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WILKES-BARRE, PA SAtuRdAy, SEPtEmBER 7, 2013 50
6 09815 10011
NEWS
Local 3A
Nation &World 6A
Obituaries 8A
INSIDE
Editorials 9A
Weather 10A
SPORTS: 1B
BUSINESS: 10B
AT HOME
Birthdays 3C
television 4C
movies 4C
Puzzles 5C
CLASSIFIED: 1D
Comics 18d
WILKES-BARRE Two
men wanted for question-
ing in the shooting death of
Brooklyn, N.Y., toddler were
arrested Friday morning in
the Sherman Hills apartment
building off Coal Street where
two girls were struck by gun-
re two weeks ago.
Daquan Breland, 23, and
Daquan Wright, 19, were
taken into custody in apart-
ment 619 of Building 328 on
Parkview Circle.
The girls, ages 2 and 5,
were injured in a shooting in
apartment 614 the morning of
Aug.24.
The two men, both of
Brooklyn, were held briey
on fugitive from justice charg-
es and $1 million bail each,
waived extradition and were
sent back to Kings County,
N.Y., with New York Police
Department detectives inves-
tigating the Sept. 1 shooting
death 16-month-old Antiq
Hennis.
Authorities said the boys
father, Anthony Hennis,
was pushing the child in a
stroller across a street in the
Brownsville neighborhood of
Brooklyn around 7:20 p.m.
Sunday when multiple shots
were red. The boy was
struck on the left side of his
face and later pronounced
dead at Brookdale University
N.Y. fugitives arrested at Sherman Hills
Men wanted in connection
with shooting death of a toddler
JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
WEST PITTSTON
Opinions vary widely in the
ve-day-old Wyoming Area
School District teachers
strike everybody wants it
resolved, but how and when is
anybodys guess.
Meanwhile, as teachers
walked the picket line Friday
at the Montgomery Avenue
Elementary School, parents
and business people wondered
how long it will take to get the
contract issues resolved and
students back in school.
The Wyoming Area
Education Association went
on strike Tuesday, and its
members have been work-
ing without a contract since
August of 2010, when the last
ve-year pact expired.
No negotiations are sched-
uled, and if a contract is not
reached, the teachers will be
ordered back to school on
Oct. 5. If all of that class time
is time missed because of the
strike, the district will not be
able to have extended holiday
breaks at Thanksgiving and
Christmas.
Walking the line
As the teachers walked
around Montgomery Avenue
Elementary School, they were
joined by Tom Saunders, a
West Pittston resident and
father of children attending
district schools. Saunders car-
ried a sign that read: This
WEST PITTSTON
Fans showed no sign of
strike fatigue at Fridays
Wyoming Area Warriors
football game against the
Mid Valley Spartans.
While varsity players
raced around the gridiron,
a little more dust probably
accumulated in the class-
rooms as strikers hung up
their signs
after a fourth
day on the
picket lines.
The dis-
tricts sports
teams con-
tinue show-
ing up to
s c h e d u l e d
m a t c h e s
despite the
fact that 12
f a l l - s p o r t s
coaches in the district are
on the other side of the
picket line, sworn to stay
away from their teams
until school board mem-
bers and Wyoming Area
Education Association
representatives end the
gridlock over a new con-
tract.
Teachers have been
working for three years
under terms of a contract
that expired in 2010 and
promise to picket as long
as they can or until their
demands are met. Many
fans who parked at the
game later found iers
WILKES-BARRE John
Halligan visits some 200 high
schools every year to talk about
the suicide of his 13-year-old
son, Ryan, who took his own life
in 2003 as a result of being bul-
lied.
Halligan will speak at 15
Luzerne County high schools
this month the largest book-
ing he has ever had for one coun-
ty.
District Attorney
Stefanie Salavantis said
the issues of bullying
and suicide are dear to
her heart and she wants
her ofce to do whatever
it can to prevent kids
from hurting themselves.
According to the Luzerne
County Coroners Ofce, there
were ve teen suicides in the
county in 2012, three in 2011,
two in 2010 and none in 2009.
Last year we
lost so many teen-
agers to suicide,
said Salavantis. We
decided to take the
initiative and bring
these programs into
schools.
The program,
WASHINGTON
Suggesting an uphill fight
for President Barack Obama,
House members staking out
positions are either opposed
to or leaning against his
plan for a U.S. military strike
against Syria by more than a
6-1 margin, a survey by The
Associated Press shows. The
Senate is more evenly divided
ahead of its vote next week.
Still, the situation is very
fluid. Nearly half of the
433-member House and a
third of the 100-member
Senate remain undecided.
By their statements or those
of aides, only 30 members of
the Republican-led House
support intervention or are
leaning in favor of authoriz-
ing the president to use force
against Syrian President
Bashar Assads government in
response to a chemical weap-
ons attack last month. Some
192 House members outright
oppose U.S. involvement or
are leaning against authoriza-
tion, according to the AP sur-
vey.
The situation in the
Democrat-controlled Senate
is better for Obama but hardly
conclusive ahead of a poten-
tial vote next week. The AP
survey showed those who sup-
port or are leaning in favor
of military action holding a
slight 34-32 advantage over
those opposed or leaning
against it.
Complicating the effort in
the Senate is the possibil-
ity that a three-fths majority
might be required. Republican
Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky
says he is going to libuster.
Still, Sen. Harry Reid, the
Democratic leader, predicted,
AP survey:
Obama may
lose vote
on Syria
Even with many
lawmakers undecided,
military action looks
like a tough sell
BRADLEY KLAPPER
and STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press
District attorney spotlights anti-bullying efort
National speaker to make presentations this
month at 15 Luzerne County high schools
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Gridlock
doesnt
slow action
on gridiron
JON OCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
Aimee dilger | the times Leader
A sign in support of striking Wyoming Area teachers hangs on the field house at Wyoming Area during the Friday night football game against Mid Valley.
Community united on strike: Resolve it
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
So you want
to be a ghost?
Heres where you can apply NEWS, 5A
SPORTS, 1B
Penn State readies
for Eastern Michigan
Supporters of both sides in Wyoming Area understand the
complexities of the issue but want students back in school
Aimee dilger photos| the time Leader
Daquan Breland, 23, is the suspected gunman in the deadly
shooting of 16-month-old Antiq Hennis in Brooklyn, N.Y., on
Sept. 1, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal.
Daquan Wright, 19, gets led out of his arraignment
Friday in Wilkes-Barre, after he was taken into
custody at the Sherman Hills Apartments Friday
morning.
See FUGITIVES | 10A
See STRIKE | 10A
Salavantis John Halligan Ryan Halligan
See BULLYING | 7A
Find out
howthe
Warriors
fared
Friday
against
the mid
Valley
Spartans
Page
3B
See GRIDIRON | 10A
See SYRIA | 10A
PAGE 2A Saturday, September 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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OBITUARIES
Bereznak, Robert
Kozemko, Dolores
Neare, Ray Sr.
Orkwis, Kenneth
Schydlowski, Glenys
Simoncavage,
Thomas
Swartz, Richard
Tyson, Donald
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BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the newsroom at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG The family
of late Penn State football coach
Joe Paterno and others suing
the NCAA on Friday led a new
court document that expanded
on how they say they were
harmed, from making it harder
to sell Paterno memorabilia to
branding Penn State coaches
with a scarlet letter.
The 92-page memorandum
explained why they think the
judge should not throw out their
claims against college sports
governing body over the punish-
ment handed down in the wake
of a child sex abuse scandal
involving a longtime Paterno
assistant, Jerry Sandusky.
A courtroom proceeding is
scheduled for late next month as
the NCAA seeks dismissal of the
breach-of-contract, defamation
and civil conspiracy claim.
The plaintiffs said the market
has been diminished for items
linked to Paterno, once the win-
ningest coach in Division I foot-
ball. A consent decree between
Penn State and the NCAA a few
months after Paternos 2012
death stripped the coach of the
last 111 wins of his career.
That Paterno is deceased
does not mean that college
football fans cannot still pur-
chase footballs that were signed
by him, they wrote. But they
are less likely to do so after the
NCAA defendants publication
of the disparaging and baseless
statements made in the consent
decree.
The consent decree also
imposes a $60 million ne on the
university, temporarily reduced
its scholarships and banned it
from post-season play for four
years. The agreement followed
the release of Penn States scath-
ing internal review, led by for-
mer FBI director Louis Freeh,
into how school ofcials handled
complaints about Sanduskys
behavior with boys in 1998 and
2001.
Freehs report said high-rank-
ing school ofcials, including
Paterno, concealed critical
facts about Sandusky because
they feared bad publicity.
Paterno was never charged with
wrongdoing but three former
school ofcials are facing charg-
es in an alleged cover up.
The plaintiffs wrote that
labeling Paterno as a concealer
of child abuse caused concrete
harms to the commercial inter-
ests of his estate.
Along with Paternos family,
the plaintiffs also include three
faculty members, nine former
Penn State football players,
former coaches Jay Paterno
and Bill Kenney, and ve mem-
bers of the Penn State Board of
Trustees, although one is drop-
ping out.
NCAA chief legal ofcer
Donald Remy issued a state-
ment in response on Friday, call-
ing the lawsuit fundamentally
awed and saying it should be
dismissed.
Although (the) plaintiffs may
be unhappy with Penn State
Universitys acceptance of the
Freeh Report and its decision
to enter the consent decree, the
plaintiffs have no legal basis to
sue the association, Remy said.
The new ling criticized the
NCAA as trying to deect atten-
tion from criticism and shore
up its reputation while broaden-
ing its authority and imposing
enormous monetary sanctions
for its own benet.
The ling said Kenney, an
offensive line coach, and Jay
Paterno, the coachs son and a
quarterbacks coach, are exam-
ples of how the NCAA allegedly
has negatively and dramatical-
ly affected opportunities and
business relationships.
The NCAA defendants
minimize the seriousness of
accusing all Penn State football
coaches of being part of a cul-
ture that supposedly allowed
child abuse, and ignore the
obvious repercussions of stitch-
ing a scarlet letter on coaches
they labeled complicit in jet-
tisoning the values of human
decency, the plaintiffs law-
yers wrote.
The NCAA has until Sept.
20 to respond to the new ling,
and oral argument in the matter
is scheduled for Oct. 29 in the
courthouse where Sandusky was
convicted last year of 45 counts
of child sexual abuse.
Paul Kelly, a lawyer for the
plaintiffs, said any trial in the
lawsuit is at least 18 months to
two years away.
Sandusky, 69, is serving a
30- to 60-year prison sentence
and maintains his innocence.
A state appeals court will hear
argument in his challenge to the
conviction on Sept. 17.
Paterno family details alleged harmcaused by NCAA
Court fling claims sales
of late coachs memorabilia
have been impacted
by the sanctions
MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
Presentation devoid of
fashy videos, sensational
demonstrations and
celebrity appearances
LOS ANGELES When
it comes to hyping next-gen-
eration hardware, the video
game industry doesnt typical-
ly opt for simplicity. However,
during a presentation at the
GameStop Expo in Las Vegas
to promote the upcoming
Xbox One console last week,
a no-frills, old-school approach
is exactly what Microsoft
employed when confronted
with a convention room full of
passionate gamers.
There were no ashy vid-
eos, sensational demonstra-
tions or celebrity appearances.
Instead, Xbox Live program-
ming director Larry Major
Nelson Hryb candidly took
questions on stage from the
crowd for 30 uninterrupted
minutes, a refreshing reprieve
considering the backlash
Microsoft has continued to
endure since unveiling the
Xbox One in May.
Look, at Xbox, we really
care about the community,
Hryb replied when asked
point-blank how Microsoft
would win back consumers.
Were very focused on what
is right for gamers. Everybody
at Xbox is a gamer. Its not like
we just show up, do our work
and go home. We want to
make this the best game sys-
tem that you are going to own
for the next 10 years.
The presentation was appar-
ently the rst stop of an apol-
ogy tour for Microsoft, which
originally said the successor
to the Xbox 360 would be
required to go online every
24 hours and limit how users
could access previously pur-
chased games. A month
later, citing feedback from
consumers, Microsoft Corp.
announced it decided not to
implement such restrictions.
Microsofts atypical about-
face continued last month
when the Redmond, Wash.,
company declared that an
updated version of its Kinect
sensor, which detects motion
and voice, would no longer
be required to operate the
Xbox One. That turnabout
came after the company, at
events like the Electronic
Entertainment Expo, defend-
ed how integral Kinect was to
the Xbox One.
Hryb said hell embark
on a cross-country tour this
month, making stops in U.S.
cities to similarly assuage con-
cerns about the next-gen con-
sole just like he did at last
weeks GameStop Expo. The
180-degree reversals and low-
key repentance are unprec-
edented moves for a company
like Microsoft, which once
hired Cirque du Soleil to theat-
rically unmask the rst Kinect.
Microsoft announced this
week that the Xbox One will
debut Nov. 22 a week after
Sony Corp. unleashes its
PlayStation 4 console on Nov.
14. The PS4 will cost $399
and feature comparable com-
puting power, high-denition
graphics and online features to
the Xbox One. Microsofts con-
sole is pricier at $499, but the
system comes bundled with a
Kinect sensor.
Ive pretty much made
up my mind that Im get-
ting a PS4 and not an Xbox,
said Jeff Lane, a gamer from
Reno, Nev., who paid $100 for
VIP access to the GameStop
Expo. I know Microsoft has
changed course on a lot of
their unfounded policies since
they announced the Xbox
One, but whats to stop them
from just implementing them
next year after the console is
out?
The worries come at an
important time for the gam-
ing industry, which has seen
sales slide in recent years as
Microsofts 7-year-old Xbox
360 and Sonys 6-year-old
PlayStation 3 have entered
their golden years. The arrival
of Nintendos Wii U last year
didnt invigorate game sales,
which research rm NPD
Group said have dropped 9
percent over last year.
Education is job one, said
GameStop CEO Paul Raines
at last weeks event, which pri-
marily served as the training
grounds for the retailers 5,000
managers. We have thou-
sands of people in classrooms
upstairs receiving training on
the Xbox One and others on
the PS4. Were trying to arm
our staff on how these devic-
es will be different and how
theyll work.
Raines said GameStop
expects this falls debut of the
PS4 and Xbox One to make
for the biggest console launch
in history, while Microsoft
announced that pre-orders for
the third-generation Xbox have
sold out faster than both the
original Xbox and Xbox 360,
which was released in 2005
and has been the best-selling
console for the past two years.
Microsoft works
to save face after
Xbox backlash
DERRIK J. LANG
AP Entertainment Writer
THE TIMES LEADER ACIVITAS MEDIAcompany
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2013-250
Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLC
Divorces sought and fled in the
Luzerne County Prothonotarys Ofce
fromSept. 2 through 6:
Thomas Epp Jr., White Haven, and
Deborah Epp, Hazle Township
Kerry Festa, Conyngham, and Martin
Festa, Sugarloaf
John Tate, Hazle Township, and
Jennifer Tate, Jeddo
Donna Matcho, Dallas, and David
Matcho, Dallas
Helene Turk, Wilkes-Barre, and Ayob
Zaneh, Amman, Jordan
Rios Vazquez, Hazle Township, and
Darison Arman Gonzalez, Hazleton
Angela Alferi, White Haven, and
Joseph Alferi, White Haven
Allison Morales, Weatherly, and Jose
Gonzales Morales, Puebla, Mexico
Bonita Boyson, Mountain Top, and
Jefrey Whitesell, Germany
Magda Vazquez Rios, West Hazleton,
and Luis Echevarria Alman, Hazleton
Musoke Lewis, Upland, Pa., and
Kimberly Lewis, Augusta, Ga.
Sandra Dougherty, Forty Fort, and
Kevin Dougherty, Nanticoke
Marriage license applications fled in
the Luzerne County Register of Wills
Ofce fromSept. 2 through 6:
Frank Thomas Tencza, Wapwallopen,
and Brianne Maryalyce Drevenak,
Swoyersville
Frederic Martin, Edwardsville, and
Nicole K. Simmons, Edwardsville
Ronald Joseph View, Wilkes-Barre,
and Zebtrina Marie Wickkiser, Wilkes-
Barre
Christopher Sage Pirrone, NewYork,
N.Y., and Nicole Kathryn Shebloski,
NewYork, N.Y.
Douglas R. Fischer, Wilkes-Barre, and
Salvina Mary George, Wilkes-Barre
Stuart Todd, United Kingdom, and
Lorrele Weston, Sweet Valley
Darren Lee Hall, Dallas, and June
Ann Phillips, Dallas
Roy James Balazs Jr., Drums, and
Charlene Anna Van Horn, Drums
Robert Gordon Aten, Dallas, and
Leah Elizabeth Grundowski, Dallas
John David Traher, Wilkes-Barre, and
Katherine Anne Grohoski, Wilkes-
Barre
Christopher John Zukowsky,
Freeland, and Kelly Marie Kavitski,
Freeland
Michael Joseph Richmond, Dallas,
and Alyssa Marie Askew, Dallas
Benjamin Robert Herring, Duryea,
and Jaime Lynn Sekusky, Duryea
Steven Lee Ferguson, Hazleton, and
Melissa Ann Keeler, Hazleton
Mark Edward Metzker, Swoyersville,
and Nicole Eileen Astolf, Swoyersville
James Durland Edwards, Harveys
Lake, and Cheryl Ann Muendlein,
Harveys Lake
Joseph James Belusko, Hazleton,
and Pamela Jean Bredbenner, Hazle
Township
Joseph Vincent Kosior, Edwardsville,
and Peggy Anne OConnor,
Swoyersville
John Joseph Farrell Jr., Dallas, and
Lee Ann Marie Conway, Dallas
Samuel Soto, West Hazleton, and
Liane Reimiller, West Hazleton
Robert Reedy III, Pittston, and
Brittany Ann Latona, Exeter
Timothy Joseph Kerestes, Harveys
Lake, and Jamie Leigh Wall, Harveys
Lake
Addresses unavailable for the
following:
Robert WilliamThomas Sr. and
Kimberly Ann Marth
Richard David Howe Jr. and Cora
Jane Doughton
Allen Kevin Church and Catherine
Marie Malloy
James Jay Delaney III and Lisa
Satkowski
Isaias Rivera and Almida Medina
Charles Benjamin Harrison III and
Jaclyn Isabell Kern
Sean Alan Murtha and Sarah
Kathryn Dewey
David John Repetz and Rebecca
Lynn Caldwell
John Joseph George and Jill Lynn
Matthews
MatthewJohn Galchefski and Kayle
Chesek
PuBLIC RECORD MuNICIPAL BRIEFS
DURYEA Borough Council
will hold a public work session at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the borough
building, with the monthly meeting
immediately following. A special
meeting will be 6 p.m. Sept. 18 to
open bids for the renovations of the
borough building.
WARRIOR RUN Residents
are reminded the rebate period for
2013 Hanover Area school taxes
ends Sept. 12. If making install-
ment payments, the rst payment
is due Sept. 12.
County and borough taxes are
in penalty and can be paid at the
tax ofce until Dec. 31. Collection
hours are 2 to 4 p.m. Monday and 6
to 8 p.m. Tuesday. For an appoint-
ment, call 570-825-4043. The
tax ofce will be closed Sept. 20
through Sept. 27.
AP photo
Microsofts Larry Major Nelson Hryb speaks at the GameStop Expo
in Las Vegas. During the presentation at the GameStop Expo in Las
Vegas to promote the upcoming Xbox One console last week, a no-frills
approach is exactly what Microsoft employed when confronted with a
convention room full of passionate gamers.
HANOVER TWP.
Two people were
taken to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley
Medical Facility after
a car crash on South
Main Street near
the state Route 92
junction early Friday
morning.
Police said Ariel
Dorris, 21, of the
Drums section of
Butler Township, was
traveling south when
she struck a center
median and spun out
of control, striking
the bridge over Route
92 at about 1:33 a.m.
Dorris and a pas-
senger, who was not
named, were trans-
ported to Geisinger
for injuries.
The investigation
is continuing, police
said.
WILKES-BARRE
City police intend
to le forgery charges
against George P.
Moses, alleging he
wrote numerous
checks on an account
he opened in the
name of a victim
whom police did not
identify.
The account was
opened using a forged
check from another
bank account belong-
ing to the victim,
police said.
Moses also faces
forgery charges led
by Wilkes-Barre
Township police in
August, according to
court records.
HAZLETON
City police reported
the following:
A man walking
in the 500 block of
West Maple Street
was reportedly
assaulted and robbed
by two men at about
1:30 p.m. Wednesday.
Police charged
Megan Cieniawa,
29, of Hazleton, with
simple assault and
harassment after
she allegedly struck
a man in the head
multiple times in the
600 block of Alter
Street on Wednesday.
Cieniawa was jailed at
the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility
for lack of $5,000
bail. A preliminary
hearing is scheduled
on Sept. 11.
Items were sto-
len from a residence
in the 200 block of
East Ninth Street on
Wednesday.
Police are investi-
gating a reported bur-
glary at a residence
in the 500 block of
East Mine Street on
Friday.
Someone report-
edly entered a 2001
Honda Odyssey and
stole the front seat,
front door panels,
the instrument panel
and factory stereo
while the vehicle was
parked in the 500
block of North Vine
Street late Thursday
night into Friday
morning.
SUGARLOAF
TWP. Richard
Meier Jr., 20, of
Hazleton, lost control
of his 1999 GMC on
state Route 93 and
the vehicle struck a
utility pole at about
8:50 p.m. Thursday,
said state police at
Hazleton.
Route 93 was
closed for several
hours as the utility
pole was replaced.
HAZLETON
The state police
Bureau of Liquor
Control Enforcement
reported it recently
cited Beniaminos,
Inc., doing business
as Benitos, 554-558
Alter St., Hazleton,
with furnishing alco-
hol to a minor.
POLICE BLOTTER
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 3A
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
HANOVERTWP. Former
Wyoming Valley Sanitary
Authority Executive Director
Fred DeSanto arrived at mag-
isterial district court Friday
wearing handcuffs and being
escorted by Luzerne County
detective lieutenants Gary
Capitano and Daniel Yursha.
He left the courtroom a free
man, released under $20,000
unsecured bail.
DeSanto, 63, of Norman
Street, Pittston Township, and
his attorney, Frank Nocito,
had no comment on charges
he allegedly had the author-
itys employees perform work
for District 16 Little League
and the Pittston Township
Recreation Association events
from 2004 through 2012.
Capitano in his investiga-
tion alleges Sanitary Authority
employees performed work
while on the clock for WVSA
over a span of nearly 20 years,
but the statute of limitations
restricted the probe to eight
years.
Since DeSanto was rep-
resented by an attorney at
the preliminary arraignment
before District Judge Joseph
Halesey, he waived his right to
a preliminary hearing, sending
the third-degree felony charge
of diversion of services to
Luzerne County Court.
DeSanto served as executive
director of the WVSA since
1998 until he abruptly retired
on Aug. 27, 2012, shortly
before he was scheduled to
be interviewed by the author-
itys board regarding the alle-
gations. He earned a salary
of $116,084 when he retired,
according to the authoritys
nance department.
He previously served in
other capacities in the author-
itys administration for 18
years.
According to the criminal
complaint led by Capitano:
Employees at WVSA
approached Human Resource
Manager Willard Oliphant, a
former state police captain,
with allegations DeSanto
had been directing personnel
to attend and work District
16 Little League games and
events while on the clock for
WVSA.
Oliphant determined there
was sufcient information
that the allegations might be
accurate and contacted WVSA
solicitor William Finnegan,
who also serves as an assistant
district attorney in Luzerne
County.
A meeting was held with
District Attorney Stefanie
Salavantis on Sept. 4, 2012, at
which Capitano was assigned
to investigate after the state
Ofce of Attorney General
determined there was no
conict of interest as long as
Finnegan had no part in the
investigation and prosecution.
The investigation involved
the questioning of 57 WVSA
employees, of which22employ-
ees allegedly performed work
for the Little League and the
Pittston Township Recreation
Association. DeSanto also
used the WVSA postage
machine to mail Little League
materials, an average of 165
mailings per year, during the
same time at a cost of $449,
the complaint alleges.
A review by the state Ofce
of Auditor General alleg-
edly revealed the total value
of employees time and ben-
ets on projects not related
to WVSA and unauthorized
postage was $30,455.78 from
2004 to 2012, according to the
complaint.
A news release from
the Sanitary Authority on
Thursday stated DeSantos
accrued benets were frozen.
These monies are being
held and will be applied
towards any restitution which
is due to the WVSA, the
news release states. If there
is a shortfall in restitution, the
WVSA will pursue recouping
the balance of restitution, if
any, through the recently led
criminal case.
LUZERNE COUNTY
Szumski named
interim sherif
Luzerne County Sheriff Lt. Brian
Szumski has been designated interim
sheriff for up to six months, effective
Monday, because current interim
sheriff Jack Robshaw has been hired
as county 911 executive director,
county Manager Robert Lawton said
in an email sent to council on Friday.
The 911 director position became
vacant in May, when David Parsnik
was promoted to administrative ser-
vices division head.
Robshaw, who also oversees the
county security department and
mailroom, had assumed the sheriff
responsibilities in February 2012 with
the implementation of home rule,
which eliminated an elected sheriff
post and put the department under
the new Judicial Services and Records
Division.
Szumski has worked seven years
in the sheriffs ofce and eight as a
municipal police ofcer.
Judicial Services and Records
Division Head Joan Hoggarth is in
the process of selecting a permanent
sheriff.
LARKSVILLE
Area bicyclist
struck, killed
Richard Swartz, 33, of West Ross
Street, Wilkes-Barre, died from inju-
ries he sustained after being struck
by a vehicle while riding a bicycle
in the area of Boston Hill Road and
East Main Street Thursday night, the
Luzerne County Coroners Ofce con-
rmed.
Swartz was struck by a vehicle at
about 8 p.m. He was pronounced dead
at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center in Plains Township just before
9 p.m.
An obituary appears on page 8A.
MONROE COUNTY
Ex-resort owner
faces charge
The former owner of Penn Hills
Lodge in Stroud Township has been
charged with ling
false documents
related to taking
more than $1 mil-
lion from pension
funds, the U.S.
Attorneys Ofce for
the Middle District
of Pennsylvania
announced Friday.
Charles A. Poalillo Jr., 80, of
Monroe County, borrowed the money
from two pension funds while he
operated Penn Hills a now defunct
Pocono honeymoon resort on Route
191 and related businesses, accord-
ing to U.S. Attorney Peter J. Smith.
At one time the resort had been one
of the Poconos largest catering to
couples.
Prosecutors allege Poalillo falsely
reported the security of those assets
to the U.S. Department of Labor.
Pursuant to a guilty plea agreement,
Poalillo agreed to try to make full res-
titution by the time of his sentencing.
The maximum penalty under federal
law is ve years imprisonment, three
years supervised release after impris-
onment and a ne of up to $250,000.
The Monroe County District
Attorneys Ofce initiated the
investigation and assisted federal
authorities. The U.S. Department of
Labors Employee Benets Security
Administration and the Ofce of
Labor Racketeering and Fraud
Investigations conducted the inves-
tigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney
Michael A. Consiglio is prosecuting
the case.
WESTWYOMING
Rally set to aid
ailing councilman
Rallyin 4 Ralph will be held 6 to
11 p.m. today at West Wyoming Hose
Co. 1, 926 Shoemaker Ave., to benet
Ralph Conetti, a West Wyoming
councilman who is battling pancreatic
cancer.
The goal of the event is to lessen
the nancial medical burden and allow
Conetti to concentrate on ghting the
disease.
The event will feature live music
from Sean Stankus, Bruce Stankus and
Carrie Meyers, Jimmy T. as Elvis,
Jimmy Dennis, and Mr. Jay the magi-
cian. Also included is an all-you-can-eat
buffet, beverages and games and prizes
for a $10 donation.
Donations are welcome and can
be made by contacting help@rallyin-
4ralph.com or call 570-407-0173.
Clark Van Orden| The Times Leader
Fred DeSanto, former Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority executive direc-
tor, gets escorted to his arraignment by Luzerne County detectives Friday
morning in Hanover Township.
DeSanto posts bail; case to court
JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE The roof needs
work on the building where Dan
Nichols and Tim Walker are pastors,
but thats not how they came up with
the name of the Restored Church.
They are more focused on peoples
lives than with replacing shingles on
the space theyre renting. The duo will
hold a grand opening at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday at the former First United
Methodist Church of Wilkes-Barre on
North Franklin Street.
Their growing following is a mix of
young and old, homeless and well-to-
do, newcomers and those turned off
by the scandals of organized religion,
all hurt and beaten down in some way
and receptive to the message deliv-
ered by the pair, they said.
The reason we named the church
Restored is that we believe that peo-
ple can have a restored relationship
with God, said Nichols. The rela-
tionship is broken by sin, but Jesus
came and so the relationship can be
xed again through faith in Jesus.
Nichols, 25, and Walker, 24, gradu-
ated from Baptist Bible College and
spent three years in preparation, learn-
ing from the leaders of the Steamtown
Church in Scranton.
Part of their outreach has been
phone calls, mass mailings and bill-
board advertising.
They looked elsewhere before
deciding on Wilkes-Barre and are cer-
tain there is a need for the Evangelical
Protestant church theyre opening,
they said. Wilkes Barre is a hurting
city, Nichols said. If we have light in
Christ, why would we burn our light
in a room full of lights.
The two have been meeting with
people in much smaller residential
settings where they share a meal fol-
lowed by a Scripture discussion.
Theyve been meeting at houses
in Wilkes-Barre, Forty Fort and
Mountain Top. The food and commu-
nity have drawn scores of people, they
said.
People really appreciate that their
opinion is valued and they appreci-
ate that they dont just have to sit and
listen, said Walker. They appreciate
that people give them an opportunity
to share whats going on in their lives.
The people care about that and theyre
also able to ask questions and really
wrestle through what the Bible says.
People who attend the house
churches are encouraged to go to the
Sunday morning gathering as well, to
make the experience complete.
There will be music and Scripture
and a grace story delivered by some-
one whos experienced Gods grace
and mercy, Nichols said. So were
tying to show people like this isnt
just a theoretical impersonal kind of
a deist thing where Gods out there
somewhere, he said. No. He is active
in our lives and he is real.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
TimWalker, left, and Dan Nichols, pastors of the new Restored Church on North Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre, look forward to the grand opening and gathering Sunday in a bigger venue than
the house churches where they regularly meet.
Restored Church seeks to mend in W-B
Man pleads guilty again in 2005 bar shooting
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE Claude
Johnston pleaded guilty Friday for
the second time to a shooting at the
former White House
Cafe in Wilkes-Barre
in 2005 that injured
several people.
This time, he
hopes to receive a
lesser sentence.
Johnston, 38,
pleaded guilty to
four felony counts
of aggravated assault at a hearing
before Luzerne County Judge Fred
Pierantoni. He had also pleaded guilty
in December 2005 and then received
a 24-to-72-year sentence from former
judge Mark Ciavarella.
After appeals and other post-con-
viction hearings, based on claims his
sentence was excessive and errors
were made at the time of his guilty
plea, Pierantoni last month allowed
Johnston to withdraw his guilty plea
and start over.
Since 2005, Ciavarella has been
found guilty of federal corruption
charges and is serving a 28-year prison
sentence on allegations he accepted
kickbacks from the developer of a juve-
nile detention center.
Johnston faces a maximum of 20
years in prison on each charge when he
is sentenced on Sept. 19. Hell receive
credit for the time he has already
served in prison, Pierantoni said.
Pierantoni ruled in July that
Johnston would be permitted to with-
draw his plea because at the time of
his original plea, there was no discus-
sion of possible sentences and nes,
no basis for the charges was put on the
record and Johnstons former attorney
failed to raise an issue to challenge that
Johnston understood the plea.
Johnston and his co-defendant,
Rasha Wimms, 35, were charged after
the March 2005 shooting. Police said
the two men, their faces covered by
bandanas, stormed into the Hazle
Avenue bar and opened re.
Police said Crystal Crawford and
Steven McClean, of Wilkes-Barre and
Naquan Knight, of New York, were hit.
They were all treated at area hospitals
and later released. The White House
Cafe has since closed.
Johnston also argued Wimms
received a signicantly lesser sen-
tence, 10 to 20 years.
At the time of Wimms sentencing,
prosecutors said Johnston received the
more severe sentence because none
of Wimms bullets struck anyone and
Johnston had a prior record.
Attorneys also said the shooting
appeared to be related to drug trafck-
ing.
IN BRIEF
LOCAL
Johnston
Poalillo
PAGE 4A Saturday, September 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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Larksville man charged with sexually assaulting 3 girls during sleepovers at his house
WILKES-BARRE
Prosecutors said Friday
theyve brought enough
evidence against Shauntae
Thomas to charge him
with rst-degree murder.
And thats all they need
to do to charge him with an
open count of homicide.
Thomas attorneys say
just the opposite there
is not enough evidence to
charge their client with
rst- or third-degree mur-
der. Therefore, they said,
Thomas, 36, should face
manslaughter charges in
the April shooting death of
Derrick Cottle, 40.
Prosecutors contend
Thomas shot and killed
Cottle on Reno Lane in
Wilkes-Barre after a ght
between their sons.
Luzerne County
Senior Judge
Joseph Augello told
attorneys he would
accept additional
court papers outlin-
ing their positions
by the end of next
week before making
a decision.
Friends and family of
both Cottle and Thomas
were in court Friday, with
some of Thomas support-
ers wearing Free Tae
shirts.
An attorney who rep-
resents Thomas, Pete
Moses, argued evidence
presented at Thomas pre-
liminary hearing doesnt
support the greater charg-
es. Thomas did not act
intentionally, Moses said,
indicating that Thomas
acted in the heat of pas-
sion.
First Assistant
District Attorn-
eySamuel Sangue-
dolce said evi-
dence shows that
Thomas followed
Cottle after the
c o n f r o n t at i o n
between their
sons, and red at him, hit-
ting him in the head. It
was a deliberate act of
pointing a gun at some-
one, Sanguedolce said,
adding its up to a jury to
decide if heat of passion
actually occurred.
Thomas attorneys say
that he was overcome
with the intense emotion
after seeing his son beaten
and lying in a pool of blood.
Because of threats to him
and his family, Thomas
believed his actions were
justied, his attorneys
have said.
Judge to rule on charges
against shooting suspect
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Thomas
WILKES-BARRE
An Edwardsville man
who pleaded guilty in
June to pouring chemi-
cals on three people and
stabbing one in a March
2012 incident withdrew
that plea Friday.
Jeremiah Hightower,
41, of Roosevelt Street,
appeared before Judge
Michael Vough at a hear-
ing at which he was
originally scheduled to
be sentenced on charges
of aggravated assault
and burglary stemming
from the incident at the
Hilltop Apartments that
resulted in a building
being evacuated.
Hightower said he
didnt do what pros-
ecutors claim and that
he felt intimidated by
Vough at his guilty plea
hearing.
I dont mean to upset
you but I was con-
fused. I couldnt answer
yes or no (to your ques-
tions), Hightower told
Vough. I was nervous.
Vough said he received
a letter that Hightower
wrote to President Judge
Thomas Burke about
feeling intimidated by
Vough as his guilty
plea hearing, and that
Hightower didnt want
to further upset the
judge.
Vough said he was not
upset with Hightowers
remarks and didnt want
him to plead guilty to
something he didnt do.
I want to expose the
truth, Hightower said.
I want the opportunity
to ght for my name.
Vough granted
Hightowers request to
withdraw his guilty plea
and said he would get his
day in court Monday
morning to face a jury
trial.
Hightower said he
had hoped to have a
little more time to le
a request to be released
on bail, to obtain a job
and to pay his attorney,
Anthony Moses, for a
proper defense.
Vough said Hightower
is one of 40 cases on
a list Monday to go to
trial, and that he still
has time to le a bail
request.
According to court
papers, on March 15,
2012, Kim Malesinski
told police Hightower
had been in contact
with her earlier in the
day, asking her to have
sex. When she refused,
Hightower took her cell-
phone and left the apart-
ment.
When Hightower
returned, Malesinski,
Mallory Corcoran and
John DePrimo locked
themselves in a bedroom
in Malesinskis apart-
ment. Hightower alleg-
edly forced open the door
and sat on Corcorans
legs, slamming her head
against the wall numer-
ous times, according to
court papers.
Malesinski told police
Hightower left the bed-
room and Corcoran
called 911. Hightower
allegedly returned to the
bedroom, dousing the
three with bleach and
ammonia, which burned
their eyes and skin.
Malesinski said
Hightower then smashed
a drinking glass and
stabbed her in the chest
with it, according to
court papers.
Malesinski and
Corcoran were treated at
an area hospital.
Man withdraws guilty plea in chemical assault case
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
Jeremiah Hightower
says he was nervous
when he entered plea
to the charges in June
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
LARKSVILLE
Police arrested a man
Friday on charges he
sexually assaulted three
girls and exposed himself
to a fourth girl during
sleepovers at his house
earlier this year.
Francis Parsons, 43,
of East Fourth Street,
Larksville, was arraigned
by District Judge David
Barilla in Swoyersville on
three counts of corrup-
tion of minors and one
count each of aggravated
indecent assault, inde-
cent assault and indecent
exposure. He was jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $250,000 bail.
According to the crimi-
nal complaint:
Four girls told police
they separately slept over
at Parsons house where
he allegedly exposed him-
self or molested them as
they slept in a bedroom
on while watching a
movie in the living room:
An 11-year-old girl
told police she was awak-
ened when Parsons alleg-
edly exposed himself to
her. She told Parsons to
leave her alone, as he kept
returning to the bedroom
during the night, the
complaint states.
The girl wanted to leave
and called her mother,
but there was no answer.
Before leaving, the girl
told Parsons daughter
about what happened and
the daughter said, It was
just a dream, according
to the complaint.
The girl did not return
to Parsons house except
for a birthday party.
A 12-year-old girl
said she slept on a bed-
room floor and felt
Parsons lying next to
her and inappropriately
touching her, the com-
plaint alleges.
During another
sleepover, the 12-year-old
told police she was awak-
ened when Parsons alleg-
edly touched her. Parsons
jumped up and ran out of
the bedroom, according
to the complaint.
Another 12-year-old
girl claimed she was sit-
ting on a couch watching
a movie when Parsons
exposed himself to her
and told her to be quiet
because his daughter was
in the same room, police
allege in the complaint.
A third 12-year-old
girl claimed she was
awakened by Parsons
lying next to her and
rubbing her thigh, police
said in the complaint. She
rolled over to get away
from him, the complaint
states.
A preliminary hearing
is scheduled on Sept. 19.
WILKES-BARRE A
Dunmore man charged
with selling suspected hero-
in to a police informant was
sentenced Friday to house
arrest a sentence Luzerne
County Judge Michael
Vough said was difcult for
him to hand down.
I would give you two
to four years in prison,
Vough said after sentenc-
ing Sir Anthony Johnson,
31. I have a hard time giv-
ing house arrest to a drug
dealer.
Johnson, who pleaded
guilty to two related charg-
es in April, signed a guilty
plea agreement in which
prosecutors did not oppose
a sentence in the countys
Intermediate Punishment
Program a period of
house arrest and probation.
Because of that agree-
ment with prosecutors,
Vough said, he had to hand
down the two-to-four-year
IPP sentence, with the rst
two years on house arrest
with electronic monitor.
If you come back youre
going to jail, Vough said,
warning Johnson he would
not tolerate a violation of
his house arrest.
Johnson sold suspected
heroin to a police informant
in Avoca in May 2011.
WILKES-BARRE A
man sentenced last month
to six to 12 years in state
prison on charges he stole
more than 500 bronze
vases from three area cem-
eteries says his sentence
was excessive.
Robert Krostag, 46, who
was sentenced by Luzerne
County Judge Michael
Vough on several related
and unrelated charges, led
court papers Friday asking
for a reduced sentence,
based on a claim that his
sentence was excessive
and that they should have
been run concurrently with
each other and not consec-
utively.
Krostag must pay more
than $121,571 in restitu-
tion, including $88,704 to
the Fern Knoll Cemetery
from which many of the
bronze vases were taken.
He previously pleaded
guilty to the charges.
COuRT bRIEfS
Veteran Pa. lawmaker dies after surgery
The Associated Press
HARRISBURG
Longtime state Rep. Dick
Hess, who served 14 terms
in the House and chaired the
Transportation Committee,
died Friday. He was 74.
Hess died from complica-
tions that arose after leg sur-
gery about two weeks ago,
the House speakers ofce
conrmed.
Speaker Sam Smith
said in release that Hess,
R-Bedford, was surrounded
by family members when
he died at UPMC Shadyside
Hospital in Pittsburgh.
Hess was closely involved
in the recent debate about
whether to raise billions
for roads, bridges and mass
transit.
Smith said he and Hess
came to the House as fresh-
men representatives in
1987, and he described Hess
as a good friend, an ally and
a devoted family man.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 5A
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80002629
171 RACE ST., W-B(OfHanover Street) 825-9166
Website www.grumposwarehouse.com
GRUMPOS WaRehOUSe
Hours: Daily 9-5:30, Sun 10-4
2014-2015
2YEAR
PLANNER
$1.00
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and 79 cents each
STARBUCKS
GROUNDCOFFEE
Caramel, Vanilla or
Cinnamon favored
11 oz. $2.49
2014
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Luzerne
570-288-1966 80070869
HANOVER TWP.
Hanover Area School
Superintendent Andrew
Kuhl commended the dis-
tricts Board of Education,
administration, faculty and
staff Thursday for help-
ing to make the rst day
of school, which was also
Thursday, a success. He
also thanked the students
and parents for their coop-
eration with the districts
new dress code.
Parents, you should be
proud, he said. Your chil-
dren looked magnicent
today. You have helped us
to instill a sense of pride
and belonging into our
community and a feeling
of safety in our buildings.
It is this cooperation and
understanding that over
the long term will guide
our children toward great
accomplishments.
Several parents argued
the dress code is too
restrictive and disagreed
with Kuhl that it will pro-
mote a safe environment
and cut down on bully-
ing. One mother pointed
out that kids who bully
other kids because of
their clothes will notice
when students wear
Kmart polo shirts, rather
than Hollister. Most of
the parents argued that
khaki pants wont last as
long as jeans and that the
required clothes are too
expensive and difcult to
nd in special sizes.
A mother of an elev-
enth-grader yelled at the
board from the back of
the auditorium that she
paid $100 for two pairs
of pants that she had to
special order because her
daughter is tall. This
irks me big-time, she
said. She admitted that
something had to be done
about students going
to school with holes in
their jeans and dressing
inappropriately, but that
the rest of the students
shouldnt be punished.
An elementary school
teacher, who didnt want
to be identied, said her
students were proud and
excited about how they
looked on the rst day
of school. She suggest-
ed starting a uniform
exchange program to
save parents money.
Kuhl said the dress code
isnt set in stone and that
ia student advisory board
will make suggestions. He
received dozens of calls
from parents in the last
few days supporting the
dress code and three calls
criticizing it, he said.
This is a living policy,
he said. Well be balanc-
ing the opinions of all.
Concerned about the
increase in violent crimes
in Wilkes-Barre, one
father asked the board
what efforts have been
made to ensure the stu-
dents safety. Kuhl said
the district went through
a safety audit during the
second semester of last
year and several changes
have been made, such as
changing the position of
the surveillance camera.
He added that several
faculty members are also
part of a countywide
security team. A pletho-
ra of information is being
shared behind the scenes
and a tremendous amount
of work is being done by
faculty, staff and adminis-
tration, he said.
In other business, the
board honored Linda
Cywinski and April
Grosky as the most recent
Excellence in Teaching
recipients.
The board also hon-
ored the following district
retirees: Joette Anthony,
36 years of service;
Janet Babskie, 26 years;
Randy Carlo, 35 years;
Marie Davis, 23 years;
Paul Martinez, 37 years;
Palmira Pavlico, 25 years;
Mary Richelmi, 37 years;
and Patricia Sirak, 35
years.
Newschool dress code rankles some at Hanover Area
While uniforms praised by many,
others contend rules too restrictive
CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
PLAINS TWP. A hand-
ful of area community theaters
enable aspiring thespians to
showcase their talents through-
out the year. But theres one area
venue thats perfect for actors
and actresses who enjoy scar-
ing as well as entertaining audi-
ences.
And they get to do it dozens
of times in just 14 nights. The
production is a major fundraiser
for the United Way of Wyoming
Valley.
The spine-chilling set is inside
an old warehouse, high on a hill
in Plains Township in the Trion
Warehouse off Laird Street. Its
the home of Gravestone Manor
a haunted house with a story
to tell. And every year, the story
is different.
One of the people likely to be
helping tell this years story of
murder and mayhem is 66-year-
old Diane Knoll, of Nanticoke,
who was one of about 30 people
of all ages auditioning earlier
this week for a part.
The potential performers
were led into a small, cluttered
room in groups of three and sat
on folding chairs, facing director
Rob Padden, who sat behind a
desk, taking notes. Each actor
took a turn standing and read-
ing separately from a prepared
script. Knoll, a six-year veteran
actress with Gravestone Manor,
was in the rst group to audition
Tuesday night and volunteered
to read rst.
Wedding to remember
This reminds me of the rst
haunted house I ever went to,
Knoll said, the intensity of her
tone mounting with every sen-
tence. It was a really scary story
in which a lot of people died
the night of a wedding. That
haunted house gave me night-
mares for months. They said the
walls were awash with blood and
every guest died, even the bride.
The story said a child was the
culprit of all the grisly murders.
Next up was Amber Kuhl,
30, of Luzerne, who has been
involved with the Gravestone
Manor productions for the past
three years.
Many people, like Kuhl and
Knoll, return year after year, said
Padden. The rst time they
come, theyre a nervous wreck.
Now, its like theyre just up in
front of a family member.
Knoll said she has been act-
ing in haunted houses locally
for more than 30 years. In 1976,
when there were no haunted
houses in the area, she said, she
and a group of friends started
one in Nanticoke at a vacant
house a friend was selling.
First-timers
We only had it for two nights
and charged people 50 cents,
said Knoll. The second night,
we had so many people show
up, we had to call the police to
do crowd control.
And while plenty of veterans
returned to audition, there were
also rst-timers.
Third to read was 15-year-
old Rachael Reese, of Lain
a newbie to haunted house
acting, but no stranger to the
theater. Shes had ensemble
parts in The Rocky Horror
Picture Show and Avenue
Q, she said, and her work at
Gravestone Manor will count
toward her required community
service hours at Holy Redeemer
High School.
I love doing everything the-
ater, Reese said.
Rachael also likes vampires,
according to her mother, Nancy
Reese, who accompanied her to
the audition. Its a good experi-
ence for her. She gets to meet a
lot of people and have some fun.
And she likes Halloween. Its
her favorite holiday.
This years theme
After the three actors n-
ished their solo readings, they
read from a conversation in
another script, conversing with
one another about dreams and
nightmares. And that topic
is the theme for this years
Gravestone Manor, which is
titled Nightfall, said Rick
Markham, project coordinator.
The audience is actu-
ally going to enter someones
dreams and experience what
they experience in different
stages of sleep as they think
back to things from their
childhoods that scared them
or caused them some alarm.
Then, in the world of dreams,
these get morphed into things
that seem to be happening all
around them, Markham said.
Markham, one of the proj-
ect founders 15 years ago, said
the production is meant to to
appeal to people at all different
levels.
So theres a lot of things that
jump out and scare you, but
there are things written on dif-
ferent levels, where we kind of
get into the philosophical ques-
tion of, when youre dreaming
and you interact with other
people in your dreams, how do
you know which one of you is
really real and which one of you
is really dreaming? And we play
around with that concept with
the audience, he said.
Haunted house auditions can rattle the nerves
STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
Would-be performers seek scary roles in United Ways annual Halloween-themed fundraiser
IF YOU GO
What: Gravestone Manor
When: Every Friday, Saturday
and Sunday fromOct. 4-27,
plus sneak previewweekend
showings on Sept. 27 and
28; 7 to 11 p.m. Fridays and
Saturdays and 7 to 9:30 p.m.
on Sundays.
Where: The Trion Warehouse,
1095 Highway 315, Plains
Township, next to and just
north of The Woodlands Inn
and Resort.
What else: Tickets are $10;
credit cards are accepted.
Learn more at www.
GravestoneManor.comor call
570-821-6500.
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Diane Knoll, left, Amber Kuhl and Rachael Reese read lines fromthe upcoming Gravestone Manor productionNightfall
for director Rob Padden, seated, during auditions on Tuesday.
Director Rob Padden listens as actors read parts from the upcoming
Gravestone Manor production. The first time they come (to an audition), he
says, theyre a nervous wreck.
ANDREWWELSH-HUGGINS
AP Legal Afairs Writer
COLUMBUS, Ohio
Cleveland kidnapper Ariel
Castro said he called the
mother of one of his cap-
tives and told the woman her
daughter was alive and had
become his wife, according to
interrogation videotapes.
Castro also told investigators
that authorities missed oppor-
tunities to catch him while he
held the three women captive
for about a decade in a run-
down house where they were
repeatedly beaten and raped.
Castro says in the video
obtained by NBC and
rst reported Friday on the
Today show that he used
Amanda Berrys cellphone to
call her mother. I think I said
something that I have her
daughter and that shes OK,
and that shes my wife now
something like that, you
know, probably not the exact
words, he told investigators.
When asked for the moth-
ers response, Castro said: I
hung up so we didnt have a
conversation.
Castro, 53, was a month
into his life sentence when
he hanged himself in his
prison cell Tuesday night. A
funeral home picked up his
body Friday from the Franklin
County Coroners ofce on
behalf of Castros family.
In the taped interrogation,
Castro also told investigators
that authorities missed oppor-
tunities to catch him while he
held the kidnapped women,
who were ages 14, 16 and 20
when captured.
Castro said cameras in
victim Gina DeJesus school
should have captured him
there 15 minutes before she
was abducted. You could
have broke the case right then
and there, he said.
Castro said a girlfriend once
noticed a TV on in a room
occupied by victim Michelle
Knight and that got him wor-
rying that he might be caught.
Was it a close call? an
investigator said.
Yeah, he said.
Cleveland police did not
respond to requests for com-
ment regarding Castros
claims that there was a missed
opportunity to catch him after
DeJesus disappeared.
Representatives of the
victims did not respond to
messages seeking comment
Friday morning. Berrys
mother, Louwana Miller, died
in 2006.
The Today show report
also provides additional
details about a 2004 note
Castro wrote that investiga-
tors found when they searched
the house. I want to put an
end to my life and let the devil
deal with me, a section of the
note read.
The state is conducting
two reviews related to Castro,
Ohio prisons spokeswoman
JoEllen Smith said. One looks
into the suicide, and the other
examines whether Castro
received proper medical and
mental health care leading up
to the suicide.
MAIDUGURI, NIGeRIA
Military: Strikes
killed 50 rebels
Nigerias military says it raided an
insurgent camp in the northeast and
launched airstrikes over two days, kill-
ing at least 50 sect members.
Military spokesman Lt. Col. Sagir
Musa said Friday that the militarys
newly formed army division, estab-
lished to quell the insurgency in the
northeast, participated in the raid.
This came as residents said nine
people were killed in a highway attack
by the Islamic sect on Thursday at
Bulabulin-Ngabura village, 31 miles
north of Maiduguri, the birthplace of
the Boko Haram insurgency.
Cab driver Musa Lado says he saw
nine corpses along the road, including
a Borno state government adviser. He
said the group also abducted a man,
his wife and two children along the
road.
FALL RIVeR, MAss.
Hernandez enters
not guilty plea
Former New England Patriots star
Aaron Hernandez pleaded not guilty
to a rst-degree murder charge Friday
following his indictment in the killing
of a friend authorities say was shot ve
times in an industrial park.
Hernandez rmly answered not
guilty to six charges, including mur-
der and weapons and ammunition pos-
session charges.
His attorneys agreed ahead of the
hearing that Hernandez, 23, will
continue to be held without bail, but
reserved the right to request bail later.
The next court hearing was set for
Oct. 9.
Defense attorney Charles Rankin
said outside the courthouse that
Hernandezs legal team is condent
the ex-Patriot will be exonerated dur-
ing a trial. Not one shred of evidence
has been presented yet, he said.
The arraignment is like the opening
kickoff, Rankin said. And, he encour-
aged people to keep an open mind and
let the lawyers and the justice system
do their work.
NeWYORK
Crossfre back
with a Ceasefre
After the crossre, CNNs new
debating crew plans a Ceasere.
The network is resurrecting its old
Crossre political debate show start-
ing Monday. CNN Washington Bureau
Chief Sam Feist said Friday that
toward the end of every show, combat-
ants will search for ways they can nd
common ground on an issue. The new
segment will be called Ceasere.
Crossre has been off the air
since 2005 and will return with Newt
Gingrich, S.E. Cupp, Stephanie Cutter
and Van Jones as rotating hosts. They
will debate one issue per night on the
30-minute show.
The hosts said in interviews that
their show will offer genuine debates,
suggesting discussions are often con-
trived on competing cable networks.
JUNeAU, ALAsKA
Cat survives
11-story fall
A house cat in Alaska learned the
hard way not to chase mosquitoes after
following one out a window and falling
11 stories.
The 2-year-old cat, named Wasabi,
survived but suffered a fractured leg
and broken bones.
The mosquito escaped out a
window, and Wasabi went after it.
Stephanie Gustafson said her mother
watched the cat fall.
AP file photo
Convicted kidnapper Ariel Castro,
who committed suicide earlier this
week, had claimed to interrogators
that years ago he contacted the
mother of one of his victims.
AP photo
Rubber duckie, youre so BIG!
Aboater rows past a giant rubber duck created
by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman in an
enclosed branch of the Yongding river in Beijing.
The 59-foot-tall rubber bath toy made its Beijing
debut Friday after previous appearances in
eight major cities around the world.
Video of Ohio kidnapper released
Students
in Boston
get fed
for free
BRIDGET MURPHY
Associated Press
BOSTON Some students
