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List of 1940s jazz standards

List of 1940s jazz standards

Duke Ellington was one of the most influential jazz composers. His numerous standards include "Sophisticated Lady" (1933), "In a Sentimental Mood" (1935), "Cotton Tail" (1940) and "Satin Doll" (1953).

Jazz standards
A-Z Before 1920 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s and later

Jazz standards are musical compositions that are widely known, performed and recorded by jazz artists as part of the genre's musical repertoire. This list includes tunes written in the 1940s that are considered standards by at least one major fake book publication or reference work. The swing era lasted until the mid-1940s, and produced popular tunes such as Duke Ellington's "Cotton Tail" (1940) and Billy Strayhorn's "Take the 'A' Train" (1941). When the big bands struggled to keep going during World War II, a shift was happening in jazz in favor of smaller groups. Some swing era musicians, like Louis Jordan, later found popularity in a new kind of music, called "rhythm and blues", that would evolve into rock and roll in the 1950s.[1] Bebop emerged in the early 1940s, led by Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk and others. It appealed to a more specialized audiences than earlier forms of jazz, with sophisticated harmonies, fast tempos and often virtuoso musicianship. Bebop musicians often used 1930s standards, especially those from Broadway musicals, as part of their repertoire.[2] Among standards written by bebop musicians are Gillespie's "Salt Peanuts" (1941) and "A Night in Tunisia" (1942), Parker's "Anthropology" (1946), "Yardbird Suite" (1946) and "Scrapple from the Apple" (1947), and Monk's "'Round Midnight" (1944), which is currently the most recorded jazz standard composed by a jazz musician.[]

List of 1940s jazz standards

1940
"All Too Soon"[3] is a jazz ballad composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Carl Sigman. Tenor saxophonist Ben Webster's performance on the tune was so highly regarded by audiences that his successors in the band were asked how they dare sit on Webster's seat.[4] Webster later recorded the tune with young Sarah Vaughan in 1946.[5] "Cotton Tail"[6][7] is a swing jazz composition by Duke Ellington, with lyrics later added by Jon Hendricks. It was based on the Rhythm changes, a chord progression later used as a basis for many bebop tunes.[] Ben Webster was often asked by audiences to play his famous tenor saxophone solo note for note.[] The name of the tune is sometimes spelled as "Cottontail". "Do Nothing till You Hear from Me" (aka "Concerto for Cootie")[8][9][10][7] is a song composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Bob Russell. "Don't Get Around Much Anymore"[11][12][10][7][13] is a song composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Bob Russell.
[14][15][7][13] Trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie was one of the leading figures of bebop. Standards composed by him include "A Night in Tunisia" (1942), "Woody N' You" (1944) and "Groovin' High" (1944).

"How High the Moon" is a song composed by Morgan Lewis with lyrics by Nancy Hamilton. Among the many takes by jazz instrumentalists there are two vocal renditions which made their way, the classic Ella Fitzgerald live performance and Sarah Vaughan's rendition.

"In a Mellow Tone" (aka "In a Mellotone")[16][17][18][7][13] is a song composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Milt Gabler. "Polka Dots and Moonbeams"[19][20][10][13] is a song composed by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Johnny Burke. "You Stepped Out of a Dream"[21][22] is a song composed by Nacio Herb Brown with lyrics by Gus Kahn.

1941
"Brazil" (aka "Aquarela do Brasil")[23][24] is a song composed by Ary Barroso with lyrics by S. K. Russell. This is originally a 'samba' from Brazil which made its way in America and was sung by Carmen Miranda as well as by Frank Sinatra in his album 'Come Fly With Me' with arrangemnents by Billy May for Capitol Records. "Chelsea Bridge"[25][26][10] is a song written by Billy Strayhorn. "Flamingo"[27][28] is a song composed by Ted Grouya with lyrics by Edmund Anderson. "I Got It Bad (and That Ain't Good)"[29][30][31][13] is a song composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Paul Francis Webster. "I'll Remember April"[32][33][13] is a song composed by Gene de Paul with lyrics by Patricia Johnston and Don Raye. "Just A-Sittin' and A-Rockin'"[34] is a song composed by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn with lyrics by Lee Gaines. "Just Squeeze Me (But Please Don't Tease Me)"[35][36][37] is a song composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Lee Gaines. "Salt Peanuts"[38][39] is a jazz composition by Kenny Clarke and Dizzy Gillespie. "Take the 'A' Train"[40][41][10][13] is a song written by Billy Strayhorn.

