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Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013 Vol. 131, No. 4 Oregon, WI ConnectOregonWI.com $1
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Oregon School District
Photo by Kimberly Wethal
Students work on a Lego project during a summer school course last week. Below, at teacher in the jewelry class helps a student tie a
handmade bracelet around her wrist.
Summer school pay riles some
Two-tiered scale
pays more for core
classes
SeTh Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
While most courses in
Oregon School Districts
popul ar summer school
program wrapped up last
week, criticism is mounting
over a pay cut for a major-
ity of its teachers.
This summer, pay rates
didnt change for teachers
of the programs so-called
extension courses, a new-
ly created category describ-
ing classes that largely aim
to help struggling students
in core academic courses.
But teachers of the more
numerous general cours-
es which cover a broad-
er array of subjects such
as music, theater, art and
sports saw their pay cut
25 percent.
Oregons roughly 135
summer school instructors
are still paid more, on aver-
age, than their counterparts
in surrounding districts,
according to data compiled
by district officials last fall.
But the new rates have
some teachers concerned
that the district favors some
subjects over others.
My main concern is that
we are setting up a two-
tiered system of importance
in terms of classes that are
taught, said Leyla Sanyer,
a 36-year teaching vet -
eran who teaches orches-
tra classes at Oregon High
School.
Oregon School Board
member Rae Vogeler would
like to reverse the change
that was first proposed last
November before she was
elected in April.
It is not wise or fruit-
ful to pay some educators
at a lower rate because of
what they teach, Vogeler
said in an email. It deval-
ues what they are doing
and it devalues the subject
matter. It also doesnt take
into account the consider-
able prep time involved in
developing individualized
lessons, such as music les-
sons.
However, superi nt en-
dent Brian Busler said the
change was instigated by
complaints from teachers
Village of Oregon
Village quits case against
Brooklyn firefighter
he was in
emergency vehicle
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Vi l l age of Ore-
gons year-old dispute
with Brooklyn firefighter/
emergency medical tech-
nician Dan Dean ended in
June when a judge denied
an attorneys motion to
prohi bi t evi dence t hat
Deans attorney felt was
central to his case.
Dane County Circuit
Cour t j udge Wi l l i am
Hanrahan ruled on June
10 t o al l ow evi dence
that Dean was driving an
authorized emergency vehi-
cle during a June 2012 inci-
dent and that he believed he
was responding to an emer-
gency call, despite the fact
that the 911 dispatch indi-
cated it was not an emer-
gency.
Attorney Timm Speer-
schneider represented the
village in the case. He said
after learning that Hanrah-
an would deny the villages
motion to limit those two
points of evidence in a jury
trial set for later the same
day, it was going to be a
difficult case to establish
our burden of proof.
Speerschnei der t hen
Caitlin
McGahan,
a 2001
Oregon
High School
graduate,
will attend
the National
Poetry Slam
competition
in Boston
later this
month.
Here, she
performs
work at a
Madison
poetry
slam.
Photo by
Victoria
Vlisides
Oregon-area youth
at the
Dane County
Fair!
See photos
Page 7-9
P
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From Page
to Stage
Local poet heads back
to national competition
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Caitlin McGahan has
loved to write since she
was a small child espe-
cially journaling and poet-
ry.
My mom f os t er ed
that, she said. Reading
and writing were always
big from the beginning.
The Oregon native and
2001 graduate of Oregon
High School put an inter-
esting twist on her writing
four years ago, when she
started taking her work
public through the Urban
Spoken Word Poetry Col-
lective in Madison.
Its been a fun dimen-
sion to add to the writing,
to kind of take it from the
Turn to Poet/Page 12
Turn to Dean/Page 13
Comparing
wages
Under the districts
new pay scale for sum-
mer school, classes are
separated into two tiers
general and exten-
sion courses.
The average teacher
in Oregon earns $46,624
annually, according to
data from the Wisconsin
Department of Public
Instruction. Using the
districts new formula
for determining summer
school wages, that teach-
er would earn $30. 67
an hour to teach general
courses and $40.89 for
extension courses. In
prior years, all teachers
were paid the higher rate.
Pay varies by teacher.
It is lower, for example,
for first-year teachers
and higher for teachers
with above-average edu-
cation credits and experi-
ence.
Turn to Compare/Page 11 Turn to School/Page 11
2
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Family celebrates 50 years of super sweet corn
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Ka yl a Oppe r ma nn s
g r a n d mo t h e r , Mu r i e l
(Onsrud) Stoneman, used to
say, The family that picks
together stays together.
I totally believe that,
Kayla said.
Her f ami l y has been
growing and picking sweet
corn together for years, and
its kept them a tight-knit
bunch.
It all started in 1963,
when a neighbor contracted
Bill and Muriel Stoneman
to grow some sweet corn at
their farm on Syene Road in
Fitchburg.
What began as a side
busi ness 50 year s ago
evolved into a family tradi-
tion. It has also become a
summer job that helped the
Stonemans grandchildren
pay for their college educa-
tions.
Stonemans SuperSweet
Corn has passed through
the generations and is now
run by the grandchildren
Kevin, Peter and Kayla
Oppermann, along with
their spouses (including
Kaylas fianc).
The business skipped a
generation, from my grand-
parents to the grandkids,
explained Kevin Opper-
mann, who lives with his
wife in Madison. While
Muriel and her three kids
wer e al l Or egon Hi gh
School grads, his parents
generation wasnt involved
in the growing operation in
Fitchburg.
We grew up outside
Milwaukee, and they still
live there and will commute
back and fort h t hrough
Labor Day from the farm to
their real jobs in Milwau-
kee, he added. But theyll
help pick every morning.
Taking over
About 10 year s ago,
when Kevin was a college
freshman, he took charge of
the operation. Its a job that
includes 18 to 22 spring
pl ant i ngs, weedi ng and
cultivating, and then pick-
ing the corn by hand, one
ear at a time, and selling it
from the familys garage at
the farm or at the Fitchburg
farmers market.
Kevin explained that the
family plants every three
to four days in the spring,
which means there will be a
new crop available for har-
vest every other day in late
July and August.
Theres really a very
short window in which the
sweet corn will be at prime
ripeness, he said.
The Oppermanns plant
two different varieties of
sweet corn and grow it on
about nine acres. The first
batch is all yellow and
super sweet, Kevin said.
Thatll last for about the
first week, and then the
second week we plant our
famous honey and pearl a
bi-color that people ask for
by name.
He estimated they harvest
about 80,000 ears in a typi-
cal summer.
Probably 90 percent of
our sales are at the farm,
he said. Its a pretty amaz-
ing thing. We put up signs
at the four or five corners
nearby, and within 10 or
15 minutes we have people
coming up the driveway.
They used to sell the
corn at the Oregon farmers
market as well, and when
there is corn leftover after a
new batch has been picked,
theyll deliver it to Madison
food pantries.
Passing the job on
After running the sweet
corn business for a number
of years, Kevin graduated
and passed the job onto his
brother. Peter Oppermann
ran it for a while and then,
in 2007, he turned the reins
over to sister Kayla.
Its really an entire fam-
ily event, Kevin said.
Kayla was a freshman
that year, and after land-
ing a job as a teacher in
Sun Prairie in 2011, she
decided to continue running
the business, with the help
and support of her family,
because she has summers
off from teaching.
Im the one who com-
mits to being able to pick
almost everyday and then
will sell out of the garage
from 8 a.m. 8 p.m., basi-
cally, she said. So with a
few exceptions, Im the one
who is here. My mom and
dad are here a lot too.
We all try to pick as
often as we can, she added.
My two brothers and their
wives and my fiance all
live in Madison, so we try
to get the whole crew out as
often as we can because the
picking just goes so much
faster. Its good bonding
family time.
Kayla said theres some-
thing invigorating and unit-
ing about getting up early,
while theres still a chill in
the air, and being part of the
family all working toward a
common goal.
Kaylas grandpa, Bill
Stoneman, was born on the
farm, and she feels a real
link to history being there
pi cki ng and sel l i ng t he
corn.
Does she think the family
will continue doing this for
a long time?
I sure hope so, its really
important to us, she said.
We love the farm and we
love the tradition and the
memories. And I think its
also important to the com-
munity.
People always ask, is
it gonna be your last year?
And I never want to say
yes, she said. We want to
keep it going as long as we
can.
It is a gorgeous place, and
people love coming up the
long driveway and seeing
the cows and the goats and
the barn, she said.
They always comment
that they really hope we
keep the farm and we
do too, Kayla observed.
Theres been so much
development in the area
that its nice to have this
space stay the way its
always been.
Dreams come true with
the Help and Support from
People like you!
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Formerly from Cutting Edge Salon
Now Open
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850 Janesville St., Oregon, WI
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Photos by Bill Livick
Above, Kevin and
Kayla Oppermann
work in the garage
where they sell sweet
corn at the family farm
on Syene Road in
Fitchburg.
Left, Mary Sue
Oppermann and her
daughter, Kayla, take
a brief break from the
work and wait for the
next sale.
If you go
What:
Stonemans
SuperSweet Corn
Where: 2559
S. Syene Road,
Fitchburg
When: 8 a.m.
8 p.m. daily,
through Labor
Day
More info:
271-7981; (414)
659-6777
We love the farm and we love the
tradition and the memories.
Kayla Oppermann
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
A LEAP ABOVE DANCE STUDIO
742 Market Street, Oregon
835-1747
www.aleapabovedance.com
Owner/Director,
Natalie Nemeckay
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Dane County
County Board
postpones funding
Hwy. MM repair
Supervisors have con-
cerns about setting prec-
edent
The road near Hwy. 14
along Hwy. MM will be a
bit bumpy for a little while
longer.
While the county board
was anticipated to approve
funds to cover then entire
cost of the road repairs for
about 1,300 feet of pave-
ment near the new round-
about s, some concer ns
about setting a precedent
sent the resolution back to
committee for more review.
County Board Vice Chair
Carousel Bayrd said in a
news release that the board
wanted to be careful with
the wording of the reso-
lution so that other com-
munities dont expect the
county to pay the entire bill
for road repair costs that
are usually shared between
municipalities.
Its an unusual prec-
edent thats being set,
Bayrd said. Theres a
huge desire to get this done,
and unusual circumstances
that are motivating county
staff to move forward. The
desire is to have a better
articulation of ... what we
are setting an exception for,
and what we are not setting
an exception for.
The county highway is
contained within the City of
Fitchburg, but located near
Oregon. Last month, county
executive Joe Parisi said the
county would pick up the
tab for the repairs, estimat-
ed at $180,000, after fail-
ing to secure a cost sharing
agreement with Fitchburg.
Parisi previously said the
funds would come from
the countys Department
of Public Works, High-
way, and Transportations
County Highway Construc-
tion program. Bridge repair
projects came in under bud-
get, allowing the county to
use money that had already
been budgeted
The board indicated at
their July 18 meeting that
they would likely cover
the cost of the repairs, but
opted to send the approval
back to the Public Works
and Transportation Com-
mittee to clarify language
regarding similar situations
in the future.
Some supervisors wished
to amend the resolution
allowing the expenditure
to make clear that other cit-
ies, villages and towns that
refuse to pay their share for
road repairs shouldnt nec-
essarily expect the county
to cover it.
The measure will like-
ly again come before the
Board on August 15.
Mark Ignatowski
Oregon Fire/EMS District
Fire district partners review
finances, future plans
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
The municipalities that
comprise the Oregon Area
Fire and EMS District met
Monday to review the dis-
tricts finances, consider
a revised plan to replace
e xpe ns i ve e qui pme nt
and consider paying for
a regional consolidation
study.
Representatives from the
Village of Oregon and the
towns of Dunn, Rutland
and Oregon did not make
any decisions, but Oregon
Village President Steve
Staton felt it was a worth-
while meeting.
It was i mport ant t o
updat e al l t he muni ci -
palities on where the fire
department is financially,
and also get a presentation
on the proposal by the con-
sultant to do the study on
consolidation, he said.
Staton said the $41,000
cost to hire a firm to study
the possible consolidation
of fire/EMS departments
in Oregon, Fitchburg and
Verona was lower than he
expected.
He added that he, along
wi t h Oregon Fi re/ EMS
chief David Bloom, fully
supports having the study
done and encouraged oth-
ers at the meeting to do the
same.
Staton said the Village of
Oregons cost for the study
would be about $8,100.
Going forward, to me
its just a critical thing to
look at as far as fire and
EMS services, he told
the Observer. One of the
biggest things to me is to
ensure that we can have the
appropriate level of service
at all times.
Staton added that the fire
district is in much better
financial shape than it was
a few years ago.