toted lunchboxes to the rst day
of school in Boston this week,
but district administrators are
expecting that could become a
more unusual sight as parents
learn about a federal program
that is now providing all public
school students in the city with
free breakfast and lunch.
The nations oldest school sys-
tem has joined a program of the
U.S. Department of Agriculture
that has spread to 10 states and
the District of Columbia that
offers students two free meals
every school day, whether or not
their families can afford them.
Its one less weight and one
less burden for parents, said
Joshua Rivera, whose son is a
second-grader at the Maurice
J. Tobin School in Bostons
Roxbury section.
Known as Community
Eligibility Option, the program
is part of the Healthy, Hunger-
Free Kids Act of 2010.
For schools to qualify, federal
ofcials said, more than 40 per-
cent of students have to be get-
ting food stamps or aid through
certain other federal assistance
programs.
Besides easing hunger, school
ofcials said, the program elimi-
nates the expense and time of
handling paperwork for students
who qualify for reduced or free
meals and also helps erase a stig-
ma that plagued some students
from poor families.
With the programs adoption
in Boston, education ofcials
said, the city joins schools in
cities including Grand Rapids,
Mich., Atlanta and Washington,
D.C., in a program that will be
available across the country
starting in the 2014-15 school
year.
Efrain Toledano, principal of
the Tobin School in Boston, said
he expects the program will cut
down on potential disruptions
at the K-8 school by easing hun-
ger pangs that could be linked to
classroom misbehavior.
We know that calm stomachs
means calm students who are
ready to learn in classrooms, he
said
Michael Peck, director of
Food and Nutrition Services
for Boston Public Schools, said
76 percent of students already
had qualied for free or reduced
price meals.
He said the program will
save the district money, partly
because ofcials wont have to
hire couriers to drop off and pick
up applications for reduced or
free meals at the citys more than
120 schools.
They also may be able to can-
cel the armored car pickups of
cafeteria money.
Federal program allows
district to serve meals to
all regardless of income
Ofcials in Portland, Ore., and elsewhere mull mandatory parking payments
STEVEN DUBOIS
Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. A blue placard
dangling from the rear-view mirror is
the equivalent of parking gold for driv-
ers in many cities they can park for
free and for as long as they want. Now
theres a gold rush on for them.
And as the number of vehicles dis-
playing a disabled placard has soared
with an aging population and loosened
eligibility standards, cities are seeing
the impact in more congested down-
towns and the loss of millions of dollars
in revenue.
Now, ofcials are pushing back, tight-
ening standards for those who can get
the placards and making sure that the
only people who get the privilege are
those who really need it.
It was astonishing to see car after
car after car with the disabled placard,
said Portland City Commissioner Steve
Novick, who is seeking a solution to the
problem in a city with a reputation for
bicycling and mass transit but still reli-
ant on the car.
In the citys annual survey of rough-
ly 9,000 downtown meters, just over
1,000 vehicles had disabled placards in
October 2012, a 72 percent increase in
ve years. In the core area of downtown,
a third of the vehicles had placards.
As a result, Portland lost an estimated
$2.4 million in meter revenue last year,
and the lack of turnover frustrates store
owners, deprives the severely disabled
of spaces near their destination and
forces drivers to circle blocks in search
of a spot.
Authorities issued 186 citations for
unlawful use of a permit the scal year
ending June 30, but believe there is
more abuse. Cheaters are tough to catch
because the placard is generally valid
and the driver, who might be borrowing
one, is only at the car for a couple of
minutes during the workday.
Experts say the easiest way to stop
abuse is to make the disabled, especially
those not in wheelchairs, pay the meter.
Places such as Philadelphia, Raleigh,
N.C., and Arlington County, Va., did
so and there was more turnover in the
spots.
The Illinois Legislature passed a law
that takes effect next year in which
free-metered parking will be reserved
for only the most severely disabled
residents. It was spurred in part by
Chicagos decision to privatize its park-
ing meters. As part of the deal, it agreed
to reimburse the company for free park-
ing provided to holders of disabled plac-
ards. The tab since 2009: $55 million.
AP photo
Portland officials are considering whether to charge disabled people who are not in wheelchairs for parking rather than allowing those with dis-
abled placards to park for free with no time limit.
Disabled drivers costly to US cities
Hitler bodyguard Rochus Misch dies at 96
DAVID RISING
Associated Press
BERLIN He was Adolf
Hitlers devoted bodyguard
for most of World War II and
the last remaining witness to
the Nazi leaders nal hours
in his Berlin bunker. To the
very end, SS Staff Sgt. Rochus
Misch was proud of it all.
For years, he accompanied
Hitler nearly everywhere he
went, sticking by the man he
affectionately called boss
until the dictator and his
wife, Eva Braun, killed them-
selves as defeat at the hands
of the Allies drew nearer.
The loyal SS ofcer
remained in what he called
the cofn of concrete for
days after Hitlers death,
nally escaping as Berlin
crumbled around him and the
Soviets swarmed the city.
Even in his later years, dur-
ing a 2005 interview with
The Associated Press in
which he recounted Hitlers
claustrophobic, chaotic nal
days, Misch still cut the
image of an SS man. He had
a rigid posture, broad shoul-
ders, neatly combed white
hair and no apologies for
his close relationship with the
most reviled man of the 20th
century.
He was no brute. He was
no monster. He was no super-
man, Misch said.
The 96-year-old Misch died
Thursday, one of the last of a
generation that bears direct
responsibility for German
brutality during World War
II.
In his interview with the
AP, he stayed away from the
central questions of guilt and
responsibility, saying he knew
nothing of the murder of 6
million Jews and that Hitler
never brought up the Final
Solution in his presence.
That was never a topic,
he said emphatically. Never.
In the forward to the
English-language version of
his book, The Last Witness
due for publication in
October he wrote that it
was a different reality then
and he never asked questions
during what he considered
just his regular day at work.
Born July 29, 1917, in
the tiny Silesian town of Alt
Schalkowitz, in what today is
Poland, Misch was orphaned
at an early age.
Against the backdrop of the
bloodyRussianrevolutionand
the rise of Stalin, combined
with the post-World War I
popularity of the Communist
Party in Germany, Misch said
he decided at 20 to join the
SS.
He signed up for the
Leibstandarte SS Adolf
Hitler, a Berlin-based unit
that originally was founded
as the Fuehrers personal
bodyguard.
AP file photo
Adolf Hitlers bodyguard Rochus Misch points to a picture of Hitler he
had taken in Berchtesgarden, Germany, in the early 1940s.
IN BRIEF
PAGE 6A Saturday, September 7, 2013 NATION & WORLD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 7A
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GET YOUR ROOF ON BEFORE WINTER
BEFORE SHINGLE PRICES INCREASE
KINGSTON TWP.
Township police are
investigating an attempt-
ed strong-arm robbery
Thursday at the M&T
Bank branch at the Back
Mountain Shopping
Center in Shavertown.
At about 11:52 a.m.,
the suspect, described
as a white male in his
20s, entered the bank,
approached the teller
and demanded money
be placed into a bag.
The would-be robber
displayed no weapon
and made no threats
to anyone in the bank.
Witnesses said the sus-
pect nervously turned
away empty-handed and
fled on foot.
Township police
are being assisted by
the Federal Bureau
of Investigation and
the Pennsylvania
State Police Forensics
Division.
WILKES-BARRE
City police reported the
following:
William Ricci report-
ed Thursday that some-
one broke into Angelos
Pizzeria, 445 Hazle St.,
at about 2:26 a.m. and
stole cash from the safe.
The suspect appeared to
be a white male, about
5 feet, 8 inches tall with
a medium build, who
was wearing a hoodie,
tan pants, gloves and a
mask. The burglary was
recorded on video sur-
veillance.
It was reported
Thursday afternoon that
someone stole a water
heater and 200 feet of
copper tubing from
a vacant residence in
the 100 block of South
Hancock Street.
Cristal Annessa
Sachs was arrested on
an outstanding warrant
from the Luzerne County
Sheriff s Department
during a traffic stop just
before 8 a.m. Thursday
at East North and North
Main streets, police said.
Jarod C. Golson,
34, was arrested while
police were investigat-
ing a domestic dispute
on North Empire Court
just after 11:30 p.m.
Wednesday night.
Golson was wanted in
Essex County, N.J., and
was charged as a fugitive
from justice, police said.
Michael A.
Kostelnick, 20, was
arrested Thursday on
a bench warrant for
failure to appear in the
Luzerne County Court of
Common Pleas when an
officer making a check
of the Intermodal Center
encountered him in the
stairwell area with two
other men. The officer
stopped the men after he
heard loud voices com-
ing from the stairwell.
WILKES-BARRE
TWP. Township
police reported the fol-
lowing:
Lori Murphy report-
ed on Wednesday that
someone stole her Apple
iPhone 5, valued at $600,
while she was at the
Auntie Anns kiosk at the
Wyoming Valley Mall.
An 11-year-old
girl from Ashley was
arrested Wednesday for
allegedly shoplifting
$13 in merchandise at
Clairs Boutique at the
Wyoming Valley Mall.
She will be charged with
a summary count of
retail theft, police said.
HAZLETON City
police reported the fol-
lowing:
Police are investi-
gating a reported hit-
and-run incident in the
840 block of Roosevelt
Street. Police were told
a white tractor-trailer
struck a fence at about
2:30 p.m. Thursday and
the driver left the scene.
Anyone with infor-
mation should contact
Hazleton police by dial-
ing 911.
Jonathan Fogrety,
17, of Hazleton, was
driving north on Lincoln
Street and attempted
to turn left onto 15th
Street at about 4:30 p.m.
Thursday when his 2002
Acura was struck by a
2012 Toyota that Eden
Moyer, 51, of Hazleton,
who was driving east on
15th Street, police said.
Police said Fogrety
was cited with a stop
sign violation. No inju-
ries were reported. Both
vehicles were towed.
ASHLEY Borough
police said they arrested
a Cook Street resident
Thursday after they
found marijuana plants
growing in his home.
George L. Krisanda,
of 11 Cook St. was
charged with posses-
sion of a controlled
substance, possession
of drug paraphernalia
and possession with the
intent to manufacture or
deliver a controlled sub-
stance, police said.
Krisanda was
arraigned before
District Justice Donald
Whittaker and jailed
at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for
lack of $25,000 bail.
The charges are the
result of a search war-
rant served at Krisandas
residence, where police
said they found evi-
dence of cultivation
including three potted
marijuana plants and
paraphernalia.
POLICE BLOTTER
BLOOMSBURG Aran and
Leann Campas just want to do
what they can to prevent kids
from committing suicide.
The couple, both 39, own
Anatomic Body Arts in
Bloomsburg and they will hold
their 13th charitable fundraiser
Tattoos for Life Sunday.
This will be the second consec-
utive event there to raise money
for the American Foundation
for Suicide Prevention.
The parents of a 19-year-old
daughter and a 15-year old son,
Aran and Leann said recent sui-
cides, especially among teen-
agers, caused them to become
concerned. Add to that the fact
that their children knew a few
of the victims and they decided
to raise money for the founda-
tion.
Last year there were so
many suicides, Aran Campas
said. Our children knew a
few of the kids who commit-
ted suicide so we wanted to get
involved.
Last year the event raised
$1,600 and Aran Campas hopes
to surpass that gure this year.
The issue is still out there
front and center, he said. And
Sept. 8 starts National Suicide
Prevention Week. Thats why
we chose that day for the
event.
The 2nd annual benet will
be held from noon to 8 p.m. at
Anatomic Body Arts, 330 East
5th St., Bloomsburg. The cost
will be $30 a tattoo. Designs
can be viewed on the Tattoos
For Life page as well as the
Anatomic Body Arts Facebook
pages.
Campas said 50 percent of
the money collected will go to
the American Foundation for
Suicide Awareness. In addition,
$15 of every piercing and 25
percent of all jewelry sales will
be donated.
This will be the 13th Tattoos
for Life event, having raised
more than $11,000 for organi-
zations, such as the American
Cancer Society, American
Foundation for Suicide
Prevention and the Make-A-
WishFoundation, he said.
Customers will be taken on
a rst-come, rst-served basis
and no appointments will be
taken. All donations are appre-
ciated, even from people choose
to not get a tattoo or piercing.
Campas said the minimum
donation for a tattoo is $30, but
larger donations will be appre-
ciated. A person must be 18 to
get tattooed, or 16 with paren-
tal consent, he said.
Weekend tattoo fundraiser makes a mark for life
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
TATTOOS FOR LIFE
Noon to 8 p.m. Sunday
Anatomic Body Arts, 330 East 5th St., Bloomsburg
For more information: Call 570-380-1202; or go to www.
facebook.com/AnatomicBodyArts
Cost is $30 per tattoo with several designs fromwhich to
choose. Designs can be viewed on the Tattoos For Life page as
well as the Anatomic Body Arts Facebook pages; 50 percent
of the money collected will go to the American Foundation for
Suicide Awareness; $15 of every piercing and 25 percent of all
jewelry sales also will be donated.
called Bullying and
Suicide Prevention, will
include presentations in
the evenings for parents
and the public.
Halligan, a nation-
ally recognized bullying
and suicide prevention
speaker, will tell the story
of his son, who endured
the torment and ridicule
associated with bullying.
After losing their son,
Halligan and his family
made it their lifes mis-
sion to educate others on
bullying and help encour-
age victims of bullying to
seek assistance. Halligan
has spoken across the
country at many schools
and has created a web-
site www.ryanpatrick-
halligan.org at which
students and victims can
seek information and
assistance.
Halligan will be in
Luzerne County for three
weeks, speaking to high
school audiences and par-
ents groups. Ive never
been booked for that
many weeks in one area,
Halligan, 50, said from
his home in Farmingdale,
Long Island.
Oct. 7 will mark the
10th anniversary of
Ryans death. It was dev-
astating, Halligan said.
The way I climbed out
of that pain was to try to
remember him and honor
him.
In 2003, the term
bullying was not even
coined, Halligan said.
But since his sons death,
Halligan left his job at
IBM and devoted his life
to speaking to kids and
parents.
According to Halligan,
his student presenta-
tion begins with video
of home movie clips and
pictures of Ryan to intro-
duce his son. Halligan
then begins to tell the
story of Ryans life and
the factors that led up to
his sons suicide.
According to the web-
site, the audience gains
a unique perspective from
inside a family of a child
who is a victim of bully-
ing and cyber bullying.
They also gain a deeper
understanding of the dev-
astating impact of a teen
suicide on a family. There
are many powerful life
lessons imparted, includ-
ing forgiveness and find-
ing ways to turn a trag-
edy into hope for others.
On the website,
Halligan says he and his
wife place accountability
for Ryans death foremost
on themselves, but they
have no doubt that bul-
lying and cyber bullying
were significant environ-
mental factors that trig-
gered Ryans depression.
From page 1A
Bullying BULLYING AND SUICIDE
PREVENTION PROGRAM
High school presentations
Sept. 9 Hazleton Area
Sept. 10 Crestwood
Sept. 11 Greater Nanticoke Area
Sept. 12 Northwest Area
Sept. 13 Wyoming Area
Sept. 16 Hanover Area
Sept. 17 Pittston Area
Sept. 18 Wyoming Valley West
Sept. 19 Lake-Lehman
Sept. 20 Dallas
Sept. 23 West Side Vocational-Technical School
Sept. 24 GAR
Sept. 25 Meyers
Sept. 26 Coughlin
Sept. 27 Holy Redeemer
Parents presentations (7 p.m.)
Sept. 10 Hazleton Area
Sept. 12 Northwest Area
Sept. 17 Pittston Area
Sept. 19 Wyoming Valley West
Sept. 23 Misericordia University
Sept. 25 Wilkes University
Sept. 26 McCann School of Business
The Associated Press
NEW YORK A driver
who allegedly posted an
Internet video of him-
self speeding around
Manhattan in just over 24
minutes is facing charges
of reckless driving, author-
ities said Friday.
According to a criminal
complaint charging Adam
Tang with reckless driv-
ing, Tang claimed he never
went over 100 mph and
ran only one red light at a
pedestrian crosswalk.
Tang, 30, appeared
Friday in court in
Manhattan but did not
enter a plea. Bail was set
at $10,000 bond or $5,000
cash. His lawyer did not
respond to a phone mes-
sage seeking comment.
Police had arrested
Tang on Thursday and
seized his 2006 BMW
Z4 after news reports
began surfacing about a
YouTube video, posted
last week by a user called
AfroDuck, that chronicled
the nighttime stunt. A day
before his arrest, Police
Commissioner Raymond
Kelly told reporters that
investigators would
review data from license-
plate readers along Tangs
route.
A dashboard-mounted
camera had recorded the
BMW traveling south on
the FDR Drive from 116th
Street to Battery Park and
then up West Street back
to 116th Street.
Along the 26.4-mile loop,
it stops for six red lights.
Electronic dance music
provides the soundtrack in
the video as a stopwatch
superimposed on the
screen keeps time: 24 min-
utes and 7 seconds. The
driver claimed on tape to
have broken the unofcial
speed record for the same
route.
Man charged after
car caper in NYC
PAGE 8A Saturday, September 8, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477 80022591
ANGELELLA- Magdalene,
funeral Mass 11 a.m. Sept. 21 in
Prince of Peace Parish, St. Marys
Church, West Grace Street, Old
Forge. Friends may call 10:30 a.m.
until Mass.
BUFF - FranklinJr., memorial
service 11 a.m. today in St. Pauls
Evangelical Lutheran Church,
MountainTop.
CONDUSTA- Samuel, funeral
services 2:30 p.m. today at
Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S.
Main St., Plains Township. Friends
may call 1 p.m. to services.
DONAHOE - Dr. Francis, funeral
noon today in Gate of Heaven
Church, 40 Machell Ave., Dallas.
GREEN- Charles, funeral services
noon today in Lord-Bixler Funeral
Home, 1818 Mahantongo St.,
Pottsville. Friends may call 11 a.m.
to services.
HOWARD- Dorothy, celebration
of life service 11 a.m. today at
Knifen OMalley Funeral Home,
465 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 10 a.m. to
service.
HUMENANSKI - Leocadia,
funeral services 11:30 a.m. today
at Jendrzejewski Funeral Home,
21 N. Meade St., Wilkes-Barre.
Mass of Christian Burial noon in
Our Lady of Hope Parish, Park
Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call 10 a.m. to services.
JACKSON- Dawn, celebration of
life 2 p.m. today at 879 St. Johns
Road, Drums.
KEIPER-QUINN- Linda,
memorial service 1 p.m. today in
Faith Lutheran Church, 550 Route
940, Blakeslee. Friends may call
noon to service.
KOTZ - Florence, funeral services
10 a.m. today at Grontkowski
Funeral Home P.C., 51-53W. Green
St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian
Burial 10:30 a.m. in St. Faustina
Parish, Holy Trinity Worship Site,
520 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke.
MARTIN- Florence, celebration
of life 8:30 a.m. today at
McLaughlins The Family
Funeral Service, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral Mass 9:30 a.m. in the
Church of the Maternity of the
BlessedVirgin Mary, Park Avenue,
Wilkes-Barre.
MUNLEY - James Jr., celebration
of life with funeral Mass 9:30 a.m.
today in the Church of St. Patrick,
Parrish Street, Wilkes-Barre.
PARKER- Charles, celebration of
life noon today in Bethel African
Methodist Episcopal Church, 716
N. WashingtonAve., Scranton.
PATRICIAN- Zachry, memorial
Mass 11 a.m. today at Holy Name
of Jesus Church, Nanticoke.
REAKES- Bettie, funeral services
10 a.m. today at Clarke Piatt
Funeral Home, 6 Sunset Lake
Road, Hunlock Creek.
RHOADS- Dorene, memorial
services 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28 in
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. Friends may call 10 a.m.
to services.
SIMKULAK- Brian, memorial
service 10 a.m. today in St. John
the Evangelist Church, Pittston.
STEPANSKI - Stephen, friends
may call 2 to 4 p.m. today at E.
Blake Collins Funeral Home, 159
George Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
WAGNER- Albert, memorial
service noon today inTrinity
Lutheran Church, 205W. Grove
St., Clarks Summit. Friends may
call 10 a.m. to service. All are
invited to a luncheon to followin
the churchs banquet hall.
WALL - HaroldJr., memorial
service 4 p.m. Sunday in
Centermoreland United
Methodist Church, 17 Creamery
Road, Centermoreland. Friends
may call 3 p.m. to service.
YANIELLO- Evelyn, memorial
service and celebration of life
today in St. Joseph Marello
Church, WilliamStreet, Pittston.
Gathering 9 to 11 a.m. with
Christian Mass following.
ZIBUCK- Arlene, funeral services
9:30 a.m. today at Andrew
Strish Funeral Home, 11 Wilson
St., Larksville. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in Holy Family
Parish, Luzerne. Friends may call
8:30 a.m. to services.
FUNERALS
THOMAS P.
SIMONCAVAGE, 58, a resident
of Dallas, passed away unexpect-
edly on Thursday evening at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
His loving wife is Karen M.
(Golanoski) Simoncavage.
Together, Thomas and Karen
shared 36 wonderful years of
marriage.
Funeral arrangements are
pending and have been entrust-
ed to the care of the Grontkowski
Funeral Home P.C., 51-53 W.
Green St., Nanticoke. Acomplete
obituary will appear in Mondays
edition of the newspaper.
KENNETH A. ORKWIS,
64, of West Vaughn Street,
Kingston, died on Friday at
Hospice Community Care Unit,
Wilkes-Barre, surrounded by his
family.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Hugh B.
Hughes & Son Inc. Funeral
Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort. A complete obituary
will appear in Sundays edition.
ROBERT R. TINO
BREZ BEREZNAK, 61, of
Drums, passed away Thursday
evening at Abington Memorial
Hospital.
Arrangements are incom-
plete and will be announced
in Mondays edition. Harman
Funeral Homes & Crematory
Inc. (East), 669 W. Butler Drive,
Drums, is assisting the family
with the arrangements.
RICHARD SWARTZ
Sept. 5, 2013
Richard Swartz, 33, of West
Main Street, Plymouth, died
Thursday evening.
He was born in Wilkes-
Barre, a son of the late Wayne
and Beverly Miles Swartz. He
attended E.L. Meyers High
School.
Rich enjoyed spending time
in the outdoors and with his
family and friends.
In addition to his parents,
he was preceded in death by
his grandparents, John and
Elizabeth Miles and Earl and
Perma Swartz.
He is survived by sisters,
Rebecca Swartz, Plymouth
Township, Diane Grigas, New
York, Clydeine Swartz, Wilkes-
Barre, and Kimberly Swartz,
Plymouth; brothers, Wayne
Swartz, Plymouth, and Thomas
Swartz, Nanticoke; and 25 niec-
es and nephews.
A memorial service will
be held at 7 p.m. Sunday at
the William A. Reese Funeral
Chapel, Rear 56 Gaylord Ave.,
Plymouth. Friends may call from
5 p.m. until time of service.
DOLORES (TOSLIN) KOZEMKO
Sept. 5, 2013
Dolores (Toslin) Kozemko,
82, a resident of Wilkes-Barre
and formerly of both the Miners
Mills section of Wilkes-Barre
and Swoyersville, passed away
peacefully on Thursday morn-
ing at Timber Ridge Health
Care Center, Wilkes-Barre, fol-
lowing a brief illness.
Her husband was the late
Andrew M. Kozemko, who
passed away on Jan. 16, 2006.
Together, Andrew and Dolores
shared 53 years of marriage.
Born on Nov. 6, 1930, in
Swoyersville, Dolores was a
daughter of the late James
(Tuzzolino) Toslin and Mildred
(Peeler) Toslin.
Raised in Swoyersville,
Dolores was a graduate of
the former Swoyersville High
School, class of 1948.
Prior to retirement, Dolores
was employed for 44 years by
various garment manufacturers
in the Wyoming Valley.
Dolores was a member of
St. Nicholas Roman Catholic
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Active within her commu-
nity, Dolores was a member
of the Cosmopolitan Seniors
Club, the Firwood Senior
Citizens Club and the Miners
Mills Senior Citizens Club.
A woman of many enjoy-
ments, Dolores greatly enjoyed
going on cruises, bus trips and
her get-togethers with her
Red Hat Ladies, the Lilies of
the Valley and the Ramblin
Roses.
Dolores greatest love in life
was for her family and friends.
Her sons and grandsons meant
the world to her and she
regarded her daughter-in-law
as the best daughter-in-law
anyone could ever have. As
for her friends, Dolores would
often say how much her friends
meant to her and how she had
the best friends in the world.
In addition to her parents,
James and Mildred Toslin, and
her husband, Andrew, Dolores
was preceded in death by her
son, Barry Kozemko Sr., who
passed away on Sept. 25, 2005;
and her brother, James Toslin
Jr.
Dolores is survived by her
son, Mark Kozemko and his
wife, Yvonne, Plains Township;
her grandsons, Jason Kozemko
and his wife, Patty, West
Pittston, Ryan Kozemko
and his wife, Jessica, Plains
Township, and Barry Kozemko
Jr.; her great-grandchildren,
Ava Kozemko and Samantha
and Stephanie Sepko; her sis-
ter, Marlene Grifth, Wilkes-
Barre; and her nieces and
nephews.
Dolores and her family thank
the many doctors, nurses and
support staff at both Geisinger
Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre,
and the Timber Ridge Nursing
Facility for their outstanding
and compassionate care.
Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited to attend
the funeral which will be con-
ducted at 8:45 a.m. Monday
from the Wroblewski Funeral
Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort, followed by
a Mass of Christian Burial to
be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. in
St. Nicholas Church, 226 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre,
with Dolores cousin, the Rev.
Walter Jenkins, ofciating.
Private entombment will follow
in St. Marys Roman Catholic
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Family and friends are invited
to call 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the
funeral home.
For additional information,
or to send the Kozemko family
an online message of condo-
lence, visit the funeral homes
website, www.wroblewskifu-
neralhome.com.
The family has requested
that owers kindly be omit-
ted and that memorial contri-
butions be made in Dolores
memory to the SPCA of
Luzerne County, 524 E. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702.
GLENYS D. SCHYDLOWSKI
Sept. 6, 2013
Glenys D. Schydlowski, 82, of
Plains Township, passed away
Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, at Hospice
Community Care of Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre.
Born Sept. 6, 1931, in
Oswestry, Wales, she was a
daughter of the late John and
Catherine Needham Ellis.
She was a member of Holy
Savior Church of St. Andre
Bessette Parish, Wilkes-Barre.
Glenys was employed in the
garment industry and was a
member of the International
Ladies Garment Workers
Union. She was also employed
for many years by the Child
Development Council of
Northeastern Pennsylvania.
She loved animals, especially
her dog, Maggie. Her love and
compassion for animals led her
to become a longtime volunteer
at the Luzerne County SPCA.
She also enjoyed gardening,
owers and trips to the Mohegan
Sun casino and Atlantic City.
She was preceded in death by
her brothers, Vic, Glyn, Ron and
Ralph.
Surviving are her husband,
Stanley, with whom she shared
56 years of marriage; daughter,
Karen Schydlowski and her part-
ner, Tammy Greer, Dallas; and
sister, Beryl Taylor, England.
Funeral will be held at 8:45
a.m. Monday fromthe Bednarski
Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming, with a Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in
Holy Savior Worship Site of St.
Andre Bessette Parish, Wilkes-
Barre. Interment will be held
in Ss. Peter and Paul Cemetery,
Plains Township. Friends may
call from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday at
the funeral home.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made in
Glenys memory to the SPCA,
524 E. Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18702.
RAYJOE NEARE SR.
Sept. 6, 2013
Ray Joe Neare Sr., 70, of
Pittston Township, passed away
Friday at home surrounded by
his family.
Born in Pittston on June 16,
1943, he was a son of the late
Raphael and Arbida Chaump
Neare.
He attended Pittston
Township schools and was
the owner/operator of Neare
Trucking for 50 years. He was
a member of St. Joseph Marello
Parish, Pittston. He enjoyed
cooking and hosting family
cookouts.
He was a loving husband,
father and grandfather and will
be truly missed.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by his
son, Ray Joe Neare Jr., in 2002;
and a stepsister, Ann Osticco.
Surviving are his wife of
48 years, Carol Kozak Neare;
daughter, Cheryl Chilson and
her husband, Mark, Pittston
Township; four grandchildren,
Sean, Alyssa, Zachary and Alek;
and a great-granddaughter,
Kaliarah.
The family thanks Dr.
Stephanie Cabello, Angels
Touch Home Health and the
Hospice of the Sacred Heart
for the compassionate care pro-
vided to Ray Joe.
A memorial Mass will be cel-
ebrated at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 14 in
St. Joseph Marello Parish, 237
William St., Pittston. Those
attending are asked to go direct-
ly to the church. Interment will
be at the convenience of the fam-
ily.
Arrangements are entrusted
to the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral
Home, 251 William St., Pittston.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadoniziofu-
neralhome.com.
DONALD T. TYSON
Sept. 4, 2013
Donald T. Tyson, 82,
of Exeter, passed away
Wednesday.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on
Dec. 24, 1930, he was a son
of the late William and Mabel
(Cunningham) Tyson.
Donald proudly served his
county in the U.S. Army dur-
ing the Korean War. He worked
as a self-employed painter and
also at Interfaith Company.
He enjoyed going to the Oak
Grove Club, Goose Island, for
more than 56 years.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by broth-
ers, Robert and Bill Tyson; sis-
ter, Mary June Smith; and step-
son, Gary Olowiany.
Left to honor his memory
are his sons, Donald Tyson,
Wilkes-Barre, John Tyson
and his wife, Kerry, Fla., and
Robert Tyson, Wilkes-Barre;
daughters, Nancy Margavage
and her husband, Bruce,
Larksville, Donna Tyson,
Exeter, Mary Bowers and her
husband, Paul, Harrisburg, and
Cheryl Fassl and her husband,
Bob, of the Poconos region; 16
grandchildren; numerous great-
grandchildren; and stepsons,
Jerry and Steve Olowiany.
The service will
be held at 7:30 p.m.
Monday from Kniffen
OMalley Funeral
Home, 465 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre. The Rev. John Green
from Paxton Presbyterian
Church, Harrisburg, will of-
ciate. Family and friends may
visit from 6 p.m. until the time
of service. Interment will be
private.
Online condolences can be
sent to www.bestlifetributes.
com.
OBITUARY
POLICY
The Times Leader
publishes free
obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit,
and paid obituaries,
which can run with a
photograph. Afuneral
home representative
can call the obituary
desk at 570-829-
7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or
email to ttlobits@
civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email,
please call to confrm.
Obituaries must be
submitted by 7:30
p.m. for publication
in the next edition.
Obituaries must be
sent by a funeral
home or crematory,
or must name
who is handling
arrangements, with
address and phone
number.
WASHINGTON The
government is aware of no
credible or specic infor-
mation that points to any
terror plot tied to the anni-
versary of the September
2001 attacks, according to
a new condential threat
assessment from the FBI
and Homeland Security
Department obtained by
The Associated Press.
The new assessment,
dated Thursday, said
that intelligence agencies
remain concerned that al-
Qaida and its afliates are
committed to carrying out
attacks on Western tar-
gets. But it said there was
no information pointing
to any known plot. The
bulletin made no mention
of Syria, even as President
Barack Obama sought
congressional approval to
use military force against
the Syrian government.
Four Americans were
killed in an attack on
the U.S. consulate in
Benghazi, Libya, on last
years anniversary. Three
others were killed and
more than 260 others were
injured when two men set
off bombs near the nish
line of the popular Boston
Marathon in April. There
was no specic or credible
intelligence about those
attacks, either.
The terror threat to
the U.S. is different than
it was 12 years ago. In
2001, there was credible
intelligence about a ter-
ror plot, but that informa-
tion wasnt shared with
the right people. Today,
the threat is more diffuse.
Cyberattacks threaten to
disrupt major U.S. opera-
tions in the government
and the private sector.
Lone actors represent
another threat one or
two people who are not
directly afliated with al-
Qaida but who subscribe
to the terror groups ide-
ology and want to strike
out because they disagree
with U.S. policies.
Today, ofcials are con-
cerned about retaliatory
strikes if Obama moves
forward with plans to
use military force against
Syrian President Bashar
Assads regime, which the
administration condemns
for the death of 1,429
in a chemical weapons
attack on Aug. 21 near
Damascus. Assads gov-
ernment blames the epi-
sode on rebels who have
been seeking to overthrow
his government. Iraqi of-
cials and militant groups
have said that Iranian-
backed Shiite militias are
threatening to retaliate
against American inter-
ests inside Iraq if the U.S.
goes ahead with strikes,
as Tehran is a close ally of
Assad.
The FBI has been
reviewing old case les
involving Hezbollah and
Irans Quds Force, reach-
ing out to its sources to
see whether they know
anything new, a law
enforcement ofcial said.
The ofcial offered few
details about the outreach
and spoke on condition
of anonymity because
the ofcial did not want
to publicize the bureaus
investigative strategies.
In its intelligence bulle-
tin, the FBI and Homeland
Security Department
reminded law enforce-
ment of activity that could
indicate a planning for an
attack, such as surveil-
lance and questions about
security operations. They
also provided tips to avoid
Internet denial of service
attacks, such as a warning
Aug. 27 from a Tunisian
hacker group.
FBI, DHS:
No specifc
9/11 threat
Although intelligence
agencies remain
concerned about
al-Qaida attacks, these
threats are more difuse.
EILEEN SULLIVAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
The Food and Drug
Administration says con-
sumers shouldnt worry
too much about levels
of arsenic in rice but
should vary their diets
just in case.
The agency released a
study Friday of arsenic
in 1,300 samples of rice
and rice products that is
the largest study to date
looking at the carcino-
gens presence in that
grain. Consumer groups
have pressured the FDA
to set a standard for the
amount of arsenic that
can be present in rice
products.
The study shows vary-
ing levels, with the most
arsenic in brown rice and
the least in instant rice.
Infant cereal and infant
rice formulas are also at
the low end of the spec-
trum.
The FDA says the
amounts are so small
that rice is safe to eat and
there isnt any concern of
immediate or short-term
adverse health effects.
But the agency said it is
still studying the long-
term effects of consum-
ing rice.
Rice is thought to have
arsenic in higher levels
than most other foods
because it is grown in
water on the ground,
optimal conditions for
the contaminant to be
absorbed.
Arsenic is naturally
present in water, air, food
and soil in two forms,
organic and inorganic.
Organic arsenic passes
through the body quickly
and is essentially harm-
less. Inorganic arsenic
the type found in some
pesticides and insecti-
cides can be toxic and
may pose a cancer risk if
consumed at high levels
or over a long period.
The FDA is looking
into how much organic
and inorganic arsenic
rice eaters are con-
suming, and whether
those levels are danger-
ous. The agency will
conduct a risk assess-
ment with the National
Institutes of Health
and the Environmental
Protection Agency to
further measure those
effects.
The government, along
with the public health
community, has long
encouraged consumers to
vary their diets to mini-
mize risk. Pediatricians,
for example, have moved
away from only recom-
mending rice cereal as
a babys first solid food.
There is evidence that
other grains and even
meats and fruits and
vegetables can be just as
healthy, says Dr. Stephen
Daniels of Childrens
Hospital Colorado, the
chairman of the nutri-
tion committee of the
American Academy of
Pediatrics.
Daniels said the FDA
results are reassuring in
many ways and parents
who have been giving
their infants rice cereal
should not be concerned.
Average levels of arse-
nic in the study ranged
from 2.6 to 7.2 micro-
grams of inorganic arse-
nic per serving. Though
the long-term effects
are still unknown, that
amount is tiny a
microgram is one-mil-
lionth of a gram.
Still, it is almost impos-
sible to say how danger-
ous these levels are with-
out a benchmark from
the federal government.
The advocacy group
Consumer Reports,
which is pushing for FDA
to create standards, uses
New Jerseys drinking
water standard a max-
imum of 5 micrograms
in a liter of water as
comparison because it is
one of the strictest in the
country. But it is unclear
how accurate it is to com-
pare the risk of arsenic
consumption in water
and the risk of consump-
tion in rice, as most peo-
ple consume more water
than rice.
The FDA study looked
at rice from the United
States, with some of the
highest levels of arsenic
found in rice grown in
Southern states. It also
looked at rice from Asia.
The FDA said its study
was not large enough to
evaluate specific brands.
FDA toxicologist
Suzanne C. Fitzpatrick
said that because arsenic
is naturally occurring it
is going to be in food, and
because rice is grown in
water it will always have
higher levels.
Its not something
that we can just pull off
the market, she said.
The rice industry said
Friday that it is work-
ing with the FDA and
is encouraged by the
results of the study. The
industry has been study-
ing how to reduce arse-
nic levels, including dif-
ferent ways to manage
the water in which rice
is grown, and looking at
processing and rinsing
methods to see if there
are ways to reduce arse-
nic levels.
Consumer groups said
they also are pleased
that the FDA is taking
a hard look at arsenic in
rice. Urvashi Rangan of
Consumer Reports said
the group hopes the FDA
eventually sets specific
guidelines for arsenic so
growers will implement
more steps to rid rice of
the carcinogen.
Dr. Steven Abrams of
Texas Childrens Hospital
agreed that varying diet
is the way to go. Rice is
a healthy food but its not
the only healthy food,
he said.
Still, parents should
not overreact and shy
away from rice complete-
ly, he said. We dont
want to over-interpret
the concerns so that we
dont give kids the foods
that they need, Abrams
said.
FDAstudy says amount of arsenic in rice is low
While the agency says there is no cause for short-term
concern, it will continue to study long-term efects
MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press
For all the new things that schools
will be called on to teach under the
soon-to-be-implemented Common
Core curriculum standards, its a skill
that has been omitted that is causing
controversy: cursive writing. Good
old script penmanship isnt part of the
standards, which have been adopted by
45 states. Its not forbidden or discour-
aged, but Common Core focuses on
analytical and computer-based skills
rather than the long hours of practice
required to link letters in a owing
style. Testing, note-taking and writing
for academia and business are increas-
ingly accomplished via keyboard, not
pencil or pen and legal pad.
Several states have kept require-
ments for cursive instruction, but many
others appear ready for its demise. The
handwriting might be on the wall.
Thats OK. States and schools
shouldnt cling to cursive based on the
romantic idea that its a tradition, an
art form or a basic skill whose disap-
pearance would be a cultural tragedy.
Of course, everyone needs to be able to
write without computers, but longhand
printing generally works ne. Many of
todays young adults, even though they
were taught cursive, have abandoned it
in favor of printing. Print is clearer and
easier to read than script. For many, its
easier to write and just about as fast.
Some educators claim that cursive
writing plays a role in brain and overall
academic development, but others dis-
agree and say what the studies actually
show is that any form of hand letter-
ing, including print, engages more of
the brain than keyboarding does.
When society adds new skills and
new knowledge to the list of things
public schools teach, some other items
have to come off the list. Otherwise,
the result is a curriculum that is a mile
wide and an inch deep. Cursive might
be one skill that can be painlessly
dropped to make way for new ones.
Because so many adults still com-
municate in cursive, perhaps whats
needed is a transition during which
students still learn to read it that
can be taught relatively quickly but
no longer go through the laborious pro-
cess of learning to write it.
This isnt a popular notion with
many parents. We all tend to think of
what we learned in school as basic
to an educated populace. How can
young people do without it? Easily, as
they already are proving. As easily as
replacing the old John Hancock with a
ngerprint scan.
Los Angeles Times
OTHER OPINION: WRITING LONGHAND
Dont lament fate
of cursive writing
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
As you know, there are some sig-
nicant changes happening to health
care and health insurance as a result
of the Affordable Care Act, or ACA,
which is also referred to as Health
Care Reform. The ACA has numerous
and complex provisions, and is pri-
marily intended to help more people
access and afford health care coverage
regardless of their health status. But
like many laws, it is complicated.
Some provisions of the law are
already in place, but other important
changes are yet to come. Lets take a
look at some of the key provisions of
the law that will take effect on Jan. 1.
Whats changing?
Virtually every American will be
required to have qualifying health cov-
erage beginning Jan. 1, 2014.
Most individuals who do not have
qualifying coverage and who choose
not to purchase coverage will be sub-
ject to penalties, with few exceptions.
In 2014 the penalty will be $95
per adult and $47.50 per child (up
to $285 for a family) or 1 percent of
family income, whichever is greater.
Penalties will increase each year.
For example, in 2016, the penalty
will have risen to $695 per adult and
$347.50 per child (up to $2,085 for
a family) or 2.5 percent of family
income, whichever is greater.
Currently, children under age
19 with an illness or disability, often
called a pre-existing condition, can-
not be denied coverage. As of Jan. 1,
the same will also apply to adults.
Individuals who do not have
coverage through their employer, or
through a government program such
as Medicare or Medicaid, will be able
to buy insurance direct-
ly in the private insur-
ance market or through
a state- or federally-
operated (also called
public) marketplace,
commonly referred to
as an exchange.
The public market-
place will be an online
site at which consumers
can view and compare
plans from multiple
insurance companies,
make their purchasing
decision and enroll. Each state had
the option to create and operate its
own marketplace or to default to the
Federally Facilitated Marketplace.
Pennsylvania chose to default.
Financial assistance in the form
of federal tax credits and cost-share
subsidies will be available from the
government to help those who qualify
pay their insurance and health care
costs. To access nancial assistance,
you must access coverage through the
public marketplace.
Open enrollment is slated to start
on Oct. 1 for coverage that will become
effective on Jan. 1.
Are there standards that plans will
have to meet to be offered on the mar-
ketplace?
All qualifed health plans will be
required to cover 10 Essential Health
Benet categories.
Plans will be assigned a metal level
(bronze, silver, gold or platinum) to
help shoppers understand how much
they will pay and how much the plan
will pay toward medical care costs.
Plans being offered must pay at
least 60 percent of the average health
care costs.
Rates for medical plans can no lon-
ger be different based upon gender or
medical condition.
Is there anything I need to do right
now?
You might need to take action after
the marketplace opens on Oct. 1 if your
employer doesnt offer qualied health
insurance or if you are not covered by
an existing government plan such as
Medicaid or Medicare.
Start to prepare by gathering Social
Security numbers (or documents for
legal immigrants), birth dates, pay
stubs, W-2 forms or wage and tax state-
ments for you and any family members
who will be seeking coverage. Policy
numbers for any current health insur-
ance, or information about any health
insurance you or your family could be
eligible for through your jobs, will also
be helpful.
To learn more about Health Care
Reform, visit www.healthcare.
gov or Blue Cross of Northeastern
Pennsylvanias enhanced website www.
bcnepa.com/reform.
Paul Holdren is senior vice president and chief
marketing ofcer at Blue Cross of Northeastern
Pennsylvania, based in Wilkes-Barre.
COMMENTARY: PAUL HOLDREN
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 9A
Editorial
State lawmakers should pass a bill
proposed by state Rep. Stephen Bloom
that would prioritize bridge repairs
over other transportation projects.
The proposal would direct the state
Department of Transportation to pay
for repairs on bridges that recently
were given tighter weight restrictions.
Bloom says hes worried that rst
responders would be slowed because
their heavy equipment might not meet
the new restrictions.
Hes right, and PennDOT should put
the kibosh on any project it can safely
stall to address that problem.
Getting PennDOT to do that,
though, would take an act of state law-
makers.
On Wednesday, Bloom announced
the bill. It would require PennDOT
to place critical bridge repairs over
other construction projects, be that
a highway reconstruction program
or bike paths. He makes a reasonable
argument that we need to focus on
the must-haves rather than the nice-to-
haves. I am not trying to say that all the
other areas of transportation spending
are unimportant.
Bloom stresses that some heavy
equipment used by emergency
responders, be it re engines or some
ambulances, would not meet the new
weight requirements on some 1,000
bridges across Pennsylvania.
PennDOT Secretary Barry Schoch
said weight restrictions were tightened
because PennDOTs funding remains
in doubt. The legislature failed earlier
this year to agree on a comprehensive
transportation spending plan.
If state lawmakers cant agree on a
transportation spending plan, they at
least should agree that Blooms bill is
right on the mark.
The Sentinel, Carlisle
OTHER OPINION: PA. TRANSPORTATION
Make bridge repairs
a priority through law
King would fght
for animal rights
The 50th anniversary of Martin
Luther King Jr.s March on
Washington was observed with
marches, speeches and speculation on
what causes Dr. King would embrace
today.
He certainly would continue to
work for racial equality. But he also
would likely advocate for a rapid with-
drawal from Afghanistan, workers
rights, gay rights and animal rights.
Yes, animal rights. Although he
is best known for advocacy of racial
equality, Dr. King opposed all vio-
lence, like the Vietnam War. And
there is no greater violence than that
perpetrated each day against billions
of cows, pigs and other sentient ani-
mals in Americas factory farms and
slaughterhouses.
The day before his assassination in
1968, Dr. King arrived in Memphis
to champion the most oppressed
human beings in America at the time:
African-American sanitation work-
ers. Today, it would also be about
the most oppressed living beings in
America: animals raised for food,
experiments and entertainment.
Although Dr. King never lived long
enough to extend his circle of com-
passion, justice and nonviolence to
non-human animals, his wife Coretta
Scott King and his son Dexter Scott
King did by embracing the vegan life-
style. A great way for us to honor the
King legacy is to follow their lead.
Trenton Lloyd
Wilkes-Barre
Visit cant erase
Obamas failures
The Obie and Joey Show, complete
with parked presidential aircraft at
the airport, lacked only one asset:
Michelles 747, also parked there, as
she and family lost a golden opportu-
nity to vacation in the Poconos.
It seemed that the shows intent
was not to remind us about jobs and
education; rather, it reminded that
the heart of the valley was again
being tugged at as the only place left
in the country to lend approval to an
administrations decades-long inabil-
ity to sell such bills of goods to its
people. How can they fool us today?
Of course, honor was sought by the
usual politicians in good standing,
despite the fact the short show in
total amounted to about the newest
thing since sneakers.
The parking of aircraft lasts a day;
the failures of an administration to
conduct the peoples business hon-
estly do not persuade.
Edziu Antek Silvent
West Wyoming
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR
SEND US YOUR OPINION
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Prepare for changes in health care
Paul
Holdren
Contributing
Columnist
By licensing casinos, Pennsylvania
makes legal in them a form of gambling
thats outlawed in bars, restaurants and
private clubs where municipalities
charge hundreds of dollars annually to
register video poker machines, electron-
ic slots and other devices. Its blatant
government hypocrisy at both the state
and local levels that needs to end.
The machines that municipalities
register almost always are marked for
amusement only pro forma nods
toward the illegality of payouts to win-
ning players and such modications as
knock-off switches that erase game
credits. Matching those nods are the
winks from local ofcials who cynically
pretend its all on the up-and-up while
reaping registration revenue and are
quick to ponticate when law enforcers
raid such machines in their communi-
ties. Witness Thursdays big gambling
raid in McKeesport.
Meanwhile, lawenforcers and the casi-
no industry warn that these machines
are rigged so the house always wins in
the end as if thats not just as true of
casino gambling. And struggling small
businesses risk nes and loss of liquor
licenses for daring to seek a tiny piece
of this gambling action, worth $13 bil-
lion-plus since Pennsylvanias rst legal
casino opened in 2007.
Its timetodoawaywithall thepretens-
es surrounding this issue. Legalize video
poker and slots for restaurants, bars and
private clubs and let Pennsylvanias gov-
ernment-sanctioned casinos compete
without legally enforced hypocrisy that
ensures only their houses ultimately win.
PittsburghTribune-Review
OTHER OPINION: VIDEO POKER
End gambling hypocrisy
parent and taxpayer sup-
ports Wyoming Area teach-
ers. Give them a contract.
Saunders has rst-hand
knowledge that the district
teachers are dedicated and
produce great results, he
said. He has received phone
calls and emails regarding
his children from teachers
working after school hours
even one email that was
time-stamped at 1:30 a.m.,
he said.
Whenever my wife and
I have had an issue with
our childrens education,
the teachers have always
been there for us, no mat-
ter what time, he said. We
are extremely pleased with
the quality of education our
kids are receiving.
Saunders said he has
three children in elemen-
tary school and one in high
school. He called a teacher
on a Thursday evening and
had a two-hour conversa-
tion about one of his chil-
dren on how to resolve a
particular issue, he said.
Now, that teacher, to
me, is worth $100,000,
he said. As far as Im con-
cerned, these teachers put
the time in and then some.
They are always available
and they care. They are 100
percent committed to their
students.
Another person joining
the picket line this week
was attorney Michael
Cefalo, who said his father
was an international union
representative for more
than 40 years. He always
taught me that unless you
know where you come
from, youll never under-
stand who you really are,
Cefalo said.
Based on that philoso-
phy, said Cefalo, he is sup-
porting the teachers, and
he urged both sides to get
together to get a resolution.
Im sure this is frustrat-
ing for everybody, he said.
Taxpayers fear tax hikes,
the board feels it cant
afford to pay more and
the teachers feel they are
underpaid.
Cefalo, who graduated
from West Pittston High
School nowMontgomery
Avenue Elementary said
the Wyoming Area district
is a close-knit community.
I sometimes wonder how
this will affect the people,
he said.
Day in the park
Connie Dominick, wife
of school board member Gil
Dominick, was at the Butler
Street Park with her two
grandchildren: Miranda
and Logan Dominick, twins
who are in the fourth grade.
She talked about the strike
and its effects.
Wed all like to see them
in school, she said. But
you really cant get blood
from a stone. How much
more can people give?
The school board is try-
ing to get the situation
resolved; her husband is
constantly attending meet-
ings to try to come up with
a resolution, she said.
What do the school
members get paid? she
asked, noting that the elect-
ed positions are unpaid.
Nobody wants to raise
taxes. If taxes keep going
up, nobody will be able to
afford anything.
Dominick didnt agree
with teachers picketing the
business of school board
President JohnBolin, owner
of Flowers by Lucille. I just
dont get that, she said.
Bolin was not at his busi-
ness Friday morning and he
did not return a message
left with an employee of the
ower shop.
Gil Dominick has been a
school board member spo-
radically for more than 20
years. Both sides are at fault
and should share the blame
for the situation.
Well meet any time they
want, Dominick said.
Also at Butler Park was
Lisa Ciampi and her three
children: second-grader
Louis, Nicholas, a kinder-
garten student and 2-year-
old Mia.
We just want whats best
for everybody, said Ciampi,
a former teacher. We know
the teachers, school board
and parents dont want a
strike. We just want the best
possible resolution.
Ciampi said the district
has a great reputation for
quality education and she
realizes the teachers are
among the lowest paid in
the county. We see both
sides, but why are they the
lowest paid? she asked.
Teachers are so important.
Look at what happened
in Newtown (Conn.). Im
sure our teachers would do
everything they could do to
protect my kids.
Ted Richard and Patty
Phares operate West Side
Chili Dog and Deli on
Luzerne Avenue. They have
been offering hoagies at dis-
counted prices for the teach-
ers walking the picket line.
We want to support
them, our community and
our schools, Phares said.
We dont want them to go
elsewhere. We want to keep
these excellent teachers at
Wyoming Area.
PAGE 10A Saturday, September 7, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
88/70
Chihuahua
82/58
Los Angeles
89/68
Washington
81/65
New York
78/66
Miami
89/76
Atlanta
88/70
Detroit
84/66
Houston
95/74
Kansas City
94/72
Chicago
87/68
Minneapolis
90/63
El Paso
89/71
Denver
94/62
Billings
84/61
San Francisco
82/58
Seattle
75/58
Toronto
74/57
Montreal
68/55
Winnipeg
76/51
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
SUN TUE
WED THU
MON
FRI
TODAY
79
57
A morning
shower in
spots
76 45
Partly
sunny and
pleasant
80 65
A p.m.
thunder-
storm
85 64
A thunder-
storm pos-
sible
80 56
Mostly
sunny and
nice
75 57
A shower
possible
74 48
Fog in
the a.m.;
partly
sunny
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 0
Month to date 29
Year to date 731
Last year to date 844
Normal year to date 540
Anchorage 60/52/r 59/50/sh
Baltimore 80/62/s 87/58/pc
Boston 76/63/s 76/56/pc
Buffalo 74/61/pc 67/49/pc
Charlotte 84/65/s 90/67/pc
Chicago 87/68/t 78/65/pc
Cleveland 82/67/pc 75/55/pc
Dallas 100/76/s 100/75/s
Denver 94/62/pc 94/61/s
Honolulu 90/74/pc 89/74/pc
Indianapolis 88/67/pc 88/66/pc
Las Vegas 96/81/t 95/80/s
Milwaukee 86/65/pc 74/60/pc
New Orleans 91/75/pc 91/73/pc
Norfolk 78/66/s 85/69/pc
Okla. City 98/71/s 96/70/s
Orlando 90/72/t 92/72/s
Phoenix 103/85/t 100/78/t
Pittsburgh 81/61/pc 78/55/pc
Portland, ME 75/58/pc 71/45/sh
St. Louis 94/72/s 92/72/pc
San Francisco 82/58/s 80/59/s
Seattle 75/58/pc 77/59/s
Wash., DC 81/65/s 86/64/pc
Bethlehem 1.94 -0.22 16
Wilkes-Barre 5.56 +0.41 22
Towanda 3.15 -1.21 16
Port Jervis 3.23 -0.26 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Friday.
Today Sun Today Sun Today Sun
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Sept 12 Sept 19
Sept 26
First Full
Last New
Oct 4
6:36 a.m.
8:49 a.m.
7:26 p.m.
8:21 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 69-75. Lows: 52-58. Partly sunny and nice today. Increasing
clouds tonight with a shower in places.
Highs: 72-78. Lows: 61-67. Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Partly
cloudy tonight. Clouds and sun tomorrow with a stray shower.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 73-79. Lows: 57-63. Nice today with clouds and sun. A couple of
showers tonight. Cooler tomorrow with a shower in the area.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 78. Low: 66. Partly sunny and nice today. Increasing clouds
tonight. A shower in places tomorrow morning.
High: 80. Low: 64. Mostly sunny and nice today. Increasing amounts of
