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VOL. 20 ISSUE 43 SEPTEMBER 4-10, 2013 THEWEEKENDER.

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school
Back to
EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE THIS SEMESTER THE BEST
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HollowTreeVentures @RobynHTV
Online comment
of the week.
Me: Good night, honey. I love you.
Daughter: Gnight. I love sharks. So
in case you were wondering where I
rank, its somewhere under sharks.
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name was.
Its been quite a few years since Ive had to think about back to
school preparation, but this weeks cover story (pages 28-29) cer-
tainly brought me back to those days.
I wasnt a party animal in college, so I often heard there was noth-
ing to do in our area. Man, how wrong those people were. There are
so many fairs to attend, great bands to follow, and craft brews to try,
all within driving (and sometimes walking) distance of just about
every institution of higher education around here. I feel like now,
more than ever, there are more events going on hosted by even more
creative people. Its more deciding what not to do than it is deciding
what to do.
I dont miss those term papers, grueling tests, or early morning
classes, but I recall having a lot more free time back then, so if youre
still hitting the books, remember to take some time off now and
again while you still can and enjoy all the area has to offer.
Youll miss it once its gone. By then, all youll have time for is
reading about it.
-Rich Howells, Weekender Editor
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LOCAL MUSIC WITH TITLE FIGHTS
Ned Russin | Special to the Weekender
is there to do this Friday? Visit the Scranton Cultural Center (420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton), because
First Fridays are back.
This season, every First Friday will feature a different visual artist and live music with the party not stopping
until 10 p.m. The rst of these events kicks off Sept. 6 at 6 p.m.
This First Friday features the inspiring artwork of Amy Wyman with the exhibit Sun Through the Leaves,
music with the all-female band Keep Coming Back, and the improv stylings of Here We Are In Spain.
Keep Coming Back performs 6 to 8 p.m. and 9 to 10 p.m., and Here We Are in Spain are taking the stage from
8 to 9 p.m.
can you nd two brand new places to shop this weekend?
Hit up the Wyoming Valley Mall in Wilkes-Barre, where two retailers are throwing open their doors for the rst
time.
P.S. from Aeropostale is one for the kiddos, offering trendy clothes for girls and boys ages four to 12. The store is
located by Radio Shack.
Indulge your taste buds at Bite Your Belgian, Wilkes-Barres premier Belgian wafe eatery. This scrumptious store
offers freshly-made wafes with a variety of toppings, including maple syrup, caramel, melted chocolate peanut
butter, Nutella, and Bischoff an authentic Belgian spread along with fresh fruit. Ice cream and frozen yogurt are
available to compliment any order, and cold and hot drinks are also sold. Its located across from the Sunglass Hut.
stop by the Connell Gallery (in the Connell Building on N. Washington Ave. in downtown Scranton) and the
Mall at Steamtowns Library Express this weekend?
On Sept. 6 at 6 p.m., the Hexagon Project exhibit will open in both locations.
The exhibit features visual art in all media by students ages 9 to 18 from around the world. Its purpose is to show-
case the power and strength of youthful vision. Interlinking hexagons creatively demonstrate both understanding of
interdependence and how art can lead to issues-based global activism.
The Student Recognition Event will take place Sept. 15 at the Connell Gallery from 2 p.m. through 4 p.m.
I dont knowwhat has hap-
pened, but 2013 has already
own by. I dont know if it is
because I have been paying
much closer attention to time
thanks to having these writ-
ing responsibilities or if it is
just because so much is hap-
pening, but either way, this
years unrelenting assault of
shows is still coming. I have
four new events to tell you
about.
Wednesday, Sept. 4 brings
the opening of a brand new
arts venue, The Lampost
(located on the third oor of
Downtown Arts in Wilkes-
Barre). The rst event being
hosted is entitled Creation
Destruction Potential and
not only features art from
Bianca Roman, Hannah
Roman, CJ Fujmura, and
Tina Cody, but features a live
performance from Sleeping
Sergeant. This new space
will showcase many different
typesof art events, everything
from music to gallery shows.
Sleeping Sergeant will also
be playing after the gallery
hours inside DowntownArts.
Sunday, Sept. 15, there
will be a screening of the new
documentary Pennsylvania
Hardcore at the University
of Scranton at 1 p.m. This
lm explores decades of
musical history and features
show footage, interviews,
and personal accounts of a
hardcore scene that stretches
our entire state.
On Wednesday, Sept.
18, Wisdom In Chains,
Take Offense, Fire and Ice,
Malfunction, and Alive and
Well will all be playing at
Nanticokes West Side Park.
Wisdom In Chains is one of
Pennsylvanias most revered
bands and will be making
their rst appearance in our
area in quite some time.
Wisdom play a style of hard-
core lled with oi inuence
and hooks so catchy that you
have no choice but to sing
along.
Chula Vistas Take
Offense will also be making
a return to the area. These
Californians perform their
take on mid 80s style hard-
core with impressive solos
and guitar work. Fire and Ice
from Richmond, Va., will be
returning in support of their
release Not of This Earth
on Reaper Records. Their
latest offering, produced by
Leeways AJ Novello, show-
cases their ability to step
outside of the hardcore norm
and write complicated music
that ows seamlessly togeth-
er witha tight rhythmsection
and great vocals.
Another band on Reaper
Records roster, Malfunction
from Buffalo, N.Y., will also
play. Malfunctions set will
surelyimpress all whohavent
heard them. And nally,
rounding out the show is a
new local band, Alive and
Well, fromScranton featuring
members of Single Me Out.
Finally, on Monday, Oct.
28, there is another show at
West Side Park in Nanticoke
featuring Disengage, Intent,
Demolition, Zoom, and
Stand Clear. For those who
missed Intent in June, you
can check out a live recording
online entitled Its Time
recorded in Wilkes-Barre.
Demolition will be join-
ing Intent. Their newest
release on Triple B Records
entitled World Gone Mad
has already made its way to
the top of all Best of lists.
Zoom will be making their
NEPA debut. Zoom features
members of Lion of Judah,
Intent, and Give playing an
intricate and aggressive style
of hardcore, la Bad Brains.
A demo will be released
shortly. And nally, opening
up the show is Marylands
Stand Clear. Stand Clear are
a new and young band play-
ing powerful music for their
age with guidance from Zack
fromIntent.
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End of summer just the beginning
Signature wafes include The Wafe Kabob, The Meggy,
and The Elvis: Peanut Butter and bananas with a scoop of
vanilla ice cream and bacon bits.
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sept. 4-10, 2013
COVER STORY
bacK to school...28-29
LISTINGS
the W... 5
concerts ... 19
speaK & see ... 21
lIVe entertaInment ... 22
mInd & body 24
FItness 24
theater ... 34
agenda ... 38, 50
MUSIC
breaKIng doWnthe Walls 5
beyond Fallen... 7
maroon 5/ Kelly clarKson...10
albUm reVIeWs ... 16
charts ... 16
cUltUre shocK 2013... 26
nepa rocK legends...27
STAGE & SCREEN
ralphIe report...10
dead.tV... 30
drInKIng bUddIes... 32
moVIe reVIeW... 34
InFInIte ImprobabIlIty 35
starstrUcK ... 43
ARTS
noVel approach... 21
booK clUb 33
LIfESTYLE
nepatattooarts FestIVal...31, 40
sIngle In scranton...33
gIrl talK...36
secUrely FashIoned ...36
la Festa ItalIana... 42
shoWUs some sKIn 43
man oF the WeeK 53
model oF the WeeK...54
HUMOR & fUN
WeeKender decK serIes...25
Fresh hop beers...37
Id tap that... 37
pUZZle 38
pet oF the WeeK 43
neWs oF the WeIrd ... 47
sorry mom & dad 47
sIgn langUage 52
GAMES & TECH
getyoUr game on 46
motorhead 46
ON THE COVER
photoand desIgn byamanda dIttmar
VolUme 20 IssUe 43
Beyond determined
Beyond fallen make comeback with Machines of Corruption
32
7
drink drank drunk
Drinking Buddies is Swanbergs funniest rom com yet
Watch the Weekender SeSSion With the PuSh
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RICH HOWELLS
Weekender editor
Beyond Fallen bringmetal to the masses
Back in 2008, Beyond
Fallen started taking some
time off, only occasion-
ally playing live and writ-
ing music together, but
by 2013, the Wilkes-Barre
metal group was ready for a
full force attack in the form
of a new album, Machines
of Corruption, recorded
locally at SI Studios.
Celebrating 10 years
since they ofcially formed,
the band will be joined
by The Curse of Sorrow,
Threatpoint, and Cause of
Afiction at Dianes Deli
(206 S. Main St, Pittston)
for a CD release show on
Saturday, Sept. 7. The
Weekender talked with
bassist Chuck Donahue and
guitarist Steve Jasuilewicz
about their triumphant
return and what metalheads
can expect when they hear
this follow-up to Mindre.
THE WEEKENDER:
How did Beyond Fallen
rst get together?
STEVE JASUILEWICZ:
I actually started form-
ing the band as far back as
2000. I just wanted to play
some metal. In 03, (singer)
Joe Karavis joined the band.
Fromthat point on, we grew
as a band, developed great
chemistry, and started turn-
ing out some great music.
We have had a few lineup
changes over the years, but
the core of the band always
remained intact. Fans will
hear that in the new music
it still sounds like Beyond
Fallen.
W: Did you always
know that Beyond Fallen
would be back someday?
CHUCK DONAHUE:
No. We were really unsure
whether it was going to hap-
pen or not. We always kept
that little grain in the back
of our heads saying, Never
say never, but I had always
pretty much in forefront
said, This is done. Over
the course of the break,
I was actually in another
band and that had kind of
folded as well. I was explor-
ing other musical options
at the time, but at the time
that they gave me the call
and said, Hey, were going
to do this again, I wasnt
doing anything. I didnt
have another project going.
I was just super, super
excited. We did really, really
great things in the past and
we want to relive that.
W: How did you decide
on and develop the bands
sound?
CD: We really didnt come
together and decide on the
bands sound; its just what
kind of fell together when
we started writing music.
Its just what sounded good.
Were very heavily inu-
enced by bands like Iron
Maiden and Iced Earth,
Megadeth you know, your
basic standard, what people
like to call classic heavy
metal. A lot of thrash, a lit-
tle bit of doom, a little bit of
Black Sabbath in there.
SJ: We knew we wanted
to be a heavy band, but we
never said we want to sound
like this band or that band.
We wanted to sound like
Beyond Fallen. That being
said, we never limited our-
selves to one style of metal
music. That can be heard
on any of our recordings.
There are elements of tra-
ditional, power, and thrash
metal, to name a few.
W: Where do you draw
your inspiration from?
CD: Really, a lot of it
starts with our guitar play-
er, Steve. We have have a
nickname for him we call
him Riff-enstein because
hes like a machine. He just
comes up with all these riffs
all the time. Hell come in
and start playing something
and it just kind of spawns
from that.
SJ: I dont think there
is any one thing that I can
say inspires me to write. It
could range from me just
having a bad day and using
my guitar to release some
stress to a cool scene in a
movie that spurs an idea.
W: How did Machines
of Corruption come
together?
CD: We had taken a break
for a couple of years. We
had a couple of members
that were busy building
families. We had one mem-
ber that had gone through
some health issues When
everybody got their stuff
together, we decided to get
back together early this
year. We hadnt put any-
thing out in about six years,
so we gured its really time
to really start pushing and
writing.
W: What was the writ-
ing and recording process
like at SI Studios?
SJ: The writing can get
stressful at times. Its kind
of like doing a puzzle. We
all bring our pieces in and
dump them on the table
and start putting things
together from there. As far
as SI Studios, I dont think
you could nd a better place
to record. (Chief Engineer
Joe) Wiggy (Wegleski) and
(owner) TomBorthwick are
great guys, and it is a very
comfortable environment.
Theres no pressure and
youre never rushed.
W: How has the group
changed over the years?
CD: This CD has gotten
a little bit more technical, a
little bit more progressive.
Its a little less straightfor-
ward. Thats the biggest
change in the music.
We just got a new drum-
mer in April. The lead gui-
tar player that we have, he
was fairly new to the band
right before we took a break;
we only had maybe a year
under our belts with him
before we took that break,
so we had never really writ-
ten anything with him yet,
so those two band members
really had an inuence on
where the style of music
changed.
W: What do you hope
listeners take away from
this new record?
CD: I hope they take
away more of an acceptance
for metal. Theres a lot of
people out there that really
just want to listen to whats
force-fed to them by corpo-
rate radio and whatnot. We
just like to bring metal to
the masses I personally
think its a lot more acces-
sible than some of the stuff
that is out there. Its not
ear-grating; its not really
screamy and bangy like
some of the stuff that is out
there.
SJ: Some will like it,
some wont you cant
please everyone. Like it or
not, I hope everyone will at
least appreciate the level of
talent in the band.
W: There seems to be
a pretty healthy metal
scene in the area. What
have your shows been
like lately?
SJ: We have been doing
shows with The Curse of
Sorrow, Threatpoint, Cause
of Afiction, and Prosody,
to name a few Live shows
have been great. Good turn-
out. The local fans are great;
they always come out to
support.
The biggest problem
now is the lack of venues in
the area. As far as writing
music and continuing, you
just have to have a love for
what youre doing and keep
it fun in the meantime.
CD: Weve only played
a handful of shows since
weve been back in April
The response since weve
been back has been really,
really good. Weve had a
great turnout for most of
our shows, and weve just
had a really good time with
it, so were going to try to
keep the ball rolling.
W: What was it like
playing the Headbangers
Open Air Festival in
Germany back in 2007?
SJ: It was fantastic; we
had a great time. I really
hope we get another oppor-
tunity to do it again.
CD: That was intense.
That was a really, really
great time probably the
best time of my life. We had
just a killer, killer trip over
there. The response was just
amazing. To go 3,500 miles
across the ocean and have
people at a meet and greet
table at the festival that we
played there were people
that had actually gone on to
the website and printed out
pictures and came up to the
meet and greet table and
were wanting us to sign.
Were from a completely
different country. We didnt
know what was going to go
on. We were treated like
absolute rock stars over
there.
W: What do you guys
have planned for this
upcoming CD release
show at Dianes Deli?
CD: Were just going to
put on a great show. Were
going to play the entire new
CD along with selections
from all of our other discs.
We have a couple of other
great bands on the show.
SJ: Its going to be a hell
of a show, but people will
just have to come out and
see for themselves.
W: What are you most
looking forward to about
the show?
SJ: Finally getting some
new material out there. Its
been a few years since we
released anything new.
CD: Just getting out there
and playing the stuff live
nally. Weve been bottled
up in the practice room and
the studio playing this stuff
for months and months
now. To be able to get out
there and play it live in front
of an audience is going to be
great.
If youre a Beyond Fallen
fan, you know its Beyond
Fallen, but you know theres
something different about
it.
W
Courtesy Photo
Beyond Fallen are back with a new record and renewed passion.
Beyond Fallen CD
release show with
Te Curse of Sor-
row, Treatpoint,
and Cause of Afic-
tion: Sept. 7, 9 p.m.,
Dianes Deli (206 S.
Main St, Pittston).
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Pop music superstars Maroon 5 and
Kelly Clarkson threw a Labor Day week-
end bash in Scranton on Sunday, and more
than 18,000 of their closest friends showed
up to party.
Most of the large crowd on Sept. 1
was made up of young women and teen-
aged girls as the double bill of the rst-
ever American Idol winner with her
girl-power anthems and the band fronted
by dreamy reality TV star Adam Levine
proved to be very much to their liking.
The Toyota Pavilion at Montage
Mountain was sold out for only the third
time in its 14-year history as a eet of
school buses shuttled concert-goers from
makeshift parking lots all over the moun-
tain.
The facility, which began life in 1999
as the Montage Mountain Amphitheater
(and spent four years as the Ford Pavilion
before gaining its current name in 2006),
was previously sold out for shows by the
Dave Matthews Band on its rst area visit
in 2005 and again in 2006.
The ofcial attendance mark was not
available at press time, but unofcial esti-
mates had the crowd as large as 20,000.
Online sources estimate the capacity for
the large amphitheater at 18,000, but
who knows just how many people can
be squeezed onto the lawn, especially if
chairs are not allowed (and they werent
on Sunday)?
The show got underway at 7 p.m. with
a short and sweet set by Rozzi Crane,
Levines protg from The Voice.
Many of Sundays concert-goers
missed her performance as they waited
for the buses to make it up the mountain
but got to catch a glimpse of her during
one of Maroon 5s songs later in the eve-
ning.
Clarkson, the 2002 American Idol
champion who has sustained a decade-
long career with her songs of female
empowerment, took the stage at 7:50 with
a sassy version of Stronger (What Doesnt
Kill You).
She then rattled off a string of her
anthems, each sounding pretty much the
same: the majority of the song becoming
almost unidentiable until she kicked into
the chorus with either Cmon! or Sing
it!
Although it was hard to tell where
Catch My Breath ended or My Life
Would Suck Without You began, thou-
sands of mothers stood on chairs next to
their daughters as both generations sang
along with Clarkson.
The now 31-year-old singer used her
voice to better effect on a string of ballads,
soaring through versions of Breakaway,
Because of You, and a stripped-down
solo version of Dont You Wanna Stay,
which was recorded as a duet with Jason
Aldean.
Clarkson wrapped up her hour-long per-
formance with a nice rendition of Aretha
Franklins I Never Loved a Man (The Way
I Love You) and strong versions of her
own hits Mr. Know It All, People Like
Us, and Since U Been Gone.
A little more than 30 minutes after
Clarkson nished up, Maroon 5 appeared
to a deafening wall of screams as
the large crowd welcomed the band and its
reggae-inuenced song One More Night.
Judging by the screams when he
appeared on the numerous video screens,
most eyes were on Levine, who sport-
ed a white T-shirt emblazoned with
Adolescents 1997 Tour in red, and,
much to the chagrin of many of the tweet-
ers whose words lled the screens between
acts, he kept his shirt on throughout the
performance.
But Levine is more than eye candy, as
evidenced by his strong vocals on rendi-
tions of This Love, Lucky Strike, and
Tangled early in the evening.
Levines bandmates were just as good
as James Valentine (guitar), Mickey
Madden (bass), Matt Flynn (drums), and
PJ Morton (keyboards), plus touring gui-
tarist Sam Farrar, awlessly replicated the
bands many hits throughout its 65-minute
main set.
The band seemed to be having fun on
Sunday, adding a horn section for Sunday
Morning and segueing into Stevie
Wonders Sir Duke, Princes I Wanna Be
Your Lover, and Daft Punks Get Lucky
in the middle of its songs.
Maroon 5 nished strongly as the main
set ended with Moves Like Jagger, and
the three-song encore featured Payphone
and early hit She Will Be Loved.
We have played in many, many towns,
but we have never played in front of a
crowd this big, Levine said about midway
through Sundays show. So, thank you
so much! God, we love you so (expletive)
much!
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R E V I E W
Brad Patton
Weekender Correspondent
Maroon 5, Clarkson pack Pavilion
Courtesy photo
Maroon 5, along with Kelly Clarkson, sold out
the Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain on
Sept. 1, a feat only accomplished by Dave
Matthews Band previously.
EntErtainmEnt rEport
Ralphie Aversa | Special to the Weekender
Its a Timberlake world,
but not without NSYNC
The energy at the
2013 MTV Video Music
Awards reached a new
height when the briey-
reunited NSYNC broke
into Bye Bye Bye. Justin
Timberlake exchanged
pleasantries with his for-
mer band mates and strut-
ted back to center stage
as the notes of Suit and
Tie blared through the
sound system. With the
VMA set in Brooklyn at
the Barclays Center, could
this be Jay Zs moment to
grace the audience with
his presence?
It would not be. Justin
explained why to The
Ralphie Show.
We talked about it,
maybe, but also I just
thought that this would
be a nice moment to
share with the guys from
NSYNC, Timberlake
told me. You cant give
me this award without
saying, Look at what the
group accomplished.
The superstar reiter-
ated over the phone a
fact that he cited that eve-
ning: around half of his
Moonmen were won with
the quartet. Jay Z would
not make an appearance
at all during the show, but
he and Timberlake linked
up later in the evening at
an after-party.
Timberlakes full inter-
view will air this Thursday
on 97 BHT.
DERULO ADJUSTS TO LIFE
IN THE SPOTLIGHT
Jason Derulo is liv-
ing out his dream. In a
relatively short amount
of time, the singer has
gained international fame
with some of the most
infectious hits heard on
the radio. Derulo has sold
over 11 million singles
in the U.S. alone and is
set to release a new EP,
Tattoos, on Oct. 8.
But in the States there
can be drawbacks to mak-
ing it big, especially when
its in the public spotlight.
Derulo dates another pub-
lic gure, singer Jordin
Sparks, and recently found
himself looking at photos
of a new house he bought
- on a gossip website.
Thats like where I
live, and youre posting
it to the whole world. Its
like, Alright, cool, said
Derulo during an inter-
view on The Ralphie
Show. While he is accus-
tomed to media coverage
surrounding his music,
the idea of his personal life
(and space) in the spot-
light is one that Derulo
is becoming acclimated
with. It just comes with
the territory. More and
more, Im seeing the blogs
and the tabloids talking
more about my personal
things and making up
things, but it is what it is.
We deal with it.
Derulo seemed more
annoyed than bent out
of shape about the whole
ordeal, but was quick to
dismiss it and move on.
He did however correct
one report when I brought
it up: there are 10 bed-
rooms and 10 bathrooms
in that new South Florida
pad he purchased, not
nine as originally report-
ed.
The Other Side singer
spent a good amount of
2012 back in Miami, recu-
perating from a freak acci-
dent in which he broke his
neck and almost ended
up paralyzed. Derulo is
stronger than ever, and it
doesnt look as if hell be
spending much time in
that new home in the near
future. He completed pro-
duction on his new EP last
week with a studio ses-
sion that followed his per-
formance on Americas
Got Talent.
- Listen to The Ralphie
Show weeknights from 7
p.m.-midnight on 97 BHT.
W
Justin Timberlake blew up the 2013 Video Music Awards stage
with a nearly eight-minute long performance, which included the
brief reuniting of the boy band that put the musician on the map
in the first place.
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133 n. Main St., W-B - (Right across fromKings College)
Happy HouR SpeCialS
Voted Best College Bar in Weekender 2013 Readers Choice
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Plus live performances by:
MiZ Graces Downfall k8
Eddie Appnel Ed Randazzo
Farley Dustin Drevitch
the
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Featuring:
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Tickets available at Toyota Pavilion Box Office
and all Ticketmaster locations.
Ticket proceeds benefit Bridge Youth Services
Anti-Bullying Program and
Wyoming Valley Childrens Association
Also featuring a
OPEN CAR & MOTORCYCLE SHOW
Sponsored by: Corvette Club of NE PA.
To register or for additional info, please visit
www.ccnepa.com. Registration begins 8:00am.
For additional event information, please contact: Alan Stout 570-824-8756 x.398
10AM- 6PM
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Sponsored by the weekender
Party on
the Patio
Thursday September 12th
Check back next week for
drink specials & updates
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Overnight
Parachute
8. Calvin Harris/Ellie Goulding: I
Need Your Love
7. Imagine Dragons: Radioactive
6. Bruno Mars: Treasure
5. Maroon 5: Love Somebody
4. Zedd/Foxes: Clarity
3. Anna Kendrick: Cups
2. Macklemore/Ryan
Lewis/Mary Lambert: Same
Love
1. Robin Thicke/Pharrell
Williams/T.I.: Blurred Lines
1. John Mayer: Paradise Valley
2. Five Finger Death Punch: Wrong Side of
Heaven & Righteous Side of Hell V. 1
3. Jay Z: Magna Carta Holy Grail
4. Tedeschi Trucks Band: Made Up My Mind
5. Jimmy Bufet: Songs from St. Somewhere
6. Luke Bryan: Crash My Party
7. Florida Georgia Line: Heres to the Good
Times
8. Earl Sweatshirt: Doris
9. Blue October: Sway
10. Avenged Sevenfold: Hail to the King
Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa Top 10 Albums at Gallery of Sound
Rating:
WWWV
Devils n Darlins
Ed Roland and The Sweet Tea Project
Rating: WWWW
Two weeks ago, Parachute released Overnight,
the groups third album to date. The band was
straight out of college when they were picked up by
Dave Matthews Bands Red Light Management in
2008.