We still need to build
the general fund, he said.
Oregon Trustee David
Donovan, who heads the
Fi re Commi ssi on, sai d
there will be much future
discussion on a draft five-
year financial plan for the
district that Town of Rut-
land representative Dale
Beske presented to all the
boards, including the Fire
Commission, for the first
time.
He added that Oregon
firefighter Gene Berman
revised the districts capi-
tal equipment replacement
plan and presented it for
future discussion.
It was about when we
shoul d buy t hi ngs and
estimated how much they
would cost in current dol-
lars, Donovan said. It
was worthwhile discussing
these things because espe-
cially as the budgets come
up, things are so tight now
that you dont want people
to be surprised. There will
be a lot of opportunity
for people to criticize and
comment and propose and
suggest changes later.
Brooklyn well repaired, mostly at village expense
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Village of Brooklyns
insurance company paid
the municipality only about
$28,000 of a $119,000 claim
to cover the cost of repairing
a municipal well that failed
in February.
Thats despite the village
carrying equipment failure
insurance.
Vi l l age cl er k Car ol
Strause said the company,
Baer Insurance, first denied
the villages claim but later
agreed to pay $28,945.
We have $1,000 deduct-
ible, so they actually paid
$27,945, Strause told the
Observer.
She said the money to
repair the well came out of
the villages water utility
fund.
The reason it was not fully
covered, Strause explained,
is that the failure was in the
pipe, rather than the well.
They ended up cover-
ing the well, but it was the
soil around the bottom of
the well 600 feet down
that collapsed on the pipe,
explained Village of Brook-
lyn president Nadine Wal-
sten. The pipe was not cov-
ered. The way the policy is
written, they could not cover
the entire cost.
She said after the compa-
ny denied the entire claim,
we challenged it and were
able to receive partial pay-
ment.
Walsten said she couldnt
recall how long the well
had been out of service, but
she thinks it may have been
several months. She stressed
that the village was never
in danger of running out of
water because the munici-
pality has two wells, and the
well that was out of service
was not the villages prima-
ry well.
At no time was there any
risk to our water supply,
she said. We had water
capacity.
In April, the Observer
reported that a loosening of
the rock formation around
the well shaft caused the
lower section of the wells
suction pipe to drop to the
bottom of the well. Sand
wear also damaged the bear-
ings inside the well pump,
which in turn led to damage
in the well impellers, which
bring water to the surface,
and the well motor gave out.
The village had already
spent $70,000 on the well
repai rs and equi pment
replacement when its Board
of Trustees on March 11
authorized the use of money
from two funds for addition-
al work from an Oconomo-
woc-based company, Water
Well Solutions. The compa-
ny basically had to rebuild
the well shaft, Walsten told
the Observer.
The repair work also
included removing debris
from the well and replace-
ment of equipment like the
impellers and the pump
parts.
Police rePorts
Information taken from the
Oregon Police Department log
book. Oregon residents unless
otherwise noted.
June 14
12:51 p.m. A 26-year-old
man was arrested and tenta-
tively charged with disorderly
conduct, criminal damage to
property, intimidation of a vic-
tim, false imprisonment and
battery after an alleged alter-
cation with a woman in their
apartment on the 100 block of
East Richards Road.
June 16
11:56 p.m. Police arrested
a 23-year-old Evansville man
on a charge of possession
with intent to deliver marijua-
na after he was stopped for
driving 56 miles per hour in a
35 mph zone on the 800 block
of Wolfe Street. He allegedly
was carrying nearly 4.5 ounc-
es of pot, a scale, pipe and
other paraphernalia.
June 17
1:44 a.m. Oregon police
helped break up a fight in the
parking lot involving about 20
people outside the dance club
at 155 Braun Road.
June 19
12:30 p.m. A 14-year-old
Sparta boy was cited for
theft and trespassing after he
allegedly stole a bicycle from
a daycare facility on the 100
block of Rosewood Ave.
June 26
4 p.m. Police investigated a
burglary of an empty condo-
minium unit on the 100 block
of Elliott Lane. A washer and
dryer were stolen, and there
were signs of forced entry to
the front door. No suspects.
7:25 p.m. Police blocked
off a roughly 2-by-1 foot
sinkhole that had formed in
the street on the 600 block of
Cherry Wood Drive.
June 28
11:24 p.m. A 51-year-old
McFarland man was arrested
and charged with his second
drunken driving offense after
he was pulled over on the 500
block of North Main Street for
driving with non-operating
taillights.
June 29
12:30 p.m. A 51-year-old
man was arrested and tenta-
tively charged with battery,
criminal damage to prop-
erty and disorderly conduct
after he allegedly repeatedly
punched a neighbor in the
face after the two had been
drinking together on the 400
block of Jefferson Street.
Seth Jovaag
4
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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E
ach of us likes to believe
were rational when we
make decisions.
If that were true, we should
come to equivalent decisions
when faced with equivalent situ-
ations. But psychologists have
found thats not always the case.
In the years my partners and I
have presented retirement analy-
sis for clients,
we have seen
many different
responses based
on a clients
expectations.
Depending on
how a problem
is framed, they
often come to
very different
conclusions.
I dont just have anecdotal evi-
dence. Theres a great example of
this in an excellent book written
by Wall Street Journal personal
finance writer Jason Zweig, titled
Your Money and Your Brain.
In this book, he cites a study
that asked more than 400 doctors
whether they would prefer radia-
tion or surgery if they became
cancer patients. Among the
physicians who were informed
that 10 percent would die from
surgery, half said they would pre-
fer radiation. Among those who
were told that 90 percent would
survive surgery, only 16 percent
chose radiation.
This illustrates how people
tend to focus on the negative
aspects of a decision if thats
whats emphasized. On the other
hand, if the situation is framed
positively, the results are quite
different.
Investment decisions are much
the same way. Since we live in a
world with cloudy crystal balls,
all we can do is estimate invest-
ment returns. Therefore, it is best
not to treat a portfolios esti-
mated return as a certain return.
But how we interpret the some-
what random probability of any
outcome has a lot to do with how
its presented.
Since any investment carries
risk, you should consider the
range of likely returns and then
estimate the odds of achieving
the financial goal. One way to do
that is through a so-called Monte
Carlo simulation, which takes
inputs about your financial situ-
ation and generates several thou-
sand potential market scenarios.
Those scenarios are aggregated
to give you an estimation of how
likely your investment plan will
achieve its goal, such as having a
minimum dollar amount to leave
to family or simply not running
out of money in retirement.
How the Monte Carlo results
are framed can make all the dif-
ference in how people perceive
risk. Consider the same informa-
tion framed two different ways:
- A 90 percent chance of not
outliving your assets
- A 10 percent chance that you
will outlive your assets
In my experience, Monte Carlo
results are almost always shown
from the positive perspective. As
a result, many people are likely
taking more risk than is appro-
priate especially since outliv-
ing your financial assets is an
unthinkable outcome.
While an estimated 90 percent
odds of success will be accept-
able to many people, it certainly
isnt appropriate for all. Whether
it is depends on your ability to
adapt your plan to deal with the
impact that a severe bear market
can have on the likelihood of out-
living your assets.
If you have a realistic backup
plan for asset shortfalls, a 90 per-
cent odds of success is probably
appropriate. On the other hand,
if you dont have any accept-
able options, a 10 percent chance
of failure is likely too high to
accept.
As seasoned advisers, my part-
ners and I have learned to frame
the outcome not just from that
more positive perspective but
also from the negative perspec-
tive. Using that 90/10 example,
we ask the investor to imagine he
or she is in the same situation as
nine other investors.
We know one of the 10 will
outlive his or her assets based on
the chosen asset allocation and
spending plan. We then ask our
client how prepared he or she is
to accept the risks of being that
person. The response is often
very different from what we get
if we only ask from the perspec-
tive of a 90 percent success rate.
Once an investor realizes the
potential disaster in that failure,
we can look at ways to reduce the
risk. These include remaining in
or returning to the work force,
reducing current spending, reduc-
ing the financial goal, selling a
home and moving to a location
with a lower cost of living. We
have found that reducing spend-
ing in a portfolio is a good way
to increase the odds of achieving
a desired portfolio and of not out-
living your assets.
Those adjustments dont often
happen until investors are fully
aware of the negative conse-
quences. And thats why its
important to frame the situation
in a way that allows you to view
the problem from various per-
spectives. Thats the best way to
be sure that all the pros and cons
have been considered.
And it is the best way to avoid
making costly mistakes.
Jim Murphy is an Oregon resi-
dent and an investment adviser
representative with Neuen-
schwander Asset Management,
LLC in McFarland.
This material is derived from
sources believed to be reliable,
but its accuracy and the opinions
based thereon are not guaran-
teed. The content of this publica-
tion is for general information
only and is not intended to serve
as specific financial, account-
ing or tax advice. Copyright
2013, Neuenschwander Asset
Management, LLC. A Registered
Investment Adviser. 4893 Larson
Beach Road., McFarland, 838-
3330.
Half-empty approach can
help your portfolio stay full
Murphy
Community Voices
Letters to the editor
Bullying hurts school board efficiency
I would like to begin this letter by
thanking Steve Zach for the count-
less volunteer hours he has donated
to our community.
In no way do I wish to dimin-
ish his efforts. However, with that
being said, I was at the June 5
School Board Human Assets Com-
mittee meeting and I feel morally
obligated to step forward with my
observations of that meeting.
It was not surprising to me that
other school board members felt
that Zachs treatment of Rae Vogel-
er was normal, or appropriate, as
this tenor has been common to our
School Board meetings for several
years. I have watched, in person
and on cable access, as the meetings
have become increasingly dysfunc-
tional. Community members, teach-
ers, staff and parents regularly leave
feeling hurt, embarrassed, frustrated
and angry.
The June 5 meeting was no dif-
ferent. I left with several people,
all upset and angry for the way Rae
was treated by Steve. We felt like
we should have done something to
rectify the situation, but second-
ary to the boards meeting rules we
could not intervene.
When I read the Bullying
Charge Plagues Board article in the
Observer, I felt obligated to speak.
After reviewing the Boards policy
on bullying, I am quite certain that
because so many people, including
myself, have left the meetings feel-
ing intimidated, victimized, frus-
trated and hurt, that whether we use
the word bullying, or another word,
the meaning is still the same.
I am even more certain that the
manner in which the meetings are
run causes an imbalance of power.
It is not simply the words spo-
ken, but the eyes rolling, the head
shaking and the lack of eye contact,
which is harmful to good healthy
communication. I believe the school
board policy calls this type of
behavior indirect gestures.
If we are going to expect our
students to treat each other with
respectful consideration, certainly
we must lead by example.
We have witnessed new school
board candidates step forward, and
be elected, in hopes of helping lead
the district in a healthier manner.
It is important to keep some of the
experienced board members, as a
completely new board will not be
optimally functional.
However, I feel very strongly that
although Zach has shown extraordi-
nary volunteerism, his personality
on the board has played a key role
in creating the toxic environment
that currently plagues our school
board.
Amy Hermus
Oregon
Corrections
The July 25 article Church
leads trail project incorrectly
stated when the trail work took
place. The trail work was done in
the end of June, not last week.

Will Reinicke was misidentified
on page 9 of the July 25 Oregon
Observer. It was Reinicke and not
Andrew Pliner, who was identi-
fied, sliding home safely in the
photo.

There were errors in the list of
Summer Fest float winners in the
July 25 edition of the Observer. It
should have read:
First-place prize of $500 went
to Brooklyn Mighty Mites 4-H
Club
Second-place prize of $300
went to the Oregon Community
Swim Club
The Observer regrets these
errors.
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Youre Invited to Vacation Bible School
at Faith Lutheran Church
143 Washington St., Oregon, WI
August 12 - 15
9 a.m.-Noon
Te program
is free of charge!
Come learn about some superheros that saved the world...
For details visit: http://www.faithlutheranoregon.com
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August 9 and 10 at 7:30 pm August 11 at 2:00 pm
August 16 and 17 at 7:30 pm August 18 at 2:00 pm
Mitby Teater at Madison College (MATC), Truax Campus
Tickets $25-$35 www. fourseasonstheatre.com
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Monica Mountford
(Formally of BJs Salon)
Now Taking
Appointments At
Oregon
Tan Spa
664 Janesville St., Oregon
608.279.5724
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Old Stage is known for our consistently excellent sweet corn, melons and tomatoes. Try our home
grown green beans, zucchini, cucumbers as well as Tennessee tomatoes. Indiana water and musk
melon. South Carolina (Big Smile) peaches and sweet Michigan blueberries. Our Yellow Doll
Watermelons are ready. Our Muskmelons will be this weekend. Our tomatoes are looking great,
but the best thing we have is our sweet corn. Its absolutely delicious!!
