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HSE Management Standards Analysis Tool

Before you start We recommend that you refer to the full instructions in the HSE Management Standards (MS) Analysis Tool User Manual before you start using the HSE MS Analysis Tool.
Important! To make the HSE MS Analysis Tool work, save a copy to your computer. When you opened the file you may have been asked whether you wished to "enable" or "disable" macros. If you clicked the "Enable Macros" button you may proceed. If you clicked "Disable Macros", close Excel and reopen the HSE MS Analysis Tool selecting the "Enable Macros" button.

If the 'Enter Questionnaire Scores' worksheet is empty, you should verify that your security settings will allow macros to be run. To do this, go to the 'Tools' menu and select 'Macro'. Then select 'Security'. Ensure that security is set to either "Medium" or "Low" ("Medium" is the recommended option). You can restore security settings when you have finished using the HSE MS Analysis Tool. You should close and reopen Excel if it is already open. We recommend that you restore the original setting as soon as you have finished using the application.
Brief instructions We suggest that you print these instructions before using the HSE MS Analysis Tool. At the bottom of the screen you will see a series of tabs. Clicking on the tabs allows you to move to different worksheets. A brief summary of the content of these worksheets is described below. Please do not change the names of any of the worksheets as doing so will affect the operation of this spreadsheet. Categories: The Categories tab allows you to set up the HSE MS Analysis Tool to enter results for different groups of staff. You can use this to set up your own choice of group identifiers in up to twelve categories. If you wish to use this facility, you must do this before entering any results. Enter Questionnaire Scores: Enter your results by clicking on the 'Enter Questionnaire Scores' tab at the bottom of this worksheet. This opens a form that allows you to enter the answers to the 35 questions in a series of screens. Data Sets: Select the benchmark survey data against which you wish to compare scores. Summary of Results: The 'Summary of Results' worksheet gives an overall summary of your results, the results for all the questionnaires you have entered to date grouped by main stressors, allows you to compare them with the results from a large national survey of employees, and suggests 'Interim Targets' and 'Longer Term Targets'. Question by question: This worksheet shows your results broken down by individual questions. Please note caveats on interpretation in the HSE MS Analysis Tool User Manual.

Raw Data: A table of raw scores that enables you to filter data. If you want to create results for different categories of staff, please see instructions in the HSE MS Analysis Tool User Manual.
Options: This worksheet includes a number of options, including an alternative data-entry facility and facilities to import raw data from another copy or copies of the HSE MS Analysis Tool or from a text file.

Categories

If the organisation has been categorised to provide meaningful information, e.g. by location, role or department, list the categories in the table below. Listing ca completing the questionnaire (see next worksheet).

Replace the identifier Untitled with the title of the category, e.g. 'Location', 'Role'. A category entitled Untitled or whose title is left blank is not considered config Use the special identifier <None> to avoid forcing the user to specify a given category. <None> must be the first item in a category list.

Category A
Untitled <None> Untitled <None>

Category B

The following are examples of what correctly configured category lists might look ories in the table below. Listing categories here will make them available when

Category A
Location <None> London Belfast Edinburgh

or whose title is left blank is not considered configured by the HSE MS Analysis Tool. be the first item in a category list.

Category C
Untitled <None> Untitled <None>

Category D

examples of what correctly configured category lists might look like:

Category B
Department Personnel Finance Research Production

Category E
Untitled <None> Untitled <None>

Category F

Category G
Untitled <None> Untitled <None>

Category H

Category I
Untitled <None> Untitled <None>

Category J

Category K
Untitled <None> Untitled <None>

Category L

Data Set Selection


The HSE MS Analysis Tool is configured with a number of data sets. Before you analyse your survey data use the drop down list below to select the data set with which you wish to compare scores.
Organisational Averages

Important changes to the HSE Management Stand Background

The analysis tool allows users to assess the perform stressors. It includes a facility to compare the organis in 2004 when the Management Standards approach

DS_ORGAVE2008
Description:

The tool assigns colour codes to seven sets of workin and Change), with the colour denoting performance r colour by comparing the organisations responses to Green Blue Amber Red

From 136 organisations, this data supersedes the 2004 data (see panel to the right for details).

Better than or equal to the 80 Better than or equal to the 50 Better than or equal to the 20 Not as good as the 20th percentile of the natio

Changes made

The principles above still apply. However the benchm reasons are outlined in the box below.