You have probably heard Parachutes songs in
Niveas skincare ads and Walmarts TV commercials
without even realizing it. With their new album, the
band has updated its straightforward pop sound to
incorporatethenewest popular electronics. Its agood
move that will hopefully allow their songs to effort-
lessly slip onto pop radios airwaves. Overnights
songs are unlikely to make a huge splash, but theyre
catchy and fun. The albumwill appeal to people who
enjoy upbeat music and charismatic musicians.
Every song on Overnight features very clean,
falsetto choruses. Parachutes lead singer, Will
Anderson, hits all the right notes, and his harmonies
are spot on. The band tries out some pretty experi-
mental B-sections and bridges on a couple songs, but
beyond that, Overnight doesnt stray far from its
core. The albums lead single, Cant Help, sounds
nearly identical to a handful of Maroon 5 songs.
(For what its worth, Will Andersons voice is more
dynamic than Adam Levines, but less distinctive.)
The albums standout track is the electro-trash
gospel hymn Higher, which showcases the band
at its most adventurous. If Wavves, Queen, and
Purity Ring were to ever cross space and time to col-
laborate, Higher would probably be the result. Its
regrettable that the band didnt try to center the rest
of Overnight around the songs sound.
Parachutes music is solid, but its not quite fashion-
able enough to make it to the forefront of pop playl-
ists. Whether you will enjoy this album comes down
to what youre looking for in music. If youre looking
for music that moves you, challenges you, and opens
your mind up to newpossibilities, Overnight prob-
ably isnt the album for you. If you want your music
to be comfortable, toe-tappy, and fun, check out
Parachutes new album and be merry.
-Matt Morgis, Weekender Correspondent
Parachute land safely
with Overnight
Collective Soul vocalist Ed Roland steps
out with the debut albumfromhis Southern-
tinged gospel/folk amalgam The Sweet Tea
Project, diving head-rst into a brave new
world of countried hootin and twangin.
Owing no small debt to Rolands Georgia
upbringing, the album celebrates a distinc-
tively Southern voice tempered with a wan-
ton sense of recording studio discovery by
way of banjos, mandolins, ukuleles, and steel
guitar.
Tracks likeGoingtoBirmingham arelike
an Americana smack of The Avett Brothers
meets Rodney Crowell: a playfully danger-
ous, barefooted honky-tonk strummer with
enough edginess for Rolands rocker-faithful
fans yet still endearing him to neo-Nashville
hipsters. Oh Lord is a faux-reggae dancer,
complete with sha-la-la chorus and Eagles-
inuenced California vocal harmonies
Roland crying out for a desired redemption
with, Oh Lord, can you save me?
Elsewhere, Pile of Pearls has a songwrit-
ers circle vibe; the contemplative nature of
the song, with its steel guitars and lived-in
skin make it the type of gold-medal brand
that Music Citys Bluebird Caf churns out
famously.
There are still bona de rockers, like
Love Wont Bring Us Down that could
very well t on a Collective Soul record
like 2008s Afterwords. There are also
pure Willie Nelson/Merle Haggard-inspired
country nuggets like Already Over. Roland
channels the ghost of Hank Williams most
convincingly of all in Enough Nickels;
Rolands classic lonesome-drifter pen comes
alive with if I could have a nickel, for every
time I think of you, in a puppy-eyed yearn-
ing to a distant love.
Ed Roland has no problem showing off
his roots, with an elegantly inspired back-
porch charm and inimitable songwriting
nerve; think Collective Souls rock candy
served up with a little grits n gravy.
-Mark Uricheck, Weekender
Correspondent
Roland gets down
with Devils
While Miley Cyrus is being a wild child
to demonstrate she is growing up, Ariana
Grande is letting her music do all the talk-
ing.
The 20-year-old singer/actress, one of
the stars of Nickelodeons Victorious
and the networks spinoff Sam and Cat,
is in near-perfect form on her debut,
mainly thanks to her Mariah Carey-esque
vocals and songs written by Kenneth
Babyface Edmonds.
Yours Truly kicks off with the R&B-
avored, near-six-minute Honeymoon
Avenue. Its dreamy, velvety, and warm,
and backed with shoo-be-doos and violins.
It sounds as good as a Justin Timberlake
intro.
Grande uses her voice as an instrument
throughout the 12-track set: Baby I,
with its nger snaps, features her scream-
ing high notes; Tattooed Heart and
Daydreamin are A-List ballads; and on
The Way, her lead single and Top 10 hit,
Grandes voice sounds like a Carey-Toni
Braxton mash- up.
Her breakthrough comes at a time when
other former Disney/Nickelodeon stars
have pop hits Cyrus and Selena Gomez
are following the Rihanna track with We
Cant Stop and Come & Get It, while
Demi Lovatos latest sound mirrors Kelly
Clarkson.
But Grande is looking back to a 90s
R&B-pop feel on her debut and her
formula works better than the others.
Almost Is Never Enough, a duet with
The Wanteds best vocalist, Nathan Sykes,
sounds classic, and the Big Sean-assisted
Right There, which samples Jeff
Lorbers Rain Dance also sampled
for Lil Kims Crush on You could eas-
ily be a No. 1 hit.
Carey should be proud.
-Mesn Fekadu, Associated Press
Grande makes
grand debut
Ariana Grande
Yours Truly
Rating: WWWW
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or 570-970-9090
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NEW HOURS. OPEN FOR LUNCH THURS.-SUN. at NOON, MON.-WED. 4-CLOSE
PARKING IN REAR DO NOT PARK ACROSS STREET THEY WILL TOW!
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Friday, September 6th:
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Tuesday, Septmeber 10th:
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Live entertainment
During happy hour,
friDays 5-7
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Dymond Cutter
80031728
Live entertainment
friDay starting at 9:30
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Onos Bar & Grill
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Dollar mugs
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80024334
Infinite Improbability:
A column focusing on geek
culture, discussing, analyzing, and
debating the impact of comics,
movies, music, and anything that
has a dedicated following.
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BREWS BROTHERS WEST
(75 Main St., Luzerne)
570.283.1300, brewsbrothersbar.
com/brewsbrotherswest
Jackyl: Sept. 13, 8 p.m. $15-
$17.
THE COOPERAGE PROJECT
(1030 Main St., Honesdale)
570.253.2020, thecooperagepro-
ject.org
Jenny Allen: Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m.
Claudia Nygaard: Sept. 21, 8
p.m., $15-$18.
Mudras: Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.
(Donations accepted and appreci-
ated at the door at all events.)
CULTURE SHOCK2013
Sept 7., noon- 9p.m., Nay Aug
Park. Aayu, A Fire With Friends, Ed
Cuozzo, Down to Six, Jeri Bennett,
Nelson, more. Free.
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
(71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre)
570.826.1100, kirbycenter.org
Alice Cooper: Oct. 18, 8 p.m.
$39, $49, $59, $75 (limited pit seat-
ing).
Ghost Hunters Live: Oct. 23,
7:30 p.m., $25-$60.
Jeff Ross: Oct. 25, 8 p.m., $35-
$75.
Merle Haggard: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
$40-$99.
YAMATO: The Drummers of
Japan: Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m. $25-$35.
Elvis Costello: Nov. 25, 7:30
p.m., $59-$95.
HAWLEY SILKMILL
(8 Silk Mill Dr., Hawley.
570.588.8077, silkmillharmony.
com)
Brooklyn Southern Soul with
the Gold Magnolias: Sept. 6, 7:30-
9:30 p.m. $16, advance; $20, doors.
Soul Fused Folk-Rock with
Caleb Hawley: Sept. 14, 7:30-9:30
p.m. $16, advance; $20, door.
New England Performer of the
Year: Sarah Blacker: Sept. 21, 7:30-
9:30 p.m. $16, advance; $20, at the
door.
Blues & Folk Artists: Rebecca
Pronsky: Sept. 28, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
$16, advance; $20, door.
MAUCHCHUNKOPERA
HOUSE
(14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe)
570.325.0249, mauchchunkopera-
house.com
Solas: Sept. 6, 8 p.m., $25.
Mary Fahl: Sept. 7, 8 p.m. $22.
David Wax Museum: Sept. 13,
8:30 p.m. $21.
John Denver Tribute by Ted
Vigil and Steve Weisberg: Sept. 14,
8 p.m. $25.
Dancin Machine: Sept. 20,
8:30 p.m. $20.
Splintered Sunlight: Sept. 21, 8
p.m. $15.
Jimmy Thackery and the
Drivers: Sept. 26, 8 p.m., $20.
Bill Kirchen and Texicali: Sept.
27, 8:30 p.m. $23.
Soft Parade: Sept. 28, 8 p.m.
$23.
MEETINGOF THE MINDS VI
Sept. 27-29, Meshoppen,
featuring Tea Leaf Green, Orgone,
Cabinet, The Heavy Pets, Flux
Capacitor, more. $65, presale; $90,
day of show. Info: jibberjazz.com.
MOHEGANSUNARENA
(255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-
Barre)
800.745.3000, mohegansunare-
napa.com
Cirque Musica: Sept. 22, 7 p.m.
$25-$65.
MOUNT AIRY CASINO
RESORT
(44 Woodland Rd., Mount
Pocono)
877.682.4791, mountairycasino.
com
Amy Schumer: Oct. 5, 8 p.m.,
$35-$50.
The Stylistics: Oct. 19, 8 p.m.,
$30-$45.
Aaron Lewis: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.,
$45-$65.
Jeff Ross: Dec. 7, 8 p.m., $35-
$50.
PENNS PEAK
(325 Maury Rd., Jim Thorpe)
866.605.7325, pennspeak.com
Live Wire: Sept. 6, 8 p.m.
Glenn Miller Orchestra: Sept.
17-19, 1 p.m.
Josh Turner: Sept. 26, 8 p.m.
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band: Sept.
27, 8 p.m.
Hinder & Candlebox with
Devour The Day and Open Air
Stereo: Sept. 29, 7 p.m.
The Swing Dolls: Tribute to
Andrews Sisters and McGuire
Sisters: Oct. 1-3, 1 p.m.
Chris Cagle: Oct. 4, 8 p.m.
Melvin Seals & JGB: Oct. 10,
8 p.m.
King Henry and the Showmen:
Oct. 15-17, 1 p.m.
Back to the Eighties Show with
Jessies Girl: Oct. 18, 9 p.m.
Real Diamond: Neil Diamond
Tribute: Oct. 23-24, 1 p.m.; Oct. 25,
8 p.m.
Gordon Lightfoot: Oct. 26, 8
p.m.
America: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
Get the Led Out: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
38 Special: Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
Dark Star Orchestra: Nov. 27,
8 p.m.
Rhonda Vincent and The Rage:
March 22, 8 p.m.
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
(667 N. River St., Plains)
570.822.2992, riverstreetjazzcafe.
com5
Sept. 6: Popa Chubby: Sept. 6,
9 p.m. $8/$12.
Floodwood featuring members
of moe.: Sept. 12, 9 p.m. $10/$15.
Tribute to Prince (Spadys
All-Star Band): Sept. 21, 10 p.m.
$10/$15.
Pigeons Play Ping Pong: Sept.
26, 10 p.m. $5/$8.
Wham Bam Bowie Band,
Tribute to David Bowie: Sept. 28,
10 p.m. $8/$10.
Joe Louis Walker: Oct. 4, 9
p.m. $10/$15.
The Manhattan Project with
Horizon Wireless: Oct. 5, 10 p.m.
$8/$10.
Start Making Sense, Tribute
to Talking Heads: Oct. 18, 10 p.m.
$10/$15.
Alexis P. Suter Band: Nov. 2, 9
p.m .$10/$15.
Dead on Live Europe 72:
Nov. 8, 10 p.m. $8/$12.
Marco Bennevento: Nov. 15, 10
p.m. $15/$20.
Zach Deputy: Nov. 22, 10 p.m.
$10/$15.
Brothers Past: Nov. 27, 10 p.m.
$12/$15.
SHERMANTHEATER
(524 Main St., Stroudsburg)
570.420.2808, shermantheater.
com
moe./Sister Sparrow and the
Dirty Birds: Sept. 29, 7 p.m., $28.
SOJA: Oct. 10, 8 p.m., $17.50-
$20.
Taking Back Sunday/Polar
Bear Club/Transit: Oct. 14, 8 p.m.,
$25-$28.
Conspirator: Oct. 19, 9 p.m.,
$17-$20.
Umphreys McGee/The
London Soul: Oct. 24, 8 p.m., $25-
$30.
The Misfts/The Attack/Take
Away The Ugly/The Big Empty/
Badtown Rude/The Curse of
Sorrow: Oct. 25, 7 p.m., $16-$18.
In This Moment/Motionless In
White/Kyng/All Hail The Yeti: Nov.
8, 7 p.m., $20-$22.
Jake Miller: Nov. 19, 8 p.m.,
$20-$22.
TOYOTA PAVILIONAT
MONTAGE MOUNTAIN
(1000 Montage Mountain Road,
Scranton)
Music. Motors, and More feat.
The Badlees, MiZ, Graces Downfall,
Eddie Appnel, k8, Dustin Drevitch,
Ed Randazzo, Farley: Sept. 15, 10
a.m.-6p.m., $10.
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
(3421 Willow St., Philadelphia)
215.LOVE.222, electricfactory.
info
Love and Theft, Canaan Smith:
Sept. 6, 8:30 p.m.
Cher Lloyd, Fifth Harmony:
Sept. 8, 7 p.m.
Alt-J, Lord Huron: Sept. 17, 8
p.m.
Michael Franti and Spearhead:
Sept. 21, 8:30 p.m.
Neko Case: Sept. 25, 8:30 p.m.
Local Natives, Wild Nothing:
Sept. 28, 8:30 p.m.
The Waterboys, Freddie
Stevenson: Sept. 29, 8:30 p.m.
Zeds Dead, Paper Diamond,
Green Lantern, Branchez: Oct. 3,
8:30 p.m.
Moe., Sister Sparrow * The
Dirty Birds: Oct. 4, 8:30 p.m.
Digitour: Oct. 5, 8:30 p.m.
The Naked and Famous, The
Colourist: Oct. 8, 8 p.m.
Sara Bareilles: Oct. 10, 8:30
p.m.
Timefies, Chiddy Bang: Oct.
11, 8:30 p.m.
Janelle Monae: Oct. 13, 8 p.m.
Mayday Parade, Man
Overboard, Cartel, Stages &
Stereos: Oct. 18, 7 p.m.
Minus the Bear, INVSN, Slow
Bird: Oct. 26, 8:30 p.m.
Frightened Rabbit, Augustines:
Oct. 27, 8 p.m.
We Came As Romans,
Silverstein, Chunk! No, Captain
Chunk!, The Color Morale,
Dangerkids: Oct. 30, 7 p.m.
Infected Mushroom, Zomboy:
Oct. 31, 8:30 p.m.
Matt Nathanson, Joshua Radin:
Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
Sleeping with Sirens, Memphis
May Fire, Breathe Carolina, Issues:
Nov. 4, 7 p.m.
Alkaline Trio, Newfound Glory:
Nov. 13, 8 p.m.
Hoodie Allen, OCD: Moosh &
Twist, Mod Sun, D-Why: Nov. 23,
8:30 p.m.
Lamb of God & Killswitch
Engage, Testament, Huntress: Nov.
24, 7 p.m.
Frank Turner & The Sleeping
Souls, The Smith Street Band, Koo
Koo Kanga Roo: Nov. 29, 8 p.m.
Running of the Santas Mega
Festival: Dec. 7, noon.
City and Colour: Sep. 18, 8
p.m.
KESWICKTHEATRE
(291 North Keswick Ave.,
Glenside)
215.572.7650, keswicktheatre.
com
Sinbad: Sep. 14, 9 p.m.
Steve Hackett: Genesis
Revisited: Oct. 11-12, 8 p.m.
The Piano Guys: Oct 18, 8 p.m.
The Fab Faux: Oct. 19, 8 p.m.
Steven Wright: Nov. 3, 8 p.m.
NORTHSTAR BAR
27th & Poplar St, Philadelphia
215.684.0808
Sept. 11: Pere Ubu
Sept. 17: Morglbl w/ Thank
You Scientist
Oct. 2: Calabrese
Oct. 3: The Toasters/Voodoo
Glow Skulls
Oct. 5: Mephiskapheles w/
Inspector 7, Post Sun Times
TROCADEROTHEATRE
(1003 Arch St., Philadelphia)
215.336.2000, thetroc.com
The Mission UK: Sept. 4, 8
p.m.
Kamelot / Delain / Exlipse:
Sep. 5, 8 p.m.
The World at Large / The
Power / True Will: Aug. 25, 7:30
p.m. $10.
Wired 96.5S 96 Cent Show
with Iggy Azalea / KAPTN / DJ
Bonics: Aug. 27, 8 p.m. $.96.
Skeleton Hands / Cinema
Cinema / Johnny Neutrino And The
Secret Weapon: Sept. 7, 8:30 p.m.
$8, advance; $10, at the door. 21 and
over.
SUSQUEHANNA BANK
CENTER
(1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J.)
609.365.1300, livenation.com/
venues/14115
Keith Urban / Dustin Lynch /
Little Big Town: Sept. 14, 8 p.m.
Expanded listings at theweek-
ender.com.
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The Mission UK will play at Trocadero Theatre (1003 Arch St., Philadelphia) on
Sept. 4 at 8 p.m.
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T H E V ID E O G A M E ST O R E
BUY-S E L L -T RAD E
VIDEO GA M ES,
SYSTEM S & LP RECO RDS
PS1 & 2,XBox,N intendo,Sega,A tari,Coleco,Vectrex,
Gam eboy,Genesis,Etc.A lso Buying DVDs,VHS & CDs
M o n day - Satu rday
12 P M - 6 P M
28 S.M ain St.,W B 822-9929
N ext to G allery o f So u n d
1150 S.M ain A v e.
Scran to n 941-9908
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Baklava, Falafel, Gyros,
Tabouli and Kibbi
35 E. South St. Wilkes-Barre
(570) 820-7172
Open Mon. - Fri. 10 am- 6pm
RICCIS PIZZA &BEER
155 Park Avenue, W-B 825-3652
View our menu at:
www.menusNEPA.com
ALL M AJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED.ATM M ACHINE AVAILABLE
M O N D AY & W ED N ES D AY
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121 domestic and imported beers


Kings Deck
49 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountaintop 474-5464
Thursday,
September 5th
Strawberry JamDuo
Sunday,
September 15th
Pair of Nuts
Wednesday,
September 18th
Revolution 3
Enjoy your favorite music
outside this Summer
Mon-Sat 12-8 p.m. 570-501-9639
10% off services for those traveling from the WB/Scranton area
www.customtat2.com /customtat2
168 Susquehanna Blvd
West Hazleton, PA 18202
WEEKENDER
EEKENDER
EEKENDER
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facebook.com/the weekender
Sun - open @ 12
Mon- open @ 7
Exxit 6 Live-NO COVER SAT-.
NFLTICKET
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Book reviews and literary insight
Kacy Muir | Weekender Correspondent
In David Kirbys new-
est poetry collection, The
Biscuit Joint, readers are
given a lesson on the ne
arts of woodworking.
Of course, chipping away
further, readers soon nd
what is hidden, layers deep.
Known for his intellec-
tually amusing collections
such as The House of
Blue Light and Talking
About Movies With Jesus,
Kirby now gives readers a
collection focused on the
elusive biscuit joint. The
term, as glossed from The
Complete Woodworkers
Bible, is distinguished by
a method of creating a
snug t between two pieces
of wood. The mechanics of
a biscuit joint are hidden,
making this technique pop-
ular for applications where
wood-workers do not want
people to be able to see the
joint. Done right, the joint
is stronger than the wood
itself.
The collection, while
petite, contains nearly 20
prose poems that capture
playfulness on the brim
of bawdiness. Most of the
pieces are blunt and funny,
often written as long-
formed thoughts. We read
as though we are going
through Kirbys contempla-
tions, no breath or pause in
between. As a whole, the
collection is tightly bound
by themes of life, death and
remembrance. Some stand-
out poems include: East
Of The Sun, West Of The
Moon, Almost Happy,
Breathless, and Horrible
Things May Be True.
In a portion of East
Of The Sun, West Of The
Moon, Kirby leads readers
with one of his elongated
thought processes: Friend
of my mother comes up at
her funeral (my mothers,
not the friends) and says
my mom once told her that
when David was a baby, he
always seemed to be smil-
ing, and I wanted to nd
out if he smiled all the time
or began to smile because
he heard me coming, but I
never could, though since
I was sans words in those
days, I wouldnt know,
either, would I, though it
goes without saying that
Id like to have thrown a
net over my infant expe-
riences. Trailing off into
distant memories, Kirby
then connects his past to
present.
After reading the col-
lection, one can quickly
discern the commonalities
between a woodworker
and their biscuit joint
and Kirby and his own
techniques: each attempt,
working towards a seam-
less smoke and mirror act
with a secret found deep
inside. The work is color-
ful and enjoyable, beckon-
ing back to Kirbys vintage
techniques while manag-
ing to showcase his poetic
evolution over time. In the
end, whether a new or sea-
soned admirer of his work,
Kirby has proved that The
Biscuit Joint is certainly
done right.
W
Hiding theBiscuit
The Biscuit Joint
David Kirby
Rating: WWWW
BooKs ReleaseD The WeeK of
sepT. 9:
Wis for Wasted by Sue Grafton
Knocking on Heavens Door, The Path to a Better Way of Death
by Katy Sutler
Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
Blackmore: AProper Romance by Julianne Donaldson
Guinness World Records 2014
POETIC
Kings College
(133 North River St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.5957
or kings.edu)
Campion Literary
Society Writing Workshops:
Sept. 17, 4 p.m., Sheehy-
Farmer Campus Center.
Campion Literary
Society Open Readings:
Sept. 27, 4 p.m., Gold
Room, Administration
Building.
The Osterhout Free
Library
(71 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, www.oster-
hout.info, 570.821.1959)
Fall Gala: Oct. 4, 6-11
p.m., Westmoreland Club
(59 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre).
Pittston Memorial
Library
(47 Broad St.,
570.654.9565, pitmemlib@
comcast.net)
Taste of Greater
Pittston: Sept. 8, 2-5 p.m.
$30.
Library expansion com-
mittee meeting: Sept. 11,
6:30 p.m.
Teen Advisory Group
(TAG) meeting: Sept. 12,
noon.
The Greater Pittston
Charity Train Ride: Sept.
15, 9 a.m., to Jim Thorpe.
$65.
Lego Club meeting:
Sept. 16, 4 p.m.
Craft Club meeting:
Sept. 16, 6 p.m.
Snacks and Stories sto-
rytime for kids of all ages:
Sept. 18, 4 p.m.
Science Club meeting:
Sept. 19, 4 p.m.
Movie night: Sept. 26,
5:45 p.m.
Scranton StorySlam:
Scranton StorySlam,
Jessup: A Tale of Two
Cities: Sept. 14, 7 p.m., St.
Georges Restaurant (304
Church St., Jessup).
University of Scranton
Book signing with
award-winning book author
Susan Campbell Bartoletti,
Ph.D.: Sept. 7, 4-5 p.m.,
DeNaples Center.
West Pittston Library
(200 Exeter Ave.,
www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
Book Club: First Tues.,
6:45 p.m. Free. Informal dis-
cussion of member-selected
books.
Weekly story time for
children: Fri., 1 p.m. Free.
