4. Issues Data is not as readily available for the number of person years committed to scientific research but information can be gathered using Full Time Equivalent allocations to projects. All research and development related to sustainable forest management needs to be captured under this KPI and this includes any research funded by the Department, whether undertaken by Department staff, consultants or universities, and whether funded by Sustainable Forest Management Division, Nature Conservation Division or Parks and Visitor Services. 31.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity
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Target

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Expenditure on research and development related to sustainable forest management. Person-years of scientific research, by ecosystems and disciplinary area of study, in the field of sustainable forest management. Publication of peer reviewed articles relevant to sustainable forest management. 31.2.6. Required data Required data Total expenditure on scientific research undertaken in the field of sustainable forest management. Collection & storage method Expenditure on research projects is collected by Science Division and stored in the Sustainable Forest Management Output Purchaser Provider documentation with Science Division. This has an attachment that details expenditure to project level. Expenditure through Nature Conservation Division, Parks and Visitor Services, Forest Management Branch and Forest Policy and Practices Branch will also be collated. Total number of Collected from Full Time Equivalent person-years of allocations to projects. scientific research devoted to each disciplinary area of study in the field of sustainable forest management. Total number of peer Science Division produces an Annual reviewed articles Research Activity Report that contains published in the field of a list of publications for the financial sustainable forest year. Research publications resulting management for each from non Science Division research related to sustainable forest reporting period management funded by the Department. 31.2.7. Calculation method Entity to be measured Expenditure

No target

Custodians Sustainable Forest Management Division, Science Division, Nature Conservation Division and Parks and Visitor Services.

Person-years

Publications

Calculation method The figure of total expenditure to include money spent directly on research and other associated costs as detailed in the Sustainable Forest Management and other Output Purchaser Provider documents with Science Division. Total expenditure on non Science Division research related to sustainable forest management funded by the Department. Science Division to refine list of research projects related to the field of sustainable forest management into specific disciplinary area of study. The total number of person-years of research to be calculated annually from Full Time Equivalent allocations to projects. Science Division to undertake same process for non Science Division research related to sustainable forest management funded by the Department. Science Division to refine list of published peer reviewed articles from Annual Research Activity Report to a list of articles directly related to

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the field of sustainable forest management. Science Division to undertake same process for non Science Division research related to sustainable forest management funded by the Department.

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31.2.8. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Expenditure (dollars) Person years (years) Publications (number) 31.2.9. Data presentation Metric Expenditure (dollars) Person years (years) Publications (number) Presentation Total number of published articles, person-years of scientific research dedicated and expenditure to be presented in a table (table 1) and figures (figure 1 and 2), by ecosystem and disciplinary area of study, in the field of sustainable forest management for annual reporting periods. Measurement frequency Annually prior to the end of the financial year. Calculation frequency Annually prior to the end of the financial year.

Table 1:

Total number of published articles, person-years of scientific research and expenditure by disciplinary area of study in the field of sustainable forest management for the financial year of 2003/2004.
Disciplinary area of study Biological Diversity Productivity Ecosystem health and vitality Soil and water Natural and cultural heritage Socio economic benefits Biological Diversity Productivity Ecosystem health and vitality Soil and water Natural and cultural heritage Socio economic benefits Biological Diversity Productivity Ecosystem health and vitality Soil and water Natural and cultural heritage Socio economic benefits Biological Diversity Productivity Ecosystem health and vitality Soil and water Natural and cultural heritage Socio economic benefits Articles published Person-years dedicated Expenditure

Ecosystem Jarrah

Karri

Other

Total

Total

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Expenditure ($)

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Time (financial years)
* Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation

Figure 1.

Expenditure on scientific research in the field of sustainable forest management over annual reporting periods

Effort

Published articles Person years

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Time
* Arbitrary figures have been used to demonstrate data presentation

Figure 2.

Number of published articles and person-years of scientific research in the field of sustainable forest management over annual reporting periods.

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31.2.10. Responsibility Science Division is responsible for:


data collection and management; data collation; data presentation and analysis; and draft text describing and interpreting trends.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for collating information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report.

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32.

KPI 32 - Environmental management system

32.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to plan implementation is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that forest management is undertaken in accordance with the plan and is continually improved so as to achieve best practice: (Forest Management Plan p61) Forest Management Plan extract (page 65) Key performance indicator 32 Performance measure Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall Environmental management system. Development of a Departmental environmental management system (EMS) to a standard suitable for accreditation. EMS developed by December 2005. December 2005. The Department to report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment on measures it proposes to complete the task and the completion date.