clouds tonight. A shower in places tomorrow morning.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Friday
High/low 70/42
Normal high/low 76/56
Record high 93 (1900)
Record low 37 (1909)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.10"
Normal m-t-d 0.76"
Year to date 18.47"
Normal y-t-d 25.79"
79/57
78/58
80/64
78/60
78/57
77/59
80/59
78/58
78/58
78/57
72/57
76/60
74/57
76/56
78/66
Summary: The central Plains to the Northeast will be sunny today. Spotty storms
will dot the Great Lakes and the Gulf Coast. Storms will reach from Arizona to
Washington, Idaho, Montana and North Dakota.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Tom Saunders, a parent and taxpayer in the Wyoming Area School District, walks in support of the
teachers Friday morning in West Pittston.
STriking
FAcTS
Wyoming Area ranked 61st
out of 619 high schools in the
state by U.S. News and World
report.
More than 21,000 schools
were evaluated across
the nation, with the top
500 schools in the nation
receiving gold medal status;
501-1,790, silver medal;
and 2,500, a bronze medal.
Wyoming Area received a
silver medal ranking for
academic achievement.
The teachers are allowed to
strike until Oct. 4 and must
return to classes Oct. 5 to
meet the state-mandated
180-school day requirement.
Non-binding arbitration
would commence Oct. 5, and
if no agreement is reached,
teachers could strike again.
But the 180-day requirement
must be met by June 30.
No negotiation meetings
are scheduled between
teachers and school board.
The Wyoming Area School
District encompasses
Wyoming, West Wyoming,
Exeter, West Pittston, Falls
Township and Harding.
TeAcher AverAge SAlArieS
According to the state Department of Education, for the 2012-
13 school year Wyoming Area ranked 405th of 500 districts in
average salary for professional personnel.
In Luzerne County, they had the lowest average salary, due
largely because they have worked under an expired contract for
three years, with no raises:
Wyoming Valley West, $66,662
Wilkes-Barre Area, $65,039
Hanover Area, $64,677
Pittston Area, $63,946
Lake-Lehman, $63,558
Hazleton Area, $60,997
Dallas, $60,968
Crestwood, $60,335
Greater Nanticoke Area, $58,198
Northwest Area, $56,344
Wyoming Area, $54,618
Hospital. Investigators are look-
ing into whether the shooting
was gang-related.
The arrests drew further
attention to the Sherman Hills
complex. In recent months it has
been the scene of shootings, rob-
beries and assaults and the focus
of meetings between federal and
city ofcials and management of
the complex where the majority
of the more than 300 tenants
receive government subsidies
for rent.
The management of the pri-
vately owned complex recently
notied residents of new regu-
lations regarding visitors and
parking, and warned that viola-
tors could face eviction. As of
Oct. 1 visitors 16 and older must
register with the ofce regard-
less of their length of stay and
must produce a valid identica-
tion to be photocopied.
The Wall Street Journal on
Friday reported New York City
Police Commissioner Raymond
Kelly said an extensive inves-
tigation spanning three states
led police to Sherman Hills
where Wrights sister, who is
Brelands girlfriend, lives. The
woman, who was not identied,
told investigators that the two
men left her home earlier in the
week, but police later learned
that Breland and Wright might
be at another unit in the apart-
ment complex, the newspaper
reported.
Arrest papers led by Wilkes-
Barre police said ofcers were
told the men could be located
in an apartment at the complex.
Police went there and made
contact with a woman who
provided updated information
about the whereabouts of the
men.
U.S. Marshal Martin Pane
of the U.S. Middle District in
Scranton said his ofce received
a tip from the Marshals Service
in New York Friday morn-
ing about the suspects loca-
tion. Members of the Marshals
Service Fugitive Task Force and
the New York and New Jersey
Regional Fugitive Task Force
went to the apartment complex
and surrounded the building
around 6 a.m., he said.
Upon arrival one man was
seen in the window and attempt-
ed to ee but was caught,
Pane said. Task force members
breached the door and took
Breland and Wright into custody
without resistance. There were
no injuries, Pane said, adding
There was ample law enforce-
ment present to effect an arrest.
The Middle District task force
is made up of the state police,
state parole, the Wilkes-Barre
Police Department, Scranton
Police Department and the
Lackawanna County Sheriffs
Department.
The woman whom the apart-
ment was registered to was
questioned, Pane said.
The U.S. Marshals Service is
pleased to apprehend these two
individuals who were sought by
New York authorities related to
this tragic event, Pane said.
Taken to court
Breland and Wright said
little at their court appearances
Friday afternoon. Both were
handcuffed and seated apart
from one another while await-
ing arraignment on the fugitive
charges by Senior District Judge
Andrew Barilla Jr.
He set bail at $1 million each
before they were taken across
town to the Luzerne County
Courthouse to the courtroom
of Judge Joseph Sklarosky Jr.
During questioning from the
judge, Breland and Wright con-
rmed they voluntarily waived
their right to ght extradition to
New York state.
Wright was wanted on a
charge of criminal possession of
a weapon. Breland, the alleged
shooter, was wanted on a parole
violation.
According to The Wall Street
Journal, Commissioner Kelly
said at least one witness posi-
tively identied Breland as the
alleged shooter. The witness told
investigators that Wright handed
Breland the gun just before the
shooting, the paper reported.
Kelly said Breland and Wright
are known to Anthony Hennis,
who has refused to cooperate in
the investigation, the newspaper
reported. Kelly said Wrights
brother was shot two years
ago and police are looking into
whether that is connected to the
shooting that killed the boy, the
newspaper reported.
From page 1A
Fugitives
From page 1A
Strike
tucked under wiper blades
urging them to ignore
the school boards claims.
Other than the iers, there
was little union presence
Friday.
Athletic Director Joseph
Pizano teaches health and
phys-ed classes and hes
been conned to striking
with his colleagues. He had
locked down match sched-
ules before the season
began, but in his absence,
high school Principal Vito
Quaglia is handling duties
while Pizano strikes, mak-
ing snap decisions as the
needs arise. Quaglia is also
pinch-hitting as head coach
for the varsity cheerlead-
ers.
All the districts PIAA-
sanctioned teams have
either a head coach or
assistant coach at the
helm; however, the coaches
unfettered by the strike are
doing double-, and some-
times triple-, duty to make
up for the absent coaches,
Pizano said.
Hopefully we can
come to some kind of reso-
lution quick and get back
to normalcy, Pizano said.
As athletic director and a
coach, this is denitely one
of the toughest things Ive
had to do.
On the eld, the play-
ers seem unaffected by
their coaches absence,
said varsity head coach
Randy Spencer. Football
is missing six of its 12
coaches due to the strike,
but Spencer credited his
players resiliency for their
performance so far.
It certainly stretches
our resources. Were
obviously not at full
strength, but were doing
everything we can to make
sure were supporting our
kids, Spencer said.
Parents have been
pushing back against the
strikers, and many of
them are concerned that
fewer coaches will mean
their children might miss
opportunities, said uni0n
President Melissa Dolman.
I think that theres a lot
of concern from the pub-
lic. Thats a lot of what I
hear, Dolman said. What
Im hearing is what are
we going to do about our
sports?
She lamented that par-
ents are not complaining
more about empty class-
rooms. There has been no
move to break the strike
by coaches, Dolman said.
The strike is the strike.
Thats it. And theyve all
vowed to not cross the
picket line, Dolman said
Pizano said he will fol-
low through in supporting
the athletes as soon as the
strike ends.
Im going to do my job
and help every one of my
kids get what they need.
Its just not right now,
Pizano said.
Members of the high
school student body coun-
cil, as usual, painted their
bodies the schools colors,
green and gold, for Fridays
game. The rowdy council
members competed with
enthusiastic cheerleaders
on the eld below shout-
ing, We are W-A!
In the stands, high
school cafeteria worker
Anne Marie Skilonger
cheered on the Warriors.
She said the strike stinks
and shes not happy to be
off the job, but the cheer-
ing crowds encouraged
her. Im glad they came
out to support the team.
From page 1A
gridiron
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
Wyoming Area Student council members cheer for their football
team.
lOcAl vOTeS
Howour area congressmen stand on the Syria issue:
Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton: Yes.
Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Zionsville: Undecided
Rep. Matt Cartwright, D-Moosic: Undecided.
Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton: Undecided.
Rep. TomMarino, R-Lycoming Twp.: No.
From page 1A
Syria
I think were going to get 60
votes.
Speaking to report-
ers Friday after a sum-
mit of world leaders in St.
Petersburg, Russia, Obama
acknowledged the difcul-
ties he faces in seeking sup-
port for action. He said he
would address the nation on
Tuesday.
Its conceivable at the
end of the day I dont per-
suade a majority of the
American people that its the
right thing to do, Obama
said. But the president, who
again would not say what
he would do if Congress
rebuffed him, expressed
condence that the people
and their lawmakers would
listen to his case.
Failing to respond, he
said, would send a signal
to rogue nations, authori-
tarian regimes and ter-
rorist organizations that
they can develop and use
weapons of mass destruc-
tion and not pay a conse-
quence.
Whatever Obama might
decide, a rejection from
Congress would have
wide-ranging ramications
in the United States and
abroad.
If the administration
goes ahead with cruise
missile strikes and other
limited action against
Syrian targets, it could
risk a constitutional cri-
sis with angry lawmakers
ahead of other confronta-
tions over raising the U.S.
debt ceiling, funding the
government, overhaul-
ing immigration law and
implementing Obamas
signature health care
changes.
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Saturday, September 7, 2013
SPORTS
WILKES-BARRE
Coughlin running back Paul
Cole was wondering just when
he would get a chance to run the
ball Friday night. After all, he
was coming off a career game
last weekend and the Crusaders
love the ground game.
Once Cole got that rst
chance, he kept running all
the way to a new career high.
Cole rushed for 182 yards on
30 carries, helping Coughlin to
a 26-16 victory over Hazleton
Area in a Wyoming Valley
Conference interdivisional
game.
Meanwhile, quarterback Tim
Pilch added two TD passes and
137 yards through the air. Both
were career highs for the senior
signal-caller. And an oddity for
Coughlin (2-0), which is known
as a ground-and-pound team.
I was waiting, I was wait-
ing for my chance, Cole said.
Coach White (offensive coor-
dinator Kenny) was doing what
he had to do. I was just waiting
my turn.
The rst chance came on
the last play of the rst quar-
ter as Cole ripped off a 7-yard
run. His no-nonsense running
style wore on Hazleton Area.
His 6-yard touchdown run with
7:20 to play built Coughlins
lead to 26-10.
If it wasnt for the line, I
wouldnt have gotten the yards I
got, Cole said. The line came
to play today, and we have to
focus on next week.
As for Hazleton Area (0-2),
the Cougars lost their eighth
game in a row. They were
handed a golden opportunity
early in the third quarter when
linebacker Jesus Castillo recov-
ered a fumble at the Coughlin
6-yard line. Quarterback Julius
Ward powered across the goal
line from 2 yards out two plays
later, cutting Coughlins lead to
13-10.
But the Crusaders came back
with a 31-yard touchdown pass
from Pilch to Tom Mitchell and
Coles TD run.
Overall, it wasnt just one or
two kids, Coughlin coach Ciro
Cinti said. A lot of kids con-
tributed tonight.
Hazleton Area never found
any rhythm on offense. The
Cougars last touchdown
summed up the offense as
receiver Charlie Burrows had
to fall on a fumbled reception in
the end zone. There were also
two dropped passes that could
Crusaders wear down Cougars
Don Carey | For The Times Leader
Joe Paterno is no lon-
ger around to say it. But
one of his most well-worn
axioms still came up this
week.
College teams, Paterno
often said, make the
biggest improvement
between Week 1 and
Week 2. And yes, fellow
Brown alum Bill OBrien
buys it.
I agree with that, the
Penn State coach said.
I think over time, thats
been proven out.
I just was thinking
about this a lot. In the
NFL, you have four pre-
season games and you
can do those however you
want. You can play your
starters the rst half,
three quarters, four quar-
ters however you want
to do it. But by the end
of four preseason games,
you have a good idea
about your team.
In college you dont
have that. You have two or
three scrimmages where
youre going against each
other and you get a good
feel. But where you get a
(real) feel is in that rst
game.
Penn State got its feel
during a narrow win over
Syracuse. And headed
into todays home opener
against Eastern Michigan,
theres still plenty of room
for improvement.
Aside from the obvi-
ous need to cut down on
the four turnovers they
committed last week,
the Nittany Lions will be
looking to nd a spark for
the ground game against
the Eagles while also
improving on a disap-
pointing 1-for-16 showing
on third downs.
We can go to the lm
room and say, This is
what we need to do bet-
ter, this is what you need
Lions look to
iron out issues in
home opener
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
ANN ARBOR, Mich.
The Notre Dame-
Michigan rivalry has been
kicked up a notch, putting
todays prime-time game
even more in the spot-
light.
Notre Dame opted
out of a contract with
Michigan last year. After
the 14th-ranked Fighting
Irish play the 17th-
ranked Wolverines at the
Big House, theyre not
expected to be back until
the early 2020s at the
earliest. The teams are
scheduled to meet one
nal time in South Bend
next year.
I think theres a lot
more hype around this
game than there was two
years ago with it being
the last meeting in who
knows how long, Notre
Dame receiver TJ Jones
said.
Michigan coach Brady
Hoke said four months
ago that Notre Dame was
chickening out of the
series, and got laughs at a
luncheon.
Notre Dame coach
Brian Kelly raised eye-
brows when he kicked
off the week by saying
the rivalry with Michigan
wasnt historic or tra-
ditional, adding it is a
regional game.
Kelly recanted the next
day, saying it is a great
and historic rivalry,
series with Michigan.
And a couple days later,
he said the pressure will
be on the Wolverines.
Theyve got to win
at home, Kelly said
Thursday night. For us,
were going to go up there
swinging.
Here are ve things to
watch when Michigan
hosts Notre Dame:
HOME COOKING:
Hoke hasnt lost a home
game in two-plus sea-
sons of leading college
footballs winningest pro-
gram, a fact that he insist-
ed isnt a topic of conver-
sation within his team.
The Wolverines have won
15 straight since losing
to Wisconsin on Nov. 20,
Series last game at
Big House adds extra
spice to matchup
HANOVER TWP. Hanover Area
and Lackawanna Trail went toe-to-toe
for most of Friday nights game.
Except for the the third quarter. Trail
outscored the Hawks by 20 points in
the third to blow open the close game
and cruise to a 54-40 victory to spoil
Hanover Areas home opener.
The teams went back and forth in
the rst half with Hanover Area (1-1)
taking a 7-0 lead on the rst play of its
second drive when on a 60-yard TD
run by Brian Belcher, who had to leave
the game later in the rst half with an
injury.
Trail (2-0) scored on its next three
possessions to open a 20-7 lead at the
9:55 mark of the second quarter. But
the Hawks werent going down without
a ght. They stole momentum away
from the Lions and started rolling.
The kick after the third LT score was
returned 91 yards by Isaiah Taylor for
a touchdown to trim the lead to 20-14.
Hanover Areas kick was then fumbled
by Trail and recovered by the home
team. Four plays later, Hanover Area
equaled the score at 20-20.
The Hanover Area defense stuffed
Trail on the next possession setting up
another score by the Hawks offense
as Taylor capped the next drive with
a 5-yard scoring run to put Hanover in
front 26-20 with 3:32 left in the rst
half.
Trails 34 straight
points dooms Hawks
See MANNING | 5B
See IRISH | 5B
See PENN STATE | 5B
See COUGHLIN| 5B
PSU GAMEDAY
Eastern Michigan (1-0)
at Penn State (1-0)
Noon, today
Beaver Stadium, State
College
TV: Big Ten Network
Radio: 103.1-FM, 910-
AM, 980-AM, 1300-AM
UP NEXT
Notre Dame
at Michigan
8 p.m. today, ABC
LARRY LAGE
AP Sports Writer
Mannings stellar opening performance one for the ages
Denver QB tosses
seven touchdowns in
rout of Baltimore
ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer
E N G L E W O O D ,
Colo. The questions
surrounding Peyton
Manning last year were
all about his right arm.
This season, they were
about his shoulders as
in, are they broad enough
to carry the Denver
Broncos in Von Millers
absence?
Manning provided
an emphatic answer
Thursday night, dissect-
ing Baltimores refur-
bished defense with a
masterpiece of a perfor-
mance the likes of which
hadnt been seen in the
NFL since the 1960s.
With their All-Pro line-
backer sitting out the
rst game of his six-game
suspension for violating
the leagues drug policy,
Denvers offense more
than picked up the slack
in the 49-27 rout of the
Super Bowl champions.
Manning joined Y.A.
Tittle of the New York
Giants as the only QBs to
throw seven touchdown
passes in a game without
an interception. Tittle
accomplished the feat 51
years ago.
Its something ridicu-
lous, said tight end Julius
Thomas, on the receiving
end of Mannings rst
two TD throws. I think a
couple guys were joking,
we were saying its like
Madden the only time
you get to throw seven
touchdowns.
Unless youre Peyton
Manning in the esh, just
as good at 37 as he was
at 27.
I nally got to wit-
ness it live and see what
hes capable of doing,
said rookie running back
Montee Ball.
Manning is the sixth
QB to toss seven TD
passes in a game and the
rst since Minnesotas
Joe Kapp in 1969. This
generation knows Kapp
more for his throwdown
with Angelo Mosca at a
Canadian Football League
alumni luncheon a couple
of years ago that went
viral on the Internet.
Great Canadian quar-
terback out of Cal,
said Manning. Kicked
the crap out of a guy on
YouTube a couple of years
ago, too.
A lot like what Manning
did to the Super Bowl
champs Thursday night.
Manning overcame a
slow start and a 33-min-
ute lightning delay to
throw for 462 yards, the
fourth-highest total in an
opener. He completed 27
of 42 passes and showed
precision all over the
eld, from the pinpoint
pass to Bubba Caldwell
along the left sideline
for a 28-yard score to the
short blitz-beating toss
that Demaryius Thomas
turned into a 78-yard
score that gave Manning
a share of the record.
Well, we got into a
good rhythm, Manning
said. It took us a while.
I dont make excuses but
I do think that lightning
delay did slow us down.
If not for that, maybe
Manning wakes up Friday
with the record all to him-
self.
The others he now
shares the mark with read
like a Whos Who to some
and to others, a Whos
That?
Sid Luckman in 43,
Adrian Burk in 54,
George Blanda in 61.
I barely remember
people on the list, coach
John Fox cracked. One,
I wasnt born yet. I actu-
ally recall the others. But
I was very young. Like I
said, I didnt really real-
ize it until after the game.
Youre trying to score a
lot of points, you dont
really remember how you
did it. But I mean, hes a
remarkable guy and there
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning throws under pres-
sure from Baltimore Ravens outside linebacker Daryl Smith dur-
ing the second half of an NFL game on Thursday in Denver. The
Broncos won, 49-27.
AP photo
HIGH ScHOOL FOOTBALL
Hanover Area half back Brian Belcher almost loses the ball on
a first-down run against Lackawanna Trail in Hanover Township
on Friday night.
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
Hazleton Area running back Nick George escapes the grasp of coughlin defender Paul cole in the first period of a game at Memorial Stadium Friday night.
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
See TRAIL | 5B
PAGE 2B Saturday, September 7, 2013 SCOREBOARD www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Major League Baseball
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
National League
Milwaukee -115 at Chicago +105
at Philadelphia -105 Atlanta -105
at Miami -130 Washington +120
at Cincinnati -125 Los Angeles +115
at St. Louis -105 Pittsburgh -105
at San Diego -105 Colorado -105
Arizona -120 at San Francisco +110
American League
Boston -110 at NewYork +100
at Baltimore -160 Chicago +150
Detroit -110 at Kansas City +100
Toronto -120 at Minnesota +110
at Oakland -260 Houston +230
Texas -110 at Los Angeles +100
Tampa Bay -115 at Seattle +105
Interleague
at Cleveland -160 NewYork (NL) +150
NCAAFootball
Tonight
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
at Boston College 3 2 (48) Wake Forest
UCF 23 24 (53) at FIU
Tomorrow
Florida 3 3 (48) at Miami
at Kentucky 13 17 (54) Miami (Ohio)
at Michigan St. 22 23 (44) South Florida
Oklahoma St. 31 26 (59) at UTSA
Houston 2 3 (67) at Temple
at Ohio 6 4 (58) NorthTexas
at North Carolina 21 17 (66) Middle Tenn.
Cincinnati 16 8 (54) at Illinois
at Oklahoma 18 21 (57) West Virginia
at Georgia 5 3 (56) South Carolina
at Ohio St. 24 28 (56) San Diego St.
Utah St. 9 9 (59) at Air Force
at Tulane 7 6 (49)SouthAlabama
Oregon 26 23 (61) at Virginia
Duke 7 4 (53) at Memphis
at Northwestern 9 16 (53) Syracuse
at Indiana 4 12 (68) Navy
at Nebraska 30 28 (59)Southern Miss.
Texas 3 7 (57) at BYU
at LSU 34 34 (62) UAB
at Missouri 12 17 (65) Toledo
at Tulsa 10 10 (53) Colorado St.
at Auburn 4 11 (62) Arkansas St.
at Ball St. 11 7 (62) Army
at Penn St. 28 24 (49) E. Michigan
at Baylor 24 27 (68) Bufalo
Bowling Green 2 7 (45) at Kent St.
at Tennessee 13 13 (58) W. Kentucky
at Kansas St. 16 10 (61) La.-Lafayette
at Michigan Pk 4 (51) Notre Dame
at Oregon St. 28 27 (55) Hawaii
Minnesota 21 15 (51) at NewMex St.
at Wyoming 22 28 (65) Idaho
at UTEP 8 6 (51) NewMexico
at Southern Cal 20 15 (54) Washington St.
Arizona 17 11 (61) at UNLV
at Stanford 18 25 (48) SanJose St.
NFL
Sunday
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
NewEngland 6 9 (51) at Bufalo
at Pittsburgh 6 7 (42) Tennessee
at NewOrleans 3 3 (54) Atlanta
Tampa Bay 2 3 (39) at N.Y. Jets
Kansas City 2 4 (41) at Jacksonville
at Chicago 3 3 (42) Cincinnati
at Cleveland Pk Pk (41) Miami
Seattle 3 3 (45) at Carolina
at Detroit 3 5 (46) Minnesota
at Indianapolis 6 10 (47) Oakland
at St. Louis 5 4 (41) Arizona
at San Francisco 5 4 (48) Green Bay
at Dallas 3 3 (48) N.Y. Giants
Monday
at Washington 4 3 (52) Philadelphia
Houston 2 4 (44) at San Diego
LATEST LINE
FRIDAY, SEPT. 6
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
(7 p.m.)
Berwick at Pottsville
Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech at Nanticoke
Crestwood at North Pocono
Delaware Valley at WyomingValley West
HazletonArea at Coughlin
Lackawanna Trail at Hanover Area
Lake-Lehman at Montrose
Meyers at Old Forge
MidValley at WyomingArea
Mifin County at Williamsport
Scranton at PittstonArea
Tunkhannock at West Scranton
HIGH SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY
Berwick at GAR
Hanover Area at Elk Lake
Northwest at Meyers
Tunkhannock at Montrose
HIGH SCHOOL GOLF
Hanover Area at GAR
Lake-Lehman at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
MMI Prep at WyomingArea
Nanticoke at Wyoming Seminary
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLSTENNIS
WyomingValley West at Holy Redeemer
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLSVOLLEYBALL
Delaware Valley at Crestwood, 4:30 p.m.
GAR at HazletonArea
Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman
Holy Redeemer at WyomingArea
North Pocono at Meyers
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Juniata at Misericordia, 3 p.m.
Keystone vs. Kings at Misericordia, 5:15 p.m.
COLLEGE CO-ED SOCCER
PSUWilkes-Barre at Davis College, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENS SOCCER
Elmira at Kings, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 7
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
Dallas at Abington Heights, 1 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Holy Cross, 1 p.m.
Northwest at Susquehanna, 1 p.m.
Dunmore at GAR, 7 p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY
Crestwood at Selinsgrove, 11 a.m.
Crestwood vs. Mifin County at Selinsgrove, 1:15
p.m.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS SOCCER
Abington Heights at Crestwood
Coughlin at HazletonArea, 11 a.m.
GAR at Holy Redeemer
MMI Prep at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Seminary at WyomingArea, 11 a.m.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS SOCCER
Crestwood at WyomingValley West
Dallas at PittstonArea
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
Tunkhannock at MMI Prep
WyomingArea at Wyoming Seminary
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Gettysburg at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
WilliamPaterson at Kings, 1 p.m.
Morrisville State at Wilkes, Noon
COLLEGE CROSS COUNTRY
Misericordia, Kings at LebanonValley, 10:15 a.m.
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Juniata vs. Kings at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
Wilkes at Salisbury, 1 p.m.
Keystone at Misericordia, 5 p.m.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
PSUHazleton at at PSUAllegheny, 1 p.m.
Stevenson at Wilkes, 4 p.m.
Baptist Bible at Misericordia, 7:30 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENS SOCCER
Wilkes vs. Richard Stockton at Catholic, 2:30p.m.
Susquehanna at Misericordia, 5 p.m.
COLLEGE WOMENSTENNIS
Keystone, Rosemont at Wilkes, 11 a.m.
PSUMont Alto at PSUHazleton, noon
COLLEGE WOMENSVOLLEYBALL
Kings at PSU-Harrisburg, noon
Kings vs. Penn College at PSU-Harrisburg, 2 p.m.
Misericordia vs. Allegheny at Susquehanna, 11
a.m.
Misericordia vs. SUNY-Morrisville at Susque-
hanna, 1 p.m.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 8
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Wilkes vs. Wesley at Salisbury, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
Widener at Wilkes, 2 p.m.
Kings vs. Sage at Rensselaer, 3 p.m.
COLLEGE MENSTENNIS
Wilkes at MuhlenburgTournament
COLLEGE WOMENS SOCCER
Wilkes vs. Mount St. Mary at Catholic, Noon
COLLEGE WOMENSVOLLEYBALL
Misericordia at Susquehanna, 10 a.m.
Misericordia vs. Haverfordat Susquehanna, Noon
local calendar
what s on tv
baseball
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
First Round Playofs
(Best-of-5)
(x-if necessary)
Durham2, Indianapolis 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Durham2, Indianapolis 0
Thursday, Sep. 5: Durham6, Indianapolis 5
Friday, Sep. 6: Durhamat Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Saturday, Sep. 7: Durham at Indianapolis, 7:05
p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 8: Durhamat Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Rochester 1, Pawtucket 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Rochester 7, Pawtucket 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Pawtucket 7, Rochester 2
Friday, Sep. 6: Rochester at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
Saturday, Sep. 7: Rochester at Pawtucket, 6:05
p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 8: Rochester at Pawtucket, 1:05
p.m.
EASTERN LEAGUE
Wild-Card
(Best-of-5)
Trenton 2, Binghamton 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Trenton 6, Binghamton 5, 10
innings
Thursday, Sep. 5: Trenton 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Trenton at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Trenton at Binghamton, 7:05
p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Trenton at Binghamton, 1:05
p.m.
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Erie 1, Harrisburg 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Harrisburg 5, Erie 4
Thursday, Sep. 5: Erie 2, Harrisburg 1, 12 innings
Friday, Sep. 6: Erie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Erie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Erie at Harrisburg, 2 p.m.
(x-if necessary)
NEWYORK - PENN LEAGUE
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
z-Aberdeen (Orioles) 40 32 .556
Brooklyn (Mets) 38 37 .507 3
HudsonValley (Rays) 38 37 .507 3
Staten Island (Yankees) 34 41 .453 7
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
z-State College (Cardinals) 47 27 .635
z-Jamestown (Pirates) 43 31 .581 4
Batavia (Marlins) 39 36 .520 8
Williamsport (Phillies) 37 38 .493 10
MahoningValley (Indians) 30 44 .405 17
Auburn (Nationals) 26 49 .347 21
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
z-Tri-City (Astros) 44 32 .579
Lowell (Red Sox) 40 33 .548 2
Connecticut (Tigers) 33 42 .440 10
Vermont (Athletics) 33 43 .434 11
z-clinched playof spot
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Salt Lake 2, Las Vegas 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Thursday, Sep. 5: Salt Lake 5, Las Vegas 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Salt Lake at Las Vegas, 10:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Salt Lake at Las Vegas, 3:05
p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Salt Lake at Las Vegas, 3:05
p.m.(x-if necessary)
Oklahoma City vs. Omaha
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Oklahoma City at Omaha, 8:05
p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Oklahoma City at Omaha,
8:05 p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Oklahoma City at Omaha, 3:05
p.m.
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
THURSDAYS LATE GAMES
Red Sox 9, Yankees 8, 10 innings,
Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Ellsbury cf 6 1 3 1 0 1 .299
Victorino rf 6 1 2 3 0 1 .294
Pedroia 2b 6 1 1 0 0 1 .296
D.Ortiz dh 4 1 2 0 2 1 .315
Nava lf-1b 3 1 1 0 2 0 .300
c-B.Snyder ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Napoli 1b 4 0 2 1 1 2 .253
1-Berry pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 1.000
Drewss 5 0 1 1 0 3 .249
Lavarnway c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .318
b-J.Gomes ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231
D.Ross c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .198
Middlebrooks 3b 5 2 2 1 0 1 .234
Totals 45 9 16 9 5 10
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Gardner cf 5 2 2 1 0 1 .274
Jeter ss 3 0 0 0 2 0 .200
Cano 2b 5 1 1 3 0 1 .307
A.Soriano lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .257
Granderson dh 5 1 1 1 0 2 .265
A.Rodriguez 3b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .283
Overbay 1b 4 0 1 2 1 2 .252
I.Suzuki rf 4 2 1 0 1 3 .267
C.Stewart c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .213
a-V.Wells ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .245
Au.Romine c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217
Totals 39 8 10 8 5 10
Boston 002 130 101 19 16 0
NewYork 002 000 600 08 10 1
a-singled for C.Stewart in the 7th. b-fouled out
for Lavarnway in the 9th. c-fied out for Nava in
the 10th.
1-ran for Napoli in the 9th.
E-Au.Romine (3). LOB-Boston 11, New York 6.
2B-Ellsbury (31), Nava (26), Cano (30), Grand-
erson (9), A.Rodriguez 2 (5). HR-Middlebrooks
(13), of Nova; Victorino (13), of Claiborne. RBIs-
Ellsbury (52), Victorino 3 (54), Napoli (78), Drew
(57), Lavarnway 2 (12), Middlebrooks (39), Gard-
ner (48), Cano 3 (94), A.Soriano (41), Granderson
(11), Overbay 2 (54). SB-Ellsbury (52), Victo-
rino (20), Berry (1), Gardner (23), A.Soriano (7),
A.Rodriguez (4), Overbay (1), I.Suzuki (19), V.Wells
(7). CS-A.Soriano (3).
Runners left in scoring position-Boston 5
(Napoli 2, Middlebrooks 2, B.Snyder); New York
6 (A.Soriano 2, C.Stewart 2, Overbay, I.Suzuki).
RISP-Boston 5 for 15; NewYork 6 for 14.
Runners moved up-Victorino.
Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Peavy 6 6 4 4 3 4 117 4.01
Thornton 1-3 1 2 2 1 0 12 3.63
Tazawa BS, 8-8 2-3 3 2 2 0 2 19 2.92
BreslowW, 5-2 2 0 0 0 1 2 16 2.12
Uehara S, 18-21 1 0 0 0 0 2 20 1.14
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Nova 4 5 3 3 2 3 96 3.02
Claiborne 0 4 3 3 1 0 25 3.33
Cabral 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.00
Warren 2 2-3 3 1 1 1 4 44 3.65
D.Robertson H, 32 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 1.85
M.Rivera BS, 6-47 1 2 1 1 0 0 19 2.19
Chamberlain L, 2-12-32 1 1 0 0 19 4.38
Logan 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.05
Claiborne pitched to 5 batters in the 5th.
Peavy pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored-Thornton 2-2, Taza-
wa 2-2, Cabral 3-0, Warren 3-1, Logan 1-0. IBB-of
Logan (D.Ortiz), of Nova (D.Ortiz).
Umpires-Home, Rob Drake; First, Joe West;
Second, SamHolbrook; Third, Andy Fletcher.
T-4:32. A-40,481 (50,291).
Astros 3, Athletics 2
Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Villar ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263
Altuve 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .276
Crowe lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .250
Wallace 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .225
Ma.Gonzalez 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217
Carter 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .220
Krauss dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167
B.Barnes cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .246
Hoes rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .252
Pagnozzi c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .125
Totals 34 3 8 2 1 9
Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Crisp cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .260
Donaldson 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .293
Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .287
Moss rf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .250
a-Freiman ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276
b-Callaspo ph 1 0 0 1 0 0 .258
1-C.Young pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .192
Cespedes lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .232
S.Smith dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .241
Barton 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .220
Sogard 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .265
Vogt c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .258
Totals 34 2 6 2 1 10
Houston 120 000 0003 8 0
Oakland 000 000 0202 6 1
a-was announced for Moss in the 8th. b-
reached on a failed felders choice for Freiman
in the 8th.
1-ran for Callaspo in the 8th.
E-Cespedes (4). LOB-Houston 5, Oakland 6.
2B-Crowe (3), Crisp (20), Vogt (5). 3B-Sogard
(3). RBIs-Altuve (44), Carter (74), Callaspo (46),
Vogt (11). SB-Crowe (4).
Runners left in scoring position-Houston 3
(Krauss, Crowe, Wallace); Oakland 3 (Donaldson,
S.Smith, Cespedes). RISP-Houston 2 for 6; Oak-
land 2 for 8.
Runners moved up-Donaldson.
Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Peacock W, 4-5 7 5 2 2 1 9 97 5.62
K.Chapman H, 32-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 2.38
De Leon 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10.13
Fields S, 3-4 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 17 5.81
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Gray L, 2-3 8 7 3 2 1 7 95 2.51
Cook 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 2.07
Peacock pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
De Leon pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored-K.Chapman 1-0, De
Leon 2-1, Fields 2-0. WP-Peacock.
Umpires-Home, Mark Ripperger; First, Alan
Porter; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Hunter Wen-
delstedt.
T-2:51. A-11,569 (35,067).
Angels 6, Rays 2
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
DeJesus cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .282
a-De.Jenn ph-cf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .249
Zobrist 2b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .277
Longoria 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .265
Joyce lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247
Loney 1b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .303
W.Myers rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286
Ke.Johnson dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .247
J.Molina c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .240
b-Scott ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246
Y.Escobar ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .265
Totals 33 2 6 2 3 9
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .270
Iannetta c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .212
Trout cf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .335
Trumbo 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .233
J.Hamilton dh 4 2 2 1 0 0 .238
L.Jimenez 3b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .263
Calhoun rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .266
G.Green 2b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .248
Cowgill lf 3 0 1 3 0 1 .296
Totals
33 6 11 6 1 7
Tampa Bay 002 000 0002 6 0
Los Angeles 033 000 00x6 11 0
a-walked for DeJesus in the 7th. b-fouled out
for J.Molina in the 9th.
LOB-Tampa Bay 7, Los Angeles 4. 2B-Loney
(25), Aybar (25), Trumbo (26), L.Jimenez (5),
Cowgill (2). RBIs-Loney 2 (62), J.Hamilton (62),
Calhoun (18), G.Green (8), Cowgill 3 (6). CS-Trout
(6).
Runners left in scoring position-Tampa Bay
3 (Y.Escobar, W.Myers, Loney); Los Angeles 2
(Trumbo, Iannetta). RISP-Tampa Bay 1 for 7; Los
Angeles 5 for 11.
Runners moved up-Aybar. GIDP-Trumbo.
DP-Tampa Bay 1 (Zobrist, Loney).
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Price L, 8-7 7 11 6 6 1 6 110 3.51
W.Wright 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.91
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Williams W, 6-106 1-3 6 2 2 2 7 102 4.60
Boshers 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 14 3.86
Kohn 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.28
Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.84
Umpires-Home, CB Bucknor; First, Dale Scott;
Second, Bill Miller; Third, ToddTichenor.
T-2:49. A-34,623 (45,483).
Diamondbacks 4, Giants 2
Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Eaton cf-lf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .273
Bloomquist ss 3 1 1 0 2 0 .354
Goldschmidt 1b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .292
Prado lf-3b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .286
A.Hill 2b 3 0 2 1 1 1 .303
M.Montero c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .238
Davidson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .176
Pollock cf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .255
G.Parra rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .268
Cahill p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .095
a-Gregorius ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .260
Sipp p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
W.Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Thatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Nieves ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .313
Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 35 4 10 4 5 5
San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pagan cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269
Scutaro 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .298
Belt 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .285
Pence rf 2 1 0 0 2 1 .283
Sandoval 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .279
H.Sanchez c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .238
G.Blanco lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .254
B.Crawford ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .260
Vogelsong p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .080
Dunning p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Kieschnick ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .218
Hembree p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Mijares p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
S.Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
d-Monell ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 29 2 9 2 5 6
Arizona 000 040 0004 10 0
San Francisco 000 200 0002 9 0
a-struck out for Cahill in the 6th. b-struck out
for Kontos inthe 7th. c-groundedout for Thatcher
in the 9th. d-popped out for S.Rosario in the 9th.
LOB-Arizona 9, San Francisco 7. 2B-Eaton 2
(7), Goldschmidt (29), Prado (32). 3B-Sandoval
(2). RBIs-Goldschmidt 2 (106), Prado (73), A.Hill
(36), Sandoval (72), H.Sanchez (17). SB-G.Blanco
(12). CS-A.Hill (4). S-Vogelsong. SF-H.Sanchez.
Runners left in scoring position-Arizona 5 (Ca-
hill 2, Davidson 2, Prado); San Francisco 2 (Pagan,
Belt). RISP-Arizona 3 for 8; San Francisco 1 for 5.
Runners moved up-Davidson. GIDP-Gold-
schmidt, Sandoval.
DP-Arizona 3 (Goldschmidt), (A.Hill, Gold-
schmidt), (Prado, A.Hill, Goldschmidt); San Fran-
cisco 1 (B.Crawford, Scutaro, Belt).
Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cahill W, 6-10 5 6 2 2 4 3 90 4.35
Sipp H, 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 3.63
W.Harris H, 3 1 2 0 0 1 1 16 2.25
Thatcher H, 14 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.13
Ziegler S, 8-10 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.37
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Vogelsong L, 3-54 2-38 4 4 3 3 87 5.62
Dunning 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.10
Kontos 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 4.91
Hembree 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 0.00
Mijares 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 4.13
S.Rosario 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 15 2.83
Mijares pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
W.Harris pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored-Thatcher 1-0,
Dunning 2-0, S.Rosario 1-0. IBB-of Vogelsong
(G.Parra). WP-Vogelsong. PB-H.Sanchez.
Umpires-Home, Tom Hallion; First, Phil Cuzzi;
Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Ron Kulpa.
T-3:11. A-41,193 (41,915).
Thursdays Game
Denver 49, Baltimore 27
Sundays Games
Atlanta at NewOrleans, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago, 1 p.m.
NewEngland at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Mondays Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 6:55 p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 12
N.Y. Jets at NewEngland, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 15
Dallas at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
NewOrleans at Tampa Bay, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 16
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:40 p.m.
THURSDAYS LATE GAME
Winner x, Loser x
Baltimore 7 10 01027
Denver 0 14 211449
First quarter
Bal_Leach 2 pass fromFlacco (Tucker kick), 7:11.
Second quarter
Den_J.Thomas 24 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 11:35.
Bal_Rice 1 run (Tucker kick), 8:03.
Den_J.Thomas 23 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 5:34.
Bal_FGTucker 25, :07.
Third quarter
Den_Caldwell 28 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 12:30.
Den_Welker 5 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
10:28.
Den_Welker 2 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
6:37.
Fourth quarter
Den_D.Thomas 26 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 13:13.
Bal_M.Brown 13 pass from Flacco (Tucker kick),
10:28.
Bal_FGTucker 30, 5:29.
Den_D.Thomas 78 pass from Manning (Prater
kick), 4:30.
A_76,977.
Teamstatistics Bal Den
First downs 24 24
Total Net Yards 393 510
Rushes-yards 21-58 23-65
Passing 335 445
Punt Returns 1-13 6-63
Kickof Returns 0-0 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-29
Comp-Att-Int 34-62-2 27-42-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-27 3-17
Punts 10-45.6 7-45.6
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-2
Penalties-Yards 7-53 8-61
Time of Possession 33:48 26:12
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Baltimore, Rice 12-36, Pierce
9-22. Denver, Moreno 9-28, Ball 8-24, Hillman
4-15, Manning 2-(minus 2).
PASSING Baltimore, Flacco 34-62-2-362.
Denver, Manning 27-42-0-462.
RECEIVING Baltimore, Rice 8-35, Clark
7-87, T.Smith 4-92, M.Brown 4-65, Stokley 4-34,
J.Jones 3-24, Leach 3-12, Dickson 1-13. Denver,
Welker 9-67, D.Thomas 5-161, J.Thomas 5-110,
Moreno 3-37, Decker 2-32, Hillman 2-27, Caldwell
1-28.
Failed to Qualify
41. (50) Danny Efand, Chevrolet, 118.791.
42. (74) Carl Long, Dodge, 118.234.
43. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, 118.229.
44. (73) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 117.391.
45. (00) Brett Butler, Toyota, 115.974.
SPRING CUP QUALIFYING
After Friday qualifying; race Saturday
At Richmond International Raceway
Richmond, Va.
Lap length: .75 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (24) Jef Gordon, Chevrolet, 130.599.
2. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 130.334.
3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 130.158.
4. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 130.02.
5. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 129.864.
6. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 129.851.
7. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 129.689.
8. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 129.633.
9. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 129.366.
10. (48) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 129.286.
11. (56) MartinTruex Jr., Toyota, 129.224.
12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 129.125.
13. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 129.119.
14. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 129.069.
15. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 129.057.
16. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 129.026.
17. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 128.995.
18. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 128.946.
19. (31) Jef Burton, Chevrolet, 128.817.
20. (55) BrianVickers, Toyota, 128.743.
21. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 128.584.
22. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 128.559.
23. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 128.486.
24. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 128.382.
25. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 128.351.
26. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 128.29.
27. (35) JoshWise, Ford, 128.272.
28. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 128.254.
29. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 128.077.
30. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 128.047.
31. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 127.847.
32. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 127.799.
33. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 127.69.
34. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Toyota, 127.527.
35. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 127.401.
36. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 127.286.
37. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points.
38. (51) RyanTruex, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
39. (95) Reed Sorenson, Ford, Owner Points.
40. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
41. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
42. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 127.208.
auto raci ng
CAMPS/CLINICS
Sem Cradle Lacrosse is ofering a clinic for
boys and girls ages 4 to 8 at Wyoming Seminary
Upper School in Kingston. Program sessions will
be held Saturdays fromnoon to 1 p.m. at Klassner
Field on North Maple Street beginning Saturday,
Sept. 21 and continuing through Nov. 2. Cost is
$120. The program provides all necessary equip-
ment with no additional feel. The curriculum is
designed to teach the basics of lacrosse. It will
be directed by Semcoach Catie Kersey. For more
information or to register, contact Kersey at ck-
ersey@wyomingseminary.org.
LEAGUES
Georgetti Painting Mens Bowling League
needs two bowlers for it Monday night league at
Modern Lanes, which starts Sept. 9. If interested,
call Rich at 829-0740.
Kingston Recreation Center is now accept-
ing teams for its fall softball leagues. League
fees for mens teams playing Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday as well as Sunday Co-Ed
are $125 per team. Sunday mens leagues are
$75 per team. Please call for more information
at 287-1106.
Midnight Hoops Fall Basketball League
will be played Sunday and Wednesday evenings
beginning Sept. 4 at the Kingston Rec Center
for boys in grades 9-12. The cost is $100. Play-
ers can sign up online, or print and mail a formto
84 South Church Road, Mountain Top, PA, 18707.
A check must be sent to the above address. No
online payments are accepted and checks should
be made payable to Steve Modrovsky. For more
information, email Steve Modrovsky at smlng@
ptd.net or call himat 793-3280.
St. Conrads Bowling League is looking for
bowlers to fll a team. The league bowls Wednes-
day nights at 6:45 p.m. at Chackos starting Sept.
4. To register, call Butch at 954-6009.
Wilkes-Barre Patriarchs have openings in
their Wednesday afternoon league. The league
starts Sept. 4 at 12:30 p.m. at Chackos Family
Bowling Center on Wilkes-Barre Boulevard. For
more information, call Fred Favire at 215-0180.
Wilkes-Barre Recreation League fall softball
season will run fromSeptember through Novem-
ber. All games will be played at Kirby Field #1 and
Wolsiefer Field located at the Coal Street Park.
Divisions include women, co-ed and three mens
divisions. Teams interested in playing softball in
the divisions listed above should to call 208-4126
for schedule and fees.
MEETINGS
Back Mountain Little League will hold a
board meeting Monday, Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. at the
Daddow-Isaacs American Legion located on
Route 415 in Dallas. General meeting, open to the
public, will be held at 8 p.m.
Berwick Boys Basketball Boosters, 7 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 9 in the varsity gymlobby.
Crestwood Boys Basketball Booster Club
will hold its next meeting at 7 p.m., Monday, Sept.
9 at Cavanaughs Grille.
Crestwood Football Booster Club will have a
meeting Wednesday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m. at Tonys
Pizza. Parents of all junior highandvarsity players
are welcome to attend.
Hughestown Sports Clubwill have a meeting
at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18, at Granteeds, Par-
sonage St. in Pittston. Game tickets and season
tickets are available and can be purchased at the
meeting or by contacting any club member. For
more information, call Barbara Kapish at 457-
5705.
Nanticoke Area Little League will meet Sept.
11 at 7 p.m. Location will be announced soon.
Elections for all positions will take place at end
of meeting.
Plains Yankees Football and Cheerleading
Organizationwill have its monthly meeting Mon-
day, Sept. 9, at 8p.m. at the PAVin Hudson. All are
welcome to attend.
West Side Soccer Club will have a meeting of
the parents/coaches committee at 7 p.m. Mon-
day, Sept. 9, on the second foor of the Plymouth
Borough Building on Shawnee Ave. For more in-
formation, call Matthewat 574-7699.
Wyoming Area Boys Soccer Parents will
hold a meeting Sunday, Sept. 8 at 6 p.m. for the
parents of the boys soccer team. The meeting will
be held at Butler Street Park inWyoming.
Wyoming Valley ASA Chapter of Umpires
will have its annual dinner meeting at Konefals
Restaurant Sept. 9at 6p.m. If attending, call Dave
Miller at 332-9105. The cost is $5.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Back Mountain Bandits Boys and Girls
Lacrosse Registration for 2014 season will be
Saturday Sept. 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dal-
las American Legion. The league is for boys in
age groups U-9, U-11, U-13 and U-15 and girls in
grades 3-8. Family Discounts apply and there
are no mandatory fund raisers. Registration fee
includes US Lacrosse registration, US Lacrosse
Magazine and a team uniform. The league is also
looking for volunteers for board positions and all
aspects of the organization. For more informa-
tion, visit www.laxteams.net/bmylax/ or email
bmtlax@gmail.com.
Wyoming Valley girls softball fast pitch 14-U
travel team will be holding tryouts for pitchers.
Anyone interested can contact Ed at 570-417-
4264 for more information.
Valley Girls Softball will have fnal 16-U try-
outs on Sunday from 5-6:30 p.m. at Hamilton
Park, Kingston. For more information, call 570-
262-2329.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Assembly 59 will have a golf tournament
Saturday, Sept. 21 at the Hollenback Golf Course
on North Washington Street in Wilkes-Barre. The
tournament begins at 9 a.m. The cost is $40 per
person. For more information, call Butch at 829-
3398 or 825-3584. Refreshments will be served
afterwards at the North End Slovak Club.
Bass Fishing Tournament will be held Sept.
21 at BlytheburnLake onBlytheburnRd. inMoun-
tain Top. Boats in the water at 6:30 a.m. and out
at 11 a.m. The fee is $40 per team. The tourna-
ment is limited to 10 boats. Reserve early. This is
a fundraiser for the Blytheburn Lake Association.
For more information, call 868-6895or 678-5261.
Commonwealth Medical Collegewill have its
ffth annual golf tournament Monday, Sept. 30, at
Huntsville Golf Course in Shavertown. Registra-
tion is at 9 a.m. and the tournament begins at
10 a.m. All proceeds beneft The Commonwealth
Medical College scholarships. For more informa-
tion, call 504-9619.
Dallas Rotary Clubs 30th Annual Golf
Classic, to support Dallas Rotary charities, will
be held at the Irem Country Club on Monday,
Sept. 23. The tournament starts at 12:30 p.m.
The sponsorship donation is $100 and the player
entry fee is $110. The format is captain and crew.
Individuals are welcome and will be teamed up
with others in a group. For more information or an
entry form, call Kevin Smith at 696-5420. Spon-
sors and players should respond by Sept. 12.
Greater Pittston Friendly Sons of St. Pat-
rick will have its Black Shamrock Open Saturday,
Sept. 7, at Blue RidgeTrail Golf Course. The format
will be captainandcrewandcost is $75per golfer.
The tournament begins at 1:30 p.m. There will be
refreshments at the course, and a bufet meal fol-
lowing the tournament at the golf course. To reg-
ister or for more information, call Jimmy Clancy
at 881-4176 or any active member of the G.P.
Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. Registration should
be completed as soon as possible. Sponsorships
are also available at several diferent levels. The
proceeds will beneft the Greater PittstonFriendly
Sons of St. Patrick Scholarship Program.
Harper Family will have its annual event Sat-
urday, Sept. 21 at Blue RidgeTrail Golf Course. The
tournament starts at 1 p.m. and will be a captain
and crew format. The cost is $95 per person,
which includes the golf, a gift for each golfer and
dinner to be heldat Blue RidgeTrail following play.
Awards will be given to three fight winners. There
will also be prizes for closest to the pins and a
pot of gold hole. There will also be door prizes. All
proceeds will beneft the American Heart Asso-
ciation. For more information, call Paul F. Harper
at 592-5191 or email himat harperpunar@yahoo.
com. The deadline for entry is Sept. 14.
Holy Rosary Golf Tournament is set for Sept.
15 at Pine Hills Country Club in Taylor. Registra-
tion is at noon for a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost
is $90 per player, $360 for a foursome, and
includes lunch and dinner. Contact Debbie at
451-1762 or Holy Rosary School at 457-2553 for
information, registrations and sponsorships.
Kings Softball will have a golf tournament
Sunday, Sept. 29, at Four Seasons Golf Course.
The cost is $75 per golfer, which includes 18holes
of golf, cart, beverages and a meal. The format is
captain and crew. Reservations are required by
Sept. 20. For more information, email softball@
kings.edu or call 208.5855.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League Board
of Directors has nominations for all positions. In
order tosubmit your name for nomination, please
email bbordow@ptd.net indicating your interest.
Nominations for all positions will be submitted at
the KFFBoard meeting on Monday, Sept. 16. Ade-
tailed description of these positions are available
on our website- www.kfl.org.
Knights of Columbus Pittston Council
#372 local level 2013 soccer challenge will be
held at noon Sept. 22 at the James Clark Park
located along Curry Street in Pittston for all
area boys and girls ages 10-14. Winners progress
through local, district and state competitions.
Participants will compete in their respective
age groups. There is no cost for admission. Par-
ticipants are required to have proof of age and
written parental consent to compete. For more
information, call Don Mac Rae at 815-4454 or
Mitch Megliola at 335-3002.
Luzerne County Special Olympics Golf
Tournament will be held Sunday, Sept. 22 with a
noon check-in and a 1 p.m. shotgun start at Four
Seasons Golf Course in Exeter. The tournament
will beneft Luzerne County Special Olympians
fall/winter/spring training. To register or to do-
nate, please email Frank at fvt315@netzero.com
or call 510-5600. Milton Brown Memorial Golf
Tournament will be held Sept. 9 at Fox Hill Coun-
try Club. The tournament starts at 1 p.m. and
the format is captain and crew. The tournament
supports the JCC day camp. The day includes
golf, dinner, prizes, pot of gold, mulligans, whiskey
tasting, a cigar smoker anda $15,000hole-in-one
give away.
Newport Township Democrats will have
their 3rd annual golf tournament Saturday, Sept.
7, at Edgewood in the Pines. It will be a four-man
scramble format with a shotgun start at 9:00
a.m. The cost is $340 per team or $85 per per-
son. This includes 18 holes of golf, carts, prizes
