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THE LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES


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TECHNIC AND ART OF SINGING

^ ^1 1

THE BEGINNING PART THROUGH THE KEYS PART PART III. PROGRESSIVE MUSICIANSHIP
=-

I.

II.

A Method of Private and Class

Instruction in the First

and

Fundamental Requirements of Music

INCLUDING

THE SCIENCE OF MUSIC READING


Arranged According to a Plan by which Pupils can Practice Correctly Alone; thus
Designed for Use
in

Connection with Instrumental

Work

as well as with

LESSONS IN VOCAL CULTURE


BY

FREDERIC W. ROOT
OPUS
21

"WS^
THEODORE PRESSER
1712 Chestnut Street
:

CO.

Philadelphia

PROPERTY OF SOUTHERN

TECHNIC AND ART OF SINGING

introduction
The beginnmg of sight singing is like the beginning of language reading; one firbt leams something of the language, then learns to read it; and one must become acquainted with musical phraseology in order to sing melodic passages from symbols.
In this regard music reading for singing differs essentially from the mentality involved ir
reading instrumental music.
;N
/

early

all

adults and the majority of children have an acquaintance with

common

melod.

forms before taking up the study of music reading. This acquaintance they have acquired a they have gained a knowledge of their language, through the sense of hearing unconsciously Church music or popular song in some of its phases are familiar experiences of every exerted.

day

life.

But

this

knowledge

is

at first exclusively associated with the sense of hearing.

When

the time comes to learn to read music, another sense must be trained to bring to the mind a Then it is found that the mind turns so persistently to the suggestions correct concept of music.

with concentration and and independently in music. At Reading music is last, however, one learns **to hear with the eye," and the goal is attained. no longer guess work, depending upon the ear, a precarious process giving occasion to the unconsciously humorous statement, some days I can read music quite well Still there is much training to be done to the ear which must be taught to classify and associate tones systematically. The sense of One must also learn to ''see with the ear." key note, tonality or key-relationship, and intervals, must be established through the hearing. Generally the beginner has a fair sense of rhythm at the outset; but unless this be specially cultivated it is sure to become obscured by being made secondary to other considerations. While intent upon thinking out pitch problems, for instance, the learner usually neglects rhythm
of the ear, its first
effort, is

and habitual dependence, that a long course

of study,

often required before the eye leads the thought securely

' *

'

altogether.

To meet
itemized thus
:

the requirements of pupils in the department of music reading the cx)urse

may

be

1. To lay a strong foundation of tonality elementary tone relationship through the tonic chord and the major scale. 2. To become acquainted with staff, notes, rests, etc. the symbols of music. 3. To associate pitches with their representation. To train the thought through the eye. 4. To inculcate an acute sense of rhythmic accent. 5. To become familiarly acquainted with scales, modes and intervals in wider relationship. 6. To become familiarly acquainted with all standard rhythmic forms and their repre-

sentation.

knowledge so as to include harmonies and modulation. memory, concentration, indeed all the general mental attri butes which other education aims at. It must be borne in mind how new and strange to a beginner are the symbols for notation and the musical concepts they stand for, ascending and descending pitch, longer and shorter sounds, accents, silences, etc., how confusing it is at first to carry in the unaccustomed mind simultaneous ideas of pitch, rhythm and performance. This work aims to present all these ideas in so simple a form that the learner may make the beginning with the least possible confusion of thought, and, before entering upon even the common complications of the science may become accustomed, under favorable conditions, to the association of ideas upon which successful music reading must depend. Consciously or unconsciously, every one who reads vocal music well forms certain habits and acquires mastery of certain things, items which are beguju upon in this work and will be fuUy defined and developed in the others of this series. These items may be grouped under seven headings
7.
8.

To broaden To sharpen

this

the faculties of

ji

_
Fannus
S.

Copyright 1931 by

Root

1.
2. 3.

The mental

A mastery of A familiarity with


Memory
of pitch

pictnre of key-representation position on the certain intervalsprincipally the step and half
^thc

iU
staff of key-note, etc.

-step.

melodic progression in scale and chord forms


positive part of

^the

relative part of

music reading.
4.

the

music reading.
of the alphabet for words.

5.
6.

7.

Thinking in musical phrase. Grouping tones as one groups the Rhythm and rhythmic forms.

letters

Methodical sight singing designs


While
this system
is

to take pupils

from the beginning through educational


equally available for private instruction.

grades to the accomplishment of the above habits and requirements.

intended for use in classes


it

it is

special feature of the system is that


little

with but

be correctly pursued by the thoughtful learner attention from the teacher; for this purpose an instrument is a necessity.

may

There are three departments in the study of singing which from the outset should receive and pupil these are 1. Music reading and musicianship. 2. Voice culture. 3. Execution and style. In some cases department three, will for a time receive attention in only the most rudimentary aspects, (breathing at right places, taking a tone without sliding to it, etc. ); but the plan proposed in " Technic and Art of Singing," is to start adult pupils at once with text books in two departments, music reading, (Methodical Sight Singing), and voice culture and the principles of execution ( Introductory Lessons), and as soon ap practicable thereafter to introduce additional studies in the third department (Twenty-Four Elementary Song Studies). Good singing is the co-operation of many habits in these three departments, the whole being touched with the glow of imagination and sentiment. The best educational work in the field of singing will see that the required habits of mind and body are started as early as practicable and are patiently supervised until established.
attention from teacher
;

Requirementsu
In order to use
1.

this

work the pupil must

learn

The

staff

with the

clef

upon

it;

also the letter

names

of the lines

and spaces:

I
2.

Quarter, half and dotted half notes with their relative lengths:

8.

Quarter, half and measure rests:

^*

-_=^=:

I
is

<g

^
i
C

4.

Bars, double bars, repeat marks; also the light double bar that

used to define a section

of a piece

and may come

in the middle of a measure:

6. The definition of two-part and three-part measure, and the motions of the hand for beating double and triple rhythms (down-up, downa up, etc.; down-left-up, down-left-up, etc,)

aitK)

the definition of " time-signature," with the meaning of each figure of the time signature,
ft.

The sharp

(J|)

and

flat (fe)

used to designate certain tones of the scale in keys other than

T7
/?\
7.

The

tie:

(^

'^^^^^
r

frj^Y"!"^^
la

^
la

The pause:

la

8.

Da Capo

(D. C.) Dal Segno (D.

S.

or dal

^)
'

and Fine:

wmm$
Fine.

D. C.

D.

Rovdaiy^

9.

For individual

practice,

one should also leam to play upon an instrument the


is

scales,

one

octave, of

C G B b F and D
required.

(For a time, only the scale of C


10.

Finally, to

name

signatures, letter names, relative


:

names (numbers),

i^Uables,

and

to

play upon the instrument each of the following

i
i

? c
1

1
D
2 ray
re

3
G
5

E
3

F
4 fah
/

A
6
lah
la

B
7
tee

C
8

doh
{do

mee
mi

soh
sol

doh
do)

I GA
1

fe^
3
4

GF)(E BCD51or87
6
fah
fa

9-

D
5 soh
sol

^^
C
4
fah
fa

B
3

doh
(do

ray
re

mee
mi

soh
sol

doh
do

tee
ti

lah
la

mee
mi

feEi
Bb

^f^^^3^

9^(^n%s^

Methodical Sight Singing.


Part
I.

Preparatory Practice of Rliythm.


Speak the following
lines slowly

5.

"

Deck the

the season to be jolly.

and
If

distinctly,

fore us.
6.

with boughs of holly, 'Tis See the blazing yule beStrike the harp and join the chorus."
hall

accenting the proper syllables, and clapping the

hands smartly at each accent.

the accent

"

How

dear to this heart are the scenes of

come

at every other syllable, repeat the lines,


If

my
7.

childhood,
to view."

When

fond recollection presents

beating down-up, down-up.


up.
1.

the accent

come

them

at every third syllable, repeat, beating down-left-

"

Mine

eyes have seen the glory of the com-

Always beat down on the accent.


"Softly
fall

ing of the Lord."


8.

the shades of evening, O'er the


still."

"

say, can

you

see,

by the dawn's

early

valley hushed and


2.

so proudly last gleaming ?"


light,

What

we

hailed at the twilight's

" Joys that we've tasted

may sometimes
I

re9.

turn,

But the torch when once wasted, ah

how

"Hark!
"

the vesper

hymn

is

stealing O'er

can
3.

it

bum ?"
me
not
in

the waters soft and clear."

" Tell

mournful numbers, Life

is

but an empty dream."


4.

of them,

"Bird

of the

wilderness,

blithesome and

Cannon to right of them. Cannon to left Cannon in front of them Volleyed and thundered When can their glory fade ? Honor the charge they made, Honor the Light Brigade,
10.
;

cumberless, 0, to abide in the desert with thee."

Noble

six

hundred."

-D-

-B-

When

the pupil
it

is

directed to point notes

upon

the fingers,

done by holding the left hand, thumb uppermost, the fingers horizontal, and pointing with the right hand at the fingers and the spaces between them as at the lines and
is

are not to be one has been correctly sung in all the ways prescribed, it need not be repeated. The next should be taken at once and Later a review may so on as rapidly as may be.

The "phrases" and "lessons"

dwelt upon.

When

spaces of a

staff,

the
it

little finger

representing E,

be in order.

the space below

an added

line

D, and, slightly lower (where would be), middle C.

1428399

Phrases

for Practice?

Key of C.

These sections have no connection with each other, and are to be learned separately. them all so as to be able, upon hearing It is expected that the pupil shall finally master
any one of them played or sung, to name the notes with absolute names (letters), relative names,(numbers), to apply the syllables (dob, ray etc.) correctly, and to write the "notes upon a staff, or point the notes on the hand (the fingers being held so as to represent the five Unes

and

their spaces).

tbis, many months of daily practice may be required. During the practice of these phrases the Lessons in the same key may be begun upon. Directions:- In individual practice, each phrase may be studied according to the following suggestions. Repeat as much as may be necessary. 1. Play it upon the instrument. 2. Sing it with syllables (dob ray etc.) playing loudly at the same time and listening care fully to see that each tone is correct in pitch. 3. Sing it with syllables, without the instrument. 4. Sing it without the instrument,usinglahlah lah(orloo loo loo) instead of dob, ray etc. 5. Sing it from memory, pointing on the fingers the position of the notes on the staft*. Further practice may be had to advantage by singing the phrase with accent upon the second note instead of upon the first.

To accomplish

Also, by singing several phrases in succession without the instrument.

Sing

softly

and avoid forcing the vocal register

at

about

(Introductory Lessons,N9. 15).

The

syllable loo is valuable in this connection.

The principal thin^


1.

is

to

practice a g7'eat deal.


6.
l

4.

7.

8.

xjJ IJji jjj h^jlljjjJJI Jjjjjll;jJjjijjJjj


I

ll

d
9.

m
10.

ff

cl

s^

d
12.

mf

fm

dm
16.

m d

11.

13.

14.

15.
i

i JiJj ;J^Jj IjjJ^ii jJji^ i^JJil jJJJj


ll

"

d
17.

rd rm

dms fm d rms d
18.
19.

dm r d s
20.
ll

d s ni r d
21.

dm r

jiJ^J^ ljJJJi d d d r r m dm rm d
l

22.

23.

^JJ^ Ii^JJjrjJ'^
I

fm

mm s

i.'iJ Jl ; .IJ d s d r m d mm
I

Ji^^
r

J.

# *

^
s

mm

r s

m mf

24.

25.

26.

27.

28.

29.

30.

$
d
31.
s

d
32.
i

m fad

mf m

d
34.

d
36.

fm

r s

fm

33.

35.
J.i
i
i

37
i

jJ.ijjiij. jj J ij. ijj jJihj jj d f r md d r m f a d r nif s I d r m f a

r'iJJir^JJji
d
f

rJiJi^
d
t I s

I s

I s

fm

38.

39.

i
d
f
1

P^
s

40.

41.

42.
i

43.

44.

Jinjjrir-'Ji
s

irr

iiiijjiihjij

fm

t I

fm

Reading Lessons, Key of C.


Each time before sinking
Take especial care
to

a lesson play these passages:

:Mi

^^^ ^^

ing

may

at first occur,

remember the pitch of the key- note; and whatever mistakes in singmake none upon the key- note. To remind the learner of this point,

printed by itself before each ksson. Practice each lesson in ten* different ways, as follows: l.Sing it with doh,ray,etc. playing the notes at the same time. Repeat as often as may be necessary. 2. Sing it with the syllables (doh, ray,) without the instrument. 3. Sing it with lah, lah, lah (or. loo) without the instrument. 4. Sing it with either doh, ray, or lah, lah, clapping the hands or otherwise strongly markthe key -note
is at first

ing the first note of each measure. 5. Go through the lesson in correct rhythm, singing the key-note each time it appears and playing the other notes. (Do not both play and sing a note. See that instrument and voice are not for an instant sounding together.) 6. Repeat the lesson, playing the first measure and singing the second; - and so on in alternation.
7.

8.

Repeat, singing the first measure and playing the second. Alternate throughout. Sing it, beating time \sith the hand. Make the note at each down beat louder than the

others.

Sing one measure and be silent in the next;- and so on in alternation. Think the tones measures and give them exact time. The instrument is not to be used. 10. Point the lesson upon the fingers, (or write it upon a staff,) while singing it from memory or hearing it played or sung
9.

of the silent

1.

Remember

tlie

relative length of a half

and

a quarter note.

^
2.

-0-

i
in

Always keep the key-note

mind.

?^
3.

P
in

Are you keeping

^
J
I

good tune?

W^

5
the voice sound soft and musical.
4t

^m
0-

^^
5.

4.

Make

^i=^

-$r

The small note

at the

beginning

is

not included in the rhythm.

W^^
6.

J
like the

Rhythm must be steady


"

marching

of soldi ers.

i i

7.

How many

5
8.

What kind

^
in

9
know thoroughly?

of the 50 phrases do you

of notes are these?

^
9.

w
it

^
10.

^
Keep

mind the key-note, C- where

is

^
i

placed and

how

it

sounds.

0-

0-

^
I

What

is

the time-signature of this lesson?

W
11.

id

What does

the 2 at the beginning of this lesson stand for?

What

the 4?

4 -t-^^^^
12.

-<9

m
W

On which beat

is

the tone louder and on which softer?

^
i
13.

J
lesson?

Ij

In

what key

is this

i
14.
:2z

N
i

1^
in

^
i
to another.
zz:

m
?
^
I

Go over each lesson


Dont slur

each of the ten ways prescribed.

4
15.

1^

or slide

from one note

^
16.

^
=f

^
to sing.

Take a good breath before beginning

^
?
^

^
^

17.

Never forget the key-note while singing.

^^
J

"17

18.

You may sometimes practice these, \diistling instead of singing.

IJ

i
"clef.'

&

19.

Point at the character called a

3. Lah,lah.4.Claphands. 5. Sing key-note, Beat. 9. Silent measure, 10. Point. 8. Sing,play. 7. second. play others. 6. Play first, sing great deal of practice. but a theory little very needs learner 20. The

10 1 Doh ray and instrument. a.Without instrument.

S
21.

w
Save the voice but don't spare the mind.
J

w^
I

^m

^Ij^lj^lj
is

jg^

^^

Jjl^
?
W
5=

^2. What

the letter

name

of the

second line of the staff?

I m
23.

S
i
/

Learning

to sing is

mental training

like

any other study.

i r^
^
24.

-0-

i -^
I

What

are the seven different characters used here?

^
S
^
27.

t
is

i
the time-signature of this lesson?

=f
How many

25. WTiat

beats are there in a measure?

w
let

-t-^

'

^ J. *

26. Accent the down beat and

the other two be lighter.

iJi
Remember

-^j,-

J-

_^
I

^-^ J^^

-^^ c

^=g
I

* m

^
I

p^
,28.

the place on the staff

and the sound

of the key-note, C.

Jj

'-U
What

i^
the last one?

What kind

of a note is the first one in this lesson?

3E

^
How many
^ J ^
Never
let

-tSl^

* J. d
and
don't shirk.

^^
J
it?

29.

Don't skip anything

3E

i^
30.

=^^^
of the

i
J

-^9-^

i
j

i.

50 phrases can you write or point upon hearing

4
31.

J^rnt

IJ

jl

^.

the voice slip or slide to or from a note. (Introductory Lessons,

N9 11.)

i 32.

h.h^

^p
^

a
33. The quarter
rest.

i i^
3E

^^T~^=J
"
.
(

M
full

M^ m
I

34. Half and quarter rests.

iiJ N
i i
I

-'

^
*

F=^
*

^^ i M ^
3

OK rni JO. The measure

rest,

The whole rest is used to indicate a what the time signature may be.)

measure of restno matter

"

-^

^ m
i

36.

^m i
37.

1
38.
NQ.*

37 and 38 may be sung together.

^ i r^^
39.

N9 39 may be sung together with N9

^
/y^^
\

8.

i
Kn
i
rr-.

^
p

40. N? 40 may be sung together with N9 39.


-ai'^-?l

m^

rr.

12

Readinff Lessons from Popular Melodies.


1.

S
2.

^
*

Repeat and

T)a

Capo.
I

Fine.

D.C.

N^ N

JJ
tie.

JJ IJJ

j I
J

~a

Begin with the up beat. The

1
pirH'nTi TTTT jjij
j
i i

^^x^i
^J
i

wxnxn^j\

^
lil^fl^lJf

3.

Do you know what these melodies

are?

^^
s
i i

S A

^^J
J J
I

lij

^^
^n^
^^
i i
:

4. This one should go pretty fast.

i iJ^ JJiijjUjiiJ^iJjiijjijjiiJ^t^jJif-rirrrNr^iJ
"iJJlJjJIrrlrrn^^^l^J^IJj^^lJjJl r

i
^.Slow.

Q.Modei'ate.

^M
i

iUiirr

^^
i

^JiJiijUjiiiirri^-'
pcp:

-iJiJiU
iii

m=m: -^^~f-

aurrirJi^rNji^jUrUj
s
^5*-^

<<<

'^^

i
77

jlJJ J^ '^^NjS
l I

^^^ mP^i
l.Slow.
-*

gi

I3g

Ji^^i-^JU-U

jiNijjiri^j
rp

jj

#4^:j4^
i

s
m m

hJmp

If |JJ

JJu i '^'^JU U

^k

^.Faat. Observe the repeat.

^^^

:zizz

JnTTTTij:

13

9. fast.
I

''Jri^Jj.uJJ Ijjj ij.l^^


(

\O.Fast. The sign.

6'^^// o.

'i^^uu^
Fi/ie

W.Fast.

ifi'JiJiLjUMiii^^
i rr^ i^r
J

*^*
n:

ijijiiji

\2.Slow. The pause.

?
^
13. Fast.

^
Fine.

iJiUj^

iJ^ri

F-^iJjijjijrnTrrirr

rrHJMJl g

-i

*jirrirrirri^JFjijji^^r^^^
i^

f^^r ?^i^JijJi^p
i

^?

^-#-

"S7

^
rij^ijJi^ X^.Moderate.

#--=rj

^
n

'

^J

# Ji^JUU

^
i

f'irHr^-ir ij;ijJiJJi-i|fr
S^
^
\

y ^H^i

F-d

-^-^

-ih-+-

14

Theme with Varied Accompaniment.


Sing
at first

with doh, ray,

mee

&c., but,

when

learned, use the other syllables. Beattime.

Slow.
22:

t ^ may
dah

nee
s

po
///

too
s

lah

bay dah
t t

may nee s d

po too
tn

^^
r

lah

P J^
P
i:^

^ ^^^ ^
-^

^W m
i^=t -g~r^

i^

t,

iz:

^
3:

f V
;

^s r^ fe i f^r

jJT^
*

rJ;^ 5&

gp^

?
i

>):

JJT3

m m m ^^E3* sm ^: eS ^ p SS ^
I
w
m m m

fff 4=4

W F=r
i=a

^ ^ ^^ ^
^<^

trt-i

15

Vocal Accompaniment to a Familiar Melody.


The Suanee River.
Sing with syllables
first,

Foster.

and, when learned, with the words. Beat time.

Slow.

S 4-^
s s

/
f:

m
roam,

si
ev
er

^m
^

Far

way

Thinking

of

my

^ 3: ^fc#

M-

Itab

PW

m m ^^
s

P
cLl^ cLir
i i

^
Omit

:y_-i:

tJiese notes)

the first time

m
low
:
zm-.

w dm
*

home.

Best

loved

home,The home whose

it
sfe

^m ^ ^

ma
r

tP^ XX^

^P

^
left,

^
heart
sore

?
>
jj-

L^^

^^

J * *

^
Long

go-

3:

^^
g

Tocal Accompaniment to a Familiar Melody.


The Last Hope.
Slow. Always beat time.

i^^^^
d The

^^
m
s s
fall

Gottschalk.

d
shades

d
of

f
a
-

d
I

d
gaze

evening now

round me,

^
d
drea
-

W 4=

^
P=fP

ZS^

P
i

i
i

m
mi
ly

on

the

night

And
i^t

muse

there

^
W--f

^T/^ F f
I
^

I
:2z

^
in
light.

the

^ ^
i
s
-

a
1
in

^^
d
t
-

=^
s

ltd
mem-o
ry's

dark

ness

With

scenes

bathed

Ie^^

xna

P
^^

^
p

m
E

-#

As in the study of a foreign language it is well to learn phrases, stories and dialogues by ear before their construction and grammar are fully mastered, so in music-reading, progress is made by singing songs even if they must be learned by rote. Melodic phraseology must be made very familiar- this familiarity is acquired by both ex ercises and songs in the
sation or recitation from

same way as

in

language study in which bothgrammer andconver

memory

are used.

Let the pupil in music-reading sing much, sometimes giving principal thought to key. scale, beat etc., and sometimes to melody, tone, and taste-

same manner as

For the latter purpose songs are necessary. The songs given in this work may be read in the the lessons; but when learned they should be sung with the thought of musical effect uppermost,- exact rhythm, clear enunciation, free, unforced tone, with breath at proper places, &c. (See Introductory Lessons, Op. 22.)

17

Loving- Voices.
Slow.

CW Glover, (adapted.)
voic
-

1. Lov- ing 2.Wlien the

es
is

^^
In gay Lov - ing

heart

fond ly sad and

ming'-le

Like the
Soft
-

mur-mur
as
the

of

pray'r,

heav-y

ly

childhood's voic - es

^
3
-

summer

rain.

n:

fair

fan-cies,

^m ^W
In youth's Tell

low and

ten - der,

up

vis -ions, rich on the spir -

and
it's

rare,

pain.

^
i
There are
O'er
life's

zc

^
/Cs

N
mel

i li j
o
-

j
na ga
-

;
ture
ther,

iiij
Ris But
22
-

J
-

"
land and ev - er

i
sea.
flee.

dies of path -way clouds may

ing the

ver

shadows

i
-d/ti

2Z
v:^

i
But like
Fbr
like

^
mu
-

i
in in

sic

sun -light

our our

dwelling dwelling

Lov - ing Lov- ing


rj

voic

es

voic-es

are are

to

to

W
Fast.

HI

^
me.

le.

The Lark.

from a part-song by
Mendelssohn.

^td
l.Wliat
3.

^
rael

m
'Tis

o
ly

dy,

hark
lay,

f=^^
thou

i
lark.

S
car
-

f
ols

mer-ry

Thy
\Mien

so

How

love

thy

Sweet

min

strel of

day

up

S
joy
earth
-

!^P^
ous out thou art

iU^i w
ing;
ing;
I

pour spring

list
-

to

thy

lay

while
I

^
up
too

from the

In

spired

i
a
-

s
off

i
in in

=0
skies

and

way

I'kr

the

soar from earth

And

join

the

car

thou art ol thouVt

^^
soar
sing-

by thy

mirth

?H
ing.

ing.

18
Felicia

The Landing* of the Pilgrims.


Hemans
Moderate

Browne.

The

m
waves dashed storm they
high sang,

i
stern and rock-bound stars heard, and the

breaking midst the

On And

a the

coast,

sea

p
And And
the

F^
F

:
-

^
branches
of

(
tossed
free

the

woods a - gainst the storm -y sky Their sound-ing aisles of the dim wood rang To the
-^^L
I

gi

ant

an-them

the

W^
i
And
the

^
I

The

hea - vy night ea - gle o - cean

J hung

i
dark soared

J
hills

J
'

The FVom

his

ters nest by the white wave's


-

and

^ wa

o'er

foam.

mm
When a band of And the rocking

i=f

i *

^
3:

^m
P P
I

f=r
pines of the

m
Adapted.

ex-iles moord their bark On the wild New England for- est roared, This was their welcome

shore.

m
J

P
I

^
i
lived

home.

^PS
in

Peter Parley.
Fast.

The Hermit.

$ =t i
1.

A
The

her

mit
to

there

was
hap
do
-

a.

way
be
:

be

^^
way
as
to

3.'Tis

ing

and

and py they ing and

he

say

hav
3Z

you ing

a have
that

grot;

The

got,

And
All

make

7
/

J.

^^
be would I pleasures and

^^-NH
hap
-

py
it

they

said

he
to

had

got.
grot,

IVe pains of which


learn

come

your mor- tals par

take:

To

to want - ed beg and en what God be


.1.

19

-J
learn

J
it,

J
so
if

i
went to his
cell,

jjJ i
l

J
as the

N Jj|
way
to

{j

And

Mviien I

was

there the old


is

treat you,

there's such

pleases,

to

do

a plan, lb a man's best, lb

write

it

me down just

her-mit said "Well," TVa cani TVa plain as you

have a good heart

be

blest. Tra

^
la

J
la

Jij
la la

^
Tra

^UiU
la
la

i
Tra
la

la

la

la

la

la la

^ ^
r
TH
SC
la

la la

la

m
}

-G-^

-^

-&-^

^B
i
gilds the

la.