The objective in relation to management and performance standards is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to provide for continuous improvement in management and performance standards: (Forest Management Plan p63) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 36.1 The Department will develop and maintain an environmental management system for forest management, which is to be independently accredited as conforming to AS/NZS ISO 14001. (Plantations): The Forest Products Commission will maintain an environmental management system independently accredited as conforming to AS/NZS ISO 14001.

36.2

32.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 32


32.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 32 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan by providing information on the development of an Environmental Management System (EMS). 32.2.2. Rationale A fully accredited and formal EMS will assist in determining the effectiveness of the implementation of the Forest Management Plans objectives and strategies in relation to planning, implementation, monitoring and any amendments due to adaptive management. 32.2.3. Background and context A formal EMS provides a standard, systematic framework for management activities that facilitate a precautionary approach to adaptive management. The most widely accepted standard for an EMS is that of the AS/NZS ISO 14000 series.
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The core component of an EMS is the analysis of all management activities to identify environmental aspects that arise in the course of those activities and then to rate them for their significance with respect to risk to the environment. An aspect is an element of an organisations activities, products or services that can interact with the environment. A significant aspect is one that can have a significant environmental impact. The aspect rating process achieves the requirement of the precautionary approach to be guided by a careful evaluation to avoid, wherever practicable, serious or irreversible damage to the environment. The EMS then requires controls on operations to ameliorate the risk of adverse environmental impacts followed by monitoring, performance assessment and review of the effectiveness of those controls. An effective EMS provides a strong framework for a precautionary approach to management incorporating adaptive management. The precautionary principle requires an assessment of the risk-weighted consequences of various options. A formal risk management system is a systematic way of identifying risks, evaluating their significance and identifying options to ameliorate them to acceptable levels. Management can then weigh up the implications and make informed decisions. An EMS for native forest harvesting and regeneration operations in Western Australia has been developed and is being implemented by the Forest Products Commission. Certification was achieved during 2001. Action 36.1 requires the Department to develop an EMS to cover its operations and responsibilities in respect of forest management. 32.2.4. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Status of development of EMS. 32.2.5. Required data Required data Status of development of EMS. Custodians Forest Policy and Practices Branch. Target EMS developed by December 2005.

32.2.6. Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Required metric Status of development of EMS. 32.2.7. Data presentation Metric Status of development of EMS. 32.2.8. Responsibility Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for reporting on the status of development and implementation of an EMS. The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and the publication of its report. Presentation Description of status of development of EMS. Measurement frequency Annual until EMS is implemented Calculation frequency Annual until EMS is implemented

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33.

KPI 33 - Operational control

33.1. Background information from the Forest Management Plan


The overall objective of the Forest Management Plan in relation to plan implementation is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that forest management is undertaken in accordance with the plan and is continually improved so as to achieve best practice: (Forest Management Plan p61) Forest Management Plan extract (page 66) Key performance indicator 33 Performance measure Operational control. The extent to which guidance documents have been prepared/reviewed and management modified to improve ecologically sustainable forest management. All guidance documents referred to in the Actions proposed by the plan to be prepared/reviewed by mid-term. Annually. The Department to investigate the cause and report to the Conservation Commission and to the Minister for the Environment. The Conservation Commission to evaluate the need for revision of management practices in the context of its assessment and auditing function, in consultation with the Department.

Performance target(s) Reporting Response to target shortfall

The objective in relation to review is: The plan proposes the following Actions for the purpose of seeking to ensure that the plan Actions, policies and guidelines maintain their currency (Forest Management Plan p62) Most relevant Forest Management Plan actions: 34.1 The Department and the Conservation Commission will: 34.1.1 develop or maintain a comprehensive suite of operational guidance documents (see Appendix 1); 34.1.2 evaluate the results from research, monitoring, audits and trialling of adaptive management practices to determine whether the plan, or guidelines and policies referred to in the plan, should be amended; 34.1.3 amend the plan if required according to the CALM and EP Acts; 34.1.4 initiate an independent expert review of silvicultural practices and their impacts on biodiversity during the second half of the life of the plan. The review will have regard to the results from FORESTCHECK and other research monitoring, audits, and adaptive management trials of these practices; 34.1.5 adopt the same processes for consultation, advice and approval for amending policies and guidelines as described earlier in the plan to develop or review them; and 34.1.6 take action that is reasonable and practicable to address problems identified in management systems.