When the HSE Management Standards Analys benchmarks was from a national survey of indi workers.

However, it is more appropriate for organisatio organisations, rather than responses from a su the distribution of responses from individuals d of responses from individuals drawn from within

HSE has now gathered Analysis Tool data from generate new benchmarks so that now, organis from other organisations and not against a sam What the changes mean in practice

Firstly, the new benchmarks are more appropriate th new targets are lower and therefore easier to achieve working conditions under the heading of Role ( The tool will still allow use of the old benchmarks, wit themselves.

HSE recommends that the new benchmarks, based o completed a previous analysis using the old benchm the same benchmarks you used previously, to allow Question & Answer:

In this section, we attempt to anticipate questions use use of the analysis tool can still be found in the HSE http://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/standards/downloads.h

My organisation completed its risk assessment using

No, the analysis is valid. The analysis tool is designe talking to their staff. Discussions with staff should be has been used.

My organisation used the old benchmarks in a previo benchmarks should I use?

The analysis tools primary use should be to direct fu benchmark to use would be the new benchmarks. Ho surveys, you should use the same benchmarks for ea assess progress and another to direct future activity.

surveys, you should use the same benchmarks for ea assess progress and another to direct future activity.

Because you now have two sets of results you can u and any subsequent surveys, can be compared agai

Why are the new benchmarks lower than the old one

The answer to this lies in the differences in the statis simple terms below:

In the individual data, the distribution of data is skew end (most positive scores) of each scale of working c

The average score however is a little lower because Consider this set of scores: 1, 4, 4, 4, 5. Although m one low scoring worker.

In the organisational data, instead of considering indi This means the best 20% of organisational average

So HSE isnt just deliberately making the targets eas

Absolutely not. The changes have been made becau the other direction (most people scoring at the lower effect of making the benchmarks harder actual incidence of ill health and not to organisationa

Does all this explain why many organisations found

Yes, partly it does. Unfortunately because the Role s scale), Role was strongly affected by the difference b should be less likely to appear red. Acknowledgements

HSE owes thanks to the following organisations, who Health e-Solutions (http://www.health was collected from organisations using their Data has also been kindly supplied by:

The University of Portsmouth, Psychology Departme

Health and Safety Executive, Northern Ireland (http:/

s to the HSE Management Standards Analysis Tool

lows users to assess the performance of their organisation in relation to sets of working conditions known to be potential s a facility to compare the organisations results with responses from a nationally representative sampl e of workers taken anagement Standards approach was launched.

lour codes to seven sets of working conditions (Demands, Control, Manager Support, Peer Support, Relationships, Role he colour denoting performance relative to the responses in the national sample. The tool determines the appropriate g the organisations responses to benchmarks in the national sample, as follows:

or equal to the 80th percentile of the national data or equal to the 50th percentile of the national data but not as good as the 80th percentile or equal to the 20th percentile of the national data but not as good as the 50th percentile percentile of the national data

e still apply. However the benchmarks which underpin the colour coding in the analysis tool, have been c hanged. The d in the box below.

E Management Standards Analysis Tool was first designed in 2004, the only data available to HSE for deriving the was from a national survey of individuals, since no organisations had yet administered the full survey to their

more appropriate for organisations to compare their average results with the average results of other , rather than responses from a survey of individuals. The reason for this lies in statistical theory, which dictates that n of responses from individuals drawn from across a number of organisations will follow a different pattern to that from individuals drawn from within a single organisation.

gathered Analysis Tool data from 136 organisations who have completed the survey. This has been used to benchmarks so that now, organisations using the tool can compare themselves directly against average results ganisations and not against a sample of individuals. mean in practice

chmarks are more appropriate than the previous benchmarks as they allow comparison of like with like. In practice, the er and therefore easier to achieve (see Q&A below: why are the new benchmarks lower?), particularly for the set of under the heading of Role (see Q&A below: does this explain why my role results came out red?) ow use of the old benchmarks, with users required to select the benchmarks against which they wish to compare

hat the new benchmarks, based on organisational data, should be used in the majority of cases. However, if you have us analysis using the old benchmarks, and wish to make comparisons between your two surveys, you may wish to use rks you used previously, to allow you to assess progress.