Get your local homegrown produce!
Special Orders Welcome!
From our gardens to your table
Old Stage Vegetable Gardens
Oregon - Stop-N-Go (corner of Janesville & Hwy. M)
Fitchburg - PDQ (McKee Rd. next to AMC Star Cinema)
Fitchburg - Liquor Town Parking Lot
(5273 Williamsburg Way, just off Verona Rd.)
New Glarus - (Hwy. 69) Chalet Landhaus parking lot
Monroe - Red Apple Restaurant
Monona - Lacalis Market & Spirits (Monona Dr.,
1 block off Broadway, 2 blocks off Beltline)
Madison - Corner Sherman Ave. & Commercial Ave.
(in front of Noahs Art Pets)
1002 S. Whitney Way (Entrance to Vitense Golfland)
Open 7 Days a Week
Approximate Hours: 10:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Have a big family? Think Toms corn!
Having a party? Think Toms corn!
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Check us out at Tomscorn.com
Please join us for cake & ice cream in celebration
on Sunday, August 4th, from 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
at the Stoughton American Legion Post 59,
803 N. Page St., Stoughton.
No Gifts Please
Happy 80
th
Mary Curran
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National Night Out
returns Aug. 6
National Night Out is
coming to Oregon for the
18th annual event.
According to the event
flyer, National Night Out
is designed to strengthen
neighborhoods and partner-
ships, heighten crime pre-
vention and drug prevention
efforts and send a message
to criminals that businesses
and neighbors are working
together to fight crime.
Festivities begin at 5 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 6, along the
100 block of Spring Street.
Booths will be in the Vil-
l age Hal l Communi t y
Room.
Activities include dem-
onstrations from Karate
America and the Oregon
Police K9 unit, games and
an out door showi ng of
Madagascar 3 on the side
of the Fire/EMS building at
8:30.
UB&T will also be pro-
viding free shredding ser-
vices from 5-7 p.m. (2-3
box limit per person.
Food will be provided
on a first come first serve
basi s, and i ncl udes i ce
cream, hotdogs, snow cones
and popcorn.
Emergency personnel
from the police and fire
departments and EMS will
be on hand, as will person-
nel from public works. .
For more information vis-
it www.vil.oregon.wi.us or
call Officer Neubert at the
Oregon Police Department
835-3111.
Michael Fiez
Straw Hat Players to perform Oliver!
The f amous st or y of
fictional orphan Oliver
Twist will be featured in
the latest musical by the
Oregon Straw Hat Players.
The amat eur t heat er
troupe will give six perfor-
mances of Oliver!, based
on Charles Dickens novel,
beginning Saturday.
The Players will give
8 p. m. performances at
Oregon High Schools Per-
forming Arts Center on
Aug. 3 and Aug. 8-10. Mat-
inee performances at 2 p.m.
will be on Aug. 4 and Aug.
10.
A classical musical with
pat hos and drama, Ol i -
ver! will engage with out-
standing musical numbers,
including favorites such as
Consider Yourself and
Food, Glorious Food,
the group said in a press
release.
The show will be directed
by Players veteran David
Lawver and includes a cast
of more than 40 people,
according to the groups
website.
Ti c ke t s a r e $11 i n
advance or $14 at the door.
Advance tickets can be pur-
chased at www.oshponline.
org with a $2.05 service
charge. Cash and checks
are only accepted for tickets
purchased at the door.
The show provides us
an opportunity to feature
many of our young per-
formers and is a great show
for families, OSHP board
president Duane Draper
said in the release. It has
been nearly 30 years since
we last presented Oli-
ver! and were thrilled to
bring this show to a new
generation of theatre goers
as well as our old friends.
Submitted photo
Members of Fagins Gang featured in the Oregon Straw Hat
Players production of Oliver! include, from left, Jonas Temte,
Brendan Moore, Kyle Kapusta, Ryan Wood, Simon Johnson and
Jacob Berggren.
If you go
What: Oliver!
Where: OHS Performing
Arts Center
When: 8 p.m. performanc-
es Aug. 3 and Aug. 8-10. 2
p.m. shows will be on Aug. 4
and Aug. 10.
How much: $11 plus ser-
vice charges in advance, $14
at the door
Tickets: oshponline.org
Rotary to host talk about STEM
Anyone i nt erest ed i n
efforts to expand the teach-
ing of science, technology,
engineering and mathe-
matics in Oregon schools
should attend an Aug. 15
meeting hosted by the Ore-
gon Rotary Club.
The four subjects, often
grouped under the acronym
STEM, will be discussed
from 7:30-10:30 a.m. at a
meeting at the local branch
of the State Bank of Cross
Plains.
The Rotary Club, in part-
nership with the Oregon
School District, is inves-
tigating whether to pur-
sue new curriculum and
staff training in the district
using the STEM model,
an innovative approach to
unlock creativity and prob-
lem solving in learners of
all ages, the club said in a
release.
If you want to attend,
call 835-4002 by Aug. 9.
Read our e-edition of the Observer at
ConnectOregonWi.com
6
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
LUTHERAN CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
offce@communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
9:30 am Worship service at the
Oregon High School PAC
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLES UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, Peoples United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Thursday, Aug. 1
10 a.m., Magic show, Prairie View Elementary Big
Gym
5:30 p.m., Fire/EMS district meeting, Village Hall
6 p.m., Rock and roll open mic, Firefly Coffeehouse
6:30 p.m., Optimist Club, Oregon Senior Center
6:30 p.m., Village of Oregon Planning Commission,
Village Hall
Saturday, Aug. 3
10:30 a.m., Red Brick Reunion, Kiser Park
8 p.m., Oliver!, Oregon High School Performing
Arts Center, oshponline.org
Sunday, Aug. 4
2 p.m., Oliver!, Oregon High School Performing
Arts Center, oshponline.org
Monday, Aug. 5
6 p.m. Village board meeting, Oregon Village Hall
Tuesday, Aug. 6
5-8 p.m., National Night Out, 100 block of Spring
Street
6:30 p.m., Delta Phi meeting, first Tuesday of the
month, various locations, 424-6485
7 p.m., Town of Oregon board, Town Hall
7:30 p.m., Village of Brooklyn public safety, Village
Hall
Wednesday, Aug. 7
6:30 p.m., Canning with confidence, Oregon Public
Library, 835-3656
7 p.m., Village of Oregon Parks Commission, Village
Hall
Thursday, Aug. 8
2 p.m., Trivial Pursuit contest meeting, Oregon Area
Senior Center, 835-5801
8 p.m., Oliver!, Oregon High School Performing
Arts Center, oshponline.org
Friday, Aug. 9
8 p.m., Oliver!, Oregon High School Performing
Arts Center, oshponline.org
Saturday, Aug. 10
Oregon Kids Triathlon, oregonkidstri.com
2 p.m., Oliver!, Oregon High School Performing
Arts Center, oshponline.org
8 p.m., Oliver!, Oregon High School Performing
Arts Center, oshponline.org
Monday, Aug. 12
5:30 p.m. Finance meeting, Oregon Village Hall
Community calendar
Thursday, Aug. 1
Joint Village/Towns Meeting
(of July 29)
Friday, Aug. 2
2013 Oregon Summer Fest
Parade (of June 30)
Saturday, Aug. 3
Movie: The Day the Earth
Stood Still (1951)
Sunday, Aug. 4
Worship: Holy Mother of
Consolation Catholic Church
Monday, Aug. 5
6 pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
Board Meeting
Tuesday, Aug. 6
Cherry Pie Band @ Oregon
Summer Fest (of June 28)
Wednesday, Aug. 7
Susan B. Anthony
Program @ Oregon Library (of
Mar. 03)
Thursday, Aug. 8
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Aug. 5)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, Aug. 5
AM-Diabetic Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
4:00 T.O.P.S. Weight Loss
6:00 Lions Club
Tuesday, Aug. 6
9:00 ST Board Meeting
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:00 Movie
Wednesday, Aug. 7
AMFoot Care
9:00 CLUB
10:00 Shopping: Hy-Vee,
Westgate
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
4:00 One-on-One
Computer Help
6:00 VFW Meeting
Thursday, Aug, 8
AMChair Massage
9:00 Pool Players
9:00 COA
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
2:00 Trivial Pursuit
Friday, Aug. 9
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
Monday, Aug. 5
Baked Chicken, Stuffing
w/Gravy, Peas & Pearl
Onions, Tropical Fruit Salad,
Multi Grain Bread
VO-Veggie Lasagna
Tuesday, Aug. 6
Baked Fish, Baked Potato,
Vegetable Blend, Fresh Fruit,
W.W. Bread
VO-Baked Potato Broccoli
Cheese Sauce
Wednesday, Aug. 7
Chicken Salad on W.W.
Bun w/Lettuce, Creamy
Coleslaw, Fresh Apple, Cake
VO-3oz Sliced Cheese
Thursday, Aug. 8
Sweet & Sour Chicken,
Rice, Oriental Mix, Pear
Slices, W.W. Bread, Pudding
w/Topping
VO- Soy Casserole
SO Chef Salad
Friday, Aug. 9
Sloppy Joe on Bun, Potato
Salad, Broccoli Flowerets,
Banana
VO-Soy BBQ
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, Aug. 1
PVE Pioneer Days (May 24)
Friday, Aug. 2
Eggheads One-Act Play
by Oregon Summer School
Theater Class (of July 25)
Saturday, Aug. 3
Great Scott & the Magic
Archaeology Adventure @
Oregon Library (of Aug. 1)
Sunday, Aug. 4
2012 Oregon Kids Triathlon
(of Aug. 12)
Monday, Aug. 5
Jack & the Beanstalk Play
by Oregon Summer School
Class (of July 26)
Tuesday, Aug. 6
Movie: Space Adventures
(1955)
Wednesday, Aug. 7
OHS Marching Band Field
Competition (of June 30)
Thursday, Aug. 8
Night Out in Oregon Hilites
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
Is Water a Basic Human Right?
Kofi Annan, the former Secretary General of the United Nations
put the issue concisely: Access to safe water is a fundamental
human need and therefore a basic human right. In the United
States and in most of the developed world we take water for
granted. We turn on the faucet and out pours clean water, but
in much of the developing world this is not the case. According
to the World Health Organization, over 2 billion people gained
access to clean water between 1990 and 2010, but roughly 11%
of the global population (783 million people) still lacks access to
clean water, and since we cannot live for more than a few days
without water, this remains a pressing issue. Three-thousand
children die each day from diarrheal illness, largely a result of not
having clean water. So what can we do about it? We can start by
donating to organizations which help in this regard. Water.org is
a charity which works to bring clean water to these communities
struggling with clean water issues. We should consider buying
one of their water bottles, which might save us money on bottled
water while supporting a good cause.
Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, but who-
ever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the
water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling
up to eternal life.
John 4:13-14
Rock and roll open mic night
The local rock and roll combo Da
Crooners will provide music from
6-8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, at an Open
Mic Night at the Firefly Coffeehouse.
There will be opportunity for citi-
zens to express their views on any
topic of concern, or present poetry or
musical offerings.
The event is sponsored by the Ore-
gon Area Progressives.
OSHP presents Oliver!
The Oregon Straw Hat Players
will be giving six performances of
the musical Oliver! beginning next
weekend.
The amateur theater troupe will
give 8 p.m. performances at Oregon
High Schools Performing Arts Cen-
ter on Aug. 3 and Aug. 8-10. Mati-
nee performances at 2 p.m. will be on
Aug. 4 and Aug. 10.
The show is based on Charles
Dickens story of Oliver Twist and
includes famous numbers like Con-
sider Yourself and Food, Glorious
Food.
Tickets are $11 in advance or $14
at the door. Purchase tickets online
at www.oshponline.org with a $2.05
service charge. Cash and checks are
only accepted for tickets purchased at
the door.
Red Brick reunion
Alumni of the Oregon Red Brick
High School are invited to a reunion
Saturday.
Former students are encouraged to
bring a dish to pass, utensils, their
own beverages and memories.
The party will be held from 10:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at
Kiser Park.
Call 795-4426 with questions.
National Night Out
National Night Out will be host-
ed from 5-8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.
6,with a movie playing at 8:30 p.m. in
the 100 block of Spring Street, Ore-
gon.
Emergency personnel and vehicles
will be at the event. There will be
many tables set up by area businesses
and organizations along with presen-
tations and games for the children.
The event is free to the public with
free food and refreshments. There
will be kid games, shredding truck,
demonstrations and a family movie.