Music on the Waves.


C.W.
Slow.
Glover, (adapted.)

S fcf=t=f=f=f
1.

^j
sigh in

j
their

N
mys
si
-

n u^
ti -

Tlie

winds
this

soft

ly

cal

caves, Tlie

moon
re
-

2.

Can

be

the

song

of

the

rens that

keep Their
22

vels

be

1^
li
1
1 1 1

20

October's Parly.
Fast.

t
1.

^
pave a

Alex. Lee.

3.

Oc - to - ber The Chestnuts


in

par-ty,
yel hoi
-

came
rust
-

in

low,

The The
At

leaves

by
in

Oaks

hundreds crimson

came,

3. There

the

-low

hide and

dress, seek they played,

W
yf^
3

^;
i

^
w=^ ^

i
Ash-es
love - ly

The The
Tl\e

Oaks and Miss - es


closed at

Ma-ples,

And
Were
But

trees of

Ma - pie
sundown.

par-ty

ra-diant eve - ry -

like

the

bod-y

^^

t
=3

^;
i

^
rest;

ry

name;

stayed;

^
The
All

^
-

Pro

sunshine spread a car- pet balanced to their partners fes-sor Wind played lou-der,

And And
"Diey

eve

ry
ly

thing

was

grand
by;

gai

fluttered
-

flew a

long the

ground,-

i
i
^
led the
like

^ ^
s
-JO.

^ ^ ^ W^
And when
Words used
bi/

^ii^^^
danc
rain
-

u u
band,
skj-.

Miss Weather The sight was


the

par- ty

end

ing Pro - fes-sor Wmd the bow, New fall -en from the ed,'Twas jol - ly 'hands all

round."

f
^

i
3

f
3

PI
^

PermtssinN of American Booh Co.

21

The Lover and the Bird.


J
Moderate.

Guglielmo.

s
1.

i
sing, sing,

m
sweet -ly
e'en

i
to

^
cheer
-

(adapted.)

2.

sing on sing on

to

de

ceive

wwm
3:

^3 I
3Z

^T^

me. Bird, me, Bird,

thy

mu
vis

sic

with

ions

^NS

1^

^'

i
bringvain;

sol- ace

glitt'ring but

m
i
Sing Sing

^m ^ m
wiE

^
WTiy should'st thou fear do not leave 0,

Thou

wilt

not

leave

me,

me?
me,

Flat -tVing but

vain hopes,

wm
-G-^

t*

=^

-6-

m
i>

3
i

^
P

m
-G

of of

love, love,

of of

on love on
love

ly
ly

sing sing

Sing, Sing,

^*-^

np
sing to sing to

f=^

3^ t p

cresc.

^^. i
ah!

sing, sing.

ahl

W
Slow.

I*-

S
3:
-^i-^

^m
Ahl.-o^ "

song,-^ ster^_^ o S

pit

my

can

i i i i i i=?=

22

^
m

Jr^^-

^
song
of

T2:

nev

er

sing

rap

ture

like

thee?

-9

WW w

mgg

f
-6

if

2:

The Strawberry
/>?/.

Girl.
adapted from M. D. Sullivan.

3E

^4^lji^ iili 3U
l

l.Th
2.

wealth can

sun was clear on the ne-ver such

light

pen im -

lea,

The

summer
sparkles

breeze had ceased to


in

^
'

part,

As

that

beam-ing

*):i>

J
I

plav;

eye^

The strawber- ry tree To girl came near the The throb of that glad, young hope -ful heart, As

^
I

J
i

^
'

i5*-

#-

iS*-

i
rest her
thro' the

4/
6f>

i ^

on her lone-ly town is heard her

Wr
way.

hi

^p
ber-ries,
1*
a:

'2

M
to
-

^^^^^^
The
gip
-

i
shadows

*=*
flung O'er eyes that glistened with

sy

hat

its

hope s glad
fresh

cry

"0

buy
1*-

my
#

ber-ries, buy

my

Buy my strawber - ries


#

^m
i

U
ray,
day,-

^+FiiJ
sim-ple
ber-ries,

;J

^^-U^-lU^-^i^
home and kindred now far aBuy mv strawberries fresh to -^
zrsi

The while a buy my

lay she

sung Of
ber-ries,

way.
day."

buy

my

*^'

-0-

0-

[^

:q=b:

:n:

is:

a3

Phrases for Practice,


Read the comments given withthe Phrases
for Practice,

Key of G.
of C;

Key

and follow the same di

rections here. The phrases must be learned. 1. Play the phrase upon the instrument. 2. Sing it with doh, ray, etc., playing loudly at the same time.
4.

without the instrument. without the instrument. it from memory, pointing on the fingers the position of the notes on the staff. Do not force the voice. Very soft tones will answer for this practice.
3.

Sing Sing 5. Sing

it it

with doh, ray, with lah.lah,

etc.,

(or loo)

1.

5.

6.
I

t
m

<*

-#

Jl
j

JJjjJ
d
t I

lJJ JJ
d
r ni r

IJ

i
t

d
8.

d
10.

tn

tn

9.

fe^
d
tn

11.

12.

13.

^
d
s

^
d d
s

=M.

tn

tn r

d
17.

tn

d
19.

14.

15.

16.

18.

i
d
t

d
tn s

ii
d
25.

s=*

d r

d r d
21.

ni

tn

dtrdtndtltd
^
s

20.

^
s I
s^

22.
-*-"

23.
<*

24.

4^-9-

JJ ^-^ IIIJJ^J
t

# #

^m
26.

d d
31.

tn

s s tn

t^

27.

^
28.
t

29.

30.

32.

33.

JJllJ
I t

.r.
tn s tn

^
d
d
s tn s

r s

/
34.

tn t

s s tn

m
t

35.

36.

37

38.

39.

40.

msf

s tn

r d

s tn

fd

#
s

in

? -#
f
s

d r

d df

tn I

Supplementary Passages for Practice or Dictation.


41.

42.

V-*
46.

^
fc
47.

43.

m "m
48.

^m
*-#
52.

44.

45.

9^2^
49.

^
^

*=*

t=m

-#^
51.

50.
^^-*-#

^m ^
53.

^
:ii^

1^

4 ^ d

=ii *-^-*

=*

24

Eeading Lessons, Key of G.

Each time before singing a lesson play these passages.

^^m

Remember
lessons.)

the pitch and the representation of the key-note (printed by itself before the first

Practice each lesson as specified for the key of C. 1. Play and sing it using doh, ray, mee, etc. 2. Sing without the instrument, doh,ray, etc.

Sing without the instrument, lah,lah (or loo). Clap the hands at the first note of each measure. 5. Sing the key-noteeachtimeandplay the others. Do not play and sing together. Keep time. 6. Play the first measure, sing the second, alternate. 7. Sing the first and play the second; alternate. 8. Beat time. Accent the first note in each measure. 9.Singone measure and be silent in the next; alternate. 10. Point the lesson on the fingers, or write it upon a staff. Be sure you keep in tune.
3.

4.

1.

m
3.

On which line does

doh, the key note,


-9-

come

in this key?

^m
-G-

2.

What

is

the signature of the key of G?

i ztt
Give the half note

t?:

^^
17 time.

its full

fe
4.

-1

z=mz

1 5

Keep on with practice


0-

of the

40 "Phrases"

if

you cant sing these lessons.

i
is

i
it

5.

Dont forget where the key note

and how

sounds.

s
6.
In

how many ways is each lesson to be practiced?


*

i
7.

i
r
at the

->-

^
t

You must not use chest tones as high as Ff.

# a^

ir

r
is

i
a"memory
tone."

zo;

m
8.
9.

The small note

beginning

^m

Accent the first count.

is

25
hands. 5. Sing key-note and Doh, ray and instrument. 2. Without instrument. 3. Lah. 4. Clap 10. Point. measures. Silent 9. Beat. 8. playothers.6.Play-8ing. 7. Sing-play.
1.

10.

Do you know the


S d
let

letter

names

of the lines

and spaces?

* t

S:

i
some count while the others
sing.

^J
d

J
I

11.

In a class

^a

J :E=

^^
I

12.

Whether
*

the lessons be class or private

you must practice.

4 ^

i
loudly.

i
J
I

13.

You need not sing


J

* 1
14.

J
|

-I

Take a good breath and hold

-^-^
15,

^^
for nothing

it

an instant befor singing.


32
-f

Singing

is

good

if it is

out of tune-

^^
^
16,

What

is

the time-signature?

I
'

^m

^
g

73

17.

S
-*

^
-^

u
IS

18.

^-^

19.

Take the high notes


*

4 ^

^
F

softly, don't force the voice


22:

20.
=3=

Hf-^
21.

^
#

-d

26
8.
/

1.

With instrument.
9. Silent. 10.

3. Without. 3.

Lah. 4. Hands.

5.

Key-note.

6.

Play- sing.

7.

Beat.

Point.

22.

J?

h^A
4
23.

_-4 ^

f
What the 4?

^
^
^^ ^
=^=^

Sing- play

-^-

^F=B

What

does the 3 at the beginning stand for?

24. Beat time in exact rhythm.

S
25.

What kind of a
*

*5F
4 *
26.

^ ^
note
is

^-^

T^#-

the fourtli one of this lesson? 22

"^
27.

7
35. Forward and backward, singly and together as in No. 34.

<>'\rJ.

^ ^^
\

r-^

1
I

^.1* ^

>

^-

36. The quarter

rest.

37.

The half

rest.

#
38. The measure rest.

#g
39. The measure rest

^!

i^^

^
some
first.
-

^
^

-^5^

40. In place of each rest sing some note that will go well with the others.

I ^z* ^^Efe^^
*:

IJ

^^

41. Replace each quarter rest with

note.

CANONS. Two divisions


1.

of a class, two singers or voice

and instrument. The second voice

beg ins one measure later than the

fa ^ftr-^

:^=ae

d-f- r_ _ ^r

rrir^i^Jijjir

i^

irlJJ JJ
I

^Mrr r

l i

Jnmf rUrlrfUJI ^^'j^ rr


i
i

Mr

Jl

JH-

3.
t5^

j.

jJJ rr^ir

njjjirJr-4M

^*!i J

Jij Jir

Mf

Jij J

rii

^irr^'j. r^'ijJ-^-'-'- jJ
i i

^i'^ ^

2H

Reading Lessons from Popular Melodies.

' JJIJjIJJNJIJJ JjI


I

lJ

JJ JJIJJhMjJIJ
I

^^

2. Ve?\^

Slow The

Pause.

r\
J J Ir p |J ^^ J fHM^^irr
i

rs

^fr-
3.

-#
T*^

iJf
i

Moderate.
I

4 ^ ^ d ^
4,

^ z

iJ

^m

i^t::^

^^-*

^
d
'

Moderate.

^^1-^ W

^^
*
^-j?

^
t-f- ^^
J r
i

^
-9-

Nir
jr
i

rr

^TJTTjJ JJIJJ
l

-^h

-g-
^1^
,

^^
J
i

jj

0 w f

p ^

I-

D.iSfOW. S/ow 5.

^
J ^
i I

ij'tt
ft

'

^-^
i

ii

^ -/Oil ^=1=

=P
Fine.

-n

r^-=^=--;

^ ^J
, .

/>.

^.
1

29
9. Fast.

9'

3 ^
^=
4-

# 1

9=i=

^^ ^
10.

Slow

-#

"

If

^
ij
ej
i

r'r

11. /V?s^.

30

Theme with Varied Accompaniment,


^

Slow.

^
nee

i^ ^^
po
///

po

^
d

too

lah

bay dah
t

may nee

^ it
^

-1^

d
-*

It

J
is:

i=*h ^

f
^1

#-

:m=i

fe

^-^

*J

i]

S
f^
1

-#-*^

y ^

afc

rj^

m
:

^T II dJJ^d S'^'

^m

m fl
^
<*

fe

^ ^
fc^
f

^ ^ W^^
d W

itf

zm

tri

^
i
I

^ m

Ws

^^1^^^
i^

Vocal Accompaniments to Melodies.


Learn the lessons, then sing them always beating time.

31

"What Are

the
IJ

Wild Waves Saying?"


J
r

^,J
(is

tn-mn w
*
*
m
as

^ S m^ m" ^ m ^
Roll-ing

'Tis

'>^[_\^^

m ^^ m ^ ^ ^ m ^ ^ ^^
s

J-,^JJ (is d
-

^^
d
r
t

Glover

i
///

i
s
-

with un

ceas

ing mo-tion

To

t h^

shore come, waves of

cean

f=r

///

if

they were

bring

ing some

word
-^

#-

ij

m.
HI

///
,

<y

d
tic

//<

From the
J

mys
i

fn

d
heard.

't

-r^

fe
.

^ ^ ^ ^^^ ^^**^
r
The Last Idea of von Weber.''

^
]

deep
i

Wliere st range se-erets

J_Li.

tlieyhave

Slow.

:=t
d As
Tho'
r

la

/^

3
Moderate.

Music Everywhere.
Geo.
F.

Root

-9

Mu Mu

#
-

sic
sic

m
in

I
the the

wood
school

land,

Mu
Mu

^
-

s
7i

sic

in

the

rill;
all;

room,

sic

for

us

1^

p
Mu Mu
-

sic

on
in

the

moun
sor
-

tains,

sic

our

row,

Mu Mu

sic

^
SIC
sic

3
the
air,

in
in

sic

our

,^

^E^
I
-

^
where, where.

care.

%
m
in

^
]

Mu Mu

sic
isic

the

our

true glad
V

heart,
-

ness,

Mu Mu

ev ev

'ry

i
Co.

-6h

Used by permission of The John Church

Chas. Mackay.
Fast.

What

Love and Hate.


(Adapted.

f
1.

9-

t
son^ of

'^ ^ ^
birds

Vi *
^
e
-

it 'i

^ i
-

r^
words,
strong,
gate,

love the

And
That
If

the
a
I

child-rens ear-ly

2.

love

sim-ple

song
hate.

wakes
seek

mo

tion

3.

But

ev

er

when

mv

gar- den

^^
And And And
r
a

-6h

%
J
-

i
J
I

P^^
the

J
low

J
and
a

j
sweet,
faints,

11^
John John John
Brown, Brown; Brown;

lov

ing

sur

world of vey the


i

wo -man's hope that


world a

voice,

rais

es

him who
and

round

me

bove,
zzr

33

Moderate.

9
There's

^r-

mu-sic

^
r

Music

ill

the Air.

in the
in the
in the

air
air
air

There's mu-sic There's mu-sic

(When (When (When


I

When

the m.orn is the infant morn is the noon-tide's| the noontide's sul - try-

^^
gen

Geo.

F.

Root.

t 9
nigh

And
Re
-

beam

!wi!'".v, V.' When the l^%twilights


I

^^i'V,^^^ sigh - tie


f

^>'*if

ir

w \n
-
-77-

^
s
(
\ /

^
Is
9-

i g^=^
faint
fleets
lost
its

^
blush
gold on
ev
-

is

seen
light

t On
On On On
As As

en

the laugh -ing sky. the bright andi the moun-tain stream,the dis - tant j
its its

'ning's

breast.
221

V' r

Many

When
Then,

be
0,

harps ec - sta - tic neath some grate-ful


then the
lov'd

^^
list

^m
J

pen

sive(

beau

ties

die.

-*

II
-

ij
joy

ones

thrill of sound, With its ing shade Sor - row's ach pure ce gone Wake the

pro
is
-

found,
laid,

head
les

tial

song,

While we
Swift
-

en
-

cliant-ed

ly

to

An
Faed

gel

voi

the ces

spir - it greet us

the mu-sic there To there Comesthe mu-sic the mu-sic therein

in In of

the

air.

the the

air.
air.

hi/

pernii anion of The

John Church Co

34

Dream
Fast.

Faces.
arr. fr.

W. M. Hutchinson.

W==^
l.Deep

-(5^
shad-ows
lie
-

a
es,

^
*

^^
-.9-^

2.

Sweet

dream-landfac

y pass
31^3

cross the dim - ing to

5^ % ^rs^
zn

^
of

old room,

and

fro,

mm
^

i
^
*==^
in -to
-#

s -mm
Fond

While Bring

fire

light
to

glows

v'
-

and
'ry

fades

back

mem

fes=

^
^
>^
-

days

long
3E

the gloom, a - go,

i
'

m m
i
^

I unf

ff

g
f

g'

mem
-

'ry

sails

to

child-hood's dis
thro'

tant shore,
of

Mur

mur

ing gent

ly

mist

pain,

^
-

-^^
that are
shall

m^
f
--

Freight

ed
on,

"Hope

with dreams v^of one, dear lov'd

days

no
a
-

more.
gain.'

^ we

meet

fei

35

A
fast.

Daisy Song.
arr. fni.

A.b.Gatty,

t:

i
1.

Pet- als pluck'd and thrown a


it

way,
preach,

2. Will

be

man

to

On the breeze are E - ven - song and

float

inp,;

mat

in?

i
*^*^

^
Wlio

J
is
lie

^
on

^^
^^

^ ^^ n ^ ^
Where
teach -es

Dai-sy, pray, her for -tune say, Or p;oes she to school a - gain,

her

dot

ing?
in?

Lut

^ ^
her, Or
-

^ ^^
will a

i
be be
a
in

S
sol-dier
cot
-

Will he Will it

ton,

silk,

f=

^ ^m m a ^^
f
i

smart,

Who

by

Or

rags, that

storm will she'll be

take

mar

ried?Well,

#=s

sail- or

break her heart, His


first,

fig- ure

come

the worst, she'll take the

And none

shall

head to say she

make
tar
-

her?
ried.

'

W^^

H6

The Heart That Knows No Sorrow.


Fast.

3^

l.The heart that knows no sor 2. The heart that trusts me on

P^ ^ *T m
i^^
-^^
I

from J.Gungl,
^5^
i>

rl J
1

J.
'

9That But

row,That
ly

is

ev

er light and

A\'hennodouht of

me

auizz?:

^f
--^

mm
?

is

gay, heard,

9^^^?^

i
-

-^

P
L^
-

1
V That

r
leaves

u
*

cares not for

the mor-row,

^^ ^
If there's

hap

pi

ness

to

day

me, sad

and lone-ly,
izia

At
a

sus

pi -cion's light

est

word
~6^

Whose

M
!g''

9J

f^
-^^

m
Jl

*i

1
nn
J

15^

^^ ^

U
*

J
Yet

^
That That

throbs not with e - mo-tion, love is not sin-cer-est


^ ^-^

When

can bound with child-like glee, oth - ers from me flee. all

^
'

;i |' ij

m
is
is

^
-61-*-

t
swells not with

de-vo-tion.
the near-est

^^
That
,

^^
not
the heart for for

^
m
m

draws not

then

^m

^^
That

me,

not

the heart

me

az~it

37

One Morning.
Jean Ingelow.
Slow.
J
1.

irr. fr.

A.S.Gatty.

l|
I

II

One morning,

so

ear-Iy,

my

2.

Fair is A-pril, fair the morn-ing,

^^ f ^ * P^ ^^

^^
V

my

be be

i#

5W

^
lov
-

lov-ed,
ed,

my be-lov-ed, All the my be lev -ed, Now for


-

* J.J ^i

i^*^

^
^ r^ As
if
-

^
J
I

J Let

J
the

birds were sing-ing blrthe-ly,

nev
on

er

they would
year's
in

us doth Springs bright morning Wait up

the

P
P

iw

-r-r

^
-

cease. 'Twas
crease.

my

1
J J J J

thrush sang in the voice be heard that

^^

^^
sto
-

^
hear the
not
for

w
the

gar- den,"Hear the

ry,

ask-eth,"Not

for

fame and

sto glo

ry','

And

ry,

Give for

lark
all

sang"Give us
our
life's

glo

- ry','

And

the

dear sto- ry.

Give us

dove sang'Give us give us love and

^
peace
'-

PI

peace."!

38

Old
Moderate,

Dog Tray.
Stephen C.Foster. ^adapted)
J
J
|

^
1

J
life
-

II =^
me
cast,

J
|

^
brings

IJ
me
that

J
a

The morn of

is

past,

And

ev'ning comes at last;

It I

2. WTien thoughts re

call

the past,

His eyes are on

know

he

* SE

*
-i

^^
*:

^^
of

i=F^ ^^^ * I i i i i 3 ^ ^ f f
tw
day.

i
J

dream
feels

once

hap-py

^
*
*

m^
j
i

what

my

sad heart would say;

Of mer-ry forms I've seen Although he can-not speak,

Up
I'll

on the

^:

mmm

vain-ly,

^
r

^
J
i

i?r
A

ru -^
i

^^^
Tray,
Tray.

iJJ

m ^
f

vil-lage green, vain-ly seek

Sporting with my old bet-ter friend tlian old

ItI $
i
a=x

S i
ful.

^ P
J

^
dog dog
;

Old

dog Tray's ev-er

i ^ 1^ ^f f W ^

-6^

JlQJj

faith

Grief can-not drive him a -way

^i
He's gen-tle,he
is

kind,

'

i l' i l'J I

i
f
^
i
i

i:

I I ?=3*:
rc

i^ i

I *^

^
^a

t
:?'i-'
^
i

%
j

f
iii A bet-ter
1

--

ji'

"cnzg
1

ni nev-er, nev-er find

friend than old

dog Tray.

Phrases for Practice,


1.

Key of B

Flat.

Be thorough with this part of the work practicing as before directed. Playthephrase. 3. Singandplay; doh,ray,etc. 3. Sing without playing; doh,ray, etc. 4. Sing with lah(orloo). 5. Sing from memory, indicating the position of the notes by pointpoii
iiig

or writing.
lightly.

Think intently; sing

d
.
.

IN

d
11.

d m
13.

d
15.

slid
16.

10.

12.

14.
l

1^'

JJjJjjlljJjJJ
d
17
l

'll'l

ji|||M|M|| j^jJ|J
mf
s
f

JjJ | JjJj
d
i

rn

mf

d d
19.

dlstddmfaddlstns
f

18.
"

20.
- ^ * ^J J jj s m d I s f /n

21.
" i

22.
'-

23.

JJJl *^ zt UiJlJllJ -* =^
d
t

mI

^JJJ I^
J-^
s

r-* :d
I

w =d
d
29.
i

s t

mf

^
d

24.

2q.

26.

27.

28.
l

: ^-^
t
I

jjj'^JJiJJ^JjjJ
s

i'jjj^lI^JiiJ ^jj Jt^j Hi


d
a

ni

mf

!^

d d d

m d

d^s

jj
r

30.

31.

32.
ii

33.
i

34.

35.

36.

i
d

jjJ'irrrJj rjJrn rrJjjMrrrrJiirrrjJiirrrJ


d d
37.
fn s

nt

s ni

ni

md

md
-

md

r tn

f/^

ni

^
r d a
I

38.

39.

^-y ^-md
I

^ES^
r

d
r //i^

in

d
44.

m d w

ltd
46.

tn

42.

43.

45.

f mf

fn

50.

51.

52.

f m

!^

mf m

40

Reading Lessons, Key of


Get the key well in mind before practicing a lesson.

Flat.
ll

j^"^

^ ^ f 1

jJ'JJ*

Think the key note clearly and practice as before.


l.Play and sing, doh,ray,etc. 2. Doh,ray,etc voice alone. 3. Lah; voice alone. 4. Clap the hands for accent. 5. Sing the B-flat eachtirae and play all the other notes. 6. Play the first measure, sinj; the second; alternate. 7. Sing the first and play the second. 8. Beattime. Accent. 9.Sing and be silent, alternate measures. 10- Point or write the lesson.
;

Keep

in
1.

tune; do not accustom the ear to false intonation.

t
r
II

^^=^
r r
2.

^
V-^
I

How many

beats are there in a measure?

^
3.

How many times

m
4.
5,

^
^
at

does the key note appear here?

Which beat

is

accetited?

e^
Which

U
^

j
r.

IJ
"flat"?

notes in this lesson are

named with the word


[

^m

7.

atzzzn

#-

6, Practice slowly

and keep the rhythm steady.

^^
J *

^ ?

^^
The small note
a
I

-6i

*
tone."

'

the beginning

is

m^
8.
.

m.

^ ^
a"memory

9.
55

What

is

the time signature here?


I i

10.

^
Take
a
1

3^

IJ
free.

^^
,

good breath and keep the throat


#

^\}''i

:=
\

-^

^---i

r
13.

41
14. Find eight differentfttenhi of notation here.

f=M: :d

15.

What does

the 3 represent?

What
d

the 4?

fa

^^^
Remember the key
i

d
note

IJ

-6^

16.

let

^
,

#-

-0

17,
I.""

Dont
.

the thought be careless or lazy.

-Mmm.

^
d

-0

#-

18. Dont slur.

iP
19,

^=^

^
i

^
1

^3=^

jfi

JJijJr rr
21.

^ A

d ^

^ *

^
^
S
26.

Pl

m
rest.
rest.
r

^m
23. Half rest.

j.ijjJ rr
i

w=g=m.

22. Quarter

nfMJHii^jij *:*^
24. Measure
1

^m^ ^
k
25. Measure

# ^#
77^

^
l#

H-

rest.

afci:

d\^
:#=ff

JT^iff
it

te ^

MIM
it.

^^
g
:t=

-(5-=

:i=*

If this is too
-6^

high turn

upside

down and sing

g
it?