attempt to anticipate questions users might have about the changes made. Please note that more general guidance on the tool can still be found in the HSE Management Standards Analysis Tool User Manual, which can be downloaded from uk/stress/standards/downloads.htm.

mpleted its risk assessment using the old benchmarks. Is the analysis invalid?

valid. The analysis tool is designed to help point employers in the right direction when taking the important next step of Discussions with staff should be used to steer the process towards the real issues regardless of which version of the tool

ed the old benchmarks in a previous survey. We are now ready to run the survey again to assess progress which

primary use should be to direct future activity, rather than to evaluate past activity. Therefore the mos t appropriate would be the new benchmarks. However, if you do wish to identify changes in working conditions between the two d use the same benchmarks for each phase. Furthermore, there is no problem with using one set of benchmarks to d another to direct future activity.

d use the same benchmarks for each phase. Furthermore, there is no problem with using one set of benchmarks to d another to direct future activity.

ave two sets of results you can use your first set of results as your own internal benchmark. The second set of results, t surveys, can be compared against your first set of results if required.

enchmarks lower than the old ones?

ies in the differences in the statistical properties of individual data and organisation-level data. We attempt to explain in

a, the distribution of data is skewed in a way that means that a high proportion of respondents scored towards the upper scores) of each scale of working conditions. So the target of being in the best 20% is quite high.

however is a little lower because it is influenced not just by those at the top end but those who score at the lower end. scores: 1, 4, 4, 4, 5. Although most people scored at the top end, the average is just 3.6 because of the influence of the

al data, instead of considering individuals scores we are looking at averages, which as shown above, tend to be lower. st 20% of organisational averages will on the whole be lower than the best 20% of individual scores.

eliberately making the targets easier?

changes have been made because organisation-level data is more appropriate. Had the individual data been skewed in most people scoring at the lower end of the scale), the changes would still have been made, and would have had the harder to achieve. HSE gains nothing from the benchmarks being changed since our own targets relate to ill health and not to organisational working conditions.

n why many organisations found Role was scored as red?

Unfortunately because the Role scale was particularly skewed (a very high proportion of individuals score high on the ongly affected by the difference between using organisational and individual level data. Using the new benchmarks, Role y to appear red.

o the following organisations, who have kindly provided data to enable us to update the benchmarks.

http://www.health-e-solutions.co.uk) have provided one third of the data used to generate the new benchmarks. This data organisations using their StressMeterTM risk assessment system. kindly supplied by:

ortsmouth, Psychology Department (http://www.port.ac.uk/departments/academic/psychology/)

Executive, Northern Ireland (http://www.hseni.gov.uk)

Work Positive - Summary of Results for HSE Management Standards Questions


Your Results Suggested Interim Target Suggested Longer Term Target Key Demands Control Managers' Support Peer Support Relationships Role Change 3.29 3.72 3.65 3.89 4.04 4.31 3.24
Data Set: Organisational Averages

Doing very well - need to maintain performance Represents those at, above or close to the 80th percentile Good, but need for improvement Represents those better than average but not yet at, above or close to the 80th percentile Clear need for improvement Represents those likely to be below average but not below the 20th percentile Urgent action needed Represents those below the 20th percentile

5.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 3.00 2.50 2.00 1.50 1.00


Your Results Suggested InterimTarget Suggested Longer Term Target

Compared with results from 'Organisational Averages' (see the HSE MS Analysis Tool User Manual for more information and for caveats regarding interpretation of results) Questions 1 to 35 comprise the HSE Management Standards Indicator Tool questions

HSE Indicator Tool - Question by Question

The results are grouped by stressor, and the average score is shown for each question associated with that stressor Question Demands 3 6 9 12 16 18 20 22 Overall
Different groups at work demand things from me that are hard to combine I have unachievable deadlines I have to work very intensively I have to neglect some tasks because I have too much to do I am unable to take sufficient breaks I am pressured to work long hours I have to work very fast I have unrealistic time pressures

Average Relationships

Question 5 14 21 34 Overall Role 1 4 11 13


I am clear what is expected of me at work I know how to go about getting my job done I am clear what my duties and responsibilities are I am clear about the goals and objectives for my department I understand how my work fits into the overall aim of the organisation I am subject to personal harassment in the form of unkind words or behaviour There is friction or anger between colleagues I am subject to bullying at work Relationships at work are strained