VISUAL
AFA Gallery
(514 Lackawanna Ave.,
Scranton: 570.969.1040 or
Artistsforart.org)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat.,
12-5 p.m.
Seventy Years of
Painting, Carol Oldenburg
and Earl Lehman: Sept.
5-28.
Gates to Infnity:
Sept. 5-28.
Choose Freedom,
drop-in meditation classes:
Through Sept. 19, 7-8:30
p.m. $10 per class.
B &B Art Gallery
(222 Northern Blvd., S.
Abington Township)
Third Friday Exhibit
featuring Travis Prince:
Through September.
The Butternut Gallery
&Second Story Books
(204 Church St,
Montrose, 570.278.4011,
butternutgallery.com).
Gallery hours: Wed.-Sat.,
11a.m.-5 p.m., Sun., 12 p.m.-
4 p.m.
Paintings, Potter, Life:
Work of Bob Smith & Cary
Joseph: Through Sept. 8.
Third annual Fiber Arts
exhibit: Sept. 11-Oct. 6.
Opening reception Sept. 14,
3-5 p.m.
Converge Gallery
(140 W. Fourth St.,
Williamsport, 570.435.7080,
convergegallery.com)
Beyond The Surface:
Sept. 5, Oct. 31. Reception
and artist talk by Jason
Bryant Sept. 5, 6-9 p.m.
Dietrich Theatre
(downtown
Tunkhannock,
570.996.1500)
Airing of the Quilts
Civil War Era Quilting: Oct.
1-Nov. 15.
Everhart Museum
(1901 Mulberry St.,
Scranton, PA, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
Admission $5 adults; $3
students/seniors; $2 chil-
dren 6-12; members free.
Sidewalk Surfng:
The Art & Culture of
Skateboarding: Through
Dec. 30.
Hope Horn Gallery
(Hyland Hall, University of
Scranton, 570.941.4214)
Gallery Hours: Sun.-Fri.,
noon-4 p.m.; Wed., 6-8 p.m.
Depths and Edges:
Berenice DVorzon: Sept.
6-Oct. 11.
Exhibit Lecture:
Where Elements Meet:
The Life and Work of
Berenice DVorzon by
Darlene Miller-Lanning,
Ph.D.: Sept. 6.
the lamp post . chapter
one
(47 North Franklin St.,
third oor, Wilkes-Barre.)
Creation Destruction
Potential, a collection of
visual, theatrical, and musi-
cal art & performance: Sept.
4, 8 p.m. $5.
Madelon Powers
Gallery at East
Stroudsburg University
(Gallery hours: 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. Tuesday and
Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday, Thursday and
Friday)
Ciocca Prints/Yanashot
Sculpture, featuring works
by Mark Ciocca and Denis
Yanashot: Through Oct. 4.
Opening reception Sept. 8,
1-3 p.m.
Pauly Friedman Art
Gallery
(Misericordia University,
570.674.6250, misericordia.
edu/art)
Gallery Hours: Mon.
closed, Tue.-Thurs. 10 a.m.-
8 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sat.-Sun. 1-5 p.m.
Capturing Realism
2013, a biennial exhibit of
works instructors, alumni
and apprentices from the
nationally renowned studios
of the Ani Art Academies
and acclaimed modern mas-
ter Anthony J. Waichulis:
Sept. 7-Oct. 31. Opening
reception Sept. 7, 5-8 p.m.
Pocono Arts Council
(18 N. Seventh St.,
Stroudsburg. 570.476.4460.
www.poconoarts.org)
September artists
show: Opening reception
Sept. 7, 1-4 p.m. Runs
through Sept. 30.
Sordoni Art Gallery
(150 S. River St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.408.4325)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun.,
noon-4:30 p.m.
The Art of Ballet:
Through Oct. 20. Opening
reception Sept. 6, 5-7 p.m.
Something Special (23
W. Walnut St., Kingston,
570.288.8386)
Open Mon.-Fri., 7:30
a.m.-4 p.m., Sat., 7:30 a.m.-2
p.m.
Quilt On, work by
Sabine Thomas: Runs
through Oct. 4.
Expanded listings at
theweekender.com.
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Wednesday:
279 Bar & Grill: StingRay Blues
Bart and Urbys: Musicians Showcase @9:30p
Hops and Barleys: Firefy Karaoke w/ DJ Bounce
My Lower End: Strawberry Jam
River Street Jazz Caf: Open Mic @ 9pm
Thursday:
279 Bar & Grill: NFL
Bart and Urbys: Trivia Night
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: DJ Fish & K-Mack @ 10
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Larry George
Chackos: Kartune
Kings, Mountain Top: Strawberry Jam Duo
My Lower End: Tracey Dee/Cee
River Street Jazz Caf: I am Bufalo & Doghouse Charlie Band
Woodlands: Club HD inside Evolution Nightclub w/ DJ DATA. Streamside
bandstand- DJ KEV - Hosted by 97 BHT
Friday:
279 Bar & Grill: Shakedown
Bart & Urbys: DJ King B on The Otherside
Beaumont Inn Dallas: Don Shappelle 8-11
Bottle Necks: SledgeHammer of Silence
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Shorty Long @9:30
Grotto, Harveys Lake: The Blend
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: Dymond Cutter
Hops & Barleys: Indoor Summer Deck Party
My Lower End: Deck Party
Plains Pub: Hat Tryk
River Street Jazz Caf: Popa Chubby
Stans Caf: DJs Bernie & Don(B&D Productions)
Tommyboys: DJ
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub 5 Day Happy Hour w/ DJ SlMJMMTop 40 &
Club Music w/ Host 98.5 KRZs Fishboy & Fake Uncle Jack Streamside/Exec
Saturday:
279 Bar & Grill: Tyme Band Classic Rock
3 Guys, Mnt Top: Hat Tryk
Bart & Urbys: DJs Jay Zero & Knucklehead from NC on The Otherside
Beaumont Inn Dallas: Big Daddy Dex 5-8
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Pop Rox @ 9:30
Dianes Deli, Pittston: Beyond Fallen CD Release party w/ The Curse of Sorrow
& Cause of Afiction &Threat Point
My Lower End: Random Rock w/ Art from Castaway
River Street Jazz Caf: Tod Clouser Band w/ Charles Havira
Rox 52: Exxit 6
Senunas: DJ Evil B
Stans Caf: 20lb Head
Tommyboys: Gone Crazy
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub - 98.5 KRZ Double Shot Weekend Your
Bachelorette Party Headquarters DJ Davey B & DJ Kev the Rev Playing Top 40
& Club Music w/ Host Fishboy from 98.5 KRZ & Into The Spin -Streamside/
Exec
Sunday:
Bottlenecks: NFL Ticket
My Lower End: StevO
Stans Caf: NFL Ticket
Monday:
279 Bar & Grill: 279 House Band
My Lower End: Kamikaze Karaoke
Tuesday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic w/ Paul Martin
Grotto, Harveys Lake: Two of a Kind
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Jim McCarthys: Wanna Bs Karaoke
Metro: Karaoke 8-12
My Lower End: Deck Party
TommyBoys: Open Mic
80019455
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August
31st - Triangle Club Picnic
September
6th - Plains Pub - Acoustic
7th - 3 Guys Mt. Top
14th - The Rattler, Pittston
20th - 279 Bar & Grill, Plains
28th - The Italian Club
October
4th - Plains Pub Acoustic
5th - Dallas American Legion
11th - Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall Loc.
Acoustic
12th - My Lower End, Larksville
25th - 279 Bar & Grille, Plains
26th - Italian Club, Plains - Acoustic
www.facebook.com/hattryk HATTRYKMUSIC@GMAIL.COM
November
2nd - Triangle Club
8th - Plains Pub - Acoustic
9th - 3 Guys, Mt. Top
15th - Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall Loc.
Acoustic
23rd - My Lower End, Larksville
27th - Pav Plains Brown Bag Wednesday
30th - Dallas American Legion
December
13th - Plains Pub - Acoustic
21st - My Lower End, Larksville
27th - Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall Loc.
Acoustic
January
18th - Private Party
The Casey
Brothers
Acoustic Music
From
the 60s - today
NowBooking Dates
For Information Call
(570) 868- 3207
If No Answer, Leave Message
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Fitness
CLASSES
Academy of Northern Martial Arts
(79 N. Main St., Pittston) Traditional
Kung Fu & San Shou. For Health and
Defense. Adult & Childrens Classes, Mon.-
Thurs., Sat. First class free. Walk-ins wel-
come, call 371.9919, 817.2161 for info.
Adult Kung Fu
(Kung Fu & Tai Chi Center, Wilkes-
Barre: 570.829.2707)
Ongoing classes. Tues./Thurs., 6:30
p.m. Study of Chinese Martial Art open
hand, weapons sets. Mon., Wed., 6:30 p.m.
Covers Chinese style theories, concepts,
applications. Sport ghting concepts
explained, practiced.
Aikido of Scranton, Inc.
(1627 N. Main Ave., Scranton,
570.963.0500)
Self-Defense Class taught by Aikido
Master Ven Sensei, every Mon. & Wed.,
7-9 p.m. $10.
Traditional Weapons Class, Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. $10.
Back Mountain Martial Arts Center
& Mountaintop Karate Center
For info, call either location, Back
Mountain (4 Carr Ave., 570.675.9535)
or Mountaintop (312 S. Mountain
Blvd., 466.6474): Visit Website at www.
fudoshinkai1.com.
Instruction in Traditional Karate,
Jujutsu, Sivananda Yoga (Back Mountain):
Tues., Wed., Thurs., 4:30-9 p.m., Sat., 8:30
a.m.-12 p.m. (Mountaintop Karate Center
Mon., Weds., Fri., 4:30-9 p.m.
Instruction in Traditional Karate,
Jujutsu, Sivananda Yoga (Mountaintop):
Mon., Wed., Fri., 4:30-9 p.m.
Beauty Lies Within School of Pole
Dance
(32 Forrest St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.793.5757, sl.beautylieswithin@gmail.
com). Hours by appointment. Call or
e-mail for details.
Dance Contours
(201 Bear Creek Blvd., Wilkes-Barre,
570.208.0152, www.dancecontours.com)
Adult classes: ballet, tap, lyrical,
CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.
Children/teen classes: ballet, tap,
CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a form of
dance blending basic Jazz Technique with
styles of street dance, hip hop.
Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.
Adult ballet: Sat. morn.
Dankos Core Wrestling Strength
Training Camp
(DankosAllAmericanFitness.com)
Four sessions/week, features two clin-
ics, two core strength. 4 sessions/week.
Increase power, speed, agility. Group
discounts, coaches, teams, clubs, free
stuff. Visit website or call Larry Danko at
570.825.5989 for info.
Downtown Arts at Arts YOUniverse
(47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.970.2787, www.artsyouniverse.com)
Traditional Egyptian Belly Dance:
Wed., beginners 6-7 p.m.; intermediate 7-8
p.m. intermediate. $10. Call 343.2033 for
info.
Tribal Fusion Dance: Thurs., begin-
ners 6-7 p.m.; intermediate 7-8 p.m. $10.
Call 836.7399 for info.
Cabaret with Helena: Sat., 4:30 p.m.
Pre-registration required. Call 553.2117
for info.
African Dance: Wed. & Sun., 1 p.m.
Traditional African moves with jazz and
hip-hop. $10, registration required, call
212.9644 or visit hipbodysoul.com for info.
Downtown Dojo Karate Academy
(84 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.262.1778)
Offering classes in traditional karate,
weapons, self defense. Mon-Thurs., 5:30-
8:45 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon.
Zumba Classes: Tues., Thurs., 7-8
p.m.; Sat., 12:30-1:30 p.m. $5/class. Call
for info.
Extreme M.M.A.
(2424 Old Berwick Rd., Bloomsburg.
570.854.2580)
MMA Class: Mon., Wed., 6-7 p.m.
First visit free. Wrestling fundamentals,
basic Brazilian Ju-Jitsu No Gi. Call for info.
Boxing/Kickboxing Fitness Class:
Mon., Wed., 7-8 p.m. First visit free. Non-
combative class.
Personal Training: Call 317.7250 for
info.
Fazios Hapkido Do Jang
(61 Main St., Luzerne, 570.239.1191)
Accepting new students. Children (age
7-12) Mon./Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Teen/
adult Mon./Wed., 6:45-8:15 p.m.; Tues.-
Thurs., 6:30-8 p.m. Private lesson also
available.
Learn Hapkido. Self defense applica-
tions. $50 monthly, no contract.
Gallis Fighting Chance School of
Self-Defense
(504 Roosevelt St., Exeter, 570.693.
2091)
Stranger Danger self-defense classes
for ages 7 to 14. One-hour sessions
Saturdays at 10 a.m. starting Sat. $40 per
student, $20 for parent.
Need a place to hone your martial arts skills?
Visit the Back Mountain Martial Arts Center &
Mountaintop Karate Center at two locations,
either Back Mountain (4 Carr Ave., 570.675.9535)
or Mountaintop (312 S. Mountain Blvd.,
466.6474). Visit www.fudoshinkai1.com.
2&4 Hand Drumming Circle
Freestyle drum circle, every second/
fourth Sat., any time between 1-4 p.m.,
Everything Natural (426 S. State St.,
Clarks Summit). All ages, newcomers, old
timers welcome. Hand drums, percussion
provided. Free, no pressure.
Absolute Pilates with Leslie
(263 Carbondale Rd., Clarks Summit,
www.pilateswithleslie.com)
Mon., Wed., Fri., 9-10 a.m. Private
training on Cadillac, Reformer and
Wunda Chair, along with Pilates mat
classes, stability ball core classes, more.
Check website for updates.
Mon., Wed.: Nia Technique, 5:30
p.m.
American Wicca Study Group
(www.americanwicca.org)
The Pagan Pow Wow: third
Saturday of every month, 7 p.m., The
Garb Wench, 13 N. Main St., Ashley.
Tarot readings by Jamie Dana by appoint-
ment, 570.235.0741.
Arts YOUniverse
(47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.970.2787, www.artsyouniverse.com)
Studio J, 2nd oor
Meditation in tradition of Gurdjieff,
Ospensky: Sun., 12-1 p.m., $5
Childrens Meditation: Thurs., 6-7
p.m. Ages 9-14, $5
Tarot Card Readings, by appoint-
ment. $20 rst half hour, $10 additional
half hours.
Awakenings Yoga
(570.472.3272)
Private Yoga Instruction w/ certifed
senior Instructor of Himalayan Institute.
24 years experience. Learn secrets of
Himalayan Masters. Lessons include
asana, pranayama, meditation, relaxation,
ayruveda, holistic nutrition, tantra. $75/
session
Balance Ultimate Fitness
(Belladaro Prof Bldg, 570.862.2840)
Early Morning Fitness Bootcamp:
Tues./Thurs., 6:30 a.m.-7:30 a.m., Sat,
9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., $15 or 12 classes
for $150.
Balance Yoga and Wellness
(900 Rutter Ave., 2nd oor, Forty Fort
570.714.2777, balanceyogastudio.net, bal-
anceyogawellness@gmail.com)
Pole Fitness: Fri., 5:30 p.m. (begin-
ner); 7 p.m. (intermediate). Sat., 1:30
p.m. (all levels); 3:15 p.m. (advanced).
Bellas Yoga Studio
(650 Boulevard Ave., Dickson City,
570.307.5000, www.bellasyoga.com,
info@bellasyoga.com)
All workshops $15, pre-registration
suggested.
Sun. Class: 10-11:15 a.m. Features
Alternating Vinyasa style yoga w/ yoga
fusion.
Candys Place
(190 Welles St., Forty Fort.
570.714.8800)
$35 a month for all classes, $7 per
class. First class is free for everyone.
One on One Personal Training
and Yoga for breast cancer survivors:
Requirements include a breast cancer
diagnosis, a doctors note for participa-
tion, and all forms to be flled out prior to
participation. Free.
Gentle Yoga: Tuesdays and
Thursdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Introduction
to the benefts of learning to relax and
energize with yoga specially designed for
people with or without cancer.
Meditation and Deep Breathing:
Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Strength and Balance: Mondays,
5:30-6:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 4:15-5:15
p.m. Several forms of exercise, such
as yoga, Pilates, and weights to help
increase strength and improve balance
Standing Strong: Mondays, 10:15-
11:30 a.m.; Wednesdays10:15-11:30
a.m.; Thursdays,10:15-11:30 a.m.;
Fridays,10:15-11:30 a.m. Incorporates
cardio exercise with a dance avor and
includes an infusion of weights.
Club Fit
(1 West Broad St., Hazleton,
570.497.4700, www.clubfthazleton.com)
Boxing classes w/ Rich Pastorella
(pastorella.net26.net). Mon., 7-8 p.m.
$40/month.
Goddess Creations Shop & Gallery
(214 Depot St., Clarks Summit,
570.575.8649, info@goddesscreations.
net)
Tarot Card Readings by appoint-
ment.
Tarot Readings: Thurs., 6-9:30 p.m.
at Montrose Inn, Restaurant & Tavern
(26 S. Main St., Montrose). $25 for 15-20
min.
Monthly astrology workshop with
Holly Avila: rst Sun., $45. Call.
Goshin Jitsu Martial Arts Classes
Every month at Golightleys Martial
Arts
(Mark Plaza Shopping Center, Rt. 11,
Edwardsville). Focus on cardio, stretch-
ing, defense, stamina, more. Self defense,
cardio, karate aerobics also available. $75/
month. Call 570.814.3293 for info.
Haifa Belly Dance
(Haifabellydance.com, 570.836.7399)
Mon., 6:30- p.m., Body Language
Studios (239 Schuyler Ave, Kingston)
Tues., 7:00 p.m., Jaya Yoga (320
South State Street, Clarks Summit)
Wed., 6 p.m., Holistic Health Center
(Route 6, Tunkhannock)
Get into the groove with the 2&4 Hand Drumming
Circle, a freestyle drum circle, every second/
fourth Saturday, any time between 1-4 p.m.,
at Everything Natural (426 S. State St., Clarks
Summit). All ages. Hand drums, percussion pro-
vided. Free, no pressure.
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Weekender Deck Series @ Kildares 08.30.13
Photos by Jordon Weiss For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
you
We want
is looking for energetic and eager interns to become part of
a publication that has had its nger on the pulse of the NEPA
arts and entertainment scene for the past 20 years.
Were looking for both editorial and marketing interns that
are creative, deadline driven, team players, and have a good
work ethic with an outgoing personality.
If interested, please submit a resume with a brief paragraph
about why you think you t the job description to
weekender@theweekender.com by Sept. 18.
Our events are primarily at local entertainment venues,
making it a good way to network while also learning the ins
and outs of a weekly entertainment paper.
weekender t
h
e
EDITORIAL
- Must have an interest/
experience in writing
- Comfortable with
interviewing story subjects
- Willing to take on a broad
range of topics
- Willingness to help out
with all aspects of the
publication
MARKETING
- Energetic and motivated
- Willing to dedicate time
and effort to events and
projects
- Ability to generate ideas
and see them through
- Sense of design
Aayu, the indie rapper
from Bucks County who
relocated to Northeast
Pennsylvania a few years
ago, admits his name is a
pain the ass because of its
unusual pronunciation, but
unlike many hip-hop artists,
its no gimmick.
Its a common boy and
girls name in India, but its
an old, old name that trans-
lates from Sanskrit to lifes-
pan. Without getting all
deep and philosophical and
all that, I felt like I had lived
a lifespan of a million men
by the time I was 25 and I
thought that it would be a
really cool name. It would
be a little bit spiritual, but
not so spiritual that it was
going to be egotistical,
Aayu, born Mark Ciccone,
told The Weekender
(Its) a new leaf, which
I feel like any human being
that wants to has an oppor-
tunity to do at any time.
Thats one of the wonderful
things about having choices
and freedom and free will.
You can, at any time, change
anything about yourself you
dont like. You just got to g-
ure out what it is rst.
He gured it out the
hard way, but Aayu feels
his experiences made him
who he is today. Those who
meet him now may hear
the early inuences of the
Beastie Boys, Bad Religion,
and NOFX in his work, but
they may not believe that
he was once a hardcore and
punk rock kid who played in
bands like Spring Victory,
Zolof The Rock And Roll
Destroyer, and Valencia.
My mother was a musi-
cian. My mom played bass
for years, and I had an
older sister that was into
music; she played guitar,
so it was a really musical
house. My sister was older,
so I thought her and all her
friends were really cool and
they listened to all these
punk bands I had never
heard of. This is, like, early
90s. I was just listening to
the radio before that. It was
something really different
for me to hear, he recalled.
It kind of took over my
life, and Im the type of
person all or nothing with
everything in my life, so
when I got a hold of that,
it just became my life
the culture, the music, the
bands, the shows, every-
thing all of that just kind
of took over my life.
His appreciation for hip-
hop was always there too,
however.
Ive always been a fan
of rap music and hip-hop
because, like I said, my
mother was a musician, so
I had a lot of classic stuff
in my life and a lot of R&B
and soul, so when I started
hearing rap and hip-hop on
the radio for the rst time,
it was all sample-based stuff
that was sampling records
that I had heard when I was
a kid that I already liked. I
was a drummer, rst and
foremost, so thats hip-hop,
thats rap rap is a rhythm.
I was always a big fan of it,
he explained.
I chased it as much as I
chased the punk and hard-
core except I couldnt rap,
really, back then when I was
young and I was a drummer.
I tried to for fun. I didnt
know how to make beats
or anything yet, so I was
just making the punk and
the hardcore because thats
what I knew how to make,
but I was always a fan of the
rap.
His rap career began in
earnest around 2007 long
after his other musical
career ended.
I was at a point in my
life, 10 years ago or so, that
I wasnt playing in bands
anymore. I had burned
some bridges and I didnt
have my guitars and my
drums and stuff anymore,
so it was only natural that I
was like, Well, I like rap. I
dont need an instrument to
rap, Aayu noted.
It was never really like,
All right, Im going to be a
rapper and Im going to put
out rap records. That really
wasnt my mentality at the
time, but since I had been
writing, it was only a mat-
ter of time, I think. Once I
started and I started really
liking what I was writing,
it was only a matter of time
before I was like, Well, Im
going to release an album
with just rap.
Im just a weird dude,
and I always like interesting
things, so my rap, my hip-
hop that I make is, I feel like,
much different than most of
the stuff that other people
are doing Theres a mil-
lion things that go into mak-
ing a song. I think when you
kind of limit yourself to, Im
just going to listen to this or
that or the other thing, you
kind of pigeonhole yourself
for what youre going to
make.
Recording his own
work and playing with live
instruments, Aayu released
Blacklister in 2012, a bio-
graphical album that reveals
the truth about his past and
faces his future with con-
dence.
I was pretty much black-
listed from the Philadelphia
music scene years ago
because of my lifestyle
choices, and I hurt people.
Even though I was a tal-
ented musician, they didnt
really want to make music
with me. You take music
away from someday thats
the only thing ever cared
about, thats tough, he
emphasized.
I called it was it was
Im the blacklister. Im the
one who was blacklisted.
I wanted to tell a story
because I get asked about
it a lot. Sometimes I talk
about the bands I used to
play in and people are fans
of those bands They got
famous making music, and I
never had that opportunity.
I tell a lot of stories about
how I felt like a phantom,
like I didnt even really
exist. Everybody knew who
these people were and I was
nameless. Theres a lot of
that in this album.
Thats some liberating
st right there, to be able
to do something like that.
And Im all about that Im
not shy.
The now 30-year-old is
headlining the 2nd Annual
Culture Shock festival at
Scrantons Nay Aug Park, in
an area he is now happy to
call home.
I moved up there origi-
nally to get clean because I
was drinking and I was get-
ting high when I was about
25 where I was originally
from in Philadelphia area.
I kind of became a product
of my environment there
with who I was hanging
out and neighborhoods I
was hanging out in, and I
was given an opportunity
to go get clean up there at
a treatment center, so thats
what originally landed me
up there and then I came to
really love the people and
the area and the atmosphere
up there, so I stayed, he
said.