27.Which way

will you read

Forward, backward, upside down.

a=i^:

^
il^
i

^tt
first^

CANONS.
l.Tlie second voice to

begin one measure after the

;^rfiJJ J'iJ^
2. The second voice to

^^

begin two measures after the first.

3. The second voice one

measure after the

first.

4.The second voice two measures after the

first.

42
Readiiii::
\.Modtr<ite.

Lessons from Popular Melodies.

(fi'

ijl

Ml in

Ml

lr

^^

ISL

r\

2. Mode rate

?2=#=

-*

1^

rP=^r

*=f

"^.Moderate.

I^^^^^
Q.Sloiv.

zz

^^ Q^
f'

^^S

f^
2Z22

^-y-

^
I

^
r.

If

/J

1^ ^ K*

M==^=:^

S 4 *
*
*

^ 3
,

-77^- d

-5^

0-

^-v

n
"5^-

p
r

If

If

l/;>Moderat0.
xtosr:

^
i

^i^
i

'

^ ^^

3^

rrHi^JiJJ

'jLli^

f-^4f-F4f-^lJ
S.Fasl.

J IJ J Ij J

li

1)^

J IJ J IJ J Ip

^f

^ji,i.hMnrrr >i^V-i'!''

rh
i=t

^^

j'mI'iiIi

||

Mil

^m
I

-6t-

m^

^ ^.Fast.

l^^'i

11

III

=n=^-a^^E^-^=F--U^^

43
1
!

1,

r^rn

44

Theme with Varied Accompaniment

$
too

i
dah
t

lah
s

bay
/

dah
s

p \^m m w ^ ^ r ^ rt^ p ^^
r

may /

nee po
s

too lah bay

3=^=J ? ^-^-^ ^^^^ feE^


f^
f
I

^
i
4

f=

^S ^ ^ pfffff
J

'd

I
*:^

^
I
F^ ;^

53

-^>i''S J

^^
r

m tM S
^^ I
^-HT"

^ ^
,

^^
d

may

^^ ^ ^ s rff
^s
r

tt
rA''iJ rr

^^ ^ ^
a

^^
^
^CS3K

1?

^ ^ ^^
ts

g
1

Ni-^iffl

^^ ^
^ ^

mfrf ^m

f0._

^^

fe

f
^
^

#P

ihM-4 -=*^

^
w

Vocal Accompaniment to Melodies.


The Hazel Dell.
Moderate.

45

t^"i^

I''
(I

!'

J
s

^
I

d
in

Down

the

dell

s s d Green ha-zel

dell

d There

d
Nel
-

s
lie

PE
I

i
s s
lie

i-^-t-t^
I

m
s

m
s

d
lov'd

sleeps

Nel-

so well

Lone

m
4

^ Mm m ^
s

ly

Lone

\y

Now my

w=*

%
J
a
t

t
-

^=t:

watch

I'lti

keep
zz

inp;

^pp
.<?

*=^^

5
s

^ ^
s
-

P^^ ^^
d Here

^
I

j
| I

JIK
d
ing.

d
sleep
-

in

the

dell

where my

Nel-lie's

1
t

3^3^

^ t

iE
m

i%
Wely.

The Monastery
m
,

Bells.

.V

tn

f
Fro

Swi ng

in g,

ring

ing,

chim

ing rhymj^J^g,

m the

f
tower.

ni
-s

s
4-

Sound the

a
bells
,

m m

tn

d
-

tn

f m

d
tells

Joy

in

glad-ness Comfort in

sad

ness

O^^^SLz

votiontheirmo^^^

46

If I
Moderate.

Were

a Sunbeam.

If

were
in

sun- beam
-

know what
soft
-

would
I'd

do;

2.

Steal-ing
If
I

a a
-

^
4.

3.

were
look

mong them, sun - beam


up
-

The
I

est

light
I

shed,

know where

Sad hearts

ing

ward

Would see

me

would go; shine, shine and

Id

seek the

whit

est

lil

ies

Un-til In -to Un-til

each grace - ful lil low - liest hov the heav they thought of

y
els

en,
-&-

wood-land through, The rain-y With glad-ness rais'd its head, dark with want and woe. All Their own sweet home and mine.

3 i

S!

Maying.
^ ia
2.

Fast.

^
I'f'M
in

l.Wan

dring in the May-time,Sweet it Spring she is a maid-en Wait- ing


-

^m
zt

arr.

fr.

Stephen Glover.

^a
g

i^
is

^
rove;

to

Just be

fore the

to

be

wooed;

Hid- ing blos-som

t^tHj-i-'i
hay-time Thro' the la - den In her
sol
-

leaf-y
i

i
-

j^^
Where
Coy

j
the

grove,
tude;

rnm
is

grass

she

bend- ing Wave -like is and meek-er Than the

22

i
lij
ij

iJi
breeze,
fair;

IJ
And

53

the

sum-mer

the white thorns send-ing But for those who seek her

Per-fumes from the treetT She has gifts more rare.

^^m

Chas. Swain,
Fast.

Never Say

Fail.

47
F.W.Root.
by per.of the John Church Co.

Keep pushing 2. With an eye ev


1.

^^^1
'tis

3. In

life's

And si^h-iili!; and wis h-ing and tongue that's not dumb, A heart that wiU nev - er to ro -sy morn-ing, in man-hood's fair pride,Let this be your mot - to your
sit -ting

wis -er than


o -pen, a

a-

side,

^^^^^m

er

m-1

ip

ip

TJ^y
'>^'

wait -ing the tide. In life's earnest bat- tle,they on - ly pre - vail,Who dai - ly march sor-rowsuc-cumb,You'll bat- tie and conquer tho' thousands as - sail; How stroi)(;and how footsteps to guide: In stormand in sun-sliine,what - ev - er as -sail, We'll onward and

Vi^
ij
fail,
fail,
fail,
r>

^f

^^m ^ ^ ^ ^^
%
^ j
i

J j J onwardand migh- ty who conquer and


4t

i^i
,

j nev- er say nev- er say

ij

^^1
fail.
fail

Who
How
We'll

nev-ersay ^-^ m

^m ^ *
r float,

dai- ly march onward and nev -er say strong and how mighty who nev- er say

onwardand conquer and nev- er say

fail.

m
^*

J.E .Carpenter.

Over the Waves.

Moderate

ver the 2. Cast by the

1.0-

m
.

te
f

Stephen Glover, (adapted

-^
in

^r-

wavesthey they float, Two fai-ries are winds from shore to shore, A mo-ment ye j2 m _*I

they

viewthem,and

"VI

*f

If

i|"

^F

Fann'd by Spreading

m ^
f=
lo:

^m
breez
sail.

i
the
it

the

es

rock'd

the

now

by onward

m
the

tide. In flies. Ear

p
wa
bil
-

nau

ti

lus

way

on

the

barque they glide, they glide, waves that sink and rise.

E'e!i
-

when the
ver

ters are lows a-

-^^-h-W-^^

*:

48

tnrm
lash'd by the

gale
-

Safe

o'er the
is

sur-face they

way, and a

There way, ^ J

the
.

they sail. freedom that knows no de - cay.


sail,

In the bright

^
llj
-J-

Braving the

7. t=*
.

."

If

F=f

FpW^
.

^r-^

'

' '
I

I I

,N
^f

JlJ
lull'd

,1
I

1
1

11,'

'

II I

calm, they rest on the and stemming the gale

deep, And
tide. In

by the safe -ty for

zeph-yrs,they sleep, they sleep, ev - er, they glide, they glide.

^
Moderate.

'T

ip

fe^tei

Hearts of Oak.

1.

iS^

i
,

T"

^
f

^
I
Life is

On for the right, Bold be your stroke. Swift as the light, Brave hearts of oak, 2.Loy-al and brave True as the sim^eights that can save, Yet to be won;

^^ r
^
'':
I

arr.fr.

F.Campana.

T-

f^E
j.J
> J
l

m
J.

^^

Ef
J
to

-^^J

field, Soldiers are we. a Conscience on guard. Sloth in the rear,

Ne'er let us yield. Faith as our ward,

i
be
free,

Dare

God ev- er

near.

'>^'

iv^

^
^ ^
^'

? Pis^
Free from the chains
I-

^.

i
leaves,

On'neath our flag,

dle-ness weaves, Free from the pains Fighting the wrong, Hill-top and crag

i^
^i

^^
J

^
r
, ,

Coward-ice Ech-o our

song

P
lies,

r From

7^

f"
All

foes that kill

f we most

S
p

=??

Bold be your stroke, Swift as the

light.

prize ,Free from fierce will Brave hearts of oak

Hat-red and

^^^H r
for tlie

^m

^^

On

right.

-&^

49

Away Now Joyful


Fast.

Riding.
Kiicken.

^^'\\\\
1.

^
rid
-

A -way now
At length a

joy-ful

ingWith heart and hope


ing
ing,There's one the star

so

light,

2.
3.

cot-tage shin

Mid floWrets comes to


of

sight;

Now by

the

warm hearth smil

My foam-ing My steed its


TMth gen tie

home,

steed

now chid
-

ingThen cheering

his quick flight.


flight.

Now
I

homedi-vin
words be-guil

ing;Springs cheer'ly on its ing She bids me ne'er to

Now by

roam.

urge thee still more fleet the door I see can-not now say 'nay"

m
i-

#pf n $ * $ m * *
Y\
f>

I%Ii

m
J
i

-<9

.ojij

i
r

^ ^
Two
fc

is free and wide,Trot, trot, trot, a smile most sweet; Trot, glide, the Trot, trot, trot trot, my own good steed,There?s home and bright eyes flx'd on me, Time seems to fleet a - way, Trot, trot, trot trot, a -far no more;With love and

Well have

^ road
*

^
i

^ fm
*

i
i
r

P
^
I

^
trot

ri^

wayl

A- wayiWe

must more

fleet-ly ride,Trot, trot, trot, trot a-

^^
way!
ill

rest for thee; Trot, trot, trot,trot home I'll stay; Trot, trot, trot, trot

my own good steedjheres home and


a -far

rest for thee

nomore^With love and home

stay

50

Sing,
L.M.Thornton.

Sweet Bird,
m

^
1.

Fust.

?
my

^
i
O
I

W. Ganz. (adapted)

Sing sweet bird and chase

2.

Morn and noon and dew-y

sor-row, Let me lis -ten to thy strain; e - ven, Anx-ious -ly for thee I'll wait;

warbling

u F^ m &W 1 ^
^
y

'S

^
J

From thy Come thou

t^
*
3t

i
f

^^

k &

|J

Jl

I
-

cho-ris

ter

can bor-rowThat which bids me hope a of hea -ven Cheer a soul dis- con-so

gain.
late.

^
^^\

^^
i

% f

sfe^

m
^
J
\

Hov-er still a - round my So shall time fond tho'ts a-

^
?;

^
J
I

^
^

i
J

i
^
I

^f^
^
\

IJ

dwelling,There is pleas-ure where thou art; While thy wak-en; Joy once more shall live and reign; And the

tale

harp

of so

love thou'rt tell- ing long for - sa-ken

^u
i

^y
-G-

M,^

m
\

JH-M4^
^

4 ^:.l>

i
r

lj^'^

Jir rir

M^ii^
bird Let

Say who can be sad at heart. Sing sweet Yield its dul-cet notes a - gain.

^
lis

bird Sing sweet

me

-ten

to

thy

strain

Sing

s'veet bird

Sing sweet bird Sing thy

song

to

me

gain

51

Phrases for Practice, Key of


1.

F.

4.

Play the phrase. 2. Sing and play, doh, ray, etc. 3. Sing without playing, doh, ray, etc. Sing with lah (or loo). 5. Sing from memory pointing or writing the notes.

^ nr
1

3.

4.

5.

6.

8.

^-i
tn

^^
d
11.

d
9.

-0-

-m-

d
12.

m
15.

10.

J J

Jl
d

did

^
t I
t

13.

14.

* d

d
r

JJJII^JJ
d
t

tl

a JJJ**
t

d
20.

d r

ni

16.

17.

18,

19.

2''l.

d
23.

d
/

tn

r s

d
/

d yS 26,

d
27.

24

25.

j^^jji j^ rrrli
d m f
t

md

^
32

i ^tat drltddfmls

^^
a s

For dictation practice, after the teacher has sung (lah lah) or played a phrase, let the puit by ear (lah lah) and then answer such of these questions as theteachermay choose to ask:l.Howmany notes were there inthe passage? 2. What note (letter name and syllable) did it begin with? 3. Point it. 4. What note did it end with? 5. Point it. 6. Did the passage go upor down, or both? 7. Was the key note sounded more than once? 8. Where was the key note? (1st., 2nd., 3rd. note etc.). 9. Were there any consecutive repetitions of a note? 10. Which note was thus repeated? 11. Were there any skips? (Intervals larger than those of the scale).
pils sing

28.

29.

30,

31.

33.

34.

35.

^m
39.

--r

40.

41.

42,

43.

53.

54.

55

56.

57.

58.
*=?

59.

'h jjJ^iuhi^i^^^
61.

n
64,

*=^

*=^^
65.

60,

jj

I I I

62

63.
# # * ^

m m 4

^TjjP'CTji

^^

"

i-^-^-^ *= "" ^-^nr^

at=^ z^

-trzf

5Z

Reading Lessons, Key


Use the instrument free ly beforepracticing a lesson; 2;h, play only as directed below. but while singing it throng
1.

of F.
m ytT P f m ^
ll

Q,
|

(C>d^|

I| p E

2. Doh,ray, etc. voice alone. 3. Lah, voice alone. 4, Clap the and play all the other notes. Do not both play and the Feachtime Sing hands for accent. singthe second; alternate throughout. 7. Sing and measure first the Play sing at once. 6. time. 9. Sing and be silent; alternate measures. Beat 8. so on. and second; the the first, play

Play andsing doh.ray, etc.


5.

10. Point or

write the lesson.

^m
2.
3. !>''

1.

^t

-0

Do not sing

in the time of a rest

J^-l^lJ-l
Name
the letter

names

^ ^m
#-

^
J

MJ
B

of the scale,

.MIJ
4.

^ % f

^^ ^
of this key,

Without looking, think the signature

I
m =d
9J
<

IJ

5. Which line is the flat placed

upon?

i
w=-=^
J
I

6.

m 4-y

17

#
8.

7,

Can you without looking think the representation

of the scale?

*=*

f
f

^
M
J
it

^
HzzM
^
1

=?==*

i =i W t\'Tm ^
10.

^^
11.

9.

Eeeee^

hat

is

the time signature?

ww

"If you do not beat time, time will beat you?


i

^g
4 ^
^a
I

MJ J ^-h^^
i
i
I

"

12. Sing a few notes of


I

^^
I I

"America" pointing
1-^

on the fingers,

ir->-+*

13. What do

we

call the figures at the

beginning of this lesson?

53

Vi=w
14.

i w-^
it

HJ
d

^^niu

Sing the key note and point

out.

*
15. There

^^
though
it

must be a mental accent on the

\ ^3
16. In

i
many
pieces, the

^
r ^

first beat

be

silent.

?=^=
beat.

music begins with the up


-

te * t
/

*
r

32:

17.

<P

^j
"-i

n^
r
I

M
"

[J J J

M M ^
|J ij
^

^^ ^a
J

18
I'is

If

1^

1^

ij

19. Nos. 19 and 20 may be practiced separately, but sound better sung together.
^"1

j^uJijn< jun^Jun^ lUM^Ji'^n* =t^ jijm^ m 4


\

20.

^^

junNunnUM^jim^jUMN r
^ ^
^

d-H

i 1

^
^ f
<!

A round for two or more voices. In a class each member may begin separately one measure after one another,- all singers excepting the last to start to sing it through three times.

^3
feES m
m

^"=?

<^

^^

**

i
'

^
IJ
^
to

22. Sing a note in place of each rest.

^tJ

23. Change five notes

make
i

this

more smoothly melodic


I
I

^li_i^j^^

'

1^

-'

IJ

ij

1^

24. In place of each rest add a melodic note.


'
I 1

^^
>-

Hj^
^

-^

25. Change the position of a quarter note

in

each measure

^ ^Flt

54

Reading Lessons from Popular Melodies,


\.Sloiv.
,

..

1 1

z^,

1T

55
9. Fast,
"

-^ ^ ii j j

J J J

"^

r^v^^^^
X^.Fast

^^
i i

W
'I j
| | |

^^=^

'j'/

UJiprrif^

'

'^

W.Fast.
i>g

Jr tmJ
I

rH'

If

^J ^rirr
i

jj|j jj
J|'

jjij

*-nr-

#
tzt

a=s
VI. Moderate.

JUIJ
l

JJ

Jl-'

[-lJ '
|

['

fi^
l

^2 ^MJJjl.LI-Jlf-r
V^.Moderate.

22

^^
J J
l
I i

ffpl'i-

JJ|7MJ i^^
l

-i |'p
l

pr'

lJ

Jl[7M-

^.

JJLI.|g i

,1

1 i

f^j

i
i

^
14./V?s^.

plfr
J
i

| |

j^Ti~r

J|J

JLM^
^

^
^7-

j.^y'j

Jf

I-

T
J J

^
^^^

^^

ip
I

JJ

:2i]

^^
tzJ

\o.Fast.
iL^^

jJ

JjIjjM

^Jg

=#==*

16.

Moderate

56

The Water Mill.


Fast
Diehl.C adapted)
J

t'il
1.

IJ
to

List-en
a

2. Take

the les-son

wa
to

ter

mill

your-selves,

All the live-long day Lov- ing hearts and true,

4t

0-

r
click-ing

r
of

^
the

M
wheel
by,

How
Gold
-

the

Wears
Youth

the hours a
is

^m
-

way
too.

en years are fleet-ing

pass-ing

^m
^ 1
t)a
I

*i * FPliJiJU^iJU^
J

^^
f
p
sheaves
-

f
IJ
-

f
J
the
the
I

J
of

Lan-guid
Strive to

make

^
J
r
r
i

From the Time will

^m^ ^ ^
most
life,

ly

Au - tumn wind

Stirs the green-wood leaves

^m

P
day,

Lose no

hap

py

i $

^tf?=Fi^

^
3t

f
If

fields the

reap-ers
bring you

nev

er

i^

PT^
J

TT i
i

^^
r f

sing back,

Bind- ing up the Chan-ces swept a

^ ^
way.

*Hj
^
And

i
-I
I
I I

i
I

i
a

J
a

^
is

mem-'ry
ten-der

o'er

ray
-

mind As

spell

cast;

Leave no

word un

said, Love,while

love shall

last,

The The

57

mill will
mill will

nev-er nev-er grind with the wa-ter that nev-er nev-er grind with thewa-ter that

is is

past,

past.

Gentle Zitella.
Fast.

/
Cooke.
'

Gen - tie Zi-tel-la 2.Charm-ing Zi-tel -la 3. Sim pie Zi-tel-la


1.

^m
I

ij

,1

i a
-

'

'

j j
is

i
tor
-

iM 1=9
nel
-

whith-er

way?
ware;
f"

Love's ri

la

why
.-,

shouldst thou care?


-

Night
List

not

dark-er than
dit
-

W=t

t f

Mr
t^

thou shouldst be
1f"

fiF

^^ t=%
.

ye no

m-

a
I

ty

and

i
list

*
play.

*=i
No
1

s
have

while
ra
-

lin-gerd too
if

thy

ven
no

hair;

And
To

those bright eyes,

the

Bri

grant ye

prayer^

your light

foot-steps let

road, long on the - gand should see, wlngB, ter - ror add

^vf-f-p
fr
J Night

If

hF
i
-

*f

if
l

^P

>

J
is

J ad
-

li
rob

j
the

j
self

J
who
F

;
-

i
broad!
he,

i
GenGen-

i
tie
tie

l
Zi
Zi
Zi

221

vanc-ing
ber

Bri-gand's a

Lone-ly

tel-la
tel-la,

Thou

art the

the
-

cap tive

is

'Tis

the bold

Bri- gand him

now
J

singsl

'I
'

>

^^
hear,

tel-la,

much has
ban ban
-

to

fear, fear,
fear.

Love's ri

tor
tor

nel

la
la

she
tar
tar
-

may
ry
-

not

ish

thy
thy

Love's ri

nel

ish

Love's ri

tor

nel

la

ry

and and

hear,
hear.

58

Phrases for Practice, Key of


1.

D.
etc.

4.

ray, Play the phrase. 2. Sing and play, doh,ray, etc. 3. Sing without playing, doh, writing. or pointing Sing with lah (or loo). 5. Sing from memory,
1,

m
(f

rn

^
d

iF*=*
s

"S^
s

mf

*=#= J J is f m d s f
14.

^'
r

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

15.

sfdmmrds
18.
19.

mf

mfrs
21.

mf

r d

m
22.

r s

16.

17.

20.
l

" JJ^JIIJ^JJ lJJjJ IJJJ^^jJllJJJiJl ^ -r ' * ^* " ^^JjJ V* IJ'^J


l I
I

tn

r s fn

s r tn

d d r
26.
i

mf

23.

24.

25.

27.

28.

29.
i

30.
i

I^S
I

jih^jj
d
I

HTJ^iur
s

p
I

rJ^J irrr
d

n^
s

rr^
t

ii

d d

Questions, (to be asked one or two at a time, after the pupil has heard and repeated the phrases) How many notes were there inthe'passage? 2. What note (letter name) did it begin with? 3. Point it. 4. What note did it end with? 5. Point it. 6. Did the passage go up or down or both? 7.Was the key-note used more than once? 8. Which was the key note? (1st, 2ndnoteetc)
1.

9.
11.

Were there any consecutive repetitions Were there any skips?


31.

of a note? 10.

Which note was thus repeated?


39.

32.

33.

34.

35.

36.

37.

38.

U
40.
41.
ii

^^
42.
43.
44.

^m
45.

=A

p^^
49.
" <*

J ^

J j "

*=

^ ^
46.
47.

48.

*-^

J ^

50.
ii

51.
i

52.
i

53.

54.

55.

56.

57.

58.

iJ ^JJ i^iJ
59.

'J
61.

60.
I

62.

63.
i

if JJJJJJJ

IJJJ.^

jJJjjj

j;:^

59

Reading Lessons, Key


Keep
1.

of D.

in tune.

^7

J J

^ J . f f p

Play and sing, doh,ray,etc. 2. Doh,ray, voice alone. 3. Lah, voice alone. 4.Clap the hands. Sing the Deachtime; play the others. 6. Play the first measure, sing the second and soon. 7. Sing the first; play the second. 8. Beattime. 9. Sing and be silent; alternatemeasures. 10. Point or write the lesson.
5.

1.

Fix the new key note well in mind

- 3.

^-0

^m
in the

^
#

Have you done Ihe work carefully


-*

preceeding keys?

<

m
4.

What two

notes in this key are

named with the word"sharp"?

1
^
*

^i
*

5. Notice the rests.

^^
^^m
first

6.

*
8.

'

The

letter

jiameof the note in the


I

space

is

not

F.

What
II
*

is it?

fc
9.

t
4

MJ

^
*^
10.

-Mnr-.

1.

Play and sing,


9.

2.

Voice alone.

3.

Lah.

4.

Hands.

5.

Key-note.

6.

Play-Sing.

7.

Sing-Play.

8.

Beat.

Silent. lO.Point.

13.

tI:^ H
14.

9r

P
IJ
J
-^

r-rr-rr-j

y":^j
15.

*~

Sing a few measures of "Annie Laurie" and point the notes.

16.
'j

Ir

IJ

ir

17.

61

Rhythmic Forms.

^^
4'';
J
I

ii

I I

II

5.

6.

*hi
8.
9.

\]i

"^^j

Hj JmJ
J
1

^i

J
I

^ ^^ ^^ ^ nn ^ ^ ^ ^
i
r
i

^i

Mr

>i^

Hj

>

r^^-f-u
ir
r

St.

10.

3=

^
J
'

3J*

P^'^
12.

fe

^
J.
I

^
I

Mf

''

"

j^"

I
' '

'

'

62

Reading Lessons from Popular Melodies.


jijirrir-^Nj
2.
i

J^^^
-

Tt

Fast
f

jh

>

^
i i

?>,Fast.

m m \m
Ai.

mzrm-

'

ji^Ji^Jir^i^J Jj

j,^^
i

Moderate
i

^i jjJiJrJiJJJuJiJjjijjJiJJJiJJiJJJ
y^^UJJ Jjj jjJiriJJJi^'iJjJirJ
i i i

Jjj rrrirH

^
^
I

5 Modemte
.

%^A
a:

JJIJJIJIJJ

^l
I
l

J^hl Jjl-l iJ
l l

^^

^W^jijJiJiJii^Jirririrri^'Hmte
^.Moderate.

hiJ ^
\

s
^

jJ
.

JjJ

.LI-

Jlr^a

^ ^

^^

1 I .Moderate. j.uuaeraie.

hJ rirJi^JM
i

8.

^
i?.C.
l

xS'/oe^;.

Fine.

jtmr^
Q.Fast.

JJ

JJ

m
A
J,
,

?
^
,

=^
r
10. Moderate. wj.inoaeraze.

rr f'J
i

'!'

Jjljl

iJ"'

III

Ml

J J

J J

^
i?.^.
-fi^

63

The Old Familiar Place.


Moderate.
'
arr.

fm.

