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Reporter

Issue 1 Fall 2013
Issue 1
Fall 2013
Reporter Issue 1 Fall 2013 SUPREME COURT OF OHIO | THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF OHIO SPONSORScalendar of events . First up, the annual Law & Citizenship Conference… why not join friends and colleagues and let us do what we do best: provide you with valuable resources, up-to-date information and time-tested programs. Teachers, this conference is, as always, for you. Please join us as we celebrate 30 years strong – and enjoy a piece of birthday cake too! (Continued on page 3) Join us for the Law & Citizenship Conference ... “Great ideas! Excellent ways to engage students.” “If you teach government, this is the professional development to attend!” “…Always a great conference.” “I’ll strongly recommend … to members of the social studies department.” IN THIS ISSUE Teachable Moment: Appellate Process May “Appeal” to Students 2 NEW! OCLRE Launches Moot Court 4 Mock Trial Case Capsule 5 Mock Trial – Closing Arguments 6 OCLRE to Present Highest Honors at Annual Law & Citizenship Conference 7 InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire 8 And the winner is…. Cleveland middle school students 10 See the Ohio Constitution Come Alive: Ohio Government in Action 10 " id="pdf-obj-0-6" src="pdf-obj-0-6.jpg">
Reporter Issue 1 Fall 2013 SUPREME COURT OF OHIO | THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF OHIO SPONSORScalendar of events . First up, the annual Law & Citizenship Conference… why not join friends and colleagues and let us do what we do best: provide you with valuable resources, up-to-date information and time-tested programs. Teachers, this conference is, as always, for you. Please join us as we celebrate 30 years strong – and enjoy a piece of birthday cake too! (Continued on page 3) Join us for the Law & Citizenship Conference ... “Great ideas! Excellent ways to engage students.” “If you teach government, this is the professional development to attend!” “…Always a great conference.” “I’ll strongly recommend … to members of the social studies department.” IN THIS ISSUE Teachable Moment: Appellate Process May “Appeal” to Students 2 NEW! OCLRE Launches Moot Court 4 Mock Trial Case Capsule 5 Mock Trial – Closing Arguments 6 OCLRE to Present Highest Honors at Annual Law & Citizenship Conference 7 InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire 8 And the winner is…. Cleveland middle school students 10 See the Ohio Constitution Come Alive: Ohio Government in Action 10 " id="pdf-obj-0-8" src="pdf-obj-0-8.jpg">

SUPREME COURT OF OHIO | THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF OHIO

SPONSORS

OHIO STATE BAR ASSOCIATION | ACLU OF OHIO FOUNDATION

Age Is Just a Number… But We’re Bragging About Ours

For many, the bigger the number, the harder to celebrate. Birthdays, that is. Not the case for OCLRE. We’re 30 – and we couldn’t be happier to celebrate, especially with you.

Whether you are a teacher, parent, volunteer, alumni or sponsor, you are the best gift we could ever receive. Your continued support has helped bring citizenship to life for hundreds of thousands of students throughout Ohio. Quite simply, we could not do it without you.

Our gift to you: to listen to and partner with teachers across Ohio to provide programs, resources and opportunities that allow students to develop into informed, active citizens.

Join us as we blow out the candles and wish for many more celebrations to come. Take a look at our calendar of events. First up, the annual Law & Citizenship Conference… why not join friends and colleagues and let us do what we do best: provide you with valuable resources, up-to-date

Reporter Issue 1 Fall 2013 SUPREME COURT OF OHIO | THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF OHIO SPONSORScalendar of events . First up, the annual Law & Citizenship Conference… why not join friends and colleagues and let us do what we do best: provide you with valuable resources, up-to-date information and time-tested programs. Teachers, this conference is, as always, for you. Please join us as we celebrate 30 years strong – and enjoy a piece of birthday cake too! (Continued on page 3) Join us for the Law & Citizenship Conference ... “Great ideas! Excellent ways to engage students.” “If you teach government, this is the professional development to attend!” “…Always a great conference.” “I’ll strongly recommend … to members of the social studies department.” IN THIS ISSUE Teachable Moment: Appellate Process May “Appeal” to Students 2 NEW! OCLRE Launches Moot Court 4 Mock Trial Case Capsule 5 Mock Trial – Closing Arguments 6 OCLRE to Present Highest Honors at Annual Law & Citizenship Conference 7 InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire 8 And the winner is…. Cleveland middle school students 10 See the Ohio Constitution Come Alive: Ohio Government in Action 10 " id="pdf-obj-0-28" src="pdf-obj-0-28.jpg">

information and time-tested programs. Teachers, this conference is, as always, for you. Please join us as we celebrate 30 years strong – and enjoy a piece of birthday cake too!

(Continued on page 3)

Join us for the Law & Citizenship Conference ...

“Great ideas! Excellent ways to engage students.” “If you teach government, this is the professional development
“Great ideas!
Excellent ways to
engage students.”
“If you teach
government, this
is the professional
development to
attend!”
“…Always a
great conference.”
“I’ll strongly
recommend …
to members of
the social studies
department.”
 

IN THIS ISSUE

Teachable Moment:

Appellate Process May “Appeal” to Students

2

NEW! OCLRE Launches

Moot Court

4

Mock Trial Case Capsule

5

Mock Trial – Closing Arguments

6

OCLRE to Present Highest

Honors at Annual Law &

Citizenship Conference

7

InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire 8

And the winner is…. Cleveland middle

school students

10

See the Ohio Constitution Come Alive:

Ohio Government in Action 10

TEACHABLE MOMENT

Appellate Process May “Appeal” to Students

TEACHABLE MOMENT Appellate Process May “Appeal” to Students by Jared Reitz, OCLRE director of programs Thep rogram: Moot Court . Through research, writing and simulated oral arguments, students will gain a better understanding of the appellate process, a process that is often not taught completely or thoroughly understood by students, or many adults for that matter. Like a football game, if we only saw the kickoff and the touchdown, we’d miss a lot of the good stuff! In many cases, the most important decisions are those made long after the courtroom action is over and the case winds its way through the appellate process. During the appellate process, parties argue critical procedural and legal issues that may challenge everything from a judge’s pretrial decisions to the rulings made during trial. Despite how interesting the facts in a dispute may be, if a case does not follow proper procedures or the judge incorrectly applies the law, the court may never get to a decision on the actual merits of the case, a verdict may be overturned or a new trial may be required. Take a look at Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, the landmark case found in most American history and government texts and one of interest to most students. Students may know the events of December 1965 when Mary Beth Tinker, her brother John, and Christopher Eckhardt wore black arm bands to their schools to symbolically express their opposition to the War in Vietnam and in support of a truce, proposed by Senator Robert Kennedy. It should be noted that the students had the strong support of their parents. The school had a policy in place that prohibited students from wearing black armbands at school. The students were suspended from school for wearing the armbands. At issue: to what degree do students in public schools have freedom of speech/ expression and what limits can be placed on that freedom? Students may also know that on February 24, 1969 the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in favor of the Tinkers and Eckhardt, holding their conduct was protected by the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment and the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. But what was happening the four years between the day the armbands were worn and the day the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in the case? In March 1966, three months after the students were suspended, the Iowa Civil Liberties Union filed suit on behalf of the students in federal district court seeking an injunction that would forbid the school board form enforcing the armband policy because it violated the First Amendment. The school board argued that the students’ armbands disrupted school order and educational activities. The federal district court denied the request for an injunction on September 1, 1966, ruling the school board had the right to prevent students from wearing armbands. Later that month, ICLU appealed the ruling to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. In November 1967, the Court of Appeals issued a 4-4 decision without an opinion. As a result the district court’s earlier decision in favor of the school board was affirmed. In January 1968 the students filed a certiorari appeal with the Supreme Court of the United States (a discretionary appeal requesting to be heard by the Court) and on March 4, 1968 the Court granted the request. Oral arguments were held November 22, 1968. On February 24, 1969, the Court ruled 7-2 in favor of the students, finding that the students were quiet and passive, wearing armbands was not disruptive did not impinge upon educational activities. The Court concluded that the students’ conduct was protected by the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment. What is not included here, are the many briefs filed by both sides, as well as the arguments presented to the Court that centered on both procedural and constitutional issues. It is very easy to go on line and find, either in summary or word for word, details of the case. Check out www.oyez.org for detailed information about U. S. Supreme Court cases. With so many interesting cases past and present, ask students to select either an Ohio or U.S. Supreme Court Case that is of interest to them and have them research the issues of the case from the beginning through the appellate process. Have them offer their rulings on the cases with proper rationale. Invite an attorney to speak to the class; he or she can explain the role of the appellate courts and the proper procedures. Create a chart that shows a case flow through the state courts and/ or the federal courts. Develop a board game that takes students through the appellate process. i Civics has several interactive games and resources designed to teach students about the role of the appellate courts. 2 " id="pdf-obj-1-8" src="pdf-obj-1-8.jpg">

by Jared Reitz, OCLRE director of programs

The Center is excited about its new program: Moot Court. Through

research, writing and simulated oral arguments, students will gain a better understanding of the appellate process, a process that is often not taught completely or thoroughly understood by students, or many adults for that matter. Like a football game, if we only saw the kickoff and the touchdown, we’d miss a lot of the good stuff! In many cases, the most important decisions are those made long after the courtroom action is over and the case winds its way through the appellate process. During the appellate process, parties argue critical procedural and legal issues that may challenge everything from a judge’s pretrial decisions to the rulings made during trial. Despite how interesting the facts in a dispute may be, if a case does not follow proper procedures or the judge incorrectly applies the law, the court may never get to a decision on the actual merits of the case, a verdict may be overturned or a new trial may be required.

Take a look at Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District,

the landmark case found in most American history and government texts and one of interest to most students. Students may know the events of December 1965 when Mary Beth Tinker, her brother John, and Christopher Eckhardt wore black arm bands to their schools to symbolically express their opposition to the War in Vietnam and in support of a truce, proposed by Senator Robert Kennedy. It should be noted that the students had the strong support of their parents. The school had a policy in place that prohibited students from wearing black armbands at school. The students were suspended from school for wearing the armbands.