I absolutely love the idea
and the concept of (Culture
Shock) because its all-inclu-
sive. Everybodys welcome,
and its free. Youve got all
this music and you get high
off this vibe and this energy
when you do something like
that. Plus its outside and
the park is beautiful, so Im
just going to go out there
and play music and sweat a
lot and dance around like a
fool.
Thats what I enjoy
doing, so I cant wait.
W
Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
Aayu fnds newlife in name, rap music
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CultuRe SHoCk 2013
sept. 7, nay aug park in scranton, Free.
SCHedule
Main Stage
7:30-8:30: aayu
6:30-7: nelson
5-6: silhouette Lies
4-4:30: young at Heart (Formerly terror On the screen)
2:30-3:30: aFire With Friends
1:30-2: down to six
12:30-1: Crock pot abduction
12-12:15: dual diagnosis
aCouStiC Stage
12:15-12:25: Jeri bennett
1-1:30: tba
2-2:30: Ed Zaleski
3:30-4: James barrett 4:30-5: a.p.
6-6:30: Ed Cuozzo (asocial state)
7-7:30: master Fox
art exhibits fromCorey romano, allison Larussa, and more along with three video
game tournaments: mortal Kombat, mario Kart, andsuper smash brothers.
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By Bill OBoyle
Fromthe times Leader
Eddie Day,Joe Nardone, andThe Poets still drawfans
They pack the houses,
they play the songs fans
want to hear, and they have
been doing it for 50-plus
years.
They are Northeastern
Pennsylvanias local
Legends of Rock n Roll,
if you will Joe Nardone,
Eddie Day (Pashinski), and
The Poets.
Since the very early 60s,
all three of these iconic
entertainers have been draw-
ing huge crowds. And for
them, the fun never stopped.
As Nardone said, Do you
think this happens anywhere
else?
People still love rock and
roll dance music, Pashinski
said. Im 18 when Im on
stage, and the people danc-
ing are teenagers again. I
think we are all truly blessed
that we can still go out there
and relive those wonderful
times again and again.
Pashinski is 68, a retired
school teacher, and cur-
rent state representative
from the 121st Legislative
District. Nardone is known
for his successful Gallery
of Sound music stores (he
declined to give his age).
They both played all the
old haunts Sandy Beach
and Hansons Amusement
Park at Harveys Lake, the
Wilkes-Barre Catholic Youth
Center, Sans Souci Park, the
West Pittston and Nanticoke
armories, Wilkes and Kings
college dances, the Starre
Ballroom, and the Stardust
Ballroom.
The old venues are either
gone, falling down, or not
used for concerts, but the
music and the three legend-
ary acts live on.
The Poets fronted by
brothers Nick (66) and Pat
Luongo (62) and childhood
pal Frank Gervasi (65)
started playing together in
July 1963. They grew up
in the Bunker Hill section
on the Scranton/Dunmore
border and they were rst
called The Dimensions.
The name changed to The
Poets in 1966 as the British
Invasion of the Beatles,
Rolling Stones, and others
changed the face and fabric
of rock and roll.
Fred Waring inuence
Eddie Day had every
intention of being a math
teacher, but avisit totheFred
Waring Music Work Shop
at Shawnee-on-Delaware
in Monroe County in 1963
changed all that. Waring, a
famous musician in his own
right, told Pashinski that if
he wanted a career in music,
he had to study music, so
Pashinski changed his major
at then Wilkes College and
became a music teacher.
That changed my life,
Pashinski said.
Pashinski would form
Eddie Day & the Starres,
EddieDay&theNightimers,
then Thee Eddie Day Groop
and later Eddie Day & TNT.
Back in 1963, the three
members of The Poets never
imagined they would still be
playing and drawing crowds
50 years later.
Now we cant imagine
not doing it, Gervasi said.
We all love it, Pat
Luongo said. Imagine, we
are paid to sing and dance
and have fun.
Deidre Miller Kaminski
has been dancing to
Nardone, Day, and The
Poets since she was a teenag-
er in the mid-60s and she
still does. Kaminski organiz-
es large groups mostly her
high school classmates and
other friends that faithfully
attend the dances at places
like the Irem Temple pavil-
ion in Dallas Township.
I just love the music; I
always have, she said. It
makes me feel happy and
alive. It makes me want to
dance, and I feel like a teen-
ager. I just cant sit still when
I hear it.
Kaminski and Eddie Day
have known each other
for decades, going back to
Mohawk Riding Stables at
Harveys Lake. Kaminski
would go there with her dear
friend, the late Billy James,
who would play guitar, and
he introduced her to Eddie
Day and the Harveys Lake
dances at Sandy Beach and
Hansons.
Kaminski and Day recon-
nected in 1976 during the
Edwardsville Bicentennial
celebration. She got his
band to play in the parking
lot of the former Vic Mars
Restaurant.
Hes such a talented sing-
er, she said. He sings from
his heart.
Kaminski went to hear
Nardone at Sans Souci even
when I wasnt allowed to.
She remembers the crowds
and the music and the
kids coming from all over
Wyoming Valley.
Those were fun times,
she said, and its still a fun
time to go out and dance to
Eddie Day, Joe Nardone, and
The Poets.
Irems pavilion
Nardone said the pavilion
at Irem Temple is the per-
fect venue for the dances
because it resembles the
dance halls at Sandy Beach,
Hansons, and Sans Souci
with its open-air sides and
large dance oor.
I still run into people
who were at those dances,
Nardone said. They tell me
when they come to the danc-
es today, theyre kids again.
They come up to me and tell
me to keep playing, to keep
holding the dances.
The Luongos said they
have performed at weddings,
graduations, re-marriages,
divorce parties, cruises
even weddings of the chil-
dren of parents whose wed-
dings they played.
We play for two or three
hours and everybody forgets
about their problems, Nick
said. They work all week,
they deal with all kinds of
issues, but when they come
to a dance, they go back to
those good times before all
the stress of reality.
The Poets play a variety
of music, frompolkas to Bon
Jovi. They said the music,
the dances, and the fans
keep them young.
Were happy to be on
stage doing it, Pat said.
Image is important for
The Poets; they like to wear
matching outts, from tux-
edos to Village People garb.
We intend to keep going
as long as we can do it and
its still fun, Nick said.
Well know when its time
to give it up. Were big sh
in a little bowl, and we like
that.
I never thought that what
we did would mean so much
to so many, said Pashinski.
Its therapeutic for me, too.
When Im on stage, I only
think of the music and the
people and having a good
time. It makes me feel good
to see how people react.
People like Kaminski and
the hundreds of others who
ock to the dances.
Its in my blood, my
soul, she said. Its in me; I
love that music and love to
hear it and dance to it.
Kaminski said Eddie Day,
Nardone, and The Poets are
a part of her and so many
others.
They make me feel
good and happy, she said.
Theyre a part of me. I truly
mean that frommy heart. As
long as theyre playing, Ill be
there and Ill be dancing.
Pashinski said nobody
ever knows whats around
the corner next week or next
year.
But lets enjoy it while we
can, he said.
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aimee dilger|the times Leader
Frankie Gervasi, and Nick and Pat Luongo The Poets perform at the Irem Pavillion in Dallas on Friday evening to a very large crowd.
Courtesy Photo
Pictured left, Eddie Day Pashinski sings at a dance at Sandy Beach, Harveys Lake, in the 1960s. He was performing with Eddie Day & the
Nightimers. Pictured right, Joe Nardone plays the saxophone at a recent dance.
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By Sara Pokorny
Weekender StafWriter
H
ello sweet
sum
wait, what?
Summer is
already over?
Sadly, it is, and that
means that school is back
in session. Even though
the days following will be
spent cracking the books,
that doesnt mean you need
to forego the fun. There are
plenty of extracurricular
activities to do, both on
and off camps, around
the Scranton and Wilkes-
Barre areas, to keep you
entertained outside of
studying.
Put the Red Bull down
you deserve a break.
Many of the area
colleges have the typical
athletic teams and group
organizations, but many
have little gems that you
may not have known about.
Kings College has a Ski
and Snowboard club for
those ready to embrace
the chilly months, and a
club dedicated to Ultimate
Frisbee for when the
weather breaks.
Fall back
into fun
Back on the bar Scene
Wilkes University also
has an Ultimate Frisbee
club and continues to help
those seeking fun physical
pursuits through both the
Running and Paintball
clubs.
Luzerne County
Community College has
an organization dedicated
solely to a sport not often
seen around here fencing.
LCCC also has the WSFX
Radio Club, which offers
students an opportunity to
hone their skills through
on-air shifts that cater to
music, sports, and news
reporting opportunities.
Marywood University
has something for those
interested in varying
cultures, such as the Anime
and Japanese Culture Club
and the Irish Dance Club.
The University of
Scranton hosts an
Equestrian Team for the
horse lovers out there, and,
perhaps on the complete
other end of the scale,
theres an Urban Beats Hip
Hop Dance Team for those
who love to get down.
Lackawanna College is a
great place for writers and
actors alike. Off the Vine is
the student-run newspaper,
and the LC Playas Drama
Club offers students the
opportunity to perform
in theatrical productions
throughout the school year.
Misericordia University
has the SOAR Program, the
Student Outdoor Adventure
& Recreation Program for
those who are in no way
content with sitting around
in their dorm room. Theres
also the Chamber Singers, a
select chorus that performs
throughout the year at the
university.
Penn State Wilkes-Barre
offers the Astro Society for
the stargazers out there,
and the Lazy Artists
Society/Radio Club, which
aims to inspire and further
Penn State students in their
artistic ventures.
Penn State Worthington
is big on giving back with
the Community Services
Club and, perhaps in what
may be the strangest
college organization weve
seen around here (and yet
the most awesome), theres
a Paranormal Club.
Who said college is a
drag?
W
O
K, lets face it: a
really exciting
part about going
back to school
is having plenty of bars
to choose from. This area
in no way falls short with
having a great selection.
The River Street
Jazz Cafe (667 N. River
St., Plains Township,
riverstreetjazzcafe.com)
is an intimate venue that
brings in awesome music
acts and has great drink
specials. All night, every
night theres a $2 bottle
special and daily happy
hours that include $3 well
mixers from 8 to 10 p.m.
and $1.50 pints of Miller
Lite and Yuengling Lager
from 10 p.m. to midnight.
Theres a $5 food menu
every Wednesday and
Thursday, and on Thursday
there is buy one, get one
admission as well as $1
Lionshead bottles all night.
River Grille (670 N.
River St., Plains Township,
rivergrillenepa.com) is the
perfect place to cure the
Sunday blues with the only
Build Your Own Bloody
Mary bar in the valley, open
from 11:30 a.m. through
3 p.m. Thirsty Thursday
offers $5 32 oz. rum
buckets.
Rodanos (53 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre,
rodanos.com) offers a ton
of space to dance if youre
looking to work up a sweat,
as well as two bars to
quench your thirst at, which
includes an enormous
selection of vodka. Theres
also newly added outdoor
seating to check out before
it gets chilly.
Beer Boys (176 N.
Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre, beerboys2nite.net)
offers an award-winning
half-off happy hour every
Wednesday from 9 to 11
p.m. and every Thursday
through Sunday from 9
p.m. to midnight. Every
Wednesday and Sunday,
the bar features a brewery,
which includes a free glass
along with the draft feature
(upcoming brews include
Straub IPL or Maibock
and SBC Oktoberfest or
Pumpkin). Beer Boys is a
good place for those who
enjoy a good craft brew
or are just looking to try
something new and unique,
with 72 beers on tap and
new beers coming in all the
time.
The Woodlands Inn
(1073 Highway 315,
woodlandsresort.com) has
plenty to offer, from the
SKYY Vu Deck Bar, which
offers a stunning view,
to Evolution Night Club,
where the hottest tunes are
always playing.
Bart & Urbys (119 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
bartandurby.com) offers
a happy hour from 5 to
7 p.m. Monday through
Friday, 9 to 11 p.m. Friday,
and 10 p.m. to midnight
on Saturday. Theres also
a Wings and Yuengs Night
and live entertainment
every weekend.
Bottlenecks Saloon
and Eatery (3 S. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre,
bottleneckssaloon.com) is
one of the newer watering
holes downtown, and it
doesnt disappoint. Each
night theres something
going on, from the all-
you-can-eat wing night
on Tuesdays, to Whacky
Wheel Trivia and Build
Your Own Burger night on
Wednesdays. Theres a live
band almost every Friday
and Saturday night and
cash prizes during NFL
games on both Sunday
and Monday. The kicker?
Theres a self-serve draft
beer bar for all to enjoy.
Joe Ks Brew House (41
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
downtownafterdark.com) is
also a newer establishment,
one that offers cornhole
competitions on
Wednesdays, turtle races
on Fridays, and beer pong
tournaments on Saturdays,
all of which have $100
prizes.
Avanti (111 Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre) has an
outside patio with plenty
of seating and offers up
some of the nest in Italian
dishes, as well as a great
beer selection.
Senunas Bar and
Grill (133 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre) has been a
Best College Bar winner
in Weekender polls for
several years in a row now.
There are different food
specials nightly and happy
hours that run Monday
through Wednesday, 9 to
11 p.m., Thursday 10 p.m.
to midnight, and Friday
and Saturday 9 p.m. to
midnight. Happy hours
include a $5 shot and draft
combo, $4 Long Islands,
$3 Jager bombs, $2 vodka
bombs, and much more.
Plus, at this establishment
thats been a part of the
Kings College community
since 1959, there are $5
Senunas Shakers all the
time, and who doesnt want
to drink out of a mason jar?
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tell us...
What are you most looking
forward to about the
upcoming school year?
Efy
Leenheer
19, Sussex, N.J.
Newexperiences.
Gabby
Vaxmonsky
19, Pittston
Meeting new
people.
Regan
Parshall
19, Athens, Pa.
Learning new
things.
Hunter
Bassitt
19, Newtown, Conn.
Lack of sleep from
architecture.
Justin
Wahy
19, Childs, Pa.
Getting more
experience in my feld.
Derek
Dunstone
21, Peckville
Doing well in school
and being around good
people.
by Afton Fonzo, Weekender Intern
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eve got a ton
of traditions
here in
Northeast
Pennsylvania, and two of
the biggest are coming up
soon.
Can you believe its
been 158 years since
the Bloomsburg Fair began?
Thats nearly 16 decades
of dazzling entertainment,
educational shows, top-
notch competitions, and
food oh, we cant forget
the food. The Bloomsburg
Fair can also be called the
land of if you can name it,
weve probably fried it.
As you can see by the
expansive schedule on
bloomsburgfair.com,
theres a little something
for everyone from Sept. 20
through the 28. Heres a
quick glance into it.
Grandstand concerts:
Lee Greenwood:
Sept. 20, 8 p.m.
Hunter Hayes:
Sept. 22, 7:30 p.m.
Casting Crows:
Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m.
Three Days Grace/Finger
Eleven:
Sept. 24, 7:30 p.m.
Halestorm:
Sept. 25, 7:30 p.m.
Scotty McCreery: Sept.
26, 7:30 p.m.
Austin Mahone/Coco
Jones:
Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m.
Justin Moore:
Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m.
Other events:
Horse racing, truck and
tractor pull, helicopter
rides, Demo Car Derby,
Double Figure 8 Racing, the
High Flying Pages Aerial
& Animal Thrill Show, and
much more.
Another local fair
hasnt been around
quite as many years as
Bloomsburgs, but it is
marking a milestone. The
50th Annual Luzerne
County Fair will take place
from Sept. 4 through Sept.
8.
A full guide is available at
luzernecountyfair.com.
Entertainment schedule:
Tommy Guns:
Sept. 4, 6-7 p.m.
The Kentucky
Headhunters:
Sept. 4, 7:30-9 p.m.
All's fair in NEPA
The Poets:
Sept. 5, 6-7:30 p.m.
That 90s Band:
Sept. 6, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
The Badlees:
Sept. 6, 8-10 p.m.
Shawn Klush with the
Sweet Inspirations:
Sept. 7, 6:30-8 p.m.
Keystone Kids:
Sept. 8, 5-6:30 p.m.
Rick K and the All
Nighters:
Sept. 8, 6:30-8 p.m.
If youre up for a bit
of a road trip, it would
be quite the experience
to slip into a land of
another time at the
33rd Annual Pennsylvania
Renaissance Faire, which
runs through Oct. 27 at
the Mount Hope Estate
and Winery. 16th century
England awaits you! And,
yes, you can totally stop
at the winery before you
leave and buy some booze.
Tickets are $29.95 for
adults. For more info and
tickets, visit parenfaire.
com or call the box ofce at
717.665.7021.
Miscellaneous
entertainment
There are plenty of other
things the area has to offer,
and on any given night.
Party on the
Square: The popular
Wilkes-Barre-centric party
is back and will take place
Oct. 18, with plenty of
dancing and entertainment
guaranteed.
The Scranton
Cultural Center (420
N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton) has some great
programs if youre looking
to have a hilarious night
out. Bad Movie Thursdays
with Mystery Science
Theater 3000 plays from
7 to 9 p.m. on select
Thursdays, and the Up and
Coming Comedy Series is
Sept. 28, Oct. 19, and Nov.
16 from 8 to 10 p.m.
While many of the
colleges in the area have
spectacular theater groups,
there are also some local
organizations worth
checking out, such as Little
Theatre of Wilkes-Barre
(537 North Main St.,
570.823.1875), Music Box
Players (196 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville, 570.283.2195,
800.698.PLAY or
musicbox.org), the
Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St.,
Duryea, 570.457.3589,
phoenixpac.vpweb.com)
and Theatre at the
Grove (5177 Nuangola Rd.,
Nuangola, 570.868.8212,
nuangolagrove.com).
Music mania
Not only are we fortunate
enough to have truckloads
of musical talent actually
in NEPA, weve also got
venues that bring in top
entertainers from all over
the country, and this fall
will be no exception.
Culture Shock 2013:
Sept. 7, noon- 9p.m.,
Nay Aug Park, Scranton.
Featuring Aayu, A Fire
With Friends, Ed Cuozzo,
Down to Six, Jeri Bennett,
Nelson, and more. Free.
F.M. Kirby Center (71
Public Square, Wilkes-
Barre, 570.826.1100,
kirbycenter.org)
Alice Cooper:
Oct. 18, 8 p.m.
Cyndi Lauper:
Oct. 22, 8 p.m.
Elvis Costello:
Nov. 25, 7:30 p.m.
Brews Brothers
West (75 Main St.,
Luzerne, 570.283.1300,
brewsbrothersbar.com/
brewsbrotherswest)
Jackyl: Sept. 13, 8 p.m.
River Street Jazz
Caf (667 N. River
St., Plains Township,
570.822.2992,
riverstreetjazzcafe.com)
I Am Buffalo/Doghouse
Charlie Band:
Sept. 5, 9 p.m.
Popa Chubby:
Sept. 6, 10 p.m.
Flux Capacitor:
Sept. 19, 10 p.m.
Clarence Spady All Star
Band: Prince Tribute:
Sept. 21, 10 p.m.
Wham Bam Bowie Band:
Sept. 28, 10 p.m.
The Manhattan Project/
Horizon Wireless: Oct. 5,
10 p.m.
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From top, the Luzerne County Fair, Elvis Costello,
and a local theater production.
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Bill Thomas
Weekender Correspondent
The slasher flmgrows up withDead.tv
Harrison Smith has
fond memories of sum-
mer camp. Unlike most of
us, though, his adolescent
reminiscences are less fun
and games, more blood
and guts.
I remember being f-
teen and seeing the movie
Sleepaway Camp at
the Sherman Theater in
Stroudsburg, Smith says.
I loved it. I saw it with
this girl I was dating at
the time and she was just
shocked. I said, Wow, that
was a real fun horror lm,
and she said, I dont know
if we can date if thats a
cool movie to you. So I
said, I guess were broken
up.
Now a lmmaker
himself, based out of
Kunkletown, Penn., Smith
returns to his cinematic
stomping grounds, the
Sherman Theater, this
Saturday for the red car-
pet premiere of his latest
production, Dead.tv.,
which will see wide release
via DVD and video-on-
demand in November.
Sure enough, its a lm
that paints the great out-
doors red with blood.
Filmed at an actual sum-
mer camp in Effort, Pa.,
Dead.tv. tells the story of
a washed-up horror movie
director trying to reinvent
his backwoods slasher
franchise as a modern-day
reality show, with expect-
edly deadly results.
Though he previously
wrote and produced two
other horror movies,
2011s The Fields and
2012s 6 Degrees of Hell,
Dead.tv marks Smiths
rst time directing.
Its a natural evolution,
Smith said. Really, direct-
ing is about understand-
ing your characters. I just
approached it with that
attitude. Im not so much
worried about getting the
perfect shot as I am getting
the content right, making
sure that the dialogue is
real and that the scene is
genuine.
As painless as the tran-
sition into the directors
chair was for Smith, less
painless was the decision
to return to the genre yet
again. Not wanting to be
pigeonholed as just a
horror lmmaker, Smith
was hesitant when a nan-
cier proposed a project in
the vein of 1980s camp-set
splatter icks Friday the
13th and The Burning.
Smith ultimately agreed
only on the condition that
he could write the script
with a greater emphasis
on plot and mystery than
sex and violence. In other
words, as the Dead.tv
tagline boasts, The slash-
er lm has grown up.
When Harrison sent me
the script, I fell in love with
it, actress Felissa Rose
says. Its very character-
driven and everything is
very textured and layered.
Theres all these subplots
and theres some great
social commentary about
where we are today with
television and pop culture
and the relationships teen-
agers have with technol-
ogy. Its denitely one of
the most amazing projects
Ive ever had the pleasure
of being involved in.
High praise, coming
from Rose. One of the
stars of Dead.tv (along-
side Eric Roberts of
The Dark Knight and
Danielle Harris of the 2007
Halloween remake),
Rose has been in more
than 20 horror lms over
the course of her career.
She will return to NEPA in
September to act in Smiths
next lm Zombie Killers:
Elephants Graveyard.
Smith specically wrote
the role Rose plays in
Dead.tv (that of a slasher-
ick scream queen, natch)
for her. Of all the charac-
ters shes played, after all,
Rose remains best known
as Angela, the not-what-
she-appears-to-be main
character of Sleepaway
Camp, the lm that cost
Smith his girlfriend so
many years ago.
I guess that that was
the end of that relation-
ship, Rose says, but, in a
way, it was the beginning
of ours.
W
Actors Danielle Harris and Eric Roberts between takes at Pennys Place in Kunkletown.
Above left, director Harrison Smith talks with George Roberts while shooting an opening scene. Above right, Dead.tv star Felissa Rose
poses with FX artist Cleve Hall from SyFy Channels Monster Man.
DEAD.Tv PREMiERE
sept. 7, 7 p.m., sherman theater (524 main st.,
stroudsburg). tickets: $10 advance, $17 at the door,
$50V.I.p. Info: 570.420.2808, deadtvmovie.com.
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
NEPA Tattoo Arts Festival @ Genetti Hotel
& Conference Center 08.30.13
Photos by Rich Howells For more photos, visit theweekender.com
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Amy Longsdorf
Weekender Correspondent
Swanberg rediscovers his humor inDrinking Buddies
After eight years of
shooting no-budget
indies like Nights
and Weekends
and Alexander the
Last, director Joe
Swanberg decided, in
his words, to hit the
reset button on his
career.
The result is Drinking
Buddies, easily his best
and most accessible movie.
While his previous 16 fea-
tures helped kickstart the
Mumblecore movement and
netted considerable critical
acclaim, Drinking Buddies
is a different brew entirely.
Not only does the lm
feature Hollywood-based
actors like Olivia Wilde, Jake
Johnson, Ron Livingston,
and Anna Kendrick, but the
budget was arguably bigger
than all of his other lms put
together.
This time around,
Swanberg says he had a
deep desire to connect with
audiences. I think it just
hit me when I was starting
Drinking Buddies how big
a deal it is for [a movie-goer]
to go to a theater and chose
my movie over any of the
others playing. I just wanted
to make sure that I was hold-
ing up my end of the bar-
gain.
