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WELCOME TO

BEAR COUNTRY!
2009-2010
University of Central Arkansas
Orientation &
Registration Handbook

HELPING STUDENTS ACHIEVE


Welcome to UCA and what President Hardin likes to call, “The Center of Learning.” Our President, our
Provost, and the faculty and staff are dedicated to making certain that students at UCA are the center of
our attention and support. At UCA you will experience opportunities for success and will be supported
by programs and individuals who will have your best interests at heart. As the new freshman class of
2009 and the new graduating class of 2013 you are joining the strongest and best students in Arkansas
and the South. UCA graduates are active in all fields and endeavors around the nation and the world.
You can feel confident your choice to attend UCA has been a wise one. The mission of UCA is to pro-
vide students with the best available education possible in the twenty-first century. Student ACT scores
here are above the national average, and UCA continues to maintain one of the highest graduation
rates in the state. We are pleased that you have chosen UCA and are eager to help you in your educa-
tional pursuits.

Welcome to the Center of Learning. Welcome to success. Welcome to UCA.

Dr. Sally Roden, Associate Provost and


Dean of Undergraduate Studies

Welcome to UCA! By now, you’ve heard that Welcome to the University of Central Arkansas! You
many times, but it is no less sincere. We are about to begin an exciting personal journey that
genuinely—and enthusiastically—welcome will forever change your life. Whether you are a fresh-
you to the UCA community. You are about to man, transfer or non-traditional student, the Office of
begin the best year of your life. Socially, Orientation is here to assist you with your transition to
emotionally, culturally, and intellectually, you college and help prepare you for the road ahead.
will experience more in the months ahead More than 13,000 fellow UCA students are waiting to
than you ever have before. meet you, along with a dedicated faculty and staff
who are eager to help.
We are happy to be part of that adventure.
UCA is a wonderful place to live, to learn, and As the newest member of our community, we want
to work. Take advantage of every opportu- you to have the opportunity to explore all that UCA
nity—every possibility—you encounter. The has to offer. Countless opportunities for leadership
more engaged you are, the more you will through the over 100 Registered Student Organiza-
benefit. And be sure to let us know when we tions are at your disposal. Not to mention we are
can help. The Academic Advising Center is equipped with a wireless campus and state-of-the art
committed to your academic success. technology that sets us above other institutions in the
nation. Our tradition of academic excellence is seen
Again, welcome. We hope the time you through the 100 major fields of study, a student to
spend at UCA will prove to be both pleasant faculty ratio of 19:1 and classrooms that provide per-
and profitable for you. sonal attention.

No matter how involved you choose to be or what


your major is we encourage you to find your niche at
UCA. Please do not hesitate to contact the Office of
Berdie Eubank, Orientation for any questions you may have. Once
Director again welcome and congratulations on your first step
Academic Advising to a new beginning!

Lindsay Grifford
Director of New Student Programs
TABLE OF CONTENTS
JUST CHECKING
INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS 2
CPT/ FYFS 1320 3
LEARNING COMMUNITIES 4
TOP 10 REASONS APPLY FOR RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES 6
SAM COMMUTER SERVICES 7
TRANSFERRING CREDIT 8

THINGS TO DO TODAY
REGISTRATION PROCESS CHECKLIST 10
NOTIFICATION OF ARKANSAS COURSE TRANSFER SYSTEM 11
GUARANTEED EIGHT-SEMESTER DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAM 12
PROGRAM COMPLETION PLAN CONTRACT 13
MASTER SCHEDULE 14
GENERAL EDUCATION CHECKSHEET 15
UCA STUDENTS ENROLLING IN TRANSITIONAL COURSES 16
GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 17
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 18
URSA 24
ACCESSING STUDENT INFORMATION IN URSA 26
WHAT IS A COURSE SYLLABUS ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER SYLLABUS
/ 27
ACADEMIC YEAR ADVISING CALENDAR 28

COUNTDOWN
ACADEMIC INFORMATION 30
ACT SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION 32
HOW DO I KEEP MY SCHOLARSHIP 33
THE FACTS ON GETTING A DEGREE 34
PROGRAMS OF STUDY AT UCA 35
DECLARING YOUR MAJOR/ MINOR 36
LOCAL BANKS/ LAUNDRY SERVICES 37
SUGGESTIONS FOR WHAT TO BRING 38
NOW THAT YOU’RE HERE-ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
WHAT IS ACADEMIC ADVISING 40
HELPFUL NUMBERS AT UCA 41
UCA COLLEGES AND DEPARTMENTS CONTACT INFORMATION 42
CAMPUS MAP/ BUILDINGS AND ABBREVIATIONS 44
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 46
HOW TO MAKE AN ADVISING APPOINTMENT 48
BEEN THERE SHOULDA DONE THAT 49
TIPS FOR SUCCESS 50
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE 54
FIRST YEAR SURVIVAL TIPS 56
STUDY TIPS 4 SERIOUS STUDENTS 57
TOP 10 TEST TAKING TIPS 58
CLASSROOM DO’S & DON’TS 59
POINTERS FROM PROFESSORS 60
CHOICES OF SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS 61
GENERAL POINTERS FOR TAKING CLASS NOTES 62

NOW THAT YOU’RE HERE-CAMPUS SURVIVAL SKILLS


CONTROL STRESS BEFORE IT CONTROLS YOU/ LIFE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES 64
HOW COLLEGE STUDENTS HANDLE TIME MANAGEMENT 65
25 SAVING-MONEY TIPS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 66
MAKE SAVING FUN! 67
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 68

UCA TERMINOLOGY 87

HOMEWORK 89

MARK YOUR CALENDAR 90

REGISTRATION CANCELLATION 91

UCA ALMA MATER/UCA FIGHT SONG BACK COVER


DID YOU KNOW?

UCA archivist Dr. Jimmy Bryant (who generously provided the UCA history facts for "Did you know?"), recently
earned the title of Certified Archivist (CA) from the Academy of Certified Archivists, making him the first certified
archivist in the history of UCA. Dr. Bryant first qualified to take the Academy's certification exam and then passed it
in Baton Rouge.

There are very few certified archivists in Arkansas, and Dr. Bryant's accomplishment makes UCA one of only two
four-year universities in the state with a certified archivist as its archive director.
JUST CHECKING...
2 INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS

INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS

This information is located on UCA’s website at: http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/


undergradstudies/advising/incomingfreshmen.html

Admissions will send an acceptance letter once a student has been admitted to UCA or University Col-
lege.

Health Services will need proof of immunization records. Students can print an immunization form and
take it to their doctor for verification of immunization. The form can be found on the Student Health Ser-
vices website at: http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/studenthealth/Required%20immun.doc

Students who do not have ACT or SAT Scores will be required to take the Computerized Place-
ment Test (CPT). The CPT is also available for any student who scores below 19 on the English, Math,
or Reading area of the ACT as an opportunity to test out of transitional classes such as Intermediate Al-
gebra, Transitional Reading or Transitional Writing. CPT tests cannot be taken after the registration ap-
pointment. A photo ID is required.

Transfer credit, AP and CLEP credit must be provided on an official COLLEGE transcripts and official
AP/CLEP score reports. All students (with the exception of Honors College students who will take HONC
1310) are required to take WRTG 1310 their first semester and will be registered for it unless documen-
tation, such as a transcript or an AP/CLEP score, is provided at the time of the registration appoint-
ment. Official documentation must be provided on an official COLLEGE transcript or official AP/CLEP
score reports. The Arkansas Course Transfer System website is a resource for students transferring
courses and the website is: http://acts.adhe.edu/

An online Placement Exam is required before a student can register for a foreign language if that stu-
dent has had previous instruction in that language. This exam MUST be taken PRIOR to the registration
appointment. The Placement Exam website is: http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/lingua/
Placement/placement_examinations.htm

Required classes for majors and the four year degree completion plans can be viewed at the Degree
Program Completion Plans (http://www.uca.edu/model/). Students who plan on taking CHEM 1450: Col-
lege Chemistry I in the Fall semester because of their PCP and major requirement should view the list of
chemistry skills (http://chemistry.uca.edu/faculty/desrochers/chem1450/1450skills.pdf) expected of stu-
dents entering CHEM 1450 to verify their readiness for the course. BIOL 1440: Principles of Biology re-
quires these same chemistry skills, as well. Some students may need to take CHEM 1301: Fundamen-
tals of Chemistry before CHEM 1450 and BIOL 1440.

The General Education Program is required of all majors. Summer and Fall 2009 classes can be found
in the Schedule of Classes. Course descriptions are
available in the Undergraduate Bulletin.

The Freshman Year Experience Seminar


(FYFS), Laptop Initiative, Clusters and Residential Col-
leges are great courses and programs for freshmen.

Academic Scholarships and Music Scholarships have


certain hour, GPA, or course requirements.

View the Confidentiality Agreement at: (http://


www.uca.edu/divisions/general/gencounsel/ferpa/
index.asp).
CPT/ FYFS 1320 3

CPT: COMPUTERIZED PLACEMENT TESTING

Computerized Placement Tests (CPT) are available for students who


do not meet regular admission criteria for academic placement pur-
poses, allowing students to enroll in the regular curriculum in the CPT
area (s) in which passing scores are earned. The CPT tests are brief,
ranging from 12 to 20 questions. These tests are not timed. CPT tests
are offered in english, reading, and mathematics.

Effective September 16, 2002, students taking CPT tests because of


program requirements and/or enrolling at UCA must pay a non-
refundable charge of $5.00 per test. Payment (cash or check) is re-
quired at the time of testing. Students who have not taken the ACT
or SAT exam will be required to take the CPT for placement pur-
poses. CPT testing must be completed prior to registration. A
photo ID is required.

For additional information, contact the University Testing Office at 450


-3209. International students should consult with the Office of Interna-
tional Programs at 450-3445 for details.

FYFS 1320
First-Year Experience: An Introduction to Higher Education (FYFS 1320) is an
introduction to the aims and activities of higher education. This course advances
knowledge. You will grow in your intellectual skills and think seriously about atti-
tudes and values. Overall, this course helps first-year students find their place at
UCA and in an increasingly global society, as it prepares UCA students for success
as life-long learners. Throughout this course, students will have the opportunity to:

• Critically examine their own values and cultures, world views, assumptions and biases about
the institution of higher education and ultimately society, both local and global;

• Cultivate a sensitive and affirming community environment that espouses an awareness and
appreciation of one’s self and others;

• Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of financial responsibility;

• Determine and apply personal learning styles and personality types to life-long learning ex-
periences;

• Achieve and apply informational and technological literacy and gain an appreciation of their
cultural significances;

• Practice the power of voice through critical thinking, speaking, reading, and writing;

• Discover and increase awareness of one’s civic responsibility.

• Use this class as a 3-hour elective. It counts towards your graduation!


4 LEARNING COMMUNITIES

LEARNING COMMUNITIES FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS


UCA—100 YEARS 100% LEARNING IN COMMUNITY!

Learning Communities are classes that typically:

ü enroll a common cohort of students (translation: you take two or more classes with the
same group of people…sometimes even people who live down the hall!)

ü seek to build community around the process of engaged learning (translation: you learn
AND you have fun doing it!)

ü restructure the curriculum so that learning is an activity that occurs both in and beyond the
classroom (translation: learning happens everywhere!)

ü emphasize collaborative efforts between faculty and students (translation: professors learn
as well as teach, because students teach as well as learn!)

ü improve both student performance and student success (translation: average GPAs are
higher in learning communities and you are more likely to graduate!)

Learning Communities come in a variety of shapes and sizes to meet the unique needs of differ-
ent students. 100% of first-year students are enrolled in a learning community—find your niche!

UCA offers entering students the opportunity to be a part of the following learning communities:

« Residential Colleges
« Honors College
« University College
« Traditional Learning Communities (clusters & linked classes)
« First-Year Experience Seminar

TRADITIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES


CLUSTER & LINKED CLASSES

Thousands of UCA students have enjoyed the benefits of "clustered" or “linked” courses -- and so can
you! Clusters consist of 2 or 3 courses that are connected -- the classes are taught by different profes-
sors but the same students enroll in both courses. This creates a ready-made group of study partners
and friends, and has been a proven means of raising student satisfaction, performance, and persistence
toward graduation. Any first-year student may enroll and several are specifically designed for pre-med,
nursing, athletes, UC and undeclared students.

"I liked having the same people in my classes. I have


made some awesome new friends!"

"The fact that we are all in the same [classes] all makes it
easier to help each other with work."

"I got to know the people in my two [linked] classes better


than in my other classes"

"Having the same people in two classes really helps with


the comfort level."
LEARNING COMMUNITIES 5

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

University College (UC) offers transitional courses and freshman - and sophomore-level general educa-
tion courses for under-prepared students with the goal of admitting them into a baccalaureate degree
program at UCA.

Transitional courses do not count towards graduation credit.

UC meets this goal by providing students with access to faculty, tutors and advising staff who
specialize in working with students with developmental needs.

HONORS COLLEGE

Established in 1982, the Honors College at UCA emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to learning
and offers a curriculum based on small, discussion-oriented classes.

“The Honors College is a community of learners practicing the art of inquiry, conversation, col-
laboration, and communication.”

The Honors Center and Honors residence halls build a sense of community among Honors students,
while study abroad opportunities expand students’ horizons. The program is open to students with an
ACT score of 28 or higher and a high school GPA of at least 3.5.

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES
HUGHES, STATE, AND SHORT/DENNEY

When Hughes Residential College began in 1997, it was the


first living and learning program in Arkansas. Now Hughes,
State, and Short/Denney Residential Colleges offer students
the experience of taking classes in their residence hall with
people who live “down the hall.” The benefits of these
shared, in-hall classes are obvious; students in the residen-
tial colleges have consistently had the highest average
GPAs of all non-Honors College residence halls.

The residential colleges also emphasize (and deliver!) com-


munity-building through camping trips, cultural excursions,
cook-outs, and service projects. Hughes, State, and Short/
Denney are open to all students accepted to UCA.

Each learning community aims to ensure that YOU get


off to a great start in your academic career. We know
one will be right for you.

For more information on Learning Communities at UCA contact:


Jayme Millsap Stone, Director of Learning Communities
501.450.3125
or see our website at:
www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/undergraduatestudies/
6 TOP 10 REASONS TO APPLY FOR RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES

UCA’S RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES


What’s so special about Hughes, State, &
Short/Denney?

Residential Colleges are more than just places to stay. They are
learning communities that provide their members with opportunities
to develop every aspect of Student Life— academic, CIVIL, & social! If
you are looking for the total collegiate experience, you need to
check out Residential Colleges. APPLY NOW, before all the places are
filled!!!!

Top ten reasons to apply for Residential Colleges

10. Increase Your Chances of Academic 5. Residential Colleges offer you a chance to
Success. Residential College (RC) study abroad. Spend two weeks in May
students earn higher grades and are visiting other countries! It will be an
more likely to graduate. enriching experience, plus you’ll earn
academic credit!
9. Get to know your fellow Residential
College Students while completing
4. Only Hughes, State, & Short\Denney have
general education classes (all first-year
Mentors. Mentors are older students who
students take 3 RC classes in the fall
continue to participate in the Residential
semester and 2 in the spring)….makes
Colleges by assisting freshmen with
studying a breeze.
everything from moving in to getting
8. Get involved in Campus Activities involved and making friends. Many mentors
and Civic Organizations. Residential are computer savvy students who are
College students are involved in many available to help residents with computer
campus activities. All Colleges questions and on-line networks.
participate in service-learning
opportunities such as Heifer Project 3. Enjoy Additional Activities that Enrich
International, Habitat for Humanity your Collegiate Experience. The Residential
and the local women and homeless Colleges offer a wide variety of activities and
shelters. social events, including field trips, camping,
canoeing, caving, and intramural sports.
7. Get to know your professors. The
Residential Colleges give you
2. Make a Smooth Transition to UCA. Being
something no other residence hall
part of Hughes, State, or Short/Denney allows
offers…a full-time UCA faculty
you to take classes with others who live in
member living in the hall. These
your residence hall. You will make friends,
“Resident Masters” help to create an
form study groups, and feel at home quickly.
extended family atmosphere within the
college (plus they’re really cool).
Also, smaller class size in the
Residential Colleges allows for more And the #1 Reason to join a
interaction with your professors.
Residential College….
6. Take Advantage of our study
groups. Hughes, State, &
Short/Denney have upper class 1. Come to Class in Your PJ’s! Since many of
mentors who organize study groups the Residential College classes are held in
for difficult classes. Earn those A’s! Hughes, State, & Short/Denney classrooms,
students can attend class right out of bed!
SaM COMMUTER SERVICES 7

SaM COMMUTER SERVICES OFFICE: ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF UCA’S COMMITMENT TO


PROVIDING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR ALL OUR STUDENTS

The Division of Undergraduate Studies is pleased to introduce UCA’s new support program for com-
muter freshmen, Satellite Minton (SaM). SaM provides academic, social and civic participation op-
portunities to encourage closer interaction between commuting freshmen and other students/offices
around campus.

SaM utilizes aspects of UCA’s successful Residential College program, applying some of the most
effective practices that we have established over the last 10 years since the Residential College pro-
gram began. Most notably, SaM provides a Learning Community environment where students in the
SaM program have access to certain General Education courses that are open only to them. This
allows for more closely targeted study group organization, and it also encourages the students to
meet other commuters and get involved with the campus community as a whole.

Some of the other services SaM offers to our commuter freshmen:


v A lounge area to hang out in during breaks between classes
v Events that are normally available only to freshmen who live on campus (for example, a
group camping/canoeing trip)
v An incentive program that provides rewards for academic success and for positive study
habits
v And perhaps our most valuable service:
Mentor-led Study Groups
SaM sections of freshmen classes
are offered very focused study
groups that are led by upperclass-
men Mentors who have previously
earned an A in that same course.
This has been enormously helpful to
our commuter freshmen over the last
year, and we are excited to be ex-
panding this service for the 2009-
2010 academic year.

If you have any questions about SaM Commuter


College, please contact Miranda Morris with the Division of Undergraduate Studies. You can apply
online at the Undergraduate Studies website: www.uca.edu/residential or by contacting the Under-
graduate Studies office at 501-450-3125.

DID YOU KNOW?

Until UCA adopted the Bear mascot in 1920, sports writers would refer to student athletes as the Tutors,
the Teachers, the Normal Eleven (in football) the Normal Gridmen (also in football) and the Pea-Pickers
(because UCA's campus included a 240-acre farm).
8 TRANSFERRING CREDIT

TRANSFERRING CREDIT

If you have attended another college or university, it is your responsibility to have that institution mail
an official transcript to UCA before classes begin.

If you have received concurrent credit through your high school, you must request an official transcript
from the college which awarded the credit. Having a course listed on your high school transcript is not
sufficient to receive college credit. Again, UCA should receive this transcript before you begin classes.

If you have taken an Advance Placement (AP) test or College Level Examination Program (CLEP) test,
it is your responsibility to have an official score report sent to the Academic Advising Center before
you begin classes at UCA.

If you intend to take the CLEP or have already taken it and are awaiting your scores, it is your respon-
sibility to report those scores to the Academic Advising Center before you begin classes at UCA.

IMPORTANT NOTE: You cannot enroll in any course for which you have—or expect to
have—transfer credit or credit by examination. When you meet with an academic advisor to
schedule classes, it is your responsibility to make the advisor aware of any such credits.
Please be reminded that you must register for a writing course. Unless you have already
tested for WRTG 1310 and/or WRTG 1320 when you enroll in the university, you cannot
earn examination credit for writing. (Bulletin, www.uca.edu/ubulletin/02 /205.html [8.1].)
REMEMBER TO:
Request OFFICIAL transcript (s) showing final grades from colleges and universities where you
have earned credit be sent to:
UCA Undergraduate Admissions
Bernard Hall 101
University of Central Arkansas
201 Donaghey Avenue
Conway AR 72035
Request OFFICIAL score reports for CLEP or AP Exams be sent to:
Academic Advising Center
Harrin Hall 100
University of Central Arkansas
201 Donaghey Avenue
Conway AR 72035
Fax: 501.450.3208

AND

After you have confirmed that UCA has received your transfer credit/test scores it will be your
responsibility to e-mail the Advising Center at AdvisingCenter@uca.edu to make schedule revi-
sions using your URSA/cub e-mail. The deadline to submit schedule changes via e-mail will be
the week before classes start. After that date you must come to the Advising Center with your
documentation in order to change your schedule. You may call 450.5149 for questions.

NOTE: CLASS SCHEDULES WILL ONLY BE CHANGED WHEN YOU PROVIDE OFFICIAL
DOCUMENTATION OF COMPLETED COURSEWORK. (ie. AP/CLEP/IB score reports, official
transcripts from the college/university awarding credit, etc.)
THINGS TO DO TODAY
10 REGISTRATION PROCESS CHECKLIST

Hello! Welcome to UCA and SUMMER ADVANCE REGISTRATION. We hope you find this booklet a
valuable source of information not only for today, but for your entire UCA career as well. This page will
help you with the process you will be going through today.

These are MANDATORY

_______ Orientation Video


Important information about UCA and the Academic Advising Center.
_______ Advising/Registration
Meet with an academic advisor to receive important university information and plan your class
schedule for the fall semester.
_______ Survey
Complete the online survey (s).
_______ URSA tutorial (pg. 25)
Brief introduction to academic software access and navigation of programs.
_______ Copy of Class Schedule
When finished with the survey, return to the counter in the lobby of Harrin Hall and receive a
copy of your class schedule for fall semester. NOTE: CLASS SCHEDULES WILL ONLY BE
CHANGED WHEN YOU PROVIDE OFFICIAL DOCUMENTATION OF COMPLETED
COURSEWORK. (ie. AP/CLEP/IB score reports, official transcripts from the college/university
awarding credit, etc.)
_______ Photo ID (Bernard Hall 207)
Show Photo ID and copy of your fall schedule to receive your UCA ID.
_______ Student Center
UCA Bookstore: Reserve your textbooks for
fall, perhaps do some shopping.
UCA Post Office: Reserve your UCA post
office box.

Student information is available in your URSA account. If


you have further questions, please contact the appropriate
offices listed below.

Ÿ Student Accounts (McCastlain 144) Learn about your


financial obligations to the university, how to pay
tuition, etc.
Ÿ Financial Aid (McCastlain 001) Discover what re-
sources are available, pick up applications and get
other printed materials. Specific information concern-
ing your application may be obtained in McCastlain 001
Ÿ Housing (Bernard 201) Learn the status of your appli-
cation, room assignment, name of roommate (s).
Ÿ Student Health Services Tour the brand new, state-of
-the-art facilities, talk with the staff, learn about ser-
vices.
Ÿ Admissions Office (Bernard 101) Inquire about schol-
arships, transcripts, immunization records, and other
admissions-related issues.

Please make sure you read and understand the


materials in this book, along with other referenced materials, before school starts in August.

Welcome to Bear Country!


NOTIFICATION OF ARKANSAS COURSE TRANSFER SYSTEM 11

NOTIFICATION OF ARKANSAS COURSE TRANSFER SYSTEM


(Act 472 of 2007)

As part of the academic advising process, Arkansas law (Act 472 of 2007) requires that we notify
you of the following matters:

1. A very important part of beginning your college career is academic advising. Your advisor, the
advising center, and the university desire to provide as much information to you as possible concerning
courses and other matters related to your academic endeavors.

2. The Arkansas Department of Higher Education, in conjunction with the public colleges and
universities in the state, has developed the Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS). This is a post-
secondary education resource service that provides comparable course information to facilitate student
transfer within Arkansas public colleges and universities. The ACTS database contains faculty-generated
comparable course information for a number of courses offered at public institutions in Arkansas. Com-
parable courses within ACTS are guaranteed to transfer for full credit to any Arkansas public institution.

ACTS provides information regarding guaranteed transfer of courses between Arkansas public
institutions. ACTS is beneficial for students, parents, and academic advisors because it provides accu-
rate, up-to-date comparable course information for educational planning and informed decision-making.

To use ACTS visit the Arkansas Department of Higher Education website at:
http://www.arkansashighered.com/ or call the academic advising center at UCA for more information on
how to use ACTS.

Please sign below to indicate that you have received this notice about the Arkansas Course
Transfer System.

Date: __________________ Student ID: _____________________

Signature: _______________________

Print Name: ______________________

University of Central Arkansas

By: _____________________________

Title: ___________________________
12 GUARANTEED EIGHT-SEMESTER DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAM

GUARANTEED EIGHT-SEMESTER DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAM

The University of Central Arkansas is please to announce its Guaranteed Eight-Semester Degree
Completion Program

UCA now offers entering first-time students assistance in completing many of our undergraduate degrees
in eight semesters. A list of the undergraduate degree programs that offer “Eight-Semester Program
Completion Plans” can be found on our website at: http://www.uca.edu/model/.

How do I enroll?

During your summer registration appointment, your advisor will ask if you want to participate in one of
these degree plans. Your participation simply means that UCA will ensure class availability, as outlined
in the plan, in order to keep you on track for graduation as long as you continue to meet the conditions
for participation.