At issue: to what degree do students in public schools have freedom of speech/ expression and what limits can be placed on that freedom? Students may also know that on February 24, 1969 the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in favor of the Tinkers and Eckhardt, holding their conduct was

protected by the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment and the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. But what was happening the four years between the day the armbands were worn and the day the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in the case?

In March 1966, three months after the students were suspended, the Iowa Civil Liberties Union filed suit on behalf of the students in federal district court seeking an injunction that would forbid the school board form enforcing the armband policy because it violated the First Amendment. The school board argued that the students’ armbands disrupted school order and educational activities. The federal district court denied the request for an injunction on September 1, 1966, ruling the school board had the right to prevent students from wearing armbands. Later that month, ICLU appealed the ruling to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. In November 1967, the Court of Appeals issued a 4-4 decision without an opinion. As a result the district court’s earlier decision in favor of the school board was affirmed. In January 1968 the students filed a certiorari appeal with the Supreme Court of the United States (a discretionary appeal requesting to be heard by the Court) and on March 4, 1968 the Court granted the request. Oral arguments were held November 22, 1968. On February 24, 1969, the Court ruled 7-2 in favor of the

students, finding that the students were quiet and passive, wearing armbands was not disruptive did not impinge upon educational activities. The Court concluded that the students’ conduct was protected by the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment.

What is not included here, are the many briefs filed by both sides, as well as the arguments presented to the Court that centered on both procedural and constitutional issues. It is very easy to go on line and find, either in summary or word for word, details of the case. Check out www.oyez.org for detailed information about U. S. Supreme Court cases.

With so many interesting cases past and present, ask students to select either an Ohio or U.S. Supreme Court Case that is of interest to them and have them research the issues of the case from the beginning through the appellate process. Have them offer their rulings on the cases with proper rationale. Invite an attorney to speak to the class; he or she can explain the role of the appellate courts and the proper procedures. Create a chart that shows a case flow through the state courts and/ or the federal courts. Develop a board game that takes students through the appellate process. iCivics has several interactive games and resources designed to teach students about the role of the appellate courts.

TEACHABLE MOMENT Appellate Process May “Appeal” to Students by Jared Reitz, OCLRE director of programs Thep rogram: Moot Court . Through research, writing and simulated oral arguments, students will gain a better understanding of the appellate process, a process that is often not taught completely or thoroughly understood by students, or many adults for that matter. Like a football game, if we only saw the kickoff and the touchdown, we’d miss a lot of the good stuff! In many cases, the most important decisions are those made long after the courtroom action is over and the case winds its way through the appellate process. During the appellate process, parties argue critical procedural and legal issues that may challenge everything from a judge’s pretrial decisions to the rulings made during trial. Despite how interesting the facts in a dispute may be, if a case does not follow proper procedures or the judge incorrectly applies the law, the court may never get to a decision on the actual merits of the case, a verdict may be overturned or a new trial may be required. Take a look at Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, the landmark case found in most American history and government texts and one of interest to most students. Students may know the events of December 1965 when Mary Beth Tinker, her brother John, and Christopher Eckhardt wore black arm bands to their schools to symbolically express their opposition to the War in Vietnam and in support of a truce, proposed by Senator Robert Kennedy. It should be noted that the students had the strong support of their parents. The school had a policy in place that prohibited students from wearing black armbands at school. The students were suspended from school for wearing the armbands. At issue: to what degree do students in public schools have freedom of speech/ expression and what limits can be placed on that freedom? Students may also know that on February 24, 1969 the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in favor of the Tinkers and Eckhardt, holding their conduct was protected by the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment and the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. But what was happening the four years between the day the armbands were worn and the day the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in the case? In March 1966, three months after the students were suspended, the Iowa Civil Liberties Union filed suit on behalf of the students in federal district court seeking an injunction that would forbid the school board form enforcing the armband policy because it violated the First Amendment. The school board argued that the students’ armbands disrupted school order and educational activities. The federal district court denied the request for an injunction on September 1, 1966, ruling the school board had the right to prevent students from wearing armbands. Later that month, ICLU appealed the ruling to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. In November 1967, the Court of Appeals issued a 4-4 decision without an opinion. As a result the district court’s earlier decision in favor of the school board was affirmed. In January 1968 the students filed a certiorari appeal with the Supreme Court of the United States (a discretionary appeal requesting to be heard by the Court) and on March 4, 1968 the Court granted the request. Oral arguments were held November 22, 1968. On February 24, 1969, the Court ruled 7-2 in favor of the students, finding that the students were quiet and passive, wearing armbands was not disruptive did not impinge upon educational activities. The Court concluded that the students’ conduct was protected by the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment. What is not included here, are the many briefs filed by both sides, as well as the arguments presented to the Court that centered on both procedural and constitutional issues. It is very easy to go on line and find, either in summary or word for word, details of the case. Check out www.oyez.org for detailed information about U. S. Supreme Court cases. With so many interesting cases past and present, ask students to select either an Ohio or U.S. Supreme Court Case that is of interest to them and have them research the issues of the case from the beginning through the appellate process. Have them offer their rulings on the cases with proper rationale. Invite an attorney to speak to the class; he or she can explain the role of the appellate courts and the proper procedures. Create a chart that shows a case flow through the state courts and/ or the federal courts. Develop a board game that takes students through the appellate process. i Civics has several interactive games and resources designed to teach students about the role of the appellate courts. 2 " id="pdf-obj-1-42" src="pdf-obj-1-42.jpg">

Law & Citizenship Conference:

Developed For Teachers, By Teachers

Reading, Teaching Primary/Historic Documents

Steven Steinglass Jane Ann Craig
Steven Steinglass
Jane Ann Craig

Steven Steinglass, Dean Emeritus of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University, is one of Ohio’s leading experts on the Ohio Constitution. To

help teachers learn more about this document

mandated to be taught by SB 165, Dean Steinglass will present What Every Ohio Teacher Should Know About the Ohio Constitution. Returning favorite Jane Ann Craig will present her lessons on teaching primary documents. Related sessions include:

• Understanding the Common Core

• How Students Can Work with Primary Source and Historic

Documents

• How to Read Like a Historian

Social Studies Updates and Resources

Law & Citizenship Conference: Developed For Teachers, By Teachers Reading, Teaching Primary/Historic Documents Steven Steinglass Janey s for Students to Avoid Financial Trouble • And Much More! 3 " id="pdf-obj-2-30" src="pdf-obj-2-30.jpg">

Dwight Groce

Social studies education is changing and teachers know they must adapt accordingly. OCLRE will make sure you are up-to-date

on the changes to the social studies, as well as available updates and resources. Dwight Groce, consultant from the Ohio Department of Education, will present

Making the Shift to Ohio’s New Learning

Standards: K-12 Social Studies.

Additional Sessions by:

• Ohio Resource Center • Ohio Council for the Social Studies

Technology Through the Social Studies Lens

Law & Citizenship Conference: Developed For Teachers, By Teachers Reading, Teaching Primary/Historic Documents Steven Steinglass Janey s for Students to Avoid Financial Trouble • And Much More! 3 " id="pdf-obj-2-48" src="pdf-obj-2-48.jpg">

David Harms

David Harms, 2013 Ohio Technology- Using Teacher of the Year, is a social studies teacher at Penta Career Center in Perrysburg, Ohio. OCLRE is excited to host Mr. Harms, who will present the session Integrating Technology into Government Secondary Education. Related sessions include:

• Preparing for a Brave New World:

Technology in the Classroom

• How to Google-ize Your Classroom

Project Based Learning

Law & Citizenship Conference: Developed For Teachers, By Teachers Reading, Teaching Primary/Historic Documents Steven Steinglass Janey s for Students to Avoid Financial Trouble • And Much More! 3 " id="pdf-obj-2-62" src="pdf-obj-2-62.jpg">

Cleveland teacher Teddy Mwonyonyi

believes engaging students in service learning projects that are technology- based and help her students develop a sense of civic responsibility and community engagement. Come learn from Ms Mwonyonyi about ready-to-use project based programs. Related sessions include:

• Taking Projects from Dessert to the Main

Teddy Mwonyonyi

Course: Project-Based Learning for the 21st Century

• Project-Based Learning Using OCLRE

Programs

A Conversation on Civic Education with Justice French

Law & Citizenship Conference: Developed For Teachers, By Teachers Reading, Teaching Primary/Historic Documents Steven Steinglass Janey s for Students to Avoid Financial Trouble • And Much More! 3 " id="pdf-obj-2-80" src="pdf-obj-2-80.jpg">

Justice French

Get to know Supreme Court of Ohio Justice Judi French in this town hall-style session as she leads a discussion on civic education in Ohio. She not only wants to share her passion on this topic, but also hear from educators from around the state. She hopes to be a resource for educators around Ohio who might like to offer a real-

life perspective on the role of the judicial

system in the lives of all Ohioans.

Mock Trial & Moot Court

It’s time to reveal the 2014 Ohio Mock Trial case! What rights do students “leave at the school house door?” Find out during the presentation of this year’s case, Phillips School District v. Jesse Springfield et al. Related sessions include:

• Introduction to Moot Court

• How To Teach Ohio Mock Trial’s Modified Rules of

Evidence

• Effective Speeches: Opening Statements and Closing

Arguments

Exciting Sessions Not to Miss

• Bringing Citizenship to Life: Educators Running for the Legislature • Teaching Controversial Issues Through Supreme Court Decisions • Teaching Social Studies in the 21st Century • YMCA Youth in Government Program • Top Ten Ways for Students to Avoid Financial Trouble • And Much More!

Teacher Resources from OCLRE A Closer Look at Local, State and National Citizenship Activities through anhere . High School Teachers Get the “Go-To” Resource for Government Teachers: Government in Action Manual Government in Action: A Content Manual for Teachers with Classroom Applications has been reprinted by the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education and is for sale. Written by Dr. David Naylor and Dr. Bruce Smith, both from the University of Cincinnati, content includes the nature of government, our federal system, Ohio’s history and Constitution, the three branches of Ohio government and more. Government in Action has been reviewed by teachers who found it the “go to” resource for teaching the requirements of Senate Bill 165 which includes U.S. and Ohio founding documents. Cost: Members $10 Non Members $15 " id="pdf-obj-3-3" src="pdf-obj-3-3.jpg">

Teacher Resources from OCLRE

A Closer Look at Local, State and National Citizenship Activities through an Ohio Lens

Special Offer!