Available on VOD and in
select theaters, Drinking
Buddies is an intoxicating
slice-of-life tale that focuses
on Wilde and Johnson. Both
work for a micro-brewery
and love to hang out togeth-
er knocking back cold ones.
Theyre clearly a match
made in heaven, but since
theyre both dating others
(Livingston, Kendrick),
their relationship stays pla-
tonic.
But then Wildes boyfriend
departs, and the stage is set
for the drinking buddies to
become something more.
But if you think you know
where this rom com is head-
ed, think again. Drinking
Buddies zigs when you
think it will zag.
Im a huge fan of roman-
tic comedies, but I was
growing frustrated at how
predictable theyd become,
says Swanberg. I wanted to
do something different but
still stay within the
genre.
To prepare,
Swanberg studied
Paul Mazurskys
Bob, Carol, Ted
and Alice and
Elaine Mays The
Heartbreak Kid,
two comedies from the late
60s and early 70s. Even
though neither lm plays
by the rom com rules, they
were both huge hits. It gave
Swanberg hope that he could
pull off a similar feat.
I used to think that if you
made a smart and compli-
cated comedy, it would only
play to a limited audience.
But those movies proved
it was possible to do some-
thing different and still con-
nect with moviegoers.
While Swanberg has
always incorporated humor
in his movies, Drinking
Buddies is his rst at-out
comedy. After a series of
dramas, the lmmaker was
ready to lighten up.
I dont know what hap-
pened to me because I
started out wanting to make
comedies, says Swanberg,
32. And I think some of my
earlier movies have a sense
of humor.
But then because of
issues in my personal life,
my movies got dark for a
while. But Im happy to have
made something light and
to have gotten my sense of
humor back.
On previous features,
Swanberg was, as he notes,
a one-man band, doing
anything and everything
that was required, including
coordinating the craft ser-
vices table and driving cast
members to and from the
set.
With Drinking Buddies,
he hired crewmembers to do
a lot of the same jobs he used
to perform. Rather than feel-
ing as if he was losing con-
trol, Swanberg enjoyed the
freedomof being able to con-
centrate on simply working
with the actors.
I was nervous at rst,
but I quickly learned that I
wasnt giving up control on
the things I cared about,
he says. In fact, hiring tal-
ented people to be in charge
of the different departments
allowed me to spend more
time dealing with the stuff
that I care passionately
about.
Another big change for
Swanberg was working
with Hollywood vets like
Wilde. The actress, who
has delivered largely bland
performances in lms like
Cowboys and Aliens
and The Incredible Burt
Wonderstone, blossoms in
Drinking Buddies.
I had seen Olivia in
Alpha Dog and I have kept
track of her ever since, says
Swanberg. She really hasnt
been given the opportunity
to shine.
Even though Swanbergs
latest is more heavily script-
edthanhis previous features,
he still allowed his cast room
to improvise. I think it was
a bit scary for them at rst,
he says. But it was also dif-
ferent for themtoo, challeng-
ing. And the chemistry that
Olivia and Jake have; I cant
take credit for that. I really
just cast them and then tried
to stay out of their way.
A native of Detroit,
Swanberg attended lm
school at the Southern
Illinois University at
Carbondale before launch-
ing his rst lo- feature,
Kissing on the Mouth,
in 2005. It was around this
same time that Mumblecore
mainstays Andrew Bujalski
made his lm debut with
Funny Ha Ha and the
Duplass Brothers turned out
The Puffy Chair.
Bujalski coined the term
Mumblecore to describe
the lms which were not
only shot on the cheap but
also shared an emphasis
on dialogue over action. A
number of the lms were, as
the New York Times noted,
largely made by and about
young post grads.
I remember the rst
time I heard Andrew say
Mumblecore, I hated it and
I told him, Never say that
again, recalls Swanberg
with a laugh. But the name
stuck.
Now, Swanberg is appre-
ciative of being part of a
movement that earned him
plenty of free publicity.
Its a struggle for a lm-
maker to get people to see
his or her movies, especially
movies that dont have stars.
In a way, being part of the
Mumblecore [movement]
was like having a movie star
in the movie. It made people
want to see our movies.
Through the years, the
Mumblecore lmmakers
have banded together, often
co-starring in each others
movies and using some of
the same actors. Weve real-
ly had each others backs,
notes the director.
Since lming Drinking
Buddies, Swanberg
has already completed
two more features 24
Exposures starring buddy
Adam Wigand, and Happy
Christmas, a rom com with
Anna Kendrick, Melanie
Lynskey, and Phillys Mark
Webber.
Swanberg has also acted
in a number of movies,
including the 2014 chiller
Proxy for director Zack
Parker and producer Faust
Checho (the Stroudsburg-
shot The Fields with
Cloris Leachman). At the
moment, Swanberg can be
seen in Youre Next, a hor-
ror thriller that earned rave
reviews from critics.
Im really proud to be a
part of Youre Next, says
Swanberg of the ick about
a family reunion interrupted
by a gang of ax-wielding psy-
chos. It opens in New York
the same day as Drinking
Buddies and I have to do
a Q&A for my movie, but
afterwards Im going to get a
bunch of my friends together
and see Youre Next at mid-
night. I cant wait because I
love that movie.
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Joe Swanberg
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Male Musings on love, roMance, and dating
Kenny Luck | Special to the Weekender
Books for casual readers
Teri Schlichenmeyer | Weekender Correspondent
Hope on the job hunt
By now, you should be
used to hearing no.
No, were not accepting
applications at this time.
No, we dont have any
openings. No, were not hir-
ing. Theres no chance well
be expanding this year.
No, we looked over your
resume and no, we cant
offer you a job now.
Youve lled out hun-
dreds of applications.
Youve done your best on
interviews and you still
dont have the job you
want. Now, with the new
book This is How to Get
Your Next Job by Andrea
Kay, youll be able to deter-
mine your next step.
When her husband, a
small business owner, said
that he had given up hope
in nding the qualied
employee hed been looking
for, Andrea Kay knew there
was trouble.
Some of his interview-
ees seemed unprofessional.
Others just didnt seem
like a right t which is
Kays rst important point:
when job-hunting, you may
be passed over because of
how employers feel about
you or because of how you
seemed, based upon how
you acted when applying or
interviewing.
The good news is, thats
something you can x.
Before you get that far,
though, remember that
there are jobs out there.
Yes, there may be a thou-
sand people applying for
the position you want, but
standing out is not that
hard. Its a matter of not
doing what everybody else
is doing.
Next, ask yourself how
you want to seem to a pro-
spective employer. What
are your strengths for
this job? How will you t?
How will you show those
strengths and convey that
meaning clearly, without
merely using words? Those
are some of the questions
you must, must, must ask
yourself before you go to
your next interview, while
youre there, and after its
over.
Be mindful of how peo-
ple will remember you
when youre not around.
Remember that your words
arent all thats on display
during the interview; your
demeanor, dress, and man-
ners are being noticed, too.
Know what you should
never do, say, discuss, or
wear while looking for a
job, and read about 15
Things You Should Never
Do Once You Get a Job or
in Your Career Ever.
Then memorize them.
Your new job may depend
on it.
So you think nobodys
hiring? Author Andrea
Kay says youre wrong, and
in this helpful book, she
shows you what to do to
put yourself front-and-cen-
ter in an employers mind
and his resume pile.
But thats not all thats
inside This is How to Get
Your Next Job.
Because its lled with
dozens of illustrative
anecdotes from employ-
ers willing to share their
experiences, this book is
really quite entertaining.
I spent lots of time being
amazed that people really
do the kinds of things Kay
mentions, and laughing.
These cautionary tales
t well in this book, and
nicely prove her tell and
show advice.
This book is great for
new grads, the newly
unemployed, new career
searchers, and anybody
who needs a job soon. If
thats you, then This is
How to Get Your Next Job
will help, no doubt.
W
This is How to Get Your Next Job
Andrea Kay
244 pages
$16
What keeps partners
coming back?
This question, a ques-
tion posed by researchers
in a 2011 study published
in The Journal of Social
Psychology, forces social
scientists and myself,
quite honestly to dive
into a phenomenon that
persists across the dating
spectrum, a phenomenon
that is both interesting
and frustrating: interest-
ing because it sheds light
on human desire, and frus-
trating because on-off rela-
tionships inhibit those who
are sort of with someone
from moving on.
According to the
research, common themes
of on-off relationships
include:
On-off partners report
more uncertainty about
their relationship.
On-off partners are
intentionally vague about
their break-up strategy.
On-off partners are
less certain they are no lon-
ger dating following their
rst breakup.
Almost half the 2011
studys participants admit-
ted to missing their part-
ner, still loving their part-
ner, and feeling that they
could not be without their
partner. My own experi-
ence conrms this too
because, when I ask people
why they keep coming
back, they often cite one
or more of the abovemen-
tioned reasons.
Aside from lingering feel-
ings, others claim, I am
afraid to be alone (com-
panionship), It was com-
fortable (familiarity), and
I knew he was the one for
me (partner is the one).
Popular culture has sati-
rized the on-off phenom-
enon.
In the 1990s sitcom
Seinfeld, for instance,
Jerry Seinfeld, the lead
character in the show, hit
the proverbial nail on the
head when he admitted,
Ending a relationship is
like knocking over a soda
machine. You cant do it in
one push. You gotta rock it
back-and-forth, and then it
falls over.
From this angle, relation-
ships are like soda machines,
but unlike soda they
are a lot less sweet.
Other studies have dem-
onstrated that the majority
of break-ups are not mutual.
Fifteen percent of on-
again/off-again partners
report a mutual break-up
compared to 43 percent of
standard couples. In other
words, mutual break-ups
are less likely among on-off
couples. Chances are that
some poor sap, either the
guy or the girl, will end up
on the break-up receiving
end, alone.
But its not all bad.
Interestingly, positive
outcomes related to break-
ups have not been widely
reported, but a 2003 study
in journal of Personal
Relationships did, in fact,
point out some positive
things about on-off rela-
tionships. For example,
some people report gain-
ing wisdom and experi-
encing positive emotions
after a break-up. Though
interesting, more research
needs to be done, however,
regarding the positive out-
comes of break-ups.
Like the ancient Greek
myth of Sisyphus, couples
that constantly renew,
pushing their relationship
rock up a hill, only to let
it roll down and up again,
are doing themselves a dis-
service, in my opinion, and
ought to just end it. Finally,
as the science suggests, if
you are the person to end
the relationship the rst
time, the odds are that you
will be the person to end
it again and again and
again ad innitum.
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On-again/of-again
relationships
Actors Circle at Providence Playhouse
(1256 Providence Rd, Scranton, reserva-
tions: 570.342.9707, actorscircle.org)
Ghost of a Chance: Sept. 19-22, 27-29,
8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, 2 p.m.
Sundays. $12, general; $10, seniors; $8, stu-
dents. Sept. 19 tickets are $8, general and
seniors; 46, students.
The Corner Bistro Community Theater
(76 S Main St, Carbondale. 570.282.7499)
Nunsense: Sept. 13-14, 8 p.m., Sept. 15,
2 p.m. $20; $2 off ticket price if use the code
word, Sr. Amnesia.
Jason Miller Playwrights Project
(570.591.1378, nepaplaywrights@live.com)
Dramatists Support Group: Third
Thursday of each month, 7 p.m., The Olde
Brick Theatre (126 W. Market St., Scranton).
Kings College Theatre
(Admin. Bldg., 133 N. River St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5825)
Almost, Maine: Oct. 3-5, 7:30 p.m.; Oct.
5-6, 2 p.m. $12; $5, students/senior citizens.
KISS Theatre Company
The Jungle Book Kids: Sept. 20-21, 27-28,
7 p.m.; Sept. 21-22, 28-29, 2 p.m.
Children of Eden: Nov. 8-9, 15-16, 7 p.m.;
Nov. 10, 17, 2 p.m.
Registrations upcoming workshops:
See www.kisstheatre.org for registration
forms.
My Son Pinocchio Jr.: Ages 8-16, starts
Sept. 23.
The Aristocats Kids: Ages 4-10, classes
begin Oct. 19.
the lamp post. chapter one
(47 North Franklin St - third foor - Wilkes-
Barre)
Creation Destruction Potential, a collec-
tion of theatrical, visual, and musical art &
performance: Sept. 4, 8 p.m. $5.
Little Theatre of Wilkes-Barre
( 537 North Main StreetWilkes-Barre.
570.823.1875.)
Spamalot: Sept. 7-15, 8 p.m. Fridays and
Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays. $18.
The Moose Exchange
(203 W. Main St., Bloomsburg)
Lucy, ImDead!: Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m. $25
until Sept. 30, $30 after that date.
USO-style showto honor local veterans at
Veterans Day: Nov. 9. $35 until Sept. 30, $40
thereafter.
M.P.B. Community Players
(531 Garfeld St., Hazleton. 570.454.3305,
mcgroganj@gmail.com)
Wonderful Town: Sept. 27,-29
Music Box Players
(196 Hughes St., Swoyersville: 570.283.2195
or 800.698.PLAY or musicbox.org)
Music Theatre Academy 2013: Theatre
Workshop for students ages 6 to 20. Tuition:
$250 - $200 if paid before Sept. 1. Sessions
begin Sept. 16. Students will performSeussical
JR The Musical, Oct. 25-27.
Dolly Partons 9 to 5: Sept. 13-15, 20-22,
27-29. Fridays and Saturdays bar opens 6 p.m.,
dinner 6:30, curtain 8; Sundays bar opens 1
p.m., dinner 1:30, curtain 3. $34.00, dinner and
show; $16, showonly.
The Phoenix Performing Arts Centre
(409-411 Main St., Duryea, 570.457.3589,
phoenixpac.vpweb.com, phoenixpac08@aol.
com)
Phoenix Kids present Willy Wonka the
Musical: Sept. 13-29, 7 p.m. Fridays and
Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. $10.
Pines Dinner Theatre
(448 North 17th St., Allentown.
610.433.2333. pinesdinnertheatre.com)
Route 66: Sept. 6-Oct. 20, Wednesdays
through Sundays. $48.50, adults; $46.50,
seniors (60+); $20, children under the age of
16. Includes dinner, beverages during dinner,
the show, and tax.
Theatre at the Grove
(5177 Nuangola Road, Nuangola. nuango-
lagrove.com, 570.868.8212, grovetickets@
frontier.com)
Ticket pricing: $18, plays; $20, musicals;
$86, summer pass, frst fve shows; $120,
season pass. All shows are BYOB and feature
cabaret seating.
The Mousetrap: Sept. 13, 14, 19-21, 8
p.m.; Sept. 15, 22, 3 p.m.
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of
Fleet Street: Oct. 18, 19, 25, 26, Nov. 1, 2, 8
p.m.; Oct. 20, 27, Nov. 3, 3 p.m.
Its a Wonderful Life: Nov. 29, 30, Dec. 6,
7, 12-14, 8 p.m.; Dec. 1, 8, 15, 3 p.m.
Wilkes University
(84 W. South St, Wilkes-Barre, 1.800.
WILKES.U, wilkes.edu)
The Curious Savage: Sept. 26-28, 8 p.m.,
Sept. 29, 2 p.m.
Seussical, The Musical: Nov. 8-9, 15-16,
8 p.m., Nov. 10, 17, 2 p.m.
The No-Frills Revue: Feb. 14-15, 21-22, 8
p.m., Feb. 16, 23, 2 p.m.
Check out Chekhov, An Evening of One
Act Plays by Anton Pavlovich Chekov: April
3-5, 8 p.m., April 6, 2 p.m.
Expanded listings at theweekender.com.
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Pete Croatto
Weekender Correspondent
Got to get away fromGetaway
OPening intheaters this week:
Riddick
Salinger
Adore
Hell Baby
DVDs releaseD sePt. 3:
NowYou See Me
Sharknado
The Lords of Salem
The Iceman
Rating: W
Getaway, the sports
car smash-em-up that belly
fopped at the box offce this
past weekend, does every-
thing wrong from its art-
lessly flmed car chases to
Ethan Hawkes tough guy
rasp, which sounds like hes
about to complain about
the lines at the post offce.
Director Courtney Solomon
keeps upping the ante on
stupidity, concluding with a
useless reveal that serves as
the moldy cherry atop this
mountainous crap sundae.
Hawke plays Brent
Magra, a disgraced racecar
driver who has started fresh
in Bulgaria with his wife,
Leanne (soap opera vet
Rebecca Budig). The tran-
sition to Target runs and
laundry schedules is rudely
interrupted when she is
kidnapped. To get her back
unharmed, Brent must fol-
low the telephoned instruc-
tions of a man known only
as the Voice (Jon Voight).
It starts with Brent steal-
ing a renovated Shelby
Cobra Mustang equipped
with internal and external
cameras so he can complete
a series of tasks requiring
the services of numerous
stunt drivers. Brents job
gets more complicated
when hes forced to take
the cars owner (Selena
Gomez), a computer-sav-
vy, tough-talking rich girl
along for the ride.
Solomons goal, it seems,
is to create a thrill-a-minute
spectacle. I have no problem
with that if I could follow
anything. Solomons go-to
move is to use blink-quick
shots, sometimes from dif-
ferent perspectives (for
example, the cars mounted
cameras). So not only is
the action indecipherable,
it physically hurts to keep
up with the epileptic jit-
teriness. Every frantic car
chase and there are a lot
of them looks exactly the
same, except maybe a train
is involved or a different
set of terrifed pedestrians
fees for their lives. Theres
a mechanical weight to
Getaway, an unwilling-
ness to embrace the humor
or stupidity behind its turbo
tendencies. It is surprising-
ly depressing: the audience
I saw this with displayed all
the enthusiasm of attend-
ing a Monday morning staff
meeting.
Not even the characters,
if you want to call them
that, in Getaway have fun.
Backgrounds, in this case
computer geek and tortured
stoic, do not make for char-
acters. Nor does that create
chemistry, a big part of keep-
ing your movie from resem-
bling a demolition derby.
Gomez andthe willowy, inse-
cure Hawke, woefully mis-
cast as a stony loner, have no
chance. Hawke excels when
hes paired with an explosive
talent Julie Delpy, Denzel
Washington and Gomez
lacks the seasoning to infict
her lines with humor or sexi-
ness. She always sounds like
shes pissed that mom still
hasnt picked her up from
school. Thanks to this movie
and Spring Breakers,
Gomez is further away from
her hollow-eyed Disney dar-
ling days. Now she must
learn that she cant take edgy
roles and magically become
Michelle Williams.
Of course, Getaway
fnds other ways to drive us
nuts. The once-respected
Voight is here because, well,
Solomonfelt hismovieneed-
ed an OK Werner Herzog
impression? Gomezs char-
acter fddles with the cars
cameras or with her tablet
which appears out of
nowhere and there are
no repercussions. And how
did she track down Brent in
the frst place? Everything
in Getaway is confusing
or dumb or pointless, mak-
ing it an ideal debut for
Labor Day weekend, a time
when studios and audiences
would rather be outside.
Read more of Petes
cinematic musings on
wh a t p e t e s wa t c h i n g .
blogspot.com or follow him
on Twitter, @PeteCroatto.
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not even varying camera angles can make this bland bomb inter-
esting.
senD yOur listings tO:
WBWnews@civitasmedia.com, 90 E.
Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703,
or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is
Mondays at 2 p.m.
Monty Pythons spamalot opens saturday at
the little theatre of wilkes-Barre for two week-
ends. starring Joe sheridan as king arthur &
kristen Peterman (shown here), the hilarious
musical comedy runs Friday and saturdays at 8
p.m. and sundays at 3 p.m. For reservations &
directions, call 570.823.1875.
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Geek Culture & more
Rich Howells | Weekender Editor
Ben drives fans batty, but he may save the day
So after discussing more
pressing comic book mat-
ters last week and giving
fanboys some time to cool
off, I think its nally time
to talk Bateck.
By now, the entire
planet and several parallel
dimensions know that Ben
Afeck was cast as Batman
in the upcoming 2015
Superman/Batman cross-
over lm, a direct sequel to
Junes Man of Steel. The
Internet instantly went
insane, mostly panning
Warner Bros. and DCs
decision and demanding
they reconsider through
rants, Tweets, and peti-
tions, including one
through the White Houses
website, which the gov-
ernment thankfully pulled
down. Considering those
guys cant even balance a
budget or pass an effective
piece of legislation, I dont
think we really want to get
them involved anyway.
It appears that all that
goodwill Afeck built up
with critics and audiences
with Argo, The Town,
and Gone Baby Gone is
exactly that gone, baby.
Even though Hollywood
clearly did, it seems the web
cannot forgive him for lms
like Gigli, Paycheck,
Surviving Christmas,
Reindeer Games, Jersey
Girl (which I kind of liked,
actually), and particularly
Daredevil, which, I must
admit, I also didnt think
was that bad. Well, at least
he wasnt too bad in it. It
was written and directed
by the guy who would
go on to give us Ghost
Rider, so seriously, lets
cut Ben some slack for
having to work with such
goofy, instantly dated mate-
rial.
In fact, before we get
into that superhero, lets
talk about that other
superhero he played
Superman, or rather the
man who once played
Superman, George Reeves.
In Hollywoodland,
Afeck did a fantastic
job portraying a man not
made of steel, but of esh
and bone. My favorite role
hes ever played, that of c-
tional comic artist Holden
McNeil in Chasing Amy,
is also a testament to his
ability to naturalistically
capture real, raw emotion
on lm.
I didnt even mention
Good Will Hunting or
the fun I had watching
him in Dogma yet. And
yes, he was the bomb in
Phantoms, yo.
OK, Armageddon was
super cheesy and Pearl
Harbor is an insult to his-
tory, but this is a whole dif-
ferent type of blockbuster
this is the Dark Knight
were talking about here.
The Man Without Fear is
like Batman in many ways,
a gritty hero who cleans up
the crime-ridden streets
of his hometown, and if
nothing else, his Daredevil
proves that Ben has got the
chin and the build for it.
He eventually got Jennifer
Garner out of that deal, too,
so who can really blame
him for at least attempting
to save that schlock?
My point is that Afeck
knows howto dig deep, and
who better to play a rich
white guy who polarizes
the public than a rich white
guy who tends to polarize
the public? Bruce Wayne
is a man who is both loved
and hated by the people of
Gotham, as is his alter ego,
and Ben knows a little bit
about that considering hes
living it. If he can under-
stand Bruce Wayne, he can
certainly get into the head
(and mask) of Batman.
And as many columnists
and bloggers have pointed
out, this isnt the rst time
that the casting of a Batman
lm has caused a major
disturbance in the force of
fandom. Michael Keaton,
considered by many now to
be the greatest live-action
Batman of all time, was
known more as a comedian
in the late 80s, so when he
was cast in Tim Burtons
1989 smash hit, the studio
received thousands upon
thousands of letters asking
that he be removed from
the production. I was a bit
young to remember that,
but I do remember the
impression that lm left on
me, even as a Marvel fan.
History repeated itself
when Heath Ledger was
cast as the Joker in The
Dark Knight in 2006.
The outcry ranged from
anger to homophobia (due
to his role in Brokeback
Mountain) to cries for a
boycott before anyone had
even seen him in the now
iconic makeup. His Oscar-
winning performance is
what made that lm what it
is, and tragically, he passed
away before he could be
vindicated on screen.
If you werent in the
room when an actor audi-
tioned, then you can
speculate and make all the
jokes you want, but please
reserve your judgment
for a trailer or even open-
ing night, if you can wait
that long. Afeck has not
had the perfect career, but
few actors have, and while
I agree there were other
actors out there probably
better suited for the role of
Batman, Im willing to sim-
ply wait and see.
I thought Christian Bale
was the perfect choice
when he began his jour-
ney into the Batcave, but
looking back now, I dont
nd his performances as
compelling as I felt they
could have been (his voice
whenever he donned the
cowl was a bit much), and
The Dark Knight Rises
left a lot to be desired. I
dont think writer/director
Christopher Nolan ever
quite nailed every nuance
of that character complete-
ly, so maybe a fresh take
will do the Batman some
good.