.W. Glover

l.We may 2. We may

rove the wide world sail o'er ev - 'ry

But sea, But


o'er,

J we we

ij
ne'er shall
still

find
fail

shall

find

^m
Of
the
-

home we
spot
so

lov'd

m
of
to

2
yore.
be,

^r
Of the As the
old fa
-

mil
left

iai lar

place,

ny

dear

one

we

be

hind

i
y'jtj. 0th er
I

If
I ' I

It

1^

1^^
a - lien touch the
skies,

'

j
be
as

scenes may
corn-fort

bright, But

U
r

we

j
miss,'neath

Words

of

we

may

hear,

But they

can- not

heart

tr-Hf

k
J

'

j-

^
and the

2
light

Both the Like the

wel-come
tones to

mem -'ry

^FfTfJ

dear,

Of the Of the

^m
friends

old kind

lov

ing

eyes.

from

whom we

part.

ft

\
is
is

N
home, of home, the
this
I

Home Home

^
be

If

17

reft,

Mem-'ry
All

loves

^
a
fa

^
-

wand-'rer

longs

m
In

the

scenes of

gain youth

to

trace
trace.

to

f
old

All

the
to

And

forms of hear the

those
old

we home

left

the

songs,

In

the

old

fa

mil mil

lar

iar

place, place.

f>4

Gently Rest.
Slow.

Kiicken

1.

AH
-

is

still

in

sweet
night

est

rest,

Be
Soft

thy

a. Gent

ly

rest,

the

stars gleam,

thy

hW

m
i^
*

SEE

T
f
9

--^

^
-

f
Winds
Fear
are

^
no

V
blest
;

^
-

sleep

se
-

rene
bright

ly

moan
harm,

ing
for

slum

S f=f
^
o'er
I

^m jm
the
will

ber,

thy

dream;

9-1.9

1
ISJ

*-

^
la
-

p
I
Lul
-

fJ
I

r
-I

J
on,

wild

la

by,

sleep

my
a
-

child.

keep

Watch

and ward,

while thou'rt

sleep,

*
^m,
^ i
m

0-

HI

f
-

T
and

r
_
my
a
-

r
-ri

n
r
-T^

^
la
la

Lul

Watch

by, sleep on, ward, while thou'rt

child.

So

lul
lul

^^
T
-

by,
by,

sleep

sleep.

So

sleep

on,

my

child.

So

lul

la

by,

sleep

on,

my

child.

Superior Vocal
THE BEGINNER'S VOICE BOOK
FRANTZ PROSCHOWSKI
By
Price,
all

Methods and Studies


EXERCISES

MASTER VOCAL
By

STANDARD GRADED COURSE


SINGING
In Four Grades

HORATIO CONNELL
Price, $1.00

^3.00, cloth
of

bound
and
instruc-

Every teacher

voice

students of singing should


this

know

remarkable

tion book by the vocal advisor many widely acclaimed of presupposes no singers. It knowledge of -nusic and de-

A fine volume of vocal exercises adaptable for use by any skilled voice teacher. The compiler, a renowned teacher and artist presents here a of the practical collection sensible, best and most useful vocal exercises selected from the greatset masters of singing from the old Italian school to
the
present.

By

HERBERT WILBEi* GREENE


and

Price, ^1.25 each grade

compilation

arrangement

of

velops musicianship along with The book is a vocal ability. splendid help in self-study as everything is fully explained

The

te.xt

and

anatomical

il-

lustrations covering the singer's equipment are parphysical ticularly helpful.

TECHNIC AND ART OF


SINGING
FREDERIC W. ROOT METHODICAL SIGHTBy SINGING.
1.

selected and original etudes graded to meet the needs of students in all stages of advancement from the point of correct tone production to finished and artistic rendering. The work is graded for a four years' course for use in conservatories, schools and vocal studios as a standard of equip-

and may be supplemented by other material at the discretion of the


ment,
teacher.

VOCAL
INSTRUCTOR
By

VOCAL STUDIES
High Voice, Medium Voice,

Op. 21
Begin$0.60
First

Part ning Part

The The
3.

2.

Time
60

Low Voice
By

Through the Keys

EDMUND

J.

MYER

GEORGE W. WHELPTON
Price, 75

Part

Progressive 60

Price, ^1.25

Musicianship

cents each

INTRODUCTORY
TURE,
Op.

L E SSONS IN VOICE CUL22


1.00

These successful volumes were prepared to aid those amateurs who wished to become intelligt.it, acceptTeachers will find these able singers.
technical studies for daily use a real Excellent hrlp to student singers. vocaii^es for style and finish, selected froti' he works of some of the master writ, "s, have been included in each
voli;.r,e,

methods embodied

THIRTY-TWO SHORT SONG STUDIES


For High Compass, Op.
24 75

practical guide to artistic of singing the writer has the experience of a lifetime. It not only contains practical notation exercises, but also numerous
this

In

For Medium Op. 25 For Lower Op. 26

Compass,
75

cuts made from photographs taken especially for this work. These illustrations make the work of the pupil much more simple and secure.

Compass,
75

75

SHORT MELODIC
VOCALISES
Studies

SCALES AND VARIOUS EXERCISES, Op. 27


For

High

and

Low
75
1.00

Voice, each

TWELVE
IN

ANALYTICAL
Op. 20

And Consonant
By W. FRANCIS
Price,

STUDIES,

SIXTY-EIGHT EXERCISES

GATES

THE SYNTHETIC METHOD. Op. 28


Principle of

SONG STUDIES FOR THE MEDIUM VOICE


By

50 ccnc

The General
Vocalization

introduction to the more advanced works of celebrated writers of vocal studies adapted fur the singer's daily practice. A valuable feature, and one not found in other vocal works, is a series of consonant exercises preparatory to distinct enunciation, and clear pronunciation, based on the Seller system.

An

75

GUIDE FOR THE MALE


VOICE,
Op.
23
.

JOHN

A.

HOFFMANN

1.00

STUDIES
For
Voice,

SONG
High

IN

FLORID
Low
1.25

GEORGE

and A. LEIGHTON

and

each

Price, ^1.00

These studies present


guise
figures

in

new

certain

conventional

LESSONS IN VOICE TRAINING


By
This
th'a-

TEN VOCAL STUDIES


By H. W. PETRIE
Price, $1.00 Studies to be used for promoting style and flexibility and for improving execution. They are quite modern, and will please the teacher who is seeking something fresh and pleasing
to
for to

and difficulties combined with the less usual onps The purpose of the studies s manifold, but in the rr. ni f aim towards developi > -'
\

ALFRED ARTHUR
Price, 75 cents
little

work was prepared with


providing grades
studies

idea
a

of

piv>i's in the early

who wish
of

the student's voice and susceptibilities for the -. the modern song literarure. number of very helpful >iigg:c.tions, relative to the pri -.tcr of the exercises, are given in the preface. The development
.:

quire

graceful- style

singing.

The pronouncing
Me,

of

Ni, Po, Tu, are exercises in this book.

syllables, La, Be, used in

Da,
the

in this

musicianship volume.

is

emphasizr.-l

alternate with, or to replace, older

conventional works.

VB--?

1211
TECHNIC AND ART OF SINGING

%o Mithahimi ^9l|t Ringing


THE BEGINNING PART a- PART IL THROUGH THE KEYS ' PART III. PROGRESSIVE MUSICIANSHIP
I.

A Method of Private and Class Instruction

in the First

and

Fundamental Requirements of Music

INCLUDING

THE SCIENCE OF MUSIC READING


Arranged According to a Plan by which Pupils can Practice Correctly Alone; thus
Designed for Use
in

Connection with Instrumental

Work

as well as with

LESSONS IN VOCAL CULTURE


BY

FREDERIC W.
OPUS
21
-

ROOT

THEODORE PRESSER
D
Pfll iCnPIVllA

CO.

MMCIP nnnior

TECHNIC AND ART OF SINGING


A COMPLETE SYSTEM OF EDUCATION
SINGING
IN
IN

ON SCIENTinC METHODS POD USE PmVATE mSTDUCTION AND IN CLASSES

By FREDERIC W. ROOT
I.

Methodical Sight Singing.


PART PART Part
I.

Op.

21.
$0.60
.60
.50

2.

The The

beginning.
first

time through the keys.

3.

Progressive mu;icianship.

II.

Introductory Lessons in Voice Culture. 1.00 Op. 22

III.

Thirty-two Short Song Studies


For high compass. Op. 24. For medium compass. Op. 25. For lower compass. Op. 26.

.75

IV.

Scales and Various Exercises.


For high voice. For low voice.

Op. 27

.75

V.
VI.

Twelve Analytical

Studies. Op. 20

i.oo

Sixty-eight Exercises in the Synthetic (The General Method. Op. 28.


Principle

of Vocalization)

<75

VII.

Guide for the Male Voice.

Op. 23

1.25
1.25

VIII.

Studies in Florid
For high compass. For medium compass.

Song

1712

i^e^t^tr.

Printed in the U.S.A.

PROPERTY OF SOUTHERN PAMCnDMIA MIICIP DDniCPT

fntroduction.
Many who
tion.

take up the study of singing imagine that voice culture

is

the principal considera-

It is secondary, however,

no adequate knowledge

of

and quite useless to one who has no proper conception of music, rhythm, intervals, melodic phrases, etc.

Some who undertake to learn to sing begin with a sufficient knowledge of the rudiments; but generally, with the youth and frequently with adults, the only proper step to take at first is Methodical Sight Singing. along the line indicated in However good the voice may be, singing has no value if the mind is hazy as to time and tune. And the best way to master these elements is to learn to read music.
' ' '
'

Consciously or unconsciously, every one


the mastery of certain things; items which
1.

who reads vocal music well has certain may be grouped under seven headings:

habits

and

The mental

picture of key-representation

the

position on the staff of key-note, tonic

chord, scale, signature, etc.


2.
3.

mastery of certain intervals principally the step and half-step.

Familiarity with melodic progression in scale and chord forms

the

relative part of

music reading.
4.

Memory

of pitch

the positive part of music reading.

(This does not

mean a knowledge

of absolute pitch.)
5.
6.

Thinking

in musical phrase,

realizing pitches mentally without

hearing them.

Grouping tones as one groups the

letters of the alphabet for words.

7.

Ehythm and rhythmic


to the

forms.

Methodical Sight - Singing designs


tional grades

to take pupils from the beginning through educaaccomplishment of the above habits and requirements.
is

While
because
it

this

system

intended for classes,

it

is

especially available

for

private instruction

may be correctly pursued by the thoughtful student with but little attention from the teacher who can therefore include this department in the vocal training lessons. This work, therefore, may accompany that given in Introductory Lessons in Voice Culture and
*

'

'

**

Elementary Song-Studies," thus providing


is

for the three

departments into which the study of

singing
1.

divided, viz:

Music reading and musicianship.


Voice culture.
Style

2.
3.

and execution.

(rood singing is from the union or co-operation of many habits in all three of these departments; and the best educational work in this field will see that the required habits of mind and boay are started as early as practicable and are patiently supervised until established.

Copyright

1904

by Thko Pbesseb.

Preliminary Examination
Upon
Points Essential to the Intelligent use of this
-S9-

Work;

1.

Write & whole note,


(

a half note,
notes,
(

a quarter note,
fe

J )

Write four eigLth

notes,
2.

J^ J^
Write the

J^y, four sixteenth

JS3

rests corresponding to the five

kinds of notes,

('"" S

^ ^

3.

What

is

the effect of a dot after a note or rest?

(The note or

rest is

made

half as long

again.)
4.

Write the treble or


JJ

G clef,/ j^
flat, (

1;

the bass or
( il).

clef,

Ql

Write a sharp, (
6.

a natural,
,

Give the
it;

letter

names

C, D, &c. )

of the lines

and spaces

of the staff

when tv^

is

placed upon
6.
7.

also,

when

^I

is

placed upon

it.

What

is
is

rhythm ? (Accents or pulsations occurring with

regularity.

What

a measure in music ? (A group of these r^ular pulsations or beats.)


is

8.
9.

What character
What is Do
the

used to divide written music into measures 9 (A bar.


the double bar ? (To divide music into sections.

office of

10.

double bars necessarily come at the

banning

or end of measures ?
fall

(They do

not.

11.

Into what principal groups do pulsations or measures


sixes.

in music ?

(Into twos, threes,

fours

and

12.

Write a time signature

for double measure, /

SI

for triple measure,

3l

for

quadruple measure,
13.

i or ^

What

does the upper figure of a time signature represent?

(The number

of beats,

counts, parts in a measure.)


14.

What
is

the lower figure?

(The value

of each beat, count, part.)

What

kind of a note

most often used as a beat-note, expressing the value of each


other
is

beat ?

(The quarter note.)


a quarter note

What
fills

often used ?

(The eighth
^if

note.

16. If

one part of a measure,


fill

it

occupies one beat of the rhythm,

how many
16. If

eighth notes would be required to

the part or beat?


beats

How many sixteenth notes?


to

an eighth note
?

is

the beat-note,

how many

wiU go

a quarter note? To a

dotted quarter note


17.

Count

one,

two,

one, two,

hand,

down

for one and

up

for two.

rhythmically a number of times, beating time with the In like manner count three, beating down-left-up. Count

four, beating down-left-right-up.

Count

six,

beating down-left-left-right-up-up.

18.

What

are the relative (numeral)

names

of the

common major

scale? (one, hoo, etc.)

19.

What

Byllables apply to the tones of the scale? (^Doh, ray, etc., or with another spellini
s, I, t,

doy re, etc.

Initials d, r, m, f,

d. )
b)

20. What do the terms step and half-step define ? (The intervals or difterences of pitch tween the tones of the scale.
21.
step. )

What is the interval between doh and rayf (A Name the intervals between the other tones of

step.)

Between mee and fahf


done
to the stafE to

(A

half

the scale.
is

22.

When
What

scale intervals
23.
24.

come
is

a scale starts from any other pitch than C, what right ? (Sharps or flats are used.
the effect of a sharp?

make

th<

flat?

natural?
flats is

When When

come right?
25.

From D?

the scale starts from G, what of sharps or From F? From BIz?


these sharps or flats appear

required to

make

the intervab

what do they constitute ?


26.

upon the (The key-signature.

staff at

the b^gixming of a piece of mnsic,

What is
What
is

doh or one of the scale called?

(The key-note or key-tone.


flat

27.

an accidental? (A tone foreign to the key, expressed with a sharp,


the chromatic scale ?

oi

natural.)
28. 29.

WhAl

is

(A

scale

composed entirely of half-steps.


(

Give the numeral names of the chromatic scale Scscending.

One, $harp-one, two, thar^

two, three, four, sharp-four, five, aharp-five, six, ahcvrpygix, seven, eight.)
flat-seven, six, flat-six, five, flat-five, fowr^

Descending

(^Eight,

seven,

three, fiat-three, tiuo, fiat-two, one. )

30.

What are
lah,

the syllables for the chromatic scale ascending?


doh.)

(DoA,

dee. ray, ree,

mu,

fah,

fee, soh, see,

lee, tee,

Descending? (Doh,

tee,

toy,

lah,

lay, soh, say, fah,

mee, may, ray,

rah, doh.)

31.

Give an example in which a natural operates as a sharp. Give an example in which a natural operates as a

(Sharp one in the key of

Bb

isBtl.
32. 33.
flat.

(^Flat-seven in

the key of G.)


(It

What
What

significance has

**

Da Capo Al

Fine," abbreviated D. C.
''

means: begin

again at the beginning of the piece and end at


34.

Fine.")

Dal Segno al Fine " abbreviated D. 8. or dal Ji^? (It meuis Repeat the section of the music between ^^ and Fine.)
significance has "
35.

Explain the use of the repeat marks. Explain the use of this sign,
z'^.

36.
37.

When
Wnac

doh, mee,

name

of the chord ?
is

and soh, one three and five of a key are sounded together, what (Tonic chord.
significance of each of the

is

the

3S.

the

following terms?

Andante,

Andantino,

Allegro, Allegretto, Lento.


39.

Mayan eighth note


the explanation?

JV

in

one piece go as slowly as a qaarter note

in

ano^er?

What

is

(The papil should also learn to play upon an instrument the


to it.)

scale in eaeh

key as be comes

Preparatory Practice of Rhythm.


-<>1.

Count

1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4-1,
1

evenly and rhythmically, like the marching ot

soldiers.
2.

8peak the

each time louder, (but not longer), than the others.


1

Repeat these counts, at the same time tapping with finger or pencil at each

and

3l,

(The notes represent thd taps.)

J
3.

123412341
fast.

Repeat with the same exact regularity but twice as

1_2 3 4 12 3 41

i.

Again, twice as fast as the last time.

12 3 4 1 2 3 4
5.

;
first,

Count
(

1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4-1,
The counts

in

march time as

at

but this time tapping at

each 1 and 4

will be regular but the taps irregular.

J.
1

-^ 2

34 234
1
fast,

J.

J
1

6.

Double the timecount twice as

and tap at

and 4 as

J.
7.

123412341
j^

n.

Redouble the time.

I r 3 123412341
8.

J.

n
1

before.

Begin again with the slow counts this time tapping at each

and

2.

^.cceut the

1-

J.

1_2 3 412 34
9.

Double the time.

;j. /J. ; 12- 3 4 12 3 41

10.

Redouble the time.

12 3 4 12 3 4
11.

Count

1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4-1,
2.

rapidly, tapping at every count, excepting

some

one:

Excepting

Js

j.^ N 1_2 3 4 12 3 41
|^

Excepting

4.

rn ^ / 123412341
.^ J" i>

Excepting

3.

/ ^ /T 3 / 123412341
f t i
? t

12.

Tap

five times,

dowly, like marching,

Then, while tapping in this

way, speak or intone the words:


f

-J
Sun,
13.

J
moon,

istar.
f

Twice as

fast.
f
f f

-J
Mom
14.
-

J
ing

ilight.
t

Eedouble the time.

15.

J^
-

J^
dom

^
f

Free

calls.

!.'.
Bay
se
-

In like manner the following:


I f

rene.

Gome

way.

Boat

hojl

16.
I

And the
t I

following:
f

J
is

IJ
pow'r.

JU
Sail
-

fill?
or

^^
-

!,
-^U^
Mer
-

^-J^
to
-

Knowledge

be

ware.

ry

day.

Methodical Sight-Singing, Part

II.

The Key of
memory
in forty seconds.

C.

Play the scale one octave ascending and descending, and sing it. Copy upon music paper the following ** picture of the key " several times daily in order to If possible, sing, hum or whistle each note learn thoroughly the sight and the sound of it. while writing it. Syllables may be used. Practice doing this until it can be written from

I
I
1.

22;

-^

-<s

^^-^-

-iSh

-sr~^
-I2L -tS^

g;

gy

ISl

-<9"2?-

1^&- 22:

sr g

>

r^

121 -i^

-TSr

-^-

ISl

121 ZSL -^h

-/5h

12L

-1^-

is:

"2?-

--

Directions for Individual Practice of Phrases \ to 26 Play the phrase. 2. Sing it with syllables (doA, ray., etc. ) playing at the same time and listening to see that each tone is correct in pitch. 3. Sing it with syllables without the instrument. 4. Sing it without instrument using lah lah, or loo loo, instead of dohy ray, etc. 5. Sing it from memory, pointing on the fingers the position of the notes on the stafiE, (the fingers being held so as to represent the five lines and their spaces. Note. ^The syllables are represented by their initial letters. The chromatic syllables are represented thus, for sharps: d' r', etc., (for dee, ree, etc.,) thus, for flats: m, r, etc., (for

fnay, rah.

<trf>/>

3-

4-

5-

pTJ m
d
6.

J
s

II

JimJHf^i^l if^M^
s

d
8.

d
9-

^
s

7-

/ 10.

I
I

-9-9 ;N-JJi

'

r r

NJJi m
12.

r r d s

P^
d

lEZM.
f f

^ w-m m
d
f
f

zz.

^;

i
r
f

d
15-

^
1

13-

4.

y-?^
s

d
z8.

s^V

y
z6.

/
17-

m ^m
I
s t

-^
d

^
s

'm mdtls
20. 2Z.

f=

19.

*i
f< 8
s 24.

i
s
f

m
25.

^m ^
dmstd
iatzi
J.

V
22.

"

'
ff^.

'

P-*
d

f"

8
4.

6P

26.

(Sing at same pitch as No.

^^
d
fi

4 ^ S
B
1

m
s
fi
f

# b# M

m m

f
8

^
r

i;
f

It

As soon as practicable, steps and half-steps should be mastered so that any note being given -F - G; G - Fn- G; the student can sing the step and half-step both above and below it; as:

G-A-G; G-Alz-G

The following exercises in intervals, 27 to 41, may be practiced thns: Play the interval and sing with syllables all the scale tones that the interval includes, three notes for a third, four For example: No. 27 would notes for a fourth, etc. Do this both ascending and descending. be practiced thus:

i
I
37.

i ^-^ mfsltd rmfs


Play.

f
-^

n
t
1

333
r

JSr
-i!9-

-t5^

-O28. 29.
-t5^

12: -^30.

-&-Z7-

-^
32.
II

31.

i
%
are

-ry-

'^^

"^

-^
-5?^-Z7
3334-

'^

W^^y
37-

^gj"^

gy

e^
35
36.

'SL ~S^

^ 2Z
-^'

=^=22=^
38.

=^ ^fei^ ^g
!i

zz: t5>- -gr

-7^

--

g?

g?

g-thg-^ t^

^ ^
^^
s^

^
41.
/

'W^

39-

I ^^
still

tS*

^-^-^

<g-

-i!5i

^Si

22L

^^ zz:

-^ZJSL &i5?-25r

7SL t$H$^

^
40.
-i9-

-0-

g; -g

g& gg 2^^ g

Practice upon the following reading lessons in daily practice.

may

be begun at the outset, while the foregoing

Reading Lessons* Practice each lesson in twelve different ways using the instrument only when thus
Directions for the Practice of

indicated *

Use
*
in

dohj ray, etc. ,only

where

specified.

1. Play and sing the memoiy tones, ^the tonic chord and whatever else may be indicated a separate measure at the beginning of the lesson. Impress these upon the mind. 2. Go through the lesson, tapping with the hand and thinking every note, but singing only

tones as they occur. Sing the lesson with the syllables (doh, ray, mee, 6tc.) (In the following repetitions, use lab or loo.) 4. Sing it again with lah or loo at each note. * 5. Sing the memory tones and play the others. Play the notes in a detached manner so that voice and instrument shall not sound together. * 6. Play the memory tones and sing the others. Always keep time. * 7. Sing the first note in each measure and play the others. 8. Repeat the lesson (lah or loo) beating time With the hand and singing the first note in each measure loudly, the others softly. 9. Sing the first measure, think the second, silently; and so on with alternate measures. Beat time and give the silent notes their exact time. Also, in like manner, omit the first

the

memory
3.

measure and sing the second.

Omit the second note in each measure thinking its pitch and giving it full time. Beat. In like manner go through the lesson beating time, thinking but not singing the memory tones three and five. Sing all the other notes. (In Nob. 16 to 18, instead of three and
10. 11.
five, all

the

memory

12.

Write or point (on the

tones indicated at the beginning of each lesson are silent. fingers) the lesson from memory, or upon hearing

it

played
in the

or Bung.
Practice in these different Introduction.

ways

is

necessary to the formation of the habits

named

Reading Lessons, Key


Learn the memory tones.

of C.

^^
is

^
what does each figure stand
for ?

1-^

What
^
II

the time signature, and

J^iJ

irJ iJJ

^~4^

^^
i ^
'

If these exercises are

beyond you, practice in Book

1 of this series.

^
Two
notes to a beat.

^^

IJJUJ N ^i
l

W
6.

-~m
i

j'jj

i;:j^i^''|'j

ij'j'ji^iprii

Practice every exercise in the twelve forms given.

j,i;oN^JJ ipJ-:u-ij:ji -9ir

p
m

;] j-JJ
|

0-m-

^-V

Learn the chromatic tones. Use the instrument.

i-

r^ T

^
i

^9-^

?m

Never force the tone; sing

softly. Taker

breath enough.

i=*
8.

JiJ

^-

m ^ ^^
3
it-^^^
-5^-=-

^^
J

Keep

strictly in tune. Play the chord as often.as is necessary.

^
1^
'^

9.

Follow the twelve directions for practice, exactly.


'^*

=^==#^
10.

IJ

<*

ru

jj

li.

3s:

^
The

Four beats

to the

measure, each beat having the value of a quarter note

zii

#-*-#

11.

letter

as a time signature.

What

figures does

it

stand for ?

fe

i^jjJJiJj

i^^^jiJ;j

fJ-l

UJjjIijp

to
Directions: (see p. 8.)
4.
first note;

*1. Learn memory tones.-

Lah-r^o. Sing memory tonesjplay others.play others. -8. Beat and accent. -9. Alternate measures 11. Omit memory tones.- 12. Write or point.
12.

Memory tones and taps. -3. Doh, ray. * 6. Play memory tones; sing others.-* T.Sing"
2.

silent .-10 .Omit second note,

Four beats
i

to the

measure. What

is

the beat-note ?
S:

2^^ M ^'%
13.

;j'^

i^v'i^J-'ippriP^T
of each note in this lesson.

*^

li^

^p ^

&

Give the letter

name

3z=i4

^^i^M'!^^ irpc:pippr
Do

prr^'i^'^'^

iW'piJV-

14.

not slip or-slideto a note; attack neatly and accurately.

- J5

t^ n

jrrrirr^ UJiiJ^i-^j uj
The memory tones here include seven or

16.

The memory tones here include two

3s^a
Y^

^ m
?
^t*:
It

^^Uji

^m
5*

S
tee,

and one or doh.

zzs

or ray, and the key- note, doh.