and skins. Clambake and refreshments will be
served at Holy Child Gove in Sheatown imme-
diately following golf. Entertainment will be pro-
vided by DJ Fran. Clam bake tickets may be pur-
chased separately for $25 per person. For more
information, call Paul Czapracki at 736-6859 or
AlanYendrzeiwski at 735-3831.
Northwest Area Hoopster Classic Golf
Tournament will be held Sept. 21 at Mill Race
Golf Course inBenton. The cost is $75per person,
which includes 18holes of golf, a cart, door prizes,
a meal, drinks and snacks. Registration is at 7:30
a.m. and the tournament starts at 8 a.m. The for-
mat is four-man scramble. For more information,
call Lisa at 256-3412.
St. Monica Parish Golf Outing benefting
projects of the parish mens and womens groups
will be Sunday, Sept. 15, at Four Seasons Golf
Club in Exeter. Registration will be at noon and
the tournament will begin at 1 p.m. The cost is
$50 per person, which includes dinner catered
byVilla Foglia, beer, soda andwater. Golf is limited
to the frst 120 golfers. Registration deadline is
Sept. 5. Checks should be made payable to St.
Monica Parish, 363 W. 8th Street, West Wyoming,
PA 18644. For more information, call John Piszak
at 313-8586 or Howard Kelley at 574-1677. Those
whoe dont want to play golf can go to the dinner
and rafe for $15. Hole sponsorships will be given
for a $50 contribution.
Shavertown United Methodist Church 7th
Annual Golf Tournament will be held at the Mill
Race Golf and Camping Resort in Benton Satur-
day, Oct. 5. Registration starts at 9 a.m. and the
tournament begins at 10 a.m. Entry fee is $80,
which includes green fees, carts, free use of driv-
ing range with unlimited balls, snacks, barbecue
chicken dinner following the tournament, souve-
nirs and prizes. Hole sponsorships are available
for $80, which gives sponsors a sign at the tee
box and a listing in the program. To donate prizes
for the golfers, call the church. Make checks pay-
able to SUMC and include the names of those in
your foursome. Singles will be paired. Mail checks
and entry form to Shavertown United Method-
ist Church 163 N. Pioneer Ave., Shavertown, Pa.
18708.
Step By Step Inc.s golf outing will be Sept.
16 at the Huntsville Golf Club. The tournament
will beneft the Step By Step, Inc. Foundation. The
Foundation has been established to provide com-
munity education regarding developmental dis-
abilities, autism, and mental health services. For
more information, call BobBlazaskie at 829-3477,
ext. 158, or Marbee Sulitka at 829-3477, ext. 308.
Football
bulleti n board
transacti ons
BASEBALL
American League
NEW YORK YANKEES Signed RHP Matt
Daley. Recalled Corban Joseph from Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre (IL) and placed him on the 60-day
DL.
National League
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Activated RHP Jake
Westbrook fromthe 15-day DL.
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS Exercised the 2014 con-
tract options on LHP Kevin Brahney, RHP Kevin
Cooper, RHP Ryan Dorado, RHP Jesse Estrada,
RHP Charlie Hejny, LHP Jon Jones, RHP Justin
Kuks, RHP Jake Meiers, RHP Alberto Montes,
RHPMarshall Schuler, CSergio Burruel, INFChris
Canedo, INF Miguel Chacoa, INF Maikol Gonzalez,
INF Rolando Petit, OF Anthony DAlfonso, OF Wel-
ington Dotel, OFOscar Mesa andOFGabe Suarez.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA Suspended New York G J.R. Smith fve
regular-season games for violating the anti-drug
program.
MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES Named Milt
Newton general manager.
Womens National Basketball Association
MINNESOTALYNXSigned GLindsay Whalen
to a multiyear contract extension.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS Re-signed FB
James Develin.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Released WR
Doug Pierce.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS Announced the
resignationof TomAnselmi chief operatingofcer
of Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment.
MOTOTRSPORTS
INDYCAR Fined Scott Dixon $30,000 and
placed him on probation through the end of the
year for disparaging comments after the Grand
Prix of Baltimore.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS Suspended Houston MF Oscar Boniek
Garcia one game and fned him an undislosed
amount for his reckless challenge that endan-
gered the safety of Chicago MF Patrick Nyarko in
a Sept. 1 game. Fined Real Salt Lake coach Jason
Kreis an undislosed amount for violating the
Leagues mass confrontation policy during a Aug.
30 game against Portland.
COLLEGE
ALBANY (NY) Named Colleen Cashman-
McSween womens golf coach.
HAMILTONNamedJoe Dougherty defensive
coordinator.
LA SALLE Named Colleen Greway varisty
assistant crew coach, Craig Bischof freshman/
novice crew coach and Emily Close graduate as-
sistant crewcoach.
OKLAHOMA CITY Named Liza Dickson
womens rowing coach and Melissa Simmons
womens assistant wrestling coach.
WISCONSIN-OSHKOSH Named Kevin To-
masiewicz baseball coach.
boxi ng
FIGHT SCHEDULE
Sept. 7
At Scottish Exhibition Centre in Glasgow, Scot-
land, Ray Beltran, vs. Ricky Burns, for BurnsWBO
lightweight title.
At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif.
(SHO), Seth Mitchell vs. Cristobal Arreola, 12,
heavyweights; Rafael Marquez vs. Efrain Esquiv-
ias, 10, junior featherweights; Rico Ramos vs.
Carlos Velasquez, 10, featherweights.
Sept. 11
At Osaka, Japan, Kazuto Ioka vs. Kwanthai
Sithmorseng, 12, for Iokas WBA World junior fy-
weight title; Ryo Miyazaki vs. Jesus Silvestre, 12,
for Miyazakis WBAWorld strawweight title.
Sept. 12
At MGMGrand, Las Vegas (FS2), Shawn Porter
vs. Julio Diaz, rematch, 10, welterweights; Marco
AntonioPeribanvs. BadouJack, 10, super middle-
weights; Hugo Centeno Jr. vs. Julian Williams, 10,
junior middleweights.
Sept. 14
At MGM Grand, Las Vegas (PPV), Floyd May-
weather Jr. vs. Canelo Alvarez, 12, Mayweathers
WBA Super World and Alvarezs WBC junior
middleweight titles; Danny Garcia, vs. Lucas
Matthysse, 12, fore Garcias WBA Super World/
WBCsuper lightweight title; Ishe Smith vs. Carlos
Molina, 12, for Smiths IBF junior middleweight
title; Pablo Cesar Cano vs. Ashley Theophane, 10,
welterweights.
Sept. 28
At Manchester (England) Arena (HBO), David
Haye vs. Tyson Fury, 12, heavyweights; Scott
Quigg vs. Yoandris Salinas, 12, for the vacant WBA
World junior featherweight title; Andy Lee vs. Do-
menico Spada, 12, middleweights.
At Montreal (HBO), Adonis Stevenson vs.
Tavoris Cloud, 12, for Stevensons WBC light
heavyweight title; Jean Pascal vs. George Blades,
10, light heavyweights; Edeider Alvarez vs. Edison
Miranda, 10, light heavyweights.
At San Jose, Costa Rica, Bryan Vasquez vs.
Rene Gonzalez, 12, for the interim WBA World
junior lightweight title.
At Mendoza, Argentina, Juan Carlos Reveco
vs. Ricardo Nunez, 12, for Revecos WBA World
fyweight title.
At Lima, Peru, Alberto Rossel vs. Jose Alfredo
Zuniga, 12, for the interim WBA World light fy-
weight title.
At StubHub Center, Carson, Calif. (HBO), Julio
Cesar Chavez Jr. vs. Brian Vera, 12, super middle-
weights; Diego Magdaleno vs. Edgar Riovalle, 10,
lightweights; Karim Mayfeld vs. Pavel Miranda,
10, light welterweights.
At Caliente Racetrack, Tijuana, Mexico, Miguel
Vazquez vs. Ammeth Diaz, 12, for Vazquezs IBF
lightweight title.
Sept. 30
At Brooklyn, N.Y. (FS1), Sadam Ali vs. Jay
Krupp, 10, welterweights.
Oct. 5
At Amway Center, Orlando, Fla. (HBO). Miguel
Cotto vs. Delvin Rodriguez, 12, junior middle-
weights; Terence Crawford vs. Andrey Klimov, 10,
lightweights.
At Olimpiyskiy, Moscow, Russia, Wladimir
Klitschko vs. Alexander Povetkin, 12, for Klitsch-
kos IBF-WBASuper World-WBO-IBOheavyweight
titles; Mateusz Masternak vs. Grigory Drozd, 12,
for Masternaks European cruiserweight title;
Ruslan Chagaev vs. Jovo Pudar, 12, heavyweights.
Oct. 12
At Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas (PPV),
Timothy Bradley Jr. vs. Juan Manuel Marquez, 12,
for Bradleys WBOwelterweight title; Orlando Sa-
lido vs. Orlando Cruz, 12, for vacant WBOfeather-
weight title; Vasyl Lomachenko vs. Jose Ramirez,
10, featherweights; Sean Monaghan vs. Anthony
Caputo-Smith, 10, light heavyweights.
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
NBCSN Formula One, qualifying for Grand
Prix of Italy, at Monza, Italy
7:30 p.m.
ABC NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Federated Auto
Parts 400, at Richmond, Va.
*
BOXING
10:25 p.m.
SHO Featherweights, Rafael Marquez (41-
8-0) vs. Efrain Esquivias (16-2-1); heavyweights,
Seth Mitchell (26-1-1) vs. Chris Arreola (35-3-0),
at Indio, Calif.
*
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
BTNEastern Michigan at Penn St.
BTNIndiana St. at Purdue
BTNMissouri St. at Iowa
BTNTennessee Tech at Wisconsin
CBSSNNorfolk St. at Rutgers
ESPNFlorida at Miami
ESPN2 Cincinnati at Illinois
ESPNUSouth Florida at Michigan St.
MSGWestern Kentucky at Tennessee
PLUS, ROOTSouth Carolina St. at Clemson
SE2 Central Connecticut St. at Lehigh
SNY, WSWB Houston at Temple
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, San Diego St. at
Ohio St. or Oregon at Virginia
CBSSNUtah St. at Air Force
ESPNUToledo at Missouri
ESPN2 Regional coverage, San Diego St. at
Ohio St. or Oregon at Virginia
NBCSNDelaware St. at Delaware
4 p.m.
ESPNEWS Old Dominion at Maryland
PLUS Bufalo at Baylor
4:30 p.m.
ESPNSouth Carolina at Georgia
6 p.m.
BTNNavy at Indiana
BTNSouthern Mississippi at Nebraska
BTNSyracuse at Northwestern
7 p.m.
CBSSNColorado St. at Tulsa
ESPN2 Texas at BYU
ESPNU Alabama-Birmingham at Louisiana
St.
FOXWest Virginia at Oklahoma
PLUS Stephen F. Austin St. at Texas Tech
8 p.m.
ESPNNotre Dame at Michigan
10:30 p.m.
CBSSNArizona at Nevada-Las Vegas
*
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, European Masters,
third round, at Crans sur Sierre, Switzerland
(same-day tape)
1:30 p.m.
TGC Web.com Tour, Chiquita Classic, third
round, at Davidson, N.C.
4 p.m.
TGCUSGA, Walker Cup, frst round, at South
Hampton, N.Y.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Montreal Champion-
ship, second round (same-day tape)
*
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
ONTHE INTERNET
1:30 p.m.
www.northeastfootball.com Dallas at Abing-
ton Heights
7 p.m.
www.northeastfootball.com Dunmore at
GAR
ON RADIO
1 p.m.
ESPNRadio(96.1/101.1 FM) Dallas at Abington
Heights
FOX Sports Radio, The Game
(1340/1400/1440 AM, 100.7/106.7 FM) Dallas
at Abington Heights (pregame 12:40 p.m.)
7 p.m.
FOX Sports Radio, The Game
(1340/1400/1440 AM, 100.7/106.7 FM) Dun-
more at GAR (pregame at 7 p.m.)
7 p.m.
SE19 Dunmore at GAR
*
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m.
FOXBoston at N.Y. Yankees
6 p.m.
SNYN.Y. Mets at Cleveland
7 p.m.
CSNAtlanta at Philadelphia
ROOTPittsburgh at St. Louis
*
SOCCER
10 p.m.
NBCSNMLS, Chicago at Seattle
*
TENNIS
Noon
CBS U.S. Open, mens semifnals, at New
York
NATIONWIDE QUALIFYING
After Friday qualifying; race Friday
At Richmond International Raceway
Richmond, Va.
Lap length: .75 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (2) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 124.327.
2. (18) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 124.292.
3. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 124.218.
4. (22) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 123.99.
5. (12) SamHornishJr., Ford, 123.961.
6. (99) Alex Bowman, Toyota, 123.683.
7. (54) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 123.53.
8. (7) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 123.423.
9. (20) BrianVickers, Toyota, 123.4.
10. (29) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 123.395.
11. (43) Michael Annett, Ford, 123.367.
12. (77) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 123.108.
13. (31) JustinAllgaier, Chevrolet, 122.99.
14. (5) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 122.984.
15. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 122.945.
16. (30) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 122.934.
17. (11) Elliott Sadler, Toyota, 122.828.
18. (32) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 122.828.
19. (33) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 122.455.
20. (14) Jef Green, Toyota, 122.332.
21. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 122.017.
22. (60) Travis Pastrana, Ford, 121.973.
23. (19) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 121.874.
24. (10) Chase Miller, Toyota, 121.869.
25. (70) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 121.852.
26. (16) Ryan Reed, Ford, 121.726.
27. (4) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 121.682.
28. (37) Matt DiBenedetto, Dodge, 121.468.
29. (55) Jamie Dick, Chevrolet, 121.327.
30. (44) Hal Martin, Toyota, 121.114.
31. (01) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 120.903.
32. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 120.697.
33. (42) JoshWise, Chevrolet, 120.016.
34. (40) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 119.782.
35. (86) Ricky Ehrgott, Chevrolet, 119.691.
36. (24) Ryan Ellis, Toyota, 119.19.
37. (52) Joey Gase, Chevrolet, 119.137.
38. (79) Jefrey Earnhardt, Ford, 119.105.
39. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
40. (46) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 119.069.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 3B
Mohawks knocked out by Old Forge
DEREKLEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
OLD FORGE Brandon
Yescavage was a bit agitated.
Old Forges senior running
back wasnt thrilled with the
Blue Devils six-point win on
opening night against Lake-
Lehman. He was determined
to make a bigger splash on
Friday against Meyers.
I was kind of mad,
Yescavage said. So I was
going to take it out on this
team.
Did he ever.
The 6-foot-2 bruiser helped
the Devils steamroll the
Mohawks, racking up 231
yards and four touchdowns
in a 49-6 victory at Veterans
Memorial Stadium.
Couldnt do it without my
line and my fullback, said
Yescavage, who is following
in the footsteps of depart-
ed all-state tailback Brian
Tomasetti. We were amped
up.
To replace Brian, hey,
youre not going to do that,
Devils coach Mike Schuback
said. Youve just got to let
Brians legacy be his. Now
Brandons taking over and
making his own. So were
really proud of that. Hes a
heck of a competitor.
It showed as Old Forge
(2-0) nished with 388 yards
on the ground and took con-
trol early, leading 28-6 at half-
time.
Shane Schuback triggered
the mercy rule at 42-6 mid-
way through the third quar-
ter. The tight end came in
motion and took a handoff,
getting some excellent block-
ing for a 26-yard score.
Theyre a physical team,
Meyers coach Corry Hanson
said. And when they kept
punching us and punching
us, they just broke us down.
Yescavages performance
was bookended by two big
plays a pick-six by Jake
Manetti on the games rst
drive and a 96-yard dash up
the middle for a score by
Brandon Vahey in the games
nal minute.
The Devils also picked up
a safety in the rst quarter
when a snap on a punt sailed
back into the end zone.
Hanson was upset at how
his team handled the adver-
sity.
Right now, were not men-
tally tough, Hanson said.
We were in the game early in
the rst half, and I thought if
we caught a touchdown pass
that went off our receivers
hands, its 28-14 at halftime
and then we come out and
play a different ballgame.
But thats not the way it
came out. Weve got to make
big plays from our playmak-
ers.
They got a handful from
one of them, quarterback
Matt DeMarco. The senior
stunned the Blue Devils on
the Mohawks third drive,
faking a handoff and making
a few quick cuts in the hole
on an option keeper, racing
91 yards for his teams only
touchdown.
DeMarco would nish the
night with 153 yards rushing,
but almost all of the damage
was limited to that one huge
play and a few nice runs just
before halftime.
For the most part, the
Devils stayed patient on
defense and didnt allow
Meyers (1-1) to break con-
tain on any pitches.
I honestly thought, the
way we play the option and
the veer, weve been very
disciplined, Mike Schuback
said. We try to work that
into practice. We show those
kids a lot of that.
Old Forge 49, Meyers 6
Meyers 6 0 0 0 6
Old Forge 14 14 14 7 49
First quarter
OF Jake Manetti 35 interception return (kick
failed), 10:20
MEYMatt DeMarco 91 run (kick failed), 6:18
OF Brandon Yescavage 11 run (run failed),
4:35
OF Safety, Cal Lisman tackled in end zone,
2:17
Second quarter
OF Yescavage 1 run (Christian Mozeleski
kick), 7:11
OF Yescavage 2 run (Mozeleski kick), 1:47
Third quarter
OF Yescavage 21 run (Mozeleski kick), 9:06
OFShane Schuback 26run (Mozeleski kick),
7:10
Fourth quarter
OF Brandon Vahey 96 run (Mozeleski kick),
1:00
Teamstatistics Meyers Old Forge
First downs 8 15
Rushes-yards 35-164 36-388
Passing yards -2 30
Total yards 162 418
Passing 3-14-1 1-2-0
Sacked-yards lost 2-5 2-10
Punts-avg. 5-31.0 2-41.5
Fumbles-lost 3-1 1-1
Penalties-yards 2-10 5-55
INDIVIDUALSTATISTICS
RUSHING MEY, Matt DeMarco 20-153, Nate
Mahalak 8-28, Mark Robinson 1-3, Zahir Dunell
5-(minus-4), team 1-(minus-16). OF, Brandon Yes-
cavage 20-231, Brandon Vahey 7-99, Shane Schu-
back 2-47, Jake Manetti 5-14, team1-(minus-1), Joey
Gutowski 1-(minus-2).
PASSING MEY, DeMarco 3-13-0-(minus-2),
Dunell 0-1-1-0. OF, Manetti 1-2-0-30.
RECEIVING MEY, Robinson 2-(minus-1), Tyon
Thomas 1-(minus-1). OF, StevenMascaro1-30.
INTERCEPTIONSOF, Manetti.
MISSEDFGsNone.
Mid Valleys Gorton scores TD to ice game
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
Mid Valleys Josh Gorton (33) falls to the ground as Wyoming Areas Michael Lumley tries to take him down during a high school football game
Friday night in West Pittston.
Warriors fall short against Spartans
TOM ROBINSON
For the Times Leader
WEST PITTSTON Mid Valley
held off a Wyoming Area threat to tie
the game early in the fourth quarter.
Moments later, the Spartans broke
the game open.
Josh Gorton went 71 yards for a
touchdown with 8:08 remaining to pro-
vide the clinching score as the Spartans
won their rst game under new coach
Dave Rebar, 29-14, over host Wyoming
Area Friday night.
Wyoming Area put three rst downs
together in the same drive for the only
time in the game to end the third quar-
ter.
The Warriors (0-2) appeared to set up
rst-and-goal at the 1 on the second play
of the fourth, only to be pushed back by
a holding penalty. They ultimately gave
the ball up on a missed eld goal with
9:48 left.
The penalty right there is a key
penalty, Wyoming Area coach Randy
Spencer said. You push one in from
there, you go for two and the games on.
Again, a critical mistake there put us
in a position where we tried to get the
three to make it a one-score game.
Gorton widened the gap by scoring a
touchdown when he appeared stopped
for the second time in the game. About
halfway through his 71-yard run, the
Warriors seemed ready to push him out
of bounds, but he managed to brush off
the shove and tip toe down the sideline
for the only score of the second half.
Youre always lucky to have a kid like
Josh Gorton, Rebar said. Hes quiet.
He doesnt say much, but he works
exceptionally hard.
Wyoming Area needed two big plays
to stay in the game in the rst half,
which ended with Mid Valley in front,
22-14.
Jeff Skursky ran 39 yards through a
huge hole off right tackle on the games
rst play to set up a quick score. A rst
down on a penalty three plays later was
the last of the half for the Warriors,
who took a 6-0 lead on Skurskys 1-yard
touchdown run.
Mid Valley 29, Wyoming Area 14
Mid Valley 7 15 0 7 29
Wyoming Area 6 8 0 0 14
First quarter
WA Skursky 1 run (kick failed), 8:07
MV Gorton 30 run (Collins kick), 4:49
Second quarter
MV Collins 13 pass fromShay (kick failed), 10:26
MV Safety (punt snap through end zone), 9:27
WA Condry 45 interception return (Skursky run), 5:23
MVWood 42 pass fromShay (Collins kick), :45.4
Third quarter None
Fourth quarter
MV Gorton 71 run (Collins kick), 8:08
Team statistics MV WA
First downs 11 10
Rushes-yards 34-204 39-101
Passing yards 128 66
Total yards 332 167
Passing 5-15-1 10-15-1
Sacked-yards lost 1-5 4-28
Punts-avg. 3-30.3 3-35.7
Fumbles-lost 0-0 4-1
Penalties-yards 4-20 5-30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING MV, Gorton 9-125, Walsh 9-40, Collins 11-37, Shay 4-3,
Team 1-minus 1. WA, Skursky 17-96, Gorki 13-38, Marsola 4-4, Wilson
1-minus 1, Borton 3-minus 18, Team1-minus 18.
PASSING MV, Shay 5-15-1-128. WA, Gorki 9-14-1-57; Borton 1-1-
0-9.
RECEIVING MV, Wood 2-76, Collins 2-36, Walsh 1-16. WA, Steve
4-27, Condry 3-17, Skursky 1-9, Steve 1-7, Murray 1-6.
INTERCEPTIONS MV, Collins. WA, Condry.
MISSED FGs WA, Lenkaitis 29.
Williamsport blanked by Mifin County
The Times Leader staf
W I L L I A M S P O R T
Mifflin County held
Williamsport to 98 total
yards in a 25-0 victory over
the Millionaires on Friday
night.
John Michael Maclay had
a big night on both sides
of the ball for the Huskies,
pulling down two intercep-
tions and scoring the games
first touchdown on a 16-yard
pass from Brice Christine.
Christine added a 26-yarded
to Curtis Jerzerick in the
third quarter to make it 19-0.
Williamsport managed just
44 yards on the ground in 27
attempts. Isaac Foust, who
ran for 186 yards in a Week 1
win over Central Mountain,
was limited to just 36 yards
on 13 carries.
The passing game also
stalled, as three quarter-
backs combined to go 9-for-
17. Dale Berkheimer, who
completed 10 passes for 90
yards last week, was limited
to 18 yards on 4- of-9 pass-
ing. Berkheimer threw both
interceptions charged to the
Millionaires.
Mifin County 25, Williamsport 0
Mifin County 7 6 12 0 25
Williamsport 0 0 0 0 0
First quarter
M- John Michael Maclay 16 pass from Brice Christine
(kick good), 4:33
Second quarter
M- Gage Reesman 6 run (kick failed), 10:00
Third quarter
M- Curtis Jerzerick 26 pass fromBrice Christine (pass
failed), 9:46
M- Kyle Kahley 5 run (kick failed), 4:15
Teamstatistics Mif Wmpt
First downs 12 9
Rushes-yards 35-218 27-44
Passing yards 105 54
Total yards 323 98
Passing 7-15-0 9-17-2
Fumbles-lost 1-1 2-1
Penalties-yards 6-55 6-45
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING MIF, Heath Hidlay 15-132; Kyle Kahley
11-55; Jadon Boyer 5-24; Gage Reesman 1-6; Jason Cic-
colini 2-7; Hunter Walker 1-(-6). WIL, Isaac Foust 13-36;
Rhomello Martin 4-16; Dale Berkheimer 2-8; Justin Hof-
man 1-(-3); Jerah Reeves 5-(-6); Christian Diggs 2-(-7).
PASSING MIF, Brice Christine 6-11-0-91; Hunter
Walker 1-4-0-14. WIL, Dale Berkheimer 4-9-2-18; Jerah
Reeves 3-4-0-18; Christian Diggs 2-4-0-17.
RECEIVING MIF, Tyler Gardner 4-67; John Maclay
3-38. WIL, Tajmir Williams 3-26; Malik Wilson 2-8; Tan-
ner Bashnick 1-7; Jerah Reeves 1-3; Donte Johnson 1-3;
Rhomello Martin 1-7.
INTERCEPTIONS MIF, John Michael Maclay 2.
TrojanD
fexes its
muscles
JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
NANTICOKE When you
win by 48, you expect to talk
about how great the offense
was.
The offense was for
Nanticoke, but the defense
stole the show.
The Trojans allowed 112
total yards, including a terric
goalline stand, in a 48-0 rout
of Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech
on Friday night in a non-league
matchup.
The Trojans (1-1) allowed
24 or fewer yards in three of
the four quarters against the
Rams. They didnt have a sack,
but they made eight of their
42 tackles in the Vo-Tech back-
eld. Derek Fisher led the way,
getting in on three tackles for
loss. Michael Rosario-Clark,
Tyler Hanna, Alec Norton,
Ron Kotz, Blake Balderamma,
Kyle Gavrish and Mitchell
Romanowski were all in on
tackles that sent the Rams
(0-2) in the wrong direction.
We went back to basics this
week, Bruza said. We took
out instead of adding to the
defense and they played excep-
tional tonight.
The defense set up one score,
as linebacker Norton stepped
in front of a crossing pattern
to give the Trojans the ball at
the Vo-Tech 42. Two plays later,
J.T. Levandowski hit Jordan
Williams on a corner route for
a 29-0 lead two minutes into
the second quarter.
Closing the half, Vo-Tech
tried one last snap from the
Trojans 32 and threw for the
end zone. Pat Hempel was
there to pull the ball down at
the 1, then weaved his way
through trafc and sprung
free for a 99-yard interception
return. Nanticoke was up 48-0
at the break.
With the game decided, the
Nanticoke defense remained a
wall. Vo-Tech took over at the
Nanticoke 1 in the third quar-
ter after Colt Longenberger
recovered a fumble. A Dylan
Larkin sneak was stuffed for no
gain, a Chris Zanolini run was
snuffed out in the backeld
by Balderamma, a pass went
incomplete and, on fourth
down from the 3, Zanolini was
hit for a 5-yard loss by Gavrish.
Extremely, was the only
response from Rams coach
Mark Varner when asked how
disappointed he was with not
scoring from the 1.
The Rams, with just ve
seniors and 10 juniors on their
roster, were no match for the
size and speed of Nanticoke.
Nanticoke 48, Vo-Tech 0
CMVT 0 0 0 0 0
Nanticoke 15 33 0 0 48
First quarter
N Blake Balderramma 70 run (Balderramma run),
6:54
NJ.T. Levandowski 28 run (Alec Norton kick), 2:34
Second quarter
N Pat Hempel 76 pass from Levandowski (Norton
kick), 11:47
NJordanWilliams 30pass fromLevandowski (Norton
kick), 9:53
NHempel 0fumble recovery in endzone (kick failed),
5:09
N Tyler Myers 53 pass from Levandowski (Cory
Hughes kick), :54
NHempel 99 interception return (kick failed), :00
Teamstatistics CMVT Nan
First downs 9 16
Rushes-yards 37-102 30-246
Passing yards 10 159
Total yards 112 405
Passing 5-18-2 3-5-0
Sacked-yards lost 0-0 1-6
Punts-avg. 6-32.7 3-30.0
Fumbles-lost 1-0 2-1
Penalties-yards 5-52 13-96
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING VT, Chris Zanolini 25-69, Nicholas Willia-
moski 5-23, Nick Kocan 6-10, Dylan Larkin 1-0; NAN, Blake
Balderramma 8-85, Ron Kotz 7-69, Pat Hempel 2-51, Alex
Norton 3-29, J.T. Levandowski 2-22, Tyler Hanna 1-(-1), Tom
Day 2-(-4), Mick Littzi 2-(-5), Team3-0.
PASSING VT, Larkin 5-18-2-10; NAN, 3-4-0-159, Day
0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING VT, Kocan 3-5, Colton Appleman 2-5;
NAN, Hempel 1-76, Tyler Myers 1-53, JordanWilliams 1-30.
INTERCEPTIONSNAN, Norton 1-0, Hempel 1-99.
MISSED FGs None.
Tigers
stumble
to loss
JOE BARESS
For The Times Leader
SCRANTON Blocked punts, botched
snaps and big turnovers doomed Tunkhannock
Friday at Memorial Stadium as West Scranton
defeated the Tigers, 35-0.
West Scranton is a good football team, but
we were hoping that it would be a little tighter
than it turned out in the end, Tunkhannock
coach Rod Azar said. We just shot ourselves in
the foot at every turn.
After stopping the Invaders on their rst pos-
session of the game, the Tigers had an opportu-
nity to capitalize on a 15-yard penalty. Instead,
Tunkhannock botched the snap on rst down,
which ended in an eight-yard loss.
Down seven early in the second quarter, the
Tigers faced a third and long, but didnt get
an opportunity to convert because of another
botched snapped.
On the next play, Collin Lipowitch blocked a
Brian Beauchemin punt to give the Invaders the
ball on the Tunkhannock 27-yard line.
The Tigers forced a third down play, but Leo
Ciullo completed a pass to tight end Lou DiBileo
in the corner of the end zone to give the Invaders
a 14-0 lead. The pass was the rst of two back-
breaking completions of more than 20 yards.
Unfortunately, we broke too many times
tonight and gave up that big one, Azar said.
We also turned the ball over in our own terri-
tory a couple times and gave thema short eld.
On the ensuing possession, Joey Leon ran ball
into the Invaders territory on a 42-yard kickoff
return to give the Tigers life. The Tigers moved
deeper into West Scranton territory when
quarterback Ryan Ell found Brian Muckin for a
13-yard gain.
However, Tunkhannock squandered the
opportunity, losing a fumble on the next play.
The Invaders capitalized and scored before the
end of the half, to increase the Tunkhannock
decit to 21-0.
In the third quarter, Brett Stage intercepted a
Ciullo pass in the red zone and gave the Tigers a
last glimmer of hope at a comeback bid.
Once again, Tunkhannock botched a snap on
the ensuing play to put the Tigers in a another
hole.
If we hadnt made the mistakes, I thought
that we could have been in a competitive foot-
ball game, Azar said. They would have been a
tough team to beat, but I thought we could have
been a lot more competitive tonight.
West Scranton 35, Tunkhannock 0
Tunkhannock 0 0 0 0 0
West Scranton 0 21 7 7 35
First quarter
No Scoring
Second quarter
WS Joe Cawley 1 run (AndrewHudack kick), 11:11
WS Lou DiBileo 21 pass fromLeo Ciullo (Hudack kick), 6:37
WS Cawley 16 run (Hudack kick), 2:10
Third quarter
WS Cawley 16 run (Hudack kick), 2:51
Fourth quarter
WS Amir Frasier 6 run (Hudack kick), 9:41
Teamstatistics Tunk W.Scranton
First downs 8 12
Rushes-yards 30-65 34-293
Passing yards 77 72
Total yards 142 365
Passing 6-10-77 2-3-72
Sacked-yards lost 3-21 0-0
Punts-avg. 5-27.8 3-27
Fumbles-lost 5-2 0-0
Penalties-yards 2-20 8-55
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING TUNK, Ryan Cywinski 11-41, Brian Beauchemin 11-12, Joey Leon
5-13, Ryan Ell 1-4, Brian Muckin 2-(-5). WS, JoshWilliams 11-79, Angel Ortiz 3-101,
Cory Jackson-Bey 3-9, Amir Frasier 2-16, Cawley 8-52, Cameron Rawlings 2-10,
Jordan McCloe 2-22, Tyler Johnson 3-4.
PASSINGTUNK, Beauchemin 3-5-46-0, Ell 3-5-41-0. WS, Ciullo 2-4-72-1.
RECEIVING TUNK, Brett Stage 1-23, Cywinski 3-46, Beauchemin 1-(-5),
Muckin 1-13. WS, DiBileo 1-21, McCloe 1-51.
INTERCEPTIONSTUNK, Stage.
Wyoming Area quarterback Ryan Gorki scrambles for yardage against Mid Valley during a high
school football game Friday night in West Pittston.
YATESVILLE Big plays
were Pittston Areas Achilles
heel in last weeks 28-0 loss to
Abington Heights. Not much
has changed for the Patriots in
the past seven days.
Pittston Area gave up three
touchdowns of more than 50
yards en route to its second
straight loss to open the 2013
campaign, 34-18, at the hands
of Scranton Friday night.
Knights tailback Jake
McCarthy rushed for 212 yards
on 24 carries. He also caught
a 53-yard touchdown pass from
Jake Pieczynzki. But most of
that damage was done in the
second half.
The Patriots and the Knights
were locked in a battle defen-
sively in the rst two quarters.
Neither team was able to move
the ball efciently down the
eld.
I cant ask for the kids to play
better, Pittston Area coach
Mike Barrett said. I think we
fought a little harder tonight, I
really do. The defense was just
giving up big plays. We cant
continue to give up big plays.
It was the same thing last
week. We missed some very
big opportunities tonight.
Following a shutout at the
hands of Abington Heights,
Pittston Areas offense put the
ball in the end zone for the rst
three times of the 2013 season.
After 3-yard touchdown
run from McCarthy to open
the scoring, Hassan Maxwell
returned the ensuing kickoff
68 yards right up middle of
the Scranton gunners. On the
very next play, Kyle Gattuso
scampered 13 yards to put the
Patriots on the board for the
rst time in 2013.
Gattuso nished with his sec-
ond straight game over 90 yards
with 122 yards on 22 carries.
Gattusos score, however,
would be Pittston Areas last
until the fourth quarter. And
nishing drives, a problem they
had last week, was starting to
cause problems Friday night.
There were many dropped
passes that would have result-
ed in rst downs from quarter-
back James Emmett. Emmett
struggled with the dropped
passes in the rst half his
second half would improve.
McCarthys touchdown
through the air came with 3:51
to play in the rst half to make
it 13-6.
Scranton 34, Pittston Area 18
Scranton 6 7 7 14 34
Pittston Area 6 0 0 12 18
First quarter
S Jake McCarthy 3 run (kick failed), 4:06
PA Kyle Gattuso 13 run (kick failed), 3:47
Second quarter
S McCarthy 53 pass from Jake Pieczynski
(Alvaro Fernandez kick), 3:51
Third quarter
S McCarthy 7 run (Fernandez kick), 10:52
Fourth quarter
PA Gattuso 2 run (kick failed), 10:03
S Joshua Gonzalez 51 pass from Pieczynski
(Fernandez kick), 7:04
PA Rich Weinstock 24 pass from James Em-
mett (kick failed), 5:03
S McCarthy 65 run (Fernandez kick), 5:03
Team statistics Scranton Pitt Area
First downs 12 12
Rushes-yards 31-218 27-140
Passing yards 142 153
Total yards 360 293
Passing 6-11-0 6-15-1
Sacked-yards lost 3-22 6-37
Punts-avg. 3-40 4-34
Fumbles-lost 3-1 4-1
Penalties-yards 10-120 5-40
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING S, McCarthy 24-212, Pieczynski
2-25, Jared Little 2-2, Jacob Watts 1-2. PA, Gat-
tuso 22-122, Hassan Maxwell 6-24, Emmett 4-(-6),
Josh John 1-0.
PASSING S, Pieczynski 6-11-142-0. PA, Em-
mett 6-15-153-1.
RECEIVING S, Gonzalez 2-65, McCarthy
1-53, Marcus Morrison 1-19, Ramon Fields 1-5.
PA, Michael Harth 3-83, Weinstock 2-64, Michael
Schwab 1-6.
INTERCEPTIONS S, Anthony Tooson, 1-18.
MISSED FGs None.
PAGE 4B Saturday, September 7, 2013 scoreboard www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
SloppyWVWscoresvictory, 35-12
JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
KINGSTON By coach Pat
Keatings post-game huddle
demeanor, it wasnt the kind
of victory he expected to get
over the defending District 2-4
Class 4A runner-ups.
Turnovers, penalties and
sluggish starts to both halves
made Wyoming Valley Wests
35-12 victory over Delaware
Valley seem less electrifying
than it would have on paper.
The Spartans committed nine
penalties for 85 yards.
Not a very good football per-
formance by our guys tonight,
Keating said. I told them just
now too many mistakes. If
theres a bright light in it, we
made all of those mistakes and
walked away with a win. I told
them good teams always nd a
way to win.
A momentous second quar-
ter by Michael Sands lifted
the Spartans (2-0) after sloppy
rst quarter. Sands scored a
pair of touchdowns and made
a red zone interception to push
Wyoming Valley West into half-
time with a 21-6 lead.
Sands caught a 17-yard
touchdown from Mike Baur
with 5:39 left. Minutes later,
Sands caught a ball up the mid-
dle, broke several tackles and
blazed past the Warrior sec-
ondary for a 40-yard score with
55 seconds on the scoreboard.
All I saw was my quarter-
back Mike Baur, Sands said,
of his 17-yard touchdown.
The ball was up in the air. I
give all the credit to him. It
was a bit of a stretch for me
but I had to look up and make a
great catch.
A failed onside kick and
three penalties quickly brought
Delaware Valley (0-2) into scor-
ing position with 11 seconds
to go. Sands caught a pass up
the middle just before the goal
line to keep it a two-possession
game.
The Spartans found them-
selves against the brink of
the wall before their offense
clicked in the waning minutes
of the rst quarter. Delaware
Valley went with gutsy playcal-
ling, completing a 4th-and-6
pass to set up a Lex Rosario
touchdown reception to put
the Spartans down six.
I thought we were a little
bit hesitant, a little bit sleepy
when we came out, Keating
said. Both halves we didnt
start well but we nished well.
Eric Acosta gave Wyoming
Valley West a well-needed
boost with a 2-yard rushing
touchdown to put the Spartans
up 7-6 with 1:32 left in the rst
quarter.
Wyoming Valley West 35, Delaware Valley 12
Delaware Valley 6 0 6 0 12
Wyo. Valley West 7 14 7 7 35
First quarter
D Lex Rosario 18 pass from Kyle Clark (kick
blocked), 9:18
W Eric Acosta 2 run (Ian Ultsch kick), 1:32
Second quarter
W Michael Sands 17 pass from Mike Baur
(Ultsch kick), 5:39
W Sands 40 pass from Brady Davison (Ultsch
kick), :55
Third quarter
DRian Fowler 21 pass fromClark (pass failed),
7:34
W Acosta 46 run (Ultsch kick), :40
Fourth quarter
W Bill Davison 2 run (Ultsch kick), 10:17
Teamstatistics DelVal WVW
First downs 13 13
Rushes-yards 33-117 38-228
Passing yards 116 203
Total yards 233 431
Passing 10-28-2 12-21-2
Sacked-yards lost 2-12 1-6
Punts-avg. 5-42.2 3-19
Fumbles-lost 2-1 1-1
Penalties-yards 4-35 9-85
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING DV, Rosario 16-72, Clark 5-10, Wayne Se-
bring 4-13, Brett Cohen 6-0, TEAM 1-1. WVW, Bi. Davison
4-25, Acosta 10-133, Baur 15-54, Shawn Judge 5-12, Troy
Yashinski 1-7, Jordan Mason 1-0, Dasheym Weeks 1-1,
TEAM1-(minus-4).
PASSING DV, Clark 9-19-1-106, Cohen 1-9-1-10.
WVW, Baur 10-18-2-152, Br. Davison 2-3-0-51.
RECEIVING DV, Fowler 2-34, Ryan McGowan 1-11,
Rosario 3-40, Cole Acoveno 1-5, Matt Wagner 1-4, Chris
McFadden 1-3, Shawn Chelbus 1-19. WVW, Jared Kozich
2-43, LJ Wesneski 1-11, Alex Barilla 1-11, Sands 6-121, Jer-
michael Bunch 1-4, Judge 1-13.
INTERCEPTIONS DV, Clark 1-0, Cohen 1-0. WVW,
Sands 1-0, Bi. Davison 1-4.
MISSED FGs None
Vigil runs
Lehman
past slow
Montrose
TOM FOX
For The Times Leader
MONTROSE Not even
a long bus ride to almost the
New York border could slow
down Lake-Lehman.
Quite frankly, nothing could
stop the Black Knights on this
night.
Joey Vigil ran for 160 yards
and three touchdowns in the
rst half, and Lake-Lehmans
defense held Montrose to nega-
tive yardage through the rst
three quarters as the Black
Knights rolled, 60-0, in non-
conference football game.
As for a letdown after a
tough loss to Old Forge in
Week 1, think twice. Lehman
(1-1) jumped out to a 21-0 lead
after one quarter and led 41-0
at halftime.
We did a nice job of mixing
up the runs, and throwing the
ball, too, Lehman head coach
Jerry Gilsky said. It was a
tough loss to Old Forge and its
hard to open the season in the
loss column, but the kids came
back to practice and we moved
on. On offense, you dont want
to live and die with one player.
Thats why we want multiple
guys to touch the ball. We are
condent in all of our backs.
It makes it really tough for the
defense to key on just one guy.
For Vigil, it was a breakout per-
formance for the promising back.
He scored on three straight
touches in the second quarter,
reaching paydirt on runs of 44,
40 and 13 yards.
If there were any nerves
for the young back, they were
quickly dashed aside as the
Meteors couldnt contain him
around the corner of a physi-
cal offensive line that pushed
Montrose all around the eld.
Our line is just so big and
physical. The holes they opened
up for me were amazing. They
deserve so much of the credit,
Vigil said. Without them, I
couldnt get the yards.
He nished with 160 yards on
just seven rst-half carries.
We had a real tough week
of practice to prepare for this
game, Vigil said. Everyone was
real serious, and determined to
get back on track. Myself, Im
happy. I feel great.
The Black Knights nished
with 485 yards of offense 425
on the ground.
Lake-Lehman 60, Montrose 0
LL`21`20`12`7``60
Montrose`0`0`0`0``0
First quarter
L Dustin Jones 7 run (Brady Butler kick), 8:51
L Josh Sayre 59 run (Butler kick), 6:41
L Bobby Wright 25 pass from Sayre (Butler
kick), 2:20
Second quarter
L Joey Vigil 40 run (kick failed), 6:45
L Vigil 44 run (Butler kick), 3:35
L Vigil 13 run (Butler kick), 0:22
Third quarter
L Antonio Ferrari 5 run (kick failed), 8:55
L Tyler Long 16 run (kick blocked), 0:45
Fourth quarter
L Jimmy Stuart 36 run (Tyler Harry kick), 4:45
Team statistics `L `M
First downs `14 `5
Rushes-yards `38-425 `37-30
Passing yards `60 `7
Total yards `485 `37
Passing `2-3-0 `2-4-0
Sacked-yards lost `2-16 `0-0
Punts-avg. `0-0 `6-28.9
Fumbles-lost `1-1 `2-1
Penalties-yards `5-40 `6-30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING LL, Dustin Jones 9-63, Brady But-
ler 6-47, Joey Vigil 7-160, Josh Sayre 3-57, Kody
Pachamovitch 2-15, Jimmy Stuart 3-45, Hunter
Nice 4-8, Nick Eury 1-7, Antonio Ferrari 1-5, Tyler
Long 2-18. M, Mike Stewart 6-18, Connor Kajolis
4-5, Robert Purdy 5-23, Patrick Parks 1-6, Team
1-0, William Hewes 12-(-2), Trevor Tompkins 4-(-
6), Mike Vaness 3-(-14).
PASSING LL, Josh Sayre 2-3-0-60. M, Mike
Vaness 2-4-7-0
RECEIVING LL, Kyle Romanofski 1-35,
Bobby Wright 1-25. M, Austin Cook 1-12, Patrick
Parks 1-(-5).
Kahlau,
Comets
run
wild
MOSCOW - On his way to
the line of scrimmage, Tanner
Kahlau said he saw an opening.
Thats all he needed to get
Crestwood off and running.
Kahlau dashed straight to
the end zone again and again
and again - scoring four touch-
downs in all Friday while lead-
ing the Comets to a 40-21 romp
past North Pocono for their
rst win of the season.
The one play was open,
Kahlau said. I needed to make
a couple moves.
Seems like he was intent on
moving straight to paydirt.
Kahlau scored on touchdown
runs of 15 and 27 yards in the
rst half to give the Comets
a slim halftime advantage,
then he broke the game open
with scoring bursts of 39 and
40 yards. The rst one got
Crestwood within 7-6 in the
second quarter. The last one
set the nal score with 33 sec-
onds remaining.
Inbetween, Kahlau rolled up
a team-high 128 rushing yards,
giving Crestwood two 100-yard
backs for the night.
Mainstay tailback Frank
Aigeldinger - who actually took
a slew of direct snaps and hand-
ed a few of them off to Kahlau
- nished with 111 yards.
We like to run the football,
theres no doubt about it,
Crestwood coach Greg Myers
said. Tanners really been
stepping up. A lot of teams
have been keying on Frank
and some of our other backs.
Tanners sort of been the guy
nobodys been watching out
for.
On Friday, North Pocono
watched Kahlau turn into a
human highlight reel.
His 27-yard sprint across the
goal line with 1:34 remaining
in the opening half lifted the
Comets into a 21-15 lead, then
Kahlau opened the fourth quar-
ter with a 39-yard t0uchdown
run to give Crestwood breath-
ing room, 27-15.
Not to be outdone,
Crestwood quarterback Jay
Popson added 103 passing
yards in the rst half - includ-
ing a 25-yard touchdown pass
to Connor Sheloski.
Crestwood 40, North Pocono 21
Crestwood 6 15 0 19 40
North Pocono 7 8 0 6 21
First quarter
NP Luke Fetter 1 run (Corey Rinaldi kick),
5:42
C Tanner Kahlau 15 run (run failed), 1:38
Second quarter
C Connor Sheloski 25 pass from Jay Popson
(Popson conversion run), 8:22
NP Paul Baldauff 15 pass from Fetter (Matt
Nawrocki conversion run), 4:00
C Kahlau 27 run (George Gendler kick), 1:34
Fourth quarter
C Kahlau 39 run (run failed)
C Jacob Zalogna 1 run (Gendler kick), 7:13
NP Brian D Agostino 24 pass from
Fetter (pass failed), 8:31
C Kahlau 40 run (kick failed), 0:33
Team statistics Crest N.Pocono
First downs 17 6
Rushes-yards 41-366 25-80
Passing yards 103 88
Total yards 469 168
Passing 4-4-0 7-11-1
Sacked-yards lost 0-0 1-5
Punts-avg. 1-34 2-37.5
Fumbles-lost 2-2 3-1
Penalties-yards 9-99 5-17
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING CRES, Tanner Kahlau 8-128,
Frank Aigeldinger 15-111, Jacob Zbegner 9-57,
Jay Popson 4-53, Matt Bobeck 5-17. NP, Matt
Kelly 14-54, Mike Epifano 5-40, Paul Badauff 1-1,
Brady Dial 1-0, Luke Fetter 3- (minus 4), TEAM 1-
(minus 11).
PASSINGCRES, Popson 4-4-0-103. NP, Fet-
ter 7-11-1-88.
RECEIVING CRES, Connor Sheloski 2-59,
Andrew Chang 1-34, Timothy Tokash 1-10. NP,
Kelly 4-47, Badauff 2-17, Brian D Agostino
1-24.
INTERCEPTIONS CRES, Matt MacDonald.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@civitasmedia.com
Big plays, mistakes hand PAsecond loss
Berwick storms into Pottsville, 56-7
JUSTIN BEITER
For The Times Leader
POTTSVILLE Berwick had
come to play. The Bulldogs put
together a near perfect rst half of
football, scoring on ve of six pos-
sessions whilerackingup296yards
of total offense. Complimented by
an aggessive defense that nished
at minus-1 yardrushing allowedfor
the game, Berwick turned in a 56-7
dismantling of Pottsville.
I told our kids, when you come
to a strange area, you have to play
extra hard, Berwick coach George
Curry said. You dont know what
youre going to get ofciating-wise.
You dont know what youre going
to get playing on grass. A good
teamis going to play.
I dont care if we have to play in
the rice patties of Vietnam, we have
to be able to play football. The kids
did what they had to do.
After facing eight- and nine-man
fronts against Crestwood last week
that stied the running game,
Berwick got Dain Kowalski going
in Week 2 with three touchdowns
in the rst half.
They gave us a bunch of holes,
Kowalski said of his offensive line.
I just found them and hit them.
Our wide recievers also blocked for
me too. I only hadtoput a move on
the safety, which was a one-on-one
matchup.
Kowalski led the charge on the
rst drive, then the Bulldogs used
a more balanced attack on their
second possession. C.J. Curry
connected with Andrew Force on
a 43-yard pass to set up another
Kowalski score.
The onslaught continued on
Berwicks next possession when
the duo of Curry and Force hooked
up again on a 66-yard pass to con-
vert and 3rd-and-18, moving the
ball to the Pottsville 9. Berwicks
lead grew to 21-0 on Kowalskis
third score.
Last week, Crestwood had nine
in the box, and we threw all over
them, Kowalski said. (Pottsville)
sawhowwe passed, and they went
nickel trying to cover us more. So
we just pounded the ball up the
middle.
Berwick(2-0)madeitfourtouch-
downs in as many possessions
when Curry hit Kyle Trenholm on
a 66-yard scoring strike.
When you get protection, you
can score, Curry said. They were
more prepared to cover the pass,
but we still the middle and inter-
mediate routes. They covered the
deep ones, but the intermediate
ones, like the one where we hit
Trenholmon were there.
Berwicks only rst-half blemish
came on a fumble, but the Dawgs
returned the favor on the next play,
as A.J. Vandermark recovered a
fumble. Two plays later, Jorden
Stout scored on a 4-yard run that
increasedthe leadto35-0with1:36
left before halftime.
Although the Bulldogs were able
to rest their starters for most of the
second half, their head coach didnt
necessarilyseethat as agoodthing.
I like to play four quarters,
Curry said. You practice your butt
off all week, and you hate (coming
out). You want to get tested. The
only way you learn how to play
football is in tough games.
Berwick 56, Pottsville 7
Berwick 14 21 7 14 56
Pottsville 0 0 7 0 7
First quarter
BER Dain Kowalski 1 run (kick failed), 5:29
BER Kowalski 2 run (Kowalski run), 0:00
Second quarter
BER Kowalski 1 run (Olivia Seely kick), 9:18
BER Kyle Trenholm 66 pass from C.J. Curry
(Seely kick). 4:56
BER Jorden Stout 4 run (Seely kick), 1:36
Third quarter
POT John Toomey 13 pass fromTyler Moser
(Kolby Kleckner kick), 4:58
BER Andrew Force 38 pass from Curry
(Seely kick), 2:05
Fourth quarter
BER Nick Talanca 1 run (Seely kick), 9:02
BER Daquan Hellenthal 2 run (Seely kick),
3:01
Team statistics Berwick Pottsville
First downs 14 6
Rushes-yards 37-17427-(minus-1)
Passing yards 253 86
Total yards 427 85
Passing 10-16-0 8-16-0
Sacked-yards lost 1-4 3-38
Punts-avg. 0-0.0 6-31.5
Fumbles-lost 3-2 3-3
Penalties-yards 1-10 4-30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING BER, Dain Kowalski 13-53, Alex
Klinger 3-32, C.J. Curry 4-27, Kyle Trenholm1-17,
Daquan Hellenthal 3-16, Nate Maczuga 3-13, Nick
Talanca 3-9, Matt Shannon 1-9, Jorden Stout 2-3,
Alex Koch 1-1, Marcus Welliver 1-0, Mike Force
1-(minus-2), Dallas Arner 1-(minus-4). POT, Dar-
ion Jacoby 12-23, Carey Bostick 3-1, Brett Van-
derMeer 2-1, Brandon Daubert 1-0, Travis Blan-
kenhorn 1-(minus-9), Tyler Moser 8-(minus-17).
PASSING BER, Curry 9-15-0-250, Arner
1-1-0-3. POT, Moser 8-16-0-86.
RECEIVING BER, Andrew Force 3-147, Tr-
enholm 2-71, Ian Mazonkey 1-21, Will Updegrove
1-13, Klinger 1-6, Trevon Simmons 1-3, Kowalski
1-(minus-8). POT, John Toomey 4-30, Timmy Vaz
1-26; A.J. Stevens 1-13, Jacoby 1-11, Blanken-
horn 1-6.
INTERCEPTIONS None.
MISSED FGs None.
Nick Wagner
nwagner@psdispatch.com
Tony Callaio | For The Times Leader
Pittston Area running back Hassan Maxwell gets past a Scranton defender for a five-yard gain Friday night.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SPORTS Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 5B
Northwest blanked by
Meyers in feld hockey
The Times Leader staf
WILKES-BARRE
Brianna DiMaggio and
Marissa Prince each
scored a goal as Meyers
defeated Northwest, 2-0,
in a Wyoming Valley
Conference eld hockey
game Friday afternoon.
Allison Berman had one
assist for the Mohawks.
Hanover Area 3, Elk
Lake 1
Hanover Area was led
by scores from Brittany
McNair, McKayla Halesay
and Marissa Keejan.
Logan Adams scored
Elk Lakes lone goal.
Berwick 4, GAR 3
Ashton Mensinger
scored two goals, includ-
ing the game winner to
lead the Bulldogs.
Bri Seabrook scored
all three goals for the
Grenadiers.
Berwick 4, GAR 3
Berwick 3 1 4
GAR 2 1 3
First half 1. BER, Kasey Rood (Allie Kat-
sock), 19:02; 2. BER, Ky Welsh (Stephanie
Harper), 13:43; 3. BER, Ashton Mensinger (Alexis
Steeber), 13:19; 4. GAR, Bri Seabrook, 6:22; 5.
GAR, Seabrook (Kristin Drozca), 3:35; Second
half 6. GAR, Seabrook (Drozca), 18:43; 7. BER,
Mensinger (Kiersten Bertollo), 13:06.
Shots BER 13; GAR 15. Saves BER 10
(Lizzie Dyer); GAR2 (BrittanyVital). Penalty cor-
ners BER 4; GAR 11.
Hanover Area 3, Elk Lake 1
Hanover Area 2 1 3
Elk Lake 1 0 1
First half 1. ELK, LoganAdams, 1:14; 2. HAN,
Brittany McNair, 20:05; 3. HAN, McKayla Halesay,
7:40; Second half 4. HAN, Marissa Keejen (Au-
brey Volenski), 12:45.
Shots HAN 7; ELK 6. Saves HAN 6 (Un-
available); ELK 5 (Brooke Seamans). Penalty
corners HAN6; ELK5.
Meyers 2, Northwest 0
Northwest 0 0 0
Meyers 0 2 0
First half No Scoring. Second half 1.
Mey, Brianna DiMaggio, 20:07; 2. Mey, Marissa
Prince (Allison Berman), 16:37.
Shots NW10; MEY 2. Saves NW3 (Olivia
Piestrak); MEY 1 (Sabrina Robertson). Penalty
corners NW3; MEY8.
Monarchs post victory
at Miseri Invitational
The Times Leader
DALLAS TWP Kim
Howanitz scored two goals
as Kings College defeat-
ed Keystone, 6-2, in the
Misericordia University
Field Hockey Invitational
Friday.
Kings goalie Megan
Withrow posted two saves.
Juniata 3, Misericordia
1
Misericordia lost to
Juniata to fall to 0-3 on the
season.
Samantha Partington
scored the only goal for the
Lady Cougars.
COLLEGE WOMENS
SOCCER
Kings 2, Elmira 1
Kings College posted a
victory over visiting Elmira
College.
Alexandra Garrett and
Ivy Nulton scored for the
Lady Monarchs.
HIGH SCHOOL GOLF
Wyoming Seminary
178, Nanticoke 212
Jon Zirnheld and Andrew
Golden led the way for the
Blue Knights win.
Joe Olszyk led the effort
for the Trojans.
Coughlin 155, Hazleton
Area 175
Dalton Lentini shot a 36
and Alex Anderson shot a
37 in the Crusaders win on
Thursday.
Rich Gawel shot a 38 for
the Cougars.
HIGH SCHOOL
TENNIS
Holy Redeemer 5,
Wyoming Valley West 0
The Royals defeated the
Spartans outscoring them
60-5, including four shut-
outs in doubles action.
HIGH SCHOOL GOLF
Wyoming Seminary
178, Nanticoke 212
at Huntsville, par 36
NAN (212) Joe
Olszyk 45; Mike Malshefski
50; Kyle Rosick 58; Dennis
Wrubel 59.
SEM (178) Jon
Zirnheld 41; Andrew
Golden42; JarodGodlewski
46; Marc Lafond 49.
Coughlin 155, Hazleton
Area 175
at Sugarloaf, par 36
COU (155) Dalton
Lentini 36; Alex Anderson
37; Corey Hauser 38; Billy
Mills 44.
HAZ (175) Rich
Gawel 38; Josh Provost 45;
Geran Triano 45; Adam
Grula 47.
HIGH SCHOOL
TENNIS
Holy Redeemer 5,
Wyoming Valley West 0
SINGLES HR
Megan McGraw d. Laura
Monto 6-0, 6-1; HR Emily
Kavalka d. Emily Coslett
6-1, 6-2; HR Angela
Malinovich d. Laura
Thompson 6-0, 6-1.
DOUBLES HR
Natalie Coffee/Hannah
Thornton d. Madison
Natello/Morgan McIntyre
6-0, 6-0; HR Danie
Cosgrove/Abby Muth d.
Courtney Borland/Ryley
Phillips 6-0, 6-0.
Delaware Valley tops
Crestwood in volleyball
The Times Leader
WRIGHT TWP.
Rachel Miller recorded
11 assists to lead Delware
Valley to victory over
Crestwood by scores of
25-13, 25-11, 25-23 Friday
night in high school girls
volleyball action.
Olivia Jankowski led the
Crestwood effort with ve
service points.
Holy Redeemer 3,
Wyoming Area 0
Lauren Slovasky dished
out 23 service points, while
Nicole Slovasky recorded 15
kills in the Royals shutout
win.
The Warriors were led by
Sam Acacios four kills.
Delaware Valley 3, Crestwood 0
Delaware Valley 25 25 25
Crestwood 13 11 23
DV: Taylor Drauog 9 kills, 7 service points, 3
blocks; Alyssa Kelly 8 kills; Rachel Miller 11 as-
sists, 3 service points.
CRE: Olivia Jankowski 9 assists, 16 digs, 5 ser-
vice points; Emily Seple 10 assists, 11 digs, 5 kills.
Holy Redeemer 3, Wyoming Area 0
Wyoming Area 12 11 15 0 0
Holy Redeemer 25 25 25 0 0
WA: Sam Acacio 4 kills; Mallory Bohan 1 kill,
5 digs
HR: Nicole Slovasky 15 kills, 2 blocks, 8 service
points; Lauren Slovasky 23 service points, 2 aces,
1 kill; Alyssa Platko 5 kills, 1 block.
to do to get better, and if we make
those improvements we got a chance
to improve each week, OBrien
said. And thats why you see that
game one to game two improvement.
Hopefully youll see that this
week.
The rushing numbers gure to
increase dramatically against an
Eagles team that ranked dead last in
the country against the run in 2012,
nishing 120th out of 120 teams at
267.0 ypg allowed. In last weeks
opener, they surrendered over 200
yards on the ground to an FCS team
in Howard.
What remains to be seen is if oppo-
nents will continue to stack the box
to try to force Christian Hackenberg
to beat them through the air.
That was very clearly Syracuses
plan, with tackle Garry Gilliam esti-
mating the Orange blitzed nearly 80
percent of the time.
Given that, the Lions offensive line
graded out reasonably well consider-
ing the team managed just 57 yards
rushing for a 1.5-yard average. Those
numbers were watered down, though,
by losses on three sacks and a Tyler
Ferguson fumble.
The stats dont tell the whole side
of a running game, center Ty Howle
said. A lot of times weve got ve,
six, seven guys in there to block and
theyve got more than us. Its simple
math.
Eastern Michigan coach Ron
English watched the game tape
intently to prepare for todays meet-
ing, and he came away with the same
conclusion.
Well, I think that they struggled
(to run the ball), but Syracuses
whole deal was to put more guys up
there than Penn State could block,
English said. If you watch the whole
game, they did that. They brought a
lot of guys. They brought a lot of run
pressure.
That can be feast or famine. And
they got hit a couple of times because
of it.
And how. Because of that aggres-
siveness, Hackenberg was able to
spring Allen Robinson wide open
with a pump fake for one touchdown
and hit Eugene Lewis on play-action
for another.
Both scores came on rst-down
passes. The Lions had more problems
on third down, something OBrien
attributed to his playcalling.
I felt like wed see two high safe-
ties (on third down) and maybe stick
a run in there and get six yards,
OBrien said. That was more game-
planning by me, and it didnt work
out too well.
But while OBrien acknowledged
that there are issues to resolve the
team went over all of them in detail
in the lm room on Monday he
didnt want to be too hard on his
players, given the situation.
We went into MetLife Stadium
with a true freshman quarterback,
OBrien said. I think it was 104
degrees on the eld throughout the
game. We didnt have our best wide
receiver in the rst half of the game
because of what I decided to do there.
And defensively, we put the defense
in some tough situations. We did this
with 65 scholarship players.
Weve got a tough, resilient foot-
ball team. To me, I just think we
should be talking about that a lot.
2010 at the Big House for their lon-
gest streak since winning 16 in a row
from 2002 to 2005.
QUARTERBACK PLAY: In
last years loss at Notre Dame, the
Wolverines leading receiver was
Devin Gardner. Now, hes back at his
natural position. Gardner has won
four games as a starting QB, but none
of them could be considered a signa-
ture victory. Tommy Rees became the
No. 1 QB again for the Irish when
Everett Golson was suspended from
school for the fall semester. Rees
made the most of the opportunity in
the opener, throwing for a career-high
346 yards with three touchdowns
without an interception.
JUST FOR KICKS: Michigan
kicker Brendan Gibbons has turned
himself into an asset, matching a
school record by making 14 straight
eld goals since a miss on Oct. 6,
2012, at Purdue. The Irish, mean-
while, wouldnt say two nights before
the game who will attempt eld goals
at Michigan Stadium. Nick Tausch
missed a kick miserably from 39 yards
in last weeks win over Temple and
Kyle Brindza couldnt connect on a
44-yard attempt.
LEWAN VS. TUITT: Two of the
top picks in the 2014 NFL draft, if
Notre Dame defensive end Stephon
Tuitt skips his senior season, and
Michigan left tackle Taylor Lewan
will likely have some head-to-head
matchups. Scouts in the league will
be watching. I know hes going to
bring his A game, I denitely have
to bring mine when I go against him,
Tuitt said.
BACK IN BLUE: Michigan expects
to have its two top safeties, Thomas
Gordon and Courtney Avery, back on
the eld. Gordon was suspended for
the rst game for violating unspeci-
ed team rules. Avery wasnt cleared
to play until this week after recover-
ing from knee surgery.
From page 1A
Coughlin
From page 1B
Penn State
From page 1B
Irish
have possibily gone for
touchdowns. At the very
least, both would have been
substantial gains.
The kids worked hard all
week, Hazleton Area coach
Jim Drumheller said. The
gameplan was in, we just
didnt execute and capitalize
on plays when had them.
Coughlin 26, Hazleton Area 16
Hazleton Area 3 0 7 6 16
Coughlin 6 7 7 6 26
First quarter
HATristanWilliams 27 FG, 8:28
COUTimPilch 52 run (kick failed), 1:24
Second quarter
COUDarikJohnson24pass fromPilch(Brandon
Butry kick), 0:15
Third quarter
HAJulius Ward 2 run (Williams kick), 10:51
COU Tom Mitchell 31 pass from Pilch (Burty
kick), 2:19
Fourth quarter
COUPaul Cole 6 run (kick failed), 7:20
HACharlie Burrows fumble recovery in end zone
(pass failed), 6:15
Teamstatistics Haz Area Coughlin
First downs 5 17
Rushes-yards 20-68 53-230
Passing yards 87 144
Total yards 155 374
Passing 6-14-1 8-16-2
Sacked-yards lost 1-4 0-0
Punts-avg. 4-25.3 3-25.7
Fumbles-lost 2-1 3-1
Penalties-yards 3-34 7-83
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING Haz Area, Zach Zukoski 12-29, Ward
6-5, Nick George 2 34. Coughlin, Cole 30-182, Pilch
14-55, Tyler Layton 3-5, Johnson 2-12, team 4-(mi-
nus-24).
PASSING Haz Area, Ward 6-14-1-87. Coughlin,
Pilch 7-13-2-137, Johnson 1-1-0-7, team0-2-0-0.
RECEIVING Haz Area, Jef Ochs 4-45, Gavin
Kopczynskie 1-14, George 1-19. Coughlin, Johnson
4-77, Frank Wojtash 1-7, Dave Parsnik 2-29, Mitchell
1-31.
INTERCEPTIONS Haz Area, Z.Zukoski, Ochs.
Coughlin, Chris Sebia.
MISSED FGs None.
On the night, Taylor lled
in for Belcher (78 yards,
1TD) rushing for 36 yards
and a touchdown, in addi-
tion to his long kick return.
Taylors a very good
athlete, Hawks coach Ron
Hummer said. Especially
on special teams. When he
gets a chance with an open
eld he takes advantage.
The Trail high-powered
offense was yet to get going
though and it started to click
after Taylors run scoring 34
straight points starting with