List of 1940s jazz standards "Why Don't You Do Right?"[42] is a blues song by Kansas Joe McCoy. Originally titled "The Weed Smoker's Dream", McCoy rewrote the lyrics for Lil Green, who recorded it with Big Bill Broonzy in 1941. Peggy Lee recorded a hit version with Benny Goodman in 1945; this version was performed in Who Framed Roger Rabbit by Jessica Rabbit at the Ink and Paint Club.[43] "You Don't Know What Love Is"[44][45][13] is a song written by Gene De Paul and Don Raye.

1942
"C Jam Blues" (aka "Duke's Place")[46][47][7][13] is a song written by Duke Ellington. "Epistrophy"[48][13] is a song composed by Thelonious Monk and Kenny Clarke. "Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)"[49][50][13] is a song written by Jimmy Davis, Ram Ramirez and Jimmy Sherman. It is associated with the definitive Billie Holiday's rendition. "A Night in Tunisia"[51][52][7] is a song composed by Dizzy Gillespie and Frank Paparelli with lyrics by Jon Hendricks. "Perdido"[53][54][55][13] is a song composed by Juan Tizol with lyrics by Ervin Drake and Hans Jan Lengsfelder. "Skylark"[56][57][10] is a song composed by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. "There Will Never Be Another You"[58][59][10][7][13] is a song composed by Harry Warren with lyrics by Mack Gordon. "Things Ain't What They Used to Be"[60][61] is a song composed by Mercer Ellington with lyrics by Ted Persons.

1943
"Harlem Nocturne"[62][63][64] is a song composed by Earle Hagen with lyrics by Dick Rogers. "Star Eyes"[65][66] is a song written by Gene de Paul and Don Raye. "The Surrey with the Fringe on Top"[67][68][13] is a song composed by Richard Rodgers with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II.

1944

List of 1940s jazz standards "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye"[69][70] is a song written by Cole Porter. "Groovin' High"[71][72][7] is a jazz composition by Dizzy Gillespie. "I Fall in Love Too Easily" is a song composed by Jule Styne with lyrics by Sammy Cahn.[73] "I Should Care"[74][75][10][13] is a song written by Sammy Cahn, Axel Stordahl and Paul Weston. "It Could Happen to You"[76][77][13] is a song composed by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Johnny Burke. This song's harmony was base to another composition titled 'Fried Bananas' written by saxophonist Dexter Gordon. "Long Ago (And Far Away)"[78][79][10][13] is a song composed by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. "'Round Midnight" (aka "'Round About Midnight")[][80][7] is a song composed by Thelonious Monk and Cootie Williams with lyrics by Bernie Hanighen.
Thelonious Monk composed the most popular standard written by a jazz musician, "'Round Midnight" (1944). His other standards include "Well, You Needn't" (1944), "Straight, No Chaser" (1951) and "Blue Monk" (1954).

"Well, You Needn't (It's Over Now)"[81][82] is a song composed by Thelonious Monk with lyrics by Mike Ferro. "Woody N' You"[83][84][85][7] (aka "Algo Bueno") is a jazz composition by Dizzy Gillespie.