Updated and Available on CD

In celebration of our 30th anniversary, the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education is pleased to make its activity book for third and fourth grades available at a special price of $30 – but only through September 30. The “book” is in CD format; more than 300 pages, including the special section “What Every Ohioan Should Know.”

Not only does MY OHIO align with the academic content standards for the social studies, it provides all the details to conduct the lessons and activities, including background information for the teacher, student activity pages, and assessments. View sample lessons and read teacher testimonials here.

High School Teachers

Get the “Go-To” Resource for Government Teachers: Government in Action Manual

Government in Action: A Content Manual for Teachers with Classroom Applications has been reprinted by the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education and is for sale. Written by Dr. David Naylor and Dr. Bruce Smith, both from the University of Cincinnati, content includes the nature of government, our federal system, Ohio’s history and Constitution, the three branches of Ohio

government and more. Government in Action has been reviewed by teachers who found it the “go to” resource for teaching the requirements of Senate Bill 165 which includes U.S. and Ohio founding documents. Cost:

Members $10

Non Members $15

NEW! OCLRE Launches Moot Court

The Center is excited to unveil its newest program, Moot Court. Appropriate for high school students, Moot Court focuses on the appellate court process and is designed to provide students the opportunity to present a simulated oral argument and respond to questions posed by a panel of volunteer judges. Moot Court arguments are evaluated on the application of the law to the facts of the case. Moot Court will also give many students their first experience in legal writing by allowing them to compose a legal brief related to their arguments, which will be reviewed and scored by volunteer attorneys.

The Moot Court case and complete program details will be released at the 2013 Law & Citizenship Conference.

Teacher Resources from OCLRE A Closer Look at Local, State and National Citizenship Activities through anhere . High School Teachers Get the “Go-To” Resource for Government Teachers: Government in Action Manual Government in Action: A Content Manual for Teachers with Classroom Applications has been reprinted by the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education and is for sale. Written by Dr. David Naylor and Dr. Bruce Smith, both from the University of Cincinnati, content includes the nature of government, our federal system, Ohio’s history and Constitution, the three branches of Ohio government and more. Government in Action has been reviewed by teachers who found it the “go to” resource for teaching the requirements of Senate Bill 165 which includes U.S. and Ohio founding documents. Cost: Members $10 Non Members $15 NEW! OCLRE Launches Moot Court The Center is excited to unveil its newest program, Moot Court . Appropriate for high school students, Moot Court focuses on the appellate court process and is designed to provide students the opportunity to present a simulated oral argument and respond to questions posed by a panel of volunteer judges. Moot Court arguments are evaluated on the application of the law to the facts of the case. Moot Court will also give many students their first experience in legal writing by allowing them to compose a legal brief related to their arguments, which will be reviewed and scored by volunteer attorneys. The Moot Court case and complete program details will be released at the 2013 Law & Citizenship Conference. 4 " id="pdf-obj-3-41" src="pdf-obj-3-41.jpg">

MOCK TRIAL NEWS

Mock Trial Case Capsule

Phillips School District v. Jesse Springfield, et al.

Phillips High School agrees to license naming rights of its field to a large corporation. In response, students organize protests both in school and on the field. The school district responds by installing security cameras, searching lockers of the students involved and filing a lawsuit seeking an order authorizing the school to remove the students from the field. The students claim that the school district’s actions violated their First and Fourth Amendment rights.

Mock Trial Case & Competition Committees

The Center is grateful to the Case Committee, which devoted many hours researching the issues, drafting witness statements and briefs, and creating exhibits for the 2013-2014 Ohio Mock Trial case materials.

We are also grateful to the members of the Competition Committee who work tirelessly to ensure the mock trial competition runs smoothly and with integrity.

2013-2014 Ohio Mock Trial Committee:

David Bloomfield, Esq., Bloomfield & Kempf

Paul Cox, Esq.

Bob Hart, Esq.*

Jon Hsu, Esq., Ohio Environmental Review Appeals Commission

Laura Jurcevich, Esq., Perez & Morris

Kara Keating, Esq., Franklin County Prosecutor’s Office

Joshua Leckrone, Esq., Golden & Walters

Julie Lindstrom, Esq.

Stephanie Graubner Nelson, Esq., Supreme Court of Ohio

Diana Ramos Reardon, MPA, JD, Supreme Court of Ohio

Jeremy Young, Esq., Roetzel & Andress*

*Co-Chair of the Case Committee

2013-2014 High School Mock Trial Competition Committee:

Jeffrey Ginsburg, Esq.

Competition Committee Chair

Shirley Cochran, Esq.

Attorney at Law and Mediator

The Honorable Jerry McBride

Clermont County Court of Common Pleas

Mock Trial Reminders…

• The 2013-14 Ohio Mock Trial Case will be available beginning

Sunday, September 22nd at the Center’s Law & Citizenship Conference.

• Request for Materials (for those not attending the Law &

Citizenship Conference) and Team Registration forms are available now. The team registration deadline is December 6th. Teams registering between December 6th and January 6th will be assessed a $30 late fee. Teams registering after January 6th will be able to compete only on a space available basis. No refunds will be available after January 6th.

• Questions regarding the case may be submitted to tburch@

oclre.org, and answers will be posted to the Errata Sheet at www.oclre.org. The Errata Sheet will be updated every two weeks beginning October 15th and ending January 21st.

• District site assignments and competition times will be

released on the Center’s website on January 10th.

New: Rule Changes for 2013-2014

• In addition to laptop computers, smartphones, tablets and

similar electronic devices are explicitly prohibited from use during trial.

• Objections during opening statements and closing

arguments are prohibited.

• Teams will have the opportunity to receive score sheets on

the day of competition. The Score Sheet Complaint Form provided in the case packet must be used to bring any issues to OCLRE’s attention.

Mock Trial Professional Development – September 21st

Are you new to the Center’s mock trial programs, or interested in learning more? This session will prepare middle and high school teachers to implement mock trials in the classroom. Learn to develop legal strategy and perform all steps of a trial including delivering speeches, questioning witnesses and making objections. Attendees will leave this session with a better understanding of how to teach the mock trial process. Participants will receive a certificate of participation for contact hours. Register online. Note: Attendance at this professional development is complimentary with Law & Citizenship Conference registration. Please contact Todd Burch at 877-485-

3510 or tburch@oclre.org with any questions.

MOCK TRIAL NEWS Mock Trial Case Capsule Phillips School District v. Jesse Springfield, et al. Phillipsavailable now . The team registration deadline is December 6th. Teams registering between December 6th and January 6th will be assessed a $30 late fee. Teams registering after January 6th will be able to compete only on a space available basis. No refunds will be available after January 6th. • Questions regarding the case may be submitted to tburch@ oclre .org, and answers will be posted to the Errata Sheet at w w w . o c l r e . o r g . The Errata Sheet will be updated every two weeks beginning October 15th and ending January 21st. • District site assignments and competition times will be released on the Center’s website on January 10th. New: Rule Changes for 2013-2014 • In addition to laptop computers, smartphones, tablets and similar electronic devices are explicitly prohibited from use during trial. • Objections during opening statements and closing arguments are prohibited. • Teams will have the opportunity to receive score sheets on the day of competition. The Score Sheet Complaint Form provided in the case packet must be used to bring any issues to OCLRE’s attention. Mock Trial Professional Development – September 21st Are you new to the Center’s mock trial programs, or interested in learning more? This session will prepare middle and high school teachers to implement mock trials in the classroom. Learn to develop legal strategy and perform all steps of a trial including delivering speeches, questioning witnesses and making objections. Attendees will leave this session with a better understanding of how to teach the mock trial process. Participants will receive a certificate of participation for contact hours. Register online . Note: Attendance at this professional development is complimentary with Law & Citizenship Conference registration. Please contact Todd Burch at 877-485- 3510 or tburch@oclre.org with any questions. 5 " id="pdf-obj-4-128" src="pdf-obj-4-128.jpg">

Mock Trial – Closing Arguments

Mock Trial – Closing Arguments By Todd Burch, Esq., program coordinator Closing arguments are one ofcgodfrey@oclre.org or call us toll-free at ( 877) 485-3510. 6 " id="pdf-obj-5-6" src="pdf-obj-5-6.jpg">

By Todd Burch, Esq., program coordinator

Closing arguments are one of the most important elements of a mock trial case as they are the last

thing a judge sees and a team’s sole opportunity to make legal arguments. Significantly different from an opening statement, a closing can and should make legal arguments. An effective closing will make clear the connection between the facts of the case and the applicable law. Thus, closings are often assigned to students with the best critical thinking and public speaking skills.

The structure of a closing argument may vary more than that of an opening statement. Closings can be structured around the legal elements of an action, the facts that make up the story of the case or in any other way that helps the judges clearly understand the arguments. That said, effective closing arguments have several important components.

Incorporate a theme: All mock trial speeches should incorporate a theme. Effective themes succinctly encapsulate the theory of the case in a way that the judges will remember throughout the trial. One way to create a theme is to finish the sentence “this case is about…” For example, “this case is about greed” or “this case is about choices.” There are certainly other effective themes such as a quote or a story. The theme should be

used in the opening statement, closing argument and wherever else possible during the trial. Themes enable judges to quickly recall a team’s theory of the case.

Argue: The closing is a team’s one and only opportunity to make legal arguments in a mock trial case so it is extremely important to make it count. A prosecution

or plaintiff closing needs to clearly state the burden of proof and how it has been met through the evidence presented. A defense closing should also discuss the burden but focus on how the prosecution has failed to meet it. A closing argument is not the time to qualify your points. For example, the plaintiff in a civil case should plainly declare to have met each element of the case by a preponderance of the evidence.

Connect the law to the facts:

Regardless of structure, the majority of time in a closing argument should be spent connecting the law and the facts. Simply reciting the favorable facts or law is not the most effective strategy, it should be demonstrated how both fit together. For example, in last season’s Dakota Allen case, a prosecution attorney might first point out the legal standard that a totality of circumstances test is used when determining coercion. Then, discuss cases where coercion was found not to have occurred. Finally, the attorney should point out facts of the current case that are similar to the previous cases with a favorable holding. Similarly, the closing attorney may also distinguish unfavorable precedent by arguing how the facts of the current case are different.