Average

Key

Doing very well - need to maintain performance Represents those at, above or close to the 80th percentile Good, but need for improvement. Represents those better than average but not at, above or close to the 80th percentile Clear need for improvement. Represents those likely to be below average but not at, below or close to the 20th percentile Urgent action needed. Represents those at, below or close to the 20th percentile

Data Set: Organisational Averages

Control 2 10 15 19 25 30 Overall Managers' Support 8 23 29 33 35 Overall Peer Support 7 24 27 31 Overall

I can decide when to take a break I have a say in my own work speed I have a choice in deciding how I do my work I have a choice in deciding what I do at work I have some say over the way I work My working time can be flexible

17 Overall

Change 26 28 32 Overall
I have sufficient opportunities to question managers about change at work Staff are always consulted about change at work When changes are made at work, I am clear how they will work out in practice

I am given supportive feedback on the work I do I can rely on my line manager to help me out with a work problem I can talk to my line manager about something that has upset or annoyed me about work I am supported through emotionally demanding work My line manager encourages me at work

5.00 4.50 4.00

3.50
3.00 2.50 2.00

Your Results Suggested Interim Target


Suggested Longer Term Target

If work gets difficult, my colleagues will help me I get help and support I need from colleagues I receive the respect at work I deserve from my colleagues My colleagues are willing to listen to my work-related problems

1.50 1.00

Compared with results from 'Organisational Averages' (see the HSE MS Analysis Tool User Manual for more information and for caveats regarding interpretation of results)

All Factors Question Question No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 Text I am clear what is expected of me at work I can decide when to take a break Different groups at work demand things from me that are hard to combine I know how to go about getting my job done I am subject to personal harassment in the form of unkind words or behaviour I have unachievable deadlines If work gets difficult, my colleagues will help me I am given supportive feedback on the work I do I have to work very intensively I have a say in my own work speed I am clear what my duties and responsibilities are I have to neglect some tasks because I have too much to do I am clear about the goals and objectives for my department There is friction or anger between colleagues I have a choice in deciding how to do my work I am unable to take sufficient breaks I understand how my work fits into the overall aim of the organisation I am pressured to work long hours I have a choice in deciding what I do at work I have to work very fast I am subject to bullying at work I have unrealistic time pressures I can rely on my line manager to help me out with a work problem I get the help and support I need from colleagues I have some say over the way I work I have sufficient opportunities to question managers about change at work I receive the respect at work I deserve from colleagues Staff are always consulted about change at work I can talk to my line manager about something that has upset or annoyed me at work My working time can be flexible My colleagues are willing to listen to my work-related problems When changes are made at work, I am clear how they will work out in practice I am supported through emotionally demanding work Relationships at work are strained My line manager encourages me at work 0s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Response Counts 1s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg* 4s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

% Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

% Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! 2 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! 3 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! 4 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

No. of records

0 denotes no response, 1 to 5 denotes higher to lower risk *Average of non-zero responses only

Categorised by Factor

Demands Question ID 3 6 9 12 16 18 20 22 Text Different groups at work demand things from me that are hard to combine I have unachievable deadlines I have to work very intensively I have to neglect some tasks because I have too much to do I am unable to take sufficient breaks I am pressured to work long hours I have to work very fast I have unrealistic time pressures 0s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Response Counts 2s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Avg % Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! % Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 2 3 4 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

Control Question ID 2 10 15 19 25 30 Text I can decide when to take a break I have a say in my own work speed I have a choice in deciding how to do my work I have a choice in deciding what I do at work I have some say over the way I work My working time can be flexible 0s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Response Counts 2s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Avg % Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! % Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 2 3 4 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

Managers' Support Question ID 8 23 29 33 35 Text I am given supportive feedback on the work I do I can rely on my line manager to help me out with a work problem I can talk to my line manager about something that has upset or annoyed me at work I am supported through emotionally demanding work My line manager encourages me at work 0s 0 0 0 0 0 0 1s 0 0 0 0 0 0 Response Counts 2s 0 0 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 0 0 4s 0 0 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 0 0 Avg % Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! % Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 2 3 4 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

Peer Support Question ID 7 24 27 31 Text If work gets difficult, my colleagues will help me I get the help and support I need from colleagues I receive the respect at work I deserve from colleagues My colleagues are willing to listen to my work-related problems 0s 0 0 0 0 0 1s 0 0 0 0 0 Response Counts 2s 0 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 0 4s 0 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 0 Avg % Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! % Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 2 3 4 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