1945
"Billie's Bounce" (aka "Bill's Bounce")[86][87][13] is a jazz composition by Charlie Parker. "Everything But You"[88] is a song composed by Duke Ellington and Harry James with lyrics by Don George. "Hot House"[89] is a jazz composition by Tadd Dameron. "I'm Just a Lucky So-and-So"[90] is a song composed by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Mack David. "It Might as Well Be Spring"[91][92][13] is a song composed by Richard Rodgers with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. "Laura"[93][94] is a song composed by David Raksin for the film of the same title. Lyrics were penned later by Johnny Mercer and the vocal renditions by Frank Sinatra and by Johnny Mathis with arrangement by Don Costa became classic along several jazz instrumental renditions. "Now's the Time"[95][96][7][13] is a jazz composition by Charlie Parker. "Since I Fell for You"[97] is a song written by Buddy Johnson.

List of 1940s jazz standards

1946
"After Hours"[98] is a song composed by Avery Parrish with lyrics by Robert Bruce and Buddy Feyne. "Angel Eyes"[99][100][10][13] is a song composed by Matt Dennis with lyrics by Earl K. Brent, it is associated with Frank Sinatra 'saloon' rendition. "Anthropology"[101][102][10] is a jazz composition by Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker. "Come Rain or Come Shine"[103][104][7][13] is a song composed by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. "Confirmation"[105][106] is a jazz composition by Charlie Parker. "Day Dream"[107][108][109] is a song composed by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn with lyrics by John La Touche. "Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans"[110][111][7][13] is a song composed by Louis Alter with lyrics by Eddie DeLange. "If You Could See Me Now" is a song composed by Tadd Dameron with lyrics by Carl Sigman.[] "Nobody Else But Me" is a song composed by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II.[112] "Ornithology"[113][114][7] is a jazz composition by Charlie Parker and Bennie Harris. "Stella by Starlight"[115][116][7][13] is a song composed by Victor Young with lyrics by Ned Washington. "Tenderly"[117][118][10][13] is a song composed by pianist Walter Gross with lyrics by Jack Lawrence. "The Things We Did Last Summer"[119][120][13] is a song composed by Jule Styne with lyrics by Sammy Cahn. "Yardbird Suite"[121][122][7] is a jazz composition by Charlie Parker.

1947
"Autumn Leaves" (aka "Les Feuilles Mortes")[123][124][10][7][13] is a song composed by Joseph Kosma with original French lyrics by Jacques Prvert and English version by Johnny Mercer. "But Beautiful"[125][126][10][13] is a song composed by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Johnny Burke. "Donna Lee"[127][128] is a jazz composition by Miles Davis. "In Walked Bud"[129][130][10][13] is a song composed by Thelonious Monk. The song had lyrics written by Jon Hendricks who has recorded it with the composer in Monk's album titled 'Underground' (Columbia Records). "Lady Bird"[131][132][10] is a jazz composition by Tadd Dameron. "Nature Boy"[133][134][10][13] is a song written by eden ahbez. "On Green Dolphin Street"[135][136][7] is a song composed by Bronislaw Kaper with lyrics by Ned Washington. Main theme (instrumental) for the film 'Green Dolphin' which was retrieved by Miles Davis with great success. "Our Delight"[][][] is a jazz composition by Tadd Dameron. "Scrapple from the Apple"[137][138] is a jazz composition by Charlie Parker. It was based on the chord progression of Fats Waller's "Honeysuckle Rose".[139]

List of 1940s jazz standards

1948
"Four Brothers"[140][141][10][7] is a jazz composition by Jimmy Giuffre. "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes"[142][143][7][13] is a song composed by Jerry Brainin with lyrics by Buddy Bernier.

1949
"Lush Life"[144][145][10][7][13] is a song written by Billy Strayhorn. "My Foolish Heart"[146][147][13] is a song composed by Victor Young with lyrics by Ned Washington.