Presentation: Even the most well written closing argument will not score well if it is presented poorly. After all, the judges will never see a transcript and it is up to the attorney to make certain the judges understand and are engaged in what is being presented. A closing attorney should use inflection, eye contact, pacing, gestures and other public speaking techniques to advance the arguments. Closings represent the longest amount of time in a mock trial that the judges will be focused on an individual student. Thus it is extremely important for closing attorneys to develop sound public speaking skills.

Start and end strong: Judges are more likely to remember the arguments they hear at the beginning of the closing and near the end. Arguments near the middle may be more easily forgotten. For this reason, it is important to state the theme as well as the strongest arguments at the beginning and end of the closing. The final few lines of the closing are the last thing the judges will hear in the trial so it is important they contain a succinct and passionate argument that will resonate with the judges.

As with any mock trial element, there are many closing argument strategies and approaches that may be effective. However, teams that incorporate the concepts above should have an excellent chance for success by finishing strong and leaving the judges with a positive impression of their case.

Registration Update: Login + Password = Time Saved, Convenience

OCLRE registration forms will now require a unique login and password. But don’t worry! We hope this feature will prove to be a convenience, particularly for returning participants and those who participate in more than one program. The main user benefit is the auto-fill feature, which will allow the system to “remember” return users and automatically populate known fields such as name, address and email.

Be sure to create a password you can easily remember. If you happen to forget your password, an automated ‘Forgot My Password’ utility will send a new temporary password to your email address on file. If you experience difficulty at any time, please contact

Cathy Godfrey at cgodfrey@oclre.org or

call us toll-free at ( 877) 485-3510.

Registration Update: Login + Password = Time Saved, Convenience OCLRE registration forms will now require acgodfrey@oclre.org or call us toll-free at ( 877) 485-3510. " id="pdf-obj-5-52" src="pdf-obj-5-52.jpg">
Registration Update: Login + Password = Time Saved, Convenience OCLRE registration forms will now require acgodfrey@oclre.org or call us toll-free at ( 877) 485-3510. " id="pdf-obj-5-54" src="pdf-obj-5-54.jpg">

OCLRE to Present Highest Honors at Annual Law & Citizenship Conference

Each fall, the Center bestows to champions for the cause of law-related education its two highest honors: the Lori U. Eiler Award for Mock Trial Coaching Excellence and the Founders’ Award, the latter of which is named in honor of the OCLRE founders, who believed strongly in creating programs and opportunities that engage students in learning about law, democracy and the importance of civic responsibility.

OCLRE to Present Highest Honors at Annual Law & Citizenship Conference Each fall, the Center bestows

Jeffrey Schobert is the 2013 recipient of the Eiler Award. Schobert served as a legal advisor to the Archbishop Hoban High School mock trial team for more than seven years. A former mock trial student described Schobert as a patient and dedicated coach who “completely dedicated himself to [the]

team.” A busy and successful lawyer himself, Jeff Schobert gladly embraced his role as a team legal advisor and made adjustments to his schedule to work with the students. Hoban team advisor Kevin Hillery offered these words about Schobert: “All in all, Jeff is most remembered…for the relationships he made with the kids on his teams. He really pushed [them] to expect more from themselves and was there for them as they needed support…”

OCLRE to Present Highest Honors at Annual Law & Citizenship Conference Each fall, the Center bestows

William K. Weisenberg was selected by the OCLRE Board of Trustees as the recipient of the 2013 Founders’ Award in recognition of his longstanding commitment to OCLRE’s mission, his significant support in connecting OCLRE with the Ohio General Assembly, and for his collaborative

efforts with the Supreme Court of Ohio and the Ohio Attorney General’s Office to secure adequate funding and expand programmatic opportunities. Weisenberg is assistant executive director for public affairs, government relations and diversity initiatives for the Ohio State Bar Association.

The Law and Leadership Institute

OCLRE to Present Highest Honors at Annual Law & Citizenship Conference Each fall, the Center bestowsp ro g ram’s website www.lawandleadership.org . The Law and Leadership Institute is hiring! If you would like to join our administrative team in Columbus as Program Direc- tor or Development Consultant, contact LLI Executive Director Hope Sharett at hsharett@lawandleadership.org . 7 " id="pdf-obj-6-21" src="pdf-obj-6-21.jpg">

LLI students at Mock Trial Competition held at the Supreme Court of Ohio

Most high school students spend the long, lazy days of summer sleeping in, hanging out with friends and swimming at the local pools- unless of course they are the students of the Law and Leadership Institute (LLI). These students spend five weeks of the summer at their local law school campus learning about the law and developing important leadership and life skills. LLI is designed to introduce high school students from under-served schools to the wide array of legal careers and to prepare those students to achieve the scholastic success needed to ultimately obtain a law degree. LLI recruits students from the high schools that neighbor the eight Ohio law schools located in urban areas, namely the cities of Akron, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Dayton and Toledo. Despite their proximity to the law schools, many of the students

who attend LLI’s Summer Institute at their local law school campuses would not have otherwise ever considered taking the necessary steps toward a college and a legal career without the LLI experience.

Statewide, the Law and Leadership Institute has nearly 400 participants in grades 9 through 12. Students begin the LLI journey the summer before ninth grade and remain with the program until graduation. 100% of LLI alumni are college bound and many with academic scholarships. Applications are available from middle school counselors or the LLI website in January, each year. During June and July students meet five days a week at the law school from 9AM until 4PM, with meals, supplies and transportation included free of charge. Students even earn a cash stipend! During the school year, students attend LLI classes on Saturdays receiving academic support, including free ACT preparation and training for mock trial competitions. The law school administration graciously made the facilities available so that the students could see what it feels like to study in a law school classroom.

The Law and Leadership Institute originated with the Supreme Court of Ohio on a pilot basis in 2008 with just over 40 ninth grade students split between Cleveland State University’s Cleveland-Marshall College of Law and

The Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law. Now, in 2013 the program has expanded to include all eight urban law schools in six Ohio cities. Courtesy of the financial and in-kind support of the Ohio State Bar Association, the Ohio State Bar Foundation, the Law School Admission Council, in addition to the state’s law schools, bar associations and other stewards of the Ohio legal community, LLI continues its work to enhance the diversity of the state’s legal profession so that it more closely resembles the diversity of the state. An imbalance not unique to Ohio, but one no less ironic given that the courts and legal profession have traditionally played a critical role in protecting the rights of minorities and the economically disadvantaged by taking the lead on issues ranging from job discrimination to school desegregation.

Further information about the LLI program can be obtained at the program’s website www.lawandleadership.org.

The Law and Leadership Institute is hiring! If you would like to join our administrative team in Columbus as Program Direc- tor or Development Consultant, contact LLI Executive Director Hope Sharett at hsharett@lawandleadership.org.

7

InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire

*Editor’s note: “InspirED” will be a regular column in the Reporter, featuring stories from current or former students about

educators (the “ED” in InpirED) who have made a special impact in their lives. This first installment was authored by OCLRE Board member Pierce Reed. Mr. Reed interviewed members of the legal community who shared stories about teachers who influenced and encouraged them. Contact Kate Strickland at

kstrickland@oclre.org to share your story.

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires.” -William Arthur Ward

re-elected four times since then. But that’s just his latest service to Ohio. Prior to joining the court, he served as an assistant prosecutor, assistant attorney general, in both houses of the General Assembly, and in private practice in his native Crawford County, where he still resides and farms.

“I was lucky enough to have an uncle who had been a state FFA officer and he set me on a path to do the same. With the help of my Vocational Agriculture teacher and my English teacher, I started high school in parliamentary procedure contests and extemporaneous public speaking contests sponsored by the FFA. I did well in those and did become a state officer in the FFA.

By Pierce Reed

“Those teachers and my family set me on

InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire *Editor’s note: “InspirED” will be a regular column inkstrickland@oclre.org to share your story. “ The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires. ” -William Arthur Ward re-elected four times since then. But that’s just his latest service to Ohio. Prior to joining the court, he served as an assistant prosecutor, assistant attorney general, in both houses of the General Assembly, and in private practice in his native Crawford County, where he still resides and farms. “I was lucky enough to have an uncle who had been a state FFA officer and he set me on a path to do the same. With the help of my Vocational Agriculture teacher and my English teacher, I started high school in parliamentary procedure contests and extemporaneous public speaking contests sponsored by the FFA. I did well in those and did become a state officer in the FFA. By Pierce Reed “Those teachers and my family set me on OCLRE Board of Trustees Sr. Judicial Attorney to Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor, Supreme Court of Ohio a course that just seemed natural. It is not always the big planned conversations between student and teacher. It may often be the gentle nudge, the slight encouragement, the ‘have you thought about’ questions that may get a child The end of summer thinking about themselves and their possibilities in an entirely different way.” is a special time in Ohio. It’s the time to get in that last boat ride or trip to Cedar Point, to stop by the local farmers’ markets to get freshly picked sweet corn, to get to that last big league baseball game (go Red Sox!) or county fair (go fried dough!). And for those of us at OCLRE, it is time to prepare for all of the teachers, lawmakers and judges who will be soon be educating, legislating and adjudicating. Debbie Enck Debbie Enck, one of Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor’s judicial externs, is a delightful and determined student. She simultaneously earned two baccalaureate degrees (one in As we do so this year, I found myself wondering how we can inspire our students to participate in their government in an era in which most citizens seem to have more interest – and faith – in the Kardashians and Real Housewives than they do in their elected officials. So, I asked some of the people here at Supreme Court of Ohio about who encouraged them to pursue the law and government service. Their responses, found below, are interesting. Sometimes, even small things make a big impact. Justice Paul Pfeifer Justice Pfeifer is one of Ohio’s great public servants. Currently the senior statesman of the court, he was first elected justice in 1992 and has been psychology and one in political science), graduating magna cum laude from the University of Arizona. After teaching in the Baltimore (MD) Public Schools, she moved to Denver and worked in a mental health center before starting law school. She is now entering her second year at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State as a top ranked student, with a full merit scholarship. Debbie still remembers the teacher who made a huge impact on her: “I distinctly remember the high school teacher – Leslie Steen – who influenced me to pursue a legal education. The same teacher taught all of the AP social studies courses at my school, so I took her class four years in a row. She was also the coach for our high school mock trial team. “My entire life I had been devoted to two pursuits: softball and music. But, after my third year in her class, Ms. Steen convinced me to try out for the mock trial team. So, my senior year in high school I added mock trial to my extra-curriculars. “Despite never having participated in mock trial, my teacher made me lead counsel for the defense. I remember the months preparing for that trial more vividly than most anything that I did in high school. That year brought many personal challenges to my life, but mock trial turned into my solace. At the end of the season (my team placed third, by the way), my teacher gave us all a little gift and a personal note. Mine said: ‘You were my rock, and the backbone of this team. Your future is bright if you continue chasing what you love to do.’ It is one of the most sincere and meaningful compliments I have ever received, and nine years later, here I am!” Demetrius Daniels-Hill Demetrius Daniels- Hill attended high school in Gahanna, his hometown. He is well on his way to being a double Buckeye: after graduating with honors in political science and humanities from The Ohio State University in 2011, he enrolled in the Moritz College of Law. Demetrius, who will graduate this spring, currently works part-time in the Columbus City Attorney’s Office and hopes to be a prosecutor. An incredibly talented and persuasive oralist, I have no doubt that he will persuade every juror he encounters to see things his way. “I had a speech teacher my junior year, Mr. Lyle Linerode. I took the class and ended up loving it. He helped me get over my fear of public speaking. “He was also the coach of the Gahanna Speech and Debate team. I joined the team and did public forum debate my senior year. I realized two things my senior year: I love arguing, and I hate math and science. This recognition made the decision to go to law school a pretty easy one. I’m sure Mr. Linerode had famous quotes and what not, and I know that many of my former classmates remember them 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-28" src="pdf-obj-7-28.jpg">