What are the Conditions for Participation?

To participate in this program, you must:

∗ Enter the University of Central Arkansas as a first-year


student in the fall semester and choose a major that of-
fers an Eight-Semester Program Completion Plan.

∗ Complete and sign the Guaranteed Eight-Semester De-


gree Completion Program contract with your advisor
prior to the first day of classes.

∗ Follow the schedule of classes on your Eight-Semester


Degree Program Completion Plan throughout your eight
semesters.

∗ Maintain satisfactory academic progress in all courses


and programs.

∗ Satisfy all prerequisites for the courses listed in your


Eight-Semester Degree Program Completion Plan prior
to enrollment in courses for which they are required.
(Note: this may include prerequisites for the foreign lan-
guage requirement that is part of many BA programs.)

∗ Have your course schedule approved by your official advisor each semester and enroll during your
designated registration period.

∗ Accept any available section of a required course that can be accommodated in your class schedule.

∗ Remain in your declared major, and successfully complete all courses and degree requirements as
scheduled.
PROGRAM COMPLETION CONTRACT 13

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS


GUARANTEED 8-SEMESTER DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAM

Pursuant to Act 1014 of 2005, qualified first-time freshmen may elect to participate in a guaranteed 8-
semester degree completion program for most bachelor’s degree programs. The list of degree majors
that are included in the 8-semester degree completion program is published on the institutional
website and in the undergraduate bulletin. A student must accept or waive participation in the
guaranteed 8-semester degree completion program.
When choosing to participate in the guaranteed 8-semester degree completion program, a student
accepts responsibility for monitoring his/her progress toward a degree and for making choices that
will lead to graduation in four years.
Please check one of the following options:
ACCEPTANCE: As a first-time freshman, I have declared a major in
_______________________ at the University of Central Arkansas and wish to participate
in the guaranteed 8-semester degree completion program.
I acknowledge that: (1) I must follow exactly the 8-semester degree plan for my major; (2) I
must make satisfactory academic progress and maintain a grade point average of 2.00 or
greater; (3) I must complete, generally, 30–36 semester credit hours of appropriate course
work each academic year as outlined in my degree plan; (4) I must have my class schedule
approved by my official advisor and register for classes each semester during my
designated registration period; (5) I must accept any available course section that can be
accommodated in my class schedule; and (6) if I change my major, the guaranteed 8-
semester degree plan is voided.
Other events based on my actions that may void the guarantee includefailure to complete
all degree and program requirements (including a minor, if required), dropping or failing a
course, withdrawing from the university, failing to pay fees, and disciplinary actions.

WAIVER: As a first-time freshman, I choose not to participate in the guaranteed 8-semester


degree completion program for the following reason(s):
I have not declared a major and am therefore not eligible to participate in the guaranteed
8-semester degree completion program.
I understand that my declared major is not included in the guaranteed 8-semester
degree completion program.
I am not eligible to participate in the guaranteed 8-semester degree completion program
because I must enroll in one or more developmental courses (pre-college level) or
prerequisite courses required in my selected major.
I am not eligible to participate in the guaranteed 8-semester degree completion program
because I am not a full-time student.
Other (specify):

STUDENT NAME (PLEASE PRINT) STUDENT ID NUMBER

STUDENT SIGNATURE DATE

WITNESSED BY ADVISOR (SIGNATURE) DATE


14 MASTER SCHEDULE
MASTER SCHEDULE

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

7:00a - 7:50a 7:00a - 7:50a 7:00a - 7:50a

8:00a - 8:50a 8:00a - 8:50a 8:00a - 8:50a

8:00a - 9:15a 8:00a - 9:15a

9:00a - 9:50a 9:00a - 9:50a 9:00a - 9:50a

9:25a - 10:40a 9:25a - 10:40a

10:00a - 10:50a 10:00a - 10:50a 10:00a - 10:50a

11:00a - 11:50a 11:00a - 11:50a 11:00a - 11:50a

10:50a - 12:05p 10:50a - 12:05p

12:00p - 12:50p 12:00p - 12:50p 12:00p - 12:50p

12:15p - 1:30p 12:15p - 1:30p

1:00p - 1:50pX-PERIOD 1:00p - 1:50pX-PERIOD 1:00p - 1:50p

1:40p - 2:30p 1:40p - 2:30p

2:00p - 2:50p 2:00p - 2:50p 2:00p - 2:50p

3:00p - 3:50p 2:40p - 3:55p 3:00p - 3:50p 2:40p - 3:55p 3:00p - 3:50p

4:00p - 4:50p 4:00p - 4:50p 4:00p - 4:50p

4:05p - 5:20p 4:05p - 5:20p

4:30p 4:30p 4:30p 4:30p 4:30p

6:00p 6:00p 6:00p 6:00p 6:00p

7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p

Printable form located on UCA’s website at: http://ccnt.uca.edu/masterclassschedule.pdf


GENERAL EDUCATION CHECK SHEET 15

To graduate from UCA, students must complete a minimum of 124 Mathematics—Choose 1


semester hours, including the general education program, major ___ MATH 1360 (Mathematics in Society)
and possibly minor requirements, any special degree require- ___ MATH 1390 (College Algebra)
ments, and 40 upper division (3000-4000) hours. OR, if required by the student’s program of study
___ MATH 1392 (Plane Trigonometry)*
___ MATH 1395 (Business Calculus)*
All students must take the following courses: ___ MATH 1491 (Calculus for the Life Sciences)*
___ MATH 1580 (Algebra and Trigonometry)*
Writing ___ MATH 1591 (Calculus I)*
(to be taken on initial enrollment unless requirement already met)
___ WRTG 1310 (Introduction to College Writing) Natural Sciences—1 Biological, 1 Physical Required
___ WRTG 1320 (Academic Writing & Research)*
OR Biological Science—Choose 1
___ HONC 1310 (Honors Core I)** ___ BIOL 1400 (Biology for General Education)
___ HONC 1320 (Honors Core II)** OR, if required by the student’s program of study
___ BIOL 1440 (Principles of Biology I)*
Health Studies
___ HED/KPED 1320 (Concepts Lifetime Health & Fitness) Physical Science—Choose 1
___ CHEM 1400 (Chemistry in Society)
Oral Communication ___ PHYS 1400 (Physical Science for General Education)
___ SPCH 1300 (Basic Oral Communication) ___ PHYS 1401(Descriptive Astronomy)
OR, if required by the student’s program of study
___ CHEM 1450 (College Chemistry I)*
___ CHEM 1402 (Physiological Chemistry I)*
___ PHYS 1405 (Applied Physics)*
American History and Government—Choose 1 ___ PHYS 1410 (College Physics I)*
___ HIST 2301 (American Nation I) ___ PHYS 1441 (University Physics I)*
___ HIST 2302 (American Nation II)
___ PSCI 1330 (US Government & Politics) World Cultural Traditions—3 courses required
Behavioral and Social Sciences—Choose 2 History—Choose 1
(Must be from DIFFERENT disciplines) ___ HIST 1310 (World History I)
___ ANTH 1302 (Anthropology) ___ HIST 1320 (World History II)
___ ECON 1310 (Modern Political Economy)
___ ECON 2310 (Global Environment of Business) Literature—Choose 1
___ GEOG 1305 (Principles of Geography) ___ ENGL 2305 (World Literature I)
___ GEOG 1300 (Geography of World Regions) ___ ENGL 2306 (World Literature II)
___ PSCI 1300 (Intro to Political Science)
___ PSCI 1330 (US Government & Politics) Other World Culture Options—Choose 1
___ PSCI 2300 (International Relations) ___ ENGL 1330 (African & African-American Studies)
___ PSYC 1300 (General Psychology)
___ ENGL 2305 (World Literature I)
___ SOC 1300 (Principles of Sociology) ___ ENGL 2306 (World Literature II)
___ HONC 1320 (Honors Core II)** ___ FYFS 1310 (First Year Seminar: Studies in World Cultural
___ HONC 2310 (Honors Core III)**
Traditions)
___ HIST 1310 (World History I)
Fine Arts—Choose 1 ___ HIST 1320 (World History II)
___ ART 2300 (Art Appreciation)
___ PHIL 1330 (World Philosophies)
___ FILM 2300 (Film Appreciation) ___ RELG 1320 - (World Religions)
___ MUS 2300 (Music Appreciation) ___ WLAN/WRTG 2350 (World Languages)
___ THEA 2300 (Theatre Appreciation)
___ HONC 2310 (Honors Core III)**
___ HONC 2320 (Honors Core IV)**

Humanities—Choose 1
___ ENGL 1350 (Introduction to Literature) NOTE:
___ ENGL 1355 (Film and Literature)
___ ENGL 2370 (Introduction to Fiction) Ÿ If the ACT subject score is below 19 in reading, writing, or alge-
___ ENGL 2380 (Introduction to Poetry) bra, remediation is required.
___ ENGL 2390 (Introduction to Drama) Ÿ Some majors require specific general education courses.
___ FREN 2320 OR GERM 2320 OR SPAN 2320 Ÿ Courses may be used only once to satisfy the general education
(Conversation-Composition II)* requirements.
___ FYFS 1301 (First Year Seminar: Studies in Humanities) Ÿ A minimum grade of C is required in some general education
___ PHIL 1301 (Philosophy for Living) courses.
___ PHIL 2305 (Critical Thinking) Ÿ For additional information, consult your academic advisor or
___ PHIL 2325 (Contemporary Moral Problems) the undergraduate bulletin.
___ PHIL 2360 (Gender, Race, and Class)
___ RELG 1330 (Exploring Religion) *This course has prerequisites: Check the Undergraduate
___ WLAN 2315 (Cultural Studies) Bulletin for details.
___ WLAN 2325 (Issues of Cultural Identity in Francophone **HONC courses may be taken only with consent of the Honors
Africa and the Caribbean) College.
___ HONC 1310 (Honors Core I)**
___ HONC 2310 (Honors Core III)**
Revised 3/2009
16 GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

UCA STUDENTS ENROLLING IN TRANSITIONAL COURSES

Who must take Transitional Courses?


Any student entering UCA with ACT math, reading or writing test scores below 19, or CPT scores
below the passing level is required by the State of Arkansas to enroll in and pass a transitional
course in the appropriate area(s). Students who transfer in credit for college-level courses com-
pleted at other institutions are exempt from this requirement.

What is the “Three Attempts Rule”?

You only have three attempts to complete required transitional courses in any one area. This includes
Transitional Writing (UNIV 1300), Transitional Reading (UNIV 1301), and Beginning Algebra (UNIV
1330)/Intermediate Algebra (UNIV 1340). An attempt is any time you make a “D” or “F”, or are withdrawn
with a “W”, “WP” or “WF”. Note: you may not withdraw yourself from these courses but you will be
dropped with a “WF for non-attendance.

Students taking Intermediate (UNIV 1340) or Beginning Algebra (UNIV 1330)

If you receive a grade of “D” or “F” in Beginning or Intermediate Algebra, or are withdrawn with a
“W”, “WP” or “WF”, you must take the course again during the next semester. Please be aware
that you only have three attempts in total to complete your math requirement (in other words, to
pass your required transitional math classes). All attempts at Beginning Algebra or Intermediate
Algebra are counted toward your three allowed attempts in this area.

Students taking Transitional Writing (UNIV 1300) and Transitional Reading (UNIV 1301) and Intro
to College Writing (WRTG 1310)

If you receive a grade of “D” or “F” in Transitional


Writing or Reading, or are withdrawn with a “W”,
“WP” or “WF”, you must take the course again during
the next semester. If you are concurrently enrolled in
WRTG 1310 and do not pass Transitional Writing or
Reading, or are withdrawn with a “W”, “WP” or “WF”,
your WRTG 1310 grade will be replaced with an
“X” (incomplete) that will not be removed until you
pass the transitional course. You may not take WRTG
1320 until the “X” grade in WRTG 1310 is replaced
with a grade of “C” or higher.

What happens after three failed attempts?

After three failed attempts in any one area, you will not be
readmitted to the university until you complete the appro-
priate transitional course(s) with a grade of “C” or higher
at another accredited institution of higher education and
provide UCA with a transcript prior to registration.

3/2009
GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 17

GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM


The General Education program is the foundation department. HIST 2301, for example, is a 2nd year,
of your university degree. It prepares you for or sophomore-level course. It offers 3 hours of
courses in your major, gives you broad knowledge credit, and the 01 distinguishes it from another
and important skills, and provides you with the flexi- course like it, which ends in 02. HISTORY 2301 is
bility and openness to different perspectives that the 1st half of American History, and HISTORY
employers are increasingly demanding in their em- 2302 in the second half. PSCI 1330 is a 1st year
ployees. course, offering 3 hours credit, and the 30 on the
end simply distinguishes it from other political sci-
To graduate from UCA, students must complete a ence courses.
minimum of 124 semester hours, including
major and possibly minor requirements, any You can take ANY of the courses listed in the Gen-
special degree requirements, 40 upper-division eral Education Program. You do not have to be a
hours (courses numbered 3000 and 4000), and 47 sophomore to take the courses numbered 2000. In
hours of general education. fact, for your 1st semester at UCA, we encourage
you to select
The purpose of the general education program is: courses you
• To enable students to have or to know know you will
where to locate the information they need to enjoy. Just be
make informed decisions and hold aware that you
responsible opinions about their lives and MUST take
the relationship of their lives to the world General Edu-
in which they live; cation courses
to graduate.
• To help students develop intellectual skills, Every student
practical skills, and emotional and aesthetic must take 2
sensitivities—that is, to prepare them to semesters of
think, to feel, and to act competently in a writing. Stu-
complex, diverse, and constantly changing dents in the
world; and Honors Col-
lege may sat-
• To help students understand the values in- isfy this re-
herent in their culture and to be aware of quirement with
other cultural traditions, values, and Honors Core I
beliefs. and II. If you
have taken
The list of general education courses contains 10 Comp I,
specific categories. After each category, you will Freshman
see the number of course hours required to com- English, or something like that at another college or
plete that category. university as concurrent credit, or have AP or CLEP
credit you probably have satisfied UCA’s writing
How do you know how many hours you earn for requirement. Be sure to tell your academic advisor
each course? Look closely at how the courses are if you have college credit for any course.
listed. Every listing has a departmental name, a
course number, and a course title. In the category Please note also that remediation is required in
for American History & Government, the name of reading, writing, and algebra if your ACT sub-
the department is HIST (HISTORY) or PSCI ject score is below 19. Remedial courses are not
(POLITICAL SCIENCE). The number after the de- listed in the general education program and do not
partment is the course number: 2301, 2302 or count toward graduation hours.
1330. Every course number has 4 numerals. The
1st numeral tells you the level of the course, the Note also that some majors require specific gen-
2nd the number of credit hours for the course, and eral education courses. For additional information,
the last 2 show that course differs from others in the consult your academic advisor.
18 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Writing-Required for all students

Introduction to WRTG 1310 Required of all students during the first semester they are eligible to enroll. This course introduces
College Writing students to the writing process, focusing on audience, invention, and arrangement, and will be con-
ducted as a workshop.

Academic Writing WRTG 1320 Part of the general education program and required of all students during the first semester they are
and Research eligible to enroll. The course introduces students to academic argument based on substantiating,
evaluating, and proposing claims. Research strategies are central to the course, which will be con-
ducted as a workshop. Prerequisite. WRTG 1310 with a grade of C or higher.

Honors Core I: HONC 1310 A reflexive study of a variety of views on the nature of human beings drawn from differing disciplines
The Search for and historical periods. Team-taught. Emphasis on writing skills and insightful thinking. By consent
Self. only. Fall. (Honors Core I fulfills general education requirements for WRTG 1310 or humanities elec-
tive.)

Honors Core II: HONC 1320 A reflexive study of a variety of views on the nature and problems of society drawn from various disci-
The Search for plines. Team-taught. Emphasis on writing skills and insightful thinking. By consent only. Spring.
Community (Honors Core II fulfills general education requirements for WRTG 1320 or behavioral and social sci-
ences elective.)

Health Studies-Required for all students

Concepts of H ED/KPED A required general education health studies course designed to help students adopt and maintain the
Lifetime Health 1320 behaviors associated with an active and healthy lifestyle. The course uses a team-teaching approach
and Fitness between the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education and the Department of Health Sci-
ences. Primary methods of instruction include lecture/discussion, interactive video, and student par-
ticipation in a health-risk appraisal, a behavior-change project, journal writing, fitness-assessment
laboratories, a fitness prescription and implementation, and required participation in a variety of
physical activities. Students with disabilities limiting or excluding participation in physical activities
should contact the Office of Disability Support Services and enroll in KPED 1191 and HED 2200 un-
der the guidance of their advisor. To earn a passing grade for this course, students must earn a pass-
ing grade in both the health and fitness sections.

Oral Communication-Required for all students

Basic Oral SPCH 1300 Study, application, and evaluation of principles of organization, evidence, reasoning, critical thinking,
Communication verbal and nonverbal behavior, interpersonal communication, public speaking, and small group inter-
action in the oral communication setting. The emphasis will be on meeting the individual needs of
students through individualized instruction using communication experiences.

American History and Government-Choose 1

American Nation I HIST 2301 Provides an understanding of the development of the American people beginning with the age of
exploration and culminating with the Civil War/Reconstruction period.

American Nation II HIST 2302 This course provides an understanding of the development of the United States since the Civil War/
Reconstruction period.

US Government & PSCI 1330 An introduction to the principles and problems of American government, governing institutions, and
Politics political processes.

Behavioral and Social Sciences-Choose 2 (Must be from DIFFERENT disciplines)

Anthropology ANTH 1302 A requirement for all ethnic studies concentration majors, and an elective for other majors and mi-
nors. An introduction to the field of anthropology with an emphasis on basic anthropological princi-
ples, the nature of culture and social organization, and the biological beginnings of Homo sapiens.

Modern Political ECON 1310 Human social order from the economic perspective. Roles and institutions developed in the Western
Economy world to deal with problems of scarcity, alternatives, and choice. Major tools of economic analysis
and application to diverse social and political problems, both contemporary and historic.
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
19

Global ECON 2310 Examination of the various economic, institutional, and cultural practices that guide international
Environment of trade and commerce in the modern world. Includes international institutions, exchange rates, and
Business commercial policy. Required for all business majors.

Principles of GEOG 1305 An introduction to the basic conceptual and methodological principles of geography as an academic
Geography discipline for understanding the patterns of human societies and physical environments on the sur-
face of the earth.

Geography of GEOG 1300 In this course students will come to better understand the rapidly changing world through analyzing
World Regions cultural and physical regions using traditional Western as well as non-Western and the evolving
Developing World's theories. The course uses primarily electronic sources for current data gather-
ing and various types of geographic analysis, supported by lecture and discussion. This course may
be taken to satisfy three hours of the behavioral and social science General Education requirement,
but it may not count toward the 36-hour geography major or the 24-hour geography minor.

Introduction to PSCI 1300 A survey of the discipline of political science designed to introduce students to important theories,
Political Science concepts, issues, in the study of political behavior, phenomena, and processes. The course will
cover the major subfields of political science, including political theory, research methods, American
government, comparative politics, public administration, public policy, and international relations.

US Government & PSCI 1330 An introduction to the principles and problems of American government, governing institutions, and
Politics political processes.

International PSCI 2300 The course examines the concepts and principles that define the conduct of relations between na-
Relations tion-states and other actors. Fall

General PSYC 1300 An introductory course in psychology to acquaint the student with psychology as a behavioral sci-
Psychology ence. A required course for majors and minors.

Principles of SOC 1300 A requirement for all majors, and a prerequisite for most sociology courses. An introduction to the
Sociology basic conceptual, theoretical, and methodological principles of sociology as an academic discipline
for understanding the structure and patterns of human social life.

Honors Core II: HONC 1320 A reflexive study of a variety of views on the nature and problems of society drawn from various
The Search for disciplines. Team-taught. Emphasis on writing skills and insightful thinking. By consent only. Spring.
Community (Honors Core II fulfills general education requirements for WRTG 1320 or behavioral and social
sciences elective.)

Fine Arts-Choose 1

Art Appreciation ART 2300 Significant styles and achievements in the visual arts with study directed toward trends and influ-
ences on contemporary society. May not be credited toward a major or minor in art.

Film Appreciation FILM 2300 Promotes understanding and appreciation of the art of cinema through study of film style, film his-
tory, film genres, and the cultural impact of films. Examines both the theory and practice of filmmak-
ing.

Music MUS 2300 Introduces students to music, its origin and development through recorded and live instrumental
Appreciation and vocal music. Relates to other arts, cultures, literature, and the social sciences. Methods of in-
struction are lecture and listening to music. Fall, spring, summer.

Theater THEA 2300 Awareness and appreciation of theatre art and its place in contemporary human culture. Incorpo-
Appreciation rates study of theatrical styles, history, theory, and practice using live and recorded performances.
May not be credited toward a major or minor in theatre.

Honors Core IV: HONC 2320 An interdisciplinary study of the arts, including aesthetic theories, art, music, or theater studies,
The Art of the media, film, or human affairs. Emphasis on seminar skills. By consent only. Spring. (Honors Core IV
Search fulfills general education requirements for ART 2300 or MUS 2300 or THEA [formerly SPTA] 2300.)
20 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Humanities-Choose 1

Introduction to ENGL 1350 A writing-intensive course exposing students to the college-level study of literature. Exposes stu-
Literature dents to the development, forms, and techniques of poetry, fiction, and drama. Attention is paid to
the writing of analytical, interpretive, and research papers.

Film and ENGL 1355 Satisfies the humanities requirement in the general education program. This course is intended to
Literature give students access to literature through a medium-film-with which they are more familiar and com-
fortable. This course will compare written and cinematic narrative forms by considering classic and
modern literary texts through the medium of film.

Introduction to ENGL 2370 The purpose of Introduction to Fiction is to introduce students to the art and significance of short
Fiction fiction: usually, short stories, novellas, and, sometimes, short novels. Students will learn to read
stories carefully and analytically and be encouraged to see the way stories both reflect and enhance
our understanding of life.

Introduction to ENGL 2380 Exposes the student to the development, forms, and techniques of poetry. Some attention is paid to
Poetry prosodical, musical, and metrical effects.

Introduction to ENGL 2390 The course is a historical overview of the development of drama from Greek tragedy and comedy to
Drama the flowering of Renaissance drama with Shakespeare. Students will study dramas of the eight-
eenth through the twentieth centuries as well. This course views drama as a genre: an evolving art
form dependent on audience and social environment for interpretation.

Cultural Studies WLAN 2315 Examination of one or more foreign cultures, their individual and group values, and their ways of life
as reflected in literature (i.e., short stories, essays, novels) and film. May be repeated for credit
under different topics. May not be presented as part of the foreign language requirement for the BA
degree.

Issues in WLAN 2325 Satisfies the 3-hour humanities requirement of the general education program and fulfills elective
Cultural Identity credit in the African/African-American studies minor. An introduction to the rhetoric of cultural iden-
tity in the post-colonial Francophone world. Examination of French-speaking cultures of Africa and
the Caribbean, as reflected in literature (e.g., short stories, essays, novels) and film. May not be
presented as part of the foreign language requirement for the BA degree.

Conversation- FREN 2320 Further review with special emphasis on reading and writing. Also fulfills humanities area elective in
Composition II OR GERM general education. Discussion/lecture. Prerequisite: sequence 2310 of selected foreign language or
2320 OR appropriate placement examination score and consent of chair.
SPAN 2320

First Year FYFS 1301 Fulfills the 3-hour requirement in humanities.


Seminar: Studies
in Humanities

Philosophy for PHIL 1301 A general education elective satisfying the humanities requirement. Develops basic skills in critical
Living thinking, emphasizing clarification of personal values, major views of human nature, and issues in
philosophical thought. Combines lecture and discussion methods.

Critical Thinking PHIL 2305 Designed to improve a person's ability to reason clearly and correctly and to make rational deci-
sions based on understanding decision strategies, knowing how to use information, and being able
to avoid erroneous thinking.

Contemporary PHIL 2325 A general education elective satisfying the humanities requirement. Introduction to the major moral
Moral Problems and ethical problems that confront individuals of the 21st century, such as abortion, euthanasia,
animal rights, and world hunger. Combines lecture and discussion methods

Gender, Race, PHIL 2360 An introduction to philosophical issues concerning gender, race, and class with an emphasis on
and Class how these issues affect our identities and our conception of ourselves and others. Combines lecture
and discussion methods.
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 21

Exploring Religion RELG 1330 This course explores religion and the meaning of religion in its various forms as an expression of
human culture. Students will be introduced to basic themes concerning the nature and function of
religion and how religion expresses and relates to matters of ultimate concern for human beings.

Honors Core III: HONC 2310 An interdisciplinary study of a non-Western culture through a critical study of its art, economics,
The Diversity of history, geography, religion, or a study of cultural pluralism in some form. Emphasis on research
the Search skills. By consent only. Fall. (Honors Core III fulfills general education requirements for behavioral
and social sciences elective or humanities elective or the third course in the three-course world
cultural traditions sequence.)