Relationships Question ID 5 14 21 34 Text I am subject to personal harassment in the form of unkind words or behaviour There is friction or anger between colleagues I am subject to bullying at work Relationships at work are strained 0s 0 0 0 0 0 1s 0 0 0 0 0 Response Counts 2s 0 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 0 4s 0 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 0 Avg % Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! % Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 2 3 4 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

Role Question ID 1 4 11 13 17 Text I am clear what is expected of me at work I know how to go about getting my job done I am clear what my duties and responsibilities are I am clear about the goals and objectives for my department I understand how my work fits into the overall aim of the organisation 0s 0 0 0 0 0 0 1s 0 0 0 0 0 0 Response Counts 2s 0 0 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 0 0 4s 0 0 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 0 0 Avg % Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! % Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 2 3 4 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

Change Question ID 26 28 32 Text I have sufficient opportunities to question managers about change at work Staff are always consulted about change at work When changes are made at work, I am clear how they will work out in practice 0s 0 0 0 0 1s 0 0 0 0 Response Counts 2s 0 0 0 0 3s 0 0 0 0 4s 0 0 0 0 5s 0 0 0 0 Avg % Nonrespondents #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! % Response Counts (excluding non-respondents) 1 2 3 4 5 #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0! #DIV/0!

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Question 34

Question 35

Input Numerical Data The following facility provides for more rapid data entry. It requires that responses on the paper questionnaires that you are processing be labelled with numbers (1 to 5). The method of data input is most efficient when used in conjunction with a numeric key pad and is therefore not suited for use with a laptop computer. This facility requires Excel 2000 or later.

Import Raw Data from Text File

Raw data from a delimited text file can be imported using this facili

Press the button below and select the text file that you wish to proc

The format of the text file must conform to strict guidelines, similar separated value (CSV) file.

The first line in the file, which usually contains column headings, is

Input

Each subsequent line represents one record, or one row of this wo

The first field in the row is assumed to be an ordinal and is ignored

Extract Selected Category If you've applied a filter to select rows whose category(s) you're interested in, press the Extract button to remove the other rows. Caution! The process is irreversible. You should save the original spreadsheet first (under a different file name) or you may lose data.

The next twelve fields are integers that index into the categories co 'Categories' worksheet. NB: If a category set contains of 1 selects the second entry for a category, 2 selects the

The rest of the fields are transferred as is to this worksheet, i.e. the actual question responses.
Use the Delimiter setting below to set the ASCII character code of file. The following is a list of some commonly used codes:

Extract

Import Raw Data from Excel Raw data from other copies of the HSE MS Analysis Tool can be collated using this facility. Press the button below and select the folder that contains the xls files you wish to process. When you click OK, each xls file will be opened and any raw data contained in it added to this worksheet. The success of processing depends on matching column headings (e.g. 'Question 15') between source and target 'Raw Data' sheets. If importing from versions of the analysis tool prior to 1.4, you must go to the Categories worksheet and temporarily alter the title of Category A to 'Category A', Category B to 'Category B', etc. If a categories configuraton file is available, you can use this to restore the category titles once the import has been carried out. See the HSE MS Analysis Tool User Manual for further information. For best results and fastest processing, collect all the source files you wish to process in one folder. Put the target (this) file in a separate folder and ensure all other workbooks are closed before proceeding. Warning! Depending upon how many .xls files are being processed, importing raw data may be a lengthy operation.

9 Tab 32 Space 44 Comma 58 Colon 59 Semicolon

Delimiter

44

Import

ort Raw Data from Text File

w data from a delimited text file can be imported using this facility.

ss the button below and select the text file that you wish to process. format of the text file must conform to strict guidelines, similar to those for a comma -

first line in the file, which usually contains column headings, is ignored by this facility.

h subsequent line represents one record, or one row of this worksheet.


first field in the row is assumed to be an ordinal and is ignored.

next twelve fields are integers that index into the categories columns found on the : If a category set contains <None> as the first option, an index entry for a category, 2 selects the third, and so on. rest of the fields are transferred as is to this worksheet, i.e. they are assumed to be

the Delimiter setting below to set the ASCII character code of the delimiter used in your The following is a list of some commonly used codes:

44

Import