OCLRE Board of Trustees Sr. Judicial Attorney to Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor, Supreme Court of Ohio

a course that just seemed natural. It is not always the big planned conversations between student and teacher. It may often be the gentle nudge, the slight encouragement, the ‘have you thought about’ questions that may get a child

The end of summer

thinking about themselves and their possibilities in an entirely different way.”

is a special time in

Ohio. It’s the time to get in that last boat ride or trip to Cedar Point, to stop by the local farmers’ markets to get freshly picked sweet corn, to get to that last big league baseball game (go Red Sox!) or county fair (go fried dough!). And for those of us at OCLRE, it is time to prepare for all of the teachers, lawmakers and judges who will be soon be educating, legislating and adjudicating.

Debbie Enck

InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire *Editor’s note: “InspirED” will be a regular column inkstrickland@oclre.org to share your story. “ The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires. ” -William Arthur Ward re-elected four times since then. But that’s just his latest service to Ohio. Prior to joining the court, he served as an assistant prosecutor, assistant attorney general, in both houses of the General Assembly, and in private practice in his native Crawford County, where he still resides and farms. “I was lucky enough to have an uncle who had been a state FFA officer and he set me on a path to do the same. With the help of my Vocational Agriculture teacher and my English teacher, I started high school in parliamentary procedure contests and extemporaneous public speaking contests sponsored by the FFA. I did well in those and did become a state officer in the FFA. By Pierce Reed “Those teachers and my family set me on OCLRE Board of Trustees Sr. Judicial Attorney to Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor, Supreme Court of Ohio a course that just seemed natural. It is not always the big planned conversations between student and teacher. It may often be the gentle nudge, the slight encouragement, the ‘have you thought about’ questions that may get a child The end of summer thinking about themselves and their possibilities in an entirely different way.” is a special time in Ohio. It’s the time to get in that last boat ride or trip to Cedar Point, to stop by the local farmers’ markets to get freshly picked sweet corn, to get to that last big league baseball game (go Red Sox!) or county fair (go fried dough!). And for those of us at OCLRE, it is time to prepare for all of the teachers, lawmakers and judges who will be soon be educating, legislating and adjudicating. Debbie Enck Debbie Enck, one of Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor’s judicial externs, is a delightful and determined student. She simultaneously earned two baccalaureate degrees (one in As we do so this year, I found myself wondering how we can inspire our students to participate in their government in an era in which most citizens seem to have more interest – and faith – in the Kardashians and Real Housewives than they do in their elected officials. So, I asked some of the people here at Supreme Court of Ohio about who encouraged them to pursue the law and government service. Their responses, found below, are interesting. Sometimes, even small things make a big impact. Justice Paul Pfeifer Justice Pfeifer is one of Ohio’s great public servants. Currently the senior statesman of the court, he was first elected justice in 1992 and has been psychology and one in political science), graduating magna cum laude from the University of Arizona. After teaching in the Baltimore (MD) Public Schools, she moved to Denver and worked in a mental health center before starting law school. She is now entering her second year at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State as a top ranked student, with a full merit scholarship. Debbie still remembers the teacher who made a huge impact on her: “I distinctly remember the high school teacher – Leslie Steen – who influenced me to pursue a legal education. The same teacher taught all of the AP social studies courses at my school, so I took her class four years in a row. She was also the coach for our high school mock trial team. “My entire life I had been devoted to two pursuits: softball and music. But, after my third year in her class, Ms. Steen convinced me to try out for the mock trial team. So, my senior year in high school I added mock trial to my extra-curriculars. “Despite never having participated in mock trial, my teacher made me lead counsel for the defense. I remember the months preparing for that trial more vividly than most anything that I did in high school. That year brought many personal challenges to my life, but mock trial turned into my solace. At the end of the season (my team placed third, by the way), my teacher gave us all a little gift and a personal note. Mine said: ‘You were my rock, and the backbone of this team. Your future is bright if you continue chasing what you love to do.’ It is one of the most sincere and meaningful compliments I have ever received, and nine years later, here I am!” Demetrius Daniels-Hill Demetrius Daniels- Hill attended high school in Gahanna, his hometown. He is well on his way to being a double Buckeye: after graduating with honors in political science and humanities from The Ohio State University in 2011, he enrolled in the Moritz College of Law. Demetrius, who will graduate this spring, currently works part-time in the Columbus City Attorney’s Office and hopes to be a prosecutor. An incredibly talented and persuasive oralist, I have no doubt that he will persuade every juror he encounters to see things his way. “I had a speech teacher my junior year, Mr. Lyle Linerode. I took the class and ended up loving it. He helped me get over my fear of public speaking. “He was also the coach of the Gahanna Speech and Debate team. I joined the team and did public forum debate my senior year. I realized two things my senior year: I love arguing, and I hate math and science. This recognition made the decision to go to law school a pretty easy one. I’m sure Mr. Linerode had famous quotes and what not, and I know that many of my former classmates remember them 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-49" src="pdf-obj-7-49.jpg">

Debbie Enck, one of Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor’s judicial externs, is a delightful and determined student. She simultaneously earned two baccalaureate

degrees (one in

As we do so this year, I found myself wondering how we can inspire our students to participate in their government in an era in which most citizens seem to have more interest – and faith – in the Kardashians and Real Housewives than they do in their elected officials. So, I asked some of the people here at Supreme Court of Ohio about who encouraged them to pursue the law and government service. Their responses, found below, are interesting. Sometimes, even small things make a big impact.

InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire *Editor’s note: “InspirED” will be a regular column inkstrickland@oclre.org to share your story. “ The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires. ” -William Arthur Ward re-elected four times since then. But that’s just his latest service to Ohio. Prior to joining the court, he served as an assistant prosecutor, assistant attorney general, in both houses of the General Assembly, and in private practice in his native Crawford County, where he still resides and farms. “I was lucky enough to have an uncle who had been a state FFA officer and he set me on a path to do the same. With the help of my Vocational Agriculture teacher and my English teacher, I started high school in parliamentary procedure contests and extemporaneous public speaking contests sponsored by the FFA. I did well in those and did become a state officer in the FFA. By Pierce Reed “Those teachers and my family set me on OCLRE Board of Trustees Sr. Judicial Attorney to Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor, Supreme Court of Ohio a course that just seemed natural. It is not always the big planned conversations between student and teacher. It may often be the gentle nudge, the slight encouragement, the ‘have you thought about’ questions that may get a child The end of summer thinking about themselves and their possibilities in an entirely different way.” is a special time in Ohio. It’s the time to get in that last boat ride or trip to Cedar Point, to stop by the local farmers’ markets to get freshly picked sweet corn, to get to that last big league baseball game (go Red Sox!) or county fair (go fried dough!). And for those of us at OCLRE, it is time to prepare for all of the teachers, lawmakers and judges who will be soon be educating, legislating and adjudicating. Debbie Enck Debbie Enck, one of Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor’s judicial externs, is a delightful and determined student. She simultaneously earned two baccalaureate degrees (one in As we do so this year, I found myself wondering how we can inspire our students to participate in their government in an era in which most citizens seem to have more interest – and faith – in the Kardashians and Real Housewives than they do in their elected officials. So, I asked some of the people here at Supreme Court of Ohio about who encouraged them to pursue the law and government service. Their responses, found below, are interesting. Sometimes, even small things make a big impact. Justice Paul Pfeifer Justice Pfeifer is one of Ohio’s great public servants. Currently the senior statesman of the court, he was first elected justice in 1992 and has been psychology and one in political science), graduating magna cum laude from the University of Arizona. After teaching in the Baltimore (MD) Public Schools, she moved to Denver and worked in a mental health center before starting law school. She is now entering her second year at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State as a top ranked student, with a full merit scholarship. Debbie still remembers the teacher who made a huge impact on her: “I distinctly remember the high school teacher – Leslie Steen – who influenced me to pursue a legal education. The same teacher taught all of the AP social studies courses at my school, so I took her class four years in a row. She was also the coach for our high school mock trial team. “My entire life I had been devoted to two pursuits: softball and music. But, after my third year in her class, Ms. Steen convinced me to try out for the mock trial team. So, my senior year in high school I added mock trial to my extra-curriculars. “Despite never having participated in mock trial, my teacher made me lead counsel for the defense. I remember the months preparing for that trial more vividly than most anything that I did in high school. That year brought many personal challenges to my life, but mock trial turned into my solace. At the end of the season (my team placed third, by the way), my teacher gave us all a little gift and a personal note. Mine said: ‘You were my rock, and the backbone of this team. Your future is bright if you continue chasing what you love to do.’ It is one of the most sincere and meaningful compliments I have ever received, and nine years later, here I am!” Demetrius Daniels-Hill Demetrius Daniels- Hill attended high school in Gahanna, his hometown. He is well on his way to being a double Buckeye: after graduating with honors in political science and humanities from The Ohio State University in 2011, he enrolled in the Moritz College of Law. Demetrius, who will graduate this spring, currently works part-time in the Columbus City Attorney’s Office and hopes to be a prosecutor. An incredibly talented and persuasive oralist, I have no doubt that he will persuade every juror he encounters to see things his way. “I had a speech teacher my junior year, Mr. Lyle Linerode. I took the class and ended up loving it. He helped me get over my fear of public speaking. “He was also the coach of the Gahanna Speech and Debate team. I joined the team and did public forum debate my senior year. I realized two things my senior year: I love arguing, and I hate math and science. This recognition made the decision to go to law school a pretty easy one. I’m sure Mr. Linerode had famous quotes and what not, and I know that many of my former classmates remember them 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-59" src="pdf-obj-7-59.jpg">