33.2. Protocol for Key Performance Indicator 33


33.2.1. Objective of the KPI The objective of KPI 33 is to assess the success of the implementation of the Forest Management Plan in achieving its targets by ensuring that guidance documents maintain their currency.
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33.2.2. Rationale The regular review and updating of guidance documents is an important part of a management system aimed at delivering best practice. KPI 33 will assist this process by monitoring the progressive development and review of key subsidiary guidelines with the continued improvement of knowledge in forest management practices. 33.2.3. Background and context Implementation of the plan by the Department and other agencies occurs within the guiding framework of policies, instructions, codes of practice and management guidelines. Action plans and operational prescriptions, developed by these bodies, make up the detailed works programs necessary to implement the strategies proposed in the plan, and meet the standard or outcome set. The Plan proposes a large number of actions aimed at improving practice and developing new information. This information needs to feed back into operational practice through review of existing guidelines and development of new guidelines. 33.2.4. Issues The key subsidiary management guideline documents to the Forest Management Plan are detailed in Appendix 1 of the plan. Guidance documents to be prepared / reviewed is primarily, but not exclusively drawn from this list. Other documents will also be prepared / reviewed and is included in measurement for the reporting of this KPI. 33.2.5. The entities to be measured for the KPI Entity Guidance documents Target All guidance documents referred to in the Actions proposed by the plan to be prepared / reviewed by mid-term.

33.2.6. Required data Required data Number of guidance documents prepared and reviewed annually. Collection & storage method All guidance documents prepared and reviewed to be recorded as and when completed by relevant custodians. Custodians Custodians according to the subject of the guidance documents may include Forest Policy and Practices Branch, Forest Management Branch, Fire Management Services Branch, Nature Conservation Division, Conservation Commission and Forest Products Commission.

33.2.7. Calculation method Entity to be measured Calculation method Number of guidance Guidance documents prepared or reviewed each year to be listed at documents prepared reporting date. and reviewed annually. Performance measure is assessed mid-term. Forest Policy and Practices Branch to provide a list of guidance documents specifically referred to in the actions of the Forest Management Plan that have been prepared / reviewed to assess performance target for KPI.

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33.2.8.

Measurement, calculation and reporting frequency Measurement frequency Annually Calculation frequency Annually, performance assessed at mid-term. measure

Required metric Number of guidance documents prepared and reviewed. 33.2.9. Data presentation Required metric Number of guidance documents prepared. Number of guidance documents reviewed.

Presentation Information is presented as a list with all documents progressed after each reporting period. Data will also be presented in tables (see table 1 and 2) to demonstrate progression towards mid-term performance target for the KPI. Table will include title of guidance document and the date prepared and reviewed. * The guidance documents included in the tables below have been taken from Appendix 1 of the Forest Management Plan.

Table 1:

Preparation and review of guidelines referred to in the actions proposed in the Plan.
Proposed guideline Date prepared Date reviewed

Guidelines for the Management of Informal Reserves Status: To be prepared by the Department in accordance with Action 3.1.2. Guidelines for Selection and Management of Fauna Habitat Zones Status: To be prepared by the Department in accordance with Action 7.2.2. Goals for Understorey Structural Diversity Status: To be prepared by the Department in accordance with Action 4.1. Fauna Distribution Information System Status: To be prepared by the Forest Products Commission in accordance with Action 8.4. Native Forest Timber Harvest Planning Guidelines Status: To be prepared by the Department by 31 December 2008 in accordance with Action 34.1.1 Soil and Water Conservation Guidelines Status: To be prepared by the Department in accordance with Action 20.1.2. Guidelines for the rehabilitation of plantation areas to be returned to native vegetation Status: To be prepared by the Department in accordance with Action 15.4.2. Forest Monitoring Guidelines Status: To be prepared by the Department by 31 December 2005 in accordance with Action 34.1.1. Key Performance Indicator Protocols Status: To be prepared by the Department in accordance with Action 32.6. Guidelines for the preparation of area management plans for conservation reserves Status: To be prepared by the Conservation Commission in accordance with Action 5.2. Indigenous Heritage Management Guidelines in accordance with action 25.2 Non-indigenous Heritage Management Guidelines in accordance with action 25.2 Existing guideline Phytophthora cinnamomi and Disease Caused by it Volume 1. Management Guidelines Status: To be reviewed by the Department in accordance with Action 18.2.1. Jarrah Silviculture Guidelines Karri Silviculture Guidelines Wandoo Silviculture Guidelines
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Table 2:

Other guidelines prepared or reviewed as is considered necessary by the Department.


Date prepared Date reviewed

Proposed documents:

Existing Documents:

33.2.10. Responsibility Custodians of key guidance documents are responsible for:


preparing and reviewing relevant guidelines according to the plans action statements; and providing Forest Policy and Practices Branch with details of the prepared / reviewed guideline prior to annual reporting.

Forest Policy and Practices Branch is responsible for:


data collation; data presentation and interpretation; and collation of information for this KPI together with other KPI into a report to the Conservation Commission.

The Conservation Commission is responsible for performance assessment and publication of its report.

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