Mathematics-Choose 1

Mathematics in MATH 1360 Upon completion of the course, students will be able to apply principles of mathematics to real-
Society world situations, create mathematical and statistical models of the situations, and utilize the models
to solve problems.

College Algebra MATH 1390 This course provides a solid foundation of algebraic concepts. It includes the study of functions,
relations, graphing, and problem solving, and provides knowledge of how to apply these concepts to
real problem situations.

OR, if required by the student's program of study,

Plane MATH 1392 Coupled with College Algebra (MATH 1390), this course satisfies the prerequisites for Calculus I
Trigonometry (MATH 1591) as an alternative to MATH 1580. Topics include angles and triangles and their meas-
ure, graphs and applications of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions, vectors,
polar coordinates, and complex numbers. Lecture/demonstration format. Prerequisite: MATH 1390
or equivalent

Business MATH 1395 As a component of the business foundation, this course is a requirement for all majors in the Col-
Calculus lege of Business Administration. The course is an introduction to calculus involving algebraic, expo-
nential, and logarithmic functions including quantitative methods and applications used in business,
finance, and economics. Calculus topics include limits, derivatives, optimization, and marginal
analysis in business and economics. Problem solving and calculator technology will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: MATH 1390 or equivalent

Calculus for the MATH 1491 This course is a brief introduction to calculus and includes differentiation and integration of polyno-
Life Sciences mial, exponential, and logarithmic functions, solutions of basic differential equations, and the appli-
cation of these techniques to solve physical problems particularly in the life sciences such as biol-
ogy. Prerequisite: MATH 1390 or equivalent.

Algebra and MATH 1580 Designed for students who plan to study calculus, this course may be used to meet the general
Trigonometry education requirement in mathematics and includes the study of concepts of algebra and trigo-
nometry essential to the study of calculus. Technology such as the graphics calculator is used ex-
tensively. Meets five days a week. Lecture/Activity Format. Not open to students who already have
credit for MATH 1390 or MATH 1392.

Calculus I MATH 1591 As a prerequisite for nearly all upper-division mathematics, this course is a requirement for majors
and minors in mathematics and other majors in the natural sciences and engineering. The content
includes the study of limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and their applications. Lecture and
problem solving activities. Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 1390 and C or better in MATH 1392,
or C or better in MATH 1580, or equivalent.

Natural Sciences-1 Biological, 1 Physical Required

Biological Science-Choose 1

General Biology BIOL 1400 This course introduces students to the structure and function of cells, organisms, and communities.
Lecture and laboratory
22 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

OR, if required by the student's program of study,

Principles of BIOL 1440 This course introduces students to the molecular and cellular basis of structure and function of or-
Biology I ganisms. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or CHEM 1301 or above.

Physical Science-Choose 1

Chemistry in CHEM 1400 Study of chemistry for general education with emphasis of learning chemical principles on a need-to
Society -know basis to address societal-technological issues such as environmental problems, energy uses,
drugs, polymers, nutrition, and genetic engineering. Small-group work, laboratory instruction, and
the worldwide web are all used. Critical thinking and problem-solving skills are emphasized. Three
hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week. CHEM 1400 does not count towards a major or
minor in chemistry, a minor in physical science, a major in general science, or a minor in physical
science. No prerequisite.

Physical Science PHYS 1400 Introduces the student to the principles of elementary physics, chemistry, and astronomy. Lecture
for Gen. Ed. and laboratory.

Descriptive PHYS 1401 An introduction to the changing appearance of the night sky, to the solar system, and to the stars.
Astronomy Lecture and laboratory.

OR, if required by the student's program of study,

Physiological CHEM 1402 A required course for BS in Nursing and other allied-health baccalaureate degrees. General chem-
Chemistry I istry topics related to physiology and other health-related sciences. Lecture, small-group work, and
laboratory instruction are used. Three hours of lecture and 2 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequi-
site: grade of C or better in high school chemistry or CHEM 1301.

College CHEM 1450 A required course for chemistry and biology majors, the biological and chemical physics tracks, and
Chemistry pre-pharmacy, pre-medicine, pre-dental, and pre-veterinarian study. Recommended for pre-physical
therapy. Principles of general chemistry with emphasis on their theoretical and quantitative aspects
and applications. Lecture, small-group work, and laboratory instruction are used. Three hours of
lecture and 3 hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: C grade or better in high school chemistry
(full-year course or equivalent) and 2 units of high school algebra, or C grade or better in CHEM
1301.

Applied Physics PHYS 1405 For health science students. Introduces the student to forces, energy, fluids, sound, heat, light,
electricity, and radioactivity, with applications to the health sciences. (Not open to students who
have completed PHYS 1410 or 1441 unless specifically required for major. May not be applied
toward a major or minor together with PHYS 1410, 1420, 1441, or 1442.) Lecture and Laboratory.
Prerequisite: High school or college algebra.

College Physics I PHYS 1410 Forms a two-semester sequence with College Physics 2. Introduces the student to mechanics
(kinematics, force, work, energy, momentum, rotational motion, elasticity, fluids), heat, and thermo-
dynamics.

University PHYS 1441 Part of the major core. Forms a three-semester calculus-based survey of physics sequence with
Physics I University Physics 2 and 3. Introduction to mechanics. Integrated lecture, discussion, workshop,
laboratory format. Pre- or co requisite: MATH 1591.

World Cultural Traditions-3 courses required

History-Choose 1

World History I HIST 1310 Students examine major contributions to the advancement of global civilizations from ancient times
to the early modern period (circa 1600).
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 23

World History II HIST 1320 Students examine development of modern industrial and urban society from its European base in
the seventeenth century to its worldwide impact in the twentieth century.

Literature-Choose 1

World Literature I ENGL 2305 The purpose of World Literature I is to introduce the student to a variety of literary texts, which have
greatly influenced culture around the world. Readings are chosen from the epic, dramatic, poetic,
and speculative traditions of several nations and cultures from ancient times up to the Renaissance.

World Literature II ENGL 2306 The purpose of World Literature II is to introduce the student to some of the literary works, which
embody and consider the values, ideas, and beliefs that have helped make the modern world.
Readings are chosen from several national traditions of the seventeenth through the twentieth cen-
turies.

Other World Culture Options-Choose 1

Introduction to ENGL 1330 This course is a requirement for students majoring or minoring in African/African American studies,
African/African and will introduce them to the study of African and African American literature and culture from an
American Studies interdisciplinary perspective.

World Literature I ENGL 2305 The purpose of World Literature I is to introduce the student to a variety of literary texts, which have
greatly influenced culture around the world. Readings are chosen from the epic, dramatic, poetic,
and speculative traditions of several nations and cultures from ancient times up to the Renaissance.

World Literature II ENGL 2306 The purpose of World Literature II is to introduce the student to some of the literary works, which
embody and consider the values, ideas, and beliefs that have helped make the modern world.
Readings are chosen from several national traditions of the seventeenth through the twentieth cen-
turies.

First Year FYFS 1310 Fulfills 3 hours of the 9-hour requirement in world cultural traditions.
Seminar: Studies
in World Cultural
Traditions

World History I HIST 1310 Students examine major contributions to the advancement of global civilizations from ancient times
to the early modern period (circa 1600).

World History II HIST 1320 Students examine development of modern industrial and urban society from its European base in
the seventeenth century to its worldwide impact in the twentieth century.

World Religions RELG 1320 Encouraged for all students majoring or minoring in the religious studies program. This course intro-
duces students to the study of great religions of the world--Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism,
Christianity, and others--by examining their history, beliefs, moral teachings, rituals, and practices.

World PHIL 1330 Develops basic skills in critical thinking. Emphasizes the global nature of philosophizing and the
Philosophies clarification of personal and social values through cross-cultural understanding.

World Languages WRTG/ An Introduction to world languages from geographical, historical, social, and psychological perspec-
WLAN 2350 tives. Emphasis on the diversity in the world's verbal communication systems as well as the univer-
sal aspects underlying all human symbolic behavior. Basic introduction to language structure, pho-
netics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.

Honors Core III: HONC 2310 An interdisciplinary study of a non-Western culture through a critical study of its art, economics,
The Diversity of history, geography, religion, or a study of cultural pluralism in some form. Emphasis on research
the Search skills. By consent only. Fall. (Honors Core III fulfills general education requirements for behavioral
and social sciences elective or humanities elective or the third course in the three-course world
cultural traditions sequence.)
24 URSA

URSA

What does URSA stand for? University Resources for


Students and Administration

What is URSA? It is a portal or a doorway to information.


Just like the ones we use every day via the web.

What is the URL address to URSA? http://ursa.uca.edu

How do we log in? You will use your network ID for username and PIN for your password
which was included in your admission letter. If you have lost or have not received this
information you will need to take your photo ID and go to the Information Technology
Help Desk in BBA 107.

Tabs: After logging in you will see TABS - All students will have the same TABS: HOME,
LIBRARY, RESOURCE, and MY TAB.

What Features does the system provide? This was designed to help you interact more ef-
fectively with your institution or with colleagues at your institutions, such as e-mail, calen-
dar, course tools, and more.
ü E-Mail - The system provides a Web-based e-mail application that you can use to
send and receive messages and maintain an address book of online contacts.
ü Calendar - The system provides a Web-based calendar application that you can use
to create and manage personal calendars, access course calendars to view informa-
tion added by course instructors, and access calendars for any online groups that
you have joined. To access the calendar, click the calendar icon that appears in the
application toolbar.
ü Group Studio - The system provides an application that allows individuals at your
institution to request the creation of online groups and maintain homepages for these
groups containing resources like photo albums, Internet links, news articles, and ap-
plications like message boards, chat rooms, and calendars. Similar homepages are
supported for courses taught at your institution.
ü Message Boards - The system provides a message board for each class in which
you are enrolled. Depending on the privileges allocated to a group, message boards
may also be available to groups for which you are a member. To access course
message boards, use the My Courses channel.
ü Chat - The system provides a chat room for each class in which you are enrolled.
Depending on the privileges allocated to a group, chat rooms may also be available
to groups for which you are a member.
ü Administrative Services - Depending on the way your institution has implemented
the system, you may be able to access administrative services to do things like
check grades, register for classes, change the personal information that your institu-
tion maintains about you.

What are channels? The campus portal displays content through channels, which are
topic-specific areas that provide convenient access to information, applications, or
other Web resources you may want to access.
URSA 25

Can I customize my layout? The system provides great flexibility for you to customize the tabs and
channels that you have in your layout. In general the system allows you to:

« Add tabs to your layout


« Remove tabs from your layout
« Move tabs to new positions
« Rename tabs
« Set the default tab that opens when you log in to the system
« Change the way a tab opens (framed or not)
« Add channels to existing tabs
« Move channels between tabs
« Reorder channels on a given tab
« Add or remove columns on a given tab

Do I get support? Yes, there is a tutorial available under your "My Tab" button and the Information Tech-
nology help desk is available for help. They are located in BBA 107 and their phone number is 450-
3107.

URSA POP QUIZ


Find the answers to the following questions using your URSA account.

1. Log into your URSA account. Click on: the “Self-Service” tab—Student & Financial Aid—”Student
Records”— View Student Information.

1) Who is your Primary Advisor? _______________________________

2) What is your Major & Department? _______________________________

3) What is your Class?_______________________________

2. List 3 other items you can view under “Student Records” menu.

1)____________________ 2)____________________ 3)_____________________

3. You can check your e-mail through the ___________________ tab.

4. What channel on the “My UCA” tab allows you to check tuition & fees and make a payment?

_______________________________

5. The Academic Advising Center Channel is located under which tab? _______________

6. List 3 resources you can access through the Academic Advising Center Channel on the “My UCA”
tab.

1)____________________ 2)___________________ 3)____________________

7. In the “Self-Service” tab, click on Student and Financial Aid, Go to “Student Records”, View/Print
Schedule, then select the current term. Next, click on “File” in the toolbar, change your page
setting to “landscape” and then click “OK”. Then, click on “File in the toolbar and click “Print”.
Return to the front desk to receive a copy of your class schedule.

Be sure to log out of your URSA account before you leave!


26 ACCESSING STUDENT INFORMATION IN URSA

ACCESSING STUDENT INFORMATION IN URSA

https://ursa.uca.edu/
Enter your Network ID and PIN-Password (if lost/unknown, take a photo ID to the Help Desk, BBA 106)

Finding the General Education and Major/Minor Check Sheets:


Click on “My UCA” tab and go to the Academic Advising Center Channel in center of page
Click on “Resources for Students” link and print:
· Master Class Schedule
· General Education Requirements
· Model Plan of Study for your chosen degree (or go directly to the Academic Department for a
degree checklist)

Finding your Advisor in URSA:


***You must meet with your advisor before you can register for classes***
Click on the “Self-Service” Tab
Click on the Student & Financial Aid
Click on “Student Records”
Click on View Student Information (middle of page)

Looking at your Academic Information in URSA:


Click on the “Self-Service” Tab
Click on Student & Financial Aid
Click on “Student Records”
Click to “View Holds”, “Midterm Grades”, “Final Grades”, “Academic Transcript” – list of all the
classes that you have taken at UCA, transfer classes, AP and CLEP credit. (Use the general education
program check sheet and model plans of study to determine what general education and major courses
you need.)
View the “Class Schedule” to plan your next semester classes

To Register for classes:


***You must meet with your advisor and clear all holds before you can register for classes***
***Incoming freshmen will not have access to change their schedule for the first term at UCA. Schedule
changes must be made through their academic advisor.****
You can find the Advance Registration Schedule on the URSA log-on page by clicking on “Registration
Information and Schedule of Classes”
Click on the “Self-Service” Tab
Click on Student & Financial Aid
Click on “Registration Link”
Click on Look up Classes
Select Term and submit
Select subject - can limit search by:
· Specific Class or all classes in a subject
· Specific Instructor
· Specific Time
· Specific Day (s)
Click on “Class Search” – after you find the class that you want to take, the box on the left will indicate
that the class is available, check the box, and scroll to the bottom of the screen:
Click “Add to worksheet” or “Register”

To View your Completed Schedule after registration:


Click on View/Print Schedule, to see your completed schedule.

Logout of URSA (top right of screen)


WHAT IS A SYLLABUS/ACADEMIC ADVISING SYLLABUS 27

WHAT IS A COURSE SYLLABUS


(AND HOW DO I USE IT?)

A course syllabus is defined as an outline of a course of study. The primary purpose of a course sylla-
bus is to communicate to students what the course is about, why the course is taught, and what will be
required of the students for them to complete the course with a passing grade. The syllabus also con-
tains instructor’s contact information as well as other university policies. The syllabus is usually distrib-
uted and discussed during the first class session.

Note: It is a good idea to use the student handbook and daily planner (provided by the University) to re-
cord important deadlines and exam dates as soon as you receive your class syllabi.

Note: Assignments/Readings, etc. should be completed and ready for discussion before the scheduled
date listed in syllabi.

ACADEMIC ADVISING SYLLABUS


Academic Advising Center Harrin Hall 100
Phone: 501.450.5149 Fax: 501.450.3208
Advising Hours: 8am-4:30pm Monday-Friday by appointment (excluding Holidays)

My Advisor is Contact Information

Mission Statement: The Academic Advising Center is a team of professionals dedicated primarily to
assisting first year students in defining and achieving their academic goals. In addition, we provide cen-
tralized academic advising services for the UCA Community.

What is Academic Advising? Academic advising is an educational process that by intention and de-
sign, facilitates student’s understanding of the meaning and purpose of higher education and fosters their
intellectual and personal development toward academic success and lifelong learning (National Aca-
demic Advising Association, 2004).

Student Learning Objectives


In other words, when you are finished with your first year of college, this is what we expect you to have
learned from Academic Advising!

Ÿ Students should be able to interpret a course number.

Ÿ Students should know how to drop a course and define what the resulting grade (W, WF, WP)
means.

Ÿ Students should know how to employ technology for registering, degree information, checking
holds, contacting their advisor and finding campus resources.

Ÿ Students will gain knowledge and awareness of the various resources located on campus and
where they are located.

Ÿ Students should know how to locate the GPA calculator online.

Ÿ Students should know how to prepare effectively for an advising meeting.

Ÿ Students should know the grade forgiveness policy at UCA.

Ÿ Students should know the main components for a college degree.


28 ACADEMIC YEAR ADVISING CALENDAR

ACADEMIC YEAR ADVISING CALENDAR


Time Of Year Event What to Do
Summer Summer Registration/ Bring AP scores, placement scores, other college
SOAR credit.
August/January Week before classes Print your schedule and make sure you know
begin where your classes are; buy your books.

First Week of Classes Go to every class and get a syllabus; meet with
your advisor if you need to make any schedule
changes.
September/February Weeks 2-5 Make an appointment to meet with your advisor to
discuss any questions you have about classes or
UCA with your advisor.

Weeks 6-8 Fall: Take the Discover Test in Career Services to


see what major might fit you and research the ma-
jor on the UCA website.
Spring: Make an appointment to discuss possible
majors with your advisor.
Early October Majors Fair Attend the Majors Fair to explore the many major
options at UCA and talk to department representa-
tives from across campus.

Mid October/Mid Midterm Grades Meet individually with your professors to discuss
March your progress in the courses. Meet with you advi-
sor to discuss your grades and any options you
may have.
Advance Registration Meet with your advisor to discuss course options
Appointment and potential major requirements. Remember, this
meeting is mandatory! Things to consider before
registering for classes:
-How many hours will I take?
-What courses will allow me a good balance in
workload?
-What time do I want to take classes?
-Do I have any holds?
-Review the registration process in the Bear
Book.
End of October/ Last day to drop a class Meet with your advisor to determine if you need to
End of March with a W drop a course.
Middle of November/ Advance Registration After meeting with your advisor to discuss course
Middle of April Begins options for the spring, register for classes online
through URSA on your day to register.

December/May Final Grades come out Check your grades through URSA and make any
necessary changes in your schedule for the up-
coming semester due to the grades.
COUNTDOWN
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GET TO UCA
30 ACADEMIC INFORMATION

ACADEMIC INFORMATION

Things you need to know:

All academic requirements, policies, procedures, etc. are listed in the Undergraduate Bulletin. The Un-
dergraduate Bulletin is available online at www.uca.edu/ubulletin. Become familiar with the contents of
the Undergraduate Bulletin.

The Student Handbook is an all-inclusive guide for student rights and responsibilities. It contains the
academic calendar and information about academic policies, general rules and regulations, university
records, student appeals processes, etc. You will be held accountable for the information in the hand-
book. You must become familiar with this information. The Student Handbook is published each year and
is available at the beginning of the fall term at the Student Information Counter in the Student Center. It
is also available on line at www.uca.edu/divisions/student/handbook.

If you need to alter your class schedule after classes begin, you can do so by adding and/or dropping
classes. Deadlines apply to both processes. The deadline for adding classes is very brief. If you decide
to add a class, you must act quickly. See the Academic Calendar for add/drop deadlines. You can find
the Academic Calendar at www.uca.edu/schedule. To add or to drop a class, see your academic ad-
visor.

You will be given a class syllabus in each of your classes. The syllabus will outline all of the require-
ments for that course: attendance policy, special requirements, test dates, due dates for homework, ma-
jor papers, etc. Be sure that you receive your syllabus for each class.

Go to class! Instructors have the right to drop you from class for non-attendance. If you are dropped for
non-attendance, the instructor has the right to give you a “Withdraw Failing” (WF) grade. WF’s are
treated like F’s and are computed in your grade point as an F.

If you are in grade trouble or are having problems in a class or classes, see your academic advisor as
soon as possible.

The University of Central Arkansas has created an e-mail account for all students . University
officials will not recognize any other e-mail address. This account must be used for official UCA
correspondence. Once classes start, your academic e-mail account will be activated. Check your ac-
count frequently for vital information from the university.

UNIVERSITY RECORDS

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect
to their educational records. For the complete Act please refer to the website:
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/general/gencounsel/ferpa/.

Record Inspection-Students have the right to inspect and review their education records.

Challenge to Educational Record-In the event it is believed education records contain inaccurate or
misleading information, or are otherwise in violation of a student’s privacy, a request for amendment may
be made. Refer to the UCA Student Handbook & Daily Planner for complete information. The handbook
can be located on the web at http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/handbook/.

RECORD DISCLOSURE

In general, the University does not disclose personally identifiable information contained in a student’s
education record unless the student provides written permission for disclosure.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION 31

DIRECTORY INFORMATION

The University may disclose, without consent, “directory’ information as defined in the student hand-
book. However, please note that doing so will prevent inclusion of a student on award lists such as
the Dean's and Presidential Scholar's Lists, unless a student contacts the Office of Undergraduate
Studies prior to the end of each semester to request inclusion for the following semester.

Students who do not wish the University to disclose “directory” information about them should notify
the Office of the Registrar in writing. Students may request the non-release of “directory” information
at anytime.

REGISTRATION CANCELLATION

In the event that you are unable to attend UCA after you have been enrolled in classes, the Registra-
tion Cancellation Form is required for you to notify the University that you will not be attending. The
form can be found on the last page of this book. Please note that this form has a deadline date by
which the University must receive notice of your registration cancellation.

STUDENT INFORMATION

The university does not mail grades. Rather, grade information is made available to students from a
secure site that can be accessed using the Internet. The Student Identification Number and PIN are
required to access grade information.

The university certifies a student’s status at the institution—full or part-time enrollment, academic
standing, advance registration for a future term, etc. The Office of the Registrar front counter in
McCastlain Hall is the contact point for this service and has forms students can complete to provide
the written request that is normally required. Certification of a student’s status is a free service. The
normal time to process a certification of student status request is four (4) working days.

STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW INFORMATION

The federal government requires that certain information be provided to incoming current University
students, prospective students, parents, and current and prospective employees for the University.
This information which comes under the Student Right to Know Act can be found at a central location
on the UCA’s website. Individuals can go to the UCA website at www.uca.edu, click on “Current Stu-
dents,” scroll down to “Student Resources,” and then click on “Student Right to Know Act.” Students
can access the website information from their personal computer or from any computer lab on cam-
pus. Students can receive a paper copy of any information, or visit the Dean of Students Office lo-
cated in the Student Health Center. Information available on the UCA website under the “Student
Right to Know” includes:

Ÿ Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA)


Ÿ Available Financial Assistance & Direct Loan Deferments for Performed Services
Ÿ General Institutional Information
Ÿ Graduation Rate Information
Ÿ Campus Security Report
Ÿ Athletic Program Participation Rates & Financial Support Data
32 ACT ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS
FOR 2009-2010 ENTERING FRESHMEN
2009-2010 ACT ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION
The University of Central Arkansas awards academic scholarships to entering freshmen based on high
school GPA, ACT/SAT scores, and other relevant factors.

UCA FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP


$6,000 per semester
Eligibility requirements: National Merit/Achievement Finalist or Semifinalist and a 3.25 cumulative high
school GPA. Students are encouraged to apply to the Honors College where they may compete for addi-
tional scholarships.

TRUSTEE SCHOLARSHIP
Up to $5,250 per semester
Eligibility requirements: 31-36 ACT/1360-1600 recentered SAT and 3.25 cumulative high school GPA.

PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP
Up to $4,500 per semester
Eligibility requirements: 29-30 ACT/1290-1350 recentered SAT and 3.25 cumulative high school GPA.

DEAN’S SCHOLARSHIP
Up to $3,000 per semester
Eligibility requirements: 27-28 ACT/1210-1280 recentered SAT and a 3.25 cumulative high school GPA
or class rank of valedictorian or salutatorian.

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP
Up to $1,500 per semester
Eligibility requirements: 25-26 ACT/1130-1200 recentered SAT and 3.25 cumulative high school GPA.

INFORMATION CONCERNING ALL


ACT SCHOLARSHIPS

*Students must complete 30 hours each academic year (fall and


spring) with a 3.25 GPA and remain enrolled on a full-time
basis.

*Fall semester GPA must be 2.5 or higher on at least 12 hours


for scholarship continuation into spring semester.

*All ACT scholarships are renewable for seven consecutive


semesters not to include summer semesters.

*ACT Scholarships will be awarded only to students not requir-


ing state-mandated remediation.

**To receive the full benefit of the ACT scholarship, students


must reside in university housing.

*Recipients are responsible for making on-campus housing


arrangements.
ACT ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION 33

UCA TRANSFER SCHOLARSHIP


Tuition and general registration fees up to 15 credit hours per semester**
-Awarded for four (4) consecutive semesters, not to include summer semesters

Eligibility Requirements: Completion of 60 transferable hours at an Arkansas two-year college with a


minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.25. For scholarship renewal, students must complete 30
hours each academic year (fall and spring) with a 3.25 GPA. Semester GPA must be 2.5 or higher on at
least 12 hours for scholarship continuation into the spring semester.