Justice Paul Pfeifer

Justice Pfeifer is one of Ohio’s great public servants. Currently the senior statesman of the court, he was first elected justice in 1992 and has been

psychology and one in political science), graduating magna cum laude from the University of Arizona. After teaching in the Baltimore (MD) Public Schools, she moved to Denver and worked in a mental health center before starting law school. She is now entering her second year at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State as a top ranked student, with a full merit scholarship. Debbie still remembers the teacher who made a huge impact on her:

“I distinctly remember the high school

teacher – Leslie Steen – who influenced me to pursue a legal education. The same teacher taught all of the AP social studies courses at my school, so I took her class four years in a row. She was also the coach for our high school mock trial team.

“My entire life I had been devoted to two

pursuits: softball and music. But, after my

third year in her class, Ms. Steen convinced me to try out for the mock trial team. So, my senior year in high school I added mock trial to my extra-curriculars.

“Despite never having participated in mock trial, my teacher made me lead counsel for the defense. I remember the months preparing for that trial more vividly than most anything that I did in high school. That year brought many personal challenges to my life, but mock trial turned into my solace. At the end of the season (my team placed third, by the way), my teacher gave us all a little gift and a personal note. Mine said: ‘You were my rock, and the backbone of this team. Your future is bright if you continue chasing what you love to do.’ It is one of the most sincere and meaningful compliments I have ever received, and nine years later, here I am!”

Demetrius Daniels-Hill

InspirED: Students’ stories about educators who inspire *Editor’s note: “InspirED” will be a regular column inkstrickland@oclre.org to share your story. “ The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires. ” -William Arthur Ward re-elected four times since then. But that’s just his latest service to Ohio. Prior to joining the court, he served as an assistant prosecutor, assistant attorney general, in both houses of the General Assembly, and in private practice in his native Crawford County, where he still resides and farms. “I was lucky enough to have an uncle who had been a state FFA officer and he set me on a path to do the same. With the help of my Vocational Agriculture teacher and my English teacher, I started high school in parliamentary procedure contests and extemporaneous public speaking contests sponsored by the FFA. I did well in those and did become a state officer in the FFA. By Pierce Reed “Those teachers and my family set me on OCLRE Board of Trustees Sr. Judicial Attorney to Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor, Supreme Court of Ohio a course that just seemed natural. It is not always the big planned conversations between student and teacher. It may often be the gentle nudge, the slight encouragement, the ‘have you thought about’ questions that may get a child The end of summer thinking about themselves and their possibilities in an entirely different way.” is a special time in Ohio. It’s the time to get in that last boat ride or trip to Cedar Point, to stop by the local farmers’ markets to get freshly picked sweet corn, to get to that last big league baseball game (go Red Sox!) or county fair (go fried dough!). And for those of us at OCLRE, it is time to prepare for all of the teachers, lawmakers and judges who will be soon be educating, legislating and adjudicating. Debbie Enck Debbie Enck, one of Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor’s judicial externs, is a delightful and determined student. She simultaneously earned two baccalaureate degrees (one in As we do so this year, I found myself wondering how we can inspire our students to participate in their government in an era in which most citizens seem to have more interest – and faith – in the Kardashians and Real Housewives than they do in their elected officials. So, I asked some of the people here at Supreme Court of Ohio about who encouraged them to pursue the law and government service. Their responses, found below, are interesting. Sometimes, even small things make a big impact. Justice Paul Pfeifer Justice Pfeifer is one of Ohio’s great public servants. Currently the senior statesman of the court, he was first elected justice in 1992 and has been psychology and one in political science), graduating magna cum laude from the University of Arizona. After teaching in the Baltimore (MD) Public Schools, she moved to Denver and worked in a mental health center before starting law school. She is now entering her second year at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State as a top ranked student, with a full merit scholarship. Debbie still remembers the teacher who made a huge impact on her: “I distinctly remember the high school teacher – Leslie Steen – who influenced me to pursue a legal education. The same teacher taught all of the AP social studies courses at my school, so I took her class four years in a row. She was also the coach for our high school mock trial team. “My entire life I had been devoted to two pursuits: softball and music. But, after my third year in her class, Ms. Steen convinced me to try out for the mock trial team. So, my senior year in high school I added mock trial to my extra-curriculars. “Despite never having participated in mock trial, my teacher made me lead counsel for the defense. I remember the months preparing for that trial more vividly than most anything that I did in high school. That year brought many personal challenges to my life, but mock trial turned into my solace. At the end of the season (my team placed third, by the way), my teacher gave us all a little gift and a personal note. Mine said: ‘You were my rock, and the backbone of this team. Your future is bright if you continue chasing what you love to do.’ It is one of the most sincere and meaningful compliments I have ever received, and nine years later, here I am!” Demetrius Daniels-Hill Demetrius Daniels- Hill attended high school in Gahanna, his hometown. He is well on his way to being a double Buckeye: after graduating with honors in political science and humanities from The Ohio State University in 2011, he enrolled in the Moritz College of Law. Demetrius, who will graduate this spring, currently works part-time in the Columbus City Attorney’s Office and hopes to be a prosecutor. An incredibly talented and persuasive oralist, I have no doubt that he will persuade every juror he encounters to see things his way. “I had a speech teacher my junior year, Mr. Lyle Linerode. I took the class and ended up loving it. He helped me get over my fear of public speaking. “He was also the coach of the Gahanna Speech and Debate team. I joined the team and did public forum debate my senior year. I realized two things my senior year: I love arguing, and I hate math and science. This recognition made the decision to go to law school a pretty easy one. I’m sure Mr. Linerode had famous quotes and what not, and I know that many of my former classmates remember them 8 " id="pdf-obj-7-81" src="pdf-obj-7-81.jpg">

Demetrius Daniels- Hill attended high school in Gahanna, his hometown. He is well on his way to being a double Buckeye:

after graduating with honors in

political science and humanities from The Ohio State University in 2011, he enrolled in the Moritz College of Law. Demetrius, who will graduate this spring, currently works part-time in the

Columbus City Attorney’s Office and hopes

to be a prosecutor. An incredibly talented and persuasive oralist, I have no doubt that he will persuade every juror he encounters to see things his way.

“I had a speech teacher my junior year, Mr. Lyle Linerode. I took the class and ended up loving it. He helped me get over my fear of public speaking.

“He was also the coach of the Gahanna Speech and Debate team. I joined the team and did public forum debate my senior year. I realized two things my senior year: I love arguing, and I hate math and science. This recognition made the decision to go to law school a pretty easy one.

I’m sure Mr. Linerode had famous quotes and what not, and I know that many of my former classmates remember them

well.

I just have a bad memory.

But I

do remember that he was the one who helped me overcome fear, and find my way into a career that I love, and one that matters. And hopefully it won’t involve much math.”

Rebecca F. Rabb

well. I just have a bad memory. But I do remember that he was the oneOhio State Bar Foundation’s Constitution Classroom . If you want to make “Constitution Day”- September 17th - or any other day of the year with your students creative and productive, visit o s b f . n e t for Constitution Classroom and seize these free, downloadable materials. No warrant neces- sary. You will find • Materials researched by lawyers but written for teachers and students No need to do any last minute research • More than 150 pages of content, lesson plans, activities, interactive PowerPoints to use in your classroom Updated Supreme Court cases that deal with actual students and issues they face today • Lessons charted for easy reference to Ohio Benchmark Standards • And… • Committed lawyers who will help teach these lessons with you any day of the year, including September 17th For more information about this program, contact Beth Gillespie at bgillespie@osbf.net or 614-487-4474. 9 " id="pdf-obj-8-12" src="pdf-obj-8-12.jpg">

When I moved to Columbus from Boston in 2005, I started working for then-Justice O’Connor. The following year, I met Rebecca, who was

participating in the judicial externship program at Moritz. She was incredibly bright and hard working, impressing even the attorney on staff who was least likely to be impressed.

After she graduated law school, Rebecca began working for Judge Mary DeGenaro in a busy appellate court in Youngstown. After a few years there, she returned to Columbus and served as a judicial attorney to former-Justice Yvette McGee Brown for two years before joining the staff of Justice William M. O’Neill earlier this year. She is now one of my colleagues in the Chief Justice’s chambers. After working for a chief justice, two justices, and a judge, I was interested in her take:

“I was lucky to have been surrounded by public-spirited people from the day that I was born. Both of my parents have devoted their lives to public service, and their community of friends and colleagues included social workers, Legal Aid attorneys, non-profit directors, and

all manner of government employees

and community organizers. I had a lot of good models to look up to.

“I was also extremely lucky to have attended a wonderful school, Linworth Alternative High School, which is one of Worthington Public Schools’ hidden gems. The teachers and administrators in that

school often dedicate decades of their

lives to educating students, and helping students educate themselves.

One of the phenomenal things about Linworth is that it includes experiential

learning.