Canning with confidence
Enjoy summer fruits and vegetables
in winter with canning.
Cynt hi a Di Camel l i wi l l show
participants the prep and what all
stages of canning tomatoes look like
with a workshop at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 7,
at the Oregon Public Library.
Pickles and jam/ jelly will also be
covered.
Call 835-3656 or email orelib@
scls.lib.wi.usorelib@scls.lib.wi.us to
register.
Trivial pursuit
An informational meeting and sign-
up for a Trivial Pursuit contest will
be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 8, at
the Oregon Area Senior Center.
Test your mental acuity in a trivia
competition with two partners that
will benefit the Alzheimers and
Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin.
You can either get a team together
and join for the informational meeting
or you can put together a team during
the meeting.
If you cannot come to the meeting,
call Anne at 835-5801.
Registration for this event will cost
$10 per person.
The first round competition will
be at 2 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 22, at
the Oregon Area Senior Center, and
the championship round will be held
Sept. 7 in Madison.
Congratulations
To All Fair Participants!
2737 Gust Rd., Verona, WI (608) 845-3800
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Thank you
B & R Pumping for
purchasing my lamb
& Wayne Ace Bus
Service for purchasing
my pig at Dane
County Fair.
Ben Outhouse
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Congrats
to all the 4-H & FFA
Youth from the
UB&T Ag Team.
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Jessica Sarbacker, Julie Johnson, Dave Wyttenbach,
Mary Stenbroten, Rene Johnson
www.ub-t.com
Above, Bailey Clark of
the Oregon Headliners
shoots indoor archery
for the Shooting Sports
competition. Right,
Haley Rockwell of the
Brooklyn Mighty Mites
goofs around with her
friend Arianna Nasserjah
of the Trailblazers 4-H
Club by the barns as
they prepare to wash
their horses. Left,
Connor Brickly works
with his swine project.
Above, Mariah Miller of the
Oregon Headliners 4-H Club
received one Reserve Champion
award and two Grand Champion
awards at this years fair.
Below, Liz Grady displays her
blue-ribbon winning salad.
Or egon yout h at t he
Dane County Fair
A week i n phot os
Photo by Bill Fenske
August 1, 2013 - The Oregon Observer - 7
H U G H E S F L O O R I N G
C O M M E R C I A L / R E S I D E N T I A L
Congratulations
Verona
Area Fair
Participants
407 E. Verona Ave.
Verona, WI 53593
845-6403
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Thank you
Thank you to
Woodmans for
purchasing my lamb
and champion barrow
at Dane County Fair.
Billy Outhouse
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Congratulations
to this years
fair participants!
Mount Horeb
800-828-4240
www.sloans.com
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5
7
Above, Kajal Russell and Maria Cisler, both of the Brooklyn Mighty
Mites 4-H club, judge Clover Bud projects. Below, Austin Kramer
brings his steer back from the wash rack.
Above, Girish Russell poses with his steer named Chuck. Below,
Billy Outhouse shows his pig.
Austin Kramer and Ben Outhouse help with cookie decorating during Youth Day at the fair.
Bailey Clark shoots 3-D archery, using a fake bear as target. Haley Rockwell from the Brooklyn Mighty Mites 4-H club poses with
her horse Tawny.
Haley Rockwell and Arianna Nasserjah get ready to show their
Faith Majors-Culp, member of the Brooklyn Mighty Mites, shows
off one of her poultry projects.
8 - The Oregon Observer - August 1, 2013
Congratulations to all
the Oregon/Brooklyn
Participants
at the
Dane County Fair!
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608-455-2411
Congratulations to the
Ace Familys
Accomplishments
at the Fair!
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www.cuttingedgehairetc.net
787 N. Main Street, Oregon
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201 Park St., Masonic Center
Mention this ad and get 25% off registration fee
Connor Brickley shows his pig project.
Brooke Ace, member of the Oregon Headliners 4-H club, shows
one of her market lambs as the judge observes.
Bailey Clark, member of the Oregon Headliners 4-H club, poses with her blue-ribbon winning Brown Swiss Spring Calf named Tessa
Paige.
Claire and Grace Michels stand next to their blue-ribbon Oregon
Headliners Club Project.
Above left, Brooke Ace
shows one of her cross-
bred market barrows.
Above right, Ace mounts
her Buckskin Quarter
horse named Bentley as
they wait outside the are-
na for their Hunt Pleasure
competition. Left, Team
Caine, consisting of
Bailey Clark, Emma
Xander, animal owner Pat
Caine, Cole Xander and
Caitlin Beyler smile with
their dairy cows.
August 1, 2013 - The Oregon Observer - 9
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
10
The Oregon Observer
Beers selected as
Remington Scholarship
athlete at UW-Madison
Megan Beers, a 2008 Ore-
gon High School graduate,
was selected
as a Reming-
ton Scholar-
ship athlete
e a r l y t hi s
year.
The award
is presented
annually to
the male and
female stu-
dent/athlete who completed
their eligibility at the Uni-
versity of Wiconsin with the
highest cumulative grade-
point averages and will grad-
uate this season.
Reci pi ent s r ecei ve a
$1,000 scholarship, provid-
ing they enter a post-graduate
program within one year of
graduation.
Beers, an elementary edu-
cation and anthropology
major from Brooklyn, is a
four-time All-Big Ten team
member in track and field
and an Academic All-Big
Ten honoree in cross country.
During her time at Wis-
consin, Beers was involved
in AIA (Athletes in Action),
SAECO (Students-Athletes
Equally Supporting Others)
and SAAC (Student Athlete
Advisory Council) and stu-
dent taught in the Madison
Metropolitan School District.
Sport shorts
Beers
MIS
Sauter wins, again
Travis Sauter worked his
way through the field of the
100-lap Triple Crown Chal-
lenge from his 14 starting
position to pick up his ninth
straight win at Madison
Internation Speedway.
With one race to go John-
son leads the points chase
over Murgic, Rich Bickle
Jr., Lamonte, and Sauter.
Wood tops truck field
John Wood topped a field
of nine Club La Mark Mid-
west Trucks to pick up his
first feature win at MIS this
season.
Jerry Wood l eads hi s
brother John in the points
race by a 30-point margin
(448-418). Chad Knaus is in
third place.
Moyer masters Legends
Aaron Moyer, who set a
new track record in quali-
fying, with a lap of 13.087,
won the 25-lap feature for
the Pellitteri Waste Systems
Legends with Cory Talaska
(13.892), Max McNamara
(13.977), Vince Bartolotta
(14.077), and Johnny Krin-
gas (14.189) rounding out
the top five.
Racing goes under the
lights Friday for Salute
to America Night featur-
ing the Big 8 Late Models,
Midwest Trucks, and IMCA
Vintage Series plus a spec-
tacular fireworks program.
Gates open at 4:30 p.m.
with qualifying set for 6:08
and racing at 7:30.
For more information
checkout: madisoninterna-
tionalspeedway.com.
State Bank of Cross Plains Little League player, Damien Rice, puts on the helmet in the dugout Friday, while
talking to Emmett Burkholder.
State Bank of Cross Plains second baseman Tyler Markham tags out
Physicians Plus baserunner Henry Wiedemann during Fridays opening
round game of the Little League World Series.
Oregon Youth Baseball board member Pat McGuine uses a sponge near third base before play was scheduled to start Friday. McGuine was one of around 20 volunteers
helping to dry Kiser Field 2. Play was pushed back around 20 minutes by the wet field conditions.
Physicians Plus pitcher Alex
Vondra delivers a strike during
Fridays game against the State
Bank of Cross Plains.
World
Series
level
of fun
Wisco Industries Ryne Panzer takes a cut during
the fourth inning of Fridays Minor League World
Series game against Gorman & Company.
Third and fifth grade Minor League and
fifth and sixth grade Oregon Youth Base-
ball Little League players took to the two
fields at Kiser Park last weekend for their
annual World Series tournament.
Physicians Plus won the Little League
World Series over State Bank of Cross
Plains by a score of 12-11 in extra
innings. Physician Plus was coached by
Rod Belville, while SBCP was coached
by Mark Rusch.
Hitters won the Minor League World
Series over Wisco Industries, 5-3.
Hitters was coached coach was Karl
Fry. Wisco was coached by Rob McKee.
photos by
Jeremy Jones
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
submitted photo
Lind takes fifth at Raw Nationals
Crystale Lind, owner of Studio 365 personal training studio on Division Street, traveled to Orlando
to complete in the USAPL Raw Nationals, where she placed fifth in the nation in her 63 kg weight
class.
Lind began competing three years ago, starting with a couple Powerlifting meets, then graduated to
bodybuilding shows. Finally, in 2013 she officially returned to Powerlifting.
Shes done five meets total (three this year alone), including a win at Badger State in Appleton back
in January.
submitted photo
Oregon softball shines in Janesville
The U14 Oregon team took first at a tournament in Janesville last weekend. The U12 and U10 teams
took second. Out of 12 games, Oregon teams won 10 of them. Above are members of all three teams.
submitted photo
Oregon falls in U14 playoff game
The host Oregon U14 Fastpitch team saw its 11-run rally over the final two innings fall short Thursday
in a 14-12 South Central League playoff loss to Poynette.
Hannah Christensen led the team on the mound, while Jenna Gratz, who had a single, double and
triple to go along with four RBIs, led at the plate. Oregon finished the season 9-1.
Team members (front, from left) are: Abby Klahn, Sydney Roberts, Kyrsten George, Lexi Cina, Hannah
Sears and Mya Lebakken; (back) Quincey Newton, Michaela Bieno, Hannah Christensen, Jenna Gratz,
Kendra Cloud and Jenna Ekstrom; (not pictured) Jayme Zander, Kate Spierings and Lauren Spierings.
Compare/ continued from Page 1
Busler pointed out that those wages only cov-
er class time and not time spent preparing les-
sons or grading papers. That wage also assumes
a pay increase of nearly 3 percent that was ten-
tatively approved last month.
Last fall, the district surveyed 15 area districts
about their summer school pay rates. Of eight
that responded with exact figures, the range was
$20-$27.25 an hour.
However, some of those pay rates may have
since changed. The Observer called one of
the districts Verona and learned that sum-
mer school teachers there are now paid $25 to
$28.13 per hour, depending on their experience
(not $20 as reported by Oregon officials) and
also receive 15 minutes of prep time pay for
every hour spent with students.
Extension vs. general
A list of summer school courses was
approved by the school board in January.
Many of the roughly 35 extension courses
on the list are simply labeled by subject and
grade level such as seventh-grade math,
grades 3-6 reading, K-2 writing or eighth-grade
science.
The list also includes one-week bootcamps
for high school students in biology, English, sci-
ence, Spanish or U.S. History.
The roughly 70 general courses are more
varied. Examples include: Fun with crafts and
cooking, Its a Musical, Cross Stitching,
Glitter Art, Basic Aid Training, Fun with
Sign Language, Theater for Young People,
Weight training/conditioning, orchestra and
band lessons, Architecture is Elementary,
Lego Logo, Costume Making, Scrap-
booking, Fun with Art, Computers,
Computers, Computers and Math Skills,
Drills and Thrills.
that summer school pay
should be fairer.
The extension courses often
require more prep time, grad-
ing, testing and individualized
instruction to students than the
general courses, he said.
Teachers were telling him, in
essence, If Im going to teach
a more rigorous class, Id like to
get paid at a more competitive
rate, he said.
But Sanyer, Vogeler and oth-
ers questioned whether extension
courses should be valued differ-
ently. Summer music lessons for
small groups and ensembles are
extensions of what students
learn during the school year,
Sanyer argued. They review old
materials and cover new ground
in theory and reading music.
It is critical, she said. Kids
who take (the summer courses)
get further than the kids who
dont.
A red flag
The teachers union initially
opposed the change but later
conceded it during negotia-
tions on a collectively bargained
agreement tentatively approved
last month.
Jon Fishwild, a union nego-
tiator, said union leaders will
still lobby members to ratify the
agreement in August or Septem-
ber. But the summer school issue
could arise in future negotia-
tions, he said.
I think it really sends up a red
flag about, are we only helping
struggling students or are we try-
ing to help all learners? he said.
A list of courses proposed by
teachers and approved by the
school board in January included
35 extension courses and rough-
ly 70 general courses.
Many of the general courses
sound more like fun than work,
with classes that teach board
games, chess, tee ball, knitting
or jewelry making. But the list
also includes courses on archi-
tecture, computers, theater, sign
language, band and orchestra.
The general courses fill up
fast, often in minutes after online
registration opens in April, said
summer school principal Shan-
non Anderson.