**Fees included in the scholarship are limited to those assessed to all general students.

PRIVATELY FUNDED SCHOLARSHIPS

Each year through endowed funds, the Foundation provides thousands of dollars in scholarships to UCA
students. Scholarships and awards are made possible by private gifts and vary considerably in dollar
value and criteria, reflecting the donors' gifts and interests. For more information, please contact the UCA
Foundation office in Buffalo Alumni Hall for more information.

Gathered on 02/04/2009 http://www.uca.edu/admissions/scholarship.htm

Question: HOW DO I KEEP MY SCHOLARSHIP?

Answer: Know how many quality points you need!

3.25 x____ number hours enrolled=_________quality points needed to keep your scholarship.

Example: 3.25 x 15 hours = 48.75 (49) quality points.

If you take 15 hours, you must earn at least 49 quality points to keep your scholarship. Below is a work-
sheet to help you calculate your quality points and GPA. More information can be found in the “Tips for
Success” section of this book.

Quality points worksheet

Course Grade x hours = Quality points


(ex.) WRTG 1310 __A___ __(4)__ x _3___= __12___

__________ ______ _______ x _____ = _______

__________ ______ ______ x _____ = _______

__________ ______ _______ x _____ = _______

__________ ______ _______ x _____ = _______

__________ ______ ______ x _____ = ______


GPA=TOTAL QUALITY POINTS
Total ______ _______ DIVIDED BY TOTAL HOURS
34 THE FACTS ON GETTING A DEGREE

THE FACTS ON GETTING A DEGREE

The first degree you will receive from UCA will be either an Associate or a Baccalaureate (your Bache-
lor’s degree). The University offers two Associate and six Baccalaureate degrees, all of which have their
own specific requirements along with the general education requirements. For a complete listing of all
degree requirements you can look on the web at www.uca.edu/entry/academic/acad_dept.htm and select
the major you’re interested in. It is your responsibility to know the requirements for your degree,
and we urge you to follow the Program Completion Plan (PCP) for your program. To assist you in
keeping up with what classes you need to take, check-sheets for each program are available at http://
www.uca.edu/model/.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
Most people think of college as four or more years
concentrating on one specific area called your major.
In reality you spend only about one in every three
classes in your major department. These courses are
very specific and you should consult your major de-
partment office, academic advisor, or the web site for
further information on what exactly needs to be taken
and in what order. There may also be prerequisites
for courses that are required for your major. These
are listed in the degree requirements for your major.
You can always check with your major department
office or your advisor for any updated information.

Regardless of major, all students must complete the


General Education Program. You will find information about general education on pages 15 through 23
of this book.

Some majors also require a minor. A minor is a second area of specialization requiring fewer courses
than a major. Minors usually require a minimum of six courses and there may be further requirements as
to which courses must be taken. It is best to acquire that information from the minor department’s office
or your advisor.

Special Degree requirements: All majors may have special degree requirements which are defined in
the Undergraduate Bulletin.

Your final requirement is elective courses. The number of elective courses required will vary by degree
plan. Again, become familiar with your degree requirements. There are some restrictions on courses and
the best way to know those restrictions is to refer to the Undergraduate Bulletin is to know where to find
them. A good rule to live by is, if in doubt, check with your academic advisor.

Need more information? Check with your advisor, department web site, or the UCA Undergraduate Bulle-
tin on the web at http://www.uca.edu/ubulletin/toc.html.

DID YOU KNOW?


UCA currently offers 164 undergraduate, master's and doctoral programs..
UCA PROGRAMS OF STUDY 35
UCA PROGRAMS OF STUDY

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Linguistics - minor


Accounting - minor, BBA, MAcc Mass Communication - minor, BA, BS
Business - AAS --Mass Communication: Broadcast Journalism
Business Administration - minor, BBA, MBA --Mass Communication: Online Journalism
Economics - minor, BS --Mass Communication: Print Journalism
Economics, International Trade Emphasis - BA, Music - minor, BA, BM, MM
BBA --Music Education-Instrumental
Finance - BBA --Music Education-Keyboard
Management Information Systems (four tracks)- --Music Education-Vocal
minor, BBA --Music-Composition
--Program/Analyst --Music-Instrumental
--Geographic Information Systems --Music-Keyboard
--Telecomm/Networking --Music-Vocal
--Web Development/E-Commerce Public Relations - BA, BS
Insurance and Risk Management - BBA Speech - minor, BA, BS
Insurance and Risk Management, Theatre - minor, BA, BS
--Personal and Financial Planning Track - BBA Writing - minor, BA
Management - minor, BBA
Marketing - minor, BBA COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND BEHAVIORAL
SCIENCES
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Addiction Studies - certificate, BS, minor
Advanced Studies in Teaching and Learning - --Treatment
MSE --Prevention
Business and Marketing Education - BSE Athletic Training - BS
Childhood Education (P-4) - BSE Communication Sciences and Disorders – PhD
College Student Personnel Services and Admini- (consortium program with UALR and UAMS)
stration - MS Community Counseling - MS
Educational Leadership - EdS Counseling Psychology - MS
Early Childhood Education - MSE Dietetics - BS, MS
Master of Arts in Teaching - MAT Family and Consumer Sciences - minor, BS, MS
School Leadership, Management, and Administra- Family and Consumer Sciences Education - BSE
tion - MS Gerontology - minor
Library Media and Information Technology - MS Health Education - minor, BS, MS
Middle Level Education (4-8) - BSE Health Sciences - BS
--Language Arts/Social Studies --Gerontology
--Math/Science --Health Services Administration
Reading - MSE --Physical Therapy emphasis
Special Education - MSE --Occupational Therapy
--Collaborative Instructional Specialist, Ages 0-8 Health Systems - MS
--Collaborative Instr. Specialist, Grades 4-12 Interior Design - BA, BS
Kinesiology - minor, BS, MS
COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS AND Kinesiology & Physical Education - BSE
COMMUNICATIONS Medical Technology - BS
Art - minor, BA, BFA Military Science - minor
--Art: Art Education Nuclear Medicine Technology - BS
--Art: Art History Nursing - BSN, MSN
--Art: Studio Art-Painting Occupational Therapy - MS
--Art: Studio Art-Printmaking Physical Therapy - MS, DPT, PhD
--Art: Studio Art-Photography Psychology - minor, BA, BS
--Art: Studio Art-Sculpture Radiography - BS
--Art: Studio Art-Ceramics School Counseling - MS
--Art: Studio Art-Graphic Design School Psychology - MS, PhD
Digital Filmmaking - BA, BS, MFA Speech-Language Pathology - BS, MS
36 UCA PROGRAMS OF STUDY/ DECLARING MAJORS

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS Secondary Science Education - BSE


Anthropology - minor --Physical Science/Earth Science
English - minor, BA, MA --Life Science/Earth Science
French - minor, BA
Geographic Information Science - minor, GC INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS
Geography - minor, BA, BS African/African-American Studies - minor, BA
German - minor Asian Studies - minor
History - minor, BA, BS, MA Environmental Science - BS
International Studies - minor, BA (three tracks) --Biology
--Regional Studies --Chemistry
--International Policies & Diplomacy --Planning and Administration
--International Political Economy & Development Gender Studies - minor
Philosophy - minor, BA, BS General Science - BS
Political Science - minor, BA, BS Latin American Studies - minor
Presidential Studies - minor Religious Studies - minor, BA
Public Administration - BS Southern and Arkansas Studies – minor
Social Studies, History Emphasis - BSE
Sociology - minor, BA, BS PRE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING
--Criminology Pre-Cardio Respiratory Care
--Medical Pre-Dentistry
Spanish - minor, BA, MA Pre-Dental Hygiene
Pre-Engineering
COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND Pre-Law
MATHEMATICS Pre-Medicine
Biology - minor, BS, MS --Biology
Chemistry - minor, BS --Chemistry
--ACS Certified Pre-Optometry
--Bio-chemistry Pre-Pharmacy
Computer Science - minor, BS, MS Pre-Veterinary Medicine
Mathematics - minor, BA, BS, BSE, MA,MS
--Applied Mathematics, BS UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
Physics - minor, BS General Studies - AA
--Applied
--Biological HONORS AT UCA
--Chemical Honors Interdisciplinary Studies – minor
--Mathematical
Physical Science - minor

DECLARING YOUR MAJOR and/or MINOR

All undeclared students are advised in the Advising Center along with all incoming freshmen ex-
cept students who have declared a major in the College of Health and Behavioral Sciences. Up-
perclassmen with declared majors and all students who have a declared major in the College of
Health and Behavioral Sciences will have an assigned advisor in their department.
To find out who your academic advisor is log into URSA using your network ID and password.
Click on the Self-Service tab and then click on: Student and Financial Aid, Student Records, then
View Student Info.

If you do not have a major or if you wish to declare or change a major or minor, you will need to
complete an electronic major change form on the Academic Advising Center’s channel under the
“My UCA” tab in your URSA account.
LOCAL BANKING/ LAUNDRY SERVICES 37

LOCAL BANKING OPTIONS

ARVEST BANK
Customer Service (501) 379-7700 CENTENNIAL BANK
2850 College Ave., (501) 513-4510 Main Office: 620 Chestnut, (501) 328-4663
West Branch: 945 Salem, (501) 328-4620
BANK OF AMERICA Downtown Branch: 1208 Oak, (501) 328-4691
1-800-432-1000 North Branch: 2690 Donaghey, (501) 328-4664

BANK OF THE OZARKS METROPOLITAN NATIONAL BANK


803 Harkrider, 72032, (501) 932-3000 414 Oak St. (501) 327-3390
2885 Prince Street, 72033, (501) 932-3040 804 Hogan Ln. (501) 932-0720
MetroLine 24 Hour TeleBanking, (501) 329-5656
FIRST SECURITY BANK
Main Center 1001 Front St., (501) 450-9800 NATIONAL BANK OF ARKANSAS
North Center 1390 Hwy 64 W., (501) 450-1810 812 Oak Street, (501) 329-0333
West Center 801 Hogan Rd., (501) 450-1876
East Center 1110 E. Oak, (501) 450-1855 REGIONS BANK
Prince St. Center: 2925 Prince St., (501) 450-1885 Main & Chestnut, (501) 450-4600
Univ. Center Dave Ward & Donaghey, (501) 450- Industrial & Enterprise Ave., (501) 450-4739
7337 West Branch Prince & Salem, (501) 450-4725
Telephone Banking (24 Hour), (501) 450-1865
US BANK
SIMMONS FIRST 24 Hour, 1- 800-872-2657
600 Salem Rd., (501) 329-7070 1122 Van Ronkle, (501) 327-7771
2620 Prince St., (501) 327-5105

LAUNDRY SERVICES
Every Residence Hall on campus has laundry facilities available.

CLASSIC LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS


2150 Harkrider, Nutters Chapel Plaza,
(501)450-7275 (501) 450-7187

505 Industrial Blvd. 2385 Prince, (501)327-3866 (501) 327-7830

FUN WASH
1065 Clayton, (501) 329-9274

HAMMETT’S DRIVE-IN CLEANERS


1104 Front St., (501) 329-5295

LAUNDRY CITY
1430 Old Morrilton Hwy, (501) 932-7624
MODEL CLEANERS
163 Farris Rd (501) 327-0555
1805 E. Oak, (501)327-2627
717 Parkway Ave., (501)329-3221

WESTGATE COIN LAUNDRY


155 Farris Rd, (501) 450-0012
38 SUGGESTIONS FOR WHAT TO BRING

SUGGESTIONS FOR WHAT TO BRING

GENERAL
o Umbrella
o Laundry bag/basket FOR AROUND THE ROOM
(Check with your roommate; you may FOR THE BATHROOM
o Power strips (max of two, 10 only need one of some of these between
the two/three of you!)
o Soap
outlets each)
o Comforter/blanket o Shampoo/conditioner
o Extension cords o Toothbrush & toothpaste
(three-prong & o DVD player
grounded!) o Sheets (size: twin) o Deodorant
o An ethernet cord o TV o Shaving supplies
o A coaxial television cable o Pillows & pillowcases o Brush/comb
o A can opener o CDs o Hair dryer
o Cleaning supplies o Alarm clock – a loud one! o Contact lens supplies/
o Air freshener spare pair of glasses
o Walkman/IPOD/MP3 player/ o Shower bucket – got to get it
o Trash cans/trash bags Stereo
from your room to the
o A small sewing kit o Answering machine/cell shower easily!
phone
o Flashlight o Towels
o Removable hooks for the wall o Full length mirror (back of the o First aid supplies
door)
o Under the bed containers o Decorations: posters, plants,
o Laundry detergent knick knacks, memory
albums
o Lamp THINGS TO LEAVE AT HOME
o Fan
FOR THE CLOSET Ó Candles
o Casual, comfy clothing
FOR YOUR DESK Ó Animals
o Socks
o Address book
o Underwear Ó Toaster
o Computer
(if you are planning on o Shoes
having one) o Bathrobe Ó Potpourri burner
o Dictionary/thesaurus o Pajamas
o Calendar or planner Ó Microwaves
o Shower shoes
(you will get one here!)
o Book bag/back pack
(flip flops are perfect)
Ó No nails or screws
o Hangers
o Sewing kit o Some dressy clothes
o Calculator (just in case!)
o Stapler and staples o Fall & winter coats
o Gloves, hat & scarf
NOW THAT YOU’RE HERE—
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
40 WHAT IS ACADEMIC ADVISING?

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS


ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER
MISSION STATEMENT

The Academic Advising Center is a team of professionals dedicated primarily to assisting first year stu-
dents in defining and achieving their academic goals. In addition, we provide centralized academic ad-
vising services for the UCA Community.

WHAT IS ACADEMIC ADVISING?

Academic advising is Educational


Academic advising is a vital part of your educational experi-
ence. Your advisor will help you to identify and develop edu-
cational plans compatible with your life goals and help plan a
curriculum to achieve those goals.
Academic advising is Informational
Like all colleges and universities, UCA has established poli-
cies, procedures, deadlines and resources to help you reach
your personal and academic goals. Your advisor will answer
questions and provide information about how to manage the
university system with confidence and success.
Academic advising is Relational
Your academic advisor uses an identification number to access your student records, but you are
never just a number at UCA. Your academic advisor cares about you and genuinely wants to help
you succeed—not only in college but also in life. Whatever your needs, you will find a friend in your
academic advisor. The stronger your relationship with your advisor, the greater the likelihood you will
succeed.
Where do I find my advisor?
Your advisor information is available in URSA under the Self-Service tab. Click on the Student and Fi-
nancial Aid link, Student Records, then View Student Information. Look at the Primary Advisor Type. If
the type is listed as “First Major Advisor” you will need to contact the department your major is in. If
the type is “Academic Advising Center” you can find your advisor in Harrin Hall.

When should I see my advisor?


*When you need information about university
policies or deadlines.

*When you have questions about degree require-


ments, course prerequisites, and specific majors Academic Advising Center
and minors. 201 Donaghey
Harrin Hall 100
*When you are having difficulty with class work or Conway, AR 72035-0001
study skills.
Phone: 501.450.5149
*When you want to drop or add a class or schedule Fax: 501.450.3208
classes for the next term. E-mail: AdvisingCenter@uca.edu

*Prior to mid-term and final exams.

*After you receive mid-term grades to discuss


academic progress.

*Whenever YOU feel it’s necessary!


HELPFUL NUMBERS AT UCA 41

PROBLEM WHO TO CONTACT/WHERE TO GO PHONE


NUMBER

Academic Issues/General Your Academic Advisor 450.5149


Information http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/undergradstudies/
CLEP and other Testing Center 450.3209
standardized http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/assess/testing/index.htm
Test Dates
Arkansas Academic http://acs.adhe.edu/ 1.800.547.8839
Challenge Scholarship (1.800.54 STUDY)

Computer Labs The Department of Information Technology has a comprehensive list at


http://cc.uca.edu/cgi-bin/cs.cgi?DF=/students/labs/index.html

Correspondence Courses, Academic Outreach 450.3118


Online courses http://www.uca.edu/aoep/

Housing Location, Room, Housing 450.3132


Roommate Assignments, http://www.uca.edu/divisions/admin/housing/
add a Meal Plan to account
Re-issue Student ID, Meal One Card Office 450.5818
plan, DCB and BearBucks http://www.uca.edu/uca/bearbucks.php
Management
Illness, Immunization Student Health Services 450.3136
Records http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/studenthealth/
Internships, Co-ops Cooperative Education 450.3250
http://www.uca.edu/newweb/careerservices/
Jobs, Career Preparation, Career Services 450.3134
Resume, Discover http://www.uca.edu/newweb/careerservices/

Loans, Grants Financial Aid 450.3140


http://www.uca.edu/divisions/admin/finaid/
Locked your keys in your car, UCA Police 450.3111
Battery needs jump, Police http://www.uca.edu/divisions/admin/ucapd/
escort to car at night
Personal Enhancement, Counseling Center 450.3138
Individual consultations http://www.uca.edu/counseling/
Fees/Fee Payment Student Accounts 450-5015
Schedule http://www.uca.edu/divisions/admin/finserv/studentaccounts/index.asp

Problems with URSA Information Technology 450.3107


account, Wireless activation, http://it.uca.edu/
WebCT
Scholarship renewal, Proba- Undergraduate Studies 450.3125
tion,Suspension http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/undergradstudies/
Special Needs/ Disability Support Services 450.3135
Accommodations http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/disability/
Transcripts, Proof of Registrar 450.5200
Enrollment http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/registrar/
Tutoring The Division of Undergraduate Studies has a comprehensive list at
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/undergradstudies/Tutoring.html
or
Contact individual departments
http://www.uca.edu/info/depts.php
42 COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENT CONTACT INFORMATION

COLLEGE & DEPARTMENT CONTACT INFORMATION


(Building abbreviations and a campus map can be found on page 44-45 of this book.)

DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES


DEAN’S OFFICE 450.3125 HAR 200
ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER 450.5149 HAR 100
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 450.3220 MH 10
UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CENTER
FOR SUCCESS Main Hall Basement
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES 450.3125 HAR 200
UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP RENEWAL 450.3125 HAR 200
PROBATION/SUSPENSION 450.3125 HAR 200
REGISTRAR 450-5200 MCC Hall
VETERAN’S AFFAIRS 450-5200 MCC Hall

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


DEAN’S OFFICE 450.3106 BBA 222
ACCOUNTING 450-3108 BBA 309
ECONOMICS, FINANCE, INSURANCE &
RISK MANAGEMENT 450-3109 BBA 304
MANAGEMENT INFO. SYSTEMS 450-5326 BBA 318D
MARKETING & MANAGEMENT 450-3149 BBA 214

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
DEAN’S OFFICE 450-3175 MAS 100
EARLY CHILDHOOD & SPEC. ED. 450-3172 MAS150
MIDDLE /SECONDARY ED &
INSTRUCTIONAL TECH. 450-3177 MAS 104

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS & COMMUNICATION


DEAN’S OFFICE 450-3293 HAR 222
ART 450-3113 MAC 101
MASS COMMUNICATION & THEATRE 450-3162 SRH 216
MUSIC 450-3163 SFAC 103
WRITING 450-3344 WTH 308
SPEECH & PUBLIC RELATIONS 450-3202 WTH 204

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES


DEAN’S OFFICE 450-3122 DHSC 104
FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES 450-5950 MAC 100
HEALTH SCIENCES 450-3194 DHSC 317
KINESIOLOGY & PHYSICAL EDUCATION 450-3148 FC102
MILITARY SCIENCE & LEADERSHIP 450-3145 MEA 101
NURSING 450-3119 DHSC 109
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 450-3192 DHSC 300
PHYSICAL THERAPY 450-3611 PTC 300
PSYCHOLOGY & COUNSELING 450-3193 MAS 248
SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY 450-5482 SLHC 110
COLLEGE & DEPARTMENT CONTACT INFORMATION 43

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS


DEAN’S OFFICE 450-3167 IRB 120
ENGLISH 450-5100 IRB 317
GEOGRAPHY 450-3164 IRB 301
HISTORY 450-3158 IRB 105
PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION 450-3179 HAR 224
SOCIOLOGY 450-3178 IRB 306
WORLD LANGUAGES,
LITERATURES & CULTURES 450-3168 IRB 207

COLLEGE OF NATURAL SCIENCES & MATHEMATICS


DEAN’S OFFICE 450-5083 LSC 105
BIOLOGY 450-5916 LSC 180
CHEMISTRY 450-3152 LAN 205A.
COMPUTER SCIENCE 450-3401 Math/Tech. 345
MATHEMATICS 450-3147 Math/Tech 234
PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY 450-5900 LSC 171

DID YOU KNOW?

At 55 percent, UCA has the


second-highest graduation
rate among all public
Arkansas colleges and
universities. Only UCA and the
University of Arkansas at
Fayetteville have graduation
rates above 50 percent.
44 CAMPUS MAP

UCA Shuttle Route is subject to change. An updated


map and shuttle route will be posted in August. The
website to view an updated map is:
http://pplant.uca.edu/MFP/CampusMaps/ShutRts.pdf
CAMPUS MAP 45

BUILDING ABBREVIATIONS
CBH—Baridon Hall MEAD—Meadors Hall
BHCC—Brewer-Hegeman Conf. Ctr. MCS—Math, Computer Sci.& Tech.
BBA—Burdick Business Admin. MH—Main Hall
DENH-Denny Hall NEWH—New Hall
EST—Estes Stadium NMIN—Minton Hall
FC—Farris Center PRIN—Prince Center
HPER—Health/Physical Ed. Bldg PHYT—Physical Therapy Center
DHSC—Doyne Health Sciences Ctr. SFAC—Snow Fine Arts Center
HAR—Harrin Hall SHDY—Short/Denny Hall
HUGH—Hughes Hall SHRT—Short Hall
IRB—Irby Hall SLHC—Speech/Language & Hearing
LAN—Laney Hall Center
LIB—Torreyson Library SRH—Stanley Russ Hall
LSC—Lewis Science Center SSA—Schichtl Studio Arts Building
MAC—McAlister Hall STAT—State Hall
MASH—Mashburn Hall TORW—Torreyson West
MCC—McCastlain Hal WTH—Win Thompson Hall
46 ACADEMIC CALENDAR

August 2009 ACADEMIC CALENDAR


SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

1 The Academic Calendar is subject to change and is posted on UCA’s webpage at:
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
http://www.uca.edu/schedule/html/academiccalendar.php
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
FALL SEMESTER 2009
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 August 16-19, Sun-Wed Welcome Week Activities for new freshman and
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 transfer students
August 16, Sunday “Countdown to Classes” Mandatory advising
30 31
session at 3:30 p.m. in Ida Waldran Auditorium
August 17, Monday Opening Convocation
August 20, Thursday Instruction begins - day and evening classes
September 2009 August 22, Saturday Instruction begins - Saturday classes
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
August 25, Tuesday Change-of-course period ends
1 2 3 4 5
Last date to register, add classes or change from
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 credit to audit or audit to credit
August 25, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
September 1, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 September 7, Monday Labor Day Holiday
September 8, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
27 28 29 30
September 15, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
September 18, Friday Final date to make degree application for Dec.
October 2009 graduation
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
Final date to officially withdraw from a Aug 20 -
1 2 3
Oct 9 course with a W grade
September 22, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 September 25, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Aug 20 -
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Oct 9 course with a WP or WF grade
September 29, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 October 6, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 October 8, Thursday MAJORS FAIR SC BALLROOM 12:30-3:00
October 13, Tuesday Final date to add Oct 12 - Dec 11 course
October 13, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
October 14, Wednesday NOON Mid-term grades report date
November 2009 October 15 – 16, Thur/Fri Fall Break
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
October 20, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 October 27, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 October 30, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Aug 20 -
Dec 11 course or the university with a W grade
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
November 2 - 24 Advance Registration
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 November 3, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
November 10, Tuesday Academic Success Prog. X-Per., DHSC Auditorium
29 30
November 13, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Oct 12 -
Dec 11 course with a W grade
November 30, Monday Final date to officially withdraw from a Oct 12 -
December 2009 Dec 11 course with a WP or WF grade
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT &
1 2 3 4 5 Final date to officially withdraw from a Aug 20 -
Dec 11 course or the university with a WP or a
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
WF grade
13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 47

November 30, Monday Recommended date to make degree application January 2010
for December 2010 graduation SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

November 25 – 27 Thanksgiving Holiday 1 2


December 4, Friday Study Day 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
December 5, Saturday Final Exams - Saturday classes
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Dec. 7 -11,Mon – Fri Final Examinations - day and night classes
December 12, Saturday Winter Commencement 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

December 14, Monday NOON Final grades report date 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

31
SPRING SEMESTER 2010
January 14, Thursday Instruction begins for the Spring semester - day
and evening classes February 2010
January 16, Saturday Instruction begins - Saturday classes SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

January 18, Monday Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday 1 2 3 4 5 6

January 20, Wednesday Change-of-course period ends 7 8 9 10 11 12 13


Last date to register
Last date to add classes 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Last date to change from credit to audit or audit 21 22 23 24 25 26 27


to credit
February 12, Friday Final date to make degree application for May 28

graduation
February 19, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Jan 14 -
Mar 5 course with a W grade March 2010
February 26, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Jan 14 - SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

Mar 5 course with a WP or WF grade 1 2 3 4 5 6


March 9, Tuesday Final date to add Mar 8 - May 7 course
March 10, Wednesday Mid-term grade report date 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

March 20-28, Sat-Sun Spring Break 14 15 16 17 18 19 20


April 2, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Jan 14 -
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
May 7 course or the university with a W grade
March 31- April 21 Advance Registration 28 29 30 31
April 16, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Mar 8 -
May 7 course with a W grade
April 23, Friday Final date to officially withdraw from a Mar 8 -
May 7 course with a WP or WF Grade
April 2010
Final date to officially withdraw from a Jan 14 - SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

1 2 3
May 7 course or the university with a WP or WF
grade 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
April 23, Friday Recommended date to make degree application
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
for May 2011 graduation
April 30, Friday Study Day 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
May 1, Saturday Final Exams - Saturday classes
25 26 27 28 29 30
May 3 - 7, Mon-Fri Final Examinations - day and night classes
May 8, Saturday Spring Commencement
May 11, Tuesday NOON-
Final May 2010
grades SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT

report 1
date 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26 27 28 29

30 31
48 HOW TO MAKE AN ADVISING APPOINTMENT

HOW TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH YOUR ACADEMIC ADVISOR


The University of Central Arkansas places a very high priority on student advising and considers it an
integral part of your academic success. The Advising Center, with professional academic advisors and
faculty, is here to assist you during your stay at UCA. Refer to your URSA Self-Service to find out who
your advisor is. All undeclared students are advised in the Advising Center along with all incoming fresh-
men with majors except for majors in the College of Health and Behavioral Sciences.
Students who have a major in the Health and Behavioral Sciences will need to contact
their major department to meet with an advisor.