two scores in the nal 2:08
of the rst half and tacking
on three more touchdowns
in the third quarter to open
up a 54-26 lead with 4:54
left in the third quarter.
In the second half I think
we did a much better job
on the defensive line, Trail
coach Steve Jervis said.
And I think our offensive
line did a good job control-
ling the tempo in the third
quarter.
Lackawanna Trail 54, Hanover Area 40
Lackawanna Trail 14 20 20 0 54
Hanover Area 7 19 0 14 40
First quarter
HAN Brian Belcher 60 run (TomWolsiefer kick)
8:42
LT Matt Harris 21 pass from Vic Mallory (kick
failed) 5:17
LTJonathon Zedar 10 run (Zedar run) 2:12
Second quarter
LTMallory 1 run (kick failed) 9:55
HANIsaiahTaylor 91 kick return (Wolsiefer kick)
9:41
HANMike Kremenic 24 run (kick failed) 7:01
HANTaylor 5 run (kick blocked) 3:32
LT Zedar 43 pass from Mallory (Phillips pass
fromZedar) 2:08
LTZedar 12 pass fromMallory (pass failed) :06
Third quarter
LTZedar 3 run (kick failed) 9:28
LTPhillips 3 run (Mike Kearney kick) 7:21
LTZedar 41 run (Kearney kick) 4:54
Fourth quarter
HAN Elido Veras 24 pass fromJake Peters (kick
failed) 9:43
HANStephen Morgan 20 pass fromPeters (Tay-
lor run) :46
Teamstatistics Trail Hanover
First downs 20 12
Rushes-yards 48-273 25-147
Passing yards 168 166
Total yards 441 313
Passing 9-11-0 7-17-1
Sacked-yards lost 0-0 2-11
Punts-avg. 4-27 5-28
Fumbles-lost 3-1 1-1
Penalties-yards 2-16 4-30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING LT, Vic Mallory 6-(minus-1), Cooper
Rosiak 16-92, Jonathon Zedar 8-78, Jared Phillips
15-12, Josh Brown 1-0, Bryan Tuft 1-(minus-2), Rocco
Pacini 1-(minus-5). HAN, Brian Belcher 5-78, Isaiah
Taylor 11-36, Elido Veras 1-(minus-1), Mike Kremenic
4-43, Khalil Lewis 1-2, Jake Peters 2-(minus-12).
PASSING LT, Mallory 9-11-0-168. HAN, Peters
7-17-1-166.
RECEIVING LT, Matt Harris 2-35, Rosiak 1-11,
Zedar 3-67, Ross Faquier 3-56. HAN, D.J. Linker 1-14,
Veras 3-48, Stephen Morgan 3-104.
INTERCEPTIONSLT, Hunter Crook. HANnone.
MISSED FGs none
From page 1A
Trail
Don Carey | For The Times Leader
Coughlin quarterback TimPilch sprints to the end zone for a touchdown
late in the first period of a game with Hazleton at Memorial Stadium
Friday night.
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Hanover Areas Elido Veras, right, stiff-arms Lackawanna Trails Bryan
Tuft in Friday night football action in Hanover Township.
FRIDAyS HIGHSCHOOLFOOTBALL
SCORES
Lackawanna Conference
Carbondale 26, Riverside 0
Crestwood 40, North Pocono 21
LackawannaTrail 54, Hanover Area 40
Lake-Lehman 60, Montrose 0
MidValley 29, WyomingArea 14
Old Forge 49, Meyers 6
Scranton 34, PittstonArea 18
ValleyView26, Lakeland 21
West Scranton 35, Tunkhannock 0
WyomingValleyWest 35, DelawareValley 12
District 11 Class 4A
BethlehemCatholic 32, Emmaus 29
East Stroud. South 27, Pocono MountainWest 0
Easton 24, Parkland 0
Nazareth 44, Northampton 23
Pleasant Valley 51, Allentown Dieruf34
Pocono Mountain East 34, East Stroudsburg North 8
Stroudsburg 13, Lehighton 6
Tamaqua 21, AllentownAllen 0
Whitehall 28, BethlehemLiberty 19
AP file photos
Michigan coach Brady Hoke, top, and Notre Dame Brian Kelly, bottom, have traded barbs about
Notre Dame ending its series with Michigan.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER SPORTS Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 6B
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS VOLLEYBALL CAPSULES
Berwick
Head coach: Sarah Warner
Last years record: 3-14
Key losses: Dejia Simmons,
Abby Rowe
Key returners: Nicoll Donayre,
Alex Walton, Courtney Soboleski
Outlook: Our teamhas
worked unbelievably hard in
the ofseason, and has grown
in terms of skill and knowledge
of the game, said Warner, the
Bulldogs second-year head
coach. I ammore confdent in
their abilities to adapt to tough
situations and make plays.
Their confdence has grown as
well, and it shows on the court.
With many newathletic kids in
the gym, it is nice to look at our
more-experienced players for
guidance.
Coughlin
Head coach: Samantha Page
Last years record: 0-17
Key losses: Summer Kubicki
Key returners: Emilee Lester,
Carmen Garcia
Outlook: For the second
consecutive season, the
Crusaders are under the
direction of a frst-year head
coach as Samantha Page takes
over for Stephanie Bell. Page
takes over a programthat went
winless in 2012, and lost key
player Summer Kubicki fromlast
years team. Page will need to
rely heavily on the experience of
senior Emilee Lester and junior
outside hitter Carmen Garcia.
Crestwood
Head coach: Mike Williams
Last years record: 14-3
Key losses: Carina Mazzoni,
Grace Emmett
Key returners: Emily Sipple,
Nicole Jankowski, Olivia
Jankowski, Taryn Wojnar
Outlook: While the Comets lose
the steadiness and experience
frommultiple-year starter and
setter Carina Mazzoni, head
coach Mike Williams has enough
to make a run to the top of the
league. We do have a lot of
experience back, he said. We
are looking to make a push. I
believe we will be in the top-
three or top-four teams of the
league.
Dallas
Head coach: Meredith Recek
Last years record: 11-6
Key losses: Tanner Englehart,
Christina Diltz
Key returners: none
Outlook: Coming of a strong
11-6 season in 2012, the sledding
could be a little rough at Dallas
this season as fourth-year head
coach Meredith Recek lost her
entire teamto graduation
including powerful hitter Tanner
Englehart. I dont like to use
the word rebuilding, but in some
ways, we are rebuilding, she
said. Our whole teamis new,
and the league is always very
challenging. But we have a great
group of girls, and they are
willing to learn and do everything
we ask of them.
GAR
Head coach: Hattie Caruso
Last years record: 4-13
Key losses: Julianna Leco
Key returners: Jocelyne
Vazquez, Jackie Rocha, Courtney
Colorusso, Banessa Flores
Outlook: GAR will have a new
leader at the helmas Hattie
Caruso takes over for Deanna
Roulinavage. Caruso, though, will
have plenty back fromlast year.
I amproud of the girls, and I
think we look strong during our
practices, Caruso said. Plus,
we still have a pretty young team
and we can continue to develop
those girls. Our goal is to,
hopefully, improve every day and
improve on last season.
Hanover Area
Head coach: Bill Kane
Last years record: 2-15
Key losses: KimOzmini,
Amanda Fuller
Key returners: Cheyenne Fine,
Olivia Fedor
Outlook: We struggled last
year with that 2-15 record, Kane
said. But we had a really strong
camp, and we have a good group
of girls that built that chemistry.
We still have a lot of work to do,
but our main goal is to improve
on last season. If we can come
together, I knowwe can do
that. Kane, though, will have to
replace two key players of last
years teamin KimOzmini and
Amanda Fuller.
Hazleton Area
Head coach: Greg Cechak
Last years record: 9-8
Key losses: Devin Motel
Key returners: Christie
Kaschak, Maggie Bono, Katie
Landis, Julia Rudenko
Outlook: While the Cougars
have a frst-year head coach
in Greg Cechak, Hazleton Area
returns a wealth of talent and
experience, and could be one of
the dark horses in the Wyoming
Valley Conference. Back is
senior hitter Katie Landis, and
senior setter Christie Kaschak.
Combine those with hitter Alivia
Roberts and libero Maggie Bono,
and the Cougars could have
all the makings of a solid 2013
season.
Holy Redeemer
Head coach: Jack Kablick
Last years record: 17-0
Key losses: Sarah Warnagiris,
Sydney Kotch, Biz Eaton
Key returners: Nicole Slavoski,
Alyssa Platko, Casey Carty
Outlook: When you look at
Wyoming Valley Conference
volleyball, you start at the top
and thats Holy Redeemer,
winners of 100-plus straight
conference games. Again,
expect the Royals to be at the
top of the conference again in
2013, despite losing hard-hitter
and conference MVP Sarah
Warnagiris. We have to replace
three really talented girls, and
thats going to be tough, Kablick
said. We need to develop early
in the season, and hopefully,
build momentumthroughout.
Lake-Lehman
Head coach: Kevin Koziol
Last years record: 11-6
Key losses: Bethany Williams
Key returners: Maria Chinikaylo,
Amy Williams, Brittany Acevado
Outlook: Another dark horse
in the conference is Lake-
Lehman, a senior-laden team
that fnished with an 11-6 record
in 2012. While the Knights lost
hitter Bethany Williams, Koziol
returns almost his entire starting
rotation. We lost some pretty
tough games last season,
he said. When you have an
experienced team, it does make
it tough. You have to nitpick on
things and refne little things.
Right now, we have expectations
for a strong season.
Meyers
Head coach: Mary Mushock
Last years record: 5-12
Key losses: Katlynn Santana,
Summer Barrouk, Brandilee
Soto
Key returners: Angela Moses,
Vichon Wilborn
Outlook: Last year didnt go as
planned for us, fourth-year head
coach Mary Mushock said as the
Mohawks fnished 5-12 last year.
We lost a lot of that team, and
we dont have a lot of experience
coming into 2013. We are going
to have to rely on our team
chemistry. It will be tough in the
beginning until we can get that
experience, but we will continue
to work hard every day.
MMI Prep
Head coach: Shawn S. Evans
Last years record: 8-9
Key losses: Kirsten Young, Kayla
Karchner, Ashmeen Baines
Key returners: Kristen Purcell,
Paige Darrow, Alexis Williams,
Sara Lucas, Hannah Lesitsky,
Maria Carrato
Outlook: We are looking
forward to a great season, said
the fourth-year head coach,
who will need to replace Young
MMIs school MVP last season.
We have a four-year core group
back that helped us reach our
goal of again returning to district
playofs last season. There is
renewed energy to obtain that
goal again. We look forward
to competing against teams
again in the Wyoming Valley
Conference.
Nanticoke
Head coach: Debbie Gavin
Last years record: 14-3
Key losses: Kayley Schinski,
Allie Matulewski, Alexandra
Brassington
Key returners: Taylor Briggs
Outlook: Coming of a 14-3
season, the long-time Nanticoke
head coach knows the road
ahead of her is challenging.
Thanks to graduation of hard-
hitters Kayley Schinski and Allie
Matulewski, and setter Alex
Brassington, the Trojans will
have to rely on a young group
of players led by senior Taylor
Briggs. We are rebuilding, Gavin
said. We have a lot of work to
do. They are very coachable
kids. We will take it one game
at a time, and well see what
happens.
North Pocono
Head coach: Chris Summa
Last years record: 14-3
Key losses: Kelli Bray
Key returners: Amanda Hall,
Emily Cook, Mallory Mokay,
Malorie Deschaine
Outlook: While the Lackawanna
County school lost outside hitter
Kelli Bray to graduation, dont
expect the Trojans to far too
far back. Chris Summa returns
three talented seniors in setter
Amanda Hall, middle hitter Emily
Cook and libero Mallory Mokay.
We continue to learn and
improve each day, and hope our
leadership can help us develop
as a consistent program,
Summa said.
Pittston Area
Head coach: Danielle McAndrew
Last years record: 2-15
Key losses: Tifany Smith
Key returners: Jackie Rabender,
Kaitlyn Simyan, Irene Magdon
Outlook: Coming of a 2-15
season, one in which the
Patriots lost senior leader
Tifany Smith, the Patriots
are hoping to improve under
Danielle McAndrew. While there
are plenty of newfaces on the
roster, senior setter Jackie
Rabender returns and should
provide leadership on the court.
The early-season schedule is
demanding as the Patriots open
up with Holy Redeemer and
Nanticoke.
Tunkhannock
Head coach: Mic Goodwin
Last years record: 9-8
Key losses: Meghan Healy
Key returners: Erin Smith,
Michelle Goodwin
Outlook: Veteran head coach
Mic Goodwin returns at
Tunkhannock where the Tigers
are looking to build of a winning
campaign in 2013. The team
does return a good group of
seniors in Michelle Goodwin,
Sommer Gaydos, Erin Smith
and Cailyn VanHouten, which
provide valuable leadership. The
schedule also sets up nice with
Crestwood and Holy Redeemer
at the end of the season.
Wyoming Area
Head coach: Nick Diaco
Last years record: 8-9
Key losses: Gabby Bohan,
Kate Kross
Key returners: Mallory
Bohan, Audrey Heidacavage,
Samantha Acacio
Outlook: Nick Diaco takes over
the Wyoming Area program
after leading the Dallas
boys volleyball team to the
postseason in the spring. Even
though the Warriors lost key
players Gabby Bohan and
Kate Kross, Diaco does have
talent back. Samantha Acacio
should be a good threat from
the middle, while senior setter
Audrey Heidacavage will
provide a steady hand with the
assists.
Wyoming Valley West
Head coach: R.J. Tomascik
Last years record: 6-11
Key losses: Gabby Gavonski,
Ashley Temarantz
Key returners: Trudi Casier,
Gavyn Giza, Sarah Fugate
Outlook: Last year was
new for everyone, the WVW
second-year head coach said.
We were able to come away
with six victories, and we are
hoping to build on that. We
worked hard in the offseason,
and we have raised our
expectations heading into this
season. Much of that success
will depend on hitters Gavyn
Giza and Sarah Fugate, two
talented juniors.
Redeemer, Del Val expected to battle for top spot
TOM FOX
For The Times Leader
It may sound like a
broken record, but Holy
Redeemer has a pretty
good girls volleyball
team.
The facts dont lie.
Undefeated seasons. A
conference winning streak
of 100-plus games.
Not to mention the
Royals return all-state
player Nicole Slavoski.
But if you ask head
coach Jack Kablick about
the conference this sea-
son, he wont lie.
I dont think we are the
favorite, he said.
The team who he thinks
is the preseason favorite is
no surprise, either.
Delaware Valley is
going to be pretty strong,
he said. Their front row
is back, and they have a
good amount of starters
back from their rotation.
Nanticoke head coach
Debbie Gavin agrees.
Del Valley has a lot of
tall, skilled and talented
girls back this year. They
are going to be tough, the
30-plus year veteran coach
said.
Welcome to the
Wyoming Valley
Conference in 2013, where
it all starts with Redeemer
and Del Valley.
The Royals return
Slavoski, a strong hitter
with power to all sides of
the court.
She can even set the
ball if we need her to,
Kablick said. No doubt,
Nicole is one of the best
players in the league. She
is so versatile. She can do
anything that we ask her
to do.
Its amazing when you
think that Redeemer lost
Warnagiris, conference
MVP last season, along
with setter Biz Eaton
and defensive specialist
Sydney Kotch.
We try to develop girls
early, he said. Last year,
we were starting to devel-
op some of our younger
girls so they were ready
when the time came. And
we also had some good
players on our junior-var-
sity team that maybe some
people dont know about.
Weve just been lucky with
good coaches and good,
dedicated players.
Delaware Valley, under
the direction of Bridget
Crawford, is looking for
revenge. Last season, the
Warriors lone setback was
a four-set loss to Redeemer.
Back is Taylor
Braunagel, a 6-foot mid-
dle hitter, along with the
Balcarcel girls, Jessica and
Marisa.
Its going to be a tough
game, Kablick said.
What else to look for in
2013?
Well, its the usual sus-
pects that could make
a run toward the top:
Crestwood, Nanticoke and
North Pocono.
Each one, though, has
to overcome losses due to
graduation.
Crestwood has to ll
the shoes of multiple-year
starter Carina Mazzoni
at setter. Nanticoke lost
two strong hitters in
Kayley Schinski and Allie
Matulewski, while North
Pocono lost powerful out-
side Kelli Bray.
Our goal is to always
contend and be at the
top of the conference,
Crestwood head coach
Mike Willliams said. Its a
tough league. You have the
usual powers, and there
are always one or two
teams that prove to be a
dark horse.
That role, in the pre-
season, seems to t two
teams.
Both Lake-Lehman and
Hazleton Area return
a good portion of their
lineup. The Knights lost
hitter Bethany Williams,
but return setter Maria
Chinikaylo and Amy
Williams. The Cougars,
under rst-year head
coach Greg Cechak, bring
back their entire team,
including hitter Katie
Landis.
But dont count anyone
out.
You know that
Redeemer and Delaware
Valley are the top two
teams, Wyoming Valley
West head coach R.J.
Tomascik said. But real-
ly, I think anyone could
beat anyone on any given
day. Its going to be a good
year to see what happens.
Holy Redeemers Casey Carty (16) gets a point for the Royals with
a kill against Nanticoke in a WVC high school girls volleyball match
last season. Carty is back as one of the leaders for Holy Redeemer
this season.
Photos by Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Monarchs look to take headline away fromPioneers
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
William Paterson foot-
ball made national head-
lines last week when four
players went into a closed
store in New Jersey not
knowing the establish-
ment wasnt open because
the door was unlocked.
The players continued
to pick up the items
they needed and when
no employee showed up,
they left money for the
products with the acts of
kindness being caught on
camera.
This afternoon, those
players and the rest of the
Pioneers travel to Wilkes-
Barre Township to face
Kings in the season-
opener for both teams at
McCarthy Stadium as the
Monarchs look to make
headlines of their own
which they would do with
a win to start 1-0 for the
rst time since 2009.
The squads are famil-
iar with each other as
they are squaring off for
the fth straight season.
While the Pioneers have
won the previous four
games, every contest has
been close.
We looked at the lm
from last year and we just
open up and you never
know what people have
done to improve you just
have go forward and have
an idea of what youre
going to see and what to
expect, Kings coach Jeff
Knarr said.
Kings is hoping to
build off the end of 2012
when it scored 85 points
in its last three games.
There was only one win
in that period for the
Monarchs, but the fact
that they were scor-
ing more is a positive.
Especially since every
time they have played
Paterson the Monarchs
havent scored more than
seven points, while not
allowing more than 14 the
previous three games. In
2012 against WP, Kings
had its best chance to win
moving the ball well, but
missed several opportuni-
ties.
The one thing is try-
ing to build off the suc-
cess we had at the end
of the year and last year
against these guys we had
success moving the ball,
Knarr added. Its a con-
dence thing that theyve
had some success and
they can build on that.
Misericordia starts
second season
Year two of the
Misericordia foot-
ball program begins
this afternoon at 1
when the Cougars host
Gettysburg in a rematch
of the inaugural game in
Misericordia history one
year ago. That game was
won by the potent Bullets
offense, 70-0.
Kings quarterback Tyler Hartranft hopes to lead the Monarchs to a
a season-opening victory this afternoon against William Paterson.
GETTYSBURG AT MISERICORDIA
When: 1 p.m. today at Mangelsdorf Field, Dallas
Last years records: Gettysburg 7-3; Misericordia 0-10
Last meeting: The Bullets won last seasons game, 70-0
Misericordia player to watch: Juwan Petties-Jackson, who did everything for
the Cougars last season with 554 all-purpose yards running, receiving, returning
and playing defense.
Gettysburg player to watch: Receiver Aden Twer begins the campaign on the
schools all-time top 10 in career yards sixth, 1,429), receptions (eighth, 78) and
touchdowns (tied for second, 16).
Cougars 2012 returning team leaders: RB Frank Santarsiero 166 yards, 1
TD; RB Robin Custodio 234 yards; QB Jeff Puckett 625 yards, 4 TD, 6 int; WR Kurt
Kowalski 12 receptions; WR Tyler Rowe 96 yards; DL Greg Zotian 20 tackles, 2
sacks; LB Hunter Pates 50 tackles; DB Ben Camacho 42 tackles, 1 int.
Bullets 2012 returning teamleaders: RB Eddie Hutchins 491 yards, 5 TD; WR
Aden Twer 22 rec, 350 yards, 4 TD; LB Cody DiAmore 87 tackles, 3 int; DB Gordon
Prince 39 tackles, blocked kick, interception.
Misericordia will win if: it can slow down the Bullets powerful Spread Wing
attack offense, which piled up 37.5 points per game in 2012.
Gettysburg will win if: junior quarterback Zach Miller, who is making his rst
collegiate start, doesnt get rattled by the Misericordia defense, which now has a
year in the new system and is looking for revenge.
What to know: The Bullets 7-3 record last year was their best record since
nishing 8-2 in 1994.
WILLIAM
PATERSONAT
KINGS
When: 1 p.m. today at McCarthy
Stadium, Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Last years records: Kings 2-8;
William Paterson 5-5
Last meeting: The Pioneers won
last seasons game, 9-3
Kings player to watch: Left
tackle Mike Clausen, who towers at
6-foot-5, 325-pounds. Hes a 23-year-
old freshman from Denmark that is
starting because normal starter Kyle
Grampp is sidelined with an injury.
If he shows he can handle the posi-
tion, he could see more time at other
positions.
William Paterson player to
watch: Quarterback Ryan Gresik is
in his fourth year as starter and fourth
year playing against the Monarchs.
In his three previous contests ver-
sus Kings hes piled up 351 passing
yards with one TD and no intercep-
tions. Hes also hurt the team on the
ground rushing for just 31 yards, but
had a TD on the ground in 2010.
Monarchs 2012 returning team
leaders: RB Kyle McGrath 960
yards, 8 TD; QB Tyler Hartranft 1,806
yards, 10 TD, 11 int, 51.1 pct; WR
Dan Kempa 31 rec, 648 yards, 4 TD;
DB Kris Matthews 2 int; 78 tackles;
LB Jake Ksiazkiewicz 4 sacks, 71
tackles; DE Ron Garrett 4.5 sacks
Pioneers 2012 returning team
leaders: RB Isaac Jlaka 500 yards, 5
TD; QB Ryan Gresik 2,097 yards, 13
TD, 7 int; WR Mick Paye , 39 rec, 553
yards, 4 TD; DL Webb Greer 3 sacks;
DB Andre Snead 2 int, 1 TD
Kings will win if: The defense
holds Paterson in check like it has the
previous three times in the series and
the offense comes to life earlier than
it did in the 2012 season.
William Paterson will win if: Its
defense continues to make big plays
late against the Monarchs like it has
the last three meetings.
What to know: This is the fth
straight year the teams are playing, a
rarity for non-conference opponents
to meet this often. Even stranger is
the previous four games are the only
times the programs have ever met.
The last three have been decided by
a total of 19 points.
Times Leader file photo | Bill Tarutis
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HANKKURZJr.
APSportsWriter
RICHMOND, Va. Jeff
Gordon will try to race his
way into NASCARs play-
offs from the pole posi-
tion.
The four-time series
champion turned a track-
record qualifying lap of
130.599 mph at Richmond
International Raceway on
Friday night to win his 73rd
career pole position, and his
rst this season.
I can breathe now,
Gordon joked after seeing
the time hold up.
His lap pushed Kurt
Busch to the outside of
the front row, meaning the
tension win be palpable
once the green ag drops
Saturday night for the 400-
lap race around the 0.75-
mile, D-shaped oval.
Busch is 10th in points,
andthe top 10 after tonights
race earn automatic berths
in the 10-race playoffs to
nish the season. Gordon is
11th, six points behind, and
needs to pass Busch or one
of the other drivers now in
the top 10 to assure himself
a berth in the Chase for the
championship.
In all, 10 drivers are ght-
ing for the last ve spots.
Theres no doubt we all
recognize whats on the line
here, Gordon said.
The pole extended to 21
Gordons NASCAR-record
string of consecutive sea-
sons with a pole position,
breaking a tie with David
Pearson, and gave him the
No. 1 pit stall on the front
stretch at RIR.
I didnt think it was going
to come this year. Ill be hon-
est, Gordon said of the top
starting spot. Qualifying
has not been very good for
me and for our team this
year. Very proud of this one.
Boy, it comes at a great time.
We know how important
that number one pit stall is
and starting up front.
Busch, the 2004 series
champion, rallied after
being 19th-fastest in prac-
tice, possible with the help
of cloud cover that moved
in front of the sun just as he
was wheeling onto the track
for his run.
We will take the cloud
cover and we will take those
adjustments we made,
Busch said, adding that we
just threw a couple of things
at it, and it stuck. That
lap came out of nowhere.
Awesome lap.
Defending series cham-
pion Brad Keselowski, who
is 15th in points and still has
a remote chance of racing
his way into the Chase, will
start third, followed by Clint
Bowyer and Matt Kenseth.
Bowyer and Kenseth are
among the drivers already
locked into the Chase, mean-
ing all eyes will be on the
front once the race starts,
with Gordon and Busch no
doubt battling to lead the
rst lap, or any lap, topgaina
bonus point that could prove
critical as the race winds
down under the lights.
It depends on what every-
bodys attitude and goals
are, Gordon said of the tone
that could be set right away.
This is a long race. Youve
got to be smart. We found
that out last year.
Gordon arrived at RIRlast
year still needing to lock up
a spot in the playoffs, went a
lap down early on and kept
battling. He eventually ral-
lied to nish second and
made it into the Chase eld.
Busch, too, said getting to
the nish in good shape is
what will matter most.
We want to make sure we
pace ourselves, do the right
thing, he said. We are feel-
ing good about this. I love
these challenges and right
now, Gordon and I are one-
two.
PAGE 7B Saturday, September 7, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER
Stakes high for Gamecocks, Bulldogs
PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer
ATHENS, Ga. The South
Carolina-Georgia game is back in
its familiar spot leading off the
Southeastern Conference schedule
and the stakes are as high as
ever today.
The sixth-ranked Gamecocks
have a chance to establish them-
selves as a legitimate national
championship contender, while the
11th-ranked Bulldogs cannot afford
another loss if they want to have a
realistic shot at climbing to No. 1.
Ive been looking forward to this
one for a while, South Carolina
quarterback Connor Shaw said.
We all know the importance of
this game.
This used to be an automatic win
for Georgia.
Not anymore.
For the rst time in series histo-
ry, South Carolina (1-0) has won
three straight over the Bulldogs
(0-1). Last year was especially
grim for Georgia a 35-7 loss
in Columbia, when the game was
played in Week 6 instead of its
usual spot at the start of the SEC
slate.
It was embarrassing, cor-
nerback Damian Swann said.
On national television, in front
of their home crowd, they kind
of put on a show. Now were in
position to do that in front of our
fans. We need to go give our fans
a show.
Georgia openedwitha 38-35 loss
at Clemson, costing the Bulldogs
six spots in the Associated Press
rankings. But it was hardly a fatal
blow to their championship hopes,
either nationally or in the SEC. In
fact, they bounced back to win the
East Division the past two years
after losses to South Carolina, and
they nearly earned a shot at the
national title last season despite
the four-touchdown loss to the
Gamecocks.
But the Bulldogs know their
margin for error is much thinner
this season, given what remains
on their schedule: No. 9 LSU in
late September and the Cocktail
Party game against No. 12 Florida
in early November.
We dont want to get behind
the eight-ball again, receiver
Michael Bennett said.
If the Gamecocks get past
Georgia, it will mean a huge
advantage in the SEC East.
Theyll gain a tiebreaker edge
over the Bulldogs, and they can
look forward to a favorable con-
ference schedule that includes
only one more ranked opponent
Florida and thats at home
on Nov. 16.
Were going to try to win the
division. This is a crucial game
there, coach Steve Spurrier said.
All of our players know what our
goals are, so that is not something
we talk about too much.
IOC weighs up major risks in 2020 Olympic vote
STEPHENWILSON
APSportsWriter
BUENOS AIRES,
Argentina From the
Fukushima nuclear leak to
the war in Syria to Europes
economic crisis, the choice
of the host city for the 2020
Olympics is fraught with
risks.
Picking the site with
the least risks shapes up
as the challenge for the
International Olympic
Committee today in a tight
three-city contest that mem-
bers say is too close to call.
Its certainly an open
race, South African IOC
member Sam Ramsamy said
Friday. They all have posi-
tive and negative points. The
nal presentations will be
crucial.
After a two-year global
race, Tokyo, Madrid and
Istanbul spent their nal full
day of campaigning Friday
to drum up last-minute sup-
port in their bid to secure
the biggest sports event on
the international stage.
Tokyo has been seen as a
slight favorite, but its status
has been put into question
by concerns over the leak of
radioactive water from the
crippled Fukushima plant.
Madrid, once counted
out because of Spains nan-
cial troubles, has generated
the most recent buzz and
momentum and could be
poised for an upset win.
Istanbul, dogged by the
war in neighboring Syria
and possible Western mili-
tary strikes against Bashar
Assads regime, looks to be
the outsider.
London bookmakers have
been taking a rush of bets
on Madrid, whose odds have
been slashed from4-1 a week
ago to 5-4. Tokyo remains
the betting favorite, though
its odds have shortened to
5-6. Istanbul is listed at 6-1.
There are all kinds of
predictions, all kinds of bets
but the only one numbers
that matter are the ones from
the votes on Saturday after-
noon, Madrid Mayor Ana
Botella said.
IOCelections are extreme-
ly unpredictable as members
vote by secret ballot and take
different personal reasons
into account. Some mem-
bers are still undecided and
will be waiting for the nal
45-minute presentations
today before making up their
mind.
Leading the delegations
will be the prime ministers
of all three countries. Shinzo
Abe of Japan, Mariano
Rajoy of Spain and Recep
Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey
were all ying to Buenos
Aires straight from the G20
summit in St. Petersburg,
Russia.
If all IOC members are in
attendance, 97 will be eligi-
ble to vote in the rst round.
With a majority required for
victory, the process is likely
to go two rounds. The city
with the fewest votes is elim-
inated after the rst round,
setting up a nal head-to-
head ballot. Outgoing IOC
President Jacques Rogge
will open a sealed envelope
to announce the winner.
All three are repeat bid-
ders: Istanbul for a fth time
overall, Madrid for a third
straight and Tokyo a second
in a row.
Previous bid campaigns
have been marked by over-
riding geographic or emo-
tional factors. In 2009, the
IOC awarded the 2016
Olympics to Rio de Janeiro
because of the Brazilian
citys push to take the
games to South America for
the rst time.
There has been no feel-
good theme this time as
the campaign has been
dominated by the nega-
tives surrounding each bid:
Syria, doping scandals and
anti-government protests
in Turkey; severe recession
and 27 percent unemploy-
ment in Spain; and, most
recently, the Fukushima leak
in Japan.
Some of the issues are
big and difcult for IOC
members: geopolitical, envi-
ronmental and economic,
Australian IOC member
John Coates said.
Many members also will
be voting with Rio in mind.
The Brazilian city has been
plagued by construction
delays and other issues in its
preparations for 2016, leav-
ing members in search of a
safe, reliable host for 2020.
With the difculties in
Rio, many people will be
thinking, Do we need to
be with safe hands or take a
few risks? Coates said.
TOdAYS TOP 25 ScHEdULE
No. 2 Oregon at Virginia, 3:30 p.m.
No. 3 Ohio St. vs. San Diego State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Clemson vs. South Carolina State, 12:30 p.m.
No. 5 Stanford vs. San Jose State, 11 p.m.
No. 6 South Carolina at No. 11 Georgia, 4:30 p.m.
No. 7 Texas A&Mvs. SamHouston State, 7 p.m.
No. 8 Louisville vs. Eastern Kentucky, Noon
No. 9 LSU vs. UAB, 7 p.m.
No. 12 Florida at Miami, Noon
No. 13 Oklahoma St. at UTSA, Noon
No. 14 Notre Dame at No. 17 Michigan, 8 p.m.
No. 15 Texas at BYU, 7 p.m.
No. 16 Oklahoma vs. West Virginia, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Northwestern vs. Syracuse, 6 p.m.
No. 21 Wisconsin vs. Tennessee Tech, Noon
No. 22 Nebraska vs. Southern Miss., 6 p.m.
No. 23 Baylor vs, Bufalo, 3:30 p.m.
No. 24 TCU vs. SE Louisiana, Noon
No. 25 Southern Cal vs. Washington State, 10:30 p.m.
WRESTLINg gETS REPRImANd
fOR RULES INfRINgEmENT
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina Wrestlings governing
body received a warning for aminor infringement
of the rules in the bidding race for a spot in the 2020
Olympics.
FILApresident Nenad Lalovic told The Associated
Press the case involves letters sent by the Japanese
wrestling federation to promote the sport to some IOC
members. IOC rules prohibit the sports fromsending
such material in the three weeks before Sundays vote.
Lalovic said he reported the infringement himself to
the IOC once he learned of the Japanese letters.
Wrestling, which was cut fromthe list of core sports in
February, is competing against squash and a combined
baseball-softball bid to be included in 2020, with
wrestling widely expected to regain its Olympic status.
The IOC said in a letter on Tuesday to the two other
sports that an ofcial warning was sent to FILAon Aug.
20 andthe matter is nowconsidered as closed.
This was a minor infringement of the rules and
was dealt with immediately, no further action was
necessary, the IOC said in a separate statement to The
AP.
Qualifying sets up tense race in Richmond
AP photo
Jeff gordon, right, looks on during qualifying at the Richmond International Raceway in Richmond,
Va., on friday. gordon won the pole for tonights NAScAR Sprint cup race.
Eagles Jackson expects to thrive in newofense
ROB mAAddI
AP Pro Football Writer
PHILADELPHIA DeSean
Jackson has added the element
of surprise to his repertoire.
The two-time Pro Bowl
wide receiver made plenty of
big plays for the Philadelphia
Eagles even when defenses
knew what he was doing. In for-
mer coach Andy Reids offense,
Jackson ran mostly deep routes.
The result was 19 of his 28
career touchdowns receiving
and rushing went for more than
30 yards.
But, Jackson found the end
zone fewer times after teams
gured out the way the Eagles
used him. He had 22 touch-
downs in his rst three seasons,
including two in the playoffs.
He scored only six over the last
two years.
Now that Chip Kelly is here,
Jackson will be used in a vari-
ety of ways. Kellys up-tempo
offense features numerous for-
mations and defenses wont be
able to predict how Jackson
gets the ball.
Hell be on display promi-
nently on Monday, when the
Eagles open vs. Washington.
In the past, teams have done
a great job of seeing what Ive
done early in my career with
making the big plays and elec-
trifying plays and things like
that, but now with this offense
coming in, its really going to
be a plus in my eyes, Jackson
said. A lot of teams dont
really know what to expect.
Regardless of what we did in
the preseason, I still think there
are a lot of plays that have been
hidden and that we havent been
running.
The versatility with the
offense will keep the defense
off-guard.
Kelly could use Jackson simi-
lar to the way he featured do-
everything-back DeAnthony
Thomas at Oregon minus the
direct handoffs. Thomas had
1,296 yards rushing and 18
touchdowns and 1,050 yards
receiving and 14 scores for
Kelly in 2011-12.
Regardless of where I come
out, every play with the tempo
and with the speed plays and
intensity, well always be able to
keep them off-guard, Jackson
said. Whether its down the
eld, options, reverses, get-
ting the ball out quick, those
are things that were going to
take advantage of, and hope-
fully once we get them to kind
of play up, we can go down the
eld a little bit.
Jackson may also get the
ball on punts. Hes a danger-
ous returner who went to the
Pro Bowl in 2009 after taking
two punts the distance. Jackson
has four career scores on punt
returns, including the memora-
ble 65-yard game-ending return
to cap a comeback win over the
New York Giants in 2010. Last
year, Jackson only returned one
punt. But, he hinted that he
could be back there for the sea-
son opener at Washington on
Monday night.
Michael Vick embraces
Jacksons new role. The quar-
terback has thrown for 2,497
yards to Jackson, the most for
any wide receiver hes played
with. Theyve combined on
touchdowns of 61, 62, 77, 88
and 91 yards since 2010.
You just have to move
DeSean around and kind of
psyche the defense out and not
make it predictable in terms of
what youre going to do, Vick
said. You move him inside, you
move him outside, and you go
deep when you get your oppor-
tunities. You dont just line up
and send him deep all of the
time. I think Coach Kelly has a
way of getting the ball to him in
the right situations.
Hes more condent and hes
ready to play some good foot-
ball. I expect a lot of big things
from him this year.
Jackson gures to get even
more touches this year because
Jeremy Maclin tore a knee liga-
ment and is out for the season.
Maclin had more catches, yards
receiving and touchdowns than
Jackson the last three years.
The duo complemented each
other well. Jackson specialized
in downeld plays and Maclin
made catches to keep drives
going.
I denitely think my role has
increased since he went down,
Jackson said. Everyone has
noticed. I dont see it as more
pressure. I was telling him the
other day that I miss him being
out there with me because of
the competitive nature.
We pushed each other and
not seeing him out there is kind
of tough.
The diminutive Jackson, gen-
erously listed at 5-foot-10, 175
pounds, isnt a prototypical No.
1 receiver. But hes a tough guy
who only missed four games
his rst four seasons before sit-
ting out the nal ve last year
because of a ribs injury.
Over his rst ve seasons,
Jackson has averaged 55 catch-
es, 957 yards and almost ve
touchdowns. Those numbers
should go up in Kellys system.
I always wanted to be known
as one of the best players to play
this position, Jackson said.
AP photo
Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver deSean Jackson looks back as Philadelphia
Eagles head coach chip Kelly hits him during practice at the teams training
facility on Thursday in Philadelphia.
Cubs 8, Brewers 5
Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aoki rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .289
Segura ss 4 0 1 0 1 0 .303
Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 1 1 .286
Ar.Ramirez 3b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .270
C.Gomez cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .281
Halton 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .237
Bianchi 2b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .250
L.Schafer lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .222
Lohse p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .146
a-J.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238
J.Nelson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Gennett ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .333
Blazek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 35 5 10 5 3 8
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
St.Castro ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .244
Barney 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .214
Rizzo 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .232
Schierholtz rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .259
Sweeney cf 3 2 1 0 1 1 .299
Do.Murphy 3b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .284
Lake lf 4 1 2 4 0 1 .299
Castillo c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .272
Rusin p 2 0 1 2 0 0 .125
Villanueva p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .161
b-Watkins ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .130
Grimmp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Bogusevic ph 1 0 0 1 0 0 .284
Gregg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 37 8 13 8 1 3
Milwaukee 011 000 0305 10 1
Chicago 502 000 01x8 13 0
a-struck out for Lohse in the 6th. b-grounded
out for Villanueva in the 6th. c-homered for
J.Nelson in the 8th. d-reached on error for Strop
in the 8th.
E_Segura (14). LOB_Milwaukee 8, Chicago 6.
2B_Rizzo (35), Castillo (22). HR_Ar.Ramirez (10),
of Rusin; Gennett (6), of Strop; Lake (5), of
Lohse. RBIs_Aoki (32), Ar.Ramirez (40), Gennett
3 (17), Schierholtz (64), Lake 4 (15), Rusin 2
(2), Bogusevic (13). SB_Aoki (18), Segura (40),
Do.Murphy (1). S_Lohse. SF_Aoki.
Runners left in scoring position_Milwaukee 5
(Halton 2, Segura, Lucroy 2); Chicago 5 (Rusin,
St.Castro, Sweeney, Barney 2). RISP_Milwaukee
1 for 5; Chicago 5 for 14.
Runners moved up_Schierholtz. GIDP_
St.Castro.
DP_Milwaukee 1 (Ar.Ramirez, Bianchi, Halton).
Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lohse L, 9-9 5 11 7 7 1 3 71 3.59
J.Nelson 2 0 0 0 0 0 19 0.00
Blazek 1 2 1 0 0 0 23 5.84
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Rusin 3 2-3 7 2 2 2 1 85 2.89
Villanueva W, 5-82 1-30 0 0 0 5 30 4.27
Grimm 1 0 0 0 1 0 11 0.00
Strop 1 3 3 3 0 2 26 3.04
Gregg S, 30-35 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 3.05
Inherited runners-scored_Villanueva 2-0.
Umpires_Home, Marvin Hudson; First, Tim
McClelland; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Wally
Bell.
T_2:53. A_25,351 (41,019).
Umpires Home, Ed Hickox; First, Jim Joyce;
Second, Jef Nelson; Third, JimWolf.
T3:18. A20,696 (41,019).
Phillies 2, Braves 1
Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Upton cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .197
J.Upton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259
F.Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .305
Gattis lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243
McCann c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .268
C.Johnson 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .330
Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .183
Simmons ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .249
Minor p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .170
a-Terdoslavich ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 30 1 3 1 0 10
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .233
Rollins ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .242
Utley 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .272
Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276
Ruf 1b 2 1 1 0 1 1 .247
Asche 3b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .287
Galvis lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .197
Mayberry rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .227
Cl.Lee p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .140
b-Frandsen ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218
Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 27 2 4 2 1 10
Atlanta 001 000 0001 3 0
Philadelphia 000 000 20x2 4 0
a-grounded out for Minor in the 8th.
b-grounded out for Cl.Lee in the 8th.
LOB_Atlanta 3, Philadelphia 2. HR_Simmons
(14), of Cl.Lee; Asche (4), of Minor. RBIs_
Simmons (50), Asche 2 (19).
RISP_Atlanta 0 for 0; Philadelphia 0 for 0.
Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Minor L, 13-6 7 4 2 2 1 9 102 3.06
Avilan 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.37
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cl.Lee W, 12-6 8 2 1 1 0 10 103 3.01
Papelbon S, 25-31 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.30
HBP_by Cl.Lee (McCann).
Umpires_Home, Bruce Dreckman; First, Mike
Everitt; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, TimWelke.
T_2:14. A_37,088 (43,651).
Orioles 4, White Sox 0
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De Aza cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267
Beckham2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .278
Keppinger 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .246
A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .225
Konerko 1b 2 0 2 0 1 0 .246
Jor.Danks rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .257
Phegley c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .213
Le.Garcia ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .179
Totals 30 0 5 0 1 3
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Roberts 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .239
Machado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .292
A.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293
C.Davis 1b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .298
Wieters c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .233
Hardy ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 .264
Markakis rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .270
Morse lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .227
Ch.Dickerson lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .243
Valencia dh 3 1 2 2 0 0 .296
Totals 31 4 9 4 1 4
Chicago 000 000 0000 5 1
Baltimore 001 012 00x4 9 0
E_Beckham (9). LOB_Chicago 4, Baltimore 4.
HR_Valencia (7), of Joh.Danks; C.Davis (48), of
Joh.Danks; Wieters (21), of Joh.Danks. RBIs_C.
Davis (123), Wieters (67), Valencia 2 (15). SB_C.
Davis (3). CS_Valencia (2).
Runners left in scoring position_Baltimore
2 (Wieters, Machado). RISP_Chicago 1 for 1;
Baltimore 1 for 4.
Runners moved up_A.Dunn. GIDP_Jor.Danks,
Markakis, Morse.
DP_Chicago 2 (Beckham, Konerko),
(Keppinger, Beckham, Konerko); Baltimore 1
(B.Roberts, Hardy, C.Davis).
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Joh.Danks L, 4-125 1-37 4 4 1 4 103 4.45
Petricka 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 18 2.00
D.Webb 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 4.50
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
FeldmanW, 5-4 9 5 0 0 1 3 106 3.63
Umpires_Home, John Hirschbeck; First,
James Hoye; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Bob
Davidson.
T_2:26. A_26,253 (45,971).
Marlins 7, Nationals 0
Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Brown cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .333
d-T.Moore ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .214
Zimmerman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .275
Harper lf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .273
Werth rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .318
Desmond ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .283
Ad.LaRoche 1b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .235
W.Ramos c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272
Lombardozzi 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .251
Haren p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .175
Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
E.Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Z.Walters ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000
X.Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Mattheus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Krol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Hairston ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184
Totals 27 0 2 0 2 10
Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Coghlan lf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .274
D.Solano 2b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .252
Yelich cf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .287
Stanton rf 4 2 2 3 1 2 .251
Morrison 1b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .261
Polanco 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .251
Hechavarria ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232
Mathis c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .196
Fernandez p 3 0 2 0 0 0 .191
b-Pierre ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .243
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
B.Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 37 7 13 7 3 8
Washington 000 000 0000 2 1
Miami 302 001 01x7 13 0
a-singled for E.Davis in the 6th. b-singled for
Fernandez in the 7th. c-popped out for Krol in the
9th. d-struck out for C.Brown in the 9th.
E_Zimmerman(21). LOB_Washington2, Miami
10. 2B_Coghlan (10). HR_Morrison (6), of Haren;
Stanton (19), of Krol. RBIs_Yelich (13), Stanton 3
(46), Morrison 2 (32), Polanco (23). SF_Polanco.
Runners left in scoring position_Miami 4
(Mathis, Morrison 2, Polanco). RISP_Washington
0 for 0; Miami 2 for 9.
Runners moved up_D.Solano, Hechavarria.
GIDP_C.Brown, W.Ramos.
DP_Miami 2 (Morrison, Hechavarria,
Morrison), (Qualls, D.Solano, Morrison).
Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Haren L, 8-13 3 6 5 5 2 5 58 5.23
Abad 1 2 0 0 1 2 30 3.27
E.Davis 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.26
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER BASEBALL Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 9B
Williams sets up meeting with Azarenka in fnal
EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer
NEW YORK Serena Williams
was cruising along in the U.S. Open
seminals, serving up another
bagel, when, out of nowhere, a com-
petitive tennis match broke out.
Didnt last long.
The defending champion won the
rst seven games of Fridays match,
then actually fell down a break early
in the second set, before quickly
regaining it on the way to a 6-0, 6-3
victory over fth-seeded Li Na.
The days only drama came in the
second-to-last game an affair that
went eight deuces and lasted 13
minutes, 49 seconds. Li saved six
match points, but it only delayed
the inevitable. Williams dropped
two points in the next game, but
ended it and let out a long, celebra-
tory scream after a 107 mph service
winner.
It got tough at the e nd. I got
a little nervous, but I was able to
close it out nally, Williams said.
The victory set up a rematch of
last years nal against Victoria
Azarenka, who beat 83rd-ranked
Flavia Pennetta 6-4, 6-2 in the ear-
lier seminal.
The rst set of the Williams match
marked the third straight set the
No. 1 seed won at love, and when
she held serve to open the second,
she had won her 24th straight game
of the tournament, dating to her
match last Sunday against Sloane
Stephens.
Nothing lasts forever, of course,
though Williams is extending her
string of dominance in the womens
game deep into a second decade.
Sundays match will mark her
21st Grand Slam final. She stands
one win away from capturing her
fifth U.S. Open title and 17th major
trophy. This will be the first time
the same two women have met
in back-to-back finals at Flushing
Meadows since it was Williams
against her sister, Venus, in 2001-
02.
Williams wore pink shoes embroi-
dered with tiny hearts on the heels,
each of them with a number inside
of it 99, 02, 08, 12 marking
each year she hoisted the trophy in
Queens.
Shes showing every sign of need-
ing a redesign, and Azarenka is the
only one standing in the way.
We always have really good
matches. I look forward to it,
Williams said. Its great to get to
another final. Shes a great player
and she lifts her game when it real-
ly counts.
Azarenka, the 2012 and 2013
Australian Open champion, is try-
ing to become the first woman to
win the majors in Melbourne and
New York in the same year since
Martina Hingis in 1997.
AP photo
Serena Williams reacts after losing a point to Li Na during the semifinals of the U.S. Open
on Friday in New York.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 85 57 .599 8-2 W-3 47-25 38-32
Tampa Bay 77 62 .554 6 3-7 L-1 44-26 33-36
Baltimore 75 65 .536 9 2 5-5 W-2 40-29 35-36
NewYork 75 65 .536 9 2 6-4 L-1 43-29 32-36
Toronto 64 76 .457 20 13 7-3 L-1 35-34 29-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 81 59 .579 4-6 L-2 44-27 37-32
Cleveland 75 65 .536 6 2 4-6 W-3 43-27 32-38
Kansas City 73 67 .521 8 4 7-3 W-1 38-34 35-33
Minnesota 61 77 .442 19 15 4-6 L-1 28-36 33-41
Chicago 56 84 .400 25 21 2-8 L-8 32-34 24-50
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas 80 59 .576 5-5 L-1 39-29 41-30
Oakland 80 60 .571 7-3 L-1 44-27 36-33
Los Angeles 65 74 .468 15 12 7-3 W-1 33-39 32-35
Seattle 63 77 .450 17 14 4-6 L-1 31-38 32-39
Houston 47 93 .336 33 30 3-7 W-2 23-49 24-44
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 85 55 .607 7-3 L-2 51-20 34-35
Washington 71 69 .507 14 8 6-4 L-1 40-31 31-38
Philadelphia 64 77 .454 21 15 4-6 W-1 37-33 27-44
NewYork 63 76 .453 21 15 5-5 L-1 28-38 35-38
Miami 53 86 .381 31 25 4-6 W-1 30-39 23-47
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 81 58 .583 5-5 L-1 45-25 36-33
St. Louis 80 60 .571 1 4-6 L-1 41-25 39-35
Cincinnati 80 62 .563 2 6-4 W-2 45-24 35-38
Chicago 60 80 .429 21 19 5-5 W-2 29-44 31-36
Milwaukee 60 80 .429 21 19 3-7 L-1 31-40 29-40
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 83 57 .593 7-3 L-2 43-28 40-29
Arizona 71 68 .511 11 7 5-5 W-2 40-31 31-37
Colorado 66 75 .468 17 13 6-4 W-1 41-31 25-44
San Diego 62 77 .446 20 16 4-6 L-1 38-33 24-44
San Francisco 62 78 .443 21 17 4-6 L-1 34-36 28-42
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Thursdays Games
Kansas City 7, Seattle 6, 13 innings
Boston 9, N.Y. Yankees 8, 10 innings
Baltimore 3, ChicagoWhite Sox 1
Houston 3, Oakland 2
L.A. Angels 6, Tampa Bay 2
Fridays Games
Baltimore 4, ChicagoWhite Sox 0
Cleveland 8, N.Y. Mets 1
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Saturdays Games
Boston (Lackey 8-12) at N.Y. Yankees (Huf 2-0),
1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 4-8) at Baltimore
(W.Chen 7-7), 1:05 p.m.
Houston (Oberholtzer 4-1) at Oakland (Straily
8-7), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 6-6) at Cleveland (Kluber 7-5),
6:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 12-10) at Kansas City (Dufy
2-0), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Happ 3-5) at Minnesota (Correia 9-10),
7:10 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 9-7) at L.A. Angels (Richards
5-6), 9:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 8-6) at Seattle (Paxton 0-0),
9:10 p.m.
Sundays Games
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
ChicagoWhite Sox at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Mondays Games
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at ChicagoWhite Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Cincinnati 6, St. Louis 2
Arizona 4, San Francisco 2
Fridays Games
Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee 5
Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 1
Cleveland 8, N.Y. Mets 1
Cincinnati 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Miami 7, Washington 0
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Saturdays Games
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 14-3) at Cincinnati (Latos
14-5), 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Hellweg 0-3) at Chicago Cubs (Ar-
rieta 2-1), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 6-6) at Cleveland (Kluber 7-5),
6:05 p.m.
Atlanta (A.Wood 3-3) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick
10-12), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Roark 4-0) at Miami (Eovaldi 3-5),
7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 9-4) at St. Louis (Wainwright
15-9), 7:15 p.m.
Colorado (Chatwood 7-4) at San Diego (T.Ross
3-7), 8:40 p.m.
Arizona (McCarthy 3-9) at San Francisco (M.Cain
8-8), 9:05 p.m.
Sundays Games
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 8:05 p.m.
Mondays Games
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
MLB STANDINGS STATS
Asche leads Phillies over Braves
PHILADELPHIA
Cody Asche hit a two-run
homer in the seventh inning
and Cliff Lee outdueled fel-
low left-hander Mike Minor
as the Philadelphia Phillies
beat the Atlanta Braves 2-1
on Friday night.
After surrendering
a homer to Andrelton
Simmons leading off the
third inning, Lee (12-6)
didnt allow a hit through
eight innings. He nished
with 10 strikeouts without
a walk, giving up just two
hits.
Asche, who was called up
from Triple-A Lehigh Valley
on July 31, hit his fourth
homer of the season and is 7
for 11 with ve RBIs in his
last three games. The rookie
third baseman boosted his
average to .287 despite
starting out his major
league career on a 1-for-17
streak.
Asches homer came on
the rst pitch he saw from
Minor in the seventh. In
his rst time facing the
Phillies this season, Minor
(13-6) allowed four hits and
two earned runs in seven
innings, striking out nine
and walking one.
Jonathan Papelbon
recorded his 25th save of
the season with a scoreless
ninth.
Lee, who had allowed
eight runs combined in his
previous two starts against
the Braves, was backed up
by some impressive defen-
sive plays.
In the sixth inning, sec-
ond baseman Chase Utley
made a sprawling catch to
rob Justin Upton of a base
hit. And two innings before
that, center elder Cesar
Hernandez ran a long way
to track down a shot in the
gap from Evan Gattis.
Simmons homered to left
eld to lead off the third
inning. It was the 14th
homer of the season for
Simmons and the league-
leading 161st for the Braves.
Simmons made a big
defensive play at shortstop,
going deep in the hole and
ring a rocket to rst to nab
the speedy Jimmy Rollins to
end the sixth.
Rollins got the Phillies
rst hit of the game with
a bloop single to lead off
the fourth but was thrown
out trying to extend it into
a double. No Phillie got
into scoring position until
Asches homer in the sev-
enth.
Indians 8, Mets 1
CLEVELAND Scott
Kazmir struck out a season-
high 12 in six innings, Nick
Swisher hit a grand slam
and the Cleveland Indians
continued their playoff push
with a win over the New
York Mets.
Kazmir (8-7) struck out
at least one batter in each
inning, including the side
in the rst, third and sixth.
The left-hander, who has
been pushed back in the
rotation for extra rest over
the last month, held the
Mets to four hits, allowed
no walks and hit a batter in
winning for the rst time
since Aug. 4.
The Mets took Kazmir
with the 15th overall pick in
the 2002 draft, but he never
pitched a game for them.
Kazmir was dealt to Tampa
Bay two years later for
pitcher Victor Zambrano.
The trade tuned out to
be one of the worst in Mets
history as Kazmir made the
All-Star team twice with the
Rays and Zambrano went
10-14 in parts of three sea-
sons in New York, and was
out of baseball in 2007.
Cubs 8, Brewers 5
CHICAGO Rookie
Junior Lake hit his rst
career grand slam in
Chicagos ve-run rst
inning and the Cubs held off
the Milwaukee Brewers.
Lake was 2 for 4 and has
ve homers since being
called up July 19.
The Cubs and Brewers
are tied for fourth place in
the NL Central at 60-80.
The Cubs jumped on
Brewers starter Kyle Lohse
(9-9) in the rst inning.
Nate Schierholtz singled
with one out and runners
on rst and second to drive
in the rst run. Two batters
later, Lake homored on a 1-0
slider.
Carlos Villanueva (5-8)
was the winner in relief.
Kevin Gregg got the nal