During their senior year,

students at Linworth go on ‘walkabouts’ – essentially internships that a student creates by contacting professionals in a field in which the student has a career interest. I spent one of my walkabouts working in a national park in South Dakota. I got to assist scientists as they collected data and studied the geology and biology of Jewel Cave. I tackled my fear of public speaking by giving tours of the cave to visitors. But the more significant experience was right here in Columbus.

During my other walkabout, I had the opportunity to work with Gayle Channing Tenenbaum, who was a lobbyist involved with the Public Children’s Services Association of Ohio. She involved me in note-taking while we were attending committee hearings at the Statehouse, listening to testimony on pending legislation that impacted child welfare and

family unity. I often served as her scribe,

and learned a great deal as I did so. also gave me the opportunity to work

She

with Charleta Tavares, now a state senator from the 15th District, but then one of the first African-American women to serve in the Ohio House of Representatives.

I was inspired by both women. I saw the power of government, and the issues that legislators addressed – sometimes positively and sometimes not. It was then that I started to think about a career in law. Even though I wasn’t quite sure what I would do in it, I knew I wanted to do something, and something that mattered, for the public.”

well. I just have a bad memory. But I do remember that he was the oneOhio State Bar Foundation’s Constitution Classroom . If you want to make “Constitution Day”- September 17th - or any other day of the year with your students creative and productive, visit o s b f . n e t for Constitution Classroom and seize these free, downloadable materials. No warrant neces- sary. You will find • Materials researched by lawyers but written for teachers and students No need to do any last minute research • More than 150 pages of content, lesson plans, activities, interactive PowerPoints to use in your classroom Updated Supreme Court cases that deal with actual students and issues they face today • Lessons charted for easy reference to Ohio Benchmark Standards • And… • Committed lawyers who will help teach these lessons with you any day of the year, including September 17th For more information about this program, contact Beth Gillespie at bgillespie@osbf.net or 614-487-4474. 9 " id="pdf-obj-8-52" src="pdf-obj-8-52.jpg">

What’s In It for Me?

Constitution Day: September 17

Relating to the Constitution can be a daunting task for students. Before they invest their time and energy to learn something, they ask “What’s in it for me?” As a teacher, you also want to know “What’s in it for me?” when present- ed with teaching resources about free speech or due process. These valid questions are at the heart of the Ohio State Bar Foundation’s Constitution Classroom.

If you want to make “Constitution Day”- September 17th - or any other day of the year with your students creative and productive, visit osbf.net for Constitution Classroom and seize these free, downloadable materials. No warrant neces- sary. You will find

Materials researched by lawyers but written for teachers and students

No need to do any last minute research

More than 150 pages of content, lesson plans, activities, interactive PowerPoints to use in your classroom

Updated Supreme Court cases that deal with actual students and issues they face today • Lessons charted for easy reference to Ohio Benchmark Standards

And…

• Committed lawyers who will help teach these lessons with you any day of the year, including September 17th

For more information about this program, contact Beth Gillespie at bgillespie@osbf.net or 614-487-4474.

And the winner is…. Cleveland middle school students

And the winner is…. Cleveland middle school students By L. Gayle Gadison, Social Studies Flexible ContentState of Mississippi v. T. J. Avery , which is based on Taylor’s book, and to learn about courtroom protocol. Afterwards, teachers worked with attorneys, recruited by the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, to prepare their students for the competition. Several teachers were veterans of the program. Newcomer, Kim Chambers, teacher at Daniel E. Morgan School said, “This was an amazing experience. We will do it again.” Jared Reitz, from the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education, travels to Cleveland from Columbus each year to observe the competition, offer suggestions, and support the program. Overall, the teams were well prepared. The competition was so fierce that it resulted in a three-way tie. The growth and success of Cleveland’s middle school mock trial program is a result of collaboration between the Social Studies Department, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, the Cuyahoga County Courts and OCLRE. And the winners are. . . Riverside, Euclid Park, and Wade Park Elementary Schools. The three winners will share the coveted mock trial trophy. See the Ohio Constitution Come Alive: Ohio Government in Action Go behind the scenes of Ohio’s government and meet those in the seats of power in the legislative, executive and judicial branches November 5 & 6! ... • Place-based learning Teaching to SB 165 • • Original texts – the Ohio Constitution • Meet with members of the General Assembly and Justices of the Supreme Court of Ohio Join us • See the Supreme Court in session • Participate in tours and simulations • Take home ready-to-use lesson plans, activities and resources What past participants say about OGIA: “I am leaving this seminar very energized to teach my students about government and citizenship.” “This conference provided real knowledge concerning the three branches of government.” “…[B]y far the best professional development I have ever attended!” 10 " id="pdf-obj-9-6" src="pdf-obj-9-6.jpg">

By L. Gayle Gadison, Social Studies Flexible Content Expert, Cleveland Metropolitan School District

Students, parents,

and teachers eagerly waited for the results of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District’s Third Annual Middle School Mock Trial Competition. On May 31, two hundred sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students traveled to the Cuyahoga County Justice Center in Cleveland, Ohio to compete for bragging rights and the chance to house the mock trial trophy at their school for the 2013-2014 school year.

Students were dressed for success and ready to compete in courtrooms reserved especially for them. Attorneys, recruited by the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar

Association, served as magistrates. The volunteer magistrates not only scored the team presentations, but provided students with valuable feedback. Magistrate Pam Daiker-Middaugh noted that students made good use of their witness statements.

Students read Roll of Thunder, Hear

My Cry by Mildred Taylor, in their English/

language arts classes.

Social studies

teachers attended a meeting, facilitated by members of the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, to receive and discuss the case, State of Mississippi

v. T. J. Avery, which is based on Taylor’s book, and to learn about courtroom

protocol.

Afterwards, teachers worked

with attorneys, recruited by the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, to prepare their students for the competition. Several teachers were veterans of the program. Newcomer, Kim Chambers, teacher at Daniel E. Morgan School said, “This was an amazing experience. We

will do it again.” Jared Reitz, from the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education, travels to Cleveland from Columbus each year to observe the competition, offer suggestions, and support the program.

Overall, the teams were well prepared. The competition was so fierce that it resulted in a three-way tie. The growth and success of Cleveland’s middle school mock trial program is a result of collaboration between the Social Studies Department, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, the Cuyahoga County Courts and OCLRE.

And the winners

are. . .

Riverside, Euclid

Park, and Wade Park Elementary Schools. The three winners will share the coveted mock trial trophy.

See the Ohio Constitution Come Alive:

And the winner is…. Cleveland middle school students By L. Gayle Gadison, Social Studies Flexible ContentState of Mississippi v. T. J. Avery , which is based on Taylor’s book, and to learn about courtroom protocol. Afterwards, teachers worked with attorneys, recruited by the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, to prepare their students for the competition. Several teachers were veterans of the program. Newcomer, Kim Chambers, teacher at Daniel E. Morgan School said, “This was an amazing experience. We will do it again.” Jared Reitz, from the Ohio Center for Law-Related Education, travels to Cleveland from Columbus each year to observe the competition, offer suggestions, and support the program. Overall, the teams were well prepared. The competition was so fierce that it resulted in a three-way tie. The growth and success of Cleveland’s middle school mock trial program is a result of collaboration between the Social Studies Department, the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association, the Cuyahoga County Courts and OCLRE. And the winners are. . . Riverside, Euclid Park, and Wade Park Elementary Schools. The three winners will share the coveted mock trial trophy. See the Ohio Constitution Come Alive: Ohio Government in Action Go behind the scenes of Ohio’s government and meet those in the seats of power in the legislative, executive and judicial branches November 5 & 6! ... • Place-based learning Teaching to SB 165 • • Original texts – the Ohio Constitution • Meet with members of the General Assembly and Justices of the Supreme Court of Ohio Join us • See the Supreme Court in session • Participate in tours and simulations • Take home ready-to-use lesson plans, activities and resources What past participants say about OGIA: “I am leaving this seminar very energized to teach my students about government and citizenship.” “This conference provided real knowledge concerning the three branches of government.” “…[B]y far the best professional development I have ever attended!” 10 " id="pdf-obj-9-57" src="pdf-obj-9-57.jpg">

Go behind the scenes of Ohio’s government and meet those in the seats

of power in the legislative, executive and judicial branches November 5 & 6!

...

• Place-based learning Teaching to SB 165

• Original texts – the Ohio Constitution

• Meet with members of the General Assembly and

Justices of the Supreme Court of Ohio

Join us

• See the Supreme Court in session • Participate in tours and simulations • Take home ready-to-use lesson plans, activities and resources

What past participants say about OGIA:

“I am leaving this seminar very energized to teach my students about government and citizenship.”

“This conference provided real knowledge concerning the three branches of government.”

“…[B]y far the best professional development I have ever attended!”

Thank you to all who have registered with the Kroger Community Rewards program to support OCLRE. By remembering to add us to your grocery list, you’ve helped contribute to the provision of civic education programs for thousands of students throughout the state. Thanks for helping us to ‘feed’ hungry young minds.

Just a reminder: All Kroger Plus cardholders must re-enroll* annually in the Kroger Community Rewards Program in order to continue to support OCLRE. If you are a current cardholder, please follow these steps:

  • 1. Visit the Kroger Community Rewards page

  • 2. At the top of the page, select “create an account” and complete the required information, including your preferred Kroger location

  • 3. Select Ohio Center for Law-Related Education from the list of organizations, or enter the organization number in the appropriate field: 80384

*Re-enrollment period begins May 1; cardholders must re-enroll each year to benefit organization of choice.