The AAC uses an innovative online appointment system called AdvisorTrac where stu-
dents can access their advisor’s calendar through any internet connection 24 hours a
day. The Academic Advising Center Advisors will see students as walk-ins from Wel-
come Week until the change of course period ends which is listed in the academic cal-
endar on page 46 of this book . After this date, appointments will be available. It is
recommended that you make an appointment within the first 3 weeks of class to
meet with your advisor. To make an appointment you will need to have access to a
computer with internet access.
TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT
1. Log into URSA. This brings you to the Advisor Availability page.
2. Click on the “My UCA” tab. AdvisorTrac automatically searches for seven days
3. Go to the Advising Center Channel (in the following your sign in date. Extend the search by
center of the page) . changing the date if you need to. Make the date in
4. Click on the AdvisorTrac Logo. the same format as listed.
10. Make sure your advisor is shown.
This brings you to the AdvisorTrac Homepage 11. Click on “Advising” .
Your user id and password for this system is your 12. Click “Search”.
Network ID and PIN just as like you logged into
URSA This will bring up your advisor’s availability. Ap-
5. Type your user id. pointments are made every 30 minutes.
6. Type your password. 13. Click on the time frame that best suits you.
7. Click the “Login” button. 14. A new screen appears. Click on the arrow
next to the time. If multiple selections are of-
This brings you to your home page. All messages fered, choose the time that best suits you.
sent to you by the AdvisorTrac system will be 15. All appointments require a “Need Help in”.
posted on this page until you log out. Your appoint- Click on the arrow and select an option.
ment day and time will also be posted here as well. 16. Click the “Save Appointment” button.
8. Click on “Go To” (located at the top right ). 17. Click on “Go To” at the top of the screen and
9. Click “Make an Appointment”. select “Main Menu”.
18. Click “Exit” to leave the program.
TO CANCEL AN APPOINTMENT
At the login screen: Appointment Page
• Your User Name is the 3rd party ID you used to • Click the DELETE button. Wait until request
log into URSA has been loaded.
• Your password is your six digit PIN. • Click on Main Menu.
• Click on EXIT to end the session or click on
Student Main Screen Make an Appointment to reschedule with your
• Click on date of appointment you wish to advisor.
cancel.

If you need any assistance, please come to the front desk in Harrin 100. Hours are Monday-
Friday 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.
BEEN THERE...SHOULDA DONE THAT 49

BEEN THERE...SHOULDA DONE THAT!

TIPS FOR MAKING THE MOST OF COLLEGE


From the experts themselves…other college students!
.................................................................................
“Don’t go home the first month. It only makes it harder when you come back. Besides,
that’s when everyone is anxious to make friends and there’s a lot going on.” --- Junior,
Business Major
.......................................................................................
“I was really pretty shy, so rooming with a friend gave me the confidence to meet more people and try
more things.” ---Sophomore, Biology Major
.................................................................................
“College is a good time to become the person you want to be. People accept you for who you
are now, not who you were in the third grade.” ---Senior, Economics Major
.................................................................................
“There’s a lot of cool stuff on campus, but you have to look for it. I was so caught up in
making friends and writing papers, that college was no bigger than my dorm. It took
me a while but I finally got involved in a campus group,
and through that, a research project. I should have done it
sooner.” --- Senior, Education Major
.................................................................
“People are the best part. Having friends makes college
easier.” --- Sophomore, Theatre Major
............................................................
“EVEN IF YOU’RE EINSTEIN, THE FIRST SEMESTER IS
A BIG ADJUSTMENT. DON’T GET SO HUNG UP ON GET-
TING OUT IN FOUR YEARS THAT YOU BITE OFF MORE
THAN YOU CAN CHEW. YOU CAN ALWAYS PICK UP EX-
TRA CREDITS SOMEWHERE ALONG THE LINE.” ---
JUNIOR, SPEECH COMMUNICATION MAJOR
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
“The first few weeks are great! You’re meeting people,
partying, no tests, no papers…Then, wham!! You’ve
got everything due in the same week. If you weren’t
hitting the books right along, you’ll spend the rest of the term digging yourself
out!” --- Senior, Political Science Major
..............................................................
“My brother, who’s not in college, works 40 – 50 hours a week at his job. When I’m sick of
studying I try to ask myself if I’ve put in that many hours. It’s definitely a reality check.
You need to think of school as your job.” --- Sophomore, Psychology Major
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ……………...
50 TIPS FOR SUCCESS

TIPS FOR SUCCESS


WEEK ONE
1. Check out the location of your classrooms to be sure you can make it to classes on time.
2. Arrive early to each of your classes.
3. Sit near the front in all of your classes, even if you have friends sitting elsewhere in the room.
4. Learn all of your instructors’ names and BE SURE to address them as “Doctor” if they have
earned that degree. Check out their office location and be sure you know their office hours
and have their telephone numbers and e-mail addresses in case you need to contact them.
Don’t be afraid to greet them and get to know them.
5. Take writing materials to class even on the first day.
6. DO NOT write in any books that you purchase prior to the first day of class. You may find that
you don’t need some books or supplementary materials. If you have kept your receipt and
have not written in the books, you may be able to return them.
7. Check in with your advisor toward the end of the first full week of classes to let him/her know
how things are going.
8. Be sure you read and reread the course syllabus and any other informational material handed
out in each of your classes. Keep the syllabus. It is imperative that you understand your in-
structors’ policies on attendance, handing in work, grading, etc. For example, some instruc-
tors have an attendance policy in which you may be penalized (even dropped from the class
with a grade of WF) for missing classes. ANY questions you have about class policies should
be asked at the beginning of the semester. Failure to read or understand these policies will
not excuse you from your obligations, and may hurt your GPA.
WEEK TWO
1. If, after the first two or three classes in a particular course, you believe that you might have
difficulty earning a “C” or higher, see your advisor and get him/her to direct you to the tutoring
center DO NOT PROCRASTINATE. If the course seems difficult at first, do not assume it will
get easier—it will not. Address any academic problems when they arise, and they will be
manageable. Don’t hesitate to ask your instructors for help: that is why they have office
hours.
2. ASK QUESTIONS! ASK QUESTIONS! ASK QUESTIONS! Your advisor is here to help you
succeed; but he/she can’t read minds!
3. Make sure that you know the deadlines for adding and dropping classes. A missed deadline
can be harmful to your GPA.
THINGS THAT WILL HELP YOU ENJOY YOUR FIRST SEMESTER
1. Check your UCA e-mail regularly.
2. Carry your student ID with you.
3. Know your PIN (but safeguard it from others). Along with your ID number, you can use your
PIN to access your academic records and get other information through your URSA account.
If you forget your PIN, go to the IT Help Desk in BBA 106. You must present a photo ID be-
fore the number will be given to you.
4. Become proficient at doing research through the Internet databases and using computer soft-
ware packages by attending workshops in the University Center for Academic Success lo-
cated in the Basement of Main Hall.
5. Make an effort to know your instructors. Visit their web pages, if they have one.
6. GO TO CLASS!!
7. Be motivated. Set academic and personal goals for yourself.
8. Be self-disciplined. Determine your priorities; then, make a realistic study schedule and stick
with it. Don’t overload on classes.
9. Participate on campus. Join a club; attend athletic events, plays, concerts, recitals, etc.
10. Consult regularly with your academic advisor.
TIPS FOR SUCCESS 51

11. Make use of available tutoring and computer labs.


12. Write or call your family at least once a month.
13. If you are ill, go to Student Health Services in the Student Health Center, phone: 450.3136.
14. If you are feeling overwhelmed or depressed, tell your advisor or visit the UCA Counseling Center
in the Student Health Center, phone: 450.3138.
15. If finances are a problem, see Financial Aid in McCastlain Hall room 001, phone: 450.3140.
16. Take advantage of the HPER fitness center, Phone: 450.3405 and the Farris Center pool,
Phone: 450.3148 to stay in shape and stay healthy.
17. You should know that many instructors expect students to follow the”2-to-1 rule”—for every hour
spent in class, students are expected to spend two hours of study/reading/homework/preparation
time outside of class. Be realistic. Schedule enough time for study and for social activities.
18. Get enough rest.
19. Maintain a positive attitude.
20. GO TO CLASS!

ACADEMIC INFORMATION
1. READ and UNDERSTAND information contained in the Undergraduate Bulletin .
(http://www.uca.edu/ubulletin/)
2. GO TO CLASS!!! Individual instructors may assign a grade of WF for non-attendance to any stu
dent. Students are responsible for completing any missed work. If possible, talk to your instruct
tor before missing class. Definitely consult with your instructor when you return to class.
3. GRADE FORGIVENESS – a student may repeat in residence (at UCA) a maximum of four
courses in which a D, F, or WF grade is earned. Both grades will remain on the permanent
record, but only the second grade will be used to calculate the grade point average. This option
may be used only once for each specific course. A student must accept, for purposes of grade
forgiveness, the first four courses repeated. No course may be repeated for the purpose of grade
forgiveness after a course for which it is a prerequisite has been passed.
4. PROBATION – a student will be placed on academic probation whenever the semester grade
point average is less the 2.0. A student will be removed from academic probation whenever the
semester grade point average equals or exceeds 2.0 AND the cumulative grade point average
equals or exceeds 2.0.

A student on academic probation who does not achieve a 2.0 semester grade point average AND
does not meet the minimum cumulative average listed below will be academically suspended.
The calculations of hours attempted will include grades A, B,C,D, F, and WF.

Semester Hours Attempted Minimum Cumulative GPA


1-30 1.70
31-59 1.85
60 or more 2.00

A first suspension will be for one academic semester and the summer session. A second sus-
pension will be for one calendar year. A third suspension will be academic dismissal, for an in-
definite period of time. Credit earned at another institution while on academic suspension will
not count toward a degree at UCA.
5. DROP/ADD CLASSES – you will need a drop/add card signed by your advisor.
Deadlines apply.

WITHDRAWALS - You may withdraw without penalty from a class which meets for a full se-
mester with a grade of “W” up to a certain date within the semester. You will still be able to
withdraw from a class, but will the drop classification will be determined from the grade
52 TIPS FOR SUCCESS

you have in the class—Withdrawal Passing (“WP”) or a Withdrawal Failing (“WF”) and may
affect your overall GPA. Check the academic calendar for important deadlines. To
withdraw from a class, see your academic advisor.
To withdraw from the university, go to the Office of the Registrar in room 112 McCastlain
Hall. You must complete paper work and collect signatures from various university offices.
DO NOT assume that you are officially withdrawn because you have stopped attending
classes or have informed your instructors that you are withdrawing. You MUST complete the
official withdrawal process, or you may jeopardize your standing at the university.
CALCULATING YOUR GRADE POINT AVERAGE (G.P.A.)
UCA uses a four-point scale to determine grade point average (GPA). A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0. To
obtain the grade point average, follow these steps: 1) Multiply the number of points for the grade, times
that number of credits for the course. For example, a B in a three-hour course is worth nine points. 2)
Add total grade points earned. 3) Divide by the total hours attempted to obtain the GPA.
COURSE RADE POINTS TOTAL
WRITING 1310 A (3X4) 12
HISTORY 2301 B (3X3) 9
MATH 1390 C (3X2) 6
HEALTH ED 1320 C (2X2) 4
KPED 1121 B (1X3) 3
34TOTA
L 12 34
Semester G.P.A.: 34 Grade Points divided by 12 Credit Hours = 2.833

TRANSFER COURSES
1. There is no limit on the number of credit hours that may be transferred to the university;
however, a maximum of 60 hours transferred from a 2-year institution may be applicable to-
ward a baccalaureate degree. A minimum of 60 hours earned at a 4-year institution is re-
quired for a baccalaureate degree.
2. Normally only credits with A, B, and C grades transfer. The university will, however, accept
for transfer a maximum of 6 hours of credit with D grades, subject to the following conditions:
• The transfer of credits with D grades is available only to first-time entering students at
the time of admission to the university.
• Only the first 6 hours of credit with D grades will be considered.
• Prerequisite rules shall apply to transfer of credits with D grades the same as they do to
UCA credits.
3. Take a copy of your evaluated transcript (s) with you when you meet with your advisor. If
you do not have a copy, you should be able to get one from the Office of Admissions.
4. If you do not agree with your transfer course evaluation, consult with Dr. Terrance Kearns in
the English department for general education courses or with the appropriate department
chair for all other courses.
5. If you are transferring foreign language credits and intend to enroll in additional courses in
that language, you may need to take a language placement examination. Contact the World
Languages office in room 207 of Irby Hall for information.
6. Your transfer courses should be recorded as part of your UCA file between mid-term and the
end of your first semester. Check online via your URSA account . Click on the Self-Service
tab, Student & Financial Aid, Student Records, Academic Transcript.
7. Please note that course credits transfer but not the grade point average. Your UCA grade
point average will be determined by the grades you make at UCA. Transfer credit is desig-
nated by the level at which it is earned (lower division - L or upper division - U).
TIPS FOR SUCCESS 53

FINDING A MAJOR
UCA’s web site offers a number of resources for exploring majors:
1. Discover Program through Career Services in Bernard Hall 314. Call 450.3134 to make an ap-
pointment.
2. Model Plans of Study are located on the UCA web site at http://www.uca.edu/model/. You can
check this site for model (suggested) four-year plans of study for many of the majors offered at
UCA. This is a good source of information if you are trying to determine a major.
3. Check the web site for the college and/or department offering the major in which you are inter-
ested at http://www.uca.edu/info/depts.php If you are interested in business, education, or health
sciences, these sites will give you more updated information than you will find in the four-year
plans.
4. If you want information about specific careers, the job market, etc, contact UCA Career Services,
which is located in Bernard Hall 314, telephone: 450.3134 or check out any of the following web
sites (enter websites EXACTLY as shown):
A. America’s Career Infonet http://www.acinet.org/
This site contains occupational information that will increase your overall understanding of
the job market, including supply/demand and salaries.
B. Career Planit http://www.jobweb.com/
Advice and resources designed to help college students find a satisfying major
C. Career Zone http://www.nycareerzone.org/
Important information on hundreds of careers
D. ONET http://online.onetcenter.org/
Occupational information on over 950 jobs
E. Prentice Hall Student Success Site http://www.prenhall.com/success/MajorExp/
index.html
Explore majors and other career planning material
F. The Princeton Review Career Site http://www.review.com/career/index.cfm
G. Myjobsearch.com http:/www.myjobsearch.com

WHAT CAN I DO WITH A MAJOR IN:


Gathering information about majors and careers is an important part of the academic decision-making
process. The following websites allow you to take stock of your interests, abilities, and values and learn
more about majors that might suit you best. You can also learn about career opportunities that are pos-
sible for different majors and gain tips on preparing your for your future career.

A. UCA Career Services: http:// www.uca.edu/career


B. http://www.keirsey.com
By clicking on the section titled “Take the Keirsey Sorter,” you can take a 70-item inventory to
learn more about your personality. Once you have your results, go to
http://www.typelogic.com/ to get a more detailed description of your personality.
C. http://www.typefocus.com
Take the Free Personality Assessment to get a profile of your personality. After you find your
four-letter personality code, go to http://www.typelogic.com to learn more about your
personality type.
D. http://career.asu.edu/S/ChooseMajor/MajorInfo/MajorInfo.htm
Outstanding site for learning about career possibilities for a range of majors and the strategies
needed to get there. Scroll down the page and click on “Information” next to the major of
interest.
E. http://jobstar.org
Provides a wealth of useful links for learning about prospective majors and careers. Choose
“Career Guides,” then “Guides for Specific Careers” to access a list of university majors and
explore career options related to the major.
54 THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE

As you will soon learn, college is very different from high school. In general, as a college student you
are considered an adult and as an adult you are responsible for your own choices —whether good or
bad. The following are comparisons you may have had in high school and what you can expect on the
college level.

PERSONAL FREEDOM IN HIGH SCHOOL VS PERSONAL FREEDOM IN COLLEGE


High school is mandatory & free! College is voluntary & expensive.
(Unless you choice other options).
Your time is usually structured by others. You manage your own time.
You need permission to participate in extracurricular You must decide whether to participate in extracurricular ac-
activities. tivities. (Choose wisely in the first semester and then add
later.)
You need money for special purchases or events. You need money to meet basic necessities.
You can count on parents and teachers to remind you of your You will be faced with a large number of moral and ethical
responsibilities and to guide you in setting priorities. decisions you have not had to face previously. You must bal-
ance your responsibilities and set priorities.
Guiding Principle: You will usually be told what your responsi- Guiding Principle: You’re old enough to take responsibility for
bilities are and corrected if your behavior is out of line. what you do and don’t do, as well as for the consequences of
your decisions.

HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES VS COLLEGE CLASSES


Each day you proceed from one class directly to another. You often have hours between classes: class times vary
throughout the day and evening.
You spend 6 hours each day – 30 hours a week in class. You spend 12 to 16 hours each week in class.

Most of your classes are arranged for you. You arrange your own schedule in consultation with your
academic advisor. Schedules tend to look lighter than they
really are.
The school year is 36 weeks long; some classes extend over The academic year is divided into two separate 17-week
both semesters and some do not. semesters, plus a week after each semester for exams.

TESTS IN HIGH SCHOOL VS TESTS IN COLLEGE


Testing is frequent and covers small amounts of material. Testing is usually infrequent and may be cumulative, covering
large amounts of material. You, not the professor, need to
organize the material to prepare for the test. A particular
course may have only 2 or 3 tests in a semester.
Makeup tests are often available. Makeup tests are seldom an option; if they are, you need to
request them.

Teachers frequently rearrange test dates to avoid conflict with Professors in different courses usually schedule tests without
school events. regard to the demands of other courses or outside activities.

Teachers frequently conduct review sessions, pointing out the Professors rarely offer review sessions, and when they do,
most important concepts. they expect you to be an active participant, one who comes
prepared with questions.

Mastery is usually seen as the ability to reproduce what you Mastery is often seen as the ability to apply what you’ve
were taught in the form in which it was presented to you, or to learned to new situations or to solve new kinds of problems.
solve the kinds of problems you were shown how to solve.
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE 55

GRADES IN HIGH SCHOOL VS GRADES IN COLLEGE


Grades are given for most assigned work. Grades may not be provided for all assigned work.
Consistently good homework grades may help raise your Grades on tests and major papers usually provide most of the
overall grade when test grades are low. course grade.
Extra credit projects are often available to help you raise Extra credit projects cannot, generally speaking, be used to
your grade. raise a grade in a college course.
Teachers carefully monitor class attendance. Professors may not formally take roll, but they are still likely to
know whether or not you attend.
Classes generally have no more than 35 students. Some classes may number 60 – 90 students.
You are provided with textbooks at little or no expense. You need to budget substantial funds for textbooks, which will
usually cost more than $300 each semester.
You are not responsible for knowing what it takes to Graduation requirements are complex and differ for different
graduate. majors and sometimes different years. You are expected to
know that those apply to you.

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS VS COLLEGE PROFESSORS


Teachers check your completed homework. Professors may not always check completed homework, but
they will assume you can perform the same tasks on tests.
Teachers remind you of your incomplete work. Professors may not remind you of incomplete work.
Teachers approach you if they believe you need assistance. Professors are usually open and helpful, but most expect you
to initiate contact if you need assistance.
Teachers are often available for conversation before, during, Professors expect and want you to attend their scheduled
or after class. office hours.
Teachers have been trained in teaching methods to assist in Professors have been trained as experts in their particular
imparting knowledge to students. areas of research.
Teachers provide you with information you missed when Professors expect you to get from classmates any notes from
you were absent. classes you missed.
Teachers present material to help you understand the mate- Professors may not follow the textbook. Instead, to amplify
rial in the textbook. the text, they may give illustrations, provide background in-
formation, or discuss research about the topic you are study-
ing. Or, they may expect you to relate the classes to the text-
book readings.
Teachers often write information on the board to be copied Professors may lecture nonstop, expecting you to identify the
in your notes. important points in your notes. When professors write on the
board, it may be to amplify the lecture, not to summarize it.
Good notes are a must.
Teachers impart knowledge and facts, sometimes drawing Professors expect you to think about and synthesize seem-
direct connections and leading you through the thinking ingly unrelated topics.
process.
Teachers often take time to remind you of assignments and Professors expect you to read, save, and consult the course
due dates. syllabus (outline); the syllabus spells out exactly what is ex-
pected of you, when it is due, and how you will be graded.

STUDYING IN HIGH SCHOOL VS STUDYING COLLEGE


You may study outside of class as little as 0 – 2 hours a You need to study at least 2 – 3 hours outside of class for
week, and this may be mostly last minute test preparation. each hour in class.
You often need to read or hear presentations only once to You need to review class notes and text material regularly.
learn all you need to learn about them.
You are expected to read short assignments that are then You are assigned substantial amounts of reading and writing
discussed and often re-taught, in class. which may not be directly addressed in class.
Guiding Principle: You will usually be told in class what you Guiding Principle: It’s up to you to read and understand the
needed to learn from assigned readings. assigned material; lectures and assignments proceed from
the assumption that you’ve already done so.
56 FIRST YEAR SURVIVAL TIPS

FIRST YEAR SURVIVAL TIPS

♦ Go to Class!
♦ Turn off all cell phones, pagers, etc. before class starts.
♦ Go to class on time with assignments completed.
♦ Study 3 hours for every hour of class. If you are taking 12 hours, plan to study for 36 hours a week.
(College really is a Full-Time Job!)
♦ Pay attention to announcements made at the start and end of class.
♦ Prepare to take notes before class starts.
♦ Be attentive, take notes, and ask questions.
♦ Proofread your papers. Keep copies of your papers.
♦ Know the names of all your professors and where their offices are located.
♦ Visit with your professors during their office hours. Make appointments to see professors at times
other than office hours.
♦ Visit with your academic or faculty advisor at least twice a semester.
♦ Know where you can find assistance with academic, health, and personal problems. Use these ser-
vices. Your tuition and fees pay for them!
♦ Keep lines of communication open. Talk with parents, friends, and professors.
♦ Be considerate and respectful of your fellow students.
♦ Develop a sense of belonging. Get involved and make friends.
♦ Much learning takes place outside the classroom. Attend campus events. There are lots of work-
shops, guest speakers, athletic events, club activities, music, art and theater performances, and
more. Check campus bulletin boards, the Office of Student Activities, and the UCA Today web site
for information.
♦ Learn to use the library.
♦ Manage time and money well.
♦ Check your URSA e-mail account daily.
♦ Get enough sleep.
♦ You will have much more freedom. Use it wisely. You are responsible for your own actions!
♦ Be prepared to work hard. This is not high school.

DID YOU KNOW?

The UCA Board of Trustees loved student Sam


Huffman's design for the 1920 class ring which in-
corporated a bear (because Arkansas was known
as "The Bear State" at the time).

UCA didn't have a mascot, so the Board of Trustees


officially adopted the Bear as UCA's mascot in
1920. The word "Bears" was first used in print to
refer to a UCA athletic team in February 1921. The
UCA women's teams were then known as the
"Bearettes."
STUDY TIPS 4 SERIOUS STUDENTS 57

STUDY TIPS
4
SERIOUS STUDENTS
«Understand that studying is not just reading.
«Choose a day each week to review ahead for at least the next week.
«Plan your study time.
«review.
Rewrite your notes the day of that lecture. Review your notes daily. Plan a time for a weekly note

«Create flash cards.