^
i

# * #

w
-
i

The memory tones here include six

s
18.

s
i

^m

or lah,with the

75

'^

jiJ ^~^~W jii ^

key-note

m
J

i^

The memory tones here include four or fah,and the key-note.

~nr 33:
19.

^=^ riJJj

JJ^^

r^TUin
II

^P
r
f!
i

Practice the beat, counting six, before trying to sing and beat.

^J
21
ts-

jTjJ.

jpj'^g
%
J-

The bass
although

clef.

The first note is sung at the pitch of the first note in No.20, represents an octave lower. ^

w^\i

Jfr^J-i

^
-

r-

rrr
j

nrr
i

#^ S
Come,

22, Exercises in rhythmic forms. 3f5 act ^


come,

23. Beat and repeat

many timeb

i^<'j
A

ir

Jj
it

j-

vj'ir'

come

^^-

way
'-

joy

is

to stray

Amongthe floNv'rs

^^
of May.

25.

h:r^
Now the day
26.
is

j'T Lhp

j^r i^p-ij^r-

ov

er.

Bright spark-ling wa-ter.

Rip-pie, sun-nv riv

er

s
Fast

>

^^
Si
-

27.

/^ 4

ji| i^p-

a-sleep,Slum-ber-ingdeep

lence keep.

Work, work with pur-pose steady.

Reading- Lessons from Popular Melodies.


1.

\\

Moderate.

i rprnrr^^
2. Fas/.

i^

'j

ji

'
'

fp'''i^rf^ ^jj..Mi.
i

m
|>
4.

3.

Siow

S.

?sm

^rrt'cnr
/jjJj'J^'
i

i^j^ J''iJ!jyjjr'''^uyj'i.^

^
i

;j

:\^ju

jjJ^^ J^i
i i

J.Ji iJii''JiJ^ ij ij^jj^ iii


i

*5^/o///

j,!;

JJJ|JjJJ-1JjJlJ.?-'iJ.j_iJ'|j.iJ;'|j ,!.|p7' p-p.

^^

5.

I'asf.

J-Jjijjjuippiruiiij
I

'Ui,in'jiijji|ii^ijnijijjiii

6.

Fast
i>

Ij^'j

pU-JjJJ J-JJi^a^J'J pU-J^Jj j^^


riffi>-iv J- 'jjjj>j
i

$
7.

pir-''-i-''

^-'J'J]^
a

Moderate.

S
I
\

^^^
^h0-

^^
=S=3t
*
I

<*

E Mp
I

^ ^
^g
i

JJMJUU'JMJ
-y/o?//.

J^JI/iJi/iJ^ J p-i'lJ
l

J^J-' iJ'j'

j,j,

j,^

8.

^^^
Moderate.

^
"

wg

^ S*

j3j]jJicr^j^'jj

ji

9.

l!;j.j]3ij^j-p

Jii:^r^ijjj:ij,JT^

Ji^

^1

r-'"cr

^-:^

^^ir^ccf

^^^ ^

r-r

1t>

The Brook.
Dolores.
('Arranged.)

Tennys^on

^IM
l.Withmany
2.
I

Moderate.
^

I-

I
lawns

a curve

steal by

i^ lj'^' my banks I fret, and gras-sy plots,

^'-

JMJ-^
Py many
l"

K
and
-

a field

fal

low,

And
I

slide by

haz

el

cov-ers,

:5

many
move

fair a the sweet

^
^l
I

r'
-

J-

J-'

ii_u
wil
-

:
low,

^^==^
weed
hap
-

m
I
I
-

y
for
-

fore-land
get

set

With
That

-me

nots

grow

for

and py

mal-low.
lov

ers.

h
slip,

ti
slide,
-

j^i

>!

h
I,

J>

e
In

gleam

glance
stars

A-mong my skim-ming
balm- y
wil- der

^ ^
^
-

^
I
I

mur-mur un

der

moon and

swal-lows, ness - es,

^% ^%

tjt

^^^t^ttjt

^p ^p ^p ^^

'^

h
the
-

h
net
-

5
ted

make
lin

sun-beams dance
shin-gly bars,

^^
J^
\^

5
A-gainst
I

^
ter

ger

by

my

my sand
round

^
-

^'

J-'

J1
I

loi

my

shal-lows. cress- es.

And

J'

J'

chat -ter, chat out a -gain

iw^^
-

p
ming ming
'

ter
I

as I flow curve and flow

To To

join join

the brimthe brim

riv-er;|
riv
er;j
''"^

13

^i

j^

ji

/'-t^p
and men

p
go,

p
But

ifi
I

j^

p
on

>
for
-

iJ-y,ev
-

j^pI

men

may come,

may

go

er,

ev

er,

^^
I

go

on

for

ev

^
er,

:5:

^^^
I

/'
-

U
-

'
II

ev

er.

go

on

for

ev

er.

The Old Folks At Home.


Slow.
:^

i y
lit
-

i'

j
-

r
nee
ere
I
-

^
riv
-

Way
I '

All All

down up - on the up and down the


round the
I

Swa
whole

er,

Far,

far
ly
I

^
a
I

S.C.

P^oster.

K3
way,

tion

2.

tie

farm
with

wan - dered
broth- er

Sad WTien

roam,

'When

was play-ing

my

Hap

py

was was

young;
I:

There's where
Still

my heart

^^m
is

ev
-

E
er,

turn- ing
old

There's where the

^^
old old

folks
folks at
I

stay.

long-ing for

the

plan
I

ta

tion,

There
0,

man
take

y hap-py
to

days

squan-dered,

And Man
There

for
-

the

home.
sung.
die.

y
let

the songs

me

my

kind

old

moth-

er,

me

live

and

I
I

i
I

-^m
sad

i
-

All

the world

is

and

drear

y,

Ev

ery

where

roam;

'j!'

j-iJ
dark -ies, how

' l

s
-

J'

my

heart grows

wea

ry,

Far

from the

^ ^
*
w
old

i
home.

folks

at

li

Tis Lone on the Waters.


F.

Modernfe.

W. R.

aij
1.

P
lone as

Tis

on

the

wa

ters

when

2.And

the fleet

sea-bird flies

mournful home to her


eve's

bell

Sounds forth

nest,

The
J
the the

wan

#
*

i a i
-

fare loves
-

i
well,

r
borne
lone

H
on on

sun

set

a
to

note
all

of

\yhen
Tis

shad - ows

^ m
to
-

the
er's

der

and

heart turns

^
a
s^

he

best;

wa

ters;

that

winds as
hour hath

they

spell

sweep There comes a fond bring back sweet To

f *=^ memory
voi
-

i
of

9-*
o'er

a
the
deep,

home

ces,

and

words of fare- well.

Sweet and Low.


Tennyson.

Barnby

Slow.

i r =ic
1.

^
and and

?I
low,
rest,

-N

J.

iJ
Wind
Fath
-

I
of er

Jt
#
"

y s
tf

^!u=
'

Z^
^
sea; soon;

^#

Sweet
Sleep

sweet
sleep

2.

and low, and rest,

the
will

wes - tern come to thee

^n^-f
k3l,j:
Low,
low,
I I
I

'.
\

\\
|

;ii^

:iH,L,J' .^,!v
|

breathe and blow

Rest, rest on moth-er's breast,

^m^ r r

y-

^=^
f wa
babe
-

^^^
Wind

,;..^pS
jb

of the wes - tern Fath-er will come to thee

sea.

soon.

Ov-er the roll - ing Fath-er will come to his

A ^

:f:

$L

^.

V-

r^l

7
i

t ^ z ^ fr^h^^-^
N ^

in

teirs go, the nest,

Come from
Sil

T:
-

J.
rs

n
J
lit
lit
-

the ver

dy

ing

moon
out
of

sails all

:^r:^
J
tie

n -^^
r^
I

aiW blow, Blow him a -gain to the west, Un-der the sil - ver

:iLi
me. moon;

iiji

J
one. one.

11
While

While
Sleep,

my my

tie

my pret Sleep, my pret

^^
-

r^

ty
ty

one
one,

.sleeps,

sleep.

15

The Key
syllable,doh,ray,
if

of G.

Play the scale of G. Copy the followin^'picture of the key'many times (singing each note with
possible, while writing
it.)

Persist in this until the looks and the sound of the


in thirty- five

key are learned and the"picture"'can be witten from memory

seconds.

o o

o "
<*

-o

o-

Tf

ray, etc., playing at the

Directions for individual practice of phrases from 1 to 31. I. Play the phrase. 2. Sing it, doh, same time. 3. Sing it, doh, ray,etc., without the instrument. 4. Sing it, lah,
it

or loo,without the instrument. 5. Sing


(Syllables represented by
1.

initials,//,/*,

/f/

from memory, pointing or writing the notes. etc. Chromatic syllables indicated, s; *.)
6.
7.

2.

3.

JrJjiiJJ r^jj^jjhjjjj-i^jjujjij
d
8.

i
ni

m smd

(f

m
fo

s ni

d
11.

ni

a s

s ni

m
md
s
a

9,

12.

13,

^*jjJrri Jjj;^JiijrrjJiii^j-^Jiirr^
i

t
s

^^m
d

14.

s /n s

r s

ni

r i-\d

s r ni d^

ni

15.

16^

17.

;
d

J J
s

J 1^ J

-I

rJ

^
rf

y^-W
ff

mvjY^^^^^
18.
19.

20.
J


s
I

iJ ^
d

ti
s
t

s o

m
22.

d /T"

r i

tt

d
24.

21.

^^
=9l
t

23.

25.

26.

^
s
t

-
s
s

d
.

Seven.tee, in this 28. 27.

d d V' key is F sharp? flat-seven, a


s

m f
30.

dm
is

r'

half-tone lower

F natural.
31.

J ^ JJ

j^ J
t

UJ jijd
t
I

d d'r
32. As soon as

^
s

29.

r'r^j^i^JiiJj
ni

ni

r s

I'liJi f t d

t^^'Trrr"^
d
t
I

fm r

(Forconvenience,take exercises in bass clef in the same compass as those in the treble clef.) should be practiced. (See p. 7.) it can be done with sonje; accuracy, steps and half-steps

Play these intervals and sing with syllables the scale tones included in each. (See

p. 8.)

33.

34.

35.

36.

37.

38.

Ift

Reading Lessons, Key of G.

Directions: Practice eath lesson in twelve ways, using the instrument only where indicated thus ^ unless it be necessary to make further use of it to keep in tune. Use lah or loo unless doh,ray are specified. -35^1. Impress upon the mind the memory tones, (the notes in the measure at the beginning of each lesson.) 2. Go through the lesson singing only the memory tones.Think the others. Tap for every note. 3, Sing the lesson with syllables doh, ray, etc. 4. Sing it with lah or loo.^ 5. Sing the memory tones; play the others. (Do not both play and sing a note.)^6. Play the memory toneS;sing the others. Keep time always. ^7. Sing the first note in each measure-, play the others. 8. Sing the lesson, beating time with the hand;accent the fifst note in each measure. 9. Sing the first measure,think the second.Beat and give the omitted measure exact time. Alternate throughout. Again, omit the first, Sing the second;and so on. 10. Omit the second note in each measure. Beat. 11. Omit every three, mee and five,soh.(In Nos.lHto 20 omit all memory tones indicated at the beginning of each.) 12. Write or point the lesson.

Learn the memory tones, the tonic chord.

i
One
of the scale, doh, the

m m

m
p

00
line.

^m
i

key-note on the second

fe^^

(J

Two
0-0

notes to a beat.

n\^^\n n

\^h
,^-1

j-/^'^ij^^ \i'Jf

^m

The memory tonas include

^^

five,soh, in two places.

#i4

rw

i[;p , pp ippr ^
pr-^
-

1/

^m ^
'

Go through every lesson in the twelve ways prescribed.

m
t

^^
r
ir

m
itf

^
=*
If

6.

Never force the voice. Sing

in tune.

Chromatic tones are never memory tones

in these lessons.
|ij

-Hh^
What
J3ffi
\&.
-'

w^ ^

ir

r"^-

-^
i

^
--*

does each figure of the time-signature indicate?

^'^''JMJ'JM'lM^iiMjIj-jjIjjj Ijj
are the letter

What

names

of the scale in this

key

n
What

t
-9-7;.

g=te

other character could be used in place of f ?

r^

Uyijjij^-

^m

IT
The memory tones include
three, mee, in two places.

E
'ml *^

S
I

cT"

^jjj ifrrr
Each beat has the value

jjJJ
liii
l'i

'|JJ J

J^'^

/^

12.

of an eighth note

'!

1^1
If

liiii

" j|ii i|"l||rii||


ltj

13.

these lessons prove difficult, practice should be in Bk.l of this series.

,v
14.

;jj-j-i;j"J

iJ-J'j';iJ''J|
foot.

i^^
'

i^^

uvj

Never beat time with the

r
*

''"
I

i'''^nii
to

ijjjjjiiM

15.
i\
II

m ^^
^^,

Accurate attack; no sliding from note

note

ur*i h
ii*

iJTi

d d

hhh ir^ a^^-^

16.
o^^
B

Two memory
4 * w

tones, two, or ray,

^
^
U
J J
.

J^J^JmP^'J.

and one,doh.
iczz:* ==

^ *

17.
e

Four,fah, as a

memory

tone with the key-note.

JpJlJJJ |J^J

If

[5

^
I

18.

Six,lah,

and the key-note as memory tones.

^
19.

:^ ^

jjjijj'^ i^jj^i^jj ijjjjijjj irr^jijj^


JJ rr

Six, lah,in another place.

" o

ni

H A
11

^
Hj.i

^-^

^^
-^

^^
i
*
fi
i

20.

Include seven, tee.


4.

^o

u^rrir

^
*
23.

m
I'
day.
II

The bass
;>'"

clef.

Sing the

first note at the pitch of the first note in No. 19.

f li
j.

ir r

22.

Be exact as

to the length of notes.


l

Vi
24.

j'H^jj n
the

uy^
Far
'
I

Beat, accent, repeat.

When

sun

at

mom a^

pears

ov-er the roll- ingr tide.

25.

.f'j'j'

'^

l^'/ Trees

,hij
-

lllJ^

1^^
-

'

tJuton their green ar

ray.

Come

gain

hap

py

18

Reading Lessons from Popular Melodies.


1.

SIOUK

zHP^^

^^Mj .;j
^
JJ
' 'l i'^l
\

r^r C;N-J3l^ J^J'JJXj.^'^'H^'>^''


i;^'

ff, If

^^^.

Ip^xf^^^'^Tn.^Mj
-'
If.

J^

i #J

O^

li

2.

Fasf.

^^_
J J
v3.

J
|

jJi^r rr
I'

-'^'irr

'^
JII

J"J

|J-

p r

^
p J
i

J^

IJ

^
p
f
,

J.^^i

Moderate.

*TJ. 4 *
4.

h J J
i

^hlJ

J=ii

JjJj|J-Jj.J-|J^_4a
ja
i

i
p
|J

/'as/'.

^^j^

|i'i-j^|j-;j-

^^^^^^^
^H'^'j' ;^jjjj
^h#
5.
/'as/'.

^
J J

/3

ip

ir

p(,

P p

r.

g #
6.

^
J
ij

^-^'ippp

^^"^TKJ
I

^
r
i

* 1^

^
ft

rJ. n n ^-h^

^jllJ-l^

Moderate.

* 3:
7.

^^^^E^
Slow.
8.

J^ Irr

ir f r ppir rr
ft
.

1^ J

Jl

h
4*^'
9.

j':3|JJjji,]jj%rJjy.,)ji^JfYirrrrJ Jj^^
i

^
i
,

Moderate

jJJiJij^'JiJ
Moderate.

r^ J^ir^'3i;,t^.iijij;]igijj^ir
isi
\

r<

rs --^'~ -^

jg.'j'N10. Slow.

Fine.

II.

I'

^^ ^^j
'

D.

^ f p^j'i*
^^i

'^'

ir

.V.

#Vfr^Tir^rtT

'

fir

i'

'u j,f4f^^^-4f^

Flow Gently, Sweet Afton.


Moderate.

19

Words by Burns.

1.

Flow gent-

2.

How

ly,
y,

loft

Af-ton, a - mong the grreen braes, Flow g-ent-ly, 111 sing thee a sweet Af-ton, thy neigh-bor-ing hills, Far markcl with the cours-es of
sw^eet

^
-

=5
song in thy clear wind- ing
praise,rills;

^
a
I
-

My
There

Ma-rys
dai
-

^m
sleep by

the

ly

wan-der

as

mur-mur-ing morn ris-es

stream;

Flow

high,

gent

ly sweet

Af-ton,

^^
dis
-

l-=t
turb not her
cot
in

^
o
fair.

My

dream.
eye.

Thou

stt>ck

dove whose ech

re

flocks and'

my

Ma-

ry's

sweet

my

How

pleas -ant thy

banks and green

wild whist-ling black-birds in your thorn - y sounds from the glen, Ye val-leys be - low "WTierewild in the wood-lands the prim - ros - es

den; Thou green crested blow.There oft^as mild

i ^
Slow.

s
lap^-^Hng, thy

^^
-

9
I

scream-ing for eve-ning creeps ov - er the

bear,
lea,

charge you,dis - turb not my slum-ber-ing The sweet scent-ed birch shades my Ma - ry and

-"
\

^-0

me,

s
f
way;
Well,

The Rock

beside the Sea.


C. C. Converse.

i^i^iU-- J'J\|-JUMj
1.

'-

N:
cur
-

J'
is

i
on
rest
-

^
her
less

well
to

^ ^^m s ^
2.

The

not the woods are fair, wild waves thun-der on the shore.
tell

me

Now spring

The

lew's

cries

Un

^
mel
-

know how bright -ly

there

In

joy

the young

^
leaves
o
-

m
play.

How
Come

my watch -ing heart are more

Than
^

all

earth's

dies.

n
sweet
back,

N--

J'i'i
eve

on winds of morn or my o - cean rov - er,

come!

vio There's but

j The

ij-

^'r
let's

1^^^
be;

breath may one place for

Yet
Till

me

jask
I

N\,li^rjr^
me, woo me not cangreet thy sum ft
to
sail

N:
lone lone

i^tt^
rock rock

leave

home,

My My
^

by
by

the the

sea;
sea;

Yet
Till

*
ask
I

i^^l'

j^

i-14
to
sail

''

l-l

f-

llil^

me, woo me not cangreet thy swift

leave

Mv

home,

20

The Three Sailor Boys.


Marzials.
Fnsf.

J
1.

/'
jol
-

J'
ly,

J^-

;^
-

Oh! we're up

three

jol

ly

2. There were three fair

girls in

mer-ry
-

3.Then

we

spokp,we jol

sail or boys, Ports -mouth town, sail or boys,

^^^ ^
i
ir
r

And we're new - ly home from And each one was like a All arm in arm so

^^

i'

;'

j^ J'
i

^
kee,With

MM-

South pos

our hearts still ting-ling with the salt, salt wind - y on the tree;There was great eyed Mar-g:a-ret, and trim set Sal, jol - ly for to see;"Girls be - side the wa - ter all a - round the globe
-

Am -er-

And the And sweet

^
Know

-^

IT

^m
*
P
Kit

^ %
''
;'

i\

J'
sea.
see.

P
ye

^
Oh,
No,
So,
.

^^^
hon hon
hon-ey, we've our - ey, tho'your - ey,while our

tum-ble and the toss-ing of the tie from theXorth so fair to how to dance as mer - ri - ly as
:
1

pock-ets full of
pock-et's full of

^^
et's full

pock

of

h
mon-ey.Will you

^^ ^^
trip,

^^
trip,

7!'

F
^

i
i'l
:

tefe
P
trip, will trip,
trip,

p
it
it it

^'^'J

^^

you
won't

trip

mon-ey,Wewont
mon-ey,Come and

trip,
trip,

trip,
trip,

we

trip
trip

come and

1^

^^

sail and there is singling, and the

thun-der in the gale. wed-dingbells a-ringingAnd the o-cean and the Chang- es and commotion And the

r p And our

^^ ^ ^ ^^
r p p good ship is plung ing to be par - son has pock-et - ed the good ship a-plung-ing on the
I

on the quay? For the wind is in the on the quay Till you've set the clerk a on the quay? For we sail-ors love the

J'J'J''^'

free,
fee.

W
1

sea."

"e^

-^

Um

The Key
of C and G. Practice

of D.

21

Play and sin^ the scale of D. Make use of the following' picture" of the key as in the keys it daily until it can be written from memory in forty- five seconds.

^
o^^
;^^^

3il

3s:

r^ijc

^O^i^

^iE

3$: '-e?^

ac

sr^

Directions for individual practice.

1.

Play the phrase. 2. Sing and play; doh,ray,etc.3. Sing


it

doh,ray, without the instrument, 4. Sing with lah or loo without the instrument. 5. Sing

from memory, pointing or writing.

^
1.

3.

6.

7.

'r^
d
8.

9
d

"

'

*_[ m 9rar
s ni

i
'

s ni

d d
9.

fd m d d
s

MZI
s

'

r^if'^jj ^-0
' '

"

"0
s

ni s

md

d
13.

s ni

d d

10,

11.

12.

14.

^^j^j
s

ii

'^'-0-^

-^0
s

"4

'
r

-^
r

:*=:

ms
16.

d d

d d
17.

d
18

r ni

f m

m
s

ji

df

15.
'^

19

20.

21.

^rJ^JiJj^jjj-^^jjijjj^'ijj^-^ rii^jj^ -0 "^ * " _^0 "0\^ IJT*


^jjT
t

"10

'

d 22.
f>

f s m md f
23.

p
d
ni s

wSt

24.
it ^

'^

jJ^ -rrjji ^ 9 "9


s
t

J'Ji
s

d
b

ni

^
^

25.

d 26.

s f

///

27.

"0^0
s

i
m
s
fi'

f'

d' r

^
m
it.
1',

JS:i=t
r' ni

f
or

s
t|

#
33.

1,1?

or

retains

its effect

28.

29.

p^
w w
/'

Pi
/ m
d
ni

^
I

throughout the measure or until cancelled by another

30.
\'0
#1

31.

32.

JjijJi'^^^"^-^^rr''
d
t_

a
p. 7.)

s_

f m

dt

ms

Steps and half- steps. (See

Play these intervals and sing with doh,ray,etc., the scale tones included in each. (See p. 8.) Also, sing the upper part of each phrase playing the lower,and then sing the lower part playing the upper.

34.

35.

36.

37.
t> t*

38.
1

ik

-^
* >

o
40.

o-xy

^5
39.

O-

^
41

"cr

^ -^
42.
i

^=B= TT <*

"o

cr

4fc

xy

43.
| '

-^
"Xjr-;

^
45.

o o
o
fc

B=

o * oi:
46.

- iuii^^u^^u
47.
*

^^>'

44.

o
<^

33:

o
3S 3i:

O tt O

o
'">

" o -

TT is:

"

"

"

" -.^

22

Reading Lessons, Key

of D.

Directions. 35fl, Impress upon the mind the memory tones, (the notes in the measure at the befrinling of each lesson.) Review these at each repetition in practice. 2. Go through the lesson sing'inic 3nly the memory tones. Think the others.Tap for every note. 3. Sing- the lesson with syllables. doh, ray',etc. Instrument not used. 4. Sing it with lah or loo. Instrument not used, (unless necessary to keep in tune.) ^ 5. Sing the memory tones; play the others. 'Do not both play and sing- a note.) ^6. Play the memory tones-, sing i\\e others. Keep time always.^ 7. Sing the first note in each measure;play the others. 8. Sing the lesson, beating time with the hand; accent the first note in each measure. 9. Sing the first measure, think the second. Beat and give the omitted measure exact time. Alternate throughout. Again, omit the first, sing the second and so on. 10. Omit the second note in each measure. Beat. 11. Omit every three, mee, and five,soh, (except in Nos.15 to 18.) 12. Write or point the lesson.
^-

Sing softly and carefully.

g=fe

iJ

iJ

1^
u

Follow directions accurately. Omit nothing.

%^: pSE53
Accent
is

*
important to rhythm.

u^

^^ ^^
''''^J

lk.h\t nj^L^JJ

^^

^=qe
Cj
r

^zsu

I'jj

s ^m

Persevere.lt takes a long time to form habits.

t
i

i
If

'

;Jt.i i J ^J4j,;jJ''ij'j^ji7^;'JMjJv ipri'ji^


these lessons prove difficult, practice in Book
1

#^
*
6.

instead of this.

^LJ

1-^

t
#
0-

^
^w-

^i^
W^
izfta:

Take breath fully and include waist action.

ifc=

^ ^
you wish
to
I

"

M"
i

If

know about breathing and

^
N J^ J^
)r

registers, see "Introductory. Lessons'.

r.j:j

/JTij

In

what two ways are

8th. notes

expressed?
I

2iA

J' -y

iUu^^^
m m m

^^^^^m
K J'
J'l

Use the instrument where indicated

^
10.

h^

IJ

^^^^^P

more

if

necessary

to

keep in tune

Never use the instrument

to

save you the trouble of thinking.

23
11.

Take the lesson as slowly as you

like; but be accurate in

rhythm

12.

Give the. letter

names

of the scale in this key.

IH (n
13.

r^iijj

ijJ-'J-j

jJ'j iJJ'jii^ij ihJ'jjij

Each time before going through the lesson, be sure you are in tune.

yrtirr
14..

jaa-j^.r ^ji'J-'J'j-

iJ''}'J'J'J^jjJ''J'j

o.

j^j'ja^ijjj''prrg

Review the memory tones frequently during practice.


Ce

-P

^>^

^Mt ^.
15.
t
jl

J-

II

I^JHit^^f lTJC^'i ^'J


I

cij. irjjJ^iJTj

Two, ray, and the key-note as memory tones.