Thank you to all who have registered with the Kroger Community Rewards program to support OCLRE.Kroger Community Rewards page 2. At the top of the page, select “create an account” and complete the required information, including your preferred Kroger location 3. Select Ohio Center for Law-Related Education from the list of organizations, or enter the organization number in the appropriate field: 80384 *Re-enrollment period begins May 1; cardholders must re-enroll each year to benefit organization of choice. Thank You, Donors! The Ohio Center for Law-Related Education is grateful to the following individuals and organizations for their kind and generous sup- port of our mission to partner with teachers to bring citizenship to life. Donations listed were given between August 1, 2012 and July 31, 2013. Many parents recognized teachers who have made a difference in their children’s lives. Congratulations and thank you! Sponsors Supreme Court of Ohio Attorney General of Ohio Ohio State Bar Association American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio Foundation Corporate & Charitable Funders Ohio State Bar Foundation Balloons Across the River Barnes & Noble Books Giant Eagle Huffman’s Market Kroger Pizza Hut Sam’s Club Target Wal-Mart $1000 or more Anonymous $500 - $999 Anonymous $300 - $499 Pierce Reed, Esq. $200 - $299 Richard Dove, Esq. $100 - $199 Douglas Buchanan & Christine Ardley Lisa & Steve Eschleman Thomas E. Friedman, Esq. Gregory Male, in honor of Jasmine Male and teacher Phil Hammer, Sycamore Jr. High School Up to $25 Lisa & Steve Eschleman, in honor of John “Jack” Strick Theresa Von Sossan John & Jeanette Talamo, in honor of Olivia Talamo and teacher Tina Bardwell, Genoa Middle School $50 - $99 Scott R. & Gretchen Coats, in honor of In-Kind Contributions Scott M. Coats and Kate, Richard & Nick Malone Gary Daniels Daniel Hilson, Esq. Mark & Cynthia Hurless, in honor of teacher Bob Priest, Van Wert High School Brett & Vicci Jaffe, in honor of Dorrian Jaffe and teachers Jane Hubbard, Kelly Tederous and Andrew Tweddle, Upper Arlington High School Georgia Lang Andrew & Mary Markiewitz, in honor of Samuel Markiewitz Marion Smithberger Mitchell & Fanette Yelsky Capital University Law School Highbanks Metro Park Ice Miller, LLP John Carroll University Ohio Attorney General Ohio Channel Ohio State Bar Association Porter, Wright, Morris & Arthur, LLP Project Management Institute Riffe Center Supreme Court of Ohio Vorys, Sater, Seymour & Pease, LLP $26 - $49 Kimberly Fausnaugh, in honor of Olivia Fausnaugh and teacher Chad Spradlin, Everts Middle School Tressa Rudik & Thomas Vargo, in honor of Vincey Vargo and teacher Elaine Nowak, Ridgeview Middle School Victoria Watters, in honor of Max Round and teacher Patty Sutton, Indian Hill Middle School 11 " id="pdf-obj-10-19" src="pdf-obj-10-19.jpg">

Thank You, Donors!

The Ohio Center for Law-Related Education is grateful to the following individuals and organizations for their kind and generous sup- port of our mission to partner with teachers to bring citizenship to life. Donations listed were given between August 1, 2012 and July 31, 2013. Many parents recognized teachers who have made a difference in their children’s lives. Congratulations and thank you!

Sponsors

Supreme Court of Ohio Attorney General of Ohio Ohio State Bar Association American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio Foundation

Corporate & Charitable Funders

Ohio State Bar Foundation Balloons Across the River Barnes & Noble Books Giant Eagle Huffman’s Market Kroger Pizza Hut Sam’s Club Target Wal-Mart

$1000 or more

Anonymous

$500 - $999

Anonymous

$300 - $499

Pierce Reed, Esq.

$200 - $299

Richard Dove, Esq.

$100 - $199

Douglas Buchanan & Christine Ardley Lisa & Steve Eschleman Thomas E. Friedman, Esq. Gregory Male, in honor of Jasmine Male and teacher Phil Hammer, Sycamore Jr. High School

Up to $25

Lisa & Steve Eschleman, in honor of John “Jack” Strick Theresa Von Sossan John & Jeanette Talamo, in honor of Olivia Talamo and teacher Tina Bardwell, Genoa Middle School

$50 - $99

Scott R. & Gretchen Coats, in honor of

In-Kind Contributions

Scott M. Coats and Kate, Richard & Nick Malone Gary Daniels Daniel Hilson, Esq. Mark & Cynthia Hurless, in honor of teacher Bob Priest, Van Wert High School Brett & Vicci Jaffe, in honor of Dorrian Jaffe and teachers Jane Hubbard, Kelly Tederous and Andrew Tweddle, Upper Arlington High School Georgia Lang Andrew & Mary Markiewitz, in honor of Samuel Markiewitz Marion Smithberger Mitchell & Fanette Yelsky

Capital University Law School Highbanks Metro Park Ice Miller, LLP John Carroll University Ohio Attorney General Ohio Channel Ohio State Bar Association Porter, Wright, Morris & Arthur, LLP Project Management Institute Riffe Center Supreme Court of Ohio Vorys, Sater, Seymour & Pease, LLP

Thank you to all who have registered with the Kroger Community Rewards program to support OCLRE.Kroger Community Rewards page 2. At the top of the page, select “create an account” and complete the required information, including your preferred Kroger location 3. Select Ohio Center for Law-Related Education from the list of organizations, or enter the organization number in the appropriate field: 80384 *Re-enrollment period begins May 1; cardholders must re-enroll each year to benefit organization of choice. Thank You, Donors! The Ohio Center for Law-Related Education is grateful to the following individuals and organizations for their kind and generous sup- port of our mission to partner with teachers to bring citizenship to life. Donations listed were given between August 1, 2012 and July 31, 2013. Many parents recognized teachers who have made a difference in their children’s lives. Congratulations and thank you! Sponsors Supreme Court of Ohio Attorney General of Ohio Ohio State Bar Association American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio Foundation Corporate & Charitable Funders Ohio State Bar Foundation Balloons Across the River Barnes & Noble Books Giant Eagle Huffman’s Market Kroger Pizza Hut Sam’s Club Target Wal-Mart $1000 or more Anonymous $500 - $999 Anonymous $300 - $499 Pierce Reed, Esq. $200 - $299 Richard Dove, Esq. $100 - $199 Douglas Buchanan & Christine Ardley Lisa & Steve Eschleman Thomas E. Friedman, Esq. Gregory Male, in honor of Jasmine Male and teacher Phil Hammer, Sycamore Jr. High School Up to $25 Lisa & Steve Eschleman, in honor of John “Jack” Strick Theresa Von Sossan John & Jeanette Talamo, in honor of Olivia Talamo and teacher Tina Bardwell, Genoa Middle School $50 - $99 Scott R. & Gretchen Coats, in honor of In-Kind Contributions Scott M. Coats and Kate, Richard & Nick Malone Gary Daniels Daniel Hilson, Esq. Mark & Cynthia Hurless, in honor of teacher Bob Priest, Van Wert High School Brett & Vicci Jaffe, in honor of Dorrian Jaffe and teachers Jane Hubbard, Kelly Tederous and Andrew Tweddle, Upper Arlington High School Georgia Lang Andrew & Mary Markiewitz, in honor of Samuel Markiewitz Marion Smithberger Mitchell & Fanette Yelsky Capital University Law School Highbanks Metro Park Ice Miller, LLP John Carroll University Ohio Attorney General Ohio Channel Ohio State Bar Association Porter, Wright, Morris & Arthur, LLP Project Management Institute Riffe Center Supreme Court of Ohio Vorys, Sater, Seymour & Pease, LLP $26 - $49 Kimberly Fausnaugh, in honor of Olivia Fausnaugh and teacher Chad Spradlin, Everts Middle School Tressa Rudik & Thomas Vargo, in honor of Vincey Vargo and teacher Elaine Nowak, Ridgeview Middle School Victoria Watters, in honor of Max Round and teacher Patty Sutton, Indian Hill Middle School 11 " id="pdf-obj-10-68" src="pdf-obj-10-68.jpg">

$26 - $49

Kimberly Fausnaugh, in honor of Olivia Fausnaugh and teacher Chad Spradlin, Everts Middle School Tressa Rudik & Thomas Vargo, in honor of Vincey Vargo and teacher Elaine Nowak, Ridgeview Middle School Victoria Watters, in honor of Max Round and teacher Patty Sutton, Indian Hill

Reporter

Reporter

Reporter P.O. Box 16562 Columbus, Ohio 43216-6562 1700 Lake Shore Drive Columbus, Ohio 43204 614-485-3510 Tollw w w . o c l r e . o r g NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID COLUMBUS, OHIO PERMIT NO. 4247 2013-2014 Schedule of Events SEPTEMBER 21: Mock Trial professional development 22: Law and Citizenship Conference 23: Law and Citizenship Conference OCTOBER 3: Youth for Justice/Project Citizen professional development 9: We the People professional devel- opment 23: Moot Court professional development NOVEMBER 5: Ohio Government in Action 6: Ohio Government in Action 13: Middle School Mock Trial professional development JANUARY 24: We the People High School Competition 31: High School Mock Trial District Competition FEBRUARY 13: Moot Court professional development 21: High School Mock Trial Regional Competition MARCH 6: High School Mock Trial State Finals 7: High School Mock Trial State Finals 8: High School Mock Trial Championship Round APRIL 3: Middle School Mock Trial Show- case 4: Middle School Mock Trial Show- case MAY 14: Middle School We the People Showcase 20: Moot Court Competition " id="pdf-obj-11-7" src="pdf-obj-11-7.jpg">

P.O. Box 16562 Columbus, Ohio 43216-6562 1700 Lake Shore Drive Columbus, Ohio 43204

614-485-3510

Toll free 877-485-3510 www.oclre.org

NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID COLUMBUS, OHIO PERMIT NO. 4247
NON-PROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
COLUMBUS, OHIO
PERMIT NO. 4247

2013-2014 Schedule of Events

SEPTEMBER

21: Mock Trial professional development

22: Law and Citizenship Conference

23: Law and Citizenship Conference

OCTOBER

3: Youth for Justice/Project Citizen

professional development

9: We the People professional devel- opment

23: Moot Court professional development

NOVEMBER

5: Ohio Government in Action

6: Ohio Government in Action

13: Middle School Mock Trial professional development

JANUARY

24: We the People High School

Competition

31: High School Mock Trial District Competition

FEBRUARY

13: Moot Court professional development 21: High School Mock Trial Regional Competition

MARCH

6: High School Mock Trial State

Finals

7: High School Mock Trial State Finals

8: High School Mock Trial Championship Round

APRIL

3: Middle School Mock Trial Show- case

4: Middle School Mock Trial Show- case

MAY

14: Middle School We the People

Showcase

20: Moot Court Competition