«Learn to combine activities. Utilize down time to review notes.
«Avoid desperation cramming. Cramming is short term. Maintenance studying is long term, but re-
quires repetition. Ex. learning phone numbers and addresses, learning multiplication

«Put a heading and a date on your notes for each day.


«professor,
Sit near the front and center of the class. You will have the most direct communication with your
and you will less likely be distracted.

«Try to prepare for each lecture by pre-reading the material in your text. You will find that you will
understand the lecture better if you have some basic background. This preparation is one that very
few students take seriously.

«Learn to identify main points and not get bogged down in details. Professors often give cues to
what's important by repeating information, changing their voices or rate of delivery, listing items in
order of importance, and, of course, by writing on the chalkboard.

«Use different colors when taking notes. Our brains love to associate memories with colors. You
may want to go through your notes and write potential study or test questions in red. Use symbols
as a memory jogger. Ex. A “T’ with a circle around it could be a test question of exam. An “!” could
indicate that the instructor emphasized a particular point.

«Leave plenty of blank space in the body of your notes.


«Refocus when your mind wonders. Concentration is important.
«Review, review, and review.
58 TOP 10 TEST TAKING TIPS

TOP 10
TEST TAKING
TIPS

üBe prepared. Start test preparation the day the test is announced: Complete all home work and
reading assignments on time. Take good notes, and rewrite and review them immediately after
class. Regularly review all of your class notes. Participate in test review sessions.

üIf you need help, talk with your instructor as soon as possible. Don’t wait until the last minute.
üGet a good night’s sleep the night before the exam.
üArrive early for the exam.
üTake any needed tools or supplies with you to the exam—pencils paper, pens, a calculator, blue
books, etc.

üListen closely to the instructor’s verbal instructions and read any printed instructions on the exam.
If you don’t understand any part of the instructions, ask questions.

üBe sure to write your name on the part to be turned in.


üBe sure you know how much time you have to complete the exam. Before you start the test,
quickly read over the whole test to give yourself an idea of how much time to allot to each portion
of the exam.

üIf you “blank out” or feel panicky, stop and try to relax. Take deep breaths and try to clear your
mind before you turn your attention back to the exam.

üAnswer all questions on the exam, even if you have to guess at answers.
CLASSROOM DO’S AND DON’TS 59

DO’S & DON’TS


√ DO PARTICIPATE: When your instructor asks a question she hopes that students will
respond. All instructors want to create lively class discussions, and they welcome your
contributions. Some students, especially at the beginning of their college career,
hesitate to speak in class. But when you share your perspectives and ideas with
others, you help to create a rich learning environment. When you do participate,
remember that you are communicating with the whole class, not only with the instructor;
the students in the back of the room want to hear your comments too.

√ DON’T MONOPOLIZE CLASS DISCUSSIONS: Sometimes, in their enthusiasm for


the course a few students will try to answer every question the instructor asks,
comment on everything any other student says, and interject questions or remarks
throughout every class. Although instructors appreciate eager and engaged students,
they want all of the class members, even those who may be shy and may lack
confidence, to feel comfortable about speaking out in class. You can help the instructor
by monitoring your own contribution.

√ DO COME TO CLASS PREPARED: Lectures and discussions depend on what you


have read and written outside of class. You will be a more valuable contributor, and
you will learn more if you do your homework.

√ DON’T USE CLASS TIME TO DISCUSS PERSONAL CONCERNS: If you need an


extension to complete a paper, for example, or if you want to inform your instructor that
you will be missing a class, talk to the instructor privately before or after class. On the
other hand, if you have a question related to the course material, the syllabus, or the
course requirements—if you need a term defined or a concept clarified, for example-do
ask. It is likely that if you don’t understand something, others do not also.

√ DON’T BE DISTRACTING: In the workplace, you know that staff meetings can be
disrupted by a co-worker who spills coffee, whispers to a neighbor, or taps a pencil
incessantly while others are trying to talk. A classroom is no different. Don’t fidget, eat,
rustle papers, whisper, pass notes, or otherwise distract and make sure your cell phone
does not go off during class.

√ DO ARRIVE ON TIME: You’ll disrupt the class if you consistently come late. If you
have a problem arriving on time, discuss it with your instructor. If coming late is
unavoidable, remove your coat and take out your notebook and pen before you enter
the classroom, take the first available seat, and make sure you catch up.
60 POINTERS FROM PROFESSORS

POINTERS FROM PROFESSORS


“Show up to class and be proactive! the assignments. It’s obvious if you
Participate and ask questions; it haven’t!”
is likely that your questions are
ones other students are wondering “You can cut study time in half just by chat-
about too---but the professor will
ting with instructors during office hours.
remember you as the student with an
they’ll pinpoint what is and what isn’t impor-
inquiring mind.”
tant in the lectures and readings. most are
glad to talk with you since they have to be
there anyway.”
“If you have a learning disability, advise the
office of Disability Support Services and
“EXTRAORDINARY DRIVE COMES FROM
your professor.”
DOING WHAT YOU ENJOY!”

“When you complete an out-of-class “Give all to your passion!”


assignment, ask yourself: Is this
the best I can do? Be honest. If “Shut off cell phones
it is not, consider it a draft, before entering class.”
and do it again. Have high expec-
tations for yourself.”
“Freshmen need to hook up with an organiza-
tion on campus where they can meet new
“Relax and enjoy. It’s not brain surgery.” friends.”

“Get an organizer and write


“Balance study & pleasure.” everything down, from assign-
ments, up and coming exams, to
special events, and meetings.
Staying organized is one of the
“Do not ask a professor, “Did I miss anything
main keys for success!”
in class?”
“instructors will bend over back-
wards to help kids who are really
“ Keep your g rade po in t average up! ” trying. Make every effort to let
them know you are.”
“Finding a good
“Studentstell me their biggest regret
study group always
helps. Don’t when they look back at college was not
hesitate to ask using professor office hours!”
fellow classmates “Forget Burger King…find a summer job or vol-
if they would like unteer doing something related to a career you
to form a study may be interested in. It’ll help you decide whether
group.” you are!”
“Before asking a professor for help, read
CHOICES OF SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS 61

CHOICES OF SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS


SUCCESSFUL STUDENTS STRUGGLING STUDENTS

1. ...accept PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY, see- 1. ...see themselves as Victims, believing that what
ing themselves as the primary cause of their out- happens to them is determined primarily by exter-
comes and experiences. nal forces such as fate, luck, and powerful others.

2. ...discover SELF-MOTIVATION, finding purpose 2. ...have difficulty sustaining motivation, often feel-
in their lives by discovering personally meaningful ing depressed, frustrated, and/or resentful about a
goals and dreams. lack of direction in their lives.

3. ...master SELF-MANAGEMENT, consistently 3. …seldom identify specific actions needed to ac-


planning and taking purposeful actions in pursuit of complish a desired outcome. And when they do,
their goals and dreams. they tend to procrastinate.

4. ...employ INTERDEPENDENCE, building mutu- 4. ...are solitary, seldom requesting, even rejecting,
ally supportive relationships that help them achieve offers of assistance from those who could help.
their goals and dreams (while helping others do the
same).

5. ...gain SELF-AWARENESS, consciously em- 5. ...make important choices unconsciously, being


ploying behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes that keep directed by self-sabotaging habits and outdated life
them on course. scripts.

6. ...adopt LIFE-LONG LEARNING, finding 6. ...resist learning new ideas and skills, viewing
valuable lessons and wisdom in nearly every ex- learning as fearful or boring rather than as mental
perience they have. play.

7. ...develop EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, effec- 7. ...live at the mercy of strong emotions such as
tively managing their emotions in support of their anger, depression, anxiety, or a need for instant
goals and dreams. gratification.

8. ...BELIEVE IN THEMSELVES, seeing them- 8. ...doubt their competence and personal value,
selves capable, lovable and unconditionally worthy feeling inadequate to create their desired outcomes
human beings. and experiences.

From Skip Downing. On course; Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life. Houghton Mifflin
62 GENERAL POINTERS FOR TAKING CLASS NOTES

GENERAL POINTERS
FOR TAKING CLASS NOTES

Be prepared with a notebook and at least two pens or writing implements. If you are an auditory
learner, ask your instructor if you may tape record lectures. Even if you record lectures, also
take notes.
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Keep a folder for each class in which you can collect and organize handouts.
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Choose a seat where you can hear easily and can see the lecturer, the chalkboard, or any vis-
ual aids such as an overhead projector or map.
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Avoid sitting near distractions such as a friend, a window, or a source of noise (such as an air
conditioner or heater.)
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Listen for cues from the instructor. Some lecturers:
• Pause before an important point
• Write an important point on the board
• Repeat an important point
• Make a point, give examples, and then repeat the point
• Change volume or inflection before an important point
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Summarize rather than attempt to copy every word.
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Write in outline form rather than in paragraph form.
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Underline main ideas.
……………………………………………………………………………………………..
Fill in points right after the lecture. While the class is still fresh in your mind, jot down some
words or phrases to remind you about the most important ideas of the lecture or discussion and
make a note of material to reread or study. If you have a tape recorder, make verbal notes of
ideas to study or to follow up in your reading.
……………………………………………………………………………………………..

If your instructor tells you that certain material will be tested, make sure to identify this material
by starring, underlining, or highlighting it.
NOW THAT YOU’RE HERE—
CAMPUS SURVIVAL SKILLS
64 CONTROL STRESS BEFORE IT CONTROLLS YOU

CONTROL STRESS BEFORE IT CONTROLS YOU

A good plan for everyone to take is finding ways to deal with the every day pressure and stress in a
very proactive manner. We have a few words of wisdom that can help you with this somewhat over-
whelming task.

LEARN TO RELAX
Sounds a bit strange but it is true. By learning to relax, you are able to focus on what is at hand and be
more productive.

REGULAR EXERCISE
This is something that helps to alleviate the physical tension thus relieving stress, and it also keeps you
healthy and energized. You can go to the HPER Center located on campus where they offer two fit-
ness rooms with cardio and weightlifting equipment. They also offer aerobic and other exercise
classes.

SLEEP
Getting the right amount of sleep at the right time you will find yourself much happier and more produc-
tive. Not sleeping for a couple of nights and then sleeping for 16 hours to make up for it is not the best
way to avoid stress.

BALANCE YOUR LIFE


Find ways to keep all the important aspects in line. Find a balance between the work and play that
needs to be a part of everyone’s life.

Don’t neglect the spiritual aspect of your life. Every person is different and what works for your room-
mate or your best friend, may not work or you. We cannot give you all the answers but that’s what your
time here at UCA is all about – finding the answers. Volunteer to help others – few things can make
you feel better than helping someone else.

There are many volunteer opportunities such as the local Boys & Girls Club, Senior Citizens Center
and Conway Housing Authority. For more information on handling stress, contact the UCA Counseling
Center at 450-3138.

LIFE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

♦ Write down your goals and the necessary ac- ♦ Say “NO” to unreasonable requests.
tions to achieve those goals. ♦ Use clear communication and practice active
♦ Set priorities for your goals. listening to be sure that you understand what
♦ Organize and schedule your activities on the other people say.
basis of your priorities. ♦ Be ruthless with time, but always gracious with
♦ Use calendars – weekly, quarterly and annual people.
♦ Set realistic deadlines with intermediate check- ♦ If in a leadership position, recruit other students,
points. delegate, and make assignments.
♦ Look at and review your goals and actions sev- ♦ Keep track of how you are spending your time.
eral times a month. ♦ Make the most of your peak-energy periods.
♦ Put 80% of your effort into the top 20% of your ♦ Use time saving techniques.
responsibilities. ♦ Use filing systems.
♦ Plan ahead for contingencies and leave “space” ♦ Develop routines.
in your plans for the unexpected.
HOW DO COLLEGE STUDENTS HANDLE TIME MANAGEMENT? 65

HOW DO COLLEGE STUDENTS HANDLE TIME MANAGEMENT?


• Before committing to a time-consuming activity ask yourself “what is the best use of my time?”
• Find out what is your best time to work. For some it is early in the morning while for others it is in the evening.
Do your most demanding work at your best time.
• Just say no! Do what you have to do first, then what you want to do.
• Don’t spend time feeling guilty about what you haven’t gotten done, just do it!
• Make a list of what you have to get done and assign priorities. Once you get something done reward yourself
with a leisure activity.
• Save at least part of your day for uninterrupted routine, preferably studying.
• Finish each task you start before starting another. Having four half done research papers at the end of the se-
mester impresses no one.
• Take care of things when they are assigned not when they are due.
• Remember you can’t fool time. Something that can be done well in four hours cannot be done four times better
in one hour.

PLANNING ROUTINES DEFINING LIMITS


• Set up daily agendas/schedule • Take time to think
• Set time for routines • Pace yourself
• Maintain weekly/daily calendar • Set deadlines for self-motivation
• Make a “to-do” list • Communicate clearly
• Delegate effectively
COMPLETING TASKS • Don’t be afraid to ask for help
• Structure use of time • Recognize your major time wasters – TV, Internet, Etc.
• Know the time of day when are most/least • Write down your goals and the necessary actions to
productive achieve those goals
• Be decisive • Set priorities for your goals
• Develop concentration skills • Organize and schedule your activities on the basis of
• Avoid procrastination your priorities
• Follow through • Use calendars – weekly, quarterly and annual
• Set realistic deadlines with intermediate checkpoints
HANDLING DEMANDS • Look at and review your goals and actions several times
• Stay with priorities a month
• Turn down unimportant requests • Put 80% of your effort into the top 20% of your responsi-
• Restrict availability bilities
• Make the most of meetings • Plan ahead for contingencies and leave “space” in your
• Exercise to reduce stress plans for the unexpected
• Say “NO” to unreasonable requests
SETTING GOALS • Use clear communication and practice active listening to
Successful people set and write down their goals. be sure that you understand what other people say
These are short (days, weeks, or months), me- • Be ruthless with time, but always gracious with people
dium (months to 5 years), and long term (5 years • If in a leadership position, recruit other students, dele-
or more) objectives to be achieved in your lifetime gate, and make assignments
and aimed at optimal results for everyone. Opti- • Keep track of how you are spending your time
mal results are defined as the best you can get • Make the most of your peak-energy periods
under the circumstances. • Use time saving techniques
• Use filing systems
CRITERIA FOR GOALS: • Develop routines
• Realistic: attainable under existing circum-
stances;
• Specific: quantifiable;
• Comprehensive: fully described conditions to
be met with dates, times, behavior, skills, and
cost;
• Understandable: use words and pictures;
• Require optimal effort: challenging, but not
too hard or easy.
66 25 SAVING-MONEY TIPS FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS

25 Saving-Money Tips for College Students


Food, Beverage, & Personal Items
1. Eat out only on special occasions with friends and family.
Eat in as often as possible or use meal plan if you have it. (Saves gas too!ý)
2. Avoid purchases at convenience stores. It is always more expensive. But use all your DCB.
3. When you eat fast food, order off the dollar menu. (Starbuck’s every day … EEK!)
4. Drink more water (out of the tap) and less soda. Use a refillable bottle to carry it around. ý
5. Don’t use paper and plastic utensils.ý
6. Shop smart! Use coupons and price compare. Use generics and store brands.
Kroger card = coupons and price savings.
7. Avoid convenience/microwaving packaging. It is always more expensive.ý
8. Lots of money is wasted on fancy shampoos, deodorant, toothpaste, and cosmetics.
Buy what’s cheap, and see if it works as well. And be careful not to use more than needed! ý
Entertainment
9. Invite friends over instead of going out. Play a board game or cards.
You can rotate buying the snacks or each person can bring one thing.
10. Watch a rented movie instead of going to the movies (Red box = $1).
11. See what’s happening in town for free (Parks and Recreation,
Chamber of Commerce, Community Calendar, UCA Calendar).
12. Visit the library instead of buying books and magazines.ý
13. Share magazine subscriptions, video rentals, & video games with friends.ý

Your Vehicle
14. Carpool as often as possible. Grocery shop together!ý
15. Maintain the air pressure in your tires. You lose 1% of gas mileage if all four tires are 1 PSI too low or
$15 for every 10,000 miles you drive. Most cars are 5–10 PSI too low, which can be up to $200 per
year or $3.50 per week!ýý
16. Clean the air filter in your car and save 7% on fuel costs or $100 in gas for every 10,000 miles you
drive.ý
17. If you use credit cards, find one that gives free gasoline.

Utilities & Services


18. Use your cell phone when it is free (nights/weekends). Shop for cheapest plan. If you must text,
compare per-text charges to unlimited-texting plans.
19. Don’t pay a service charge at the bank. Many banks offer no service fees to students. In fact, you
should be earning interest on your balance, even if it is <1%.
20. Use a local bank to avoid ATM charges.

Other BIG ideas


21. If it costs more than $100, wait 30 days to see if you still want it.
22. Avoid paying interest if you can! If you carry a balance on your credit cards, don’t charge it
on your credit card unless you will be using it 30 days from now (no meals, no gas).
23. Save for big purchases and pay with cash instead of buying on a credit card and paying interest.
24. Don’t smoke!!!ý
25. Get organized. Use a weekly or monthly planner to schedule all your payments; there’s no excuse for late
fees. Make a budget to see how much money you have coming in and going out. Use the left-over to either
pay down credit cards (reducing interest) or add to savings.

Save before your spend!!!


Try to save as much as 10% of your income.
ý=Good for the environment too!
MAKE SAVING FUN! 67

Make saving fun!

Make it a game!
Challenge your friends!
Who can save the most?

Add to your saving


by selling unneeded items!

How much
can you save?
Can you save 1.70 per day?
That’s $50 per month.
That’s $600 per year!

If you save that money…


Rate of Return (Interest)
Time No interest 6% 10%
20 Years $12,000 $23,102 $37,968
40 Years $24,000 $99,578 $316, 204
… and think about how much this could grow when you have a great
job and you save more than $1.70 per day. You could retire a
millionaire!

Want to learn more about personal finances?


UCA offers two courses on the subject:
FINA 2330 or FACS 3372

Information provided by Dr. Stephanie Watson


68 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

DIVISION OF STUDENT SERVICES


COUNSELING CENTER
Student Health Center Phone: 450-3138
http://www.uca.edu/counseling/

The mission of the counseling center is one of education. The definition of goals, acquisition of knowl-
edge, and development of skills are central to the educational process. The primary aim of the counsel-
ing center is to enable students to achieve their goals and thereby develop to their fullest potential.

PERSONAL COUNSELING
Individual counseling is provided to help a person develop better coping strategies, resolve conflicts,
and handle crisis situations. Typical issues include:

♦ College Adjustment
♦ Depressed Mood
♦ Decision-Making
♦ Anxiety
♦ Relationship Concerns
♦ Family Problems
♦ Divorce Adjustment
♦ Intimacy

The Counseling Center uses a brief counseling model with a limit of 10 sessions of individual counsel-
ing, per student, in a one year period. Individuals who require longer term therapy will be provided with
referral sources.

GROUP COUNSELING
Group Counseling is available to assist persons who share similar concerns. The size of a group is
generally from 4-10 members. Groups that may be offered include:

♦ Divorce Adjustment
♦ Incest Survivors
♦ Eating Disorders
♦ Bulimic Support
♦ Assertiveness Training
♦ Stress Management
♦ Healthy Relationships

OUTREACH PROGRAMMING
Presentations, workshops, and seminars are given as requested for classes, residence halls, groups,
and organizations. Certain programs are planned in advance by counseling staff and are advertised
each semester. Among the topics presented are:

♦ Relationships
♦ Managing Emotions
♦ Self Improvement/Understanding
♦ Stress Management
♦ Depression

SELF HELP CENTER


For those who want to do some learning on their own, the Counseling Center offers self-help re-
sources: Informational pamphlets and brochures are available at no cost. Audio cassette tapes, on
subjects ranging from the healthy family to overcoming shyness, can be checked out.
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 69

CONSULTATION
Counseling Center staff meet with individuals, small groups, organizations, and departments to assist
them in defining issues and developing strategies to deal with concerns.

Examples include:
♦ “I have a friend who needs counseling. What should I do?”
♦ “We want to improve relationships among our members. How do we go about that?“
♦ “There seems to be quite a bit of stress in our department. What can we do?”

REFERRAL
The Counseling Center maintains an extensive list of resources available in this area and can provide
suggestions for referral. Private practitioners, physicians, substance abuse treatment centers, and hu-
man service agencies are among some of the resources we can help to locate.

EMERGENCIES
An on-call counselor is available at 501-450-3138 from 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Students living in university housing are also provided after hours emergency assistance. CALL
UNIVERSITY POLICE AT 501-450-3111 after 4:30 p.m.

CONFIDENTIALITY
The UCA Counseling Center follows the ethical guidelines of the American Psychological Association
and the American Counseling Association. Except in certain emergencies, information is released to no
one outside the Counseling Center staff without the written permission of the individual.

TRAINING
The Counseling Center also serves as a site for the training of graduate students in counseling. They
provide personal counseling under the supervision of the professional staff.

ACCREDITATION
The UCA Counseling Center is accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services.

CAREER SERVICES & COOPERATIVE EDUCATION


Bernard Hall 314 Phone: 450-3134
http://www.uca.edu/newweb/careerservices/

Career Services is designed to assist students in maximizing their college career by preparing for
graduation through guidance and resources for undergraduates and graduate students, and alumni for
their life-long career development. The Career Services Department offers such services as:

CAREER COUNSELING & ADVISING


Career counselors are available to students by appointment to discuss career options.

CURRENT JOB LISTINGS


View jobs available on the career services website. These jobs include summer and part-time positions
both on and off campus during the school year. You also want to place your name with us in the part-
time jobs folder located inside our office as an additional resource to you in finding a job. Most of these
jobs will be located within the Little Rock or Conway area. All full-time jobs and internships in-state and
out-of state are kept in notebooks within our office as well. If you are not on campus, visit the web site
for a listing of some local part-time jobs.
70 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
Want a job but just can’t make it to the interview with your busy schedule? Within our services, the in-
terviewers come to you! Our office attracts employers including private business and industries, gov-
ernment agencies, schools and other educational organizations to interview students for employment.
This is something you’ll definitely want to be a part of your senior year.

COMPANY INFORMATION
Need information about a specific company? Come in and receive all the literature you’ll ever want at
your fingertips!

RESUME WRITING ASSISTANCE


Come and utilize our services and get that job you’ve always dreamed about having. We have a com-
puter in our office for you to use to write your resumes. Sample resumes and assistance with Microsoft
Word are provided upon request. With our services, you can have an expert critique your resume by
making an appointment with our career counselors. Just bring in a rough draft and they’ll help you
make the final touches that will help your resume stand out to employers.

THE DISCOVER PROGRAM


Just don’t know what you want to major in? Come in, take the Discover Program and let us help you
open your mind to a variety of jobs that fit you. The Discover Program assesses your Interests, Abili-
ties, Experiences, and Values through an inventory and from this prints out a list of occupations that fit
you to a tee. The Discover Program also provides information about work tasks, demand, and salary
for the different occupations, identifies specific occupations related to majors, financial aid information,
and information about how to get a job.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS


Want to know how to dress for an interview? Come see our Fashion Show. We will demonstrate appro-
priate job interview attire for men and women.

TEACHER’S FAIR
Come meet with the Districts! Future teachers are encouraged to attend to meet representatives from
schools in the state and out of state.

CAREER FAIR
Come rub elbows with people who have the career you desire! Students from all majors are welcome
to meet representatives from a variety of companies who are searching for new employees. This fair
will be held in November and March.

JOB ACQUISITION SKILLS WORKSHOP


Come and learn strategies for landing the job you want. We offer programs on resume writing, inter-
viewing, writing cover letters, and job search strategies. Watch for fliers on campus about these work-
shops. They are held periodically throughout the year.

The Office of Cooperative Education, located in Bernard Hall room 209, helps eligible UCA students to
identify opportunities for these experiences. Students are coached on the placement process: com-
plete an application, submit a resume and are placed in an applicant pool. Cooperative Education is
an experiential learning activity involving a three-way partnership between the student, the university,
and an employer. These experiences permit students to enhance skills and knowledge obtained in the
classroom, solidify career decisions, gain work experience and develop career related networks. Stu-
dents are paid in many of these experiences. Some experiences permit students to earn academic
credit through internships.
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 71

MINORITY STUDENT SERVICES


Bernard Hall Phone: 450-3135
http://www.uca.edu/minorityservices/

The specific goals of the office:

Ÿ Develop partnerships across campus with student-centered offices and faculty to help the uni-
versity improve ethnic minority retention rates.
Ÿ Collaborate with other student service components on campus to provide support to underrep-
resented populations on campus.
Ÿ Increase ethnic minority student involvement in university leadership opportunities.
Ÿ Provide programs and services that will instill a university-wide appreciation for diverse per-
spectives and ensure equal levels of inclusion and participation.
Ÿ Work in conjunction with student organizations to provide programming that promotes the com-
munication and exchange of multicultural perspectives and values.