1

Q
-j^f^

^
Four,fah,a

Jj
memory

J
tone.

J^^-^
F;>

i #
<

16.

I^ES
17,
I!

^
Six, iah,a

2?

^-^UJ-JI^
J
J

memory
I

j ;|^
18.

^
tone.

2ZIZ

1^

^
^

Seven, tee, added; two- places.

fei

#a

i
19.

i
r=r^
P Q

'^

^^
*

Learn

to

sing either part, playing the other on the instrument.

-o^-^

i=t=f

f J

'i

^^
*

aaa ^2^
t&lii^-i-^Xjp
Master no 22. z^.
Come, come a -way. No de
-

20. Bass

clef.

#=FF
r

^ r

!# =|f==^

r f

r r

^
l

J^
'

^^^^^\\.\
^
The laughiny^
little rill

points with great accuracy. Accent these rhythmical ^


f\

.9^ 23
^11

1^

T'j

J IjJ^

f-

'iU-

J'-

I.

:|

li

lay

Mountains and val-leys bring^a

welcome

to thesprng.

in ripples

^m
down the hill
Wake,

25.

1
a- wake,

Leaps

wake.

^4
1.

Readings, Lessons
SIoiv.

from Popular Melodies,


Fine.

jJ.i
^l^^
3.

iijij Moderale.
i I

^ J- .i J

J^-J

JJ-N jjjjjj|JJJ|fmrr^'i'rr
i

i^

^^H|

J 7J^;0

J''J''

i'J'lJ'J

'/jJJ^J^J'J

J^'J'-IJ'J'i'

^^
to

\ j,j';ao J'> ppff^,j


i

JMpjq^^'J

i'jM;']^;7>^
I
I

4.

Moderate.

i:i-i's

u jj

J i"^

/J ii.iw^'i^ Ji
5.

n u: ;^^
I

/V?*A

^^ \^\^W^ T
\

\\\^

IHytlJl J-J-UyJY^IJJ.

Jj ;.'

w^]^j^-J ii j.j:JH-Jv|J-J-ii^J^TM J-j- i^j^^


6. /Vz^/.

%r

"J

i7^
2=^

^a
^
i

^
i

j .j

Ji^-^j i^-jj:u

?^
7.

Moderate.

^
##
'i
i

Mi^'"!
#

J^
j'l

jjj^;
ca
"rj

jj jjij^

j;ii^jjj]ic;rcrO
^

j\

>
I

M ^

j3

8. Slow.

^J.^

'

'

'^ ^

^
i

p
9
.

-^^

^-It

rH^jj
1

P
^11

Moderate.

-'jijji'i^jijj
^

i.;^lj- i.^^i!!i^
rint.

. *

^
*'
i

rpT

f'

^'^if

jjjjiJJ'^^irpr r

^ i'j'jj'iJi'

^Mrprp

^ j'^^'ir

prf

There neath the Trees.

25
Bucalossi.
Adapted.

^
Fast.
1.

w
I

^
-

There neath the


will

2. "Love,

trees love

to

g-eth

er,

In

the bright
I

sum
leave

mer
you

you

ev

er,

Love,

will

W^^.

^m

i I
f.

1.
IS

if if
light,

%
iJr

m
i
is

weath nev -

er,

Two
Ev

er;

hearts are - er to

me

te
Nev-

* *
3s:

m
^ ^ bove
part.
-<^

^
love-,

Sun-shine Pre-cious

to

bright, be.

w^
?

ii rij
i
lives are will I

iL^-i
Song-sters a
-

^^
War-ble
Heart bound
^

of
to

Two

there
love

^^
er

to

heart;

Love,

you

* *

TT
*

t
^.

te
f i W

zzt:

^
to
I

f
each
will

nit

ing,
er.

ev

^
^
Joy - ous they
Faith-ful

W
ev

Love Love

oth leave

er

plight

ing,
er,

you

nev

5 i
llZi

w
i

and

sing, true

stroll -ing
-

^
er

long,
I,

? Ev
-

?
er the
to

u
song.
-

same

old

am

Nev - er

say good

byeV

26

Darling- Nellie Gray.


Moderate.

i tfii
1.

J'

i'

J'

J'
val
-

j>
ley

J-

There's a green 2.When the moon 3. My ca - noe's

on the a-bove us and the rose un - der wa - ter and my


lit - tie

y shore, There Then stars were shin-ing too, ban -jo is un-strung. And
old Ken-tuck
-

^
Gray.
shore.
\

B.R. Hanby.

^
I

I've
I'd

whiled man - y hap-pyhoursa take with me dar-lingNel-lie

way,
Gray, more;

And we'd

^
lit
-

don't

want

to

live

an

My

'

S
'

E5
p
p
r
cot-tage door

tie

p p Where she

lived,

my own
jo

dar-ling Nel-lie
I

^^
you
a

sit-ting and a-sing-ing by the float a-lon^ the riv- er in my eyes will be cast downwardand my

^^
my

red ca-noe, While ray song shall be un-sung, While I


lit

-tie

ban
stay

to Nel-l-ie

would play./

on

the old Ken-tuck -y

4*11

J'
Nel
-

/lie

J
Gray;

J^

J^

J^'

^^
-

^
And
1 11

poor

They have

tak

en

way

nev

er see

my

dar-ling an

more.

am

sit-ting by the riv- er

and

Im

J^

weep-ing

all

^ ^
the
day,-

r^

J^

J^
old

'

h
-

f
y
shore.

e
Lady
Scott.

For you've

gone

from the

Ken -tuck

Doug'lass.
Miss Muloch.

Moderate.

1.

J' y Could

i'
ye
-

i
come
a
call

''

J'

^
Doug word
days
-

te

s
Doug
lass;

2.

Nev

er
to

3.

back to scorn back

me
ful

lass,

the

should grieve that are

you,
not!

r
the old I'd smile as Mine eyes were
In
like
-

ness
as

that

knew,
do,

Id
Sweet

be
as

so
yx)ur

faitlT^ful, so

sweet
blind,

an

gels

smile
truth

on

your

words were few:

Know

you

the

now

i^

'

J
lev
-

Jing,

^
-

E
Doug Doug Doug
-

Doug
ev

lass,
er,

lass,
lass,
lass,

me
up

shone
in

Heav

en,

Doug Doug Doug

iass,
lass,

f=W=f^
ten ten ten
-

lass,

der der der

and and and

true. true. true.

The Key
written from

21

of A.

Play and sin^the scale of A. Practice as before directed until the"picture"of the key can he memory in thirty- five seconds.

zxs:

3s:

3s:

o o

fW

35:

xe:

Directions for individual practice.l.Play the phrase.2. Sing and play; doh, ray, etc. S.Sing without

instrument doh,ray.4,Sing without instrument lah or

loo. 5. Point

or write the phrase.

m
u

1.

4.

o.

6.

^jjiJrrJjiJijJrirr^j^if^jjJi
r/

wsmd

(f

ms

ff

dm

m
12
'

mds

^^
7.

mdsms

M fes
8.
s

9.

10.

11.

13.

Xj+J-T ^jj iv'


i

j^j^
dm
s

J r r r ^

J ^
.<?

J^^
.<?

m ri

ni

d
17.

ni

d
18.

m
19.

14.

15.

16.

jj
s

iiJ

rrpJ irJrr^ i^^jj^ ^ irr^ irr^'j


/m
r ds

/s

d
21.

fm

d
23.

m
24.

r d

u^
m
I

20.

22.

25.

///

<''.

rt'

</

///

.v

./'

.v

m
w

26.

27.

Three,mee.>nx,lah,and seven, tee in this key are sharp; flatted thev are natural. 30. 31. 29. 28.
'

when

I:

^'
d d'r

rn^ ijj

JJ'

i^ rr 'Trr^
d

^^ J-h JJjJ iP^^^J^j iJ^^J^i* y"ff^


i

mf

fs d

rmmrsd

dtl

l_sni!i

dt

t_

ds

t^l

32. Steps and half-steps;as: A-Gif-A; A-Gb-A; A-Bl'- A; A-Bc-A.


duet, playing one part

Span the following intervals using syllables as before directed. Also, practice each section as a and singing the other.

i^
i r

33.
-^>-

34.

35.
-XT

36.
".

o
38.

"
39.

IV

<>

**

t^

TV

37.

40.
**

o
8

<>

"

o XE

"cr

^
42.
"

S
ry

o o o <% o

<^ <>

^- *p -o

IE
W

"Tt

xr U ^^=

43.

IM

8 H^ ^=e= -C

O ^ 33u
v

*
>

O O

**
7Z

35:

^ O <> H " o
JTt

,
il

*^s

Reading Lessons, Key of A.


1. Impress upon the mind the memory tones/the notes in the measure at the be^ineach lesson.; 2.,Go through the lesson singing only the memory tones. Think the others. T;ip for every note. 3. Sing the lesson with syllables, doh, ray, etc. 4. Sing it with lah or loo. 5. Sing the memory tones;play the others. (Do not both play and sing a note.) 6. Play tlie memory tones; sing the others. Keep time always. 7. Sing the first note in each measure; play the others. 8. Sing the lesson beating time with the hand. Accent the first note in each measure. 9. Sing the first measure, think the second. Beat, and give the omitted measure exact time. Alternate throughout. Again omit the first,sing the second and so on. 10. Omit the second note of each measure. Beat. 11. Omit certain memory tones. 12. Write or point the lesson. Use the instrument in directions 1, 5,6, 7; also in reviewing memory tones.

Directions:
of

Tiiii^'

U f^

1.

A new

picture of the key; doh in the

^
P
=Mfc
j
1

^
i=
r

3nd space.

F==^^==r=^

Sing

softly.

^ JtZZIZZJE #
I

^ J

J =:g

'I

Learning

to read

music

is like

learning a language.

^^ J J

JJ

Ic;

^^
1

^^J;HJ^-

4a^4^
:ffS:
^
^

The memory tone,mee, in two places.

^^
6.

i^Hn

j^jjj^

pj
J J J

i^h^'if^^ iprrF
J

O iij^ i i ^ iS
1

Guide the voice by the eye; don't depend upon the ear.
J
J
J.

rr

^!
1

Breathe fully but noiselessly. (See'lntroductory Lessons."^

J
tfj

1^*^^

J|j^j

U
u.

j 1^ji

J ^j J

r^

Give the letter names of the scale in this key.

f^^
8.

*=t#
i

n
' 1

';t^

ilej
.

ac=i:

^t^

1^
9.

j,;,^j, *" ^ j.^j, ^


|

|j..j,j',|

,_-

^Ui|^,

j'.j,|j^;,^

r*

No slipping or sliding from note


i

to note.

'!'''

!:

'M
=

'

.1
i

jjjjijjj u.
'^
'
I

U fc^

10.

'^

r r

i*^

*^

'

^^"^

^m

29

u
*i

11.

Keep
it

in tune.

i
Accent well the

^^
first note of
I

^JJ

H^J

|JIJ|JJ

IJJ^^

Cj''

12.

each measure.

'f-^f. pjJ^JiJ'JJ
13.

IJ'J'J'j- Ji h

Lhjtji^J/

jo

;J-J'p

^'^''^
l

M
*i r

Name (letters)
i

all

the notes in No.l3.


=3=

J;ii!WjjrJ"J jjji.
14.

jjjjj'i^f UJ^^iqi;
at the end.
l

Sing either the higher or the lower notes

jjlji
15.

JWJ'J'IN'^'f
Memory #

ii^iJ^^iJ'

:J-^r'

'

^''^>^"'^^i'li'ij'|

tones, including two, ray.

3^:
16.

^^ ^^
memory
tone.

Memory tones4ncluding

four,fah in two places.

^^
!

=S=Z2

j
17.

;^jji;^,i ijJjJii^-,!
Six, lah,as a

jj c;

^'^
-

^^
I i

u ^

i
l

^^

^^
Jilii'i

<j

^ii^jj g? j

rrr

M j\U
18.

Seven, tee, as a
i!

memory

tone.

pJJ-i ;JJii3Jlr-lpJ%JilJ,MJ.
Sing each part
separately,- then play

j^JlJ^N ]J:]

^l JJiUJJiJJ
19.
i

one and sing the other.

ii

iJiJiJ
(for

20.

Fifth line bass clef at the pitch of the second space treble clef

convenience.)

^Mti'i

v'

J r

pr

22. Rhythmical accuracy. Strong accent.

23. Dotted notes and rests carefully observed.


1

i (
24.

I,

I'M

\\\Pi
,

hix-i^'-iui^M
and banners they come.

March-ing

to

vic-to-ry and glo

-ry.

Withmus-ic

^'^i^i'-.l.
Ah! nev -

'

"

^^J^^S^^-to^^
I'
II'
l

^^^^
tolls

er,

nev -er more.

Sol -emn-ly,

mourn -fully,

the

bt-il

80

Reading Lessons from Popular Melodies.


1.

*a
Mei
2.

Fast.

*^
fast.

feffU^^4lf

Jij.

ijju^ rr -M
i i

4^.M^.^^^
itfjij:jjo
3.
.sVo//^.
i,
i

'

'
I

[>

m
^^
"
'

i'J''^^^''^

j3ji

-^y^r-irnjrT^^^''^r

'"^-i

'

g
a
'

iS:

^
Modei'afe.

^5^^

m
I

w
r

^
p
i

S^

'#

4.

Fine.

f ^ f

w
P'

1^

ri Oil, * *

pir
r

f-

^
ii

|i^

^
^^

G*

P'Mr

g
i

/?.c

*i g^=fr
it

5.

Jfo(fe?'afe.

jjjjjjj''^ijjj;'ijj'Jvirpr^'i^pr-i^i'^:' J-J
^^j^ >irpr

^^^ w^
6.

pNpf

^.Nj'ij.j^

Slow

N
g

rPPpp
^' ^

Fine.

41
7.

SIoio.

!''"
'iiii'iii
I

'iiiiiiiii

i|i|ii|iiii

i
i

.i

-v

i i

Jj'Ju. ji ii
|

8.

SIOKK

>T':j'J:u.m

iJ' rrif

h^

"^-jjij.mjj rrr

-'
i

4^^VrtHVrH^E^^^^^4^^
9.

^?
S*

Moderate

^^^g^^^

Fine.

^^

wr.

Chime

Asrain.

31

u r^
1.

J'jiJ
^

J'j
^

25

J
-

i
Now
Lin- ger

2.

Chime Chime

a-gain, chime a-gain,beau- ti a-gain, chime a-gain, beau -ti

ful ful

bells; bells;

thy soft mel - o - dy a while o'er the

^^^
N:IJ:
sails

Bishop.

*:

floats on the wind, deep, dusk-y bay;

^tt^
in
-

Burst - ing at Faint - er and


I

ter-vals ov - er the faint - er thy mel - o - dy

Leav - ing a swells While the land

'V i

iii\i
train fades,
of re -fleet
-

j:

j'j
i

m
left

ion

be

M
*fc

and thy sounds die a

hind, way.

Night with

An-swer-ing ech-oesthat gath-er its cold lamp now sil-vers


l

a - round the deep,

iU'j
Call

iJ

j:

hp
be-loved

[;

Ij
Voi
-

^
ces
of ly I'm

$
friend-ship
still

On

from the heart ev - ry the bark sails from the well

shore;

Lone

on

the

i
ring

3:
sound, weep.

=^
Bid
-

wa

in each ters to

ding
for

me
the

wel-come that chim, with


bells that shall

'^

#^
cheer

i
a
tear.

Weep

me

no

more.

Chas. Swain.

The Old Clock.


J
That

1.

n
The

j>

^^

^
a a

J.

L. Molloy

ri

u
U:

2.

old, old friend- ly

neat smil

est; ing;

m
And
the be

the house -hold 8tock,Was the bright-est thing clock of stood up there it old, old clock, As voice was that

^
J'
a a
I

hands,
bless'd

tho'

old,

had

touch

of

gold.

And
All

^
so
its

and

the

time with

mer
J'
'

ry

chime

the

r r r chimes sang still win ter hours

lj
-

^
sweet
guil
-

i' est.'Twas But ing.

J^ m
i

m
tor
too,

E
tho'
its

mon

pee-vish old

voice

had

that

words were

few, Yet

they
it

lived though
call'd

U
4^"

tire- some

clock

As

at

^
-

na day

tions

al

tered;
ly;

And

its

break

bold

When
r
-

CJ l;
friend- ship

^
ly.

the

voice

still

strong warned

old

dawn
'-

look'd

gray o'er the


ji
it it

mis

and youngWhen the voice of ty Way, And the air blew


*

fal- tered,

ve

ry

cold
i^z:

J)
tick" tick"

'^'

i\

-^j.

i'
For

^
Ten Ive
giv giv
-

"Tick. "Tick,

said, "Quick, said, "Quick

quick to bed. out of bed,

For Five Ive

en warn en warn

ing; ing;

^^
Up
YouU

i'"' quick-lyand

rise soon in the morn or sure- ly you know You'll nev-er go nev-er have health,you'll nev-er have wealth Un - less you're up soon in the morn

rrrr

S2

t:

hh^

^m
-

ing."
ing.''

:^^

Fair as the Morning-.


Geo.
Moderate.
F.

Root.

1.

2. 3.

Fair as the morn-ing,bright as the day, Vis -ion ofbeau-ty, An -gel of slum-ber, bright as the day, Vis -ion of beau -ty, I have known Dreaming and waking Fain would I tell thee all

^^
*

^
s

by permission of the John Church Co.

h ^-

it.

fade not a \vay; tar - ry for aye;

here

all

a-lone;

^ i ^s
u.

f
#

.g^
A^^'^
Ov
-

^^
J
the

I.
er

moun -tain,

^
ov
-

^
er

^
for

3t

^
i

M j^

Chase from the spir - it Vis - ion of beau-ty,

shad-ows tar- ry

the sea. of care,

me

Come in my dreams to me. Leave but thy pres-ence there. Un - der the dream-land tree.

m
,

^^
P
the

%
f

t
XE

I
.'

f
r-

M S rr^
Far and wide
t '
i

T
I
I

p^7 Hr
I

i'iW^
r

ech-oes roll a -long, While the day -world sings its bu-sy Song;

J
I

J
I

J.
I

^
J

y^
^
-i

J
^
^^

ii
:
#
(^

ir

^"^

I'
.

I'i
are
all

^^
la-bors
to

^^

* *

But what

its

me

^ ^^
the

Un

der

dream-land tree.

The Key

of E.
memory
**

33

Practice the scale and the"picture" until this can be written from

in thirty-five seconds.

^^
hh
ijj ^
^
"

rt

i\

o o

^ Q

o o

IT

Directions: 1. Play the phrase .phrases ito 37. 2. Sing and play; syllables.S. Sing without the in strument; syllables. 4. Sing without the instrument; lah or loo. 5. Point or write the notes.

5.

6.

7.

rTj
s

ij

rpJj iUjjj i^jj-j^iiJ^jj^:^


dsm
d

fl/nsm d
8.

dm
9.

d d

d
10.

dmds
11.

sm

ma dms
12.

dsmds
13.

^B^
d
s

^
d
16.

m
s

**

*i/
r r

^rt
d

it #-^

m
-^

s s

dm d

ms

d
17.

rf ///

rm d
19.

f rmd

^
^b

14.

15.

18.

fm

fm

fm
22.

r s

Is

20.

m. 1

^
d

21.

23.

24.

25.

J- J * dm t

i
I

IJ_JJ** "**JJ
I
t

I|J*
/

i-j
d
I
is

r ni

m
is

Two, ray,in this key

26.

fe

4h^~9-

n P#eS^3^^
d
I

27

28,

named F sharp; sharp-two ree F double sharp,which has the same pitch as Gl^. 30. 31. 29.
,

W'lltf'

^
fi

;;3E

^'X.d

////

frm

d
35.

mf

f's

32.

33.

34.

36.

37
^ff jjJ ij
d d
t^l

-^h
d

i
4h^Br9-

^ ^^^jM^
s s
I

pom
fi i^ ^JJiJ
d

m
d

d' r s

m w

r s

dm

J_

t_

fm s

J.Stepsand half-Steps as:F^E-F^i;F^F-F*;Ft-G-Fl;F^G^F}J.


Span these
intervals with syllables, playing only the printed notes.

Also sing and play each

notion in duet form

39.

40

41.
**

42.

43.

8 a " --Ty

o
"

c^^^Hh8^Trg=^^ -O- B^
o
46.
^

3H

^
fl

44.

xy

o~0 8 XV
48^

ft^n 8 H ^ ^

47.

^4;^^-g--^<^^-8-^n^
-^-xy

'^

Reading Lessons, Key


;

of E.

Directions:!. Impress upon the mind the memory tones. 2. Go through the lesson singing only the memory tones. Think the others. Tap for every note. 3. Sing the lesson with syllables floh,ray, etc. 4. Sing it with lah or loo. 5. Sing the memory tones. Play the others. (Do not both play and ing a note.) 6. Play the memory tones sing the others. Keep time always. 7. Sing the first note

^
m
*
f

each measure-, p'ay the others. 8. Sing the lesson, beating time with the hand. Accent the first note in each measure. 9. Sing the first measure, think the second. Beat and give the omitted measure exact time. Alternate throughout. Again, omit the first, sing the second, and so on. 10. Omit the second note in each measure. Beat. ll.Omit certain memory tones. 12 Write or point the lesson.
in
1.

Key- note, doh, on


^ #
If

'

^^
i

first line; five, soh, in

two places.

these lessons are too hard, review Book

|^&4lU4fr3^4g
3.

^
I

^^
1

of this series.

#--

nr^-mj]
0-i^

-5^

Sing

lightly, especially

upon upper notes.

n
Do

1^
#
'

irJj^ rjJi/i ;]j ^ #

^4

^S
l

S
*:=*:

4.

not force the chest register. ("Introductory Lessons" No. 15.)

^*THi

^'J'JiitNlVJ
Take a

J'J'J^'

tli

Jjj

ll.jJ .">-"-'l

J' J'J

^
Mi
8.
9.

u S

full breath, deliberately.

:St

t
i

^d

^^
J.

F double sharp, sharp -two, syllable ree;the same pitch as

*-*-

"^

ir

^ m
Gk.
i

It

^
Name
I

What does each

figure of the time-signature represent?

J'^J'JHn

Uf^
'i

gj

i^'JV^ r'Ji'ij.

Follow directions. Persevere. Skip nothing.

#fe ?

it

^-^^
all

r-i/'J JHj'^'^-^'i^J J--^

^
u P

the notes in this lesson.

m
10.

^r
i

rfi^

''
1

M m

-*Ty

<^

^ ^ d J

^jjj

^j^^

iJ^j.i

rr^^ 1^

11.

#4^
12.

i^p:7^^
Keep
in tune.

^^^^^^^^^^^^
Review memory tones
frequently.

^
njj

35

^m
.i-jj
i

4*"^^ jH
14.

ii

Jj^iJJ
What
is

iri ij.

i;j^

j^

mxmi^^

the beat -note here?

p^.
f t

^
^JJ
r

^^^

'

15.

One,doh,and two,ray, as memory tones.

I^H]
16.

Et
s

<i

'*

rr
l

^ ^
w
i

Four,fah,a

^
l

memory

tone.

J^lrN^r
fe

rr
o
'

17.

Six,lah,in two places.

it
18.

^P
Seven, tee.

^
l

^^^^^ ^
-^*-

|^"Vj

.l t

j].rj

i-

O;i|.^"V

^^
^
'

O^^
l|'

:f!^

-^-^

19.

First learn each part separately.

yi ^^ll tJJjj N
20.

Iji."
I .

I|

The Bass

^^
#

Clef

nh

\
21.

\^^r^:^ \P

;>#^n.;
||

opp
^.y.

>

^^
many
^5

^*-

22:^

-^-=-

M=

22. Beat and sing each section

times.

IH^i

^'

23. The half note as beat -note.

^^^m
go.

Hon- or and truth Are the


24.Bef!:in to

gems of youth. beat up) on the 2nd note.


\

pin ^ih
O day
of

Be not slow,when for^\'ardyou must

^^^^^^^m
Branches gent-Iy wav-ing.

25.

days!

Iglad-ly

sing-

thy praise.

:jr>

Read in g^ Lessons from Popular Melodies.

^
^

1.

Fast.

i^Miijmjji^^i
I

Nj^j^;jipp;jijjj^
*.

^te
^
m^.

Mn

2.

Moderate.

-*>*.
|

^i

.iiii.|.rj|. |r3 jJ^I-^-J^'^^lfP

0^iP|J]h,.r] J.^j]|rr.J^|J:ji '^,J^IJ-J'/^lf p


| i

M/ri, n.r
i

^,,.r

;^^ njjijjj, rrr r^^r


i i i

sp

3.

.y/oj*'.

ii

# # #

* ^Jijj^^r

^
J'^^
J
i

fc3

**fe
*l

rj-j'jj

ij.jJ r r-J'^
i

?
'
I

5D

^a
H'JJ^
i i

^
'

J-i ijI^

12^
i

4. Modetate.

hj^

IJ.K

^I'i^lJ

^J

^J^J

J -iJ.j^Jj^J

J -^'J -i^

ML-/gj^j|Jf4^^^J^^ij.jJ-J-ij r.aj]ijjj JU v|VT


5. Moderate.

if'HiJj'^

JM

JlJYp rrprp
rir f i^ ^j J.J
I

^^^^

^'

^^^

/'^^

ii

^^
*i

c:;r-

irpr^'^^
I

^ p^Wrr^j-^if
6.
/>?.?/

if^H^^ij

j-i

rfir^ES

7.

yfffxA

f\\r^u
^"'"
I

^\n

\n'] i f.\i^^.^.^\^].^
\

m
i

Mil
11

ii^-ij

rmirrj
-i'
i

8. Moderate.

iM

ih iin

;jj,

3ji .nj ji^i^


^-

9. Fast.

The
Slow.