On a somewhat related
note, a website with dubi-
ous sources conrmed
the casting of Breaking
Bad star Bryan Cranston
as Supes archenemy Lex
Luthor soon after the
Afeck announcement,
a rumor that has since
been shot down despite
him being such an obvi-
ous choice in both looks
and personality. A lot of
reputable sites ran with the
story in an attempt to beat
others to the punch, which
is the sad state of journal-
ism today, but I found it
ironic that the casting prac-
tically everyone would have
agreed with turned out to
be false while the casting
everyone thought was a
bad joke was quickly con-
rmed.
As funny as all the
Batman- wi th- a- Boston-
accent impressions will be,
Im waiting for Afeck to
get the last laugh. Im not
totally condent that will
be the case, but Im not
ready to string him up by
his grappling hook, either.
At least not yet.
-Rich Howells is a life-
long Marvel Comics collec-
tor, wannabe Jedi master,
and cult lm fan. E-mail
him at rhowells@civitas-
media.com.
The casting of Ben Affleck as Batman in the upcoming Superman/Batman crossover film may have come as a surprise, but that doesnt
mean its a bad idea.
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Yes, no, and where to go
Erin Rovin | Weekender Correspondent
same sex, different citY
Melissa Hughes | Weekender Correspondent
When a couple starts
getting serious, one of
the primary needs that
should be focused on
is having quality time
together. It is a time of
building connections,
getting to know each
other, having relations
in every room of the
house, and cuddly, snug-
gle time. What happens
if during the high point
of those blissful honey-
moon days a roommate
moves in? How do you
share the space, make
the moves, and keep the
sizzle hot without get-
ting caught scampering
nude from the bedroom
to the bathroom?
It is never something I
had ever been confront-
ed with until recently.
My boyfriend was toss-
ing around the idea of
saving on money by
bringing in a roommate
to his apartment. I was
so against the idea of
having someone invade
the love nest that it
caused an actual fight.
I had gotten so comfort-
able with the idea of
sweatpants, no makeup,
and a scrunchie that the
thought of having to put
on the dog and pony
princess show for a third
party was actually sick-
ening to me.
What will happen to
loud physical encounters
and random household
hook-ups wherever and
whenever? These are
things I had become very
accustomed to. I am all
about saving money, but
I dont share well with
others, whether its my
boyfriend, my space, or
my French fries.
There are so many
pros and cons to the sit-
uation that I really had
to have a heart to heart
with my man candy
about it. I know in the
long run it would be a
huge help for him, but I
am horribly selfish and
selfish always wins.
Maybe I am irrational,
maybe I am stubborn,
and maybe I am slightly
immature about it all,
but I admit to being a
control freak about just
about every situation
life throws at me. I cant
control a third party
walking in his under-
wear through the house
eating cold pizza at 3
a.m. I cant control lis-
tening to someone elses
bad taste in music as it
is blasted through the
walls while he plays air
guitar and Xbox. And
lastly, I cant control
myself, loud and proud
and sometimes less than
ladylike.
Perhaps this is why I
live alone. My cat doesnt
seem to mind midnight
strolls in my underwear
to grab a juice box from
the fridge. I could leave
laundry out on the floor
or skip the dishes for a
day or two or three. I
will forever be a believer
in the old adage, Two is
company, and three is a
crowd, and I still vote
no on the roommate bal-
lot.
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Threes a crowd
For years, monogrammed
handbags have been the
epitome of class. I used to
be obsessed with the icon-
ic LVs in different colors
sprawling across a white
Speedy; then I switched
to the classic brown mono-
grammed Louis Vuitton.
Then I went vegan and sold
them all.
10 years later, and I am
pretty sick of staring at
letters plastering every
handbag walking down the
street. My overzealousness
for designer bags may have
led me down this path.
In my broke-but-having-
more-fun-than-I-should in
Hollywood, Calif., days, I
would take Sunday after-
noon trips to downtown
Los Angeles. I frequented
the seedy and famous
Olympic Boulevard, where
you could buy anything for
under $100. I loaded up
on Louis Vuittons, Gucci,
Prada, and anything else
that I thought was cute
and would make me a little
happier walking down the
street without totally bust-
ing my personal assistant
budget.
Downtown, you could
nd anything from knock-
off sweatpants to knockoff
lap dogs. Sad, but true. I
remember when my moth-
er and sister visited Los
Angeles. I took them down-
town to do some hot shop-
ping. I will never forget the
moment when my mother
handed a shop owner $20
for a designer bag, and
all of a sudden, the metal
security gate was rolled
down simultaneously from
all of the shop owners and
we found ourselves in an
almost deserted shopping
center, when just moments
ago it was bustling. Then
the cops came around the
corner. Oh, damn, it was a
raid. We grabbed our goods
and just kept walking. The
cops left shortly after. Ah,
those days were fun. Now I
realize the consequences of
buying counterfeit goods.
Not just that the handle
will probably break off or
the zipper will stick in a
very important job inter-
view, but the people who
make these cheap bags
have to work in terrible
conditions, and some are
even children.
The real Louis Vuitton
has been monogramming
their impeccable luggage
since 1854. To me, they
are monogram royalty. But
in a sea of LVs, Gs, Cs,
and CCs, I have come to
appreciate the structure
and function of a handbag
over the in-your-face name-
tagging on everything.
One day, my L.A. room-
mate had just bought a
white Coach bag. She
sat down for drinks and
unstitched and ripped the
Coach signature off the
front of the bag! She said,
I hate labels. I thought,
Then buy a $10 bag from
Ross that looks like that
one! I was mystied. But
now, I get it.
I want to appreciate the
hardware, the stitching, the
feel, and how the bag wears
on my body. Whether its
a $10 bag from Ross or a
more expensive designer
piece, I dont care. Its a
personal preference, but
for me, the love affair with
designer monogrammed
bags is ofcially over. I am
no longer a logo ho.
-Erin Rovin has been
working in the entertain-
ment industry for 10 years
and writes for various
national gossip publica-
tions. You can reach Erin
at erinrovin@gmail.com.
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Logo ho no mo!
WHatEvER you do
Buy what makes you happy.
Remember that counterfeit items equal poor working conditions for many people
and even child labor.
Dont have a designer budget? Try a designer collaboration like Target and Philip Lim
this month! Great bags for around $35 at Target.
Check out the plethora of bags at T.J. Maxx, Marshalls, and Ross in Dickson City or
Wilkes-Barre.
Still love monogramming? Make your own personal printable monogramdesign at
forchicsake.com/printable-monogram.
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Derek Warren
Weekender Correspondent
Ahoppy harvest
BEER REVIEWS
Derek Warren | Weekender Correspondent
Beer: Tumbler Autumn
Brown Ale
Brewer: Sierra Nevada
Brewing Company
Style: American Brown
Ale
ABV: 5.50%
Description: Sierra
Nevadas Tumbler pours
a clear dark brown with a
creamy and frothy off-white
head that lingers long, with
huge lacing on the glass.
The aroma alone is perfect
for a lovely autumn eve-
ning, with notes of brown
sugar, molasses, biscuit,
slight nuttiness, and toast-
ed malt. Thankfully, the
taste matches the nose and
even brings more to the
party. The sweetness of the
brown sugar hits the palate
rst, but is quickly washed
over with notes of choco-
late and toasted malt with
subtle hints of molasses
and earthy hops, making
an appearance before the
brown sugar cuts through
again, leaving a lingering
sweetness on the palate.
The body of this beer is
soft and creamy with a very
light amount of carbon-
ation; just the kind of beer
you want to sip on during
a cool evening. I am a huge
fan of brown ales in gener-
al, and this is an extremely
tasty and easy drinking
beer, perfect for the upcom-
ing autumn evenings.
Food pairing: Tumbler
is a great beer to have with
a hefty dinner, especially
those dishes that include
a fair amount of meats.
A delectable baked ham
and mashed potato dinner
make a great pairing with
Tumbler. Another great
match-up is with roasted
pork, as the smoothness
and sweetness of the beer
intermingles perfectly
with the fatty pork. A truly
impressive coupling with
this beer is grilled salm-
on topped with smoked
Gouda cheese. The com-
plexities of this dish, along
with the smokiness of the
cheese, pair perfectly with
this beer and really high-
light the toasted malts and
subtle hop avors within
the beer. This is also a
great beer to have with
desserts, but keep it light
as too hefty of a dessert
can overpower the beer.
Desserts such as brownies,
chocolate chip cookies,
and light cream puffs are
all perfect pairings with
Tumbler.
Is it worth trying? As
with everything brewed
by the world-class brewery
Sierra Nevada, yes! Brown
ales are wonderful any
time of the year, but this
truly is a fantastic way to
kickstart the fall season.
Tumbler offers the per-
fect bridge between light
summer beers and heavier
winter warmers and stouts
that come when the snow
starts to fall which, unfor-
tunately, is right around
the corner. While pumpkin
and Oktoberfest beers may
get all the glory this time
of year, there are many
other fabulous fall sea-
sonal releases, and this is
certainly in the top of the
crop. Grab yourself a bottle
while you can and enjoy
this delightful seasonal
beer around a nice warm
campre.
Rating: W W W W
Where can I get it?
Currently available in
bottles at Wegmans,
Dickson City; Goldsteins
Deli, Kingston; Krugels
Georgetown Deli & Beer,
Wilkes-Barre; and J&H
Beer, Plains Township.
Remember, enjoy respon-
sibly! Cheers!
-Derek Warren is a beer
fanatic, avid homebrewer,
and beer historian. Follow
Dereks beer blog at idtap-
that.org.
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Atasty tumbler
Though the impending
autumn season may bring
about thoughts of pumpkin
and Oktoberfest beers being
enjoyed on chilly evenings,
you may be overlooking
some other fantastic beers
that come to market during
this time namely, fresh
hop beers that celebrate the
bountiful harvest.
While Samhain may be
one of the oldest festivals
celebrating the harvest
season, fresh-hopped beers
may be one the newer and,
some may say, tastier ways
to celebrate a generous har-
vest. Many breweries have
begun creating fresh hop or
wet hopped beers, taking
advantage of the explosion
in the popularity of hoppy
beers. This is a rather new
phenomenon that began
hitting the market around
10 years ago and has
steadily grown in popular-
ity every year since.
Before we can discuss
what wet hopped beers are,
a quick detour into differ-
ences within hops are in
order. Hops come to brew-
ers in two forms: whole
cone or pellets. Many brew-
eries use pellet hops as the
shelf life in this form is
much longer and thus more
cost efcient. However, in
brewing a wet hop beer,
whole cone hops are need-
ed for both its freshness
and higher oil content.
Wet hopped beers are a
true showcase of the nuanc-
es within hops. This is
because in the fresh whole
cone state the hops contain
a higher amount of oils that
emit more aroma and bitter-
ness within the beer. How
bitter and how potent of an
aroma varies depending on
which hops have been cho-
sen for the beer.
Another important note
with hops is the two cat-
egories hops mainly are
divided into: aroma and
bittering. Aroma hops add
hop bitterness to the beer
but, even more so, give
hoppy beers a wonderful
smell. Bittering hops add
just what you would think,
bitterness.
So what are wet hopped
beers and why are they so
popular this time of the
year? Wet hopped beers are
those beers which use fresh
whole cone hops. The main
difference between whole
cone hops and pellet hops
is that pellet hops are pel-
letized and kilned, whereas
whole cone hops are picked
fresh from the vine and
have more moisture
hence wet hopped.
The reason they are so
popular this time of year
is that hops are grown.
The peak of the hop har-
vesting season in the
Northern hemisphere rang-
es from August through
September; this is the time
popular American hops
such as cascade, simcoe,
and citra are at their best
and tastiest.
This style began to take
off in popularity thanks
to our friends at Sierra
Nevada. In 1996 Sierra
Nevada decided to buck
the current trends at the
time and add fresh hops
to its beer with the release
of Harvest Ale, now called
Northern Hemisphere
Harvest Ale. The beer was
an overwhelming success
and has become a seasonal
staple for the brewery.
Many other beer mak-
ers have caught on to this
trend and have released
great harvest ales, such as
Founders Harvest Ale and
Rogue Wet Hop Ale. Our
own local heroes at Breaker
Brewing Company are cur-
rently brewing up a wet
hop version of their popu-
lar IPA, I Love PA, with
locally grown fresh hops
that will be unleashed upon
the public soon.
Wet hop beers are just
starting to hit the market
now with many more to
come as we plow through
harvest season. Grab some
bottles of your favorite
pumpkin and Oktoberfest
beers, but also be sure to
enjoy these unbelievably
fresh hoppy beers, or you
will have to sit with regret
until the next harvest sea-
son.
W
Pumpkin beers and Oktoberfest brews may be popular this time of year, but look to other beers and
their hops for a refreshing fall taste.
BAZAARS/FESTIVALS
26thAnnual FelitteseFestival
Sept. 6-8, OldForge. 5-10p.m. Friday,
Saturday, noon-10p.m. Sunday.
2ndAnnual Racefor Our Ladyof
ConstantinopleSept. 8, 9a.m., Old
ForgeHighSchool Football Field.
Masstohonor Our LadySept. 8, 10
a.m., St. MarysChurch. For more
infovisit www.facebook.com/
FelitteseAssociation.
33rdAnnual Pennsylvania
RenaissanceFaire:
SaturdaysandSundaysthroughOct.
27, andLabor DayMonday, Mount
HopeEstateandWinery. $29.95,
adults; $10.95, childrenages5to
11. For moreinfoandticketsvisit
PaRenFaire.comor call theboxofce
at 717.665.7021.
BENEFITS/CHARITYEVENTS
AmericanCancer Society
DrinktoPink, tobeneft Making
StridesAgainst Breast Cancer
Walk: Sept. 13, 5:30-8:30p.m.,
BackyardAleHouse(523Linden
St., Scranton). $10suggested
donation, twodrinkticketsfor
domesticdrafts, well drinks, house
wines, andcosmopolitans. Pinkattire
encouraged.
Cancer PreventionStudy-3(CPS-
3): Nov. 2, 10a.m.-2p.m., Nov. 6,
4-8p.m., KeystoneCollegeHibbard
CampusCenter. Participantscan
register at www.keystonecps3.org.
For moreinfocall 570.562.9749.
AmericanLungAssociation
Fight forAirWalk: Oct. 3, McDade
Park, Scranton. Registration9
a.m., runbeings9:45, walkersat
10. For moreinfovisit lunginfo.org/
scrantonwalk.
AmericanRedCross
11thAnnual GolfTournament: Sept.
23, registration11 a.m., shotgunstart
at 12:30p.m., GlenmauraNational
Golf Club. Dinner andawards
ceremonyat 6p.m. Limitedto120
golfers. $300per golfer.Tomakea
reservationfor golf and/or dinner,
contact Carol Craneat 570.823.7161,
ext. 329or carol.crane@redcross.org
CareNet of Scranton
ThirdAnnual Walkfor Life: Sept.
14, registration9a.m., walkfrom
10-11 a.m., CourthouseSquare,
Scranton. $25per person. For more
infoor toregister for thewalkvisit
carenetofscranton.com.
LuzerneCountyPit Bull Owners,
Inc.
3rdAnnual Pit Bull AwarenessDay
andCarnival: Oct. 26, noon-6p.m.,
KirbyPark.
PolycysticKidneyDisease
Foundation
Chapter Kick-of: Sept. 20, 6-7:30
p.m., PoconoMedical Center Main
Building(206E. BrownSt., East
Stroudsburg).
SharetheJourney, Suicide
PreventionRegional Walk
Sept. 7, 9a.m. registration,
walkat 10, LackawannaCounty
Courthouse(LindenStreet side,
Scranton). Register at www.
rtheastsuicidepreventionintiative.
com.
Traceys HopeHospiceCare
ProgramandDomesticAnimal
Rescue
(570.466.7930,
traceyshopenmcdonald@gmail.com,
petservicesbydenise.com)
RummageSale: Sept. 7, 8a.m.-2:30
p.m., St. BenedictsChurchbasement
(155AustinAve.,Wilkes-Barre).
CAR&BIKEEVENTS
8thAnnual TommyZMemorial
Car, Street RodandBikeShow:
Sept. 15, 9a.m.-3p.m. (Raindate
Sept. 22), CrestwoodHighSchool
parkinglot. $12registrationuntil
Sept. 1, $15afterwards. For an
applicationcall 570.868.6515.
Car Showtobeneft thePlains
LittleLeague
Sept. 15, noon-5p.m., Dominicks
Caf(20School St., Hudson). $10
donationall carsandbikes. Call
829.9612OR829.9658for more
information.
Coal Cracker Cruisers Car Club
(570.876.4034
CruiseNight: Sept. 6, 6-9p.m.,
AdvanceAutoParts(Route6,
Carbondale).
15thAnnual Car Show: Sept. 15, 9
a.m. For moreinfocontactJoAnn
Spalnick, 570.876.4034.
Fall Festival Car Cruise
(EagleRockResort, 1 CountryClub
Dr., Hazleton)
Oct. 12, 10a.m.-midnight. Raindate
Oct. 13. Optional donationof $12day
of show, $9pre-registration. Pre-
register bymailing1 CountryClub
Drive, HazleTownship, PA18202.
McDonalds(Route590Hamlin, PA)
Car Cruise: EverysecondFridayof
August, September, 6p.m.
MontageMountainClassics
(Thurs., 6-9p.m., Fri., 6-10p.m., Sat.,
5-9p.m.)
Car Cruises:
Sept. 21, 5-9p.m.,JohnnyRockets,
MontageMountain.
CruisetoBeneft RonaldMcDonald
House: Sept. 22, 2-6p.m. Raindate
Sept. 29.
CHURCHES
Corpus Christi
(Montdale)
Annual Harvest Festival Turkey
Dinner: Oct. 6, noon-5p.m. $10,
adults; $5, children.Take-outs
available.
Exaltationof theHolyCross
Church
(420MainRd., HanoverTwp.,
570.823.6242)
Annual ChickenBarbecue/Flea
Market/Craft Sale: Sept. 15, noon-4
p.m. $9, dinner.Additional feamarket
timesSept. 20, 8a.m.-2p.m.; Sept.
21, 8a.m.-noonand6-7p.m.; Sept.
22, 10a.m.-noon.
First PresbyterianChurchof
Clarks Summit
(300School St., ClarksSummit,
570.586.6306, www.fpccs.org)
Excelsior Cornet Band, NewYork
StatesAuthenticCivil War Brass
Band: Oct. 6, 4p.m.
All-churchrecital withFirst
PresbyterianChurchmusical
ensembles: Novl 17, 4p.m.
RestoredChurch
(DowntownArts, 47NorthFranklin
St.,Wilkes-Barre)
Grandopeningservice: Sept. 8,
10:30a.m.
Ss. Cyril andMethodius Ukrainian
CatholicChurch
(135River St., Olyphant)
ThirdAnnual RummageSale:
Sept. 20, 8a.m.-7p.m., Sept. 21, 10
a.m.-1:30p.m.,AmericanLegionHall
(RaymondHenryPost No. 327).
125thAnniversaryCelebration; Oct.
27, beginningwithliturgyat 3p.m.,
followedbycelebrationfrom5-9p.m.
$40, per person; $12, children12and
under. For ticketscontact Sandraat
570.383.9487.
UkrainianCultureDay: Oct. 26, 9
a.m.-3p.m.
ShavertownUnitedMethodist
Church
7thAnnual GolfTournament: Oct.
5, registration9a.m., shotgunstart
at 10, Mill RaceandGolf Camping
Resort (Benton). $80entryfee.
For questionscall BevAtherholt
at 570.675.7295or Bill Runner at
570.675.5055.
EVENTS
CocoonCofeeHouse
(Route6&BellemonteAve., Hawley.
570.226.6130, cacoonbarista@gmail.
com)
First FridayOpenMichostedby
KenPlatt: Sept. 6, 7-9p.m.
TheCommonwealthMedical
College
(525PineSt., Scranton,
570.504.7000,
thecommonwealthmedical.com)
Annual golf tournament: Sept. 30,
HuntsvilleGolf Club, Shavertown.
Registrationandbreakfast begins
9a.m., shotgunstart at 10. $300,
per golfer; $1,200, foursome.
For moreinfocall 570.504.9650
or toregister online, gotowww.
thecommonwealthmedical.com/
golf .
FifthAnnual Gala: Oct. 19, 6p.m.,
ScrantonCultural Center.
DietrichTheater
(60E.TiogaStreet,Tunkhannock,
570.996.1500, www.dietrichtheater.
com).
BearsInOur Backyard: Sept. 7, 11
a.m.
JimmyWelchQuartet Concert:
Sept. 15, 3p.m.
Fall 2013FilmFestival Oktoberfest
OpeningNight Gala: Sept. 20, doors
5:30p.m. $35.
Fall 2013FilmFestival: Sept. 20-
Oct. 3. $9, evening(after 6p.m.); $8,
matinee(before6p.m.).
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SEE AGENDA, PAGE 50
ACROSS
1 Chic, to Austin Powers
4 Crooked
8 Implement
12 Tramcar contents
13 Decorative case
14 Unsightly
15 Relinquish the throne
17 Smile
18 Squid squirt
19 Big-time operator?
21 19-Across, e.g.
24 Chart format
25 Eureka!
26 Run-down horse
28 Financial advisor Suze
32 Teeny bit
34 Deviate off course
36 Antitoxins
37 Dickinson output
39 Space
41 Water barrier
42 Suitable
44 Literary comparison
46 Last major battle site of
WWII
50 Lobbyists org.
51 Actress Sorvino
52 Suggest
56 Greatly
57 Dazzle
58 Driving site
59 Zilch
60 - -a-ling
61 Right angle
last week
DOWN
1 Bygone bird
2 Sphere
3 Commit (to)
4 Signal, as with a nod
5 Schedule abbr.
6 Phooey!
7 Trafc jam
8 Theyre in for the long haul
9 Shrek is one
10 Hodgepodge
11 Singer Loretta
16 Bankbook abbr.
20 Carnival site
21 Moist
22 Cantons place
23 Shaft of light
27 Choke
29 Treat an ailment
30 Asian sea, really a lake
31 Appellation
33 Spring (from)
35 Existed
38 Hot tub
40 Ornamental material
43 Checker move?
45 Buddy
46 Muscats land
47 Narcs measure
48 Press
49 Con
53 Press for payment
54 - Aviv
55 Moray or conger
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Adult Swim @ Montage Meltdown Waterpark 08.29.13
Photos by Jordan Weiss For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
NEPA Tattoo Arts Festival @ Genetti Hotel &
Conference Center 08.30.13
Photos by Rich Howells For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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Joe Sylvester
Fromthe times Leader
51st fair full of fun for kids and adults
Children will have it
made at the Luzerne
County Fair this year.
For the rst time, orga-
nizers will transform a spe-
cial area of the fairgrounds
into Kiddie Land, with free
rides for the younger fair-
goers, an ag (agricultural)
activity tent, and exotic
animals.
Theyll actually get to
plant a ower into a pot
and get to take it home
with them, fair Chairman
Brenda Pugh said. They
get to dress scarecrows,
dig for potatoes, learn how
to gather eggs.
But those wont be real
chickens in the ag tent in
Kiddie Land, which will be
down by the horse arena
on the opposite side of the
arena from the barn.
There will be exotic
animals in Animal Alley,
Pugh said.
She would not give spe-
cics but did say there will
be animals not native to the
area.
Our petting zoo is
down there goats, sheep,
all kinds of stuff they can
touch and see, she said.
The fair gets under
way today and runs for
ve days. And aside from
Kiddie Land, there will be
something else not seen at
past Luzerne County Fairs:
camel rides for $5.
If there is a charge for
something, we try to keep
it low.