In contrast, students are typi-
cally invited to take extension
classes in reading, writing, math,
science or history that are geared
toward students needing addi-
tional time or support to gain the
necessary skills to be successful
at the next grade level, accord-
ing to an explanation of the
courses posted on the districts
website.
Good program
Beginning this year, teachers
applied to teach the extension
classes, while in the past they
either requested to do so or prin-
cipals asked if they would.
Under terms of the bar-
gained agreement, teachers of
the general courses can ask for
additional pay if they feel their
course requires additional prep
time. Two teachers successfully
sought that exemption, said Jina
Jonen, human resources director.
Officials have not yet com-
piled estimates on how much
money the district will save with
the new pay scale, said business
manager Andy Weiland, but
Busler said saving money was
not the goal. And he bristled at
the suggestion that the district is
heading down a slippery slope
toward paying teachers different-
ly for the subjects or grades they
teach during the regular school
year.
That is absolutely not what
anybody should read into it,
he said in a phone interview
Monday. That is not something
we have talked about or contem-
plated.
The districts summer school
program is hugely popular and
every course is taught by certi-
fied staff and tied to state edu-
cation standards, Busler said. It
also pays staff better than in most
area districts to ensure that top-
notch, local teachers sign up.
Busler did not respond before
the Observers deadline Tues-
day to follow-up questions sent
a week earlier asking how many
teachers asked for the new pay
scale, or who decided to cut pay
rates for general courses.
Total enrollment in summer
school courses is unclear, as the
district includes swimming les-
sons taught separately by life-
guards at the Community Pool
in its count of 2,675 students
who participate in summer pro-
gramming.
School: Officials not yet compiled estimates on amount saved
Continued from page 1
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Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
page to the stage, McGahan
said.
The Spoken Word Poetry
Collective has existed for
about a decade and hosts
open mic poetry readings
and poetry slams. A slam is
a competition at which poets
read or recite original work.
The performances are judged
on a numeric scale by previ-
ously selected members of
the audience.
The collective runs slams
from October until the
finals in May, when a team
of four or five is chosen to
represent the Madison col-
lective at the National Poetry
Slam in Boston, which takes
place this year Aug. 12 17.
For the fourth time, McGahan
has made the team that will
represent Madison.
When the slam season ends
in May, the collective contin-
ues to have open mic nights at
7 p.m. on the third Saturday,
June through September, in
the second-floor space of
Gennas Lounge in Madison.
The open mic events con-
tinue year round in conjunc-
tion with the slam season.
And they are sometimes held
outside Madison. One such
event was held several weeks
ago at the Firefly Coffee-
house in Oregon.
On Monday, McGahan
spoke with the Observer
about her writing.
OO: Is there a difference
between the skills of writing
poetry vs. performing it?
McGahan: Slam poetry
was created to get poetry to
the masses. The writing and
the performing do a nice job
of dovetailing to get it to the
general public.
I wouldnt say those skills
are exclusive of each other. I
would say youve kind of got
to have that happy marriage
of being able to write and per-
form in order to have a nice
experience.
OO: Are there people other
than your mother whove
been important in fostering
your love of poetry?
McGahan: There have
been teachers along the
way and other mentors. My
moms side of the family is
really big on writing, so I def-
initely got it from them. They
played a big part in my love
of words.
And they are friends of
mine who write, too. Were
really supportive of each
other, so its a nice little com-
munity.
OO: How do you decide
what to write about?
McGahan: I just write
what Im feeling at the
moment. Some people go in
with a mindset of what they
want to write about. But I
take it from a journaling
aspect more than Im going
to construct this poem. Im
kind of all over the place.
OO: So its not necessarily
more about your personal life
or your interior life vs. what
you see going on out there in
the world?
McGahan: Sometimes it
is for sure, but other times Ill
use the first person I and
Im not really talking about
myself or from personal
experience.
OO: You were saying
youll often create poems out
of journaling that you do?
McGahan: Yeah, Ill just
kind of start with that. I just
really like to stay writing. Not
everything that I put down on
paper is something that I want
to continue to pursue, but
maybe it just needs to be writ-
ten down on paper just to get
that thought down. So I just
like to write, ideally every-
day, but Im still working on
that.
I feel like if I just keep writ-
ing Im eventually going to
stumble on something that I
like. Its like, I really like this
and I want to expand on it or
do a second or third draft of it.
Im kind of organic.
OO: You ment i oned
theres a team going to the
nationals in Boston. How
does that work? Were there
tryouts? How does that all
work?
McGahan: It is a competi-
tion, so we have a slam sea-
son from November through
April, and then in May we
have the finals. Its a point-
based system, so you have
to earn a certain number of
points in order to be placed in
the pool of finalists.
Then in May we have the
slam finals competition, and
the top four or five people
will be the ones who will rep-
resent the Madison team.
OO: Who does the point
totaling, members of the col-
lective?
McGahan: Right, exactly.
And then once you compete
in the finals its not based
on how many points youve
acquired. Its based on the
scores that you get for that
night for the pieces that
youve performed.
OO: How many pieces
would you perform in that
final?
McGahan: We use the
slam rules, so it has to be like
three minutes and its usually
two rounds per person so
two poems per person.
OO: Under three minutes?
Thats fast.
McGahan: Yeah, it goes
pretty fast. We pull the judges
from the audience for most of
the slam season we just kind
of randomly pull the judges,
which is how they do it even
at the National Poetry Slam.
They pick five random people
from the audience and they
judge on a scale of zero to 10
and then its five people who
do the judging. And then you
drop the highest and lowest
score and add the three scores
in the middle. That cumula-
tive score is where you place.
Thats your value number.
OO: I assume there are
teams from all over the U.S.
that go to Boston?
McGahan: Yes absolutely,
and then there are teams from
Canada that come through
and usually a team from
France and Germany as well.
But its mostly teams from
the United States. They send
usually at least two teams
from each state. The big-
ger the state the more teams
they send, so like New York
and California send a ton of
teams.
Its nice to hear every-
bodys different style and
themes, what people are talk-
ing about and how they do it.
OO: And what happens
at these national slams? The
same thing as locally, where
they try to pick winners out of
that whole bunch of perform-
ers?
McGahan: The first three
nights are whats called the
preliminary bouts, but you
only compete two out of the
three nights. And then the top
two teams from each of the
bouts from each night will go
on to the semi finals, and then
the finals are on Saturday.
OO: Are you feeling con-
fident?
McGahan: Our motto is
we go for the experience, so
we dont necessarily go with
winning in mind. I mean, we
absolutely practice hard and
always do our best, but we
kind of go for the feel and
experience more and just the
appreciation of poetry.
OO: Do you have aspira-
tions for your poetry in the
future?
McGahan: Just to keep
writing. Urban Poets have
been around for 10 years and
I would like to help that con-
tinue to grow.
We do the slam and the
open mics, and then we do
workshops and fundraisers.
So I would like to help spo-
ken word continue to grow.
I just released my first
chapbook a couple of months
ago, which was really excit-
ing. Its a passion of mine and
certainly a hobby, but I dont
know if I see it as a profes-
sion. I would be open to it,
but its something I just real-
ly enjoy.
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10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
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Poet: Local poet talks poetry slams and what competition is like at nationals
Continued from page 1
Photo by Victoria Vlisides
Urban Spoken Word Poetry Collective has poetry slams at Gennas Lounge in Madison each third
Saturday of the month. Above, David Hart gets the crowd at Gennas ready. The slam season ended
in Spring and Caitlin McGahan is one of the finalists the group will be sending to the National Poetry
Slam in Boston in mid August.
Learn more
Urban Spoken Word
Poetry Collective
Like Urban Spoken
Word on Facebook, follow
the group on twitter @
urbanspokenword, or visit
urbanspokenword.org
Read Caitlins blog:
figure-eight.blogspot.com
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2 1042 Park St.,
Oregon, WI
(608) 835-DUCK
Ice
cream
social
Heather
Newton and
Dave Freitag
entertained
the crowd at
the Oregon
Area Senior
Center ice
cream social.
The ice cream
social, July
11, provided
treats and live
entertainment.
Photo by Clarice
Dewey
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
Legals
SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT TO BID
BROOKLYN BUSINESS
COMPLEX
CONTRACT 1-2013
VILLAGE OF BROOKLYN,
WISCONSIN
The Village of Brooklyn will re-
ceive sealed Bids for construction of
the Brooklyn Business Complex until 1
P.M., local time, August 8, 2013, at 210
Commercial Street, Brooklyn, Wisconsin
53521, at which time the Bids will be pub-
licly opened and read aloud.
The Work includes the construction
of 200 linear feet of urban street recon-
struction and site grading. The project in-
cludes the following approximate quanti-
ties: 950 linear feet of sanitary sewer; 800
linear feet of water main; 250 linear feet
of storm sewer; 500 linear feet of curb
and gutter; 300 tons of asphaltic pave-
ment; 18,000 cubic yards of site grading
and detention basin construction.
Bids are to be addressed to the Vil-
lage of Brooklyn, 210 Commercial Street,
Brooklyn, Wisconsin 53521 and shall be
marked Sealed Bid-Brooklyn Business
Complex-Contract 1-2013.
Complete digital project bidding
documents are available at www.strand.
com or at www.questcdn.com. Download
the digital plan documents for $30 by
inputting Quest project number 2836667
on the websites Project Search page.
Please contact QuestCDN.com at (952)
233-1632 or info@questcdn.com for as-
sistance in free membership registration,
downloading, and working with this digi-
tal project information.
Bidding Documents may be re-
viewed and paper copies may be ob-
tained from the Issuing Offce which
is Strand Associates, Inc.?, 910 West
Wingra Drive, Madison, Wisconsin
53715. A nonrefundable fee of $100 will
be required (shipping and handling fees
included). Overnight mailing of Bidding
Documents will not be provided.
All Bidders submitting a sealed Bid
shall obtain the Bidding Documents from
QuestCDN.com or from Strand Associ-
ates, Inc.?
Bidders who submit a Bid must be
a Plan Holder of record at the Issuing Of-
fce. Bids from Bidders who are not on
the Plan Holders List may be returned as
not being responsive.
Plan Holders are requested to pro-
vide an e-mail address if they wish to
receive addenda and other information
electronically. Plan Holders are request-
ed to designate whether they are a prime
contractor, subcontractor, or supplier if
they want this information posted on the
project Plan Holders List.
The Bid must be accompanied by
Bid security made payable to OWNER in
an amount of 5% of the Bidders maxi-
mum Bid price.
Bidders shall comply with all provi-
sions of Section 66.0903 of the Wiscon-
sin Statutes with respect to wage scales.
In addition to the provisions of Sec-
tion 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes
with respect to wage scales, Bidders
shall comply with federal wage rates.
Bidders shall comply with the Presi-
dents Executive Order No. 11246, Equal
Employment Opportunity as amended.
Attention of Bidders is particularly
called to the requirements as to condi-
tions of employment to be observed and
minimum wage rates to be paid under
Contract, Section 3, and E.O. 11246.
The Village of Brooklyn reserves the
right to reject any or all Bids, to waive any
technicality, and to accept any Bid which
it deems advantageous. All Bids shall re-
main subject to acceptance for 85-days
after the time set for receiving Bids.
Contract award shall be made based
on the lowest responsive and respon-
sible Bidder and pertinent to Section 3
requirements per Dane County.
Contract award may be funded in
part by a grant from the Community De-
velopment Block Grant Program.
The Strand Associates, Inc.? project
manager is Joshua J. Straka, P.E. and
can be contacted at Strand Associates,
Inc.?, 910 West Wingra Drive, Madison,
Wisconsin 53715, (608) 251-4843 regard-
ing the project.
Published by the authority of the Vil-
lage of Brooklyn, Wisconsin
Carol Strause, Village Clerk
Dated at Village of Brooklyn, Wisconsin
Published: July 25 and August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
* * *
RUTLAND TOWN BOARD
MEETING
AUGUST 6, 2013
AGENDA:
1. Appearance by Dane Co. Sheriff
Dept. representative.
2. Constable Report.
3. Racetrack matters: monthly report
and discussion and necessary action on
racetrack deed restriction document.
4. Rutland Church and Cemetery
matters.
* Discussion and update on land-
scaping and grave platting with action as
necessary.
5. Planning Commission report.
6. Consent Agenda:
* Minutes June 4th meeting.
* Treasurers Report.
* Vouchers and Checks.
7. Correspondence.
8. Oregon Senior Center Agreement
discussion and action as necessary.
9. Discussion on excavator agree-
ment amendment and action if neces-
sary.
10. Discussion and action as needed
on Bobcat and trailer agreement.
11. Discussion and necessary action
on proposed increase in Building Permit
fees.