Valley.

37
Nag-eli.

1
1.

I'
val
-

J'

J'

Charm
Skies

2.
3.

May

ing are our

lit

tie

ley,
-

bri]^ht

a
-

bove
dai
-

spir

its

thee, ly

Smil - ing Peace and

Be
i' J'

like

all so qui et tnee, sweet

'

J^

J
I

ly,

thee,
ley,

Like an Tran-quil
Trar-quil

g
Call
-

Twin
Of
nif

ing us to ing wreaths of the vales of

pleas

^
an
-

^el's

lit

tie

dell-,
-

and

se

brow; Spread- ing out thy thy fra-grant In Em-blem to us renc;

treas-ures,

bowgiv
-

ers,

en

^^

38

Mary
Maderafp.

of Argyle.
S. Nelson.

Pi;-i^i^-

j^'j^^
ma -vis may lose its
\

g
^?^

^
I

^
*
havp

^W ^
/

have heard the

The' thy voice

love sopg to the morn; sing- ing His sweet-ness, Thine eye its bright -ness too;

Tho' thy

^
2i:

i
%

-# -9

'}%%

?^=f

seen
step

may

the dew-drops cling -ing lack its fleet-ness,

:#^

^ M ^
^ ^

W
:=^
is=t

To the rose just new-ly born. But

And thy

hair its sun-ny

hue,

Still

^
i
9

^
to

a su'eet-er song has me thou- U'i It be

i.

? * J *
XE

f
h j

III
And
I

|J

j'> ib^t

cheered
-

me

At.

dear er

Than

eve-nings gen -tie close, all theworld shall own;

I've seen an eye still bright-er Than the have loved thee for thy beau-ty, But 'twas

=^^

i^m

^^
detv-drop on not for that

f
=p^

*f*

s
On

^
^'

^^4
s

\ii ^ j

Tn
-^

S
^Ms PE

p^'j;-

the
a

rose, lone;

Tis thy voice, my gen -tie Ma - ry, I have watched thy heart, dear Ma- ry,

<<

And thy art-less,WTni\lng Andifs good-nesswasthe


=?=

^ ^^
:::^

1^ e
:|

i
^

*
-:^

P^
M m

smile wile

##

That has made this world an That has made thee mine for

^
E
-

^
Bon-ny Ma -ry of Bon-ny Ma- ry of

den,
-

SI
Ar Ar
-

ev

er,

ps

?lF^=4

gyle, gyle.
a=!

The Key of
Practice as before. Learn to write the"picture" from

39

F.
in thirty-two seconds.

memory

S^

^ o

351

<\

3s:

/^

o "
"cr

Dir^ctions:!. Play the phrase.


syllables. 4.
1.

^
d

(I to 38) 2. Sing and play; syllables. 3. Sing without instrument; Sing without instrument; lah or loo. 5. Point or write the lesson.

6.

Jj ijjjJjifJjJ m s m d d s d m d s m d m.
9.

r
a

i^^j^^ *=Z*
m
10.

frJj *
s

I I II

J
d

m mdm
11.

s ni

r^ s md s

^
m

8.

12.

13.

^ w ^ d m
s

r d

ll

rrf
d
ffi
ft

A^
r

ff f

s r

///

^^i"''i d s
d
s

injTT7
r

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.
i

^ #

dm
21,

fe^^ w
fm
s
s

i
r

m d

\i

m
d
I

jjj ijjjjjijjjjj ijJr


s
t

fm

s r

ni

dm Ids
25.

d r

dm
26.

^
t

22.

23.

24.

^jjjiijj
ni
t

ab*
d m
s
I

J J J

ii^^^j
nt

J
I

ii

jj^r
Id m
32.
I
///

d
30.

m d

fm d

27.

28.

29.

31.

^^^^^^^P^^^^
I

-tp^^
s
>/i

s' I

md

d' r

s'

ltd

33.

34.

35

36.

37.

38,

f J^
/-'///

jjTr^
rt'

^rJ^ ft d

ii

r"rrJ^i*'''^i'^i>Jj^J^iJiUJJji
s
H

ft d

m m

r s

t_

dt

t_d

39.Steps and ha]f-steps,as:I>-C^D;D-C-D;

D-E -D;

D-El>-D.

Span these intervals;


40.

also practice in duet form each section.

41.

42.

43.

44.

-^
45.

46.

%
-O-

O
TT

-^ o Q
*V

47.
5^
< <* <> <

48.

<\

II

<V

O O
Xir

41

-yy

<v

T5

O O 4 X3 XS

1(1

Reading Lessons, Key


Directions:!. Impress upon the

of F.
sing'inpf

the

memory

tones. Think the others.

mind the memory tones. 2. Go throuf^h the lesson Tap for every note. 3. Sing the lesson with the

only

syllables doh,

it with lah or loo.5.^ing the memory tones. Play the others. (Do not both play and sing a note.) 6. Play the memory tones;sin^ the others. Keep time always. 7. Sing the first note in eacli measure; play the others. 8. Sing the lesson beating time with the hand. Accent the first note in each measure. 9. Sing the first measure, think the second. Beat and give the omitted measure exact time. Alternate throughout. Again, omit the first, sing the second and so on. 10. Omit the second note in each measure. Beat. 11. Omit certain memory tones. 12. Write or point the lesson.

ray, etc. 4. Sing:

^^ ^^
1.

Can you 8ee,mentally,the new key picture?

I
"
.1

2.

Work with

the mind, not with the voice.

Ml
-af
L

INJ
tig

IJ

J l^^4f^ \^^

IJ

I'JI^ j
.
.

IJ

IJ

Eighth notes written in two different forms


^

41
11.

Be accurate with stp8 and half -steps.

i'',brr Tl
l

'"P'l>i

jOlji

fa-it.
13.

i'

Prrippr

^'^'J^i^'J^J
for

iJi^f^g
I

Read the seven requirements


!!

music -reading, on page 2

fe3
14.
^

J?1 JT3
Name
J
I

1^
j

r-

IJ^
J

m i.^J.
a J UJ
it
^

r^

m
_

IT33

all

the notes in this lesson, (letter names.)

W:\1
15.

* ^

=^

'^

J-

?
^^^

_
j''^
i

^^
>

^:

!i

%iJ iJ^^
^

'^' ir

-^^'

pp

r%^'

i^,jjj-j^pg

16,

What

figures would represent this

rhythm?

?.

m
I

^
l i

^
l

17.

18.
^^^.

jij.j

;^j j^p'''i^jj iljJ' ciT


i

J^J^.&^
J
1^.^

^m
l
1

19.
I.

First learn each part separately.

21

#
-

jQI

^ i

Jjjj

?^rr

iJIJjJ lJiN^
i

f[P
JUa
'

20.

<^^^^^^% 'ISIiT

jJJ^

Uf

J7]

21.

^^1
23.

^^
fear.

rrf'iifr^'

22. Accent, accuracy, repetition. Always beat as directed.

What's theword you bring here? Bring naught of pain or


.

Come and

brinjgrus

good cheer.

24.

ti'j> >i-iU)^-r
All
a-round,belovv',a-bove,

teems with

life

With cour-age and faith press

on.

^^
1.

Reading- Lessons from Popular Melodies.


Fast.
'

1^1

tj" r r" 'i'


l

i'
i.l

Tn

J
#''

ij

ii'
i

r^'"f
i

:'^Q-'''
l l

"

i'i

m
2.
3.

Fast

^
lU
J.

'-

pr

g"-at

J'J

U- r,r

liJ
d*

22:

Moderate.
* I*

4^-lr^^^^^W:^ 5
Fine.

^4^-1 J'

JMJ^
-9
'

a ^ m

g
>.
'^^

^i^~*"

f';j^jj i'ij.j
4.

'P-iM
^

pry

^t^
^
li/'
i;

/j.i-.

Mode /-ate.

iU'i';'i;>j^>^

^^
h
-t^

^
^
N,

Fine.

RC.

^^

i^

J'i^g'.M.^.Tll'J'J'J^lJ tiiUJ'J-J-j^rr;

J^4-^

K K

-ZIL

5. Mo(ie7'ate.

P^

* *

=j=i-J

<>

^j-

I*

f^f

jj

rJjJLT/J *kj^f^ir 4^^'i4^4^


'AA[' ^J
j

?2=^

-#-^

6. Slo2v.

^
J.

'

IJ.

i'

pr

i^"/'i-l.

/J

U'-

J\i^

7.

Fast

jjr^Ti

j,ij,j'j'jJ.hJjJ'j

piJ

'^vi.Tifp p'

8. 3fode?'ate.

^ ^ ^i
l
,

,^
i

^
|

^^Jj,
"-|(;^.ft^

^x]^
zc

ife

%^^iiiij^i:^'^'
9. S!hu>.

,lT||,

gSE^:^=ppt^

i^^^^^^M^M^^U^ff^mnM^m^

Not
Modei'afe.

Sparrow

Falleth.

43
Arr. from Franz Abt.

1.

^P
2.

Not Not

a
a

spar
leaf
-

row
let

fall

eth eth

wav

But But

its
its

God doth God doth see;

i ^ know,

Just as

Think not

WP
i
Lays a mon-arch God for get-teth

w,Wip

-TT-'^r-iS-

^ ^
^
*:
ly

when His man


then,

date
bier,

*
low.
thee.

trem

Far more pre-cious sure E'en thine hairs are num

P
i
m
m

m p p^y
g

m^
i
-

:**

m
To
a

^^^
full

^^

3
age

Than

the birds that fly

bered,

Trust Him

and

free,

Is a Fath-ers im Cast thy care be - fore

Him

And He' 11

^
*=

fe3E

5"

m
i

W^-

m
-

p m
5

3
*
-

^
eye, thee

Fath
care

er's

feE

^ ^
i
^

m ^^W P ^
for

trem Cheer thine heart, that plant For the God

^
bier,

^
er
faith
-

Nev

^
less

ed

In thy

breast

^
a

1^

%
J J
I.I

iJH

be;
soul

^^

wm

He that marks the spar tab sa-cred On His

row
lets

Will

re-mem-ber

thee.
-

Doth thy name en

w
^

roll.

*4

S
8.

iSlow.

l.WTiere

^^
is

Far Away.

Miss Lindsay
^
I

^ ^ j^
mer
-

^
re
-

;
-

now

the
to

ry

par
(lis

Some have

gone

la mis far

ty tant

mem
stran
-

And with

ber long a gers made their

fe^

:5^5

1]

III'

fires, Brightened go Laugh-ing round the Christmas wa-ters All their the world of home; Some up - on

by
lives

their rud-dy are forcd to

.^
hay?
stay; i

glow? roam;

Or Of Some

in

sum-mer's balm-y
for
-

eve-nings
ev
-

are gone from us

er,

the In the field up - on Long-er here they might not

'-^u

J'l^|j _^
dis-pers'd

^^
Far Far
a
-

Theyha^ They have They have


J'

f,

I
a a

ip
way, way,

m
all

all

and
er

wdn-dered
re
-

reach'd

fair

gion

h
-9

h
-g

J^
-^

*
wan
re
-

reach'd

dis-pers'd and fair - er a

dered
gion

^
a

way, way,

far far

E
*

-9'

^
a a

j' They have They have

3
-

m
Scotch.

Far Far

a a

way, way.

far
far

way way

Caller Herrinl
Moderate.
V-^i-\\
V.
V.

^
-

h
her
-

h
-

E
nie

fe
fish

Wholl

i)uy cal

ler

rin?They're bon

and hale-some far

^^ ^
-

in'.

m
Who'll

fr=^
buy
cal
-

F^= ^
drawn
frae

ler

her

rin.

New

the

Forth?

^:
1.

^^^..^^^..^S^^^^g^^p
pil
tel
-

;,

J,

J,

^^
-

2.

WTien ye were sleep-ing on your Now,neigh-bors,wives,cometentmy


fl

lin'

lows Dreamt ye aught o' our poor fel -lows When the bon-nie fish ye 're sel - lin'

^^l-^i^^Mfe
Dark -ling
At
as they face a word be aye

;
i

U
A
iJ'

y i^_A^^^,_yJ,
to
fill

the bil

lows,
-

our

wov
all

en

wil
fail

lo

s?

your deal

in'

Truth

will stand

when

h
buy

h
cal
-

h
ler

j
her
-

T-

j^

^
drawn

5
fish

^
J^
J"

things

in'.

Who'll

rin?Thev're

bon-nie

J-^-^^^R^=^
Who'll

s
her
-

i
J
Forth?

i'

J^
in;

ajid

hale-some

far-

--

ll

buy

cal

ler

rin

New

frae

the

The Key
Write the"picture"several times every day,until
it

of

45

Flat.

can be done correctly from

memory

in 32 seconds.

^ -^
Directions:
4. Sing
1. Play the phrase. 2.Sin^ and play; syllables. 3. Sing- without Instrument,syllables. without instrument; lah or loo. 5. Write or point the notes.

.1.
d
8.
s

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

rffJ
m
s

irr^fM^rn
dm
10.
s oi

r d

"jj^^^i^^^f^ftff^
dm
12.
s

d ni d
9.

ft

s
11.

dm

d d

md

13.

14.

m
17.

ff

r s

md

d rf

md

15.

16.

18.

19.

20.
il
l

JjJJ
d

JJ
t

f mf

21. r

22.

23.
'

24.

25.

26.

p d

^
t

r r
r

uj ^ ^
li tii

'
t

r r t d r

'

XJXxX^ ^^ '^t^* irr~p-^4


I

in

d d

in

27.

28.

29.

30.

31.

32.

*
d
t I
fi

J.jJjJlLU^ *
I I

\i^i
m
a

J
>

IUt|J|,JJjUtf
^

/' s d 35.

f f
37.

33.

34.

r
Span

r^rrJ^r
d
d' r
s

hM^^ m m
r'

"-'^^''^^
d
t

f_

^
36.

m m

r s

t_

tad

38. Steps and half-steps.as:Bl>-Al>-BhBl>-A-B(>; Bb-C-Bl>; Bb-B-Bk


the intervals,(doh, ray.etc.) and practice in duet form,(la}i or
loo.^

4(>

Reading Lessons, Key


1.

of

B -Flat.

Impress upon the mind the memory tones. 2. Go through the lesson singing only the memory tones. Tap for every note. 3. Sing the lesson with syllables doh,ray etc. 4. Sing it with lah or loo. 7). Sing the memory tones; play the others. 'Do not both play and sing a note.; 6.Play the memory toneS; sing the others. Keep time always. 7. Sing the first note in each measure; play the others. 8. Sing the lesson beating time with the hand. Accent the first note in each measure. 9.Sing the first measure.think the second. Beat and give the omitted mea.sure exact time. Alternate throughout. Again, omit the first, sing the second and so on. 10. Omit the second note in each measure. Beat.
Directions:
11.

Omit certain memory


1.

tones. 12.

Write or point the lesson.

What

notes constitute the tonic chord in this key ?

i
Nothing helps

m
to

=*==E

mastery more than writing the notes as directed.

w -Ar^

^^
*

acut^

Can you distinguish the steps and

^l==?

^
?
in
it

^m
^
its

*==i=

^m
i^
r

half- steps?

h.hJ-J' h
l

ri^'C/icj

^^ *
i

Music, like language, is learned by repeating

phraseology often enough.

^ ^^
6.

i^MM'^}
-th-^

U'J'J'^'icr

ippp

pi^J

-'^pp

L^' ^

=#=

^
^
;j'j Mi J'JiJ^

-4

'

^
i

Keeping

tune and keeping time are the two most important things.

^^S& ^m
Sometimes

^^
i i
'

^
f
i

may be

better to review before going on

-jt^n J^
8.

^.i^ri J.

;ji' fi pp r [:rippp

Don't force the voice.


'

f
9.

i|>

M' ir^
'

''T|^
l I

tP

pipr-

rrf
*

^gdt
10.

3
What
J
is

^^
J J
'

f=r=r

^
i

sharp- one in this key ?

K,8JUl

J
I

iJlJ ^* J
1

J
f

'

r ^r

I'

If

.'

^J

47
11.

Give the letter names of the notes.

#:j=ir-^'i'J-'>iJ:j [JjjOjij jJj-^i-^


i

^f^^

12.

What

does each figure of the time-signature indicate?

^j"3jJ

iJJ4i^>4cf

iQjJ rji IjlJI


I i

^
i

r^ppp

^j.

^^m^i^
J

^^ ^ ^
14.

Do you begin
J

to "hear

with the eye"?

IJ

iJ

^
u
J
IJ

w w

iJ

1^

r-^f
i^r
r

15
,

JK==::^ r
16.

u
i

fe^^ iiij^ ^i[i;iricrjicri' ^jii


i

J --#

I^ IM

17.

Do you recognize
J

the characteristic sound of six,- Jah ?

:^ 14
18.
n''

i
i

i
J
"*=

.^.-10

.p>J

19.
'

^
'-

^ 5

^
.

l-j
tf

4 ^ J J

20.
:^^!^:

^
J

rrr^^^

frr
J ^

v-^^^

P#^
^
#=t
=

^
I
i5-^

1
i

'J ^ "

ij-jrr-rsts T ?
* <

^=
21

CJtj JlJ
ih-

EJij^
r

^i i i

%}' 1
22.

J ^

f
,

ir

if

if

i^

r-f-t^-^
N'll
all

Comparatively few students are careful enough in rhythm. 23. A


, 1

^iTj Ml
24.

-Jj J'

111^ ^'N'
Tho'
it

III

'

II

Rightwill tri-umph at

last.

be

work

or play,

Be hap-py

day

25.

Ui''!i jj
Hap-py birdling onthewav-ingbough.

j'i^p
-

J^=Hyrw
Fly, far

Fly,bird

ling gay,

way.

'S

Readings Lessons from Popular Melodies.


1
.

Moderate.

ii''\'ij,jj' j>pr-.M,!.'-piipir
i

f,

if^

rirrr^ip^rf

1^ --m-

^i'-

j'j ij'^i [;j

li^p'T'ir ^P

ic>j

PPIPP^- pi^J

^P
i

^i> j^J-j

ij^j

i'Ppp

Pc;

J-^'J

iJ^J ii'rr.p
^Ist time.
'

i'

Pr

II

^
^

2. Fast.

2d

time.

'

M:
3.

g Q-STlCri^'L'-J^IJ ^'Ip
Fast.
i i

a^'/IC/^M/^jilJ i'-L^J^f

jjj Jrrcf J^'^JiJrrcrirjjijrrcri^^^^^


\

^D^Cr

^
1

r^TT-pf * ^^5
4.

Moderate.

4^''!s JJ^J *
5.
^'^

^
*'
I

r j^ij \i\'^ ^l1Ui\\ ^f/c


;

^-

iM

[;;;j,h ^ d' ^. r^
^

?-/ j
i

Mj ^r-f
k

p^^^lf-'r

^
i?.(7.

ModPrate. ^^'^-

Fine.

j^jiprni r i j Mac 1^=3^


6.

f^
l]
'

Moderate.

#^

it

^^JMJ. 0.
J.J.
|

h ^ S

m
#

^a

*=?

^^
JMp-

7.

^ ^^
/Vj.?/".
i i
\

5 .^- ipj'j J:J> dJ.J7|r-0;'IJ.^ f=

4^g^/JIJJJjjj i^r
I

[^ip pprf

JJ.J'Ji-JMJJ^j

iljU^

t^s?

G;r< frrr[r crrrrJ rrrrcr


i

rJjn^-J3j^

%fru^jJ J3;^
i

^
jJ

8. S'tON'.

*V

"^

J. J

iji

JUr
rc/ir

CJ'

^r^

-^

jjiJjJj

p'p

^rr^

^^^
9. Fast.

pirrr
[

^
i

^
ii

iS^

^*

j.j

Jj;J'^-^>Abr;|-jjij:rr

;irrij jQ'Jj u r jr J

-^^'

No, Sir!
Moderate.

49
Wakefield.
'

t'll\h\^
1. 2. 3.

II
tru
-

J
ly,

Tell roe one thing, tell

me

Tell

me why

i^
4.

Fath-er was a Span-iSh mer-chant, And be -fore "he e went _ sea, to If when walk -ing in the gar -den Pluck-ingflowVs all wet with dew, If when walk -ing in the gar -den I should ask you to be mine,
,

J J J ou scorn me yc

^H
so;

Tell

me
said

He

=at

^^
4^''
^'vhy, when ask'd

m m m
-9-9-

Tell me, And should

H^
i
\

-&

^'^'JMJ

Jj'lj

J'f j
I

HjiJ^j
No, Sir!

l;

^
\^-li \
No.

'Al
will

^
tell

a ques-tioD, You will al-ways an-swer*'No! ways an-swer No. Sir! "To what e'er you said to me. you be of - fend - ed If I walk and talk Avith you? you that I love youWould you,then, my heart de - cline?

^ n

n ^ a
f
9-^

No, Sir

"

-9^

i?

^^

fe
i
\

I^kIj^
No,
Sir!

J?

IjU'^
No. Sir!

\l^h
No. Sir!

No, Sir!

No, Sir!

Softly Fall
Slow.

The Shades.

Geo.

F.

Root.

from'' The

Model Organ Method" by per. of John Church Co.

l^-i\J

J
-

|J,J
the mists have high the
fall

J
shades
lulled

\L^
O'er

^
the

^
1.

Soft

ly

of
to

3.

Balm

3.

Far

y on

hushed and
of

still,

^^
As
the in

moon

as

eve -n ing slum-ber cend - ing

Wea
Sheds

ry on

f val ten
all

^
ley

ants her

sun's last
-

the
-

tree;

Stars

bright
sil

peace

ful

beams; From her

^'

I
dis

J
-

J
tant a a

^J
west
-

i ern
less of
hill.

^
From
Spar
-

and very

fad -ing are rays glor - ious num-ber throne she smil - eth,

From
Spar Smil
-

the
kle

on on

wave
world

sea,

dreams,

Smil

the kle eth

^
dis
-

eth

^
west
-

m
ern
less of
hill,

on on

tant a a

wave
world

sea.

dreams.

50
Modernfe.

Summer.

1.

f Sum-mer now hath come


is

U'^--

l'

^
us

-^
With Woos
its bright

Pinsuti.

J^iJPf
-

a-mon^

2.

Sum-mer

the time, when

o-cean

and gen the shore with soft


5^:

tie

em

smile; brace;

Laugh-ing,pleas-ant, gen-ial the time when boun-teous "Tis

^^^P^rt
y

^
1^^'

fc

sum-mer, na-ture

That will all our care be Looks a -broad with smil - ing

;-

M-.JU^=^e
-

I'

^-^
-

the Gokl - en sun -light tints ^lien all hearts to glad - some

ther,
-

Balm
In

y breez

Hap
Hail

^
-

:^

^^

mus

ic

re-spon-sive ca

3
mea'd-ows, beau - ty,

N^
Joy
Hail
-

this

py chil-dren roam the joy-ous time of

ous mirth
the

^
es scent
-

^
the
ev
-

wm
-

guile. face,

t=^
air,

dence

chime-.

h=k
ery
-

S
where.
time.

is

hap

py

sum-mer

Hail,

hail. hail,

bright

summer time

Hail,

hail,

glad

sum-mer

time.

S.Woodworth.

The Old Oaken Bucket.

Slow
-

t^^
dear

1.

How
The The

#r#^
to

fe:

4^-

this heart
-

are
et
et,

the
I

scenes
hail
i

2.

moss
itld

D. C.

cov-ered buck ak - en buck


^

of as

my
a

child -hood

^
When
For
et
,

Kiallmark.

treas-ure.
-

the

K
rj

K m

ron bound buck K K

^'
rec
-

j
ol
-

*
lect
-

fe^
to the the

The
Fine.

fond
of

ion

pre
re that
-

sents

ten

at
-

moss

cov

ered

noon buck

when
-

turned

them from
in

view;
field,

et

hung

well.

Tlie
I

gl orch-ard.themead-ow. the orch-ard,themead-ow, found it the source of an

^. deentan-e-Ied wild-wood deep tan-gled wild-wood.

-m

*
-

-g-

And
The

ex-quis

ite

pleas-ure.

ervlov'd mv ery lov'd snot spot which my pur- est and sweet -est that

ev

^-^

3
.

fan-cy knew; ture can yield

i The

How

* J I s I j. wide spread-ing stream and the mill that stood by it, The ar - dent I siezed hands that were glow- ing, And it with
\ '

>~^
a

tit
f^l,
fell;

>

^
e
to

i i
J. J'

and the rock where the


the white peb- bled

cat

i 1 3-^if
-

E ^ .M'
V The Then

:^

^'

i'
the
of D.
r.

ract
it

bot-tom

cot of m}' fath - er, soon with the em-blem

If
e'en

.'M
-

h!
hung
rose

J
in

^r

J w

dair
truth

y house nigh
ov
-

it,

er

flow- ing,

And And

drip

the rude buck- et that ping with cool -ness it

the well

from the well

The Key
heretofore directed.

of

E -Flat.

51

Directions: Play and sing the scale of E-f lat and name the tones. Write the"picture'"of the key as found on page 3a, but with three flats in the signature (B\>, E\>, A\>) instead of four sharps. Review phrases 1 to 28. page 33, playing and singing them in the key of E-flat. Practice the following as

i^

j^jjiiJj ijj^ ii|'iij{ijJJiiiiii Jj


i

ijjj,j^^^^
m
d
t t
I

(/

f)'

/'

ni 7.