MINORITY MENTORSHIP PROGRAM


The Minority Mentorship Program was developed to help students maximize their potential while at-
tending UCA. Students involved in the program have been shown to have higher grade point averages,
participate in more student organizations, and generally enjoy their time at UCA.

It begins with the Transitions Workshop. Transitions is a week-long event focusing on getting freshmen
students acquainted with campus life and meeting new people. During Transitions, freshmen are
paired with an upper-class, student peer-advisor to help them navigate the transition from high school
to college. Peer advisors work with students throughout their freshman year. The Mentorship Program
has events scheduled throughout the year to support both academic and social growth.

Mentorship Program students are experiencing success in their academic and co-curricular activities.
They are involved in and leading organizations on campus such as the Student Government Associa-
tion, Students for the Propagation of Black Culture, SOS, UCA Ambassadors, fraternities, sororities,
and many other student organizations.

DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES


Student Health Center 212 Phone: 450-3613
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/disability/

Disability Support Services (DSS) at the University of Central Arkansas is committed to compliance
with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and other relevant state
and federal legislation. The goal of DSS is to maximize each student’s educational potential while help-
ing him or her develop and maintain independence. Our philosophy is one that encourages self-
awareness, self-determination, self-advocacy and independence in a comprehensively accessible envi-
ronment. While complying with the letter of the law, DSS also embraces the spirit by providing services
to all students with permanent or temporary disabilities to ensure that all University programs and ac-
tivities are accessible.

You are encouraged to visit the Office of Disability Support and learn more about the services available
to you. Early planning is essential for many of the resources and accommodations provided so we ask
that you contact us at the earliest possible date in order for us to assist with your needs.

The decision to use services is a matter of individual choice. Our experience has been that students
achieve higher levels academic and personal success when they demonstrate initiative and assertive-
ness, begin preparing for college of graduate school early, and are aware of and can communicate
their strengths and weaknesses along with appropriate accommodations. The student’s responsibility
is to become informed about and to make use of the resources and services available.
72 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

DSS will respond to telephone inquiries and referrals by sending the appropriate or requested informa-
tion about the Disability Support Services, as well as an invitation to visit the University. Prospective
students are encouraged to visit the University and DSS prior to the start of their first semester.
Specific goals of the office are as follows:
Ÿ Develop partnerships across campus with student-centered offices and faculty to help
the university improve ethnic minority retention rates
Ÿ Collaborate with other student service components on campus to provide support to un-
derrepresented populations on campus.
Ÿ Increase ethnic minority student involvement in university leadership opportunities
Ÿ Provide programs and services that will instill a university-wide appreciation for diverse
perspectives and ensure equal levels of inclusion and participation.
Ÿ Work in conjunction with student organizations to provide programming that promotes
the communication and exchange of multicultural perspectives and values.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES


Student Health Center Phone: 450-3136
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/studenthealth/

Student Health Services provides essential health care services which enhance the ability of students
to be academically successful and develop the life skills and attitudes of healthy, productive members
of society. Services provided include:
♦ Treatment for minor illnesses and inju- lected lab tests)
ries ♦ Blood Pressure Monitoring
♦ Vaccines (MMR, tetanus/diphtheria) ♦ Health-related literature
♦ Hepatitis-B vaccine (fee required) ♦ Pregnancy tests (fee required)
♦ Meningitis vaccine (fee required) ♦ TB (tuberculosis) skin tests (except
♦ Crutch loan Thursdays) (fee required)
♦ Allergy injections, physician-ordered ♦ Physicals (by appointment only)
♦ Physician-ordered treatments (i.e. se- ♦ PAP smears (by appointment only)

INTRAMURAL SPORTS & RECREATION


HPER Center Room 103 Phone: 450-5712
http://www.uca.edu/healthpromotion/

The mission of Campus Recreation is to provide students, faculty, and staff with programs that offer com-
petitive, non-competitive, health promoting, and physical activity conducive to their personal development
and overall wellness within safe facilities and fun-filled environments. The department also provides lead-
ership development opportunities for students and participants. The department personnel recognize the
value of developing the total person and feel that recreational and intramural sports are an essential
component of the educational experience at UCA.
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 73

HEALTH PROMOTION & WELLNESS SERVICES


Student Health Building Phone: 450-3133
http://www.uca.edu/healthpromotion/

The UCA Office of Health and Wellness works to keep UCA students informed of numerous issues that
affect their lives daily such as stress management, self-image, and sexual health. Resources available
to students include various pamphlets, brochures, & videos which are available for checkout.

The Office of Health and Wellness offers several programs for UCA students, including Drug/Alcohol
Education Classes, RA Drug/Alcohol Training, and health related presentations to any UCA organiza-
tion. The office supports the Recognized Student Organizations H.E.L.P. and 80 PROOF:

H.E.L.P. was designed for students interested in Health and Wellness issues, specifically those regard-
ing HIV/AIDS and making a difference on campus. This student organization is instrumental in the
planning World AIDS Day.

80 PROOF is a Peer Education Group designed to help reduce the negative consequences of alcohol
abuse by promoting responsible attitudes and behaviors regarding alcohol consumption.

STUDENT CENTER
Phone: 450-3235
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/studentcenter/

The UCA Student Center is centrally located on campus and serves as a hub of campus activities and
services. You can find the following offices and services in the Student Center:

“The Bear” 91.3 KUCA FM Radio – Basement Greek Services & Leadership Development – 2nd
Barnes & Noble Bookstore – 1st Floor Floor
Food Court – 1st Floor Orientation – 2nd Floor
Post Office – 1st Floor Student Activities – 2nd Floor
C-Store – 1st Floor SGA – 2nd Floor
Java City – 1st Floor RSO Resource Center – 2nd Floor

There are also several lounges, meeting rooms, a ballroom, and conference-style rooms for studying,
relaxing, or student organization meetings. These rooms can be booked by calling the Calendar Office
at 450-5270.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES BOARD


Student Center 206 Phone: 450-3235
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/activities/

The Student Activities (SAB) is an organization that provides fun and exciting activities for the UCA cam-
pus. SAB consists of five committees: Music, Comedy, Pop Culture, Films, and Novelty. Past performers
by the SAB include: Jimmy Fallon, Lifehouse, Michelle Branch, Pat Green, Jimmy Eat World, The Call-
ing, Train, D.L. Hughley, Taking Back Sunday, Dave Chapelle plus much more! Visit us at www.uca.edu/
divisions/student/activities/ to learn how you can get involved.
74 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED
ORIENTATION
Student Center 206 Phone: 450-3235
http://www.uca.edu/orientation

The mission of the Office of Orientation is to coordinate and implement a process to:
♦ Assist new students with their academic, personal, cultural, and social transition to UCA
♦ Expose new students to the broad educational opportunities within the institution
♦ Integrate new students into the life of the institution
♦ Assist the institution in learning more about its entering students, and
♦ Provide an opportunity for new students and their families to become familiar with institu-
tional policies, programs, and resources.

To achieve its mission, the Office of Orientation offers a variety of programs and services including:
♦ Summer Orientation and Academic Registration (SOAR) programs in June for incoming
freshmen and their parents
♦ A four-day program at the start of the Fall semester called Welcome Week
♦ Resource Fair for new students on the first day of classes in January
♦ An orientation guide for new students and parents

The Orientation Office relies on volunteer students to conduct its programs for freshmen and transfer
students. These two organizations are the Student Orientation Staff (SOS) and Transfer Orientation
Leader (TOL). These students are selected through an application and interview process every March,
and begin training in April.

GREEK SERVICES & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT


Student Center 207 Phone: 450-3137
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/UCA_Greek/index.html

The Greek system at the University of Central Arkansas offers you an opportunity for involvement that is
truly unique. Scholarship, leadership, brotherhood & sisterhood, community service, and social activities
are the key elements of the 18 fraternities and sororities at UCA. We believe that one of the best ways to
get the most out of your college years is through the Greek experience. The opportunities for involve-
ment and participation are numerous, and we encourage you to take a good look at what our Greek com-
munity has to offer.
FUTURE GREEKS FAQ
How can Greek life help me succeed academically?
Greek letter organizations were founded on the principle of successful scholarship. Academic success is
in the student’s favor when you factor in help from fellow sisters and brothers, study halls and sessions,
study skills workshops, test taking strategies, time management and class scheduling assistance. The
Greek community also provides a number of incentives and recognition to those Greeks who achieve
academically. For example, UCA’s Greek community’s grade point average is consistently higher than
that of the all university average. Many chapters also provide incentives to their members who excel in
the classroom; recognition at meetings, reduced fees, national awards and much more.

Does being a member of a Greek letter organization have benefits after graduation?
With the job market becoming increasingly competitive, a college degree no longer guarantees a suc-
cessful career. In today’s job market it is not only important what you know, but who you know. When
someone joins a fraternity or sorority, they not only become friends with the families, friends, and girl-
friends or boyfriends of those members as well. Members are also introduced to alumni of their chapters
all over the country. By joining a Greek letter organization, a person can create an entire network of peo-
ple, from which could possibly become an employer, a spouse, or a lifelong friend.
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 75

Do Greeks participate in community service?


Through the support of local and national philanthropies, fraternities and sororities promote ideals that
will enhance a member’s college experience. Charities and service organizations have long depended
on the dedication and generous time contributed to the community by the UCA Greek chapters. Per-
haps one of the most rewarding aspects of Greek life during the 2003-2004 year was when UCA’s
Greeks gave over 15,000 hours and $20,000 to charities. Recipients of Greek service include the
American Heart Association, Adopt-A-Highway, St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, United Way, Big
Brother’s and Big Sister’s, the Boy’s and Girl’s Clubs, and countless other agencies in the Conway
community and the state of Arkansas.

Does it cost a lot to be a Greek?


Joining a fraternity or sorority does carry a financial commitment. Each chapter is self-supporting
through dues paid by their members. When students join a Greek letter organization, they also agree to
pay dues and fees while in school to maintain membership. Although chapters may have accommoda-
tions for special needs, students should discuss the financial obligations with their parent(s) before de-
ciding to join. Each chapter has different dues for membership that cover such things as chapter and
national dues, dues to the Interfraternity, Pan-Hellenic, and National Pan-Hellenic Councils, social ac-
tivities, resources, and other miscellaneous costs.

Are Greeks really like the actors in Animal House?


Many people have the misconception that the image of Greek organizations depicted in the movie
“Animal House” really what is happening on college campuses across America. In reality, the Animal
House image of Greek life could not be further from the truth. The UCA Greek community focuses on
responsibility in our activities. The university promotes alcohol responsibility in a number of ways; risk
management training and implementation, social event monitoring, and judicial action for groups who
violate policy. UCA Greeks hold their members accountable for their choices.

What is “hazing” and is it something I should worry about?


All of our organizations, UCA, and the State of Arkansas has very strict policies and laws to deter haz-
ing in any student organizations. For more information about hazing, feel free to contact us at 501-450-
3137.
DONALD W. REYNOLDS PERFORMANCE HALL
Phone: 450-3265 or 1-866-810-0012
http://www.uca.edu/publicappearances/

The Donald W. Reynolds Performance Hall on the UCA Campus opened on September 15, 2000, with a
sold-out concert by the late Ray Charles. Mr. Charles was backed by the University’s Concert Choir and
members of both the UCA Chamber Orchestra and Conway Symphony Orchestra. Since then, the 1200-
seat Reynolds Performance Hall has hosted numerous celebrities, including the Temptations, Ms.
Gladys Knight, the Irish Tenor Ronan Tynan, Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons, mezzo-soprano Denyce
Graves, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, and many national and international touring companies.
The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation made a $5.6-million grant to the University in 1997. UCA raised
$1.13-million to fund the Reynolds Endowment Fund, which assures that the Performance Hall will be
maintained as a first-class building in Conway, Arkansas, for the foreseeable future. Reynolds Perform-
ance Hall is managed by UCA Public Appearances, a division of the College of Fine Arts & Communica-
tion.
.“THE BEAR 91.3” KUCA-FM
Suite 01 Student Center Basement Phone: 450-3326

UCA has its own student-operated radio station “The Bear 91.3” and is sponsored by the Student Gov-
ernment Association. The radio station, which has a 5,000 watt signal and covers central Arkansas,
broadcast a top 40 rock format as well as campus news, weather, UCA sports and other events. The
76 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

station also gives students the opportunity to host their own radio shows with the music of their choice.
For more information, contact Monty Rowell at 450-3326 or Steve Owens at 450-5467.

BARNES & NOBLE UCA BOOKSTORE


Student Center Phone: 450-3414
HOURS OF OPERATION Monday - Friday: 8:00 AM-4:30 PM Saturday & Sunday: CLOSED

We accept cash, personal checks with proper ID, VISA, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, &
Barnes & Noble Bookstores Gift Certificates & Gift Cards.
SERVICES OFFERED

♦ Copy Center ♦ School supplies


♦ Textbooks with Price Matching Plus ♦ General, reference & bargain books
♦ Textbook Buybacks everyday ♦ Snacks & Drinks
♦ Textbook reservations ♦ School spirit clothing & novelties

CAMPUS MINISTRIES
Ÿ Alabaster Dance Ÿ Elevation Ÿ Missionary Baptist Student
Ÿ Apostolic Students for Christ Ÿ Friends of Christ Uniting Fellowship
Ÿ Assoc. of Baptist Students Ÿ Students Ÿ Sons of Adam
Ÿ Baptist Collegiate Ministry Ÿ Griot Society Ÿ Student Mobilization
Ÿ Bears for Christ Ÿ Interdenominational Christian Ÿ Wesley Foundation
Ÿ Breakout Council Ÿ Words of Wisdom
Ÿ Campus Ministry International Ÿ Judah Chorale Collegiate Ÿ Young Life Fellowship
Ÿ Catholic Campus Ministry Choir
Ÿ Chi Alpha Christian Ÿ Lutheran Student Fellowship
Fellowship

THE ECHO
Student Center Phone: 450-3446
http://echo.uca.edu/

The Echo is UCA’s independent newspaper. It is written by UCA students and published every
Wednesday morning. The Echo supplies students and faculty with schedules of upcoming events as
well as information about issues of importance to UCA students and faculty. It highlights recent events,
gives opinions of UCA students and faculty on certain issues, presents feature stories about visitors of
UCA, and highlights sports events and sports schedules.

BAUM GALLERY
McCastlain Hall Phone: 450-5793
http://www.uca.edu/cfac/baum/

The Baum Gallery is an educational art museum for UCA students, faculty, and staff. It serves as a cul-
tural resource for the state, participates in national and international touring exhibitions and programs,
and curates original exhibits distinctly suited to an academic environment. The gallery develops exhibi-
tions and events that invite interaction and encourage dialogue about visual art: the creators, studio
process, history, criticism, curation, and cultural contexts.

The Baum Gallery is open Monday-Friday 9am-5pm, Thursday 9am-8pm, and on Sunday 1-5pm.
Weekday opening receptions are held on designated Thursdays from 4-6pm. Weekend receptions are
held on designated Sundays from 2-4pm. Additional events are publicized individually. All events are
free. The public is invited.
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 77
FINANCIAL AID
McCastlain 001 Phone: 450-3140
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/admin/finaid/

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What forms are needed to apply for financial aid?


The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be completed each year. You can submit
your application electronically by using FAFSA on the web. In addition, you will need to complete a
UCA Financial Aid Application. Once your FAFSA is received by UCA, you will be able to complete this
form.

What types of financial aid do I apply for when I complete this application?
Your eligibility for all forms of federal financial aid, including PELL Grant, SEOG Grant, ACG Grant,
SMART Grant, Perkins Loan, FFELP Loans, Work-Study are determined when you complete the
FAFSA.

What is UCA’s Title IV Code, and why do I need it?


Our Title IV code is 001092. When you enter this code on the FAFSA, UCA will automatically receive
an electronic version of your processed Student Aid Report (SAR).

I probably don’t qualify for aid. Why should I apply?


Many families mistakenly believe they don’t qualify for aid, preventing themselves from receiving aid for
which they may be eligible simply because they fail to apply. In addition, there are sources of aid, such
as Unsubsidized Loans and Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), available regardless of
need. The FAFSA form is free. It does not obligate the student or the parent in any way. There is no
reason not to apply.

How do I apply for a scholarship?


Freshman Academic Scholarships are awarded through the Office of Admissions. Performance Schol-
arships, such as Athletics, Cheerleading and Band are awarded through the respective departments.

I sent in my FAFSA over four weeks ago, but haven’t heard anything. What should I do?
If you haven’t received a Student Aid Report (SAR), call the Federal processor at 1-319-337-5665 or 1-
800-433-3243.

I am independent of my parents. I don’t live with them, I file my own taxes, and they are not helping me
with college expenses. Can I file for financial aid without using their income information?
Probably not. The federal aid programs are built on the premise that educating a child is a family re-
sponsibility. It is unfortunate that your parents do not support you in this effort. However, the FAFSA
gives specific criteria for determining when a student may file for federal aid without using parental in-
come information, and none of the circumstances you mentioned are listed as factors in that determi-
nation. However, if there are other extenuating circumstances please feel free to contact the financial
aid office for further assistance.

How do I transfer my financial aid to UCA?


Technically, financial aid does not transfer from one school to another school. Each school must deter-
mine your eligibility for financial aid. It may be exactly the same at each school or it may differ consid-
erably. The first thing you should do is contact the other school and cancel your financial aid and notify
the appropriate office that you are transferring. You will then need to phone 1-800-433-3243 and re-
quest that your Student Aid Report be sent to UCA. Our school code is 001092. You will need to click
on “Forms” and print the appropriate “University Application.” When these documents are received by
the Financial Aid Office, we will contact you concerning the status of your application.
78 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

How do I apply for a student loan?


When you submit the FAFSA you should indicate that you are interested in receiving a student loan. If
you did not indicate your interest or have changed your mind since you filed, you should contact our of-
fice so we can note your aid preferences in your file. If you are eligible, a loan will automatically be
awarded to you.
What is the difference between a subsidized and an unsubsidized loan?
For both loans, the principal (the original amount a student borrows) is deferred until six months after the
student graduates or stops attending school at least half-time. As its name implies, a SUBSIDIZED loan
is one where the government pays the interest on the loan while the student is in school. An UNSUBSI-
DIZED loan is one where the government does not pay the interest while the student is in school, that is,
the student is responsible for paying the interest.
What is “Loan Counseling,” “Entrance Interview” and “Entrance Counseling Session”?
All of these terms refer to the same thing: loan counseling. The federal government requires all first-time
student loan borrowers to participate in loan counseling prior to receiving a Federal Student Loan. During
this session, you will review basic facts about loans, managing your education expenses and your rights
and responsibilities as a student loan borrower.
Can I cancel my loan if I change my mind?
Yes. You may cancel all or a portion of your loan by informing us in writing that you wish to do so within
14 days after we send you notice that we have credited your account with your Loan funds or by the first
day of the payment period, whichever is later.
I was awarded work study but can not find a job. Can I convert my work study money to a loan?
Work Study can not be converted to a loan. However, if you have remaining eligibility it may be possible,
if the work study is canceled, to increase your student loan.

HOUSING & RESIDENCE LIFE


Bernard Hall 201 Phone: 450-3132
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/admin/housing/

HOW DO I APPLY FOR HOUSING?


Easy, you just need to fill out a housing application and make your $100.00 deposit. You can do it in
person, at the housing office (Bernard Hall, Room 201), by mail, or you can get the application on the
housing website. There is not a deadline for applying but we encourage you to apply early so that we
have opportunities to meet your needs.

WHAT IS A HOUSING LEASE?


Just like a lease for an apartment, the housing lease lists the terms and conditions of the agreement.
You must sign a nine or twelve month lease in order to live on campus.

WHAT DOES THE HOUSING DEPOSIT DO?


The deposit serves three purposes: guarantees your room, insures against damages, and makes sure
you properly check out with housing staff.

WILL I GET THE DEPOSIT BACK?


Provided you are not returning to housing, you do not have any damages, and you have checked out
properly, you will get your deposit back.

WHEN WILL I FIND OUT MY ROOM ASSIGNMENT?


This depends on when you apply for housing. The earliest assignments go out the first week of June.
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 79

IF I DON’T LIKE MY RESIDENCE HALL OR ROOM CAN I CHANGE?


Yes, you may change rooms when or if spaces are available. Room changes take place after the first
two weeks of classes. You have to see your residence coordinator to change rooms or buildings.

WHAT IF I DON’T LIKE MY ROOMMATE?


Again, roommate changes take place when or if spaces are available. Please discuss this with your
Residence Coordinator or RA to help assist in positive communication between you and your room-
mate.

WHAT HAPPENS IF MY ROOMMATE NEVER MOVES IN?


You have three options: 1) You may find another student to move in with you. 2) You may move into a
room with another resident within the hall or another hall. 3) You may be able to keep your room as a
private room provided there are enough rooms for all students. Private rooms for freshman are not
available during their first semester.

IS IT A GOOD IDEA FOR ME TO TALK TO MY ROOMMATE BEFORE I MOVE IN?


YES! Conversing with your roommate whether it be by phone, letter, or email is a great idea. It lets
you get to know the person and also provides a way for you to decide who is bringing what.

CAN I DECORATE MY ROOM?


Your room is your home, at least for nine months, so you can decorate within reason. Plants, carpets,
rugs, posters, fish in small aquariums, and such. Keep in mind that the furniture must remain the
same as when you arrived or you will be charged for damages.

IS THERE PARKING ON CAMPUS?


Yes there is on campus parking, but you are required to purchase a parking decal from the university
police department. http://www.ucapd.com/

HOW IS THE RESIDENCE HALL ROOM FURNISHED AND WHAT IS THE ROOM SIZE?
Each room comes furnished with a chest of drawers, bed with mattress, desk and chair, mini blinds,
sink, cable television jack, computer jack, mirror, and counter/ storage space.
The dimensions for the following are:
Arkansas Hall: 13’6’ W by 12’6’ L
Baridon Hall: 11’6 W by 12’6’ L
Bernard Hall: 13’4 W by 18’6’ L
Carmichael Hall: 12’6’ W by 15’ L
Conway Hall: 12’6’ W by 15’ L
Hughes Hall: 12’6’ W by 13’9’ L
State Hall: 12’6’ W by 13’9’ L

HOW ARE THE APARTMENTS FURNISHED AND WHAT IS THE BEDROOM SIZE?
Each apartment comes furnished with a love seat and chair in the living room, a dining set or bar
stools in the kitchen/dining area, cable jack in the living room, & computer jack in each bedroom.
Each bedroom comes with a chest of drawers, bed with mattress, desk and chair. Each window
comes with mini blinds.

WHAT SHOULD STUDENTS DO IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY ILLNESS OR INJURY?


If a student becomes ill or injured, and is in need of immediate attention, the Residence Coordinator
or RA on duty should be notified. The staff member will contact Student Health Service during day-
time hours. In extreme emergencies, students should dial 911 and ask for an ambulance.

MAY I HAVE A REFRIGERATOR OR MICROWAVE IN MY RESIDENCE HALL ROOM?


Students may have a micro-fridge combination (ordered through Collegiate Concept - see below) or
refrigerator in their rooms, but appliances may not exceed 3.8 cubic feed or 1.5 amps. Approved
80 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

devices may be rented through UCA services. Information regarding pick up times and location will be
noted in the information packet. Rental prices vary from year to year. To inquire about renting a mi-
crofridge call 1-888-929-0806.

WHERE CAN I DO LAUNDRY?


Each residence hall/Apartment Complex is equipped with free laundry facilities. Apartments at UCA usu-
ally have washer and dryer in each unit except for Stadium park and Elizabeth Place where Laundry Fa-
cilities are provided within the complex.

WHAT IF I LOSE MY ROOM KEY OR LOCK MYSELF OUT OF MY ROOM/APARTMENT?


Students who lose their room key should immediately report the loss to their RA or RA on duty. The
room will be re-cored within 24 hours at a cost to the student. If a student is locked out of his/her room,
the RA can open the room at a charge of $5 per lockout.

WHERE DO I GET MY MAIL?


All students who live in University Housing are required to rent a campus post office box. Students are
assigned post office boxes, which are located in the Student Center and cost $5.00 a semester. Students
may purchase stamps and mail letters and packages at the Student Center post office. Packages can be
sent to students at this box, but these must be claimed within 10 days or they will be returned to the
sender.

IF THERE IS A MAINTENANCE PROBLEM, WHOM SHOULD I NOTIFY?


Students who need maintenance service should contact their RA or Residence Coordinator. The RA or
Residence Coordinator will call out a maintenance request and submit it to the Physical Plant within 24
hours. You can expect a Housing or University maintenance worker to respond to your request within
one to seven days, depending on the severity of the problem and the workload of the maintenance staff.

WHAT CAN I NOT BRING TO UCA?