Notes
[6] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 90 [7] Listed in The Real Jazz Book [9] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 107 [10] Listed in New Real Book, Volume I [12] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 122 [13] Listed in The Real Vocal Book [15] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 180 [17] [18] [20] [22] [24] [26] [28] [30] [31] [33] [36] [37] [39] [41] [42] [45] [47] [48] [50] [52] [54] [55] [57] [59] [61] [63] [64] [66] [68] [70] [72] [75] [77] [79] [80] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 206 The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 170 The Real Book, Volume II, p. 318 The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 423 The Real Book, Volume III, p. 60 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 76 The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 105 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 187 The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 153 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 197 The Real Book, Volume III, p. 225 The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 194 The Real Book, Volume II, p. 340 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 398 The Real Book, Volume III, p. 447 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 459 The Real Book, Volume II, p. 74 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 132 The Real Book, Volume II, p. 255 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 302 The Real Book, Volume II, p. 311 The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 287 The Real Book, Volume III, p. 356 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 407 The Real Book, Volume III, p. 401 The Real Book, Volume III, p. 140 The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 127 The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 351 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 393 The Real Book, Volume III, p. 113 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 166 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 194 The Real Book, Volume II, p. 204 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 251 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 345

[82] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 435 [84] The Real Book, p. ? [85] The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 436

List of 1940s jazz standards


[87] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 44 [92] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 205 [94] The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 212 [96] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 293 [100] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 28 [102] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 29 [104] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 88 [106] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 87 [108] The Real Book, Volume III, p. 91 [109] The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 101 [111] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 108 [114] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 317 [116] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 382 [118] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 389 [120] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 394 [122] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 433 [124] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 39 [126] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 62 [128] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 123 [130] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 200 [132] The Real Book, Volume I, p. 235 [134] The Real Book, Volume II, p. 284 [136] [138] [141] [143] [145] [147] The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 273 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 351 The Real Book, Volume II, p. 138 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 301 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 258 The Real Book, Volume I, p. 286

Bibliography
Reference works
Bchmann-Mller, Frank (2006). Someone to Watch over Me: The Life and Music of Ben Webster. University of Michigan Press. ISBN0-472-11470-0. Crouch, Stanley (2007). Considering Genius: Writings on Jazz. Basic Books. ISBN0-465-01512-3. Herzhaft, Grard; Harris, Paul; Debord, Brigitte; Haussler, Jerry; Mikofsky, Anton J. (1997). Encyclopedia of the Blues. University of Arkansas Press. ISBN978-1-55728-452-5.

Fake books
The New Real Book, Volume I. Sher Music. 1988. ISBN0-9614701-4-3. The New Real Book, Volume II. Sher Music. 1991. ISBN0-9614701-7-8. The New Real Book, Volume III. Sher Music. 1995. ISBN1-883217-30-X. The Real Book, Volume I (6th ed.). Hal Leonard. 2004. ISBN0-634-06038-4. The Real Book, Volume II (2nd ed.). Hal Leonard. 2007. ISBN1-4234-2452-2. The Real Book, Volume III (2nd ed.). Hal Leonard. 2006. ISBN0-634-06136-4. The Real Jazz Book. Warner Bros. ISBN978-91-85041-36-7. The Real Vocal Book, Volume I. Hal Leonard. 2006. ISBN0-634-06080-5.

Article Sources and Contributors

Article Sources and Contributors


List of 1940s jazz standards Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?oldid=565884949 Contributors: Carlos from Rio, Czgibson, Dr. Blofeld, Jafeluv, John of Reading, Koavf, Oashi, Ohconfucius, Tassedethe, 2 anonymous edits

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File:Jazz musician Duke Ellington.JPEG Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Jazz_musician_Duke_Ellington.JPEG License: Public Domain Contributors: High Contrast File:Dizzy Gillespie playing horn 1955.jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Dizzy_Gillespie_playing_horn_1955.jpg License: Public Domain Contributors: Ary29, Dcoetzee, Docu, Frank C. Mller, G.dallorto, Infrogmation, Jkelly, Jossifresco, Juiced lemon, Mjrmtg, Romary, Wst File:Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947 (William P. Gottlieb 06191).jpg Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Thelonious_Monk,_Minton's_Playhouse,_New_York,_N.Y.,_ca._Sept._1947_(William_P._Gottlieb_06191).jpg License: unknown Contributors: Freimut Bahlo, Infrogmation, Ras67

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