Of course, this being a
county fair, there will be
exhibits, including paint-
ings, duct-tape items, sew-
ing creations, photography,
vegetables, plants, and
ower arrangements. Then
throw in animal and tractor
rodeo judging.
New to our barn, were
actually going have long-
horns, Pugh said.
Shes also heard a
rumor: We may have an
impregnated cow coming
into the grounds, so we
may have a calf born at
the fair.
The 51st annual fair
also will include amuse-
ment rides, the high-
ying Dialed Action
Sports Team, 4-H Fun
Horse Show, Fair Princess
Contest, line dancing,
Barnyard Olympics, re-
works and entertainment
by the Tommy Guns
Band and the Kentucky
Headhunters today,
the Poets on Thursday,
That 90s Band and the
Badlees on Friday, and
Shawn Klush and the
Sweet Inspirations in an
Elvis tribute on Saturday.
Keystone Kids and Rick K
and the All Nighters take
the stage on Sunday.
Approximately 50,000
people attended the fair
over the ve days last year,
Pugh said. She pointed
out the crowds range from
30,000 to 60,000, depend-
ing on the weather. But
she knows people will keep
coming back, not just for
the attractions and the
fairs affordability but to
spend time with family
and friends and make a few
memories.
Thats what we hope,
she said.
But she added none of it
would be possible without
the hundreds of volun-
teers who put in endless
hours.
We are 100 percent vol-
unteer, Pugh said. The
money goes back into
the maintenance of the
grounds.
The fair also is a major
fundraiser for the commu-
nity service clubs whose
members volunteer at the
fair, she added.
W
Photos by bill tarutis | the times Leader
Misericordia University peer advocates Tori Dziedziak of Shenandoah, right, and Amy Bunavage of Falls paint a deck at the Luzerne
County Fairgrounds in Lehman Township.
ABOVE: The sun shines brightly over the Luzerne County
Fairgrounds on Saturday afternoon. LEFT: Dallas Area Fall Fair
Association Secretary and vendor committee member Colette
Mahoney of Sweet Valley, right, and Misericordia University peer
advocate Mindy LaBarre of Rome survey the Luzerne County
Fairgrounds.
Luzerne County Fair:
4-11 p.m. Wednesday and
thursday; 4-11:30 p.m.
Friday; 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m.
saturday; 11 a.m.-9:30
p.m. sunday; route 118,
Lehman township. $8,
includes parking, rides
(except for camel), and
entertainment; senior
Citizens day thursday,
$4. Info: 570.675.3247,
luzernecountyfair.com.
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
La Festa Italiana @ Courthouse Square, Scranton
08.31.13
Photos by Rich Howells For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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TONY HALCHAK
MELISSA
KRAHNKE
GRACES
DOWNFALL
TIM HUSTY
JOHN CANJAR
THE FIVE
PERCENT
NOWHERE SLOW
102.3-FMThe Mountain
Every Sunday
from 8-9 p.m.
WITHALAN K. STOUT
FACEBOOK.COM/
Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your picture for our Starstruck.
It doesnt matter if it happened fve months ago or fve years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when and
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resolutin JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.comor send your photos to
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Cindy Spencer of Hanover Township, right, and her
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KISS and reality showFamily Jewels at Oxford Valley Mall,
Langhorne, on Oct. 12, 2006.
Enter your pet for Weekenders PET OF THE WEEK
by sending photo, pets name, breed if applicable, owners name and hometown to:
weekender@theweekender.com subject line: Pet of the Week
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We have an immediate
need for:
SuperviSorS
Maintenance MechanicS
Quality aSSurance
technicianS
For immediate
consideration contact:
Tara Petroski
tpetroski@masterhalco.com
Phone # 570-330-0427
1000 n. South road
Scranton, pa 18504
www.masterhalco.com
Is Hiring Now!
Chain-link
Ornamental
Wood
Vinyl
A Tradition of Fencing Solutions
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
Trucksville
Shavertown
Lehman/Harveys Lake
Lee Park
Hilldale
Wyoming
Glen Lyon
South Wilkes-Barre
FOSTER PARENTING
HAVE YOU
CONSIDERED IT ?
SIBLING GROUPS
CALL CONCERN 800-654-6180
www.concern4kids.org
Special Notices
ADOPTION
Amazing family for your
baby! Loving married
couple long to adopt 1st
child and provide all the
love & opportunities that life
has to offer. Expenses Paid
1-800-359-6937
LizAnthonyAdopt.com
ADOPT:
A teacher hopes to adopt a
baby! I promise to provide a
lifetime of unconditional
love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
Miscellaneous
BUSINESS FOR SALE
COMPUTER
SALES & SERVICE
Established 10 years
Owner retiring
Asking $125,000. Good
location in Pocono Lake, PA.
Call after 6pm
570-646-5100
Attorney
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Drivers & Delivery
DRIVERS
New Higher Pay!
Local Hazleton Runs!
CDL-A, 1 yr Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics
Apply: www.goelc.com
1-866-213-1065
Legal
LEGAL
ASSISTANT
to (1) assist clients with loan
modifications, (ii) conduct
legal research, and (iii) draft
court filings. Degree in busi-
ness and prior experience
required. MS Word & Excel a
must. Email resume to:
essexfells@hotmail.com
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
Land (Acreage)
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
Land (Acreage)
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
Lots
ACREAGE FOR SALE
No Closing Costs
No Time Frame to Build
Dallas School District
10% Down Financing
Lots of Elbow Room for Privacy
3ac 425 ft. rd. Frontage $49,900
7ac 700 ft. rd. Frontage $89,900
Call 570-245-6288
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
Houses For Rent
WILKES-BARRE
Wyoming Street
Unfurnished house for rent.
$750 + utilities,
security required
570-961-3162
Sales
PITTSTON TWP.
RENT TO OWN
2 bedroom, clean, needs no
work. remodeled throughout.
Minutes from I- 81 & PA Turn-
pike. $550/month.
570-212-8663
610-767-9456
Pets
SHELTIE PUPPIES
2 males, ready to go, 1st
shots, dewormed, papers.
$400 each. 570-899-9723
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
Hauling & Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
Miscellaneous
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Its once again time to strap
on the tri-goggles of elite spe-
cial forces soldier Sam Fisher
in Splinter Cell: Blacklist.
Splinter Cell is a long run-
ning series of action stealth
games that began in 2002.
Sam Fisher is a highly-trained
agent of the NSA called
Third Echelon, a group
organized to be the best of
the best in anti-terrorism.
Over the course of the last
six games, Sam and his team
have thwarted many different
terrorist plots, andthis time in
Blacklist, thestakes areeven
higher.
The gameplay of the
Splinter Cell series has been
largely the same, but thats not
bad; this series is known for
having one of the best stealth
gameplay around. The best
way to play the game is to be
methodical and remain out
of sight, select non-obvious
routes, and use diversions to
outwit guards. What makes
theseries standout for meis it
seems tobe more groundedin
reality. There are several other
games that offer great stealth
gameplay, such as Metal
Gear Solid, but they have
unbelievable stories and crazy
casts of characters. Splinter
Cell is a lot more realistic.
The graphics and lighting are
gorgeous, and the physics and
AI are very plausible.
The story of Blacklist is
a twisting and turning tale of
espionage, and could possibly
be the best of the series. This
time, there has been a terror-
ist attack in Guam and the
terror group having issued an
ultimatumcalledthe Blacklist,
which is a list of escalating ter-
rorist attacks that will be per-
formed against the U.S. The
President has granted Sam
Fisher and his new team, the
Fourth Echelon, ultimate
authority and resources to
eliminate this new terrorist
threat.
The variety of missions in
this game is incredible: there
is parachuting, sniper mis-
sions, breaking into Gitmo,
and several other interesting
scenarios. All of the different
mission objectives ensure the
game is never boring, and tak-
ing down all of the enemies
silently feels very satisfying. A
cool newaddition is the mark-
and-execute system; each
time you do a stealth take-
down, you earn an execute
maneuver, andwhenyouhave
a few saved up, you can cash
them in by tagging several
enemies in a room and Sam
will automatically take down
everyone in the room. Stealth
take-downs and tasks also
earn you ways to customize
you character with all sorts
of different gadgets, such as
sleep grenades, mines, cross-
bows, and many other tools.
I played the game on the
Wii U, and graphically, its
about the same as the PS3
and 360 but has slight frame
rate issues; none of the them
are game-breaking. The
thing I really enjoyed about
the Wii version was the abil-
ity to quick-select gadgets and
weapons on the touchscreen
and controlling drones and
sticky cams. The best use for
the game pad is the ability to
play the full game on it. You
can throw the game from the
television to the game pad
and continue playing when
someone wants to watch
something.
Blacklist has much more
todothanthepreviousentries,
as there are now several chal-
lenge modes for you to test
your sneaking skills; the chal-
lenge modes can be done in
single mode or with a friend.
Although the story mode is
quite good, Blacklist has
some great multiplayer modes
that are very entertaining.
The best of the new modes
is called Spies vs. Mercs,
where teams of spies play a
game of hide and seek with
bigger lumbering mercs. One
team plays the spies and they
are like Sam, and the mercs
are big burly guards that play
like a rst-personshooter. The
mercs jobis totrackdownthe
spies who are trying to hack
into the computers. It can be
a lot of fun, but the majority
of my time was spent with the
single story mode.
Overall, I loved my time
with Splinter Cell: Blacklist.
I recommend this game to
anyone who likes stealth
games. It has the best story
and gameplay of the series
and is worth a look, especially
if you are veteran fan. If you
are newto the series, it might
take some getting used to, but
once you learn the system,
you are in for one of the best
spy games on the market.
-Robbie Vanderveken is the
digital operations specialist
at The Times Leader. E-mail
him at rvanderveken@times-
leader.com.
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If theres ever a zombie
apocalypse, I want to be
driving this car,Terpak
joked. It is very well built
and can handle a lot of
incoming.
The Fury has been in my
family for years. It was my
grandfathers daily driver,
then my father drove it for
a while, who gave it to my
brother, and I fnally inherited
it,Terpak continued. My
plan is to eventually do a
total restore.W
1971
PLYMOUTH FURY III
Owner:
Kyle Terpack
Scranton
VIDEO GAME REVIEWS
Robbie Vanderveken | Special to the Weekender
Blacklist should be added to your gaming list
Splinter Cell:
Blacklist
System: PS3, Xbox
360 , Wii U, PC
Genre: Tird-Per-
son Action
Rating: M for
Mature
Publisher: Ubisof
Developer: Ubisof
Toronto
NEWAND UPCOMING GAME
RELEASES:
Sept. 3: Rayman Legends
Sept. 10: Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 ReMIX
Sept. 15: Te Wonderful 101
Sept. 17: Grand Tef Auto V
RIDE OF THE WEEK
Michael Golubiewski | Special to the Weekender
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By Chuck Shepherd
Weekender Wire Services
FETISHES ON PARADE
Finding an aberrant sexual behavior not previously
mentioned in News of the Weird is an exhausting
task, but British psychologist Mark Grifths, of Not-
tingham Trent University, has succeeded: the eproc-
tophile (a person sexually aroused by the passing
of gas). Grifths told LiveScience.com in July that
he plans to study other rare paraphilic disorders,
including fre fetish, a blindness fetish and dacry-
philia, or arousal by tears, weeping or sobbing.
A 20-SomethingS wild AdventureS
Justin Brown | Weekender Correspondent
Flying high
All inhibitions were thrown to the wind, pretty literally, during this mid-air
interview.
QUEEN OF THE NIGHT
the conficted double life of
Israeli Orthodox Jewshadar
Hadar, 34, might be as
formidable to manage as that
of an international spy. though
deeply and defantly religious, he
typically around midnight trades
his knitted white yarmulke for a
wavy blond wig and pink velvet
dress and takes the stage as a
nascent drag queen, according
to an august associated Press
dispatch fromJerusalem. His
gayness has alienated his ex-wife
(who bars himfromseeing
their daughter, now11) and is
only grudgingly accepted by his
parents. as a bridge of sorts in
his life, he has rejected the usual
raunchy drag queen personas
and adopted instead that of a
female rabbinic adviser, musing
fromthe stage on optimistic
teachings of breslov Hasidic
ultra-Orthodox Judaism.
GOVERNMENT INACTION
Philadelphias Veterans
stadium, whose construction
was fnanced in 1964 by
borrowing $25 million (and
untold more as part of a subway
expansion to service the
stadium), was demolished in
2004 and is but a memory to
the citys sports fans. However,
nine years later, the city is still
paying for it (though next year
will retire the $25 million bond
and nine years fromnow, the city
hopes, will retire the stadium/
subway bond). the citys deputy
controller told Phillymag.comin
June, profoundly, When issuing
a bond to build a facility, the debt
payment on that bond should not
outlast the facility.
Inexplicable: the Oklahoma
department of Public safetys
solution to its legendary long
lines at drivers license stations
was to createIn Line Online
registration, which it introduced
recently. Online registrants were
beside themselves, however,
when they arrived on time across
the state, only to learn that In
Line Online merely entitled them
to a reserved place in the line
for making future appointments
to take their drivers test. a
spokesman acknowledged that
In Line Online might have some
kinks and thus would be closed
temporarily.
toronto is facing such a
crippling backlog of challenges
to parking tickets, reported the
toronto star in august, that
more than 73,000 citations from
last year were still unresolved
and that many cases were
proceeding even less hurriedly.
mahmood-reza arab, a computer
programmer who was ticketed
for parking too close to a hydrant
in 2005 and who has dutifully
met all deadlines for making a
proper challenge, was recently
scheduled (again) for trial
before a judge this month
(september 2013). aspokesman
said thenormal wait time for a
court date is only 18 months.
rules are for the beneft of
Us all: adhering tofederal
regulations, the denver Housing
authority ordered the immediate
ejection of the family of sandra
roskilly (her mother and autistic
son) because roskilly had
been shot dead in a random
homicide in august. the mother,
who shared the apartment with
roskilly for 10 years, said she
was told that once the head of
household is no longer present
(no matter the reason), the
apartment must be forfeited.
said roskillys astonished
brother, (t)here was no question
in my mind that my mother
would at least be able to fnish
out the lease.
GREAT ART!
artist John Knuth creates
broad swaths of color that
appear to be meticulous
impressionistic abstractions,
reported a gizmodo.comwriter in
July, but in a video made for the
museumof Contemporary art
in Los angeles, Knuth revealed
that he makes colors with paint
harvested fromthe vomit of
about 200,000 housefies. Knuth
raises the fies frommaggots,
then feeds themsugar mixed
with watercolor pigments, then
coaxes the fies to regurgitate
and then captures and uses the
result. Of Knuths accompanying
high-minded explanations of his
purpose, gizmodo wrote, Once
you decide to make paintings
fromfy barf, you pretty much
forfeit any other subtext youd
like your audience to appreciate.
suspicion Confrmed: a
british art critic created the
Colne Valley sculpture trail
in West yorkshire by inviting
patrons to walk a 3-mile path
past derelict buildings and
discarded objects that the critic
suggested, in a formal leafet,
were purposeful art objects
designed to be provocative.
(In reality, they were random
junk.) an abandoned bathtub
(titled Wash behind the ears)
evoked contradictory concepts
of flth and cleanliness in
a countryside setting, the
critic wrote. a collapsed wall
was built by fctitious artist
Karen braithwaite, who then
destroyed it with some sense of
violence,suggest(ing) a sense
of bereavement, the turf above
almost seeming to weep. the
author spoke to bbC news in
July but insisted on remaining
anonymous.
POLICE REPORT
notwithstanding the city
of detroits various problems,
residents still expect its police
force to behave sensibly, but
in July, a police commanders
ofce blundered, releasing to all
ofcers a document concerning
an order of form-ftting
bulletproof vests. each individual
ofcers height and weight were
on the email, but so were female
ofcers bra cup sizes (which
were initially necessary to assure
body-armor ft so as not to
restrict mobility but obviously
were no one elses business).
In august, prosecutors in
broward County, Fla., accused
two Lauderhill police ofcers of
an improper 2012 trafc stop,
charging both patrolmen in the
squad car with demanding favors
fromtwo female motorists.
Ofcer Franklin Hartley allegedly
demanded oral sex fromthe
passenger, and his partner,
thomas merenda, according to
the charge, asked the victim
to punch himin thenuts,
meaning genital area. said
merendas lawyer, of the charge:
outrageous, outlandish and
absurd.
PERSPECTIVE
americas military veterans,
whom the country supposedly
champions wholeheartedly
and insists should be properly
compensated for their service
and the disruption to their
lives, must navigate as many
as 613 government forms
from 18 diferent agencies to
receive what they are due by
law, according to a July study
released by the american action
Forum. the principal agency, the
department of Veterans afairs,
purports to have been making
great progress over the last
few years, but earlier this year
acknowledged that, still, about
70 percent of claims (covering
600,000 veterans) have been
waiting longer than 125 days for
yes-or-no decisions.
W
Over the past few years
Ive interviewed oodles
and noodles of my favor-
ite celebrities, discover-
ing some of their wildest
adventures and life les-
sons, while nding out
what they could go on the
record saying Sorry, Mom
and Dad for. I have talked
with Grammy winners,
reality TV stars, sitcom
stars, comedians, talk show
hosts, best selling authors,
and even a LOHAN!
Something that caught
me off guard over my con-
versations with some of the
most uninhibited people
in the public eye was how
reserved they can be dur-
ing a one-on-one chat.
There is so much pressure
during an interview with
somebody you dont know
that it is often hard to get
someone to answer a ques-
tion without them having
their guard up to an extent.
I think its time to take
the pressure off the inter-
view and put the pressure
on what is taking place
during the interview. Why
not put the pressure on a
wild, extreme activity, such
as bungee jumping, rock
climbing, or swimming
with sharks?
Thats why I decided to
interview 98.5 KRZ morn-
ing radio personality, Lissa,
while JUMPING OUT OF
A PLANE!
Last Friday afternoon, I
met up with the always out-
spoken Lissa and we head-
ed to Above the Poconos
Skydivers (118 Old Airport
Rd., Drums) for the most
extreme interview EVER!
A family operated busi-
ness for over 50 years,
Above the Poconos
Skydivers is co-owned by
husband and wife Don and
Darlene Kellner. I knew we
were in the right hands with
the Kellners when I learned
that Don holds the Guiness
Book of World Records
record for the most jumps
out of a plane, with over
41,000 jumps and count-
ing! He once went skydiving
63 times in one day!
Nevertheless, I was
still nervous as hell, even
though it was my second
jump. Lissa, on the other
hand, who was making her
third jump, was not ner-
vous at all. However, with
her adrenaline rushing and
mind focused on dancing in
the clouds like an In Living
Color y girl, her guard
was completely down when
it came to answering my
questions.
Thats probably why I got
an answer from her when
my one question was: Lets
play Marry, Make-out, and
Murder. Out of fellow KRZ
personalities Rocky, Jeff
Walker, and Amanda, who
would you marry, who would
you make out with, and who
would you murder?
Lissa said she would
make-out with Amanda,
because she would have
less stubble, marry Jeff
Walker, and murder Rocky,
her morning co-host,
because he would prob-
ably love to kill her some-
times! She might not have
answered that if her mind
wasnt focused on jumping
out of a plane!
During our ight, I asked
her what she would say
Sorry Mom and Dad for,
and she apologized for not
telling her parents that she
was going to be jumping
out of a plane.
With photographers
Brian Gerrity and Darlene
Kellner helping capture
the epic moment, and pro-
fessional skydivers Paul
Mayza and Christoph
Streicher attached to us,
we concluded our inter-
view with a free fall from a
plane, because sometimes,
when you want the best
results out of something
in life, you just have to
go above the clouds, and
beyond.
Watch the entire extreme
interview with Justin and
Lissa exclusively at www.
theweekender.com.
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The Aroma A Spa
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1-866-858-4611
570-970-3971
Call our friendly staff about our new services and
masseuses. Waxing, skin esthetics, facials and
more available. Couple specials Fri-Sat-Sun 6-
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Lather up in the company of Peaches and
Cream in the Jacuzzi of Dreams. Call for rates.
EVERY TUESDAY 6 P.M.-MIDNIGHT is COUGAR
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NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-11 NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-11
12-6 pm Sunday 12-6 pm Sunday
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OPEN:
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2042 N. Memorial Hwy., Shavertown, PA
675-1245
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WEEKENDER
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facebook.com/
the weekender
Fall 2013FilmFestival Post-Festival
Discussion: Oct. 4, 1 p.m.
OpenMicNight: Sept. 27, doors
6:30, openmicat 7.
19thCenturyAppliquedQuiltsAn
AmericanTradition: Oct. 5, 11 a.m. $5.
Guitar Musicof SouthAmerica:
Oct. 6, 3p.m.
DietrichClassicMovieSeries:The
KingandI: Oct. 9, 1 and7p.m., $5.
Fall FoliageTriptoGreyTowers,
DingmansFerry&Milford: Oct. 12.
Busdeparts8a.m., returns6p.m.
$100.
DoYouRememberThisMusic
for theMoviesfromSilentstothe
1960s: Oct. 13, busdeparts1:30
p.m., concert atWVIAMediaCenter
3p.m. Free.
TheMagicof Bill Dickson: Oct. 19,
11 a.m.
OpenMicNight: Oct. 25, 7p.m.,
featureat 8:15.
Sing! Sing! Sing!: Oct. 26, 11 a.m.
F.M. KirbyCenter
(71 PublicSquare,Wilkes-Barre.
570.826.1100.)
W. CurtisMontzSummer FilmSeries:
($4, matinees; $6, eveningshows)
Psycho: Sept. 4, 1 and7:30p.m.
Glasswine.bar.kitchen. at
Ledges Hotel
(119FallsAve, Hawley. 570.226.1337,
www.ledgeshotel.com/glass-wine-
bar-bistro/)
LiveMusicwithJohnCurtin: Sept.
5, 7-10p.m., Sept. 12, 7-10p.m.; Sept.
19, 7-10p.m.; Sept. 26, 7-10p.m.
LiveMusicwithRickHorvath: Sept.
6, 8-11 p.m.
LiveMusicwithSteveWoodman:
Sept. 13, 8-11 p.m.
LiveMusicwithEricRudyandJen
Kiesendahl: Sept. 20, 8-11 p.m.
LiveMusicwithKevinCampion:
Sept. 27, 8-11 p.m.
TheGreater ScrantonChamber of
Commerce
(222MulberrySt., Scranton)
OneMan, OneVision40Yearsof
Progress: ATributeDinner forAustin
J. Burke: Sept. 15, 5p.m.
SAGEAwardsWorkshop: Sept. 5,
8:30a.m.
SeptemberWomensNetwork
Luncheon: Sept. 18, noon.
Chamber Dayat RobaFamily
Farms: Sept. 22, 10a.m.
IremClubhouse
(64RidgewayDrive, Dallas)
WineTasting: Sept. 7, 6- 9p.m.
Reservationsrequired.
JessupArt Walk:
SecondSaturdayof everymonth. For
moreinfovisit jessupartwalk.infoor
email info@jessupartwalk.info.
KeepWine-ing, HeMight Start to
LookLikePrinceCharming
withAuthor/ComedianJeannine
MLuby, Sept. 26, 7p.m., III Ponds
Winery, Dalton. Special guest Liz
Russo. $16, advanceticketsat
JeannineLuby.com.
Kings College
(133NorthRiver St.,Wilkes-Barre,
570.208.5957or kings.edu)
ThirdAnnual KingsCollege
DiversityFilmFestival: Sept. 18, 25,
Oct. 2, 7p.m., BurkeAuditorium.
LackawannaCollege
(501VineSt., Scranton,
1.877.346.3552, lackawanna.edu)
Environmental Institute(10Mofat
Dr., CovingtonTwp.)
WildernessSkills: Sept. 17, 5:30-
7:30p.m.Ages7andup. $5per
person. Pre-registrationrequired.
Art Opening: WorksfromThe
Studio: Sept. 20, 5-7p.m.Through
Nov. 1.
Natural Wonders: Fall Harvest: Sept.