12. Status of Joint Fire Discussions
as necessary.
13. Update on possible Agricultural
Conservation Easement.
14. Road Work Update.
15. Flood Plain map updates.
16. Update on Highway 14 north and
south end connections meetings.
17. Discussion regarding new Town
Hall matters as necessary.
18. Adjournment.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published; August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
RUTLAND PLANNING
COMMISSION
AUGUST 5, 2013 6:30 P.M.
Agenda:
1. Call meeting to order.
2. Roll Call.
3. Approval of July meeting min-
utes.
4. Stoughton FUDA presentation.
5. Informational presentation re-
garding hamlet development.
6. Discussion/update/necessary ac-
tion on items from previous meetings:
* Town of Rutland Comprehensive
Plan.
* Hwy 138/14 ParknRide and Impact
on Comprehensive plan.
7. Adjournment.
Dawn George, Clerk
Published; August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
AGENDA
OREGON TOWN BOARD
TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2013
7:00 P.M.
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING
1. Call Town Board meeting to order.
2. Reading and Approval of minutes
from previous meeting.
3. Treasurers Report and Approval
Christensen LaFlash.
4. Public Comments.
5. Presentation of Eagle Scout proj-
ects.
6. Discussion and possible Action
re: Purchase of New Radio System.
7. Discussion and possible Action
re: Purchase of New Election Equipment
and Software.
8. Discussion and possible Action
re: the Anderson Farm Park progress.
9. Communication and Action of the
Dane County Board Bollig
10. Fire & EMS Report (Oregon,
Brooklyn & Belleville) Van Kampen.
11. Park Committee Report and Ac-
tion Root.
12. Assessors Report and Recom-
mendation Blomstrom.
13. Building Inspection Services Re-
port Arnold.
14. Constables Report Wackett.
15. Plan Commission Report and
Recommendation - Weber.
16. Public Works and TORC Report
Ace.
17. Discussion and possible Action
re: Potential Impacts of the states 2012-
13 Budget Bill.
18. Senior Center Van Kampen.
19. Discussion and possible Action
re: Oregon Senior Center Contract.
20. Board Communications/ Future
Agenda Items.
21. Approval of payment vouchers
Arnold.
22. Clerks Report Arnold.
23. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Towns e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerks offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Posted: July 29, 2013
Published: August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
Labor Day
Early Deadlines
Due to the Labor Day holiday,
the Display Ad Deadline for the
September 4 Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, August 28 at 3 p.m.
Classified deadline will be Thursday, August 29 at Noon.
Display & Classified Deadlines for the
September 5 Oregon Observer, Verona Press
and Stoughton Courier Hub will be
Friday, August 30 at Noon.
Our offices will be closed
Monday, September 2
in observance of the holiday.
Oner Lxplres Aug. l5, 20l3
Speerschneider then rec-
ommended that the village
not continue to pursue the
case, which village officials
accepted in return for Dean
promising not to pursue a
claim against the village.
The judge dismissed a
$240 citation for failure to
yield to an emergency vehi-
cle.
Oregon police chief Doug
Pettit said the village decid-
ed not to continue the case
because he had received
assurances from Brooklyn
Fire Department chief Leif
Spilde that he was doing
a comprehensive review of
the fire departments poli-
cies and procedures, and
that he would be chang-
ing the policies related to
allowing volunteer fire-
f i ght er s and EMTs t o
respond to the fire depart-
ment in the manner that
Dean did.
We were satisfied that
the public safety issue was
being addressed by the new
chief, Pettit said. Given
the fact that we had the jury
instruction that we felt was
improper, we felt it was in
the best interest of every-
body not to move forward
with the case.
Dean and his attorney,
William Haus, spoke off-
the-record and asked not
to be quoted, except to say
they felt Dean had been
exonerated of any wrong-
doi ng when t he vi l l age
decided to quit the case.
Dean felt he shouldnt
have to pay the fine because
he was responding to a fire
department call for emer-
gency assistance.
Officer Gilbertson issued
the ticket several weeks
after the June 2012 inci-
dent, in which he pursued
Dean to the Brooklyn Fire
Station, drew his pistol and
pointed it close to Deans
head. The chase and stop
are clearly visible in a vid-
eo recording taken by the
police cars dashboard cam-
era.
Dean has said he received
a pager alert while fueling
up his Dodge Charger at an
Oregon gas station. He then
drove to the Brooklyn Fire
Station to respond to what
turned out to be a small
refrigerator fire at a home
near Brooklyn.
As Dean drove south,
with EMT identification on
his license plates and a siren
and flashing red emergency
light mounted to the dash of
his car, Gilbertson noticed
the car speeding past. He
had earlier received a report
of a similar car possibly
impersonating an emergen-
cy vehicle and pulled out in
pursuit of Dean.
Dean saw flashing lights
in his rear view mirrors
but assumed it was some-
one responding to the same
call, he told the Observer,
and did not pull over until
he reached the fire station
parking lot.
Once there, Dean exited
his car and was immedi-
ately ordered back inside
the car by Gilbertson, who
then drew his pistol and
approached Deans car, the
video shows. The officer
pointed the revolver either
i nsi de or nearl y i nsi de
the drivers side window,
where Dean sat.
The situation was quick-
ly defused, with both men
apologizing. Almost three
weeks l at er, Gi l bert son
asked Dean to meet him at
the Oregon Police Depart-
ment, where he issued Dean
the citation.
Dean then filed a com-
plaint against Gilbertson
charging excessive force in
drawing his pistol. When
the police department exon-
erated Gilbertson of any
wrongdoing, Dean filed a
claim for $50,000 against
the village. He later said he
would withdraw the claim
if the police department
would apologize and agree
to provide officers with
more training.
I n J a n u a r y , De a n
appeared in Oregon Munic-
ipal Court, where Judge
Beth Cox refused Deans
request to dismiss the case.
He then requested a jury
trial, which would have
been held in Dane County
Circuit Court on June 10
more than a year after the
incident.
The village paid its attor-
ney about $5,000 for his
work on the case, village
administrator Mike Gracz
said.
Dean: Incident happened in June 2012
Continued from page 1
Timeline
June 4, 2012:
Firefighter/EMT Dan
Dean responds to a
pager alert while fueling
up in Oregon, speeds to
Brooklyn Fire Station.
Oregon police officer
Todd Gilbertson pursues
Dean for speeding; Dean
fails to pull over.
At Brooklyn Fire
Station, Gilbertson draws
pistol and checks Deans
identification. About three
weeks later, police issue
Dean $240 citation for
failure to yield.
June 29, 2012: Dean
complains to Oregon
Police Department, alleg-
ing excessive force for
Gilbertson drawing his
weapon.
October 2012: Dean
files $50,000 claim
against the village, says
he will drop claim if police
apologize and promise
more officer safety train-
ing.
January: Case goes
before municipal judge
Beth Cox, who refuses to
dismiss citation.
February: Dean
appeals case, asks for
jury trial.
- June 10: Dane County
judge denies village
attorneys motion to limit
evidence. Village decides
to drop case in return for
Deans promise not to
pursue claim.
Historic house available to
someone willing to move it
The owner of a historic
limestone house near Cooks-
ville is offering to give the
house away for free to some-
one whos willing to move it.
The Stebbins House was
built in 1850 in the Federal-
Greek Revival style. The
old rural residence has been
called one of the finest mid-
19th century farmhouses
in Rock County. It was the
home of prominent Porter
Township resident Harrison
Stebbins.
The house is a solid, quar-
ried-limestone structure with
approximately 2,400 square
feet under the Federal-style
roof with stone parapets,
stepped-gables and chimneys
at each end. The five-bay
residence has stone lintels
above doors and windows
and bulls-eye louvers in the
gables of the attic story.
Located near the his-
toric Village of Cooksville,
the house was listed in the
National Register of Historic
Places in 1980 as part of the
greater Cooksville areas his-
toric and architectural heri-
tage.
The Stebbins House is a
magnificent and important
example of the earliest rural
architecture in Rock Coun-
ty, said Larry Reed, local
Cooksville historian and
chair of the Historic Cooks-
ville Trust. The move and
re-location and re-use of this
great house would preserve
an important part of Wiscon-
sins rural heritage.
The historic house must be
moved and re-located and is
available free of charge. Sev-
eral qualified lots in or near
Cooksville are potentially
available for purchase for
its re-location, and a house-
moving company has stated
that the house can be easily
moved.
The stone house is solidly
constructed and retains much
of its interior woodwork and
other architectural details,
according to Reed, but it will
need rehabilitation.
Historic rehabilitation
income tax credits may be
available from the state or
federal government if it is
an approved move or after
the move if the new owner
applies for the state rehabili-
tation tax credit for a historic
residence before any rehab
works begins, according to
the State Historic Preserva-
tion Office.
The Stebbins House is
available through the His-
toric Cooksville Trust, Inc.,
a non-profit charity, which
helps to preserve the areas
heritage, or through the
owner. The Trust is cooper-
ating with the owner to help
coordinate the move and
the relocation of the his-
toric house.
For more information,
contact the owner Ted at
444-3951 or Larry Reed at
873-5066.

- Bill Livick
14
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
140 Lost & Found
BLACK LEATHER BANK MONEY
BAG! Sunday, July 28th between
9:30am and 10:30am in Stoughton
between Old Stage Road-
Lake Kegonsa Rd and Cty A going
into fairgrounds. Farmers Market
money. Reward! 608-320-7184
PINK CAMERA! Stoughton City Wide
Garage Sales. Pictures of grandaughter
and dog. Please call
608-873-9580
143 notices
START WITH ROTARY and good things
happen. Locate the nearest club at www.
rotary.org. This message provided by
PaperChain and your local community
paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their ability.
Unfortunately, many unscrupulous people
are ready to take your money! PLEASE BE
CAREFUL ANSWERING ANY AD THAT
SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE!
For more information, or to file a com-
plaint regarding an ad, please contact The
Department of Trade, Agriculture & Con-
sumer Protection 1-800-422-7128 (wcan)
150 PLaces to Go
GUN SHOW South Wayne, WI Vendors
wanted. Vendor space available August
25th, 2013 $15/ 8ft table. 9am-3pm.
Phone 608-439-5336
CRAFT AND VENDOR SHOW
42nd Annual Utica Festival
Utica Community Park
August 3-4 9:00am - 4:00pm
Hwy B- Come one. Come all!
163 traininG schooLs
TRAINING FOR CNA
And Computer and Clerical
Early bird discount.
www.newaydirections.com or
Call Neway Directions
for class schedules
608-221-1920
340 autos
2004 FORD Taurus Wagon SE.
Good condition. One owner! New
battery. 87,800 miles. $3995. OBO.
Metallic grey. 608-239-3201
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck or Boat to
Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vaca-
tion. Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All
paperwork taken care of! 888-439-5224
(wcan)
342 Boats & accessories
$9995+FSD FOR a new boat or pontoon
package- Both with lots of standard
features! New 16 Pontoon w/furniture
& 25HP or New 16 Boat, locator, trailer
& 25HP. Your choice $9995.+FSD.
American Marine & Motorsports
Shawano 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New and Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats,
Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye boats, Cudd-
ys, Cruisers up to 33 feet and Outboards
@ Guaranteed Best Price! Crownline
Axis Malibu Triton Alumacraft Mirrorcraft
Misty Harbor & more! American Marine
& Motorsports Super Center Shawano-
where dreams come true 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
RENTALS WAVERUNNERS Pontoons
- Ski Boats - Fishing Boats Outboards -
Canoes - Kayaks. Daily or weekly. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Fun Center,
Shawano 715-526-8740 (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 recreationaL VehicLes
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATVs & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atvs @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 traiLers
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
390 auto: Wanted to Buy
WANTED: Autos, heavy trucks,
equipment and scrap iron.
Steves Recycling. Hollandale, WI.
608-574-2350 (cell)
402 heLP Wanted, GeneraL
DISHWASHER WANTED. Applications
available at Sugar & Spice Eatery. 317
Nora St. Stoughton.
EXPERIENCED CONCRETE Finisher
Must have valid drivers license. Com-
petitive wages. Health, dental available,
608-884-6205
MADISON AREA Road Maintenance
Company accepting applications for CDL
drivers and laborers. Full time beginning
now thru October. For more information
call 608-842-1676.
MONROE AUTO Dealer is looking for
qualified individuals for Sales and Light
Maintenance / Repair Technician. Com-
petitive wages, benefits package and a
pleasant working culture. We are looking
to replace retiring employees. Please
contact 608-325-9191. Ask for Fixed
Operations director - Steve or Sales
Manager Brent. We look forward to your
inquiries.