///

f
8.

'.s'

ltd
9.

n>

.v

6.

8 o ^

^ =^

^^ ^^
<> >

10.

-^ XE

-<St-

XT XT

o o 8 U 8

=
3CSII>

# m
m'i

Practice the reading lessons in twelve ways as before.

%
Any

-0-

^fe^
may

^
^
*=#:

exercise that is too hard

be omitted until the review.

:E

^=it^
Name
all

J^i^Ji^cJ

the notes in this lesson.

#
fe

m^ S^5^ n *^^
Except
for signature

and accidentals, the keys of E and Ep look


I'

j^

^
alike.

-^

^ ij

^' J' J'

5.

B
^

double-flat

is

a half- step below B-flat,viz.A

^ =^

^m

10.

^
11

^
:#3c

^>friHi^f^^F^-^lfl^ r rrJEfe#

Eff^

3f:i=t

52
1.

Reading Lessons from Popular Melodies.


Moderate.
.

Fine.

4
^
>.

m^
m

^p iri^'ppipp7^.Mi^'j-;';'ij

-i

m^\i^r^\n^'^'\^
2. Fast.
!,i

cr

\^^>\^'^m^^
|

iJ^iJ JJJ IJJ /IIJJJ JIJ


Moderate.
J. i'
l

i^ ^l JiJprf Jte'lJ
\

'. ,^J .n
l

Jffl

3.

j^''i'i

rriJjjQiJjJLnjJJLfjj^J
i

^^Mj'nJi^
dz

fp rrr pi^^
i

^'Ic;^ jj

j^

^ ^
4. /b*/.

^
i

a
s

f r
5.

ii

f^^ rrni

^
^
HJ^
I

=S=

^
-#

^Sf

i
.^

Moderate.

^^
SIOUK

Fine.

\J

ip

S ^^ ^
Imaere.
*

^M'^'

J f

The Mirrored

^
1.

* I
Now
So

J-

ff

^
ful

y
pose

i,i

2.

a calm and the earth shall

peacefind

w
glas
-

"Seymour".

'y-K i P

w.

^
re
l

sleep Spreads o'er all the From op -press- ion

sy deep;

and from woes,

^>'F

^r

>""

i^
the

.1

iiJ

'HiJ
se
-

iiJ
an
our
-

pjJ
oth
-

In

And

an

az - ure ira-aged

lake heav'n

rene

Like

ap

pear

On

world

er of

heavn

^
is

seen.

dark-ness here.

The Ivy Green.


Chas. Dickens.

53

Fast

H. Russell.

1.

A dain- ty plant is the i S.Whole agieshave fled and their works

vy green That
de-cay'd,

creepetho'er

ru

ins

old;

'

Of
But

And

na-tionshav-e scat-tered

been;

ri^tdkoicefeodarehis meals
stout (4d
i

-vy shall

nev

I ween lit his cell so kme and er fade From its hale and hear-ty

c<4d.

ThewallsmnstbecmiiAMt^

green. The hard -y oldplant in it^

stones decagr'd To pleasure his dain

lone-lydaysShallfai-tenup- on

ty whim ; the past,

And the mould-er-in^ dust that years have madels a


Forthe stat-li-estbuild-ingman canraisels
tiie

mer-ry meal
i-.vy's

for at

him.
last.

food

Creep-ing- where no

life

is

seen,

rare

old plant

is

the

vy green,

Creep-ing:

where no

life

is

seen,

rare oldplantisthe

vy green.

J_JJ_Jli,U

54

The Key
l

of

A- Flat.

Directions: Play and sing the scale of A-flat and name the tones. Write the 'picture'of the key as found on page 27, but with four flats (BIj El> Al> Dl>) instead of three sharps. Review phrases to 22 on page 27, playinff jmd singin/?- them in the key of A-flat.

Practice the following as heretofore directed.

:>

d
d

m r^^^V^xr^^
d' r
r'

m y
\

*
r s d

i W=3S
t
I

i
Is
ff

m n I" o

mf
..

f' s

a' I

m m

did
..

fefe ftfe^g

If

"-^

" " " "

II

Q 8

w^
1.

2i

m M^j^^-^^
jy^' c^f ^'jxis
i i

OC

|ff

^
I i

w at

m ^iiAMm 5^
3.

r^n^Tf

s=

^if.

i^^E ^
itfe^ ^^3^
6.
f>

t5t

I"

^ M: ^
'j

i>V, f

f^4J^
-i-^^* fete

^
r
1

^
y^^^

01:1:

E5
^'-T^

^^^^^^^
1.

i^y^ji=4-^ijj
t* a
8.
fefe

!
1

J
i

('-

iFp

^'
i

^
I

t^ ^
si^
9.

tf

^ ^m m gn^m^rr^^^-i^

J .

r . J

^rJJJlJJjJ
;J' Ji;^, j
1.

^4^^:^

^^ ^ S^ ^ S $ =* ^T-r^ ^^ ^ r^B #^i~JE^rnnT[7cj'c?^^^ g ^


D.C.

te

1.

^^m
Jfoderfifp.
,

Reading: Lessons from Popular Melodies.


,

55
Frne.

i ^

^^^^^m

d*-

pi-'^-iT-^^-\$=i=i=^^^
2.

ZZZZI^

E^

Moderate.
:!i:

w^-

m '

==*

^*

3.

Fa^f.

Af.

a*:

^^?^
^

rrifPrr

4. AYo//'.

n^r-tr ^ '^

ij*

^
5.
1.

7 J r^JJi^
I

i^-^r^t^

?3

t/r
SIOUK

c^'

[:jc^cjCi'i[;^^E^i'"jj.7^
*-#-<-

^^m
F.W.R
xy/o?^/.

F=^4=f=^

n
P
I

w
I

#-

r^^ jj.
J^
thee
-

j^rr^

Folk Sons:.
j

^h>a
2-

;
I

In
I

JO
,

i'
I

a V V
go from thee Leave Quick bird of air
ly

How
Were

can

rd

love so well? fly to thee,

^W f^^
..^
in

5^

f
Can With
l|

^^m
^
er
to

^
this
if
1'

Thou
Brav

^
"on
-

(German.

ly

ing the

S^
1^
get - me - not, shot were heard

^
ev thee
-

4i-4i-U
dwell. See
for

my
-

fowl

sw

U
-

ers

heart snare

be;

But

the

MMf
-

^
f*
V9

Blue
Tell

f low'r that

ing

my

lov-ers prize, Sym life were spent, Fall


_*

bol

of
at

my

ing

true heart WTiere love ne'er dies die con - tent. I'd thy dear feet,

:^

s i

%
\

^^

56

Peacefully Slumber.
Randegger.
S/oiv.

te
1.

i
-

Peace

ful

ly

slum
heav

ber,

my
as

own
love
-

Ia

^
i
eye era
o'er

2.

An

gels of
ful
-

en
ber,

3. Peace

ly

slum

my

own

dar-ling ly as dar-ling

^m
#^

Arrangea. i
\

'\

one;

thou
one,

^te
xe: 3x:

thy^dear o'er thy Love watch-es

Close Float

^>'i''i>

'J

*
All

=-

l.''l

>

w'~".
-

i
lids

and die and


till

sweet smile

ly

sleep

on.

Uiings
-

lie

on
night

thee
is

thee

dark

now. gone,

Lat Care

when less how


er

bur - ied an > gels


ear
-

in

ly,

how

fe m

J7>J7J|UT'JV?^rJ^^'^l^^
^

^^
te s
si 81
-

S
%
Sleep,

round
late

lence pro - found thee shall stray,


it

^
be;

^
I

iz*

f* $ ^^m

may

m
mus
-

will Twill be to

Love nev-er
2S

scare e'en the gnats float - ing round. wipe all thv tear-drops a - way. wea-ries of watch -ing o'er thee.

^^P P P ^^ ^^
&^
JXL

-^

^^m
De
Pinna.
^

'M>

3x:
{'

JDEl

What

Fairy-like Music.

^ Jiiim
Fast.
1.

iM.n
ic

tete*
ov
-

\^i^
sea,
rest;

\^
I

What fair-y
The winds are

like
all

steals

er

the
at

2.

hush'd

and the

wa-ters

En-tranc-ing the They sleep like the

."

HiJ
'

J
-

ij
dy? Tis

I I

ii

nil
the

~i
that

sen - ses with charm'd mel - o pas-sions in in-fan-cy's

breast; Till

the voice of the storm shall

mer-maid
chain them

un

from

!'"*(

I floats o'er out their

As she min-gles her song with dark cave, And shall break the re - pose of
the main,

l 'i

\j

i^i

'

r\
the
the

^!\^m
gon-do-liers
strain,

shore and the

wave.

57

The Key
:

of D-Flat.

Directions Play and sing the scale of IMlat.and name the tones. Write "picture ''as found on p.2l but with five flats in the signature (Bt Et A\> DI GI) instead of two sharps. Review phrases 1 to Z2 on page 21, playing and singing them in the key of D flat.
4.
5.

1.

te
d
6.

jj w^j^mm f f
^0 ^
d r
^

^ ~
r'
7.

"^ ^

^ 'T

9 j d

jJ^J
g
s'

- jiJj ir'Tr^r^ w rrr


I

Is
,
,

m m

r s d

^
p
I

i^
fe
i'
\

8.
l

9.

'

loT
l

XJl

=SFS^

xx:

"'o

l^ sff
J

m
i

txc

g oo

^""8ti 8o l

.ji^

jJijj
i

IJ

-i
i
i

rr
i

^
1

zt

t\h
y\h

\\i jj/j j,|j j^cji^^i'^


i

^;3i;]; j^ r^ii^
i

te

j]:iii.J

J
J

jj
j

JJ
ii

J J
J

L^
I

Ij J # J
Si-:

t^j
j

ii

JjJJi'^ j'i ^ji

ir

r ri r r ''I^mj. j^j>i^j;ij:j^ijJ
i

Up # It
6.

<yl

J i*JJ J

J i,J J

^
I

^'-'-^^

^;i?i

^jyj^'ij7^f

^^^
#^
fete

Ltrpi^' ^J^j.
i

^J^j'i'j'i^f

^^
^\ \ ^\ '^'^'\ '

8.

5=i

*T*

J 'g' * Jj
*

^a
/J
*
^

J'J'J

J'^'JU'lJJ'a

I^

IJJj

^i>,

Mrp frr-U^J

ir

'rr

^*^
1.

Reading Lessons from Popular Melodies.


rate. J/or/e/a/e. Mode

;Air.:

J1[.^ JJjl ^nQ-PHt^^'t^


l

-^

^
J'i-^

r^
r. ii j jj,i

^^

|J

'

i* ffip m m m
2.
>cy/6?/

S=^.

m
i

MMM.

^ht'

ffiS 000 4

1^^^^^^
i?.C.

Fine.

3.

3Iode7'ate.

^^ \ i
\

jjJJ
jj

^rr

-^-'

i'^-^^^

rr^ij^ffli'^-^
Fine.
|rJ
"cr:

^J-^
i

rrfr

^^^

^^
w
^^
:*=*
300

^^
4.
5.

Slow.
"

J ^0

0'

'

J <g3C

T^-^vT^a

r^

Moderate

4^1>UJ->^^^^l^:|ffl^rJ^J^I^-J

s
6. <S7o/

jM^-i';j>

r3 j

^^i^^rfrrri^ ^-^^177^
JiJMJ
^^
IIW]
<*

S*F5 S^
thi m^

4 J

^ pip
'^-

J J -U-J

^
Moderate

^^ ^P
p'

,0

^
jy

tf*

-#

^^
'

* 1^

^S
a that

The Messag^e of the

Bell.

^^^^?^?4^+Hr
1.

Now

as

S.Heard ye

the zeph-yr the voi-ces

of of

night -fall

na -ture

i' i^i' Balm- i - ly wan-ders From the green meadows

I7T
round,

come?

4u^^4^jj^
Dear Dear
is
is their

j!

^
ly,

J'

^'

/'
ly

Bells from the vil - lage Vol - ces that sing at the

7 are

^
they us

chim
twi
-

ing.

Sweet

how sweet ly
call
-

kound. I

light,

Pleas -ant

ing

home.

H^^n^'m
Striv - ing is IS changed] changed in - to Hearts that are rest- less -Iv
qui
-

your mus-ic each clear ring-ing bell; Dear is yourmus-ic each clear ring- ing bell; mus-ic from moun-tain and dell; Dear istheir mus-ic from moun-tain and dell;

\trn
Un
-

^^:

et

der your
to their

sooth

ii^
ic^

fepefll

yearn

ing

Yield

mag-

spell.

59

0,Ye Tears.

Franz Abt.
Slow.

i
1

i
2

ye ye

tears,
tears,

P ye
ye

tears,
tears,

1
have long

^^

flow,

^^
tea

i i*f
P

* *

^
I
;

That

am

re-fused to thank -ful that ye

^
run,

are Tho' ye

Ye

J v*^

^m
^
The The
ice

wm:

kfe

4=

p
to

^ ^
my
and

^a'
heart,

^
Ye

F=iJ-^'^H^
like the

^5

^
bound clod has

wel-come come from

Thaw -ing, thaw- ing


shall spar-kle

cold

dark

in

snow. the sun.

rain -bow can not

^ ^^1 i V
-i9-^

^m
m
Sabizz^:^:5
p

p^
^

rn h

KTj

^
p
And
Are
f,
1

m
J
-

te^=.S.L^^=^#=jyjzjv^:^=-f^^-rr-p-i^i
yield-edAndthe ear- ly snowdrops spring,And the heal
cheer us If the showrs re-fuse to faU,

^EEEi:

^
r

ing fountains gush


that can not

And

the eyes

weep

the the

Sis

g ^^ i ^j
br''

5p

FPt^f^
^3 ^^a

y^ w
^iM,

p
IIZZ

I'

JO^i-j-i^
wil-der-ness shall sing, all. saddest eyes of

^-^

t=^

X=^

^^t

g J JJ*

^#
^

jMvte

W^

-^

^?

^ ^ ^^
yj JJ#

ye ye

tears, tears,

ye tears. ye tears.

m 1
f
e

fi

60

The Key
i

of B.
45,

Directions: Play and sing the scale and name the tones. Write the "picture" as found on page but with five sharps in the signature (Fi Ci Gi Di Aii) instead of two flats.

Review phrases
1.

to 28,

page

45, in

the key of B.
,

2.

3.

4.

5.

$i

U^r^^
d

^
1.

^^
*t tf>

d
ft:

(J

m m

^^
r
s

jca tl o nn XF *w oTTc? ^

JTM'TT

i
I

^^
hiJ
J' J

^
IJ
i

tJj

jijj
h

IJ)(J^J

jJIjJ^

Cha Mackay.

The Miller of the Dee.

JmJ

^
J

There dwelt a mil - ler, hale and bold Be - side 1. 2."Thourt wrong,my friend"said old KingHal, As wrong

Hh

^'

J
heart

4^
be

J
1

_K
till

J
thine

J^

wrought and sang from


could

my

mom
light

^
^'r
er used

the riv - er as wrong can

night,

No
I'd

as

lark more blithe than glad - ly change with

^^ ^^ E5
^
Dee;

He

be;

For

he. thee.

And

Thy

j^
this

J
I

i'
his

the bur
-

den
is

of

^ song
J
I,

s
For
-

J
ev
mill,
-

P
to
-

ir--i-^
be-.

"I

meal

y cap

worth

my

crown, Thy

my

king

dom's

fee;

Such

i%

'

'

J'
not

J^

J
-

^' one
ler

J
en
of
-

en

vy
as

no
thou

men

one, art

no

And

Eng-

land's boast.

Oh

no mil

j. vies the

r
rae.

r'

Dee.

OCome,Coine Avray.
Fast.

Hickson.

J'
1.

J'

ij:
way,
mel,

i
From
The

m
la
-

i
bor ry

^^5
now
trav
-

2. While

come, sweet

come
Phil

^ sLj
pos cheer
-

I
-

J'

U'
bus

j'^
-

*=*

ingjJLet

ing,With

a y care eve -ning song her

while for -bear, notes pro - long

^ ^m ^m
come, come,

wea

re eler

come come

P^

way. way.

i:

J'
In

j'

Come, come, our

n
so
-

lil'J
joys
re
-

^^^^^^
therewith trust and
sing
in

cial

new And
thy Well

ans-w'ring song

of

sym

pa

tune

ful

*! ^-Mj^ _ CVi-*. 4-^A T -4. friend-ship too Let

har-mon

Of

true hearts hope, joy,

J.

wel- come you,


lib
-

j^

er

ty,

come, come,

come a come a

^^

r
way. wav.

The Key

of

sharp.
'

61

^A ^
E. Sargent.

Directions: Play and sing the scale and name the tones. Write the'picture"a8 found on paire 39 but with SIX sharps in the signature (F| C^ GJ Di Ai Ef) instead of one flat. Review phrases i to 22, page 39, in the key of F sharp: (To restore a double sharp to a single sharp, this form is used i)|)

'3t=f;

dm

h
'

II

' J J J

hi

'

8"

I" y

A
Fast
1.

Life on the Ocean Wave.

Russell.

life

on

the

cean
I
-

wave,
stand
view.

2. 3.

Once more on the deck The land we no long

er

te
deep
!

E5
Where the
Set
the
craft;

frown, But

we

scat-tered wa - ters to sail, fare well have a stur - dy

?
j

^
J
;.
i

rave,

^
The

Of

A home on my own swift


clouds have

the
-

roll
-

ing

ly

be

glid grun

ing
ti>

^^
rev
fair
-

And

the winds
not

their

els

land crew.

As the gale comes

And

care

\^^en storms come

j.
keep.
baft.

j>j^;,
Like an

J,

J._JM^ >i
pine

>
-

J
-

:b
ing
set

Now we

down. 'Tis our

ea - gle caged I shoot thro' spark -ling the home up - on J^ J^

On
Ours
J'

this

dull,

un-chang
cean bird up - on J^

foam
deep,

Like an
a

o
life

the

te
\%

J^J J^J^
shore,
free,

J^

|J_J
brine,

J^U^

J> J

^ ^ ^ ^^ *fc
life

^ ^^ ^
on the
scat
-

0,giveme the flash -ing

The spray and the tem

pest's

And like thewild bird, our wave, A home on the roll - ing

home We'll find on the storm - y deep Where bois4er-ous wa - ters

roar, sea. rave.

r^^ft

cean

wave,

home on

the roll

ing

deep! WTiere the

V^
winds their
rev
-

tered

wa

ters

rave

And

the

els

keep.

F.W. R.

Home and Country.


Moderate

1
1.

H
ano'er

A. Methfessel.

\\
-

mj H
2
3!

Of home andcoun-try The bards may sing or Come for- ward all, let

raise the song, And all must join the oth - er times In fine and diil-cet

chor

phras
oth
-

us. And es, but


er,

no

one lag, Let's stand by one

And

clear cheer with voice-es ours are rough and hon loves ev ry man who

and strongThe flagthatswav-ing estrhj-mes.To sound our coun-trys glad-ly call him theflag,Well

6J>

The Key
^J J

of G-flat.

Directions: Play and sing the scale and name the tones. (The scales of FJtand Gfare the same on the instrument, but the naming is different )"Picture"on. p. 15,with six flats(Bl>El)Al?Dt>Gt>C!?)Phrasesito^2,p.i5. (To restore a double flat to a single flat, this form is used k;l>)

^
1

^^^^

J ^^^ J m d

8
II

^^ W
-O-

^
.

xr TS

^rr-^ xe:

tl <>

-^

-o-

o o

^m
ij^''^^J-i

^r^ij.AuUiff^rr ri
I cannot sin^ the Old Song^s.
Sloio.

^''^jj^'J'J'1.
I

JMJ

i'p

;'ii

Mj

2. I

^
'^''

3.

can-not sing the can-not sing the can-not sing the

old songs I sunglongyears a -go For heart and voice would old songS;Theircharmis sad and deep. Their mel- o-dies would old songs; For vis -ions come a-gain Of gold-en dreams de-

^p
IPo'er

?^^#^

J'

i:^

^
1^' J'
J!

>

i-i

h
un
-

D
for
-

fail

wak

me. And en Old

part- ed,And
^'

fool -ish tears would flovs'; sor-rows from their sleep; years of wear - y pain.

For

by-gone hours come


tho' all

myheart^^th
-

And

got
fet
-

Per-haps when earth- ly

ten still. And ters shall Have

'''i>||'

J'

J'

J'

JTij,
I

Ji|j
the the the
old old old

i'

Ip

;^

^l
|v|
gain,

each fa -mil - lar sad-ly sweet they


set

strain;
be,

can-not sing can-not sing


voice

my

spir

it

free

My

may know

songs, Or dream those dreams a songs,They are too dear to songs For all e - ter - ni -

te im

V~r
I

gain,

me,

can - not sing can - not sing


voice

^^
-

e
the the the
old old
old

ip
:?

^
ter
-

i'lJ
-

My

songs, Or dream those dreams a songs. They are too dear to

me.
-

may know

songs

For

all

ni

ty.

Jfofferafe.

The

Long"

Weary Day.
||

Diir ringer.

!'''!'

J
1.

^1 n
I,

n
y day
to prove,

The long,long wear


his

J
passed in
tri
-

'

f
a -way;

is

tears

^^^
wear
-

2. When

The

^^ r^
long-,
I.

long
his

truth

would

fie

with

my

love,

When

y day

is

rfr^ J'J'
passed In
tears

>

^
And
He'd

Jr^iy^^^fe
at

a-wav,
love,

still

eve-ning

am

weep-ing,

truth

to prove, would tri- fie

with

my

sa}',

'For

me

thoushaltbe weep-ing,

When from my -windows height I lo( r>OKouton


Wlien
at

the right

some fu-tureday

shall be far

I still am weep-ing, My lonewatdi keepini;. a-way, Thou sh alt be weeping,' Thy lonewatch keeping."

A
Fast.

Dollar or Two.
V K
as
in

63
Arranged.

K
1.

E^
we
a our
you're

R==5
tread pal -

^
way
or
thro'

With

cau

tious

3.

At 3.WTien

^
4.

And
/'
tri

home. times then


/)

a are

steps broad,

t^
pew,
few, woo,

our ace
forts

hard
-

and
-

when
j^

com
wish
i'

Wh
/'

This
;r
-

are
to
J''

When
Re

ev

er

ing

|h
-

J'
-

i'

J'
I

i'

/'

>
be
the

in

-cate world,

as

ev

lem-ber mem

tax

er es

we roam,
in -crease this fact,

what and
they

oth ev
bills

er er
it

folks do,

May
No
There's

we
sound

on
is

our jour-ney
I

we
is

do,
true,

more charm -ing, be


pray you, be
like
-

be-come due.

say

Oh, what would, noth - ing

so

Iv

^i=^^J^il^|p
a
lieve
-

p
-

C,
-

p
ring

j>
of of of
of

J'
a

j'
|

J^

||

',gf

ble

to
'tis

view
true, lieu

me,

The be - nev Than the mus


Of the
neat

o
i

lent face
ca] tie ful

in giv - en bus-iness to

lit -

sum
face

do

As the beau-

ti

M
Thore ure three kinds of
scalee, major,

minor and chromatia


scaleB.

The next book

of this senes will


tiie

indnde the minor and the chromatic


is

This book oseB only

major scale which

made up

of eight t(mee, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 6, 7, 8,
fiollows:

((M,

ray,

MM,

ete.,)

arnuu^ed as to intervals, whole and half steps, as


8 4
half

5
whole
whole

6
whole

7
half.

whoie

whole

Each

scale uses all the staff letters

(A

to

G)

in their order

and sharps and

flats

are osed

to bring the intervals right.

If the scale begins

with , for instance, F, the next

letter in order
1,

names a tone only a


2. Tray).

half-step removed; whereas,

a whole

step is required between

(doh),

and

Therefore

we have F^ next; and

so <m through the scale.


2,

In the key of F,

to

6 and G to A,

give the whole steps required between 1 and


is

and 2

and
and

3.

But

A to B

being a whole step, 67^

used to secure the half-step required between 3

4.

Thus we have the signatures


,

of (me, two, three, four, five or six flats or sharps.

Constroct scales from A, B|^

etc.,

writing

them on a

staff

without signature.

In the " Beading Lessons " of this work are no skips (intervals larger than a st^) except
to tones of the tonic chord or other

" Memory Tones

'*

printed at the b^inning of

^e lesson.
and

The reading

lessons

from popular melodies and the songs

may

be read with the syllables


doh, ray, etc,

doA, may, nee, po, too, laky bay,

which have no connection with pitch as have


tiie

may be

applied to the notes of

melody by repeating them

in that order as often as is

necessary.

Of course, the syllables

doh, ray, mee, etc.,

may

also be used.

To

read mosiCy certain habits of the

mind are

indispensable; these habits are best formed

by practice upon lessons that are not hard enough to involve guesswork.

No book

in this series

should be undertak^i until the previous one has been mastered according to directions. evo* long it takes, the work must be th<oughly done if it is to be suooe^ul.

How-

Mbthodioal Sight Sikgikg represents the most important part

of

a singer's education.
will gen-

A
erally

fine musical

sensethe cultivated apprehension

of

rhythm and musical phrase,

make a good

singer without voice culture; but voice culture without the other will never

do

in

University of California

SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1388
Return this material to the library from which it was borrowed.

OCT

3 2000

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