The following list contains items that are not allowed on campus, this list is not inclusive and students
should refer to the University Student Handbook for a complete list of the items that are not allows on
campus:

Open element appliances, microwave ovens, sun lamps, air conditioners, outside antennae/satellite
dishes, potpourri pots, halogen lamps, outdoor grills, space heaters, explosives, fireworks, firearms, alco-
hol, lofts, pets other than a fish, weapons, etc.

MEAL PLANS
CAMPUS DINING SERVICES

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF CAMPUS DINING?

µ No need to carry cash around


µ Eat as much as you want, whenever you want
µ No more traffic and parking hassles
µ On campus access to a variety of dining choices

HOW DO THEY WORK?


Meal plans are geared specifically to make your life simpler! A magnetic strip on the back of your stu-
dent ID card works with our computer system to identify you as a meal plan member. Our meal plans
are easy, economical and designed to meet the needs of your busy campus lifestyle. The Meals Per
Week portion of your plan can be used at our all-you-can-eat on-campus dining facility, Christian Cafe-
teria. The more meals you commit to purchasing, the more money you will save in the long run. The
Declining Dollars work on the same principle as bank debit cards. Each time you make a food
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 81

purchase, the total cost of your meal is subtracted from the dollar balance in your account. Declining
Dollars can be used at your discretion throughout the fall and spring semesters and are accepted at
ALL campus dining locations.

ARAMARK Hours of Operation:


Farris Hall Burdick Business Admin. C-Store
M-F 7am-9pm M-Th 7am-7pm after 6pm. M-F 8am-10pm
Sat 9am-7pm Fri 7am-4pm Sat 9am-10pm
Sun 2pm-9pm Sat. & Sun. Closed Sun 2pm-10pm

Bear Village Food Court Java City


M-F 8am-8pm M-F 7am-7pm M-F 7am-10pm
Sat. & Sun. 10am-8pm Sat 10am-2pm S&S closed
Sun closed

Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT IS A BEARBUCKS CARD?


The UCA BearBucks Card is the official identification and on-campus debit card. The BearBucks Card is
the property of the University of Central Arkansas and should be carried with the cardholder at all times.

MAY ANYONE USE MY CARD?


The BearBucks Card is not transferable. Altering or lending the card may subject the cardholder to disci-
plinary action. Only the person pictured on the BearBucks I.D. Card will be allowed to use the Card, al-
though you may use the card to buy items for other people if you wish.

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR MY BEARBUCKS CARD?


The BearBucks Cardholder is responsible for monitoring the debit transactions at the time of the sale and
for monitoring the current account balances.

MAY I CHARGE ON MY BEARBUCKS CARD?


No. The BearBucks Card is NOT a Credit Card. You may only purchase items if you have that amount of
money in the account at that time. Purchase returns will be credited to the cardholder's BearBucks ac-
count.

MAY I TAKE CASH OUT OF MY ACCOUNT?


No. Cash refunds and withdrawals are not permitted. The BearBucks Card is not an ATM card; it is for
purchases only.

HOW MANY TIMES CAN THE CARD BE USED?


There is no limit on the number of times the BearBucks Card can be used or the dollar amount of any
transaction, as long as the purchase amount does not exceed the balance in the BearBucks account.

WHAT IF I LOSE MY CARD?


Lost, stolen, or misplaced BearBucks Cards MUST be immediately reported to the OneCard Office lo-
cated at:

Bernard Hall, Room 207


(phone: 450.5818)

Business hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 - 4:30.


After hours or on weekends, your card can be deactivated on the OneCard website found at https://
bearbucks.uca.edu/1card/.
82 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO REPLACE MY BEARBUCKS CARD?


There is a replacement fee of $10.00 per card for lost, stolen, or misplaced cards. If your missing card is
found after a replacement card has been issued, the old card needs to be destroyed, as it is no longer
useable due to deactivation. Purchases will not be allowed with a deactivated card.

HOW AND WHERE DO I MAKE DEPOSITS?


Deposits into your BearBucks account may be done in the OneCard Office in Bernard 207 or at the Stu-
dent Accounts Office in McCastlain Hall. The initial minimum deposit is $25.00. Cash, check, or money
orders will be accepted as the method of payment. There are also Automatic Deposit Machines (ADM's)
located in Torreyson Library, the Student Center Food Court, and Christian Cafeteria. Deposits to the
ADM's may be made with cash or credit cards (Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and Diners Club). Credit or
Debit card deposits can also be made on the OneCard server located at
https://bearbucks.uca.edu/1card/.

WHAT HAPPENS TO MY BEARBUCKS ACCOUNT BETWEEN SEMESTERS?


Nothing! Your BearBucks account balance will carry over and be available as long as you are a student.

WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON’T USE ALL THE MONEY I'VE DEPOSITED INTO THE ACCOUNT?
Refunds may be applied for by the BearBucks cardholder, in person or in writing at the end of the semes-
ter in which they graduate or anytime during the semester if the cardholder officially withdraws from
classes at UCA. There will be a $30.00 administrative fee upon closing your BearBucks account.
DID YOU KNOW?

In 1986, UCA's Torreyson Library became the first computerized or automated library in the State of Arkansas.

TORREYSON LIBRARY
Phone: 450-3129
http://library.uca.edu/
HOURS
Online services are available 24/7. Building hours during fall and spring semesters are Sunday,
2 P.M. to 12 Midnight; Monday - Thursday, 7 A.M. to 12 Midnight; Friday, 7 A.M. to 5 P.M.; and Satur-
day 8:30 A.M. to 4 P.M. The Library's "Night Owl Study Room" is open Sunday through Thursday,
from Midnight to 7 A.M. Hours vary during finals week, summer semesters, holidays, and intersession
periods. For additional information, please call 501-450-3129, 501-450-5224 or visit Library.uca.edu.

ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS


Archives and Special Collections The UCA Archives is dedicated to the acquisition and preservation of
historical documents that pertain to the State of Arkansas and its citizens. Hours vary from regular Li-
brary hours. Please call 501-450-3418 for additional information.

ARKLINK
As a member of the ARKLink consortium, Torreyson Library can provide students with an ARKLink bor-
rower's card, giving them borrowing privileges at dozens of academic libraries throughout Arkansas.
Please inquire about this service at the Circulation Desk.

BORROWING BOOKS CIRCULATION


Students must present a valid UCA ID card when checking out library materials. Undergraduate stu-
dents may check out fifteen books for a loan period of 28 days. All patrons may renew books at the
Circulation Desk, by phone at 501-450-3174, or by selecting “Renew a Book Online” from the library
website.

Daily overdue fines are not charged. However, once materials are eight weeks overdue, student bor-
rowers will be billed for the replacement cost of the item, as determined by the Library. In addition,
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 83
Torreyson Library reserves the right to revoke Library privileges, block transcripts, and block course
Registration if materials are not returned on time. Charges for damaged materials will vary according
to the extent of the damage.

The Library's main book collection is arranged on the shelves by the Library of Congress Classification
system. Books in the Children's Room are arranged by the Dewey Decimal system.

COMPUTER ACCESS
Ninety-five desktop workstations (including five Macintosh) are available for student use in the east
wing of the Library 1st floor. These workstations offer access to the Microsoft Office suite of products
(Word, Excel, etc.), campus network resources, the internet, the Library's book catalog, and the Li-
brary's collection of electronic resources. Wireless internet access is provided throughout the building.
The second floor, east wing is specially configured with furniture and electrical outlets to accommodate
laptops, and laptops are available for in-building loan at the Circulation Desk.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
Over 55 research collections are available through the library website. These collections provide ac-
cess to business information, legal information, current events, and to full text journal, magazine, and
newspaper articles in the humanities, social sciences, life sciences, and applied sciences.

GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS
Government Documents As a federal and Arkansas document depository, Torreyson Library collects
information published by both the U.S. and Arkansas governments. Most documents are available for
checkout, and many are accessible through the internet

INTERLIBRARY LOAN
This service provides students with access to materials such as books, articles, and media not owned
by Torreyson Library. Requests may be submitted via the Library's website or at the Library Reference
Desk.

MUSIC RESOURCE ROOM


This area provides both listening and viewing capabilities. Collections include musical scores, perform-
ance scores, CD recordings of UCA performances in Snow Fine Arts Recital Hall, composer biogra-
phies, music history, compact discs, long play records, music videos, and analytical works. Hours vary
from regular Library hours. Please call 501-450-3413 for additional information.

NIGHT OWL STUDY ROOM


The Library's "Night Owl Study Room" is open Sundays through Thursdays, from Midnight to
7 A.M. This room is restricted to UCA students, and students must show their UCA ID card to be ad-
mitted. The Night Owl Study Room entrance is in back of the Library to the right of the jumbo screen.

PRINTING
Library printers operate on the “OneCard" system and require that students scan their UCA ID card.
Printing charges are $.05 per page using the OneCard system and $.10 per page for cash transac-
tions.

REFERENCE SERVICES
Library Faculty are available at the Reference Desk to give students personalized help in doing re-
search and finding information required for course assignments. Students may also receive assistance
by phone at 501-450-5224, or by email via the Library’s website.

RESERVE MATERIALS
Course reserve materials are available for checkout at the Circulation Desk and/or electronically via the
Library's website.
84 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

UCA POLICE DEPARTMENT


24 Hour Dispatch: 450-3111 - Emergency: Dial 9-1-1
www.ucapd.com

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

WHERE CAN VISITORS PARK?


Since we have no control over when visitors will be arriving on our campus it is the responsibility of the
students, faculty and staff to inform their guests about parking regulations. The best way to help your
visitor is to bring him or her to the police department so they may obtain a temporary visitor parking
permit and we can explain the parking to them. If visitors park at metered parking spaces they are ex-
pected to pay to park there. No one is exempt from paying the meters.

ARE VISITOR PARKING PERMITS FREE? Yes.

CAN I MOVE MY DECAL FROM CAR TO CAR?


Beginning in the 2009-2010 academic year, student parking permits will no longer be adhesive decals.
Each student will be issued a hanging permit which may be used in any vehicle the student parks on
campus.

WHAT IF I ARRIVE ON CAMPUS AND RELAIZE I HAVE FORGOTTEN MY PERMIT IN ANOTHER


CAR?
We have temporary permits. You simply need to come to the police department before you park and
request a temporary parking permit. You will be required to present your UCA ID. A temporary permit
will allow you to park where you normally do.

WHAT DO I DO IF I LOST MY PERMIT?


Report the lost permit immediately to the police department Parking & Traffic Services Section and re-
quest a replacement permit.

WHY IS ENFORCEMENT INCONSISTENT?


Think of it this way: not every person who goes speeding down the highway gets a ticket. But, anyone
who goes speeding down the highway is subject to getting a ticket, should that individual be caught.
Ask yourself what kind of resources would be required to ensure that every violator be apprehended,
and the reason for inconsistent enforcement becomes obvious.

MY CAR BATTERY DIED. CAN YOU GIVE ME A JUMP-START? Yes.

I LOCKED MY KEYS IN MY CAR. CAN YOU UNLOCK MY VEHICLE? Yes.

I HAVE A FLAT TIRE. CAN YOU HELP ME CHANGE IT?


In most cases, no. However, we will assist you with contacting a service company to assist you.

ARE UCA POLICE OFFICERS REALLY POLICE OFFICERS?


Yes. UCA Police officers are really police officers. They attended a 12-13 week basic law enforcement
training academy and are certified by the Arkansas Commission on Law Enforcement Standards and
Training. UCA Police officers’ training does not stop at the academy. Officers are also required to com-
plete a 12 week field training program and, throughout their time at UCA PD, receive in-service training
ranging from firearms, CPR, first aid, legal updates, community oriented policing issues, defensive tac-
tics, use of force, and domestic violence just to name a few.

ARE WEAPONS ALLOWED ON CAMPUS?


No. UCA prohibits weapons of any kind on campus.
DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED 85

Safe@UCA

The UCA Police Department is pleased to announce the availability of brand new services offered to
the UCA community in the interest of safety and security on campus.

The Safe@UCA Info Line is active 24 hours a day to allow members of the community to call and listen
to a recorded message regarding the status of the university or to receive instructions or information
about emergencies or closures affecting the UCA campus. During an emergency or closure, the re-
corded message will be updated periodically with the latest information or instructions.

You are invited to preview the Safe@UCA Info Line by calling 852-INFO (4636).

In addition to the Safe@UCA Info Line we also have established the Safe@UCA email listserv for
those members of the UCA community who do not have access to listservs provided exclusively to stu-
dents or faculty and staff. Parents, visitors, neighbors, or anyone who would like to receive safety and
crime alerts via their personal email account, are invited to register.

Please visit the UCA Police Department Web site at www.ucapd.com to sign up for the Safe@UCA
email listserv.

We are also pleased to announce release of the next phase of implementation of AlertXpress at UCA.
At present, approximately 300 University administrators and key faculty and staff are registered to re-
ceive voice message alerts via telephone in the event of emergencies on campus. We are now ready
to open AlertXpress registration to all UCA faculty and staff.

To register for AlertXpress please log on to URSA and visit the UCA Police Department channel under
the Resources tab.

Through these and our many other efforts to protect and serve the academic community, the UCA Po-
lice Department is committed to maintaining our excellent quality of life on campus.

DID YOU KNOW?

UCA's Sophomore Year Experience program recently


won regional and national awards for being an out-
standing retention program for UCA sophomores. The
American College Personnel Association (ACPA)
Commission III recognized the program with its Out-
standing Innovation Award, and the Southwest
Association of College and University Housing Officers
(SAWCUHO) gave the
program its Frank Cloud Award of Excellence.
86 DEPARTMENTS AND SERVICES OFFERED

UCA MATHEMATICS LAB


2nd Floor
http://library.uca.edu/

The Mathematics Lab provides tutoring and help for UCA students enrolled in College Algebra and
Trigonometry. The hours of operation for the lab are 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday – Thursday and 8 a.m. –
12 p.m. on Friday.

UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR COMMUNICATION SUPPORT


Thompson Hall 109 450-5123
http://www.uca.edu/cfac/writing/owl/

The primary mission of the UCA Writing Center is to help students become more confident, more effec-
tive, more self-sufficient writers and communicators. The Writing Center is a free service for all UCA
students.

How Can the Writing Center Help Me?


Bring writing projects from any class, any discipline, and trained consultants will read them with a fresh
pair of eyes and discuss writing techniques and issues such as brainstorming and other means of idea
generation, research strategies, focus, organization, development, documentation, and grammar.

We also offer two kinds of online conferencing, where you can either simply e-mail a draft to a consult-
ant and receive feedback, or receive e-mail feedback plus discuss that feedback online via Instant
Messenger. In addition, we offer a writing hotline, tip sheets, resource books, and workshops.

How Can I Make an Appointment?


You can make an appointment by calling 450-5123, or you can schedule an appointment yourself by
logging into our online scheduler.

Hours of Operation:
Monday -Thursday: 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Tuesday - Thursday: 6:00 - 9:00 pm
Friday: 8:00 a.m. - noon

ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER


Main Hall Basement Phone: 852-7167

Approximately 13-15 tutors work in the center to assist with Intermediate and College Algebra. They
also have the ability to cover many different areas if called upon. Students that need assistance can
get a schedule of when certain tutors are available and for what specific subject. There are also super-
vised study (quiet) areas during the days and evenings for students to take advantage of.

DID YOU KNOW?

Sally Roden, UCA's current dean of undergraduate studies, was recognized in February 1998 for her
contribution to ensuring the success of freshmen students when she received the Outstanding Advocate Award
from the National Resource Center for the Freshman Year Experience and Students in Transition.
UCA TERMINOLOGY 87
UCA TERMINOLOGY

ACADEMIC FREEDOM
"Right" of faculty to decide what, within reason, will be done in the classroom, such as course content, teaching
methods, attendance policy, etc.

ADVANCE REGISTRATION
Period of time when students may register for class for the upcoming semester in advance of the established day
for registration.

ADVISOR
Faculty or staff member "assigned" to an individual throughout his/her college career as an academic resource per-
son.

BACCALAUREATE
A degree awarded by the University to a student who has completed his/her undergraduate studies.

CATALOG/ BULLETIN
Published every two years, UCA’s Undergraduate Bulletin contains general information on admissions, enrollment,
fees, housing, graduate schools, etc., as well as information on schools and the programs and courses offered.
The catalog in effect when you are admitted determines the requirements for your major and degree program.

CLASS PERIOD
Monday/Wednesday/Friday (MWF) Class periods are 50 minutes long starting on the hour. Monday/Wednesday
(MW) and Tuesday/Thursday (TTH) class periods last 1 hour and 15 minutes. All classes are designed to have 10
minutes between classes to allow students time to walk to their next class.

CLOSED CLASSES
A course which has reached its maximum student capacity.

COLLEGE
A degree-granting academic unit of the University.

CREDIT HOURS
Numerical value assigned to each class; credit hours roughly equate to the number of hours a student is actually in
the classroom per week.

DEAN
The administrative head of an academic school or college.

DEPARTMENT CHAIR
The administrative head of an academic department within a school or college.

DROP & ADD


Time set aside after classes have begun during which students may add or delete a class or classes from their
schedule without penalty. Signatures from your advisor are required on a "drop/add" form. The form is located at
the Registrar’s Office in McCastlain Hall.

ECHO
The Echo is the weekly newspaper of UCA, and is distributed without cost every Wednesday.

ELECTIVE
Class not specifically required in the student's course of study.

MAJOR
Concentrated course work in one area leading in part to a degree with specialization in that particular area.

MINOR
A group of courses that represent a subordinate area of study.
88 UCA TERMINOLOGY

ORIENTATION
Get acquainted period for new students. Time when students learn more about rules and procedures, facilities, per-
sonnel services, etc. of the university.

PREREQUISITE
Required course that has successfully been completed prior to the enrollment in a more advanced class.

PRIVACY ACT
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act establishes the privacy of student records and the conditions under
which students and others may review a student's educational records.

PROFESSOR
The highest professional rank a faculty member can achieve. Other faculty ranks include associate professor, as-
sistant professor, and instructor.

PROGRAM COMPLETION PLAN (PCP)


Semester by semester plan of study for degree requirements.

REGISTRAR
Administrator responsible for keeping student records, transcripts, and handling class registration procedures. The
Registrar’s Office is located in McCastlain Hall.

RESIDENT ASSISTANT
A junior or senior level student who lives in a residence hall and advises/counsels the hall’s residents.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES (LOOK UP CLASSES)


Available each semester in your URSA account, the schedule of classes is a listing of all courses offered in each
department for the semester. The entry for each course includes course numbers, names, credit, time, place and
instructor. Each course also provides a hyperlink to the Undergraduate Bulletin for course descriptions and prereq-
uisite information.

SCHOOL COLORS
The UCA school colors are Purple and Gray.

SCROLL
The Scroll is the University yearbook. It is distributed to all students with a valid UCA ID at the end of each spring
semester

UCA ID
Random unduplicated number assigned identify a UCA student and is issued at the beginning of registration.

UCA ID CARD (BearBucks) Don’t lose it!!! Your student identification number is on the card and you’ll need it to
attend football games, use the Health Center, check out books at the library, enter certain residence halls and par-
ticipate in many campus activities. Your meal plan and DCB funds are also on your card.

URSA
University Resources for Students and Administration. URSA is the web portal or doorway to UCA information and
can be personalized to fit the needs of each individual in the UCA community.

VICTOR E. BEAR
The official UCA mascot.

WITHDRAWL
Letter "W" recorded when a student voluntarily and officially drops out of a specific class or the University
within a prescribed period time limit.

X-PERIOD
Time period on Tuesdays and Thursdays from1:40 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. for campus programs and student organiza-
tions to hold meetings.
HOMEWORK 89

HOMEWORK

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE FOLLOWING COMPLETED BEFORE CLASSES START:

þ Read and understand the following materials:

1. The Welcome to Bear Country Orientation and Registration Handbook


(this book).

2. Student Handbook
http://www.uca.edu/divisions/student/handbook/ Be sure to pick up your copy during fee
payment in McCastlain Hall.

3. Undergraduate Bulletin
Read the General Policies section and your major section. http://www.uca.edu/ubulletin/.

þ Become familiar with URSA. Know how to:

1. View /print your schedule (p. 26) Print a new copy the day before classes start in case of
last-minute schedule changes.

2. Find your advisor (p. 26) and contact information (p. 42).

3. View your academic transcript located in the Self-Service tab of URSA for any posting of
concurrent or transfer credit (p.26).

þ Check your UCA e-mail at least twice a week to keep up with important university information.

þ Purchase a planner/calendar. Write the important academic dates (p. 46) in the planner before
classes start.

þ If you have received or are expecting concurrent credit, AP/IB/CLEP credit, or have taken course
work during the summer, make sure to contact the Academic Advising Center if schedule revisions
are needed before classes start. Make sure official transcripts are sent to UCA.

þ Buy required textbooks early. Keep your receipt but do not mark in textbooks. If the book isn’t
needed, you will have a short time frame to return the books for a full refund. Be aware of book re-
turn deadlines.

þ For your convenience and protection, save all of your receipts for your UCA expenditures (textbooks,
tuition, deposits, fines, etc.) Make a folder for this purpose if necessary.

þ Bring this handbook with you when you come to UCA. Several instructors use it as the sole textbook
for their class.

þ Attend the mandatory session, “Countdown to Classes” on Sunday, August 16th at 3:30 at Ida
Waldran Auditorium in Main Hall.

DID YOU KNOW?

UCA made history in 1997 when it created the first residential college in Arkansas, Hughes Residential College.
90 MARK YOUR CALENDAR

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!!!

ACADEMIC SUCCESS WORKSHOPS


All workshops are held in DHSC Auditorium
at X-Period (1:40-2:30)
Fall 2009
Attendance Verification Available

Topics covered:

Time Management/Study Skills Writing Tips 101


Study Styles/Learning Styles What about the Library?
Reading a College Textbook Test Anxiety
Success: How to define it? Procrastination
How to talk to your instructors! You are Pro-Choice!
Career Alternatives You’re in the Right Place

Come to the Advising Center in Harrin 100 for dates to specific programs

MAJORS FAIR
Thursday, October 8, 2009
12:30-3:00 p.m.
Student Center Ballroom

ur
ad to yo .Which
ro ..
The ins here ose?
g o
e be u ch
futur will yo
path

This is an excellent opportunity for YOU to get informa-


tion on different majors and discuss various career possi-
bilities. Representatives from each college as well as the
Division of Undergraduate Studies and the Office of Ca-
reer Services will be available.

DON’T MISS IT!!!!


REGISTRATION CANCELLATION 91

REGISTRATION CANCELLATION
My plans have changed, and I will not be attending UCA the following term for
which I am registered: _______________________________________________.
Please cancel my registration for this term. I understand that I may be required to
re-apply in order to attend UCA in the future.

(Print All Information Clearly)

NAME____________________________________________________________

Student Identification Num-


ber________________________________________
(See Student ID Card)

Street Address____________________________________________________

City_________________________ State_________ Zip Code______________

E-MAIL___________________________________________________________

Signature________________________________________ Date____________

Return To: Office of the Registrar


Room 112 McCastlain Hall
University of Central Arkansas
Conway, AR 72035-0001
FAX: (501) 450-5734

NOTICE: In order to avoid a financial obligation for the enrollment, this Reg-
istration Cancellation must be received by the University BEFORE the first day of
classes at the University for the specified term. The student identification card
is the property of the University, and should also be returned.
UCA FIGHT SONG
Go-Go-Fight Bears
You will lead us on to victory FORMER NAMES OF UCA
Hey, go-go-win team
Bears will charge the field and never yield 1975 – Present: University of Central Arkansas
1967 – 1975: State College of Arkansas
So, FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT!
1925 – 1967: Arkansas State Teachers College
We've got the spir-it, and we'll show our colors 1907 – 1925: Arkansas Normal School
Here tonight-so let's cheer
The Purple and the Gray Team
Mighty BEARS will win the FIGHT (Go Bears!)

UCA ALMA MATER


University of Central Arkansas
THE PRESIDENTS OF UCA From the hills and from the lowlands,
Comes the song of praise anew;
2008-Present: Tom Courtway (Interim) Sung by thousands of our children,
2002 – 2008: Lu Hardin Alma Mater we sing to you.
1988 – 2001: Dr. Winfred L. Thompson Then we'll unfurl our colors the Purple and the Gray
1975 – 1986: Dr. Jefferson D. Farris And in the breezes see them ever proudly sway;
1953 – 1986: Dr. Silas D. Snow They lead us upward, they lead us onward,
1941 – 1953: Dr. Nolen M. Irby
They lead us to victory (Go Bears!).
1930 – 1941: Colonel H.L. McAlister
1917 – 1930: Burr Walter Torreyson Then let us gather round with loyal hearts and true,
1908 – 1917: John Joseph Doyne Our Alma Mater's call OBEY;
Our dear old colors will live forever,
The Royal PURPLE and the GRAY.

Division of Undergraduate Studies


Academic Advising Center
201 Donaghey
Harrin Hall 100
Conway, AR 72035-0001
Phone: 501.450.5149
Fax: 501.450.3208
Website: http://www.uca.edu/divisions/academic/undergradstudies/advising/