PART TIME DELI Help Wanted.
Apply at 135 S. Main St, Oregon.
SERVICE TECHNICIANS needed for
local and statewide pipe maintenance
& trenchless rehab services. Must have
good driving record & CDL preferred-will
train right individual. Working w/heavy
equipment is required w/some travel.
Strong computer skills a plus. Benefits
available DOQ with rapid advancement
for right individual. Call McCanns
Underground
608-835-3124 or apply in person at:
611 N Burr Oak Ave. Oregon, WI.
STOP-N-GO IS Hiring! Starting pay
of $9.00 per hour with premium pay
for overnights and weekends. We
offer increases after 90-days, flexible
schedules, a fun work environment and
we promote from within! Applications
are available at the store located at
856 Janesville Street, Oregon or apply
online at
www.stop-n-go.com and click on the
Careers tab. No phone calls, please.
SUPER 8 Verona has immediate open-
ings for Maintainence personnel. Full
and Part time positions available, $10-12/
hr. Apply in person at 131 Horizon Dr,
Verona, Wi
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Part time,
days only. Become a part of our
growing Team! Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
423 Work Wanted
LET ME MAKE YOUR HOME Sparkle!
7 years experience. Reliable. Call Karen
608-558-8860
434 heaLth care, human
serVices & chiLd care
PERSONAL CAREWORKER needed for
girl with disabilities in Verona. Monday-
Friday 7:00am-8:30 am and 3:30 pm to
5:30 pm, weekends flexible. Assist to get
ready for school, bus comes to home.
Call for more information: 608-238-8119
443 manuFacturinG
& industriaL
SPUNCAST, INC is now hiring.
Melters, Cast Operators & Machinist
Apply at: W6499 Rhine Rd
Watertown, WI 53098
Questions: Call 920-262-8607
444 construction,
trades & automotiVe
GENERAL LABORER positions avail-
able. Must be able to lift 100 lbs on a
regular basis. Must have valid drivers
license and references. Please mail let-
ter of application and resume to All Dry
Waterproofing, INC. 621 E South St,
Stoughton, WI 53589
447 ProFessionaL
DEDICATED TEAM
RUN & SOLO Runs available.
Above Average Mileage pay.
*Teams Avg 6000 Miles/Wk
*Solos Avg 2500-3500/Wk
*Flexible Home Time
*100% No Touch/Drop & Hook
*Full Benefit Pkg CDL/A
*12 Months Exp. preferred
1-888-545-9351 EXT 11 Jackson, Wi
www.doublejtransport.com (wcan)
449 driVer, shiPPinG
& WarehousinG
COMPANY DRIVER Needed for Dedi-
cated Runs. Great Pay & Benefit Pack-
ages Sign on Bonus + Consistent Miles.
CDL A + 1 yr Exp Required. Lawrence
Transportation. 800-328-7224x205
452 GeneraL
CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP Leader
at First Lutheran, Stoughton. Excellent
musical skills needed.
608-873-7761
453 VoLunteer Wanted
TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD Mobile
Food Pantry is in immediate need of
12-24 volunteers for Food Distributors and
Shopper Helpers; as well as an on-going
need for on-site coordinator. Assistant on-
site coordinators, volunteer coordinator,
Registation/Sign-in, Greeter/Line Moni-
tor. The Food Pantry is held on the 1st
Wednesday of each month. Volunteers are
needed from 1-3pm. Wisconsin Public
Television is seeking volunteers to help
out at our next membership drive, Aug
3-12. Volunteers are needed to answer
phones and input pledge information into
the computer. Or, you can also show off
your culinary skills by serving snacks
and refreshments to volunteers and staff.
Shifts are approximately 4 hrs and include
snacks and a free meal. United Way 2-1-1
is seeking new volunteers to become Infor-
mation and Referral Specialists. If you are
looking for an opportunity to learn more
about community resources and would
like to assist people in finding ways to
get and give help, United Way 2-1-1 may
be the place for you! Our volunteers staff
our telephone lines, answering questions
about resources available in the service
ares. Call the Volunteer Center at 246-
4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
for more information or to learn about other
volunteer opportunities.
508 chiLd care & nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stough-
ton / Pleasant Springs Licensed Family
Childcare 22 yrs. exp. Quiet acre lot.
Summer & Fall Openings Available Sum-
mer Field Trips - Kindergarten Readi-
ness Music Program - Indoor Platform
& Slide Teacher Directed Call: 873-0711
Location - Experience - Rates All on our
website at: www.browndeerdaycare.com
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** DRIVERS **
FULL-TIME DRIVERS
FOR REGIONAL WORK
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreens
Private Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI.
Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreens
stores within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND,
SD). Workweek is Tuesday-Saturday. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
Full Beneft Pkg. includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
Paid Holidays and Vacation
Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min.
2 yrs. tractor-trailer exp. & meet all DOT require-
ments. Send resum to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755.
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Web Designer
Are you a skilled web designer? Does working in an
ever changing, fast-paced environment excite you? Are
you a self-motivated person with creative ideas? If you
answered yes to all three of these questions, you might
be the TH Medias next Web Designer.
This Web Designer position is located in Dubuque,
IA. Responsibilities include developing, testing, and
auditing of THonline, other TH Media websites, and
our mobile site. In addition, this person should also
be skilled in print design, provide a high level of timely
and accurate customer service, and stay abreast of the
latest trends as it relates to web development.
To be considered for this position, you must have
a two-year college degree in a related feld (or the
equivalent in experience) and one to three years
experience with Web site creation, design and online
publishing. Additionally, experience with content
management systems is a plus.
For consideration, apply online at
http://www.wcinet.com/careers
TH Media, a division of Woodward Communications,
is an Equal Opportunity Employer
Donald E. Larson
Donald E. Larson, age
78, died of a heart attack
on Tuesday, July 23, at
the Stoughton Community
Hospital. He was born on
August 28, 1934 in Stough-
t on, t he son of Hel mer
A. and Irene M. (Kratz)
Larson. Don received his
education in the Oregon
School District. Don, along
with his brother, Howard,
farmed for many years on
the family farm until it was
sold to the DNR to restore
it to natural life.
Don received his cer-
tificate in floral arrange-
ment. For many years he
ran Dons Gift Shop on the
family farm in Oregon. He
was very talented in making
floral arrangements of all
kinds, as well as gifts and
crafts for every special
occasion and holiday of
the year. Don was gifted
in interior decorating. He
and his brother, Howard,
moved into their home in
Stoughton in 1995 which
Don completely decorated
himself-- he even made the
draperies for their entire
home.
Don always loved flow-
ers, even as a child. He
rai sed fl owers on t hei r
Oregon farm by the acres.
Whe n Don move d t o
Stoughton, he had 25 to
30 varieties of flowers in
his yard. He had beautiful
flowers all year long. In the
spring his tulips and daffo-
dils would be in full bloom.
In the summer, it would be
the petunias, marigolds,
and impatiens. In the fall,
it would be the mums and
wild asters. Dons favorite
was the mums because they
would last so long and were
so colorful.
Don was preceded i n
death by his parents; broth-
er, Howard; uncles, Axel,
Carl, Hjelmer, Hans and
Peter; aunts, Nora, Ella and
Clara; cousins, Willard and
Kenneth. Don is survived
by his brother, Glenn of
Stoughton; and his cousin
Betty Stenjem of McFar-
land.
Devotions were held at
1:30 p.m. at Cress Funer-
al Home, Stoughton on
Friday, July 26. A brief
visitation began at 1 p.m.
Burial will follow in Upper
McFarland Cemetery.
Please share your memo-
ries at www.cressfuner-
alservice.com
Cress Funeral & Crema-
tion Service
206 W. Prospect Stough-
ton
873-9244
Obituary
xxx obituary ID
5'x10' $27 Month
10'x10' $38 Month
10'x15' $48 Month
10'x20' $58 Month
10'x25' $65 Month
At Cleary Building Corp.
190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
(608) 845-9700
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI SToRAgE
U
N
3
0
0
9
1
0
View obituaries
online at
Connect
OregonWi.com
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
516 cLeaninG serVices
WANT SOMEONE to clean your house?
Call DOROTHYS SWEEP CLEAN. We
are Christian ladies that do quality work.
Dependable and have excellent refer-
ences. Call 608-838-0665 or 608-219-
2415. Insured.
524 contractors
CONCRETE FINISHERS AND LABOR-
ERS. Experienced w/valid DL, CDL pre-
ferred.Competitive wage and benefits.
Contact Jeff at 608-884-9725
QUALITY USED EQUIPMENT FOR
SALE Skidsteers, Backhoes, Forklifts,
Manlifts Compressors, Generators and
much much more. RENTALS are also
available by the day, week or month
Contact United Rentals @ 608-260-9558
Ask for Ken
532 FencinG
CRIST FENCING FREE ESTIMATES.
Residential, commercial, farm, horse.
608-574-1993 www.cristfencing.com
548 home imProVement
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING Crack
filling and striping. No job too small.
Call O & H at 608-845-3348 or 608-
845-8567

HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Summer-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
Interior-Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

RECOVER PAINTING offers all carpen-
try, drywall, deck restoration and all forms
of painting. Recover urges you to join in
the fight against cancer, as a portion of
every job is donated to cancer research.
Free estimates, fully insured, over 20
years of experience. Call 608-270-0440.
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a
sensible price. Free estimates,
Insured, Polite, Professional.
608-873-9623
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
WINDOW REFINISHING
PHONE 608-575-6781
advancedpaintinginc@yahoo.com
550 insurance
SAVE MONEY On Auto InSurance from
the major names you trust. No forms. No
hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR
MY QUOTE now!
888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 LandscaPinG, LaWn,
tree & Garden Work
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing, trimming,
rototilling ,etc. 608-235-4389
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 ProFessionaL serVices
MY COMPUTER WORKS! Computer
problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer issues, Bad Internet Connections
- Fix It Now! Professional, US Based
Technicians. $25 off service. Call for
Immediate Help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
576 sPeciaL serVices
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and
surrounding area. Merry Law Offices.
608-205-0621. No charge for initial con-
sultation. We are a debt relief agency.
We help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code.
590 Wanted: serVices
NEED HOST Parents for German/Swiss
High School Students, for all or part of
2013-14 school year. Reflections Intl
608-583-2412 www.
reflectionsinternational.org (wcan)
606 articLes For saLe
BRINKMANN SMOKER Charcoal grill.
Slow cook BBQ for moist, delicious fla-
vor. Used a few times, like new. Asking
$60. 608-669-2243
BUTTERFLY CHAIRS Black canvas.
Made in the USA! Metal frame fold up
for easy storage. Comfortable. Indoor/
Outdoor. $20 for the pair.
608-669-2243
FIREWOOD DRY Crab apple, Ash and
Maple. Small to giant sizes.
$6. per bundle or large piece.
Verona 608-669-2243
MOVING??? HAVE I got a deal for you!
70 used packing boxes and material.
Includes 3 dish packs with dividers. All
for $100. If you have ever bought these
boxes/packing material from a moving
company, you will know what a deal this
is. Call 608-213-4818.
648 Food & drink
SHARIS BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! 100% satisfaction guaran-
teed. Fresh-dipped berries from $19.99
+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
THRILL DAD with 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 67% plus 4 FREE burgers - The
Favorite Gift - ONLY $49.99. Order
Today. 888-676-2750 Use Code:
45102DJW or www. OmahaSteaks.com/
gcoffer83 (wcan)
650 Furniture
BURGUNDY RECLINER/LIFT chair less
than 6 months old 608-884-9372
652 GaraGe saLes
BROOKLYN N9353 Benson Rd. Fri-
day-Saturday, 8/2 and 8/3, 8am-4pm.
Antiques, building and household misc,
horse misc. Antique entertainment cen-
ter.
EVANSVILLE ANNUAL CITY WIDE
Garage Sales, Fri-Sat, Aug 2-3 8am-
4pm. Link to complete listings at: www.
evansvillechamber.org
OREGON 755 N Perry Thursday-Satur-
day, August 1-3, 8am-5pm. Fisher Price,
Rescue heroes, Little Pony, clothes,
newborn-size14.
OREGON 536 N Main St. Thurs. Aug
1, 4-6, Fri-Sat Aug 2-3 8-? Couch w/
matching wingback chair, book shelf,
entertainment center, sofa
table, drafting table, trampoline w/
net, couch w/matching love seat, room
divider screens, books, clothes, shoes,
crafts, misc.