26, 1-2:30p.m., andeveryThursday
throughDec. 5.Ages3to5. $40, six
classes. Pre-registrationrequired.
Registrationlimited.
GettingtotheCore, programon
treeaging: Oct. 1, 5:30-7:30p.m.
Ages7andup. $5. Pre-registration
required.
Art inNature: BirdSeedWreath:
Oct. 12, 9a.m.-noon. $25. Pre-
registrationrequired.
Bearsinyour Backyard: Oct. 15, 6-8
p.m.$5. Pre-registrationrequired.
WolfVisions: Oct. 26, 6-7:30p.m.
Gearedfor childrenandfamilies. $5.
Pre-registrationrequired.
Mill Market intheHawleySilkMill
(Suite#111, 8SilkMill Dr., Hawley,
570.390.4440, info@MillMarketPA.
com, www.millmarketpa.com)
ShemanskisMapleSyruptasting:
Sept. 14, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
MisericordiaUniversity
Annual HealthCareLectureSeries
TheFutureof HealthCareinthe
UnitedStates,bySusanDentzer:
Oct. 4, 7:45a.m., Dudrick, Muth,
Huntzinger, andAldenTrust Rooms
of SandyandMarleneInsalacoHall.
Registrationrequired.
NinthAnnual Fall Intertribal
Powwow
Sept. 28-29, 10a.m.-6p.m.,
NoxenFireCo. grounds(3493
Stull Road, Noxen). For more
informationcontact Natalie
Wisteriaat 570.947.2097or email
wisteria18704@yahoo.com.
North Pocono Cultural Society
HarmonicBrass of Munich,
Germany: Sept. 23, 7p.m., Saint
Catherines CatholicChurch(220
ChurchSt., Moscow). $8per
person; $15for two.
76UniversityDrive, Hazleton,
570.450.3000, www.hn.psu.edu)
Penn StateWilkes-Barre
(Rte. 115, Lehman, 570.675.2171,
wb.psu.edu)
FiveGreat Films, FiveGreat
Genres:Thursdayevenings
beginningSept. 26throughOct.
24, RCTheatersWilkes-Barre.
Pre-flmlecturenotes andpost-flm
discussionwill accompanyeach
screening. Films includeAirplane!,
OnGoldenPond,Raiders of the
Lost Ark,TheDaytheEarthStood
Still, andHighNoon.
Scranton Cultural Center
(420N. WashingtonAve.,
Scranton, 570.346.7369,
scrantonculturalcenter.org)
First Fridayexhibit withartist
AmyWyman, musical group
KeepComingBack, andimprov
performanceHereWeAreInSpain:
Sept. 6, 6-10p.m.
Settlers Inn
LiveMusicintheDiningRoomwith
SteveWoodman: Sept. 7, 6-9p.m.;
Sept. 14, 6-9p.m.
LiveMusicintheDiningRoomwith
DanBradley. Sept. 21, 6-9p.m.; Sept.
28, 6-9p.m.
Unityof NEPA: ASpiritual Center
(140S. Grant St.,Wilkes-Barre.
570.824.7722.)
Special WorldPrayer DayService:
Sept. 11, 7p.m.
CozyCafCinemashowingofThe
Keepersof theKeys: Sept. 14, doors
6:30p.m.
Special Guest Speaker Richard
Pacheco: Sept. 15, 10a.m. service.
HowtoPraytoGodWithout
Talkingprayer class: Sept. 18, 11:30
a.m. post-service.
TheAmazingBagSale: Sept. 20, 9
a.m.-6p.m.; Sept. 21, 9a.m.-3p.m.
HipSipCofeeHouseSeries80s
KaraokeNight: Sept. 28, 6:30p.m.
Special Guest Speaker - Rev.Ann
Marie: Sept. 29, 10a.m. service.
WaverlyCommunityHouse
(1115N.AbingtonRd.,Waverly,
waverlycomm.org)
Basketball clinics: BeginningSept.
17, sixweekseveryTuesdayfrom
3:30-5p.m. Boysandgirlsages6to
9. BeginningSept. 19, sixweeksevery
Thursdayfrom3:30-5p.m. Boysand
girlsingrade4through6. $60per
participant or $12per class.
BabySignsParentWorkshop: Sept.
19, 7-8:30p.m. $55per individual
or couple. For moreinformation
or toprint aregistrationform, visit
www.waverlycomm.orgor call the
570.586.8191, extension2.
BallroomDancinglessons: Session
1,Wednesdayeveningsbeginning
Sept. 11, 6-7p.m., advanced,
AmericanTango; 7-8p.m., beginners,
ChaChaandRumba; Session2,
WednesdayeveningsOct. 23, 30,
Nov. 13, 20, Dec. 4, continuation
of Session1 classesfor thosewho
completedit. $45per personfor
eachfve-weeksession.Advanced
registrationrequired.Toregister call
Jill Wetzel at 570.954.1147or email
her at jgwetzel@epix.net.
WorldMusicDrumming, program
for special needschildren: Begins
Sept. 11, 3:45-4:30p.m. for children
Kthrough2ndgrade, 4:30-5:15p.m.
for 3rdthrough12thgrade. $95, each
ten-weeksession.
CommunityPledgeofAllegiance:
Sept. 11, 9:30a.m., fagpoleonthe
front lawn.
LearnItalian: Tuesdays, starting
Oct. 1. Session1BasicItalian:
6-7:15p.m.; Session2Introto
Conversational Italian(for advanced
beginners), 7:30-8:45p.m. $120,
eight-weeksession, includes
materials.
Childrenandteenetiquetteclasses:
HowtoSayit Best: Sept. 28,
10-11:30a.m.Ages4-7. $30.
TheCommunicationConnection:
Sept. 28, noon-2p.m.Ages8-14. $35.
SayPlease, SayThankYou: Oct.
12, 10-11:30a.m.Ages4-7. $30.
CommonCourtesiesCount: Oct.
12, noon-2p.m.Ages8-14. $35.
PassthePeas, Please: Nov. 16,
10-11:30a.m.Ages4-7. $35.
DiningBoot Campfor Kids: Nov.
16, noon-2p.m.Ages8-14. $35.
Great Events: Dec. 21, 10-11:30
a.m.Ages4-7. $30.
Great Events: Dec. 21, noon-2
p.m.Ages8-14. $30.
Wilkes University
(84W. SouthSt,Wilkes-Barre, 1.800.
WILKES.U, wilkes.edu)
Forensicanthropologist Dennis
Dirkmaat will shareForensicTales
fromtheWoodsof Pennsylvania:
Sept. 9, 4p.m., HenryStudent Center
(84W. SouthSt.,Wilkes-Barre).
FamilyBusinessForumeventsby
fnancial advisor FrancoLombardo:
TheGreatWhiteElephant of
Money,Sept. 18, 5-7:30p.m., Hawk
LectureHall inBusinessBuilding, and
Sept. 19, 5-7:30p.m., HenryStudent
Center Ballroom.
LOCALHISTORY
EckleyMinersVillage
(locatedninemileseast of Hazleton,
just ofRoute940; 570.636.2070;
www.eckleyminers.org)
Monthlyvolunteer meeting: Sept.
14.
Traditional musicfestival: Sept. 15,
gateopensnoon.
LackawannaHistorical Society
(TheCatlinHouse, 232Monroe
Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841.)
HauntedScrantonandTrolley
ofTerror tours: Sept. 13-14, 20-21.
$25, societymembers; $30, non-
members.
OldJail Museum
(128W. Broadway,Jim
Thorpe. 570.325.5259. www.
TheOldJailMuseum.com.)
TOURS: ThroughLabor Day, daily
(closedWednesday), noonto4:30
p.m. $6, adult; $5, senior over 65and
highschool; $4, childrenages6-12;
free, childrenunder 5.
SteamtownNational HistoricSite
(I-81 toExit 53, Scranton:
570.340.5200or 888.693.9391,
www.nps.gov/stea.)
Celebrationof 50thAnniversaryof
TheMarchonWashingtonandDr.
MartinLuther KingsI HaveaDream
speechbell-ringingevent: Aug. 28,
3p.m. Event includedinparksdaily
admission.
LEARNING
DietrichTheater
(Tunkhannock)
ChildrensClasses
All About Pottery&Sculpturefor
Ages58: Series1: Sept.13, 20, 27,
Oct. 4, 4-5:30p.m.; Series2: Nov. 8,
15, 22, Dec. 6, 4-5:30p.m. $40per
classseries.
All About Pottery&Sculpturefor
Ages912: Series1: Sept. 12, 19, 26,
Oct. 3, 4-5:30p.m.; Series2: Nov. 7,
14, 21, Dec. 5, 4-5:30p.m. $40per
classseries.
Art ExplorersCampforAges58:
Oct. 11, 18, 25, Nov. 1, 4-5:30p.m.
$40.
Art ExplorersCampforAges912:
Oct. 10, 17, 24, 31, 4-5:30p.m. $40.
Preschool Art Explorers: Oct. 10, 17,
24, 31, 10-10:45a.m. Free.
Preschool Pottery&Sculpturefor
ages4and5: Series1, Sept. 12, 19, 26,
Oct. 3, 10-10:45a.m.; Series2, Nov. 7,
14, 21, Dec. 5, 10-10:45a.m. Free.
Quiltingfor Kids: TumblingBlocks:
WednesdaysSept. 11 throughDec.
11, 3:30-5p.m.Ages6andup. $6per
class, fabricisfree.
SidewalkSurfng: TheArt &Culture
of Skateboarding: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29,
4-5:30p.m.Ages5to12. Free.
SingYour Heart Out: Oct., 26, Nov.
2, 9, 16, 23, 10a.m.-noon.Ages8to
13. $50.
WritingYour Hat Of: Creative
Writingfor Kids: Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30,
Nov. 6, 4-5:30p.m.Ages10to16.
Free.
Intergenerational Classes
OpenStudio&PortfolioPrep:
Series1: Sept. 10, 17, 24, Oct. 1, 7-8:30
p.m.; Series2: Oct. 8, 15, 22, 29,
7-8:30p.m.; Series3: Nov. 5, 12, 19,
26, 7-8:30p.m.Ages13andup. $15,
per class; $60, seriesof four classes.
Quiltingfor Everyone: Tumbling
Blocks: Wednesdays, Sept. 11-Dec. 11,
6-7:30p.m.Ages13andup. $6per
class, fabricisfree.
ClassesforAdults
BasicKnitting: Oct. 29, Nov. 5, 7
p.m.Ages16andup. $30.
DecorativePainting: Oct. 16, 23, 30,
Nov. 6, 13, 20, Dec. 4, 11, 18, noon-3
p.m.Ages16andup. $20per class
pluscost of paintingsurface.
DesignaPaintedSilkScarf: Oct. 8, 7
p.m.Ages16andup. $35.
GoldenDaysof RadioPlayers: Oct.
22, 29, Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26, Dec. 3, 7-9
p.m.Ages18andup. Free.
IntroductiontoResinJewelry: Oct.
14, 6-9p.m.Ages16andup. $35.
IntroductiontoStainedGlass: Oct.
21, 6-9p.m.Ages16andup. $60.
JewelryMaking: Kumihimo
Beading: Oct. 16, 23, Nov. 6, 7-9p.m.
Ages16andup. $75.
Kundalini Yoga: Series1: Sept. 30,
Oct. 7, 14, 21, 5:30-7p.m.; Series2:
Oct. 28, Nov. 4, 11, 18, 5:30-7p.m.
Ages16andup. $40, four classes;
$15, drop-in.
Nia: Series1: Sept. 10, 17, Oct. 1, 8,
5:30-6:30p.m.; Series2: Oct. 15, 22,
29, Nov. 5, 5:30-6:30p.m.; Series3:
Nov. 12, 19, Dec. 3, 10, 5:30-6:30p.m.
Ages16andup. $40, four classes;
$10, drop-in.
NutritionforWomen: Oct. 3, 10, 17,
24, 7-8:30p.m.Ages16andup. Free.
RecycledGlassArtwork: Series1:
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30, 7-8:30p.m.; Series
2: Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, 7-8:30p.m.; Series
3: Nov. 4, 11, 18, 25, 7-8:30p.m.Ages
18andup. $65, four classseries,
studentssupplyownsafetyglasses.
SimplyYoga: Series1: Sept. 4, 11,
18, 25, Oct. 2, 9, 10-11:15a.m.; Series
2: Oct. 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13, 20,
10-11:15a.m.Ages16andup. $60, six
consecutiveclasses; $15, drop-in.
WritersGroup: Thursdays, 7-8:30
p.m.Ages18andup.
Yogafor theGuardiansofYour
Health: Sept. 23, 5:30-7p.m.Ages16
andup. Free, donations
Freestylehanddrumming
heldeverymonthonthesecond
andfourthSaturdaysat Everything
Natural healthfoodstore, 426South
StateStreet, ClarksSummit.All
agesandnewcomerswelcome. No
experiencerequired. Drumsand
percussionprovided.Attendanytime
between1:00-4:00PM.
NEPABonsai Society
(MidwayGardenCenter, 1865Hwy.
315, Pittston, 570.654.6194, www.
myspace.com/nepabonsai).
23rdAnnual OpenHouse: Sept. 7,
10a.m.-4p.m.
PoconoArts Council
(18N. SeventhSt., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.
org)
Oil Painting: Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26,
6:30-8:30p.m. $72, member; $80,
non-member; $60, senior; $65,
senior non-member.
AcrylicPainting: Sept. 9, 23, 30,
9:30a.m.-12:30p.m. $85, member;
$95, non-member; $65, senior; $70,
senior non-member.
DecoupageAKeepsakeBox: Sept.
4, 11, 18, 25, 1-3p.m. $72, member;
$80, non-member; $60, senior;
$65, senior non-member. $10
material fee.All material supplied.
BasicDrawing: Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25,
6:30-8:30p.m. $72, member; $80,
non-member; $60, senior; $65,
senior non-member.
IntermediateWatercolor: Sept. 8,
15, 22, 29, 1-4p.m. $110, member;
$120, non-member; $90, senior;
$95, senior non-member.
MixedMediaApproachtoCreative
PaintingDesign: Sept. 9, 23, 30. $85,
member; $95, non-member; $65,
senior; $70, senior non-member.
HowtoPlayGuitar: Sept. 10, 6:30-
8:30p.m.
Sil-LumKung-Fu&Tai-Academy
(509PittstonAvenue, (3rdfoor).
Privateclassesareavailable. For
moreinfocontact: Master Mark
Seidel, 570.341.8089.)
Adult classes: Tuesday&Thursday,
7-8p.m; Saturday&Sunday, 10-11
a.m.
Childrensclasses(ages9&up):
Saturday, 11 a.m.-noon
YangStyleTai-Chi ChuanAdult
classes: Saturday&Sunday, 11
a.m.-noon
WiltonCourseOneCake
Decorating:
Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26, 6-8p.m.,A.C.
Moore,Wilkes-Barre. $20, all four
classes.
WudangSwordsmenAcademy
(269SWashingtonStreet,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.630.0088, www.
WudangSwordsmen.com, info@
WudangSwordsmen.com)
WudangTaijiquan(traditional tai
chi): Mon.,Wed., 6:10-7:30p.m.
WudangGongfu(internal kungfu):
Tue.,Thu., 6:10-7:30p.m.
YouthKungFu(ages10-13): Mon.,
Wed., 5:00-6:00p.m.
Baguazhang(EightTrigramPalm):
Sun., 10:50a.m.-12:50p.m.
CardioKungFu: Mon.,Wed., 10:00-
11:00a.m.
Tai Chi for Health: Tue.,Thu.,10:00-
11:00a.m.
Daoist SittingMeditation: Sun.,
4:30-5:30p.m.
MorningSeatedQigong
(meditation&breathwork): Tue.,
Thu., 9:00-9:50p.m.
PushingHandsCircle(opento
all tai chi playersinthearea): Sun.,
3:00-4:00p.m.
OpenWudangTrainingHall: Sun.,
1:00-3:00p.m.
OUTSIDE
Friends of Salt Springs Park
MovieNight: Sept. 7, Cot. 5, Nov.
2, 7p.m.
GameOn!: Sept. 20, 7-8:30p.m.
BikenBonfre: Sept. 21, 5-8:30
p.m.
Astronomyfor Beginners: Sept. 28,
7-9:30p.m.
NescopeckStatePark
(1137HoneyHoleRd., Drums,
570.403.2006)
GuidedBirdWalk: Sept. 7, 8a.m.
Meet at ParkOfce.
Kayaking: Level Three, Bradys
LakePaddle: Sept. 7, 10a.m., meet at
BradysLakeparkinglot.Ages16and
up, must register inadvance.
GuidedHike: BroadMountain
Overlook: Sept. 12, 9a.m., meet
at DCNRparkinglot onLehigh
GorgeDrive, acrossfromWeatherly
CountryInn.
GuidedHike: SkylineTrail: Sept. 25,
9a.m., meet at largeGouldTrailhead
lot.
Expandedlistings at
theweekender.com.
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From page 38
Agenda
GET ONTHE
AGENDA
Sendyour listingsto
WBWnews@civitasmedia.
com, 90E. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703,
or faxto570.831.7375.
DeadlineisMondaysat 2
p.m. Print listingsoccur
upuntil threeweeksfrom
publicationdate.
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By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS
BEYONCE KNOWLES
(pictured)
Sept. 4, 1981
Michael Keaton
Sept. 5, 1951
Pippa Middleton
Sept. 6, 1983
Gloria Gaynor
Sept. 7, 1949
Martin Freeman
Sept. 8, 1971
Hunter Hayes
Sept. 9, 1991
Coca Rocha
Sept. 10, 1988
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Pomp and circumstance have their
places, but leave them among the gradua-
tion ceremonies and British courtrooms.
Theres no need to whip out formal robes
or powdered wigs. Just keep it real.
When it comes to the deep, soul-to-soul
st, you cant hide behind rules of
order. Youve chosen to enter the lawless
world of love and lust. Dont fool yourself
into thinking you can impose order on
that chaos. Little from the outside world
intrudes on the reality you create and
share with someone else. Since most of
this weeks important events and interac-
tions will take place in that little world,
just live thereas fully as you can. The
more wholly you can occupy that space,
the more youll be able to extract for use
in the real world outside.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Youre a kid on a swing in a play-
ground. Goaded by your school chums,
youve pumped until the chains are
buckling at each apex of your arc. Now
theyre screaming for you to jump.
You know you can. You know it would
actually feel good, that effortless glide
through the air, the exciting tumble to
the ground. You even know, in your gut,
that you probably wouldnt get hurt. But
your ngers wont release! Luckily, you
havent stopped pumping. Youre still
primed to y as far and fast as you ever
were. You may have missed a few good
opportunities already, like when your
buddies offered to cushion your fall with
their bodies. But you have chances yet
left. All you have to do is let go.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Watch your weight. Youve suddenly
become so receptive that desserts are
effectively twice as fattening as usual.
Thats the downside of your current
state. The upside is that youll be twice
as fed by spiritual nourishment. Thus
your recent near starvation diet will
seem a little more like a feast. And thats
not all. Its just like the universe to throw
in a bonus package when youre already
reeling with newfound wealth. The pow-
ers that be are likely to throw more than
a bone your way; theyll probably toss
you a whole steak.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You have the power to make a seed
sprout just by staring at it. Water boils
when you get mad. A kiss from you has
enough juju to wake the dead. What to
do with this suddenly amplied and
concentrated (and hard to control) per-
sonal power? Anything you want. The
trick is guring out what you want, fast,
before your batteries run back down to
normal levels. Youre likely to inadver-
tently manifest the next three wishes
you make. I just hope theyre things you
actually want, not just things you think
you want.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Frequent laughter is exactly the medi-
cine you need, and youre nally realiz-
ing that having fun is more important
than some of the other things youve
been putting all your energy into. Life is
short, and material success might play a
factor in your maximum enjoyment of it.
But I believe a much greater role in your
general happiness can be played by the
gooest people you know. Forget physi-
cal sex appeal, nancial status, gender,
or any of that supercial stufflook to
the people who make you laugh best and
most often. Invite them deeper into your
life. Make room for them, and for the fun
youll have. Youll not only live longer as
a result, youll live way, way, better.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Your psychic inbox is full of spam.
Your life is rife with useless distractions
and annoying reminders of the pettiness
youd rather be free of. You need a better
junkmail lter, but youre not sure how
to implement it without shutting out at
least some of the people you would like
to hear from. Just like no ones gured
out a hassle-free way to keep their email-
box free of porn and chain letters, theres
no easy way to keep your life crap-free.
But if you pay attention this week, you
should discover at least one way of more
effectively screening out the noise and
hearing more of the music.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Youre being poisoned by your envi-
ronment. This is besides the toxic ven-
geance we wreak on ourselves in our
sick self-sabotage, like pollution, pesti
cides, and free radicals. You, specically,
are being sickened (physically or spiritu-
ally or both) by your unique living situ-
ation. Check for radon, evil roommates,
or just an overall sterility that doesnt
reect, stimulate, or amplify the rich-
ness of your inner life. Pisces are fed by
richness and diversity so make sure the
place youve put roots in has plenty of
magic to help you keep growing, or you
wither like a plant out of sunlight. Make
your environment reect you and what
you believenow. If you cant make that
happen, its time to leave.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
The more you trust, the more your
trust will be rewardedmostly. The
unfortunate exceptions to this rule,
however, teach us distrust so quickly
its scary. Sadly, distrust works the same
waythe more you suspect someone,
the more likely they are to fulll your
worst expectations. Why do we let the
negative experiences have so much more
power than the positive ones? Because
pain is easier to remember than pleasure.
This week, you have a chance to change
all that. Your best hopes will yield the
best results, as long as you dont give
an inch to your worst fears (which are
equally likely to become manifest if you
do). Its an exercise in faith. Think good
thoughts, good st will happen. Think
life sucks? It will.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Where have you gone? Some of your
friends are convinced youve fallen down
a well somewhere, and just cant get cell-
phone service down there. Maybe you
have. From my astrological readouts, it
looks like nearly all of the arrows and
buckshot headed your way will miss
their target. Meanwhile, youre free to
concentrate on the introvert-type stuff
youve been neglecting. Just dont stay
down in your well of solitude for too
long. Climb up before weeks end or your
worst enemies will discover your best
hiding place, which just cant happen;
youre a sitting duck down there.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Dont freeze up in fear. This week
youre likely to encounter a few things
that youd rather not experience. They
might be pretty unpleasant. But rigidly
trying to ignore or escape them without
being touched (mentally or physically)
wont work, and will just make the situa-
tion that much worse. Be open, loose, and
exible. Its not like the drunken home-
less guy (or whatever form the unfamiliar
new thing will take) is actually a threat
to you. Heed whats going on. I promise
youll learn something. Youll probably
have a good laugh about it, tooand who
doesnt need more of those?
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
If DNA evidence were brought to
bear in processing most of the emo-
tional crimes youre accused of, youd
be convicted every time. Fortunately,
you cant easily be sued for breaking
hearts or making people mad with lust.
But the karmic statute of limitations is
a bit longer than the legal one, and you
might encounter some repercussions
from some mental misdemeanors you
committed way back when. Dont resist
the cosmic subpoena; some part of your
soul craves an accounting, and the pun-
ishments youll be sentenced with wont
be as gruesome or insufferable as you
think, and will be drastically outweighed
by the lingering guilt youll subsequently
be able to shed.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Lately youve shunned the open, sunny
rooms of the mental house youve built;
youve crawled into the spaces between
the walls, slithered behind radiators,
peeped through paintings, and shimmied
up chimneys. I appreciate that youre try-
ing to experience all the places between
or behind the familiar (slightly tired)
ones youve already visited. Youre look-
ing for something new, or something
old that you might have missed. But the
things youre craving are too big to t
into the places where youre looking for
them. If you want something grand and
beautiful to come live in your house,
you cant make room for it in a walk-in
closet; youd better build on a whole new
addition.
To contact Caeriel, send mail to
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
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