three outs for his 30th save
in 35 chances.
Orioles 4, White Sox 0
BALTIMORE Chris
Davis hit his major league-
leading 48th home run,
Scott Feldman pitched a
ve-hitter for his rst career
shutout and the Baltimore
Orioles beat the White Sox,
extending Chicagos losing
streak to eight games.
Davis connected in the
sixth inning off John Danks
to move within two homers
of tying Brady Anderson
for the single-season club
record. The solo shot gave
Davis 123 RBIs, second-
most in the majors behind
Detroits Miguel Cabrera
(130).
Danny Valencia and Matt
Wieters also homered for
the Orioles, who began the
day three games behind
Tampa Bay for the nal
AL wild-card slot. All three
long balls came off Danks
(4-12).
Marlins 7, Nationals 0
MIAMI Jose
Fernandez allowed one hit
and struck out nine in seven
innings to lead the Miami
Marlins to a victory over the
Washington Nationals.
Giancarlo Stanton hom-
ered and drove in three runs
for the Marlins and Logan
Morrison hit an estimated
484-foot home run, which
would be the longest in
the majors this season, and
drove in two runs.
Fernandez (11-6) retired
the rst 14 batters before
walking Adam LaRoche.
He didnt allow a hit until
the sixth with one out when
pinch-hitter Zach Walters
hit a dribbler up the third-
base line for a base hit in his
rst big league at-bat. Third
baseman Placido Polanco
didnt have a play on the
slow roller and was hoping
it would roll foul, but the
ball stayed on the ineld
grass.
Fernandez went 2 for 3 at
the plate and Chris Coghlan
had three of the Marlins 13
hits.
Reds 3, Dodgers 2
CINCINNATI Joey
Votto emerged from his
deep slump with a single
and a two-run homer
Friday night, leading
the Cincinnati Reds to a
3-2 victory over the Los
Angeles Dodgers, who had
another starting pitcher
get hurt.
The NL West leaders
lost Chris Capuano to a
mild groin strain in the
second inning, when he gri-
maced on a pitch to Zack
Cozart. Already this week,
the Dodgers had to push
Hyun-Jin Ryu back from a
scheduled start because of
a sore back.
Mike Leake (12-6)
emerged from his recent
slump, helping the Reds get
their fourth win in their last
ve games. Leake allowed
ve hits, including Hanley
Ramirezs two-run homer,
in 7 2-3 innings.
Aroldis Chapman, pitch-
ing for the fourth day in a
row, fanned three in the
ninth for his 35th save in
40 chances.
The third-place Reds
kept their momentum
going from a successful
series against the St. Louis
Cardinals that tightened
the NL Central race. The
Pirates, Cardinals and Reds
are all in good position to
reach the playoffs one
as the division champ, the
other two as wild cards.
Los Angeles has taken
control of the West by
going 36-10 since the All-
Star break. The Dodgers
want to get the NLs top
rotation fully healthy for
the playoffs.
Capuano has never lost at
Great American Ball Park,
going 3-0 in eight games.
The groin strain prevented
him from trying to add to
the total.
The left-hander has
been on the disabled list
twice this season. He was
sidelined from April 17 to
May 6 with a strained left
calf and from May 30 to
June 19 with a strained left
shoulder.
Votto has been having a
tough time, watching his
batting average fall to .300
after he led the NL at .361
on May 24. The Reds got
a run in the fourth when
Votto ended his 0-for-13
slump with a single off
Stephen Fife, Jay Bruce
singled and Ryan Ludwick
grounded into a double
play.
Votto hit a two-run
homer his 22nd off
J.P. Howell (2-1) in the fth
inning for a 3-2 lead.
Reds second baseman
Brandon Phillips was in the
lineup a day after he left a
game because of a sore left
thigh. He singled in the
eighth off Paco Rodriguez
and was replaced by Billy
Hamilton, who stole sec-
ond, leaving him 3 for 3 in
attempts since his promo-
tion. Rodriguez walked the
bases loaded, but Brian
Wilson got Ryan Ludwick
to line into a double play
as he escaped the threat.
Right elder Yasiel Puig
was back for the Dodgers
after a sore right knee lim-
ited him to pinch-hitting
status the last two games.
He had an ineld single.
AP photo
The New York Yankees Alfonso Soriano, right celebrates with Derek Jeter after Soriano hit a two-run
home run during the first inning of a game against the Boston Red Sox on Friday at Yankee Stadium
in New York. At press time, the game was still in progress.
X.Cedeno 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 8 5.40
Mattheus 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 18 6.67
Krol 1 1 1 1 0 0 21 3.67
Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Fernandez W, 11-6 7 1 0 0 2 9 94 2.23
Qualls 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 2.91
B.Hand 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00
Inherited runners-scored_Mattheus 1-0.
Umpires_Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Lance
Barksdale; Second, Gary Cederstrom; Third,
Angel Hernandez.
T_2:31. A_25,118 (37,442).
Reds 3, Dodgers 2
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Crawford lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291
Puig rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .348
Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .287
H.Ramirez ss 4 1 2 2 0 1 .340
Ethier cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277
Uribe 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .274
M.Ellis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .274
Federowicz c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .241
b-Schumaker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272
A.Ellis c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241
Capuano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .042
Moylan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-D.Gordon ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .218
Fife p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .067
Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Withrowp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-M.Young ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .279
P.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
B.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 31 2 5 2 0 8
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .288
B.Phillips 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267
1-B.Hamilton pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
C.Izturis 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .178
Votto 1b 2 2 2 2 2 0 .302
Bruce rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .267
Ludwick lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .254
D.Robinson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .251
Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .238
Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .253
Mesoraco c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .242
Leake p 2 0 0 0 1 1 .197
M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
A.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 28 3 7 2 5 10
Los Angeles 200 000 0002 5 0
Cincinnati 000 120 00x3 7 0
a-singledfor Moylaninthe 3rd. b-groundedout
for Federowicz in the 8th. c-singled for Withrowin
the 8th.
1-ran for B.Phillips in the 8th.
LOB_Los Angeles 2, Cincinnati 6. HR_H.
Ramirez (16), of Leake; Votto (22), of Howell.
RBIs_H.Ramirez 2 (49), Votto 2 (66). SB_B.
Hamilton (3). CS_H.Ramirez (2).
Runners left in scoring position_Los Angeles 1
(Ad.Gonzalez); Cincinnati 2 (Mesoraco, Frazier).
RISP_Los Angeles 1 for 2; Cincinnati 1 for 6.
Runners moved up_Puig, Ad.Gonzalez.
GIDP_B.Phillips, Ludwick.
DP_Los Angeles 3 (H.Ramirez, M.Ellis,
Ad.Gonzalez), (Uribe, Ad.Gonzalez), (B.Wilson,
Uribe).
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Capuano 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 32 4.34
Moylan 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 6.17
Fife 2 4 2 2 2 1 43 2.72
Howell L, 2-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 11 2.36
Withrow 2 0 0 0 0 5 21 3.08
P.Rodriguez 0 1 0 0 2 0 15 2.01
B.Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Leake W, 12-6 7 2-3 5 2 2 0 5 98 3.46
M.Parra H, 16 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.43
A.Chap S, 35-40 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 2.67
Fife pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
P.Rodriguez pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored_Howell 1-1, B.Wilson
3-0, M.Parra 1-0. WP_P.Rodriguez.
Umpires_Home, Jim Joyce; First, Jef Nelson;
Second, JimWolf; Third, Ed Hickox.
T_2:59. A_33,778 (42,319).
This Date In Baseball
Compiled by PAUL MONTELLA
Sept. 7
1908 Walter Johnson pitched his third con-
secutive shutout in four days with a 4-0, two-hit
victory over the NewYork Highlanders.
1911 Rookie Grover Alexander of the Phila-
delphia Phillies took a 1-0 thriller from 44-year-
old Cy Young, who was closing out his career with
the Boston Braves.
1914 The Boston Braves had to move its
home games to Fenway Park because Braves
Field was not big enough to handle the crowds.
The Miracle Braves played the rest of their
home games and the World Series games at the
home of the Red Sox.
1916 The New York Giants beat the Brook-
lyn Dodgers 4-1 to start their 26-game winning
streak, a major league record.
1923 Howard Ehmke of the Boston Red Sox
tossed a 4-0, no-hit victory over the Philadelphia
Athletics. Philadelphias Slim Harriss hit a ball to
the wall for a double, but was called out for miss-
ing frst base, preserving the no-hitter.
1962 Maury Wills of Los Angeles stole four
bases and set a National League record with a
total of 82 for the season. The Dodgers lost to the
Pittsburgh Pirates 10-1.
1984 Dwight Gooden of the Mets struck
out Ron Cey of the Chicago Cubs in the second
inning for No. 228 to set a National League record
for a rookie. Gooden passed Grover Cleveland Al-
exander, who set the mark with 227 in 1911. New
York coasted to a 10-0 victory behind Goodens
one-hitter.
1993 Mark Whiten of the St. Louis Cardi-
nals had the greatest game at the plate in major
league history in the nightcap of a doubleheader
with Cincinnati. In the 15-2 win, Whiten hit four
home runs and drove in 12 runs to become the
only player to accomplish both feats in one game.
1998 Ken Grifey Jr. homered twice against
Baltimore, giving baseball three 50-homer play-
ers in a season for the frst time. Grifey joined
Mark McGwire and Babe Ruth as the only players
tohit 50or more inconsecutive seasons. Ruthdid
it in 1920-21 and 1927-28, and McGwire hit 50 or
more the last three years.
2001 Alex Rodriguez broke his own Ameri-
can League record for homers by a shortstop
with his career-best 43rd as Texas beat Kansas
City 8-2.
PAGE 10B Saturday, September 7, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
JPMorgCh 52.56 +.45 +20.4
JacobsEng 58.08 -.94 +36.4
JohnJn 87.16 +.12 +24.3
JohnsnCtl 41.02 -.35 +33.7
Kellogg 60.23 -.19 +7.8
Keycorp 11.90 +.06 +41.3
KimbClk 93.06 +.79 +10.2
KindME 80.19 +.25 +.5
Kroger 37.40 +.05 +43.7
Kulicke 11.48 +.11 -4.3
L Brands 56.45 -.45 +20.0
LancastrC 72.28 +.53 +4.5
LillyEli 52.41 +.20 +6.3
LincNat 43.73 -.12 +68.8
LockhdM 123.73 -.41 +34.1
Loews 44.69 -.12 +9.7
LaPac 16.99 +.04 -12.1
MDU Res 26.35 -.04 +24.1
MarathnO 35.69 -.20 +16.4
MarIntA 40.62 -.15 +9.0
Masco 19.63 +.41 +18.4
McDrmInt 7.51 -.25 -31.9
McGrwH 60.03 +.18 +9.8
McKesson 123.57 +.63 +27.4
Merck 47.49 -.02 +16.0
MetLife 47.98 -.42 +45.7
Microsoft 31.15 -.08 +16.6
MorgStan 26.81 +.16 +40.2
NCR Corp 36.60 -.04 +43.6
NatFuGas 65.70 -.02 +29.6
NatGrid 57.79 +.42 +.6
NY Times 11.06 -.12 +29.7
NewellRub 26.04 +.12 +16.9
NewmtM 30.43 +.13 -34.5
NextEraEn 80.01 +.05 +15.6
NiSource 29.11 +.10 +17.0
NikeB s 64.98 -.40 +25.9
NorflkSo 74.39 +.26 +20.3
NoestUt 40.25 -.01 +3.0
NorthropG 93.12 -.44 +37.8
Nucor 46.61 +.01 +8.0
NustarEn 41.11 +.27 -3.2
NvMAd 12.09 -.01 -20.5
OGE Egy s 34.86 +.05 +23.8
OcciPet 89.00 -.10 +16.2
OfficeMax 10.98 -.22 +27.4
Olin 22.70 -.36 +5.1
ONEOK 51.28 +.11 +20.0
PG&E Cp 40.88 +.03 +1.7
PPG 159.25 -1.32 +17.7
PPL Corp 30.07 -.04 +5.0
PVR Ptrs 23.19 -.11 -10.7
Pfizer 28.28 +.01 +12.8
PinWst 52.49 +.22 +3.0
PitnyBw 16.82 +.17 +58.1
Praxair 118.11 +.19 +7.9
PSEG 32.16 +.19 +5.1
PulteGrp 15.47 +.22 -14.8
Questar 21.92 +.12 +10.9
RadioShk 3.53 +.04 +66.5
RLauren 165.18 -.82 +10.2
Raytheon 75.61 -.19 +31.4
ReynAmer 47.41 +.16 +14.4
RockwlAut 100.04 +.27 +19.1
Rowan 37.26 +.08 +19.2
RoyDShllB 67.50 +.18 -4.8
RoyDShllA 64.91 +.21 -5.9
Ryder 56.98 +.48 +14.1
Safeway 25.96 +.03 +43.5
Schlmbrg 85.14 +.92 +22.9
Sherwin 172.69 -1.67 +12.3
SilvWhtn g 25.94 +.19 -28.1
SiriusXM 3.75 -.05 +29.8
SonyCp 21.02 -.07 +87.7
SouthnCo 41.12 +.37 -3.9
SwstAirl 13.10 +.01 +27.9
SpectraEn 32.79 +.21 +19.8
Sysco 32.04 -.06 +2.1
TECO 16.59 +.04 -1.0
Target 63.29 -.17 +7.0
TenetHlt rs 39.86 -.82 +22.8
Tenneco 48.78 -.24 +38.9
Tesoro 46.78 +.38 +6.2
Textron 28.17 +.11 +13.6
3M Co 115.04 +.17 +23.9
TimeWarn 61.45 -.13 +28.5
Timken 61.52 +1.26 +28.6
Titan Intl 15.80 -.09 -27.3
UnilevNV 37.48 +.20 -2.1
UnionPac 154.92 -1.20 +23.2
Unisys 24.57 -.07 +42.0
UPS B 86.76 -.05 +17.7
USSteel 18.87 +.15 -20.9
UtdTech 103.23 -.45 +25.9
VarianMed 71.87 -.02 +2.3
VectorGp 16.54 +.02 +11.2
ViacomB 80.29 +.38 +52.2
WestarEn 29.96 -.05 +4.7
Weyerhsr 28.51 +.75 +2.5
Whrlpl 131.37 +1.89 +29.1
WmsCos 35.12 -.01 +7.3
Wynn 143.43 +.74 +27.5
XcelEngy 27.37 +.10 +2.5
Xerox 10.03 -.03 +47.1
YumBrnds 69.61 -.23 +4.8
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 16.70 +.02 +19.5
GlblRskAllB m14.70 +.06 -4.2
American Cent
IncGroA m 32.45 -.01 +19.9
American Century
ValueInv 7.53 -.01 +19.0
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.83 ... +21.7
BalA m 22.36 +.01 +10.6
BondA m 12.29 +.04 -3.7
CapIncBuA m55.42 +.19 +6.9
CpWldGrIA m41.20 +.16 +12.4
EurPacGrA m44.17 +.28 +7.2
FnInvA m 47.03 +.04 +16.0
GrthAmA m 40.77 +.03 +18.7
HiIncA m 11.15 +.01 +2.4
IncAmerA m 19.30 +.04 +8.7
InvCoAmA m 35.24 +.01 +17.8
MutualA m 32.45 ... +15.6
NewPerspA m35.17 +.12 +12.5
NwWrldA m 55.25 +.36 +1.4
SmCpWldA m46.71 +.09 +17.0
WAMutInvA m36.25 -.01 +17.3
Baron
Asset b 59.23 -.03 +21.2
BlackRock
EqDivI 22.03 +.01 +11.6
GlobAlcA m 20.99 +.05 +7.0
GlobAlcC m 19.50 +.04 +6.4
GlobAlcI 21.09 +.05 +7.2
CGM
Focus 35.45 +.04 +21.0
Mutual 30.87 +.05 +8.6
Realty 28.60 +.33 -2.1
Columbia
AcornZ 35.39 +.12 +17.7
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 18.71 +.17 -7.6
EmMktValI 27.29 +.26 -7.7
USLgValI 28.12 -.02 +23.7
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.20 +.03 -8.5
HlthCareS d 34.12 +.02 +30.8
LAEqS d 28.75 +.45 -12.1
Davis
NYVentA m 38.57 -.06 +19.8
NYVentC m 36.99 -.07 +19.2
Dodge & Cox
Bal 89.74 +.08 +16.1
Income 13.41 +.03 -1.8
IntlStk 39.05 +.38 +12.7
Stock 148.30 +.07 +22.7
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 39.87 +.21 +15.6
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.53 ... +3.7
HiIncOppB m 4.53 ... +2.9
NatlMuniA m 8.78 +.03 -11.6
NatlMuniB m 8.78 +.03 -12.1
PAMuniA m 8.58 +.01 -4.3
FPA
Cres d 31.71 ... +13.1
Fidelity
AstMgr20 x 13.22 +.01 +1.6
Bal 22.08 +.04 +10.2
BlChGrow x 56.95 -3.34 +22.9
Contra 90.61 +.09 +17.9
DivrIntl d 33.11 +.16 +10.6
ExpMulNat d 24.85 +.02 +13.5
Free2020 15.08 +.04 +6.1
Free2030 15.45 +.04 +8.8
GrowCo 114.80 -.13 +23.1
LatinAm d 38.27 +.66 -17.4
LowPriStk x 45.38 -2.23 +20.6
Magellan 87.22 +.03 +19.6
Overseas d 36.23 +.16 +12.1
Puritan 21.22 +.02 +10.2
TotalBd 10.40 +.03 -3.3
Value 92.89 +.11 +21.7
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 34.41 -.02 +16.9
Fidelity Select
Gold d 23.47 +.39 -36.5
Pharm d 18.25 +.03 +23.4
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 58.88 +.01 +17.7
500IdxInstl 58.89 +.02 +17.8
500IdxInv 58.88 +.01 +17.7
TotMktIdAg d 48.76 +.02 +18.6
First Eagle
GlbA m 52.61 +.19 +8.3
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.78 +.01 -7.2
Income C m 2.32 ... +6.7
IncomeA m 2.30 +.01 +7.1
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z x 33.05 -.12 +16.0
Euro Z x 24.48 +.08 +15.9
Shares Z x 26.34 -.09 +17.7
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.82 +.05 -1.9
GlBondAdv 12.77 +.05 -1.8
GrowthA m 22.64 +.13 +16.5
GMO
IntItVlIV 23.12 +.17 +11.3
Harbor
CapApInst 50.51 +.15 +18.8
IntlInstl 66.43 +.48 +6.9
INVESCO
ConstellB m 25.39 +.08 +19.7
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.37+.03 +17.5
PacGrowB m 20.92 +.05 +3.2
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 58.38 -.54 +9.9
AT&T Inc 33.41 +.07 -.9
AbtLab s 33.50 -.24 +6.9
AMD 3.57 +.16 +48.8
AlaskaAir 57.38 -.58 +33.2
Alcoa 7.92 +.05 -8.8
Allstate 48.40 -.08 +20.5
Altria 34.40 +.15 +9.4
AEP 42.56 +.42 -.3
AmExp 73.35 -.45 +28.1
AmIntlGrp 48.18 -.49 +36.5
Amgen 111.01 -1.92 +28.8
Anadarko 93.01 +.26 +25.2
Annaly 11.78 +.30 -16.1
Apple Inc 498.22 +2.95 -6.4
AutoData 73.13 +.79 +28.5
AveryD 42.98 -.18 +23.1
Avnet 39.59 +.37 +29.3
Avon 19.82 +.02 +38.0
BP PLC 41.82 +.27 +.4
BakrHu 48.99 +.56 +19.9
BallardPw 1.64 -.01+168.4
BarnesNob 13.48 +.10 -10.7
Baxter 70.01 +.23 +5.0
Beam Inc 63.75 +.43 +4.4
BerkH B 111.86 -.41 +24.7
BlockHR 26.91 +.07 +44.9
Boeing 106.07 -.58 +40.8
BrMySq 41.89 +.17 +29.9
Brunswick 38.22 +.04 +31.4
Buckeye 66.37 -2.69 +46.2
CBS B 53.62 -.20 +40.9
CMS Eng 25.98 +.12 +6.6
CSX 25.45 +.02 +29.0
CampSp 41.99 +.11 +20.3
Carnival 35.86 -.08 -2.5
Caterpillar 83.39 +.44 -6.9
CenterPnt 22.81 +.05 +18.5
CntryLink 31.90 -.23 -18.5
Chevron 121.21 -.16 +12.1
Cisco 23.55 -.14 +19.9
Citigroup 49.22 -.64 +24.4
Clorox 82.33 -.01 +12.4
ColgPalm s 58.00 +.47 +11.0
ConAgra 33.70 -.12 +14.2
ConocoPhil 68.20 +.43 +17.6
ConEd 55.59 +.44 +.1
Corning 14.40 -.05 +14.1
CrownHold 43.55 -.07 +18.3
Cummins 126.77 -.34 +17.0
DTE 65.56 +.56 +9.2
Deere 82.61 +.06 -4.4
Diebold 28.63 +.03 -6.5
Disney 61.39 +.09 +23.3
DomRescs 57.53 +.02 +11.1
Dover 87.60 +.09 +33.3
DowChm 38.56 +.15 +19.3
DryShips 2.88 +.12 +80.0
DuPont 57.11 -.50 +27.0
DukeEngy 65.45 +.65 +2.6
EMC Cp 26.39 +.07 +4.3
Eaton 65.63 +.19 +21.1
EdisonInt 45.04 +.68 -.3
EmersonEl 61.47 -.20 +16.1
EnbrdgEPt 29.94 +.19 +7.3
Energen 68.18 +.43 +51.2
Entergy 62.92 +.88 -1.3
EntPrPt 58.65 +.11 +17.1
Ericsson 13.11 +.57 +29.8
Exelon 30.31 +.26 +1.9
ExxonMbl 87.25 -.10 +.8
FMC Corp 67.80 +.46 +15.9
Fastenal 47.89 -.71 +2.7
FedExCp 108.16 -.74 +17.9
Fifth&Pac 24.35 -.01 +95.6
FirstEngy 36.99 +.43 -11.4
Fonar 5.29 +.03 +22.2
FootLockr 32.65 -.19 +1.7
FordM 17.00 -.30 +31.3
Gannett 24.54 -.30 +36.3
Gap 40.39 -.26 +30.1
GenDynam 84.57 -.42 +22.1
GenElec 23.16 ... +10.3
GenMills 49.19 +.09 +21.7
GileadSci s 61.12 +.05 +66.4
GlaxoSKln 51.67 +.24 +18.9
Hallibrtn 49.54 -.23 +42.8
HarleyD 61.97 -.31 +26.9
HarrisCorp 57.28 -.73 +17.0
HartfdFn 30.87 +.13 +37.6
HawaiiEl 24.66 +.12 -1.9
HeclaM 3.37 +.02 -42.2
Heico 62.93 -.04 +40.6
Hess 77.30 +.77 +46.0
HewlettP 22.42 +.30 +57.3
HomeDp 72.70 -.29 +17.5
HonwllIntl 81.66 +.27 +28.7
Hormel 42.21 +.40 +35.2
Humana 95.64 -.62 +39.4
INTL FCSt 19.65 +.03 +12.9
ITT Corp 34.03 +.07 +45.1
ITW 72.88 +.31 +19.8
IngerRd 61.77 +.13 +28.8
IBM 183.03 -1.12 -4.4
IntPap 47.86 +.21 +20.1
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.00 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 102.99 -.85 +22.6
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 39.28 -.05 +5.8
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 42.30 -.35 +9.2
28.12 19.25 AquaAm s WTR .61 24.40 +.09 +20.0
38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 35.79 -.40 +30.7
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 417.53 -2.57 +17.8
15.03 7.93 BkofAm BAC .04 14.36 -.01 +23.7
32.36 22.27 BkNYMel BK .60 30.46 -.20 +18.5
22.68 9.34 BonTon BONT .20 11.02 -.09 -9.4
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 58.63 +.17 +21.3
81.75 45.16 Cigna CI .04 80.83 -.42 +51.2
43.43 35.58 CocaCola KO 1.12 38.35 +.11 +5.8
46.33 33.42 Comcast CMCSA .78 42.48 -.06 +13.7
34.85 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.12 33.36 -.30 +21.9
51.29 26.33 CmtyHlt CYH .25 39.68 +.40 +29.1
68.00 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 65.34 +.27 +38.0
62.91 47.10 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 61.47 -.20 +16.1
68.39 41.72 EngyTEq ETE 2.62 63.51 +.51 +39.6
11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 8.05 +.05 +15.3
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 12.88 +.02 -10.6
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.28 -.08 0.0
21.30 15.09 Genpact G .18 19.60 +.07 +26.5
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 8.27 -.07 +40.2
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 90.74 +.55 +25.6
47.51 27.81 Lowes LOW .72 45.60 -.26 +28.4
119.54 86.34 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 114.98 -.93 +16.8
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 96.26 +.60 +9.1
32.91 24.50 Mondelez MDLZ .56 30.94 +.20 +21.6
23.25 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.55 +.13 +6.3
39.75 8.70 NexstarB NXST .48 33.52 -.46 +216.5
77.93 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 73.19 -.16 +25.5
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.07 -.04 +5.0
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 18.10 +.19 +2.6
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 79.26 +.19 +15.8
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 84.19 +.09 +.7
82.54 65.83 ProctGam PG 2.41 77.15 +.01 +13.6
83.67 48.17 Prudentl PRU 1.60 77.55 -.50 +45.4
3.62 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 3.49 -.02 +156.6
26.17 15.33 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.15 -.02 +41.0
74.46 46.87 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 70.70 ... +33.4
54.66 40.08 TJX TJX .58 53.92 -.20 +27.0
43.24 30.15 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 38.34 -.04 +17.2
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.12 46.34 -.30 +7.1
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 72.59 -.08 +6.4
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 46.62 -.15 +19.0
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 41.43 -.39 +21.2
USD per British Pound 1.5633 +.0042 +.27% 1.5039 1.5936
Canadian Dollar 1.0399 -.0104 -1.00% 1.0311 .9822
USD per Euro 1.3182 +.0062 +.47% 1.2994 1.2643
Japanese Yen 99.23 -.90 -.91% 94.06 78.88
Mexican Peso 13.1995 -.1918 -1.45% 12.7607 13.0582
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.26 3.24 +0.52 -6.22 -10.89
Gold 1386.70 1373.10 +0.99 -11.93 -20.19
Platinum 1495.70 1482.10 +0.92 -5.32 -6.30
Silver 23.84 23.21 +2.74 -17.10 -29.11
Palladium 695.45 685.80 +1.41 -5.77 +6.34
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.46 ... -3.3
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.55 +.03 +8.1
LifGr1 b 15.06 +.03 +11.8
RegBankA m 17.55 -.06 +23.6
SovInvA m 17.97 +.01 +12.8
TaxFBdA m 9.44 +.01 -7.4
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 18.17 +.17 -7.0
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.83 +.06 +1.2
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.54 +.01 +0.1
MFS
MAInvA m 25.13 +.07 +17.2
MAInvC m 24.21 +.07 +16.6
ValueI 30.41 +.01 +20.6
Merger
Merger b 16.10 ... +1.7
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.45 +.03 -1.9
Mutual Series
Beacon Z x 15.66 -.13 +18.3
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 24.68 -.01 +28.4
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.41 +.02 +13.7
Intl I 24.91 +.19 +19.0
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 48.12 +.06 +13.7
DevMktA m 35.10 +.35 -0.5
DevMktY 34.76 +.34 -0.3
PIMCO
AllAssetI 11.99 +.07 -3.2
AllAuthIn 10.10 +.08 -7.4
ComRlRStI 5.74 +.07 -12.5
HiYldIs 9.41 ... +1.7
LowDrIs 10.19 +.03 -1.7
TotRetA m 10.58 +.05 -4.5
TotRetAdm b 10.58 +.05 -4.4
TotRetIs 10.58 +.05 -4.2
TotRetrnD b 10.58 +.05 -4.4
Permanent
Portfolio 47.38 +.30 -2.6
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.95 ... +10.8
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 36.05 ... +15.4
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.53 ... +19.6
BlendA m 22.12 +.03 +20.0
EqOppA m 19.30 -.01 +21.7
HiYieldA m 5.60 +.01 +2.5
IntlEqtyA m 6.83 +.03 +8.8
IntlValA m 21.56 +.08 +8.2
JennGrA m 24.73 +.07 +18.4
NaturResA m 47.90 +.21 +6.2
SmallCoA m 26.87 -.04 +19.8
UtilityA m 13.22 +.05 +13.3
ValueA m 19.02 ... +21.8
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.63 +.01 +21.0
IncomeA m 7.04 +.01 -1.0
Royce
LowStkSer m 14.88 +.08 +7.5
OpportInv d 14.96 +.04 +25.2
ValPlSvc m 16.34 +.03 +18.1
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 26.11 ... +17.7
Scout
Interntl 34.48 +.19 +4.4
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 55.10 +.07 +20.8
CapApprec 25.26 -.02 +13.5
DivGrow 30.51 ... +16.6
DivrSmCap d 22.06 -.02 +26.5
EmMktStk d 30.69 +.33 -9.9
EqIndex d 44.75 +.01 +17.6
EqtyInc 30.81 +.03 +17.5
FinSer 18.18 +.03 +21.7
GrowStk 45.11 +.15 +19.4
HealthSci 55.87 -.01 +35.5
HiYield d 6.95 -.01 +3.9
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q q q q p p q q
q q p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$3.53
-.05
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Ford CEO downplays
rumors of departure
Alan Mulallys tenure at Ford Motor
Co. is back in the headlines after a
report that he is considering leaving
the CEO post before 2015 to pursue
another high-prole job.
Reuters cited sources who say the
board is aware of Mulallys pursuit of
other opportunities including a post
with the Obama administration, and
that the board would accept an exit
before 2015. But Ford says that isnt so.
I love serving Ford and will continue
serving Ford, Mulally said in an inter-
view on Bloomberg Television.
Mulally spoke Friday in Berlin at the
IFA technology show.
In emails to the media, he has said he
is committed to staying at Ford through
2014, as previously outlined in Fords
succession plans.
Even so, Mulallys name has come up
as a possible interim successor to Steve
Ballmer, 57, who plans to step down as
CEO of Microsoft Corp. in the next year.
Tax revisions sought
for multinationals
Its time to make Google, Apple and
other multinational companies pay
more taxes. Thats the message from
President Barack Obama and the lead-
ers of the worlds leading economies at
a summit ending Friday.
The head of the Organization
for Economic Cooperation and
Development told The Associated Press
that the leaders have signed up to an
ambitious new tax plan at the Group of
20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia.
The new rules, unveiled by the
OECD and debated by G-20 nance
ministers in July, would make it harder
for companies to hide prots in tax
havens and force them to pay tax in
the countries where they make money.
The leaders also agreed to an unprec-
edented deal to share information on
individual taxpayers, despite earlier
resistance by China.
Apple to modify
ebook contracts
A judge on Friday ordered Apple to
modify contracts with publishers to
prevent electronic book price xing
and said she will appoint an external
compliance monitor to review the com-
panys antitrust policies and training.
U.S. District Judge Denise Cotes
order came nearly two months after
she concluded that Apple Inc. used the
popularity of its iTunes store to con-
spire with publishers to raise e-book
prices in 2010.
IN BRIEF
$3.63 $3.49 $3.79
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
US job growth steady but subpar
CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
APEconomics Writer
WASHINGTON U.S.
employers have yet to start hir-
ing aggressively a trend the
Federal Reserve will weigh in
deciding this month whether to
slow its bond buying and, if so,
by how much.
Employers added 169,000
jobs in August but many fewer
in June and July than previously
thought, the Labor Department
said Friday. Combined, June,
July and August amounted
to the weakest three-month
stretch of job growth in a year.
The unemployment rate
dropped to 7.3 percent, the
lowest in nearly ve years. But
it fell because more Americans
stopped looking for work and
were no longer counted as
unemployed. The proportion
of Americans working or look-
ing for work reached its lowest
point in 35 years.
All told, the report adds up
to a mixed picture of the U.S.
job market: Hiring is steady
but subpar. Much of the hiring
is in lower-paying occupations.
And many people are giving up
on the job market in frustra-
tion.
The jobs picture is sure to
weigh heavily when the Fed
meets Sept. 17-18 to discuss
whether to scale back its $85
billion a month in Treasury
and mortgage bond purchases.
Those purchases have helped
keep home-loan and other bor-
rowing rates ultra-low to try to
encourage consumers and busi-
nesses to borrow and spend
more.
David Jones, chief economist
at DMJ Advisors, said he still
thinks the Fed will begin slow-
ing its bond buying later this
month. But he suspects the
August data and the reduced
job totals for June and July
will lead the Fed to trim more
gradually than it would have
otherwise: The Fed could start
reducing its monthly purchases
by $10 billion rather than $20
billion.
Jones said he expects peri-
odic reductions of $10 billion
between now and mid-2014.
At that point, Chairman Ben
Bernanke has said the Fed
expects the bond buying could
likely end.
The revised job growth for
June and July shrank the previ-
ously estimated gain for those
months by 74,000. Julys gain is
nowestimatedat 104,000 the
fewest in more than a year and
down from a previous estimate
of 162,000. Junes was revised
to 172,000 from 188,000.
In the past three months,
employers have added an aver-
age of only 148,000 jobs. The
average monthly gain for 2013
so far is 180,000, slightly below
the 183,000 average for 2012.
One possible concern for the
Fed is that most of the hiring
in August was in lower-paying
industries such as retail, res-
taurants and bars. This con-
tinues a trend that emerged
earlier this year.
Companies showing heart with art
ULAILNYTZKY
AssociatedPress
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J.
Corporate art buying in North
American has fallen off since
the boom days of the 1970s and
1980s but even as the economy
improves, some companies are
buying less art but doing more to
put their works out for the public
to enjoy.
There are about 1,500 cor-
porations in the world with art
collections, with some of the
largest held by banks and nan-
cial institutions, according to
the International Directory of
Corporate Art Collections.
Shirley Reiff Howarth, the
editor of the directory, said that
since 2000, the percentage of col-
lections listed as ongoing, or
still being added to, has dropped
from 55 percent to about 40
percent. Many corporations are
limiting new purchases for new
buildings, expansions or renova-
tions.
While the volume of buying
has been reduced, educational
programs have increased and
the collections are used for more
than simply enhancing the walls
of the company and its image,
Howarth said.
Bank of America, with more
than 30,000 artworks created
from several mergers, has one of
the largest collections in North
America. Instead of buying new
art, it focuses on the arts pro-
grams it has created, including
Art In Our Communities, which
has loaned fully curated exhibi-
tions to 60 museums worldwide
since 2008.
This is something that reso-
nates with the communities
where we loan the exhibitions,
said Allen Blevins, who oversees
the banks collection and art pro-
grams.
The Charlotte, N.C.-based
company currently has 16 trav-
eling exhibitions, represent-
ing 2,500 works. Among them
is a show at the Museo del
Novecento in Milan of Andy
Warhols most important silk-
screen portfolios.
At Johnson & Johnsons
sprawling I.M. Pei-designed
headquarters in New Brunswick,
there are two galleries that fea-
ture continuous exhibitions, one
for special and touring shows
and the other for New Jersey art-
ists. They are open to the public
by appointment.
At Neiman Marcus, one of the
few luxury retailers to boast an
art collection, the art-apprecia-
tion concept is extended to its
customers by turning all 42 of its
stores into galleries.
The retailer has about 3,500
pieces inits collection, whichwas
started in 1951 with the commis-
sion of Alexander Calders large-
scale mobile Mariposa, nowon
display at its Chicago store.
AP photo
Two prints from Sharon Suttons Space Time series hang in the office of the CEO of Johnson & Johnson in New
Brunswick, N.J. Corporation art collecting has a long history that can be traced to the 1400s when European banks
commissioned artists to create murals.
Rising car prices hit record
TOMKRISHER
APAutoWriter
DETROIT Americans are
paying record prices for new
cars and trucks, and they have
only themselves to blame.
The average sale price of a
vehicle in the U.S. hit $31,252
last month, up almost $1,000
over the same time last year.
The sharp increase has been
driven by consumers loading
cars up with high-end stereos,
navigation systems, leather
seats and safety gadgets.
Its a buying pattern that
began around two years ago
with low interest rates that let
buyers choose pricier cars while
keeping monthly payments in
check. And automakers have
also offered cheap lease deals
that include fancy options.
Add in booming sales of
expensive pickup trucks, and
you get record high prices.
But those conditions could
soon change. Although sales
are expected to keep rising,
automakers say the next wave
of buyers who replace older cars
will be more cost-conscious,
shunning expensive radios and
cushy seats to reduce payments.
Ford is starting to see that trend
in pickup trucks, and is adding
a lower-priced model to its top-
selling F-Series line.
Most car buyers shop based
on expectations for a monthly
payment, with the average run-
ning around $450, said Jesse
Toprak, senior analyst with the
TrueCar.com auto pricing web-
site. Since bank interest rates
run as low as 2 percent and
automakers offer no-interest
nancing, buyers now have a
choice between a lower pay-
ment or a nicer car. Unlike
rising mortgage rates, shorter-
term auto interest rates have
remained fairly stable.
If you can keep your pay-
ment the same and get more
car, most consumers in the U.S.
just get more car, said Toprak,
who calculated the record aver-
age price.
The average price, he said,
went up about $1,400, or 4.5
percent, in the past two years,
far faster than normal.
The result is a dreamscenario
for automakers and car dealers:
People are paying record high
prices just as demand returns to
levels not seen since the Great
Recession.
You want a better bathroom, but
dont want to put a drain on your
finances? Worry not. This is one
room in the house where little things
mean a lot.
On the other hand, if you want to
go luxe, there are also a variety of
new products that can turn the bath-
room into a showcase.
Simple fixes
Often small and poorly lighted,
bathrooms can end up neglected. But
theyre probably the easiest room to
make over, says Ingrid Abramovitch,
senior editor and writer at Elle Decor
magazine and author of Restoring a
House in the City (Artisan, 2009).
A very basic change is to buy a
new shower curtain and good qual-
ity towels.
Is this a kids bathroom? Think
bright colors and fun patterns. Or,
to create a spa-like retreat, look for
fluffy towels in serene neutrals, and
maybe add accessories like new soap
dishes and towel rails in elegant
materials. If you want to up the luxe
factor, think about installing a towel
warmer.
Another easy change is to swap
out your shower head for a new,
multifunction model. If your water
pressure isnt all it could be, show-
er heads designed to boost spray
power can help. You also might try a
shower filter to see if you notice an
improvement; basic models can be
found from under $30 from brands
such as Aquasana and Sprite.
A hot trend is bringing music
into the bathroom the better to
accompany your shower serenades.
The Moxie showerhead from Kohler,
for example, has a built-in wireless
speaker that uses Bluetooth tech-
nology to sync with your music
device. (Suggested retail for the
When silica, soda and lime
meet high heat, a beautiful
alchemy occurs. The result
a taffy-like substance oth-
erwise known as glass has
inspired creative minds for
centuries.
Artists and craftsmen today
often combine old-school tech-
niques with new technology to
create one-of-a-kind works of
arts for the home.
Internationally known
sculptor Dale Chihuly, based
in Tacoma, Wash., has drawn
crowds to a variety of pub-
lic spaces with his outdoor
glass garden installations
of imaginative, other-worldly
creations. (www.chihuly.com)
You can nd some of his small-
er pieces glass baskets, wall
art and table sculptures at
www.artnet.com.
In her Detroit studio, Nina
Cambron fuses opaque, trans-
lucent and iridescent glass
into wall panels resembling
totems. The enduring quality
of glass as an artistic medium
is what drew her to it, she
says.
Its just so rich, smooth,
shiny and permanent, she
says. Unlike painting or
drawing, you cant erase and
rework an area. After its red,
youre done. (www.ninacam-
bron.com)
Gale Scott, a glass artist
based in Worcester, Mass.,
uses a technique called elec-
troforming that involves
blowing glass into copper
forms. The hot, soft glass
meets the rigid metal and
billows into ethereal shapes.
(www.galescott.com)
New Yorker Peter Byrum
displayed his paintings on
glass at Mays International
Contemporary Furniture Fair
in Manhattan. Using acrylics,
he paints natural elements
like leaf fronds and coral on
layered sheets of tempered
glass, sometimes half a dozen
or more. The effect is three-
dimensional, an organic,
ephemeral diorama. (www.
peterbynum.com)
Thor and Jennifer Bueno of
Spruce Pine, N.C., are inspired
by nature, and form hot glass
into shapes evoking water-
washed rocks or molecular
structures.
Walking along a river, light
bounces across the waters
surface, Jennifer Bueno says.
Each sculpture is made by
blowing and shaping molten
glass into pebbles. The col-
ors come from adding glass
shards or powders. The piece
is then baked to hardness,
sandblasted and given a pro-
tective luster; the result looks
remarkably like a rock scoured
by the action of a swift current
over time.
In another series, the pebble
shapes are made out of the
mirrored material known as
mercury glass.
In its liquid state, glass
glows with intense heat
at home
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SATuRDAy, SEpTEMbER 7, 2013
Q: One side of my
asphalt-shingled roof,
which is shaded by a
large maple tree, has
small growths on it that
look like the lichens that
grow on trees. It also
has black stains in other
parts of the roof. How
can I clean this stuff off
and what is it?
A: The growths that
look like lichens prob-
ably are lichens, which
can grow on asphalt
shingles as well as trees.
The black stains are a
fungus. Shingle stains
like these are very com-
mon, especially in areas
of high humidity and on
roofs shaded by trees.
Unfortunately, cleaning a
roof isnt easy, and it is
usually not a good do-it-
yourself project, because
of the saftey equipment
needed, including a har-
ness and safety glasses.
Many mixtures for roof
cleaning are available at
home centers and on the
Internet, but care should
be used in selecting one.
Some cleaners contain
bleach, either chlorine
or oxygen bleach, and
some experts say bleach
should be left on asphalt
shingles no more than
five minutes or it will
damage the shingles.
Other cleaners contain
sodium hydroxide, a
powerful chemical that
can be hazardous if not
used properly. Many roof
cleaners also can damage
plants unless the plants
are thoroughly soaked
before and after use.
It pays to hire profes-
sionals to clean roofs,
but it is sometimes dif-
ficult to find a pro that
uses safe cleaning meth-
ods. Many roofers wont
clean roofs, and some
who do want to use pres-
sure washing, which can
damage the shingles if
the pressure is too great.
McClatchy-
Tribune News Service
Q&A: What is all that junk on my roof?
Toward a better bath
Simple fxes,
small and large
MICHELLE LOCKE
Associated press
When Mountain Top-area native Kathleen
Sigda remodeled her main bathroom last year,
she did most of the work herself. Her husband,
her father and even her 7-year-old daughter
pitched in, and she left the plumbing work to the
professionals.
Even though the job took about ve months,
she is pleased with a more spacious bathroom
and roomier, tiled shower with its glass wall and
a more environmentally friendly commode.
Thats the way many new bathrooms are going.
Many homeowners are taking out their small-
er shower and installing a walk-in shower with
the seat and glass doors, said John Regnosky,
owner of Endless Possibliities Kitchen and Bath,
Dallas, formerly Creative Kitchen Refacing.
A lot of people are going with clear glass as
opposed to a shower curtain and instead of a
sliding glass door.
Shower walls now are mostly tile, and rain
showers or body-spray showerheads with mas-
sage are in, he added.
Everybodys going with the rain shower,
Regnosky said. Its installed in the ceiling, and
the water comes down like rain.
Kristie Vaccaro, showroom manager at R.J.
Walkers Wilkes-Barre store, which sells plumb-
ing, heating and cooling supplies, agreed rain-
shower heads and body sprays are popular, and
some customers go with heads that shoot water
from the walls, depending on how many heads
the customer chooses.
Want to sing along to some tunes in the show-
er? You can buy a showerhead with a wireless
speaker that pops in the middle and connects to
your wireless device that will channel your playl-
ist or the radio.
They also sell tubs like that, too, Vaccaro
said.
She said the store sells a lot of materials for
tile showers and all-glass shower doors.
Regnosky said another trend is to separate
the main vanity sink cabinetry from the toi-
let with a wall for a semi-private effect, and
some are putting in recessed lighting in the
shower and waist-high, or kitchen-height,
sinks and counters in bathrooms. The coun-
ters are 36 inches high instead of 30 inches.
Locals talk up the steaming-hot trends
JOE SYLVESTER
jsylvester@timesleader.com
With glass, old-school techniques meet new-world technology
KIM COOK
The Associated press
Ap photo
The silver series from buenoglass.com is composed of a mirrored material
known as mercury glass. The smooth pebble shapes represent sound waves,
or scientific particles.
See TRENDS | 2C
See GLASS | 2C
See FIXES | 2C
Bringing in more light was a goal of the Sigda family mom Kathleen is a Mountain Top native when they remodeled
their walled-off bathroom in Warrington.
pete G. Wilcox/The Times Leader
READY TO GO
BUILDINGS & SITES
O
Its the same with toi-
lets, Regnosky added.
Before you felt you were
sitting on the oor. (Now
its) 1.28 gallons per ush,
vs. the old style, which is
a few gallons. Everybodys
going green now.
Vaccaro said there are
dual-ush toilets, with
ush options of 0.9 gallon
for No. 1 and 1.6 gallons
or 1.28 gallons for No. 2.
As for the cabinet x-
tures, nickel stainless
hardware still is popular,
Regnosky said.
Twenty, 30 years ago,
everything was gold or
polished chrome. Chrome
and polished brass are
out.
Also in is Venetian
bronze, which is a bronze
color with light amber
tones brushed throughout
the nish.
Brass is obsolete,
Vaccaro said. Brushed
nickel is still good. Theres
a new color out cham-
pagne bronze chrome.
Vaccaro said many of
the wall mounted, free-
standing cabinets are
popular.
We actually did not
replace the cabinets, the
upper and lower, said
Sigda, who now lives
in Warrington, Bucks
County. We replaced the
faucet and shower x-
tures.
She liked the cabinets
and waist-high sink she
already had, and the cabi-
net and drawer knobs
were more like antique
bronze.
But she had a cubicle
stall shower before she
had it turned into a show-
er that spans the length of
the wall nearly 8 feet.
She also had the com-
mode replaced with one
that uses less water and is
the right height.
The showers glass wall
is one large piece of glass
that is long enough so
there is just a 3-foot open-
ing at the back end. To
shower, one walks around
the glass to get in. The
shower head is stationary
but can alternate between
regular shower and mas-
sage.
We left the plumbing to
the professionals, Sigda
said. Im not practiced
in that. We left the slop-
ing of the shower oor to
the professionals so that it
would drain correctly.
Sigda, a stay-at-home
mom, said she took her
time with the project,
which is why it took so
long from demolition to
remodeled bathroom.
We knocked down a
wall, she said. The sink
was separated from the
shower by a wall. A door
would be closed to the
commode and shower.
Now, without the wall,
more natural light comes
in through the window.
She said her husband,
Jack, her father, John
Merges, and daughter
Kaitlin, then 7, helped
with the demolition.
I did have help when
we gutted the room Sigda
said. They helped me
break a wall down, and we
broke down the support
that was in the wall. We
had to rip up an old oor
and took out the inside of
an outer wall to insulate.
Overall, Sigda said, the
decisions on the bathroom
project were pretty easy,
and she doesnt remember
any snags.
Nothing broke; noth-
ing really slowed us down.
I was just lucky to be
home to take my time to
do it.
And she not only was
very happy with the way it
turned out, she also saved
money.
I think it cost in mate-
rials and labor, plumb-
ing and glass, grading of
the shower oor, about
$8,000, Sigda said. I
saved at least $3,000 to
$4,000 by doing the labor
myself, albeit slower.
PAGE 2C Saturday, September 7, 2013 AT HOME www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
moves slowly, as if self-
propelled, Bueno notes.
Mercury glass has the
appearance of liquid
metal, undulating and
three-dimensional.
The nished glass
resembles electrons,
particles, even sound
waves. (www.buenoglass.
com)
At Wayfair.com, youll
nd photographs print-
ed on the back of glass
panels from Platin Art.
Bamboo stems, owers,
and black and white city
skylines seem to oat,
making for arresting wall
art, particularly for large
expanses of wall space.
(www.wayfair.com)
At LaylaGrayce.com,
the Worlds Away Marina
Ice Glass collection of fur-
niture has a Hollywood
Regency vibe, cool and
elegant. Nightstands,
chests and other pieces
are clad in a milky, trans-
lucent glass. (www.layla-
grayce.com)
If youre interested
in acquiring art glass,
ArtfulHome.com has an
extensive collection from
North American artists at
a range of prices. (www.
artfulhome.com)
If stained glass intrigues
you, there are tutorials on
YouTube. DelphiGlass.
com offers stained-glass
supplies, kits and tips for
beginners. (www.delphi-
glass.com)
You also can learn more
about the history, art and
science of glass at the
Corning Museum of Glass
in Corning, N.Y. Try your
hand at glassmaking in
one of the museums many
classes. (www.cmog.org)
From page 1C
Trends
From page 1C
Glass
Clockwise from top, Kristie Vaccaro, showroom manager, shows Kohler shower heads at R.J. Walker & Sons in Wilkes-Barre. Wireless speakers for showers are on display
at R.J. Walker & Sons in Wilkes-Barre. A higher-height, more water-friendly commode now sits inside Mountain Top-area native Kathleen Sigdas Warrington bathroom.
Pete G. Wilcox/The Times Leader
showerhead: $199.)
If youre feeling handy, one of the
cheapest ways to transform a bathroom
or any room is color. You can
always very quickly change the aesthet-
ics of a room with a can of paint, says
David Alhadeff, interior designer and
founder of The Future Perfect, a fur-
nishings store based in San Francisco
and New York.
Is the room white? How might it look
in bright yellow with towels and bath
mat to match?
Look for the new humidity-resistant
paints that come in flat finishes for a
refined look.
Another way to make a big change
is to re-evaluate the lighting. A lot of
bathrooms still have a single overhead
light fixture, which casts unflattering
shadows.
Lighting is everything in the bath-
room, and there are a lot of tricks to
how we want to illuminate ourselves
within that space to make ourselves
look best, Alhadeff says. If youre get-
ting only overhead lighting, youre not
getting the clear picture of what you
look like.
If you already have lighting around
your mirror, a change of bulbs can work
wonders, and lighting along the side
of the mirrors is preferable, Alhadeff
says. Creating layered lighting is more
involved than buying a new towel, espe-
cially if you have to hire someone to
add electrical outlets for sconces and
mirror lighting, but it can make a bath-
room much more inviting.
A cheaper, albeit temporary, way to
create a soft ambience: Light a few
candles.
Big-ticket items
So much for budget-conscious bath-
room makeovers. What if youve just
won the lottery and are ready to make a
really big splash?
Large, free-standing tubs are chic
right now, Abramovitch says. Some
people are making room for them by
taking guest bedrooms and turning
them into a bathroom-dressing room,
with a free-standing tub surrounded by
built-in closets and other accessories.
Hot tubs, too, have evolved, with new
systems that create smaller bubbles, as
opposed to the roaring jets of yester-
year.
And what high-end bathroom would
be complete without a high-tech toi-
let? Take Kohlers Numi model, which
includes a motion-activated cover and
seat, built-in bidet function, charcoal-
filter deodorizer and air vents at the
floor to warm your toes. Naturally,
there are illuminated panels with differ-
ent colors that can be set for the day
of the week. A remote control with a
touch screen allows you to set your
preferences on settings and, of course,
you can play your favorite music via
Bluetooth connection.
Sure, its not cheap, with a suggest-
ed retail of $5,978. But who can put a
price on never, ever having to have the
seat up/seat down discussion?
From page 1C
Fixes
The Holy Name Society of St. John the Evangelist Parish community in Pittston recently awarded
its annual $1,000 scholarship to Wilkes University student James Musto. He is the son of James and
Lisa Musto. Last years scholarship winner was Shane Farrell, son of Edward and Mary Beth Farrell.
He is a sophomore at the University of Scranton. At the award presentation, from left: Stephen Vitek,
president, Holy Name Society;
James Musto; Monsignor John
J. Bendik, pastor; and James
McGill, vice president, Holy
Name Society.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER BIRTHDAYS/COMMUNITY NEWS Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 3C
IN BRIEF
CONYNGHAM: The
Conyngham United
Methodist Church, 411
Main St., is starting its
weekly Sisters study
at 10 a.m. on Tuesday.
The ve-week series will
begin with a Women
of Faith DVD featur-
ing Sheila Walsh, Patsy
Clairmont, Thelma Wells,
Marilyn Meberg and Lucy
Swindoll. Non-church
members welcome.
For more information,
call 570-788-3960 or
email conynghamumc@
ptd.net.
KINGSTON: The
Wyoming Avenue
Christian Church, 881
Wyoming Ave., is con-
ducting a Bible study on
the Book of Revelation at
7 p.m. every Wednesday
in the E.L. John Social
Hall. The Bible study is
being taught by the Rev.
Dennis Gray, pastor. All
are welcome.
LATTIMER: A memo-
rial service will be held at
3:30 p.m. on Tuesday at
the Lattimer Monument.
The service will be
sponsored by St. James
Episcopal Church, St.
Lukes Lutheran Church,
Queen of Heaven Parish,
Immaculate Conception
Church and Faith United
Church of Christ. The
service will be dedicated
to the 19 miners who died
on Sept. 10, 1897, and
will include an account of
the massacre, a roll call
and candle lighting for
the 19 miners, prayer and
song.
Everyone is invited to
attend this memorial. The
Lattimer Monument is
located at the junction of
Lattimer road and Quality
Road in Lattimer Mines.
MOUNTAIN TOP:
The Emmanuel United
Church of Christ, 7768
Blue Ridge Trail, is host-
ing an evening of songs
and worship with the
group, Re-Creation at 7
p.m. on Sept. 15. The
group has been perform-
ing since 1976 at hos-
pitals, Veterans Affairs
facilities, nursing homes
and other care facilities.
They perform over 300
shows a year to fund their
mission to bring music
and healing to others. For
more information visit re-
creationusa.com.
A free will offering will
be taken and light refresh-
ments will be served after
the show. For more infor-
mation call Allen Dennis
at 868-5120 or the church
ofce at 868-5675.
PITTSTON: A bus pil-
grimage to the National
Shrine of Divine Mercy in
Stockbridge, Mass., will
See BRIEFS | 6C
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
Quinn R. Crispell
Quinn Rose Crispell, daughter
of Scott and Debbie Crispell,
Swoyersville, is celebrating her
10th birthday today, Sept. 7. Quinn
is a granddaughter of Jim and
Rose Ann Cox, Forty Fort, and Don
and Bev Crispell, Sweet Valley.
Mackenzie R.
Hagenbaugh
Mackenzie R. Hagenbaugh,
daughter of Dave and Heather
Hagenbaugh, Wilkes-Barre, is
celebrating her seventh birthday
today, Sept. 7. Mackenzie is a
granddaughter of Sandy Browning,
Plains Township; Wayne Bevan,
Hunlock Creek; and Mr. and Mrs.
Gene Campbell, Wilkes-Barre.
She is a great-granddaughter of
Theresa Comitz, Sugar Notch; the
late JimComitz; the late Walter and
Rose Kaskiel; Ronald Hagenbaugh,
Hanover Township; and the late
Betty Hagenbaugh. Mackenzie has
a brother, Cameron, 8.
Ava Conrad
Ava Conrad, daughter of
Christopher Conrad and Mary
Barberio Conrad, both of Wilkes-
Barre, is celebrating her eighth
birthday today, Sept. 7. Ava is
a granddaughter of Philomena
Conrad and the late Louis Conrad
and Jane Barberio and the late
Joseph Barberio, all of Wilkes-
Barre. She has a brother, Dean, 19.
Livia Moore
Livia Moore, daughter of Richard
and Lisa Moore, Luzerne, is cel-
ebrating her 11th birthday today,
Sept. 7. Livia is a granddaughter
of Dorothy Risboskin, Luzerne; Bill
and Toni Risboskin, Waverly, N.Y.;
and Sonia Moore, Dravosburg.
Photographs and informa-
tion must be received two
full weeks before your
childs birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-gen-
erated. Include your name
and your relationship to
the child (parent, grand-
parent or legal guardians
only, please), your childs
name, age and birthday,
parents, grandparents
and great-grandparents
names and their towns of
residence, any siblings and
their ages. Dont forget
to include a daytime
contact phone number.
Without one, we may be
unable to publish a birth-
day announcement on
time.
We cannot guarantee
return of birthday or occa-
sions photos and do not
return community-news or
publicity photos.
Please do not submit pre-
cious or original profes-
sional pho tographs that
require return because
such photos can become
damaged, or occasion-
ally lost, in the produc-
tion process. Email your
birthday announcement to
people@timesleader.com
or send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250.
You also may use the form
under the People tab on
www.timesleader.com.
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be
published free of charge
NAMES AND FACES
Dr. Jerry Branch,
pastor, Dallas Baptist
Church, participated in
the graduation ceremony
at Trinity College of the
Bible and Theological
Seminary, Evansville,
Ind., on Aug. 10.
Dr. Branch was hood-
ed for his Ph.D. by
Drs. Elliott and Baxter
Hunter and congratulat-
ed by Dr. Harold Hunter,
president of the semi-
nary.
Branch
b e g a n
his Ph.D.
in lead-
e r s h i p
study in
2008 and
compl et-
ed the
d e g r e e
re qui re -
ments in the summer of
2012. In Nov. 2012, the
degree of Ph.D. with
high distinction was
conferred after success-
fully completing and
defending his disserta-
tion, Rethinking State
Convention Resourcing
to the Local Church:
The Baptist Resource
Network of Pennsylvania-
South Jersey.
Branchs wife, Gini,
and son, Jeff, attended
the ceremony with him.
His son also helped with
the statistical analysis
used in the dissertation.
Branch serves as
senior pastor of Dallas
Baptist Church and was
recently appointed to
serve as on-line adjunct
faculty of Mid-Continent
University.
Prince of Peace Episcopal Church holding rummage sale
The Prince of Peace Episcopal Church, 420 Main St., Dallas, is holding a rummage sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon on Sept. 14. Bag Day will be
on Sept. 14 and everything that can fit in a bag will sell for $2. There will be bake sale items available on both days. For more information call 570-675-1723 or visit www.
princeofpeacedallaspa.org. Committee members, from left, first row, are Mykala Wright, Pauline Roth, Edna Yatsko and Linda Shrader. Second row: Cori Gwilliam, Beverly
Cushner and Beverly Todd. Third row: Sandy Sheehan, Diana Dreher, Missy Rodgers, Madeline Reed, Carol Jones and Jean Gale. Fourth row: George Gwilliam, Debbie Rafferty
and Eleanor Eppley.
St. Jude hosting Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration
St. Jude Parish, Mountain Top, is hosting the 21st anniversary of Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration.
Mass will be celebrated at 9 a.m. today. Celebrant and speaker will be the Rev. Jeffrey D. Tudgay, who
will be celebrating his first Mass since his ordination. Breakfast will be held after the service at Blue
Ridge Trail Golf Club, 260 Country Club Drive, Mountain Top. Reservations should have been made
in advance. For more information call 868-5346. Quadrant leaders of St. Jude Church Eucharistic
Adoration Chapel, from left, first row: Vincenza Konopelski; Cathy Dormans; and the Rev. Gerald
Shantillo, assistant pastor. Second row: Gloria Calabro, Marie Nelson and Phyllis Powell.
Holy Name Society presents scholarship
Branch
SEPTEMBER 13 TO15, 20 TO22, 27 TO29
DINNER ANDSHOW: $34 SHOW-ONLY: $16
CALL 283-2195 OR 800-698-PLAY
PRESENTS
THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 HUGHES ST. SWOYERSVILLE, PA
80022469
C.W. SCHULTZ & SON, INC
Plumbing Heating
Air Conditioning
PA Contractor License #001864
(570) 822-8158
www.cwschultzandson.com
If You Have Steam Heat,
We're tHe CompanY to Call.
570.287.4329
EdwardsGardenCenter.com
525 River St., Forty Fort
Mon. Fri. 7am to 6pm
Sat. 7am to 4pm
Sun. 9am to 4pm
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570-262-6212
Serving Luzerne County
Since 1992 Expert Hardscaping
PA Registered Contractor PA019927
Call Now For Fall Projects
Cover up
because you
want to...
...not because
you feel you
have to.
You may be interested in learning about a clinical research study of an
investigational study medication for symptoms associated with
plaque psoriasis.
The purpose of this clinical research study is to determine the safety and
efectiveness of an investigational study medication for the symptoms
associated with plaque psoriasis.
You may qualify if you:
Are 18 years of age or older
Have been diagnosed with moderate-tosevere plaque psoriasis
for at least 6 months
have not previously taken etanercept (Enbrel