STOUGHTON- 1210 Oakwood Ct (cul
de sac off of Roby Rd). Fri Aug 2 & Sat
Aug 3 8am-5pm. Linens, clothes, books,
aquarium and stand, rollerblades, board
games, assorted household items
STOUGHTON- 1890 Erdahl Dr 8/1 2pm-
6pm, 8/2 8am-2pm. Its our ANNUAL
SALE! Girls & womens clothing, rubber
stamps, assorted toys, housewares, fur-
niture. No early sales, & cash only.
STOUGHTON- 613 Johnson St Friday
8/2 8am-4pm, Saturday 8/3 8am-2pm.
Antiques, furniture, papasan chairs, milk
glass, garden, framed art, lamps, kitchen
and many vintage treasures
STOUGHTON- 627 N Harrison Aug 2-Aug
3 8am-5pm. European Beer Glass Col-
lection. Dolls-star wars- McDonald Col-
lectibles- Syttende Mai Coins and buttons-
Lots of misc- Fishing rods & reels-CDS
STOUGHTON- 925 Virgin Lake, Ben-
efit Kayla Urban 8/1 6pm-8pm, 8/2-8/3
8am-12pm.
STOUGHTON- 970 Taylor Lane, August
2 & 3 from 8am-4pm. Large Estate Sale
UTICA- BARN Sale 2251 Washington
Rd. Aug 2 & 3rd 8am-5pm. Old furni-
ture, chairs, tables, dressers, interior
doors, household items, tools, refrigera-
tor, many old other items
VERONA MOVING Sale 434 New Age
Circle. August 1, 2, 3. 8am-5pm. Badger
Memorabilia, Furniture, Amish couch and
loveseat, recliner, futon, dresser, double
bed, rattan couch and chair, glass tables,
curio cabinets, kitchen cabinets, pictures,
tools, kitchenware.
664 LaWn & Garden
3-12 EVERGREEN & Shade Trees. Pick
up or Delivery! Planting Available! DET-
LOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444 (wcan)
RED INTERLOC Edgers - 66 .50 cents
each 608-845-7477 Verona.
666 medicaL & heaLth suPPLies
ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFER-
ERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP
Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus
FREE Home Delivery! Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection! 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL ALERT FOR SENIORS - 24/7
monitoring. Free Equipment. Free shipping.
Nationwide Services. $29.95/month Call Med-
ical Guardian today. 877-863-6622 (wcan)
668 musicaL instruments
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 Pets
Cats and Kittens for adoption. Healthy,
friendly. 608-848-4174 www.Angels-
Wish.org. Verona.
FOR SALE: 2 African Grey Red Belly
Parrots. Born Nov. 2004. Monroe Wi
Breeder. Hatch Certificates. Can be sold
separate. Cage & accessories included
in price. Please call 608-290-4087 or
608-862-1003. Must sell.
FOR SALE: Cockatiel. Age 10+ years.
Cage and accessories included in price
$175. Must sell. Call 608-290-4087 or
608-862-1003
676 PLants & FLoWers
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Prices starting at
just $19.99. Plus take 20% off your order
over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/
ActNow or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
688 sPortinG Goods
& recreationaL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATVs &
Motorcycles! Cash Paid NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 eLectronics
DIRECTV OVER 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Call now! Triple Sav-
ings. $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade
to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!
Start saving today. 800-320-2429 (wcan)
DISH NETWORK STARTING at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
888-719-6981 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for
12 mos) Options from ALL major service
providers. Call Aceller today to learn
more! 866-458-1545 (wcan)
696 Wanted to Buy
TOP PRICES
Any kind of scrap metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick-up
Property Clean Out
Honest/Fully Insured/U Call-We Haul
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 rentaLs
BROOKLYN BEAUTIFUL Modern
upper 1 bedroom apartment in quiet
neighborhood. Stove, refrigerator, W/D
included. $525. per month plus $525.
security deposit. Utilities not included.
1 year lease. No pets. No smoking. If
interested call 608-669-2460
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
SPECTACULAR 2BR Stoughton. Quiet
historic neighborhood, Master bedroom
balcony overlooks 2-story living room.
Hardwoods, designer ceramic bath, sky-
lights, C/A. No Smoking. 608-238-1692
STOUGHTON-LARGE 2-BDRM unit in
quiet, owner managed 10 unit. All appli-
ances, A/C. Close to shopping, off street
parking, large yard. Laundry. $675/month
PLUS UTILITIES. Water included. 850 sq
ft. 608-772-0234
STOUGHTON- LARGE One Bed-
room, Upper Level of Victorian house,
Near Downtown. Window A/C, Water,
Kitchen Appliances Included. $575/
month+security deposit. 608-873-7655
or 608-225-9033
STOUGHTON TWO bedroom upper.
595/month + utilities. Water/sewer paid.
Yard. 608-712-3384
STOUGHTON- WEST Main St newer
apartment. 1 bedroom, 1 bath. High
end appliances, include washer/dryer,
hardwood floors. Available 7/15 or 8/1.
$695/mo. Evans Properties, LLC. 608-
839-9100
720 aPartments
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
OREGON 2-BDRM second floor
apartment. No pets. No smoking $650+
electric. Next to shopping.
608-695-1181
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
VERONA 514 Topp Ave, 2 bedroom,
spacious, off street parking, A/C. Laundry
hookup, heat included. Available Sep-
tember 1. $690. rent/security deposit.
845-7057
740 houses For rent
STOUGHTON 4-BDRM, 2 1/2 bath
raised ranch. 2 1/2 car garage. Newly
renovated. No pets. No smoking. $1450
plus utilities. 608-209-8816
STOUGHTON- RAISED ranch 7-acres.
3-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, 2-car attached
garage No smoking indoors. $1250+
Utilities. Days Jeff 608-873-3923(lease)
750 storaGe sPaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
OREGON SELF-STORAGE
10x10 through 10x25
month to month lease
Call Karen Everson at
608-835-7031 or
Veronica Matt at 608-291-0316
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10 X 5 - 10 X 30
24/7 Access/Security lit.
Short/long term leases
608-334-1191
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
770 resort ProPerty For rent
FISH CANADA KINGFISHER
Resort Cottage-Boat-Motor-Gas. $75 per
person/day. Call for Specials
800-452-8824 www.kingfisherlodge.com
(wcan)
793 Wanted to rent
SOUTHERN DANE/NORTHERN ROCK
prefer country will consider city a newer
house. 608-289-2116
801 oFFice sPace For rent
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
810 commerciaL &
industriaL For saLe
VERONA CONTRACTORS Center
2400 sq. ft. shop with 2 bays
Radiant heat - Hot/Cold water
Bathroom/Shower 600 ft mezzanine
2 separate offices rented in front.
608-513-6273
820 misc. inVestment
ProPerty For saLe
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper Har-
bor & Lake Medora, MI. 320 wooded acres.
CFR tax. Will divide. Terms available. Ask-
ing $800 per acre. 715-478-2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper Harbor,
MI. 320 wooded acres. Montreal River runs
thru land. CFR tax. Will divide. Terms avail-
able. Asking $280,000 715-478-2085 (wcan)
845 houses For saLe
GREAT VERONA Home $295,900 606
Green Meadow Dr. Call 608-334-6093 or
fsbo madison.com
870 residentiaL Lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895

970 horses
2006 HAWK horse trailer Elite. Two
horse bumper pull, dressing/tack room,
extra wide & tall. Excellent condition,
blue/silver. Rumbar floors, loading ramp.
$11,000 OBO.
608-289-0968
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
980 machinery & tooLs
WANTED: TOBACCO Lathe, large or
small quantities. Paying top dollar. David
Lapp 4395 Spore Rd. Argyle 717-806-1035
990 Farm: serVice
& merchandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
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Mowing / Trimming / Clean-up
Tree/Shrub Pruning
Planting & Edging
Shredded Bark & More!
Jeff 608-575-5984
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Driveways
Floors
Patios
Sidewalks
Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
HELP WANTED- MANAGERIAL
UNITED PRAIRIE COOPERATIVE at New Town
ND is seeking a Manager of Business Operations.
RESPONSIBILITIES: Manager of Business Operations
is responsible for divisional proftability, sales, new
product/market development, reporting, purchasing,
resale pricing, inventory control, customer service,
asset maintenance, environmental compliance,
and other duties as assigned by the CEO/General
Manager. This supply very successful cooperative is
located in NW ND with great recreational opportunities.
Company owned housing is available. Email resume
to: larry.fuller@chsinc.com CHS National Director of
Placement, 5213 Shoal Drive, Bismarck ND 58503 or
call (701) 220-9775 (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
HBI, UTILITY CONTRACTOR, HAS Immediate
Opportunities in the Telephone Industry. Foremen,
Aerial Technicians, Cable Plow/Bore Rig Operators,
CDL Laborers. Training Offered. Travel Required for all
positions. 800-831-0754 www.holtger.com. EOE by AA
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefts! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079 (CNOW)
Take your career to the next level with Roehl CDL School-
earn your CDL-A and start a rewarding driving career!
Call Kim- 800-535-8420 GoRoehl.com AA/EOE (CNOW)
Gordon Trucking CDL-A Drivers Needed Up to $3,000
Sign-on Bonus! Starting Pay Up to $.44 cpm Full
Benefts, Excellent Hometime, No East Coast. Call 7
days/wk! GordonTrucking.com 866-565-0569 (CNOW)
Drivers - CDL-A Now Hiring Experienced OTR Drivers.
Excellent Miles, Family Oriented Company. Up to
$5000 Sign On Bonus USA TRUCK 877-521-5775
www.GoUSATruck.com (CNOW)
Get more home time on Transport Americas regional
runs. Great miles, equipment + extras. Enjoy Transport
Americas great driver experience! TAdrivers.com or
866-204-0648. (CNOW)
Drivers - Day Cab Drivers Wanted. Competitive Pay, HOME
DAILY. Join the deBoer team now! deBoer Transportation
800-825-8511 Apply Online: www.deboertrans.com (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
VACATION AND TRAVEL
Vacation Rentals on Lost Lake- St. Germain, Wisconsin.
Two Cottages, all amenities included-beautiful location.
3 day weekends avail. Property also for sale. Call 715-
499-2611 (CNOW)
16
Aug. 1, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Inventory Reduction Sale
50% OFF
Discontinued and Select Varieties
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4062 County Road A
(608) 873-8329
Stoughton, WI 53589
Open 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m., Monday through Friday
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Saturday
www.thefowerfactorynursery.com
100s of Varieties to Choose From
Including Rock Garden, Water Plants, Hostas,
Daylilies, Ornamental Grasses and
Native, Sun and Shade Perennials.
CARING DENTISTRY
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
General and
Cosmetic Dentistry,
Crowns, Bridges,
Implants, Veneers
Tooth Colored Fillings,
Whitening, Emergencies
New Patients Always Welcome
Mueller Dental Clinic
978 Park Street
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-0900
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for 15 Years!
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Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office Madison, WI 53783
2006 002138 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
Life is full of change.
Has your insurance kept up?
An outdated policy could mean costly
policy gaps or overlaps. To know for
sure, call me for a free, no-obligation
Personal Insurance Review.
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
Home Office Madison, WI 53783
2006 002138 3/06
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
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Southside block party a tradition
The neighborhood sandwiched between
Washington Street and State Street (and
spilling over a bit each way) held their
annual block party on Saturday, July 27.
This gathering has become a fun-filled
event for families in the neighborhood.
This summer event provides a great way
for new and old neighbors to get together.
The block party on the south side of
Oregon originated in 2006 when Dana
May organized the first event. The orga-
nizers this year were Dan Barker, Anna
Cowen, and Donna and Gary Disch with
others helping.
When the fire truck from the village
arrived, the young people were quick to
climb on board with the help of local fire
-fighters.
Several talented musicians live in the
neighborhood and performed at the party.
The block party band consisted of Ran-
dy and Shelley Glodowski, Tom Herman,
and David Briles. Additional musician
friends who joined in included Ron
Vogel, Jim Chelios, Mike Morganthaler.
Alan Maslowksi and Danny Sutter.
Article submitted
The block party band consisted of Randy and Shelley Glodowski, Tom Herman and David Briles.
The Oregon Fire Department showed up with a fire
truck for people to explore.
Photos submitted
Kids gather for facepainting.
Patty Kexel partakes in the potluck.
Photos by Michael Kriefski
Dance, dance
The Oregon High School Performing Arts Center played host to the annual spring dance recital of
A Leap Above Dance Studio. The recital, the Skys the Limit, was in June and had dancers ages
three and up. Right is Ally Kriefski dancing to Release. Left are Danielle Zurfluh and Sarah Dewey.
Kendal Franklin, Tori Lokuta, and Madison Finke dancing to You Cant Stop the Beat.