)
In order to qualify, there are other requirements that must be met.
Qualifed participants will receive all study-related medical care
and study medication at no charge
All appointments will be at a clinical research center near you.
570-582-7180
80025548
The Used Furniture Store
120 N. Main Avenue Scranton
(570) 342-9259
Come See an
extensive
collection of used
furniture at
extremely low rates.
Everything is negotiable.
Celebrate with Savings!
We Work with you, not against you
80031834
PSYCHIATRIC & COUNSELING SVC., PC EARLY
Dr. S. Rahman, M.D. (Psychiatrist)
Expertise in
Panic Attack Depression Anxiety
OCD Bipolar PTSD ADHD
Accepting new patients for medication management & counseling.
Patients of all ages welcome.
MOUNTAINTOP
474-0100
HAZLETON
454-2545
BLOOMSBURG
784-5663
SHAVERTOWN (DALLAS)
784-5663
Accepting Medicare, Medical Assistance, BC/BS, Geisinger & most insurances.
SLEEP &NEUROLOGICAL DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
TREAT MOST SLEEP DISORDERS
Has Board Certified Physician in Sleep Medicine Affordable Payment Plan Available
Performs Sleep Apnea Testing For CDL Truck Drivers
Performs Sleep Disorder Studies (PSG & CPAP)
Scheduling & Report in as little as 1 week
Home Sleep Testing Available (No Referral Needed From Your Doctor)
MOUNTAINTOP (On Route 309) 474-5599
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Singl
Lifes too shot to be alone
80011205
NEW YORK (AP)
MSNBCs prime-time
lineup is getting some
star power with Alec
Baldwin, at least for one
night a week.
The cable news
network announced
Thursday that the actor
will host Up Late with
Alec Baldwin, a current-
events and culture talk
show to air at 10 p.m.
Eastern time Fridays.
The show is modeled
after a podcast hes been
doing for WNYC radio
in New York, interview-
ing personalities such as
David Letterman, Dick
Cavett and Republican
political strategist Ed
Rollins.
The network said
the show will begin in
October. The two-time
Emmy winner for 30
Rock and 16-time host
of Saturday Night Live
will be back in familiar
territory. MSNBC says
Baldwins show will tape
at 30 Rockefeller Plaza
in New York.
PAGE 4C Saturday, September 7, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 7, 2013
LOCAL 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30
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Fourth season of Boardwalk Empire premieres Sunday
WHAT: Boardwalk
Empire
WHEN: Fourth-season
premiere, 9 p.m. EDT
Sunday on HBO
WHAT ITS ABOUT:
By 1924, Nucky
Thompson (Steve
Buscemi) is undisputed
king of the boardwalk,
while the Capone broth-
ers, Al (Stephen Graham)
and Frank (Morgan
Spector) are fastening
their grip on Cicero, a
Chicago suburb. Chalky
White (Michael Kenneth
Williams) gets his own
boardwalk club, the Onyx,
as promised by Nucky
but the clubbing business
isnt as easy as it looks,
especially when a harrow-
ing newcomer drifts to
Atlantic City. Meanwhile
J. Edgar Hoover (The
Killings Eric Ladin) is
told theres something
called organized crime
and that Nucky who
else is part of the orga-
nization.
MY SAY: Based on
most of the rst ve epi-
sodes sent out for review,
Boardwalk Empire eas-
ily establishes its claim as
one of the three or four
best dramas on TV. But
initial impressions arent
too promising. Sundays
opener is a nasty piece
of business in parts, and
worse, muddled.
Some fans may nd
themselves wondering
where this is going and
whether they want to go
there with it. You will
(believe me, you will),
but just gird yourself for
something new, and in
surprising ways, some-
thing better. Empire is
richer, deeper, and if
possible even more
beautiful. And this does
remain very much a thing
of beauty and craftsman-
ship. The huge creative
challenge for Empires
fourth season is escap-
ing the long shadow cast
by the third a crowd-
pleaser with archetypical
villain Bobby Cannavales
Gyp Rosetti, who tend-
ed to suck up so much
oxygen there wasnt all
that much left for most
of the other characters.
The series takes its time
doing that, and probably
needs to.
What happens after the
extraordinary fth epi-
sode, Erlkonig, on Oct.
6? Guess well all nd out
together.
VERNE GAY
Newsday
Alec Baldwin gets
MSNBC talk show
LOS ANGELES
NBCs banking on TV
viewers being ready for a
little football as the NFL
settles into its proper
Sunday night slot tomor-
row when the Dallas
Cowboys host the New
York Giants. Fans might
feel like theyre watching
The Matrix when they
see the new 360-degree
view of any play, made
possible by 24 camer-
as placed around each
end zone in Cowboys
Stadium.
This circling look at
the game is limited and
will only show in games
played in Dallas. Because
it takes a month to install
all of the cameras, there
isnt time to move them to
other arenas throughout
the season. But there are
two telecasts scheduled
to originate from Dallas,
including an Oct. 13 clash
with the Washington
Redskins.
The 360-view is the
latest innovation. It joins
the likes of slow-motion
replays, cameras above
the eld and the yel-
low rst down line. Fred
Gaudelli, producer of
Sunday Night Football,
has a simple formula for
which technology he adds
to the broadcast.
Does it make the game
more enjoyable or does
it make it more informa-
tive to watch? If it could
t either one of those cri-
teria, or hopefully both
of them, then I think
its a good innovation,
Gaudelli says.
The 360-degree replay
qualies. Gaudelli is cer-
tain it will be popular
because so many viewers
play video games where
they can change the angle
of how a play is viewed.
NBC hasnt announced
which game it will broad-
cast on Dec. 29 and it
could be the Dallas home
game with Philadelphia,
should the contest have
playoff implications. Add
in the Nov. 10 away game
for the Cowboys at New
Orleans, and Dallas could
be on almost one-fourth
of the NBC Sunday line-
up.
I think going all the
way back to the 20 years
I did Mondayand you
look at the ratingsany-
time the Cowboys were
on, the ratings were pro-
portionally higher. I dont
know what it is, says Al
Michaels, the announc-
er for Sunday Night
Football. The Cowboys
are an iconic American
gure. Everything just
sings about Dallas, about
Texas being big, about
the fact that they have
such a great history.
When theyre bad, a
lot of people love that
theyre bad. When theyre
good a lot of people love
that they are good. Ive
never seen in all the years
Ive covered all of the
sports, anything like this
in terms of the love/hate
relationship. It makes for
great television.
Every 2012 playoff
team will make an appear-
ance on Sunday Night
Football.
But just because the
teams made the playoffs
doesnt mean they will
be good this year. Mark
Lazarus, chairman of
the NBC Sports Group,
knows there could be
games that look good
now but by mid-season
could be a dud.
Thats the nature of
live sports. But it sure
looks good on paper. You
got to play the games,
Lazarus says.
Color commentator
Cris Collinsworth sees
the no-huddle offense
as the biggest challenge
in coverage this season.
No-huddle offenses allow
little time between plays
for instant replay or even
analysis of a previous
play.
I thank goodness
every day that I played in
the no-huddle, and it was
Sam Wyche in Cincinnati
whos really one of the
innovators of the no-hud-
dle, Collinsworth says.
So we have some differ-
ent concepts of how were
going to try and get that
one done.
NBC plans 360-viewinSunday Night Football telecast
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4:20PM 10:20PM
BLUE JASMINE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
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CLOSED CIRCUIT (DIgItal) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
10:15PM
CONJURING, THE (DIgItal) (R)
1:55PM 4:35PM 7:50PM 10:35PM
ELYSIUM (DIgItal) (R)
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GETAWAY, THE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM
9:15PM
JOBS (DIgItal) (Pg-13) 1:20PM
7:20PM
KICK-ASS 2 (DIgItal) (R) 9:20PM
LEE DANIELS BUTLER, THE
(DIgItal) (Pg-13)12:30PM 3:40PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS
(DIgItal) (Pg-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM 9:45PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (3D)
(Pg) 11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM
7:10PM 8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3D) (Pg) 1:25PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (DIgItal) (Pg) 4:05PM
PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
PLANES (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:10PM
4:50PM 9:35PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
SMURFS 2 (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:50PM
6:50PM
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(DIgItal) (R) 12:00PM 2:35PM
5:10PM 7:40PM 10:15PM
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10:10PM
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2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WORLDS END, THE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
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Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
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**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
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*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
Special Events
World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Friday September 6th - Thursday September 12th
Advance Ticketing Available Nowfor :
The One: Mayweather vs. Canelo Sat, Sep. 14
Clean Guys of Comedy Thu, Sep. 19
UNSTOPPABLE A Live Event with Kirk Cameron
Tue, Sep. 24
The 2013-2014 Metropolitan Opera Series
Riddick in DBox Motion Code Reserved
Seating R, 1 hr 59 min - 1:50p 4:25p 7:20p
10:05p
One Direction: This Is Us 3D PG, 1 hr 32 min
2:00p 3:00p 4:00p 5:00p 5:55p 7:00p 8:00p
9:00p 10:00p
Getaway PG13, 1 hr 30 min - 2:40p 5:00p
7:15p 9:25p
The Worlds End R, 1 hr 49 min - 1:45p 4:20p
7:15p 9:50p
Youre Next R, 1 hr 34 min - 2:10p 4:30p
7:20p 9:40p
The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones
PG-13, 2 hr 10 min - 1:40p 4:20p 7:00p 9:50p
Lee Daniels The Butler PG-13, 2 hr 12 min
1:55p 4:30p 7:10p 9:50p
Planes PG, 1 hr 32 min - 2:15p 4:25p 7:10p
9:30p
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters PG, 1 hr 46
min - 2:05p 1:20p 4:30p 3:50p 7:05p 9:30p
Were the Millers R, 1 hr 50 min - 1:40p
4:15p 7:15p 9:45p
This Is The End R, 1 hr 47 min - 2:20p 4:40p
7:25p 9:45p
The Conjuring R, 1 hr 51 min - 7:05p 9:35p
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1 hr 40 min - 7:40p
10:10p
Despicable Me 2 PG, 1 hr 38 min - 2:00p
4:15p
The Smurfs 2 PG, 1 hr 45 min - 1:40p1:40p
4:10p
RIDDICK(XD) (R) NEW
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4
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2 GUNS (DIgItal) (R)
4:20PM 10:20PM
BLUE JASMINE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
1:40PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:45PM
CLOSED CIRCUIT (DIgItal) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
10:15PM
CONJURING, THE (DIgItal) (R)
1:55PM 4:35PM 7:50PM 10:35PM
ELYSIUM (DIgItal) (R)
12:45PM 3:20PM 6:20PM 9:55PM
GETAWAY, THE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM 9:15PM
JOBS (DIgItal) (Pg-13) 1:20PM 7:20PM
KICK-ASS 2 (DIgItal) (R) 9:20PM
LEE DANIELS BUTLER, THE (DIgItal)
(Pg-13)12:30PM 3:40PM 7:05PM 10:05PM
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS
(DIgItal) (Pg-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM 9:45PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (3D) (Pg)
11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM 7:10PM
8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS
(3D) (Pg) 1:25PM 6:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (DIgItal) (Pg) 4:05PM
9:50PM
PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
PLANES (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:10PM 4:50PM
9:35PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
SMURFS 2 (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:50PM
6:50PM
THIS IS THE END NEWMOVIE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:40PM
10:15PM
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(Pg) 11:50aM 2:25PM 5:00PM 7:35PM
10:10PM
WERE THE MILLERS (DIgItal) (R)
2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WORLDS END, THE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:20PM
YOURE NEXT (DIgItal)
(R) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM
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RIDDICK NEWMOVIE (DIgItal) (R)
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 5C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: Im 24
and a college gradu-
ate. My boyfriend,
Jordan, and I have
been together for a
year and we would
like to get married.
However, my parents
are against the idea. They love Jor-
dan, but they think marriage is stupid
because, in 2013, WHO is getting
married?
I want to be married and I would
love my parents approval, but its
hard when they call me stupid for
wanting to take that step just because
their marriage didnt work out.
I love Jordan and I love my parents.
Should I have to choose between
the two?
Totally Torn
Dear Totally Torn: You do not have
to choose between your parents and
being married. At 24, you are an adult
and mature enough to make your own
decision about the importance of the
institution.
Im sorry your parents marriage
didnt work out, but you would be
foolish to let their cynical opinion of
this kind of commitment taint your
perspective. I hope you and Jordan
enjoy many happy and fulfilling years
together.
Dear Abby: What are your thoughts
about co-workers dating? I have a
crush on one of my co-workers, and
I believe it is reciprocated. Were un-
sure about an office romance because,
while it isnt against the rules for peo-
ple to date within the building, there
are concerns about sexual harassment
or inappropriate behavior on the
premises. (Some of our co-workers
have dated with no problems.)
Would it be wrong to attempt to
further the relationship, as long as it
remains appropriate within the office,
or should I forget it and date some-
one outside of work?
Working Relationship in Indiana
Dear Working Relationship: This
may seem old-fashioned, but Im not
crazy about the idea of office romanc-
es. While I know they are not uncom-
mon and its hard to fight mutual
attraction, office romances are dis-
tracting. When the pheromones are
flying, it can be extremely difficult
to concentrate on the tasks at hand.
And if it doesnt work out, there can
be tension, embarrassment and hard
feelings in the aftermath, and thats
not good for business.
Dear Abby: Twice in the past
month I have received thank-you
notes for gifts I had given, but the
wrong gift was mentioned. I usually
spend a lot of time selecting just the
right thing, and I take pride in my
choices.
I understand how something like
that could happen, but Im not sure
what to do about it. Should I just
keep quiet about it, or say something
to the person? What would I say? I
dont want to embarrass anyone, but I
know I have received gifts in the past
that will forever remind me of the
giver.
Picking Out Presents in
Pennsylvania
Dear Picking Out Presents: I see
nothing to be gained by not alerting
the person to the mistake. If you were
thanked for the wrong gift, so was
another giver. If I had mixed up the
gift cards, I would want to know
wouldnt you? Do unto others ...
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Parents disdain the idea of marriage after the failure of their own
To receive a collection of Abbys most memo-
rable and most frequently requested po-
ems and essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check or money
order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear
Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). The best
use of your time will be the thing
that takes the least amount of
effort. So settle into an easy
pace. Leisurely activities are
worthwhile endeavors.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Youll
find out what happens when you
treat friends like family and fam-
ily like friends. The happy result
will propel your weekend in a
most pleasant direction.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Everyone
likes a busy person. Momentum
is with you. As you move breez-
ily through your day, you will
make many connections, some
of which you will call on in weeks
to come.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Good
leaders let people know whats
expected of them and how they
will be held accountable to those
standards. Bad leaders make
people guess. Youll encounter
both types.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You dont
need an excuse to do what pleas-
es you. Maybe your happiness is
reason enough to execute even
the most outrageous of plans. As
long as youre not inconvenienc-
ing others, go for it!
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). In the
particular game youll be play-
ing today, you wont earn extra
points for difficulty. So you may
as well make things easy on
yourself. The use of props or
tools might be just the thing.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Very few
people will show initiative in the
way you want them to. Youll
have to prompt people in the
manner of a comedian gestur-
ing to indicate when its time for
everyone to laugh.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Since
youll be playing in an arena in
which you already have achieved
some notable measure of suc-
cess, the thrill is gone. Setting
other people up to win will be
more fun for you than winning.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
You like attention, but not when
its sudden and intense. Avoid
people who put you on the
spot and give you an unnatural
amount of attention. There are
plenty of comfortable friends
around call one up.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You
prefer people to be direct with
you. It saves you from having
to unearth the real reasons for
their behavior. So let down your
guard, and make it easy for peo-
ple to be honest with you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
Youre creative, but a bit scat-
tered. You may have to chase
your own thoughts, gathering
your focus as if it were a wan-
dering 2-year-old and bringing it
back to the main task at hand.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You will
get the satisfaction of a small
but significant breakthrough.
Celebrate the first signs of
change in a big way, because
later you wont have time. Events
are important because you make
them so.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept. 7).
First, youll find qualified help,
and then youll learn how to do it
yourself. Finally, you will become
the expert others need. The next
four weeks develop a special
relationship, and theres more
happiness in the future with this.
Your lucky numbers are: 38, 13,
27, 49 and 41.
PAGE 6C Saturday, September 7, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS/CHURCH BRIEFS www.timesleader.com TIHE TMES LEADER
From page 3C
Briefs
take place on Oct. 5 to honor
the 75th anniversary of St.
Maria Faustinas entrance into
eternal life.
The bus will leave at 7 a.m.
from the Oblates of St. Joseph
Seminary, 1880 Highway 315,
Pittston. Estimated time of
arrival is 11 a.m. All events
will be at the Mother of Mercy
outdoor shrine. The itinerary
includes a presentation on St.
Faustina, Eucharistic adora-
tion and confessions, Rosary
for Life, Mass, Chaplet, bene-
diction and veneration of First
Class Relic of St. Faustina,
and dinner at Michaels
Restaurant.
The cost of the trip is $57
and includes bus, fee to enter
the shrine, full-course dinner
and tip for the bus driver.
Coordinator of the trip
is Cathy Mack, Eucharistic
Apostle of Divine Mercy
Cennacle Leader. For reserva-
tions, call Cathy at 570-654-
6063.
WILKES-BARRE: St.
Lukes United Church of
Christ, 471 N. Main St., is
marking Grandparents Day on
Sunday with a special service
at 10 a.m.
The parish will also partici-
pate in the National Back to
Church Sunday program on
Sept. 15. People who have not
attended church in a while are
invited to attend the service at
10 a.m.
For more information call
the church at 822-7961 or
visit the Facebook page for St.
Lukes UCC Wilkes-Barre PA.
WILKES-BARRE: Unity of
NEPA: A Spiritual Center, is
participating in the 20th annu-
al Unity World Day of Prayer.
This years theme is Living
Well: Nurturing Mind, Body
and Spirit.
An evening of prayer will be
held at 7 p.m. on Wednesday
and the celebration will con-
tinue through Thursday at
11:30 a.m., when a joint ser-
vice with Unity Worldwide
will invite people of all faiths
to join in praying for the
health and well-being of the
world and each other.
Names can be submitted for
prayer online at www.world-
dayofprayer.org.
Religious Service Calendar
To AdvertiseYour Church, Call Caitlin, 970-7374
Apostolic Baptist Bible Episcopal Lutheran Orthodox
Apostolic Faith
Tabernacle
536 Village Rd, Orange
Pastor Frank Chorba
333-5172
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Sunday Evening
Worship 7 p.m.
Bible Study
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
Messages-To-Go Ministry
apostolicfaith.net
MEADE ST.
BAPTIST
50 S. Meade St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Chester F. Dudick, Pastor
(570) 820-8355
SUNDAY SCHOOL
9:30 a.m.
WORSHIP SERVICE
10:30 a.m.
PRAYER, BIBLE STUDY
& PIONEER CLUB
Wed 6:30 p.m.
WOMENS FELLOWSHIP
2nd Tuesday of the month
6:30 p.m.
AFTERNOON
FELLOWSHIP
12 noon last Sunday of the
Month
EXPOSITORY PREACHING:
EXPLAINING GODS TRUTH,
ONE VERSE AT A TIME.
Christ
Fellowship
Church Of
Plymouth
246 E. Main St.,
Plymouth, PA
(570) 779-4210
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday night bible study
and prayer 7 p.m.
Sunday School and
Nursery provided
We are a Christian bible church
teaching the plain truth of Gods
word as we prepare
for our eternal future.
River Of Life
Fellowship
Church
22 Outlet Road
Lehman, PA
675-8109
www.rolfministries.org
Sunday School 9:15am
Service 10:30am
Nursery provided
Thursday Night
6:30pm Bible study
& Youth Groups
Coffee house
Fridays 6 to 9 pm
with live music.
St. Martin
In-The-Fields
3085 Church Rd.,
Mountaintop
Rev. Dan FitzSimmons
CHORAL EUCHARIST
10AM
HEALING SERVICE
Last Sunday
each month
Serving through Faith,
Praise & Good Works
ST. CLEMENT &
ST. PETERS
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
165 Hanover St., W-B
822-8043
The Rev. John C.
Major Priest-In-Charge
Holy Eucharist 9am
Sunday School 9:00am
WELCOME ALL TO
GROW IN GODS LOVE
www.stclementstpeter.org
Episcopal
Holy Trinity
Lutheran Church
813 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston
Saturday
Contemporary Holy Communion 5:30
Sunday
Traditional Holy Communion 10:00
Rev. Paul Metzloff
Handicapped Accessible
Messiah
Lutheran Church
453 S. Main Street, W-B
Rev. Mary E. Laufer
Sunday Holy Communion
8:00 and 10:45 a.m.
St. Johns
Lutheran Church
410 S. River St.
Wilkes-Barre
Worship
9:30 AM
Ofce Phone 823-7139
St. Marks
Lutheran Church
56 S. Hancock St., W-B
Pastor - Rev. Mary Lauffer
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
Sunday School 10:15 a.m.
St. Matthew
Lutheran Church
667 N. Main St., W-B
822-8233
Worship Schedule:
Sun 7:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School 10:45 a.m.
Adult Bible Class 11:00 a.m.
Rev. Gary Scharrer
Chairlift Available
Missouri Synod
St. Peters
Lutheran Church
1000 S. Main St., W-B
823-7332
Reverend
David Szeto
Sun. Worship 9 AM
Sunday School &
Adult Bible Study 10:30 AM
Missouri Synod
Mennonite
Nanticoke
Christian
Fellowship
112 Prospect St.
Sunday Celebration 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School - Sept. - May
9:00 a.m.
Pastor D. Pegarella
735-1700
Nazarene
Mountain View
Church Of The
Nazarene
WE HAVE MOVED!!
52 E. 8th Street, Wyoming
Pastor Bryan Rosenberg
Sunday Worship
9 am
Childrens Church &
Child Care Provided.
570-821-2800
Everyone is Welcome!
Saint Mary
Antiochian
Orthodox Church
905 South Main Street
Wilkes-Barre
Very Rev, David Hester
Deacon John Karam
Saturday - Great Vespers 6 p.m.
Sunday - Divine Liturgy 10 a.m.
Parish Ofce 824-5016
All Are Welcome
Website:
www.antiochian.org
Presbyterian
First United
Presbyterian
Church
115 Exeter Ave.,
West Pittston
654-8121
Worship 11:00 AM
at St. Cecilias Roman
Catholic Church, Wyo-
ming Avenue, Exeter
Rev. James E.
Thyren, Pastor
Primitive
Methodist
New Life
Community
Church
570 South Main Rd.,
Mountaintop, PA
868-5155
Pastor Dave Elick
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service
8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Bible Services
Wed. 7 p.m.
All Are Welcome
United Methodist
Central United
Methodist
65 Academy Street, W-B
Rev. Dr. Paul C. Amara
SUN. WORSHIP SERVICE
11:15 am
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Child Care Provided
For Infants
& Toddlers
822-7246
Askam United
Methodist
Church
2811 S. Main St., Hanover Twp.
Pastor:
George Price
570-823-6467
Sunday Services
at 9 A.M.
Kids Korner
available during worship.
Dallas United
Methodist
4 Parsonage Street, Dallas
Pastor:
Rev. Robert G. Wood
675-0122
Summer Church Service
9:15 & 10:30 A.M.
675-5701
Handicapped Accessible
Luzerne United
Methodist Church
446 Bennet St., Luzerne
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Church School
during Worship
Carol E. Coleman
Pastor 287-6231
Shavertown United
Methodist Church
shavertownumc.com
163 N. Pioneer Ave.
Shavertown
Phone-A-Prayer 675-4666
Pastor: Rev. Judy Walker
Organ/Choir Director:
Deborah Kelleher
Saturday Service-5:30 pm
Chapel Service
Sunday Service-10:00 am
Worship Service
Prayer & Praise
Service - 2nd Monday
of the month at 7 pm.
Nursery Care
Available during Sunday
Service
For more information call
the office at
570-675-3616
Trucksville United
Methodist
Marian E. Hartman, Pastor
Dr. Stephen L. Broskoske,
Director of Music
Making Disciples for
Jesus Christ
Sunday Worship Schedule
8:30 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.
17 West Church RD off Route
309, Trucksville at Carverton RD
Nursery available for children
birth through kindergarten.
Vacation Bible School
August 18-22 5:30-8:30pm
Grief Support 7PM
3rd Wednesday Every Month
Phone: 570- 696-3897
Fax: 570-696-3898
Email:
ofce@trucksvilleumc.com
Unity
Unity: A Center for
Spiritual Living
140 S. Grant St., W-B
Rev. Dianne Sickler
Sunday Service &
Childrens Church
10 a.m.
Church 824-7722
Prayer Line 829-3133
www.unitynepa.com
Forty Fort
Presbyterian
Church
1224 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
Pastor William Lukesh
287-7097
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
6 p.m. Praise Band
Handicap Accessible
Nursery Provided
Air Conditioned
Visitors Welcome
Loyalville United
Methodist Church
Loyalville Rd.
Lake Township
Sunday Worship
9:30 am
570-477-3521
St. Johns
Lutheran
Nanticoke
231 State St.
Ofce 735-8531
www.NanticokeLutheran.org
Rev. Debby North
Holy Communion
Sunday 8 am & 9:30 am
Christian Education
10:30 am
Christian Coffee House
Every 4th Fri 7-9PM
Catholic
PARISH OF ST.
ANDRE BESSETTE
Vigil (Saturday)
4:00 p.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
(570)823-4988
5:30 p.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
Sunday
8:30 a.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
10:30 a.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
Weekday Mass
7:00 a.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
8:00 a.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
Confessions
3:00 p.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
4:30 p.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
Catholic
Holy Cross Episcopal Church
373 N. Main Street, W-B
Father Timothy Alleman, Rector
SUNG SUNDAY EUCHARIST - 9:00 AM
SUNDAY SCHOOL - 9:00 AM
SATURDAY HOLY EUCHARIST - 4:30 PM
HEALING SERVICE & HOLY EUCHARIST
PARKING
St. John The
Baptist Church
126 Nesbitt St.
Larksville, PA 18651
570-779-9620
A WELCOMING, GROWING,
FAITH COMMUNITY
Saturday 4 p.m.
Sunday
7 a.m., 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.
Ample, Easy Parking
Handicapped Accessible
Confessions:
Saturday 3 p.m.
Firwood United
Methodist Church
Cor. Old River Rd. &
Dagobert St.
Rev. Barbara Pease
Safe Sanctuary Policy
Sunday School
9:45
Morning Service
11:00 a.m.
Handicap
Elevator
Available
You are invited to
attend.
823-7721
Holy Trinity
Russian
Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church In America
401 East Main St., W-B
Phone: 825-6540
Rev. David Shewczyk
Sunday Divine Liturgy 9:00 a.m.
Feast Days 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Vespers:
Summer 6:00 p.m. - Winter 4:00 p.m.
First
Presbyterian
Church
S. Franklin &
Northhampton Sts., W-B
10:00 a.m. Worship
Rev. Dr. Robert M.
Zanicky, Minister
Air Conditioned Sanctuary
Nursery provided
Handicapped Access
John Vaida -
Minister of Music
Pamela Kerns -
Christian Education
Director
A Friendly Inclusive,
& Welcoming Church
Audio Sermons
available on the web
www.fpcwb.com
Wyoming
Presbyterian
Church
Wyoming Ave.
at Institute St.,
570-693-0594
Laura Lewis, Pastor
Worship Service: 11 a.m.
Sunday School: 10 a.m.
Forty Fort United
Methodist Church
Church Ofce 287-3840
Wyoming & Yeager Ave
Rev. Dr. PhilipT. Wanck
Handicapped Accessible
Sat. 5pm
Praise and Worship
Service Sun. 8:30 a.m.
Early Summer Worship
(June 9-Sep 1)
10 amTraditional
Worship
Prayer Line
283-8133
Friends &
Quakers
Friends & Quakers
Stella Prebyterian
Church
1700 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
570-824-5130
11 am
Worship
http://northbranch.
quaker.org
Wyoming United
Methodist
376 Wyoming Ave
Rev. Marcelle Dotson
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
570-693-2821
Ample Parking
United Church
Of Christ
St. Lukes UCC
471 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre 822-7961
Rev. Justin Victor
Sunday Worship
10:00 A.M.
Sunday School
10:15 A.M.
Communion Service
the 1st Sunday of
every month.
TRANSPORTATION: CALL
Catholic
Independent
Second Welsh
Congregational
Church
475 Hazel St., Wilkes-Barre
829-3790
Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. Sunday School
6 p.m. Sunday Eve
Wednesday 7 p.m. Bible Study
Prayer and Youth Groups
Limited Van Service
Available, Please Call.
Independent...
Fundamental...
Friendly
Wyoming Ave.
Christian
881 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston
570-288-4855
Pastor Dennis Gray
Come Hear The
Word Of God,
Let It Change
Your Life!
Sunday School
9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship
11 a.m. Communion
Every Sunday
Sunday Evening
Worship At 7 p.m.
Wednesday Bible
Study 7:00 p.m.
ELEVATOR
ACCESSIBLE
Baptist
Tabernacle
63 Division St., W-B
Interim Pastor:
Richard McIntyre
Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
570-823-3083
Slocum Chapel
1024 Exeter Avenue
Exeter, PA 18643
Pastor Guy Giordano
(570) 388-5213
SUNDAY SERVICES
Intercessory Prayer
9:30am
Worship Service
10:00am
Sunday School/
Nursery Provided
WEDNESDAY SERVICES
Bible Study & Prayer 7pm
Visitors Welcome!
Encounter Christ in a
historical church in a
new & relevant way.
Assembly of God
340 Carverton Rd. Trucksville
Pastor Dan Miller
570-696-1128
www.bmha.org
SUNDAY
Morning Worship
(Main Sanctuary)
8:00AM, 9:45AM, 11:00AM
(Harvest Cafe Bldg)
9:45AM, 11:00AM
Kids Church
8:00AM & 11:00AM
Sunday School: 9:45AM
SUNDAY EVENING
WORSHIP
(Main Sanctuary) 6:30PM
WEDNESDAY EVENING
(Harvest Cafe Bldg)
FUEL Youth Ministry 6:30PM
We have various Ministries
available for Men, Women,
Youth and Children.
SUNDAY SERVICES
Celebration Service
10:15AM
Sunday School 9AM
Christian Education 9AM
Kidz Church
10:15AM
Intercessory Prayer 8:15AM
Sunday Evening 6:30PM
TUESDAY
Womens Bible
Study 10AM
WEDNESDAY
Family Night
Ministries 7PM
THURSDAY
Evidence Youth
Group 6:30PM
570-829-0989
www.wilkesbarreag.com
First Assembly
Of God
424 Stanton Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Dallas Baptist
Harveys Lake
Highway, Dallas
639-5099
Pastor Jerry Branch
Sun. Worship 9:15 & 10:30 am
www.dallasbaptist
church.org
Nebo Baptist
Church of
Nanticoke
75 Prospect St.
Nanticoke 735-3932
Pastor Tim Hall
www.nebobaptist.org
Worship Service
Sun. 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.
Sun School 9:45 a.m.
Nursery Junior Church
Youth Groups
Great Bible Seminars
Everyone is Welcome
Christian
Grace
Community
Church
A Bible Teaching Ministry
Memorial Hwy. Dallas
Sunday Services:
11 a.m., 6 p.m.
(570) 675-3723
www.gracechurchdallas.org
Parker Hill
Community
Church
667 N. River St.
Plains
Sundays
10:30 a.m.
570-822-1111
parkerhill.org
CHRIST UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
175 S. Main Road
Mountain Top
Pastor Rev.
Stephen Sours
Sunday Worship
8:30 & 10:45 am
Sun School 9:30 am
Nursery Available
570-474-6060
Trinity
Presbyterian
105 Irem Rd, Dallas
Worship Service:
10:00 a.m.
Pastor
Kathleen
Jamhoury
Nursery Provided
570- 675-3131
Holy
Resurrection
Cathedral
Orthodox Church In America
591 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Very Rev. Joseph
Martin, Pastor
570-822-7725
Saturday Vespers 6:00 p.m.
Sunday Divine Liturgy 8:30 a.m.
Feast Day
Vespers 6 p.m.
Feast Day
Divine Liturgy 9:00 a.m.
ALL ARE WELCOME
web site: www.oca.org
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
190 S. Main Street, W-B
Pastor Peter D. Kuritz
Pastor Janel D. Wigen
Saturday Service
5:00 p.m.
Sunday Service
9:30 a.m.
Worship
570-824-2991
Lutheran
NEW LIFE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
301 Delaney St.
Hanover Township
LOOK/LEARN/LOVE/LEAD
Sunday School
9:30 am
Worship Service
10:30 am
Nursery/Childrens
Church
570-NEW-LIFE
(639-5433)
Pastor:
Gideon Gaitano
newlifefamily.org
Presbyterian United Methodist
Bible
Christ
Community
Church
100 West Dorrance St.
Kingston, PA 18704
Sunday School/ABF
9:30 a.m.
Sun Worship 10:30 a.m.
Radio Ministry
Searching the Scriptures
Sunday 7:30-8:30 AM
WRKC 88.5 FM
website: www.ccchurchtoday.org
Pastor: John Butch
Phone: 283-2202
Cross Creek
Community Church
Sunday Services 9am &
10:45am
With Jr. Church & Nursery
Available.
Wed 6:30 Family Night
with Awana for ages 18
months - 6th grade.
College & Career,
CrossRoads for Teens,
Deaf Ministry, Small
Groups, Mens & Womens
Ministry, Groups.
Celebrate Recovery for
Hurts, Habits, Hang-Ups -
Tuesdays 6:30pm
Discover the difference!
370 Carverton Road,
Trucksville 696-0399
www.crosscreekcc.org
High Point Baptist
Church
For the Glory of God and the
Proclamation of His Word
1919 Mountain Road, Larksville
570-371-4404
www.highpoint church.info
SUNDAY
9:30AM Bible
Studies for All Ages
10:30AM Worship
and Rootz
Childrens Ministry
WEEKLY
Small Group Bible
Studies Adult/Teen
Ministries Cub Scouts/
American Heritage
Girls
www.highpointchurch.info
Living Hope
Bible Church
35 S. Main St.
Plains, PA
Pastor Mark DeSilva
Sunday Service
10:00 a.m.
Sunday School for
all ages 9:00 a.m.
Mid Week Bible
Study every Wed
at 6:30pm
Youth Group Mens
& Womens
Bible Studies
For information call
570-406-4295
www.lhbcpa.org
WHERE HOPE COMES
TO LIFE AND THE
SON ALWAYS SHINES
First Baptist
Church
Water Street Pittston
654-0283
Rev. James H. Breese, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Childrens Sun School
9:45 a.m.
Adult/Teen Sun School
10:45 a.m.
Bible Study/Prayer
Meeting Wed at 7:15 p.m.
Chairlift Available
www.fbcpittston.org
Welsh Bethel
Baptist
Parish & Loomis St. W-B
Sunday Worship 10 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Bible Study Wed 6:30 p.m.
Pastor Don Hartsthorne
822-3372
Mt. Zion
Baptist Church
105 HILL ST...WILKES-BARRE
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Service 11 a.m.
We offer Childrens Church
Prayer Service Wednesday 7p.m.
Bible Study Wednesday 8 p.m.
Rev. Michael E. Brewster, Pastor
Baptist
ST. ELIZABETH ANN
SETON PARISH
116 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville
Masses:
Saturday
4:00 & 5:30 pm
Sunday
8:30, 10:00, 11:30 am
Daily: 8:00 am
Confessions:
Saturday 3:15 pm
www.setonpa.com
287-6624
CHRIST FELLOWSHIP
CHURCH
OF PLYMOUTH
246 E. Main St.
Plymouth, PA
(570) 779-4210
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday night
bible study and
prayer 7 p.m.
Sunday School and
Nursery provided
We are a Christian
bible church
teaching the plain
truth of Gods word
as we prepare for
our eternal future.
Christian
First Baptist
52 E. 8th Street Wyoming
Sunday School All Ages 9:30
Worship Service 10:45 a.m.
Tues. 7 p.m. prayer meeting
693-1754
Visitors Welcome
St. Pauls
Lutheran Church
474 Yalick Road
(Route 118)
Dallas, PA
Rev. Charles Grube
Sat. Worship
5:30 PM
Sunday Worship
9:30 AM
570-675-3859
SAINT MARYS CHURCH OF THE
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
Our Lady of Fatima Parish
134 S. Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre
(570) 823-4168
Saturday 4:00 PM
Sunday 8 AM, 10 AM, 12:10 PM & 7PM
Monsignor Thomas V. Banick, Pastor
PRAISE
JESUS
Tree of Life
Christian
Fellowship
167 East State Street
Nanticoke, PA
A Church
Unashamedly in
love with The LORD
JESUS
CHRIST
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
570-735-4737
www.treeoifefellowship.net
Firwood United Methodist
Church
Cor. Old River Rd. &
Dagobert St.
Rev. Anthony Brima
Safe Sanctuary Policy
Morning Service 10:00 a.m.
Handicap Elevator Available.
You are invited to attend.
570-823-7721
Shavertown United Methodist Church
shavertownumc.com
163 N. Pioneer Ave. Shavertown
Phone-A-Prayer 675-4666
Pastor: Rev. Judy Walker
Organ/Choir Director: Deborah Kelleher
Saturday Service-5:30 pm Chapel Service
Sunday Service-10:00 am
Worship Service
Prayer & Praise
Service - 2nd Monday
of the month at 7 pm.
Nursery Care
Available during Sunday Service
For more information call the ofce at
570-675-3616
Handicapped Accessible
CHRIST UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
175 S. Main Road
Mountain Top
Pastor JP Bohanan
Sunday Worship
8:30 & 10:45 am
Sun School 9:30 am
ChurCh onthe Square
Pastors Vincent OBoyle and Louis Smyth
52 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
570-446-4740
A Full Gospel Church
Sunday 10:30 AM
Tuesday Prayer 6:30 PM
Friday Bible Study 6:30 PM
Churchonthesquareinc.org
Follow Us On FaceBook!
Loyalville United
Methodist Church
Loyalville Rd.
Lake Township
Sunday Worship
9:30 am
570-477-3521
Luzerne United
Methodist Church
446 Bennet St., Luzerne
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Church School
during Worship
Carol E. Coleman
Pastor 287-6231
Calvary United
Methodist Church
39 East Poplar St
West Nanticoke
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Childrens Church School
Everyone Welcome
George Price
Pastor
570-735-1514
Air Conditioned
Wyoming Seminary
Lower School
1560 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
570-824-5130
10 AM Adult Discussion
11 AMWorship
www.northbranch.
quaker.org
Grace
Community
Church
A Bible Teaching Ministry
4122 Memorial Highway, Dallas
Sunday Services:
10 am, 6pm (August only)
570-675-3723
www.gracechurchdallas.org
Firwood United
Methodist Church
Cor. Old River Rd. &
Dagobert St.
Rev. Anthony Brima
Safe Sanctuary Policy
Sunday School, 9:45-10:45
Worship Service 11-Noon.
Handicap Elevator Available.
You are invited to attend.
570-823-7721
HOLY RESURRECTION
CATHEDRAL
ORTHODOX
CHURCH IN AMERICA
591 N. Main St, Wilkes-Barre
Very Rev. Joseph Martin, Pastor
570-822-7725
Sat. Vespers 5 pm
Sun. Divine Liturgy 9 am
Feast Day
Vespers 6 pm
Feast Day
Divine Liturgy 9 am
ALL ARE WELCOME
web site: www.oca.org
Dallas United Methodist
4 Parsonage Street, Dallas
Pastor Rev. Robert G. Wood
570-675-0122
Sunday School, Sat. 6PM
Church Service Sat. 7PM
Adult Sunday School Sun. 9AM
Church Service Sun. 10:30AM
570-871-0863
Handicap Accessible
St. Johns
Lutheran Church
410 S. River St.
Wilkes-Barre
Worship 11 A.M
Oce: 570-823-7139
Trucksville United
Methodist
Marian E. Hartman, Pastor
Dr. Stephen L. Broskoske, Director of Music
Making Disciples for Jesus Christ
Sunday Worship Schedule
8:30am& 11:00am
Nursery Available - Infant through
Kindergarten
Sunday School 9:45 to 10:45 am - Nursery
through Senior High
17 West Church Road oRoute 309,
Trucksville at Carverton Road.
Nursery available for children birth
through kindergarten.
Grief Support, 7pm, 3rd Wednesday of
Every Month
570-696-3897
Fax: 570-696-3898
Email:oce@trucksvilleumc.com
ST. PAULS
LUTHERAN CHURCH
474Yalick Road(Rt. 118) Dallas, PA
Rev. Charles Grube
Sat. Worship 5:30 pm
Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:45 am
570-675-3859
Handicap Accessible
First Presbyterian
Church
S. Franklin and Northamp-
ton Sts. W-B
10:00 A.M. Worship
Rev. Dr. Robert M. Zanicky,
Minister
11:00 A.M. Sunday School
Nursery Provided
Handicapped Access
John Vaida - Minister of
Music
Pamela Kerns - Christian
Education Director
A friendly, inclusive,
and welcoming church
Audio Sermons avail-
able on the web
PARKER Hill
COMMUNITY CHURCH
667 N. River St, Plains
Sunday 9:30 AM &
11AM
570-822-1111
parkerhill.org
To Advertise Your Church, Call Caitlin, 970-7374, cakins@civitasmedia.com
376 Wyoming Av
Rev. Harriet Santos
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
570-693-2821
Everyone Welcome!
Handicap Accessible
Car-Lotta Credit Car Sales is looking for an experienced
Collector in their Kingston, PA Customer Service Center.
Full-time with benets and bonus programs. Pension
program, paid vacation, health benets, paid sick
days. 2-Years experience making daily collection calls
required. NO phone calls! Go to Our Website...
www.carlottacredit.com, click on Career Opportunities
and submit your On-line Employment Application.
EXPERIENCED COLLECTIONS
ASSOCIATE
Discover an exceptional opportunity to deliver
quality healthcare to Americas Veterans
Registered Nurse
Education Specialist-Critical Care
TheVAMedical Center Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvaniais currentlyacceptingapplications
for a Registered Nurse-Educational Specialist-Critical Care.
The requirements/responsibilities of the Education Specialist will include:
Masters Degree in Nursing or related Healthcare Field (If Masters is in a related Health
Care Field then a Bachelor of Science in Nursing required)
Current BCLS and ACLS certifcations; CCRN preferred
Minimum of fve (5) years recent (within past 2 - 3 years) Critical Care experience
Experience as an Educator preferred but not required
Assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating the educational needs of Patient Care
Services specifcally the Critical Care Areas
Profcient in developing and delivering curriculum in a variety of methods
Tour of duty: Full-Time; Monday through Friday (8:00am 4:30pm)
Interested applicants must submit the following information by September 23, 2013:
Registered Nurse: Application for Nurses and Nurse Anesthetists, 10-2850a;
Declaration for Federal Employment, OF-306; Resume/CurriculumVitae; copy
of license/degree.
For additional information and an application packet, please call (570) 824-3521 ext. 7209.
Please mail your complete application package to:
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
Medical Center (05)
1111 East End Boulevard Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
VA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
Trucksville
Shavertown
Lehman/Harveys Lake
Lee Park
Hilldale
Wyoming
Glen Lyon
South Wilkes-Barre
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 1D
MARKETPLACE
570. 829. 7130
800. 273. 7130
PLACE YOUR AD 24/7 AT TIMESLEADER.COM
Special Notices
Want a real show-stopper at
your wedding? Oysters flam-
ing dessert displays are al-
ways a part of your
Oyster Wedding!
bridezella.net
NANTICOKE
AN OPEN HOUSE
Celebrate the New Begin-
nings of the Calvary United
Methodist Church, West
Nanticoke, that was dam-
aged in the Sept. 2011 flood
DATE: Sat., Sept. 7, 2013
TIME: 2:00- 4:00 P.M
WHERE: Calvary United
Methodist Church
39 East Poplar Street
West Nanticoke, PA
Refreshments will be Served
Everyone is Welcome!
GUARDIAN ANGEL
Hard times upon you?
Down on your luck?
Need help & dont know
where to turn? We care and
are willing to help.
Serious problems only.
Write to:
PO Box 3238,
W. Pittston, PA 18643
ADOPT:
A teacher hopes to adopt a
baby! I promise to provide a
lifetime of unconditional
love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
Sold out tonight! Mr. & Mrs.
Grzymski- Over the top
Oyster Wedding!
oysterrestaurant.com
570-820-0990
CRAFTERS
WANTED
For Pittston Marching Patriots
Craft Fair Sat., Nov. 23.
Fair is 9am to 4pm.
For info & contract Call Kristen
570-499-4957 or email
marchingpatriotscraftshow
@gmail.com
Special Notices
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
B2B Service Franchise
Promo, Digital Print
& Advertising
Well Established,
Owner Retiring
No Experience Necessary!
Financing & Support
Call: 1-800-796-3234
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
Special Notices
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
Miscellaneous
BUSINESS FOR SALE
COMPUTER
SALES & SERVICE
Established 10 years
Owner retiring
Asking $125,000. Good
location in Pocono Lake, PA.
Call after 6pm
570-646-5100
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
LYNN S. CAMPBELL late of
Hazl eton, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, who died July
13, 2013 to Jenny Lee Camp-
bell. All persons having claims
against the estate are reques-
ted to make known the same
to the executor, c/o Peter J.
Fagan, Esquire, P O Box 904,
Conyngham, Pennsylvania.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF PETER DUDZIN-
SKI late of Dupont, PA (died
June 8, 2013) David Dudzinski
and Donna Dudzinski Dulney,
Co-Executors John J. Coury,
Esquire, Attorney for Estate,
108 N. Washington Avenue,
Suite 300, Scranton PA 18503.
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
PAGE 2D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
INVITATION TO BID
The Commission on Economic
Opportunity (CEO) will accept
sealed bids for a HUD CoC
Consul tant to assi st i n the
planning activities to evaluate,
support, and develop an over-
all community-wide collaborat-
ive process resulting in the
submission of an application to
the Department of Housing
and Ur ban Devel opment
(HUD) for the Continuum of
Care (CoC) Program.
Bid specification packages will
be available to any interested
bi dders by t el ephoni ng or
emailing the Commission on
Economic Opportunity, tele-
phone number (800) 822-0359
or email at ceo@sunlink.net
with subject HUD CoC bid. Any
questions on this bid can be
addressed to Barbara Gomb at
(800)822-0359.
Bids must be received in the
CEO Main Office, 165 Amber
Lane Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702,
by CERTI FI ED OR RE-
GISTERED mail not later than
5:00 p.m. EST on September
24, 2013. All envelopes must
be clearly marked (Bid for
HUD CoC).
Bids will be opened at 2:00
p.m. on September 25, 2013 at
the CEO Main Office.
CEO reserves the right to re-
ject any or all bids; otherwise
the bid will be awarded to the
l owest responsi bl e bi dder
whose bid conforms to all the
terms and conditions of this in-
vitation.
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
JOSEPH P. MYERS late of
Sugarloaf, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, who died Au-
gust 1, 2013 to LEE ANN
LYEISKI and THOMAS P. MY-
ERS. Al l per sons havi ng
claims against the estate are
requested to make known the
same to the executor, c/o
Peter J. Fagan, Esquire, P O
Bo x 9 0 4 , Co n y n g h a m,
Pe n n s y l v a n i a .
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to the provisions of
the Fictitious Names Act, as
Amended, Act No. 177 of
1988, 54 Pa.C.S. Section 311,
of the filing in the Office of the
Secretary of the Common-
wealth of Pennsylvania, on Au-
gust 19, 2013, of an applica-
tion for conducting business
under the assumed or ficti-
tious name of:
Mikey's Mini-Mart
said business to be conducted
at 2372 State Route 92, Hard-
ing, PA. The name and ad-
dress of the person owning or
interested in said business is:
MOI enterprises, LLC, 2372
State Route 92, Harding, PA
18643
GENE M. MOLINO, ESQUIRE
Skibitsky & Molino
457 N. Main Street, Suite 101
Pittston, PA 187640
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Grant of Letters Testa-
ment ar y wer e gr ant ed t o
Joseph J. Sabatini in the Es-
tate of John A. Sabatini, De-
ceased, late of the Borough of
Exet er , Luzer ne Count y,
Pennsylvania who died Febru-
ary 7, 2013. All persons in-
debted to said Estate are re-
quired to make payment and
those having any claims or de-
mands are to present the same
without delay unto the Execut-
or, Joseph J. Sabatini at the
following address: 23 Dolores
Drive Wyoming, PA 18644-
9365
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
CATHERINE A. VITAGLIANO
l at e of Hazl et on, Luzerne
County, Pennsylvania, who
di ed June 26, 2013 t o
ROBERT JOHN VITAGLIANO
a n d P A T R I C I A A N N
VITAGLIANO, Executors. All
persons having claims against
the estate are requested to
make known the same to the
executor, c/o Peter J. Fagan,
Esquire, P O Box 904, Con-
yngham, Pennsylvania.
Lost & Found
FOUND. White binder, con-
t e n t s s e e m i mp o r t a n t .
Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter. on
8.5.13. Call 332-2786
Notices
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult-Payment Plan!
Atty Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
BANKRUPTCY
DUI-ARD
Social Security-Disability
Free Consultation
Attorney
Joseph M. Blazosek
570-655-4410 or 570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
CAREGIVER
Experi enced 24 hour mal e
caregi ver. Speaks Sl ovak.
$800 monthly with 2 days off.
570-814-9880
COMPANION/CARE GIVER
Reliable, Pleasant, Experi-
enced Woman seeking posi-
tion as companion. Appts, er-
rands, etc. 570-823-8636.
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fish-
ing & tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
KINKY BOOTS
WED. NOV. 6TH
$165. (MID MEZZ SEATS)
CINDERELLA
WED., NOV 6TH
$159 (ORCHESTRA SEATS)
JERSEY BOYS
WED., OCT 16TH
$129 (FRONT MEZZ
SEATS)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
MON DEC. 2ND
$99 (Orchestra Seats)
A CHRISTMAS STORY
SAT., DEC. 14TH
$165 (FRONT MESS SEATS)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
OCT. 5 & 6 SAT/SUN
CALL NOW LIMITED
SEATING AVAILABLE
F.L. Wright's
Fallingwater /Clayton/911
Memorial @ Shanksvillle
NOV.. 3 SUN
Chocolate World Expo
White Plains,
Lyndhurst Castle,
Tarrytown
Empire City Casino, Yonkers
NOV. 14 THURS. NYC
Vermeer Exhibit
@ the Frick
Dinner @ Four Seasons
Restaurant
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Child/Elderly Care
CHILD CARE AIDE
Part time position for after
school program avai l abl e.
Pl ease cal l 570-735-9290
Child/Elderly Care
FAMILIES
URGENTLY NEEDED
More children than ever
before can no longer live in
their own homes. You can
help by becoming a foster
parent. Call FCCY at
1-800-747-3807. EOE
Clerical
Administrative/
Personal
Assistant
Multi-Corporation CEO seeks
qualified individual to assist
on a number of tasks related
to said corporations and oth-
er duties. These duties in-
clude but are not limited to:
- Appointment setting
- Phone/E-mail
correspondence
- Clerical tasks
- Minor accounting work
- Errands
Position will begin as part-
time and will develop into full-
time as candidate acclimates
themself into role. Qualified
candidate must possess a
warm and charming person-
ality, be able to speak in front
of a group, must dress for
success, be able to type 40+
wpm, must be proficient in
Microsoft Office suite + Apple
computers and must have a
val i d dri vers l i cense and
automobile. Please submit
resume to sherry@posi t-
i veresul tsmarketi ng.com.
Automotive
Claims
Assistant
The Claims Team Leader is
responsible for directing a
team of claims assistants.
The Team Lead delegates
and distributes claims to the
team. They provide guid-
ance and training to assist-
ants during the claims pro-
cess. They assist with escal-
ated calls and customer is-
sues and works to resolve
problem situations. The posi-
tion requires extensive auto-
motive service experience
and superior customer ser-
vice skills.
Applicant must be well or-
gani zed, have excel l ent
phone skills, able to commu-
nicate effectively. Basic typ-
ing skills preferable. Full
time position Monday Fri-
day. E-mail resumes to
jennifer.davailus@
pennwarrantycorp.com
Drivers & Delivery
CLASS B DRIVER
FULL TIME
A Growing Family Business!
Municipal waste hauling.
Rear Load & Roll-Off
Experience a plus,
but not necessary!
Call 570.868.6462
Drivers:
Bolus Freight
Systems
Call about our Driver
Sign-on Bonus Program!
NOW HIRING CLASS A
CDL FULL-TIME DRIVERS
Immediate openings for:
Day-Trip/Local Drivers
N.E. Regional Drivers
Over-The-Road Drivers
Monday to Friday
No Weekends
No Touch Freight
More home time!!
Be appreciated for what
you do!!!!
Excellent Weekly Pay Plus:
Monthly Safety Bonus
Stop & Detention Pay
Make up to $1200 Weekly!
Holidays, Vacation, Health
Packages,
401K & much more!!!!
(570) 342-1903
(800) 444-1497
Or Apply Online:
www.bolusfreight.com
Education
HOLY REDEEMER
HIGH SCHOOL
159 S. Pennsylvania Blvd W-B
Accepting applications for
(1) Boys Swim Coach
(2) FT Housekeepers
Phone: 570-829-2424
Help Wanted General
DALLAS SCHOOL
DISTRICT EOE
Campus Traffic Coordinator
Oversee and direct traffic
flow on the district campus
during drop off and
pick up times.
Hours are 7:30AM-9:00AM
and 2:45PM-4:15PM.
$30.00 per day.
Please submit a letter of
interest, resume, district
employment application, Act
34, 114 and 151 clearances
and any other supporting
materials to:
Mr. Frank P. Galicki; Dallas
School District; PO Box
2000; Dallas, PA 18612.
Deadline: September 13,
2013 or until position filled.
TAX
PREPARER
Free Tax School. Earn extra
income after taking course.
Flexible schedules. Small fee
for books & supplies.
LIBERTY TAX
Edwardsville & West Pittston
570-288-4007
Pittston & Plains
570-883-7829
Dallas 570-675-2240
Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp
570-208-1096
WAREHOUSE/
DISTRIBUTION
CENTER
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Job duties may include: order
picking/packing, inventory of
incoming merchandise, and
shipping. Must be able to stand
and/or walk for extended peri-
ods of time. Lifting up to 45 lbs
may be required. Applicants
must possess a strong work
ethic, sharp attention to detail,
and be reliable. Employees
must work quickly and
efficiently with a high level of
accuracy.
vkasha@hillcorporation.com
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
OUTDOOR
POWER
EQUIPMENT
(OPE)
TECHNICIAN/
MECHANIC
Minimum 5 years experience
diagnosing / repairing small
engi ne power equi pment ,
plows, tractors, mowers, etc.
Will have OPE factory training
on motors, transmissions, hy-
draulics, electrical, pneumat-
ics or other components. Must
have your own tools. Call Bri-
an at Harvis HR Service 570-
542-5330 or send resume to:
hilbertsequipment.jobs
@gmail.com
IT/Software Development
WORDPRESS
WEB
DESIGNER
PRM, Inc. l ocated i n Ol d
Forge, PA is looking for a
qualified individual to assist
in Web Design and creation
using Wordpress. This indi-
vidual will create 5-10 page
websites for clients using a
Wordpress template or cus-
tom design. Full-Time with
benefits. Please e-mail re-
sume to Sherry@positiveres-
ultsmarketing.com.
Logistics/Transportation
ASSISTANT
DISPATCHER
Trucking Company with 24/7
operation seeks individual to
assist Dispatch office in fast
paced environment with
scheduling assignments,
drivers, etc. Exprience help-
ful, but will train the right can-
didate. Health & Life Insur-
ance, 401(k), plus. Reply to
hr@nichlostrucking.com
CLASS A CDL
DRIVER
Small trucking company
looking for qualified drivers to
run Regional and OTR. Must
be at least 24 yrs of age & a
minimum of 2 yrs experience,
with clean driving record.
Average over $1,000 a week.
Interested drivers can call
Howard at 570-417-4722
Maintenance / Domestic
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
PRM, Inc. located at 102 N.
Main St., Old Forge, is look-
ing for a part time mainten-
ance person to handle main-
tenance in and around our
7,500 sq. ft. building. Can-
didate must have reliable
transportation and be willing
to work a flexible on-call
schedule as an independent
contractor. Please contact
Sherry @570-457-7020 for
more details and to set up
an interview. Wage is $10
per hour. 1099 issued at
year end.
Medical/Health
A/R ANALYST
Physician Billing Office
seeking an experienced
insurance A/R Analyst for a
full time position. Candidate
must have experience in all
aspects of medical
insurance billing, CPT and
ICD-9 coding, problem
solving skills, and be able to
work in a fast paced
environment. We offer a
competitive salary and
benefit package.
Email resumes to:
hr@ihgltd.com or fax to
(570) 552-8876
CAREGIVERS
Looking for compassionate
people to assist the elderly in
their homes. Personal care
and transportation required.
All shifts and flexible hours
available. Call 338-2681
or visit homeinstead.com/494
to apply.
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Part time 20-24 hours per
week. Computer ski l l s a
must. Send resume to:
POSITION # 4510
c/o Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871
RSA's
Cook
Dishwasher
LPN, Part-time 11-7
Apply in Person
No Phone Calls.
TIFFANY COURT
700 Northampton St.
Kingston, PA
Technical Trades
Experienced Heavy
Equipment Mechanic
Class B CDL required. Must
have 3 years experience &
own tools. Working on
engines, electrical, hydraulics,
power train, welding.
Machine Shop experience a
plus. Apply in person:
703 S Township Blvd, Pitt-
ston, PA 18640
Commercial
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
HUNLOCK CREEK
Turn Key and come to this
beautiful quiet area with a
stream that runs between the
properties. Great yard for sit-
ting on the deck & watching
nature all for a great price.
This place has been remodel
and updated. A great place to
live. Do not let this house
pass you by. This is by ap-
pointment only. 24 Hour no-
tice.
MLS# 13 2668
$82,000
Please call Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, sideby-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve
570-474-6307, ex. 2772
timesleader.com
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it happens.
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WITH THE LATEST SALES.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
339 HIGHWAY 315, PITTSTON, PA 1-800-223-1111
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAGS, & FEES. ART WORK FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. 3 YEAR / 100,000 MILE
LIMITED POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ON 2008 MODELS AND NEWER WITH LESS THAN 75,000 MILES. 90 DAY / 3,000 MILE LIMITED POWERTRAIN WARRANTY ON 2004 MODELS AND
NEWER WITH LESS THAN 100,000 MILES. SALE ENDS 9/12/2013.
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PLATINUM CERTIFIED HIGHLINE VALUE VEHICLE OUTLET
3 Year/100,000 Mile Warranty
125-Point Inspection Full Service Dealership Body
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2013 DODGE RAM 1500
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$
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2010 MERCEDES C300
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2012 CADILLAC SRX AWD SUV
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2006 SCION XB WAGON
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2011 HONDA
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2009 BMW
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2012 HONDA
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OPTIMA
LX PACKAGE, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, AUTOMATIC, 1-OWNER, STOCK
# P15203
$
1 4,495*
2012 SUZUKI
SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, ALLOYS, 1-OWNER,
LOW MILES, STOCK # P15150
$
1 1,795*
2012 TOYOTA
YARIS SEDAN
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, AUTOMATIC,
A/C, STOCK # P15056
$
12,695*
2008 CHEVROLET
IMPALA SEDAN
ONLY 30K MILES, 1-OWNER, POWER
WINDOWS AND LOCKS,
STOCK # P15164
$
12,895*
2012 NISSAN
VERSASEDAN
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15302
$
12,995*
2009 TOYOTA
CAMRY LE SEDAN
LOW MILES, AUTOMATIC, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK #P15155
$
13,895*
2012 CHEVROLET
IMPALA SEDAN
ALLOY WHEELS, 1-OWNER, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK # P15206
$
10,895*
2007 NISSAN
ALTIMA SEDAN
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, AUTOMATIC,
4 CYLINDER, STOCK # P15219
$
14,695*
2008 HONDA
CR-V 4WD
EX PACKAGE, MOON ROOF, ALLOYS, CD,
STOCK # P15135
$
16,995*
2013 HYUNDAI
SONATA GLS
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD,
1-OWNER, AUTO, STOCK # P15301
$
35,895*
2013 VOLVO C70
HARDTOP CONVERTIBLE
NAVIGATION, HEATED LEATHER, ONLY
4K MILES!!! STOCK # P15227
$
37,895*
2012 ACURA MDX
AWD SUV
NAVIGATION, 3RD ROW SEATING,
HEATED LEATHER, MOONROOF,
STOCK # V1014A
$
13,795*
2012 TOYOTA
CAROLLA SEDAN
LE PACKAGE, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15097
2010 VOLKSWAGEN
CC
SPORT PACKAGE, RARE MANUAL TRANS,
PW, PL, STOCK # P15193A
$
16,995*
$
13,995*
2009 HYUNDAI
AZERA SEDAN
LEATHER, MOONROOF, ALLOYS, POWER
SEAT, STOCK # P15137
$
20,795*
2011 JEEP
WRANGLER 2DR 4X4
ALLOYWHEELS, POWERWINDOWS&
LOCKS, 1-OWNER, STOCK#P15144
2011 CHEVROLET
CAMARO COUPE
LT PACKAGE, MOON ROOF, AUTOMATIC,
ONLY 11K MILES, STOCK # P15146
$
21,595*
$
31,795*
2011 VOLVO XC90 AWD
NAVIGATION, MOON ROOF, ALL WHEEL
DRIVE, STOCK # P15230
$
9,995*
2010 SUZUKI SX4 HATCHBACK
AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CD,
1-OWNER, STOCK # P15236
$
9,995*
2003 HONDA ACCORD EX-L SEDAN
MOONROOF, LEATHER, AUTOMATIC, PW, PL, STOCK
# V1156A
FLEET PURCHASE SPECIALS!!!
2013 SUBARU
LEGACY SEDANS
1-OWNER VEHICLES, COLD
WEATHER PKGs WITH HEATED SEATS,
AUTOS, STOCK # P15250
10AVAILABLE
STARTING@$19,995*
$
13,795*
2011 CHEVROLET
MALIBU
1-OWNER, LOW MILES, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, STOCK # P15148
$
22,495*
2013 CHRYSLER
TOWN & COUNTRY VAN
HEATEDLEATHER, BACKUPCAMERA, BUCKET
SEATS, STOWNGO, STOCK#P15254
$
8,995*
2005 VOLVO S40 AWD
ALL WHEEL DRIVE, AUTOMATIC, ALLOYS,
STOCK # V1155A
$
7,895*
2003 FORD ESCAPE 4X4
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, POWER WINDOWS &
LOCKS, STOCK # V1125B
$
1 1,795*
2008 CHRYSLER
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK # P15106A
$
1 1,995*
2004 VOLVO
S60
R-DESIGN, MANUAL TRANS, ALLOYS,
POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, LOW MILES,
STOCK # V1105A
$
13,695*
2012 DODGE
AVENGER SXT SEDAN
CHROME WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, PW,
PL, 1-OWNER, STOCK # P15093
$
16,495*
2012 FORD
FOCUS SEDAN
LEATHER, MOON ROOF, AUTO, 1-OWNER,
STOCK # P15246
$
19,995*
2011 HYUNDAI
SANTA FE AWD
ALLOY WHEELS, AUTOMATIC, POWER
WINDOWS & LOCKS, STOCK # P15249
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 3D
08 Chrysler Sebring Convertible
Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry
#AU4015
$
9,990
05 Buick LaCrosse CXL Sedan
AU3641,
Leather,
Key Entry
$
9,990
09 Mercury Mountaineer Premier
ONLY 13K MiLES
Leather, Moonroof, Memory
Seat Position, All Wheel Drive
$
22,990
06 inniti M35 Sport AWD Sedan
AU4208
Leather, Moonroof,
Heated Seat, Keyless Entry
$
16,990
12 Chevrolet Colorado Work Truck
AU4044,
Automatic
$
15,990
08 Mercury Sable Premier
AU3838-Leather,
Parking Sensor, Heated Seats,
Power Drivers Seat, Memory Seat
$
16,990
07 Towncar Signature LMTD
AU3116- Memory Seat,
Pwr. Leather Seats,
Parking Sensor
$
16,990
08 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer Edition SUV
AU3640-
Air Conditioning, Cruise
Control, Moonroof
$
17,990
08 Lincoln MKZ AWD
All Wheel Drive, Leather,
Moonroof, Heated Seats,
Memory Seat w/power Seats
$
16,990
2
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
Starting at
11 Toyota Prius iii Hybird Hatchback
AU4096, Leather,
Moonroof, Navigation System,
Satellite radio
$
23,990
$
21,990
2
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
Starting at 3AU4097, AWD, Moonroof,
Power Memory Seats, Parking
Sensor
09 Lincoln MKS Sedan
Free State inSpection aS Long aS
You own the car!
$22,990
1.9
%
APR
to choose from
08-11 f150
supercab & crew
XLT & FX4's & Lariat
10
September 9, 2013.
to choose from
2
1 1
07 mercurY mouNtaINeer premIer
Navigation, Memory Seats, Moonroof, Heated Seats
$
10,990
08 Chevrolet impala
Front Wheel Drive, Air
Conditioning, Cruise Control
#AU4335
$
9,990
Starting at
06 Mitsubishi Outlander SE
AU4183
All Wheel Drive
$
10,990
07 Hyundai Azera GLS
ONLY 40K MiLES
AU3198-Pwr. Drivers
Seat, Keyless Entry
$
11,990
11 Hyundai Sonata GLS
Balance of Factory
Warranty, Keyless Entry
#AU4303
$
14,990
06 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer
AU4075- Leather, Power
Drivers Seat, Four Wheel
Drive, roof rack
$
12,990
08 Jeep Liberty Sport
AU2962-
CD, PM, PL, rear
Defogger
$
13,990
06 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo
AU4007
Keyless Entry,
Four Wheel Drive
$
12,990
03 Ford ranger FX4 4WD
Keyless Entry
#AU4354
$
13,490
07 FOrD FrEESTYLE LiMiTED VAN
AWD-LEATHEr- 3rD rOW
SEATS- HEATED SEATS-
#AU4133N
$
12,990
12 TOYOTA PriUS FiVE
HATCHBACK- NAViGATiON
SYSTEM - rEVErSE CAMErA
-#AU4198
$
24,590
12 Toyota Tundra Crewmax FWD
ONLY 16K MiLES, AU4308
Leather, Moonroof, Bedliner,
Navigation System, Parking Sensors,
reverse Camera, running Boards
$
43,990
12 Ford E-350 Van
$
21,990
4
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
Starting at
12 & 15 PASSENGEr
Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry
11 Ford ranger XL
Front Wheel Drive, Air
Conditioning, Bedliner
#AU4285
$
10,990
11 Ford F-150 Supercrew 4WD Lariat Limited
AU4178
Navigation, running Boards,
Leather, Moonroof, Heated Seat
$
36,990
11 rAM 1500 Laramie FWD
ONLY 24K MiLES
AU4292
Leather
$
36,990
08 Chrysler ASpen Limited
3rd row, running Boards,
Leather, Moonroof, Heated
Seat, 4WD, Tow Package
$
22,990
12 Ford Explorer Limited AWD
ONLY 12K MiLES AU4370,
Leather, Moonroof, 3rd row Seating,
Navigation System, Parking Sensors,
Power Adjustable Pedals, reverse Camera, SYNC
$
36,990
11 Kia Sorento EX
AU4099- Front Wheel Drive,
Leather, Satellite radio, Bluetooth,
3rd row Seating, Parking Sensors
$
19,990
06 Mercury Mountaineer Luxury
AU3531-
AWD, Leather, 3rd row Seating,
running Boards
$
11,990
11 Mazda MAZDA 3 S Sport Hatchback
Moonroof,
Keyless Entry
#AU4307
$
16,990
03 Toyota Tundra Double Cab
Four Wheel Drive,
Tow Package
#AU4264
$
16,990
12 Ford Focus SE Hatchback
AU4248-
Leather, Heated Seat,
Satellite radio
$
14,990
04 Mercury Grand Marquis LS
AU3891, Leather,
Keyless Entry,
Traction Control Sytem
$
7,990
$10,590
4
TO CHOOSE
FrOM
2011
72
06-12 Fusions
& Milans
to choose from
10
STARTING AT
$11,990
$21,990
09 LINCOLN MKS
Some have Moonroofs,
Adaptive Cruise Control,
Some with Navigation
to choose from
5
$16,990
Leather, SYNC,
Some with Moonroofs
07 Lincoln MKX
Navigation, rear View, Panoramic
Vista roof, Leather, Front Air
Conditioned Seats, Power and
Memory Seats
$
17,990
Moonroof, Keyless,
Satellite
08-11 F150
SUPERCAB & CREW
08-11 EDGE SE,
SEL & LIMITEDS
MOSTWITHLOWMILES!!
MOSTWITH
LOWMILES!!
PAGE 4D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualied
buyers for limited term.
2013 PILOT EX 4WD
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
**Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment.nt
1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $19,152.00
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through AHFC $0 Down Payme
Per Per
LLea
* *
Model #YF4H4DEW 250-hp (SAE Net),
3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC

V-6 Engine
Variable Torque Management 4-Wheel Drive
System (VTM-4) 18-Inch Alloy Wheels
Power Windows/Locks Fog Lights
Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) i-MID with
8-inch WQVGA (480x320) Screen, Customizable
Feature Settings and Rearview Camera with
Guidelines Bluetooth HandsFreeLink

Tri-Zone Automatic Climate Control System


with Humidity Control and Air Filtration
Drivers Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
Including Power Lumbar Support
229-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 7
Speakers, Including Subwoofer 2-GB CD
Library Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
USB Audio Interface
2013 ACCORD LX SEDAN
MPG
27 City
36 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $13,729.30
Model #CR2F3DEW
185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC

4-Cylinder
Engine with Direct Injection
Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA

)
with Traction Control Continu-
ously Variable Transmission (CVT)
16-Inch Alloy Wheels Dual-Zone
Automatic Climate Control with
Air-Filtration System Rearview
Camera with Guidelines Blu-
etooth

HandsFreeLink

Pandora

Internet Radio Compatibility USB


Audio Interface MP3/Auxiliary
Input Jack i-MID with 8-inch
WQVGA (480x320) Screen and
Customizable Feature Settings
2013 Honda CR-V LX
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 9-3-2013.
Per Mo.
Lease
*Lease 36 Months through AHFC $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $15,671.25
Model #RM4H3DEW
185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC

4-Cylinder
Engine Automatic Transmission
Real Time AWD with Intelligent
Control System
TM
Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA

) with Traction
Control Multi-Angle Rearview
Camera with Guidelines
Bluetooth

HandsFreeLink
USB Audio Interface
Remote Entry System
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio
System with 4 Speakers
Pandora

Radio Compatibility
Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
Per Mo.
Lease
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
**Lease 36 Months through AHFC $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MATT BURNE Honda PRE-OWNED CENTER
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2013 Honda
Civic LX Sedan MPG
28 City
39 HWY
*Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st payment, tax, and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,055.55
Model #FB2F5DEW 140-hp (SAE Net), 1.8 Liter, 16 Valve, SOHC i-VTEC

4 Cylinder Engine 5 Speed Automatic Transmission Air


Conditioning with Air Filtration System i-MID with 5 inch LCD Screen and Customizable Feature Settings Rear View Camera with Guide-
lines Bluetooth

HandsFreeLink
3
SMS Text Message Function
4
Power Windows and Door Locks Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA

) with
Traction Control Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) Cruise Control Illuminated Steering Wheel Mounted Cruise, Audio, Phone and i-MID
Controls 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers Pandora

Internet Radio Compatibility


5
Bluetooth

Streaming Audio
3

USB Audio Interface MP3/Auxiliary Input Jack Exterior Temperature Indicator Security System with Remote Entry and Trunk Release
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-Honda
570-341-1400
MATT BURNE Honda
MATT BURNE Honda MATT BURNE Honda
Call: 1-800-NEXTHonda View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
08 PILOT EX Gray, 48K ......................................NOW $18,532
09PILOTTOURINGBlack,48K.............................NOW$25,170
11 PILOT EXL Red, 44K .....................................NOW $25,581
11PILOTEXLWhite,31K......................................NOW$26,853
11PILOTEXL Silver, 23K......................................NOW$27,309
PILOT 4WD
08 CRV LX Lt Blue, 75K......................................NOW $13,457
09 CRV LX TITANIUM, 44K.................................NOW $16,896
08 CRV EX Silver, 56K......................................NOW $16,969
11 CRV LX WHITE, 37K......................................NOW $17,682
10CRVEX Titanium, 56K......................................NOW$17,738
10 CRV LX GREEN, 24K ......................................NOW $18,289
10 CRV EX SILVER, 40K ......................................NOW $18,319
10CRVEX Black,35K.........................................NOW$18,947
11 CRV SE titanium, 31K....................................NOW $18,793
10 CRV EXLBLACK, 38K............................................... NOW$19,499
11 CRV EX Silver, 29K.........................................NOW $19,533
10 CRV EXL Red, 43K ........................................NOW $19,993
11CRVEXTitanium, 38K......................................NOW$20,485
11CRVEXTitanium, 35K......................................NOW$20,564
10CRVEXL Black, 23K........................................NOW$20,677
12 CRV LX Silver, 9K...........................................NOW $21,278
11 CRV EXL Gray, 28K.........................................NOW$21,965
12 CRVEX Gray, 17K...........................................NOW$22,932
CRV 4WD
08ACCORDEX SDNGrey,53K..............................NOW$14,221
09ACCORDEXSDNBlack,64K..............................NOW$14,749
09 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 53K ...........................NOW $14,982
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Black, 35K......................NOW $16,528
11 ACCORD LX SDN Gray, 30K ...........................NOW $16,717
12ACCORDLXSDNBlack,36K..............................NOW$16,728
11ACCORDSESDNBlack,11K..............................NOW$17,838
12ACCORDLXPSDNBlack,20K............................NOW$17,871
10 ACCORD EX SDN Black, 21K .........................NOW $18,168
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 21K..................NOW $18,989
12 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 9K............................NOW $19,720
ACCORDS
10 ODYSSEY EX Blue, 47K ...............................NOW $19,477
10 ODYSSEY TOURING NAV-DVD Gray, 42K...NOW $25,978
11ODYSSEY EXL Black, 36K ...............................NOW$25,779
11 ODYSSEY EXL-DVD Black, 19K...................NOW $26,741
ODYSSEY
08 CIVIC LX 5SPD SDNBLACK, 78K......................NOW $9,789
10 CIVIC LX CPE Black, 35K............................NOW $13,541
11 CIVIC LX SDN Silver, 25K ..............................NOW $14,461
11 CIVIC LX SDN BLUE, 36K .............................NOW $14,490
10 CIVIC LX SDNWhite, 33K ..............................NOW$14,584
10 CIVIC LX SDN Grey, 21K ..............................NOW $14,879
10 CIVIC LX SDN Blue, 9K ..............................NOW $15,364
12 CIVIC LX CPE Black, 12K...............................NOW $15,783
12CIVICLXSDNTitanium,20K..............................NOW$15,870
12 CIVIC EX-NAVI Crimson, 31K...................NOW $17,932
12 CIVIC EXL-NAVI SDNWhite, 10K...................NOW$18,804
CIVICS
$
179
*Per Mo.
Lease
Call: 1-800-NextHoNda View: www.mattburnehonda.com
10INSIGHTEXGray, 38K....................................NOW$13,487
INSIGHT
$5,260
04 TOYOTA COROLLAS SDN
NOW
Gray, 132K
Was
$7,250
04 HONDA ACCORD SDN EXL V-6
$9,898
Red, 81K
NOW
$10,996
NOW
07 GMC ENVOY EXT
4X4
White, 60K
Was
$12,500
$19,862
NOW
07 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4WD
Navy, 95K
Was
$20,950
$8,992
04 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4WD
Blue, 77K
Was
$10,950
NOW
$10,970
NOW
08 HYUNDAI TIBURON
CPE 5SP
Silver, 44K
Was
$11,950
$13,594
10 JEEP PATRIOT 4WD
NOW
Gray, 51 K
Was
$13,950
NOW
$23,925
10 NISSAN PATHFINDER SL 4WD
Red, 42K,
Was
$25,950
$22,227
NOW
09 BUICK ENCLAVE
AWD
Brown, 57K
$19,191
09 HONDA RIDGELINE TRL 4WD
NOW
Gray, 63K
Was
$19,950
$3,999
01 DODGE NEON SE SDN
AS TRADED
Burgundy, 88K
NOW
$15,247
07 HONDA PILOT LX 4WD
White, 61K
Was
$16,950
NOW
$15,641
07 FORD EDGE AWD
Cream, 54K,
Was
$16,950
$16,300
NOW
06 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER LTD 4WD
Navy, 33K
Was
$17,950
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
NOW
Silver, 9K
$13,759
Was
$15,750
$14,535
08 NISSAN XTERRA S 4WD
NOW
Red, 53K
Was
$15,750
$7,590
01 HONDA CRV SE 4WD
NOW
Silver, 101K
$11,011
NOW
07 HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
LX
Blue, 61K
$8,715
NOW
10 CHEVY AVEO
LT SEDAN
Blue, 56K
Was
$9,950
$7,438
04 TOTYOTA CAMRY LE SDN
NOW
Gold, 114K
Was
$8,350
07 EX CARBON, 27K $14,582
HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
05 EX GOLD, 89K $9,746
$9,271
02 HONDA CRV EX 4WD
NOW
Navy, 76K
Was
$9,750
$9,999
NOW
07 NISSAN SENTRA S
SEDAN
Brown, 58K
Was
$10,950
$10,456
06 PONTIAC G6 GTP CPE
NOW
V6, Black, 64K
Was
$11,500
07 JEEP COMPASS AWD
$10,492
Blue, 46K
NOW
Was
$11,950
$10,796
07 SUBARU IMPREZA AWD
NOW
Silver, 67K
Was
$12,500
$10,977
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 4WD
NOW
Silver, 63K
Was
$11,950
06 HONDA CIVIC EX SDN
NOW
Silver, 54K
$12,867
Was
$13,250
$14,567
10 FORD FUSION SE SDN
NOW
Black, 9K
Was
$16,950
15,801
09 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING R-DVD
NOW
red, 57K
07 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL NAV/DVD, SLATE 54K $16,872
EXL DVD, BLUE, 26K $18,478
11-4-2013
$239
*
$13,263.90 $15,173.75
$11,655.45
$18,468.00
Payment
Due to the success of our , we are extending i t one more week!
WHAT YOU SEE
IS WHAT YOU PAY!
WHITE, 89K
03 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
4WD
$7,795
NOW
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 5D
PRE-OWNED
USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
*Tax & Tags Additional. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
2006 CHEVY EXPRESS
COMMERCIAL CUT AWAY
Stk #12834A, Rare Find! Tommy Liftgate, V-8, Auto, A/C,
Dual Rear Wheels, 139WB C64 SRW, Dont Pass This Up!
Reduced
$
9,999
*
2012 GMC Arcadia
All Wheel Drive
2,969 Miles 1-Owner Special Crystal Red Paint
2.49%
Financing
available
$28,500
Front and rear A/C
XM/Sirius radio
8 passenger seating
telescopic steering
side impact airbags
PRE-OWNED
USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
*Tax & Tags Additional. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
2006 CHEVY EXPRESS
COMMERCIAL CUT AWAY
Stk #12834A, Rare Find! Tommy Liftgate, V-8, Auto, A/C,
Dual Rear Wheels, 139WB C64 SRW, Dont Pass This Up!
Reduced
$
9,999
*
SPECIAL PURCHASE
2
T
O
C
H
O
O
S
E
Dodge Challenger R/Ts
2010-Blue
Hemi
6 Speed
2 Tone htd/leather
20Wheels
Spoiler
$26,999
21KMiles 1-owner
2009-Black
Hemi
Leather
Roof
Auto
$24,999
31K
M
iles
1-ow
ner
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2002 Z06 Coupe 13295 ........................................$27,778
2003 BMW Z43.0i ConvertiBle 53232 ...............$13,999
2003 SilverADo XCAB 4X4 lt eXt. 46582 ..............$15,999
2004 S2000 roADSt ConvertiBle 87617 ..........$16,495
2004 venture lS eXt. 97840 ............................$4,500
2004 Corvette Coupe 17167 .............................$26,986
2005 MuSt Gt ConvertiBle 32500 ...................$18,999
2005 tACoMA 4X4 CreW 87132 ........................$18,898
2006 F150XCAB 4X4 Xl 62084 .........................$15,999
2006 HuMMer H3 Suv 50591 ...........................$18,999
2006 350Z tourinG ConvertiBle 22128 ...........$19,495
2007 MuSt Gt Coupe 32569 ........................$16,999
2007 GXp v8 SeDAn 82306 ...............................$11,495
2007 MerC C350 SeDAn 59231 ........................$16,990
2007 HArley 883 SportSter 5353 ......................$6,000
2007 F350 XCAB 4X4 lAriAt 91235 .................$21,999
2008 MuSt Gt Coupe 3012 ..........................$23,898
2008 F150 KinG rAnCH CreW 50457 ..................$27,980
2008 SilverrADo lt2 74414 ..............................$18,999
2009 Cr-v eX Suv 42978 .................................$16,990
2009 HonDA Si SeDAn 45585 .............................$17,495
2010 MuSt v6 ConvertiBle 40332 .................$15,999
2010 tiGuAn Se Suv 22065 ...........................$17,499
2011 ForD FuSion i4 Se 82321 .........................$10,989
2011 MitSu outlAnDer 4X4 Se Suv ...................18124
2012 vW Gti 4 Door 12199 ...........................$21,999
2012 JettA Se SeDAn 32392 ............................$14,999
2012 Beetle 2.5l 30751 ...................................$14,999
2012 iMpreZA SeDAn 33059 .............................$17,495
2012 SCion tC 7.0 21125 ................................$19,898
We Buy CArS
PAGE 6D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Commercial
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
SWOYERSVILLE
Great i nvestment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major high-
ways & conveniences. Bring all of-
fers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done. MLS #13-1983.
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901 or 696-2468
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
For Sale By Owner
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
ORANGEVILLE
1900's Farmhouse
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on
twelve acres, with 5 stall run
in and fenced pasture.
Many up grades. Move in
condition. $180,000
570-394-6835
PITTSTON
251 Broad Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath. Cape Cod
Home. With many upgrades,
finished basement, 2 fire-
places, sun room, pool and
deck, 2 car garage. $176,500
570-883-0412
PLAINS TWP.
29 Jay Drive
2 story, 4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, on half acre. Fenced
yard with heated in ground
pool. $250,000.
570-235-1624
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
OPEN HOUSE
Thurs., 9/5 4pm-7pm
Sun, 9/8 10am-3pm
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage
on 1.09 acre. Finished base-
ment with laundry room.
Hardwood floors and
carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located
on a quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
WILKES-BARRE
8 Mill St. (Parsons)
**REDUCED**
3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
Large yard with 2 tier deck.
Spacious driveway, garage,
and storage shed. Conveni-
ent location for shopping,
casino, hospital, school bus
stops. Asking $90,000
(NEG.) Call: 570-824-8665
Houses For Sale
ASHLEY
8-10 E. Hartford Street
Well cared for home/invest-
ment property. Move in
ready. 2 spacious bedrooms
on each side with additional
3rd floor living/storage space.
Full basement, large back-
yard. Quiet area on
dead end street.
Pre-qualified Buyers
/Principal Only
$56,500
Call 570-287-2073
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
BEAR CREEK
Spaciously satisfying from the
open kitchen/eating area, im-
pressive. Fireplace in great
room to an expanded family
room, you will enjoy life more
in this picturesque 4 bedroom
in Laurel Brook Estates.
MLS 13 1587
$372,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied.
MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
40 CLAUDE ST.
5 year young ranch home in
the Dallas Sch. Dist. Conveni-
ent 1-floor living includes
large modern kitchen with tile
floor & countertops, dining
area, LR, 3BRs & 2 full BAs.
For additional living space,
the LL is finished with a fam-
ily room & space for a gym,
playroom hobby room, etc. An
attached deck & a large level
yard provides ample space
for outdoor cooking & activit-
ies. OSP. For more details &
to view the photos online go
to: www.prudentialrealestate.com
and enter PRU9Y5P8 in the
Home Search. This home is
also for rent. #13-3371.
$199,900
Mary Ellen or Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
45 OLD GRANDVIEW AVE.
Make your new home a me-
ticulously maintained bi-level
in the Dallas Sch. Dist. This
property offers 3BRS, 2 mod-
ern baths, modern kitchen,
LR, and formal DR. For relax-
ation and entertaining there is
a 3-season room off the kit-
chen and a large FR in the LL
wi th Berber carpet and a
wood-burning fireplace. All
appliances and window treat-
ments remain, so it is truly
move-in ready. Call today
for your private showing.or
more details and to view the
phot os onl i ne, go t o:
www.prudenti al real estate.com
and enter PRU3J2D2 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3552
$196,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
Cozy, comfortable home with
3 bedrooms, living room with
cathedral ceiling & fireplace,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, screened in porch &
laundry room. Includes lovely
studio apartment with deck,
perfect for family member. 2
car garage.
$239,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
DUPONT
Very nice 2 story, move in con-
di t i on. Ori gi nal woodwork,
stained glass windows, hard-
wood under carpet, fenced
yard on corner lot.
MLS#13-2310
$95,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$87,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
EXETER
206 Cedar Street
$88,900
Neat & tidy low maintenance
home with three bedrooms,
large unfinished basement,
rear carport. No grass to cut.
MLS #13-1914
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
FORTY FORT
REDUCED 10K!
56 Oak Street
A Lovely Single family house
with hardwood floors,
throughout. 3 season side
porch, large closets in all 3
bedrooms. Walk-up attic for
additional storage space, and
so much more. Check it out!
MLS# 13-3149. $135,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor family room, Large
master bedroom (15x16) with
lots of closet space.
Aluminum siding.
Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$117,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
FORTY FORT
52 Ransom Street
Recently renovated and up-
dated this double block is cur-
rently 100% occupied. Little
exterior maintenance or yard-
work for landlord. Current
rents $700 and $750 per
month plus utilities. Corner
lot. Off street parking for each
tenant. Granite kitchens,
hardwood floors, Living
Room, Dining Room, 3 Bed-
rooms and bath in each unit.
MLS# 13-809.
$114,900
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
HANOVER TWP.
7 ALLENBERRY DR.
Ready to move in this 3 bed-
room town house in Allen-
berry is also the most afford-
able unit currently for sale.
New hardwood floors & in-
cluded LG washer & dryer.
Over sized lot with patio &
private wooded surroundings.
Convenient location. One of
the first units in Allenberry.
Easy in & out.
MLS#13 403
$98,900
Call Paul at 760-8143
or Gail at 760-8145
to schedule your
appointment.
696-2600
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP
Affordable 2 story home fea-
turing nice size living room,
dining room, eat-in kitchen,
1/2 bath on 1st floor, 3 rooms
on 2nd floor with full tile bath.
Updated gas heating system.
Off street parking for 2 cars.
Little grass to cut! Mortgage
payment will be less than
most rents.
MLS #13 2100
$44,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Sept. 8th 1-3 P.M.
3 Prince St.,
Hanover Green
Great Location, near schools,
Industrial Park, I-81.
Quality-Construction
3 BR, 2+ Bath, Ranch Home.
Immaculate, Move in immedi-
ately. Freshly-Painted Interi-
or & Exterior. Features:
Large Eat-In Kitchen with
New Flooring, plenty of stor-
age, Plaster Walls, Hard-
wood Floors, Refurbished
Tile Baths. Newer Roof, Gut-
ters, Windows, Doors.
Covered Patio, Finished
Basement with Laundry
Room, Workshop & Outside
Entrance. Plenty Off street
parking Lot 100' X 150' Level
& Fenced with Stucco Shed.
Economical 2-Zone Gas
Heat, inc. all gas appliances.
Reasonable Taxes.
One owner,
Selling to settle estate.
Reduced for quick sale:
$143,300Call/Text for
details 570-466-9843.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
timesleaderautos.com
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Your Next
Vehicle
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WITH THE LATEST SALES.
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inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 7D
LEGAL NOTICE
The Lower Lackawanna Valley Sanitary Authority, (LLVSA), is considering revising the allowable dis-
charge limits for non-domestic users of the LLVSA Treatment System.The revised allowable discharge
limits were submitted and approved by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Be-
low is the current and revised allowable discharge limits.
Current Revised Current Revised
Pollutant Limit (mg/l) Limit (mg/l) Pollutant Limit (mg/l) Limit (mg/l)
Arsenic 0.1953 0.158 Mercury 0.0533 0.0533
Cadmium 0.2598 0.443 Molybdenum 0.9356 0.48
Chromium 19.05 17.34 Nickel 4.002 7.95
Copper 4.3952 3.80 Selenium 0.6174 0.199
Cyanide 1.33 1.575 Silver 4.352 0.218
Lead 0.9852 1.867 Zinc 2.5757 2.64
The revised allowable discharge limits will be presented for consideration during the September 23, 2013
LLVSA Board of Directors meeting, which will be held in the Avoca Borough Building, 752 Main Street at
5:00PM. Any and all public input regarding the revised allowable discharge limits are to be submitted in
writing prior September 23, 2013.
THOMAS A. MCDERMOTT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
ESTIMATOR
Local Commercial General Contractor is seeking an
experienced Full Time Estimator. Candidate will work with
management & be responsible for attending pre-bid meetings,
entire bid process including blue print take offs, solicitation of
pricing, job site visits & pictures. Marketing experience is a
plus. Salary based upon experience. Company has been in
business for over 25 years and offers competitive wages, paid
vacation and holiday time off, health benefits and 401 (k) profit
sharing plan. Please forward your resume in confidence to:
Human Resource Dept.
Champion Builders, Inc.
239 Pringle Street, Kingston, PA 18704
www.championbuildersinc.com
The Township of Plains requires professional service and advice for the following:
INSPECTION SERVICES FOR THE UNIFORM
CONSTRUCTION CODE.
The Township of Plains is pleased to invite you or your firm to prepare a written qualification and
types of licenses that you or your firm possess under UCC (Universal Construction Code) Act 45.
A municipal code official is an individual employed by a municipality and certified by the
Pennsylvania Dept. of Labor and Industry under Act 45 to perform plan review of construction
documents, inspect construction or administer and enforce codes and regulations under this act
or related acts.
The Township of Plains shall negotiate with the highest qualified firm or individual for necessary
services, at compensation which the Township determines to be fair and reasonable. Should the
Township be unable to negotiate satisfactory compensation with the firm or individual considered
to be the most qualified, the Township shall then undertake negotiations with the next most quali-
fied firm or individual.
Information shall include at minimum the following:
1. The firm or individuals method of approach for furnishing the required services
2. The firm or individuals statement of qualifications, profile, performance or any other pertinent
information that will be utilized to increase their opportunities for this position
Interested firms or individuals shall address and submit their intent to:
Patty Sluhocki- Secretary, Plains Township Board of Commissioners 126 North Main Street,
Plains, PA 18705 clearly marked on the envelope FIRM OR INDIVIDUAL INTERESTED IN
PLAINS TOWNSHIP UCC INSPECTOR to be received by September 19, 2013 at 11:00A.M. If
firm has submitted proposal within the last 60 days, kindly send a cover letter that you have
submitted, are still interested and your pricing is still valid.
The Township of Plains will negotiate your attached fee schedule for all services to be provided in
regards to this service. Firms or individuals, who have submitted a fee schedule, shall have valid
pricing for 90 days. It is expressly understood that failure to negotiate for services as established
above will disqualify the firm or individual.
The Township of Plains is an Affirmative Action Equal Employment Opportunity Employer.
INVENTORY
CONTROL COORDINATOR
Emery Waterhouse is an independent wholesale distributor
that services Hardware stores, Home Centers and Lumber
Yards in the Northeast has an opening for an Inventory Con-
trol Coordinator in their Pittston Pennsylvania Distribution
Center. This individual must be detail oriented and have past
inventory management experience. This position requires a
high level of accuracy and efficiency at all times.
Primary Responsibilities:
Performs daily cycle counts
Identifies and corrects discrepancies found in inventory
Identifies reason for discrepancies to insure errors are not
duplicated
Conducts daily audits to verify bin labels and product
locations are accurate
Conducts audits to identify discrepancies with product
locations and takes steps to determine
reason for error.
Assists in maintaining a shrink percentage
relative to sales in accordance with company
standards
Skills/Experience:
WMS and Cycle counting experience
Experience in high sku environment
Understanding of inventory from an accounting and financial
level.
High School diploma or equivalent
3 years related experience
Operate forklift, high lift and order picker
Experience with hand held Telxon unit
Proficiency in Microsoft Office applications (excel, word)
Problem solving using analytical data to determine root cause
Emery Waterhouse offers competitive wages and
excellent benefits.
Apply by attaching your resume to an email to
knason@emeryonline.com
Customer Service / Sales Associate
Our company currently has an opening at our Forty Fort loca-
tion. We are a small business that sells and repairs telephone
systems and parts to our customers located throughout the
USA.
Job Description:
Chosen candidate will address the needs of customers via
telephone, email and fax. Duties will include issuing price
quotes, entering sales orders, researching past orders, provid-
ing reports, and processing product returns. During peak hours
individual will be challenged with managing and prioritizing
many customer requests within a short period of time. Individu-
al will be required to develop a thorough understanding of
products as to effectively address customer requests. Periodic-
ally, individual will reach out to client base regarding current
promotions.
Details:
Monday through Friday - 8:30am-5:00pm
Benefits package offered.
Requirements:
3+ years customer service experience.
Proficiency working with multiple programs and windows on
a Microsoft Windows XP, Vista or 7 computer.
Interest in and working knowledge of consumer electronics,
smartphones and computer devices preferred, but not
required.
Excellent written communication skills. Concise and friendly
oral communication skills.
Must be able to work effectively in a fast-paced environment
and possess ability to multi-task.
Email your resume and salary requirements to:
nepajob@gmail.com
We are an equal opportunity employer.
SENIOR
TRUST OFFICER
Community Bank has an opening for a Senior Trust Officer who
will be responsible for managing the Financial Services
Department in order to meet the trust, estate, and employee
benefits services of customers within the bank's market area;
developing, implementing, and achieving annual goals and
objectives as established for the trust department and retail
investment program; organizing the division;
insuring the division's compliance with various operating
policies and procedures and various regulatory requirements;
supervising assigned personnel; communicating and
interfacing with other divisions and management personnel and
providing periodic management reports.
The successful candidate must possess a B.S. or B.A. degree
in a related field of study; a master's degree
preferred and specialized trust education and training. Must be
self-motivated and have excellent interpersonal and
communication skills. Position requires the ability to think and
work independently. We offer a competitive wage and benefits,
an incentive program, the opportunity for career advancement,
and the excitement and challenge of day to day
operational tasks.
Interested candidates should submit a cover letter, resume, and
salary requirements to:
The Times Leader
Position #4515
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
48 Patrick Henry Drive
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Sept. 15, 1-4
3 bedroom, 2.5 bath two
story. 3,165 sq ft move-in-
ready home with lots of stor-
age. Ultra-modern kitchen,
cherry cabinets with island,
granite counter-tops, hard-
wood floors& stainless steel
appliances. Living room &
family room with gas fire-
places & custom trim, includ-
i ng wai nscot i ng & crown
molding. Finished basement
with wet bar, theater room,
exerci se room, & l aundry
room. Large deck, Heated in-
ground pool with new liner,
Security, central vac /air, & ir-
ri gati on systems, & much
mor e. See pi ct ur es on
www. f orsal ebyowner. com
ID#239509O6 or
www.gwbar.org
MLS listing #13-2505.
Asking price $308,000.
570-814-8010
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
TO SETTLE ESTATE
Two family, with garage, large
fenced yard, needs some
updating, new boiler,
water heaters & roof.
570-735-1058
570-704-8099
HANOVER TWP
Newer construction offers open
concept between ultra-modern
kitchen, eat-in area w/sliders &
FR; light & bright throughout!
Formal LR & office or den. 2nd
fl r l ends to MBR w/WIC &
MBA, 3 additional BRs & 2nd
fl r bath. Rear deck, huge
fenced yard, gas FWA & cent-
ral A/C, 2 car garage. Con-
venient to shopping, bus stop,
walking path, restaurants.
MLS# 13-3541
$260,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
Nice bungalow ranch style
home containing (6) rooms, 3
bedrooms. Rooms in lower
level. New bath, upgraded ap-
pliances, new parquet & car-
peted floors, new windows.
Close to grade school & high
school. Property is close to all
amenities. Nice view from up-
per deck. Home is next to 501
High St. which can be pur-
chased as a package deal.
DIR: From W-B to San Souci
Parkway, left on Willow, right
on High.
#13-697
$67,500
Your Host: Louise Laine
283-9100 x. 20
283-9100
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must
see, home with many desirable
features. Lower level remodeled in
2009 is A-1 grade including family
room with fantastic gas fireplace,
wet bar, 3/4 bath & additional 4th
bedroom. Home also includes
new on demand tank less water
heater, securi ty system & i n
ground lawn sprinkler. Owners
have enjoyed this home for many
years, now it's your turn. Come &
take a look!
MLS# 13-2335
$259,900
Call Jim Banos
Call or text 570-991-1883
For appointment
jim.banos@
coldwellbanker.com
Town & Country
Real Estate
570-474-2340
HANOVER TWP.
Very neat & clean 2 story
single family home with 3
bedrooms, 1st floor bath, eat-
in kitchen, pantry, & formal
DR. Fenced yard. Gas
f orced ai r heat .
$59,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
Looking for an affordable home
in excellent condition, close to
grade school and high school,
this is the home for you! Re-
modeled throughout, private
driveway, fenced-in yard, new
ki t chen, f r eshl y pai nt ed
throughout, new windows, new
parquet floors and carpeting.
Property at 503 High St. also
for sal e. Sel l er wi l l accept
package deal. DIR: From WB
to San Souci Parkway, left on
Willow, right on High.
#13-691
$74,500
Louise Laine
283-9100, x 20
283-9100
HANOVER TWP.
Maintenance free townhome
in Ledgewood Estates. 2
story great room, hardwood
floors, maple glazed kitchen
wi th grani te counters and
stainless steel appliances.
gas fireplace. 3 BRs on 2nd
floor with 2 full tiled baths.
Master boasts a separate
shower & Jacuzzi tub. Laun-
dry on 2nd floor. Full base-
ment, gas heat & central air.
nice deck, 2 car garage. Loc-
ation near all interstates & the
Hanover Industrial Park.
MLS 13 1960
$245,000
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
Houses For Sale
BERWICK
Lovely 2-Story Home in Nice
Residential Neighborhood!
Features Living Room, Din-
ing Room, Kitchen/Adjacent
Family Room, 3 Bedrooms,
2.5 Baths with Gas Heat &
Central Air + 2-Car Attached
Garage.
MLS 20 52633
Price: $210,000
Call Patsy @ 570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
HUNTINGTON TWP.
Looking for that country living
while your still close to town?
Only 25 minutes from town.
Come live in this cozy 2 story
Cape Cod nestled in a coun-
try setting on a .99 acre lot.
Very well maintained, move in
condition, with lots of closet
space, a 11' x 21' deck and a
Florida room with a knotty
pine ceiling. Don't worry about
losing power, home comes
w/a portable generator w/its
own transfer box.
MLS 13 3364
$149,000
Call Michael Nocera
696-5412
696-1195
KINGSTON
Great location - This 3 bed-
room 2 bath home is waiting
for i ts new owners. Entry
opens to living room/dining
room combo lovely large
rear yard garage with lots of
storage.
MLS #13-2659
$124,000
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room & re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
counter tops. Tile floor in foy-
er and kitchen, master bed-
room and master bath with a
whirlpool tub. The home has
Pella windows throughout.
MLS#13 3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
KINGSTON
283 REYNOLDS ST.
Spacious four bedroom home
with plenty of charm. Hard-
wood floors, leaded windows,
accent fireplace and built-in
bookshelves. First floor laun-
dry/power room, three-sea-
son porch and a 16x32 in-
ground pool. Move-in condi-
tion with newer roof, siding
and windows, ductless air, all
appliances and alarm system.
#13-3406
$189,900
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$268,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL ROAD
Spacious Modern Tri-Level,
4 bedroom with 3.5 bath,
Large Kitchen, family room
with fireplace, dining room
and living room. Attached 3
car garage, gas heat, cent-
ral air, central vac-system.
Closet and Storage Space.
Second lot included. Minutes
from I-81 and Pennsylvania
Turn pike. $374,900.
570-237-0101
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
timesleader.com
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PAGE 8D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Houses For Sale
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$54,900
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
PITTSTON
MLS 13-3293
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570 592 3966
MOUNTAIN TOP
A 1.17 acre serene setting &
a l arge pi cni c grove wi th
stream makes this move in
ready 3 BR bi level a must
see property! Theres an eat
in kitchen with breakfast bar,
a formal DR with sliders to a
private deck, ample LR with
picture window, Master BR
suite, 25 LL Rec Room with
bath, oversized 2 car gar-
age with large paved drive.
MLS 13 3516
$259,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
570-287-1196
Houses For Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Immaculate 3/4 bedroom bi-
level on half acre lot offers
privacy & outdoor beauty.
Convenient U shaped kit-
chen opens to dining area.
Hardwood floors in much of
house. Family room in lower
level has tile floor & brick
mantle ready for wood burn-
er. Office can be 4th bed-
room. Perennials comprise
extensive outdoor landscap-
ing, along with a 10x17 deck,
15x 16 pat i o & 20x 12
Studi o/offi ce. Home War-
ranty.
MLS#13 2914
$189,000
Call Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
MOUNTAIN TOP
Well cared for 2 story on quiet
street. Eat in kitchen, dining
room, living room along with
sun room comprise the first
floor. 2 generous bedrooms w/
closets and full bath on 2nd
floor. Walk up attic provides
easy storage. Hardwood floors
and beautiful wood. 2 addition-
al buildings on lot offer many
possibilities and Storage! 1
year Home Warranty to buyer.
MLS 13 2817
$124,900
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
Rear 395 E.
Washington St.
Double Block Home,
Each Side:
Large Living Rm., Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Vinyl Sid-
ing, Brand New Roof New:
Berber Carpets, Paint, Floor-
ing, With Backyard Deck
length of House Have In-
come Tomorrow or Live for
Free! Appraised at $65,000
listing at $47,950 or
BEST OFFER!!!
570-916-2043
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
cently painted & move-in
ready. This 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
level lot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
tos online, go to.
www.
prudentialrealestate.com &
enter PRU7R4L5 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3363
$142,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
NANTICOKE
101 Honey Pot St.
$72,000
Well cared for and desirable
corner lot with replacement
windows, private driveway in-
cluding a carport, and recent
updates to the kitchen and
bath. MLS #13-3243
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
Penn Lake
Lakefront Cottage
(pennlake.org).
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
large living room, large en-
closed heated porch, eat-in
kitchen, laundry room, at-
tached shed, wood burning
stove, electric baseboard
heat, 1300 sq. feet, public
sewer. Beautiful views and
wonderful lake community.
Some furniture negotiable.
No realtors please.
Call 856-217-9531
or 610-357-3338
or email preedys@aol.com
PITTSTON
47 Wine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
90 River Street
$57,900
This traditional 2-story prop-
erty features a large fenced in
yard, private driveway, re-
placement windows, large
laundry room and an eat-in
kitchen. MLS#13-3269
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
PLAINS
''Busy People Compatible''.
Enjoy the daily convenience of
living in the vicinity of what's
happeni ng ' ' Woodcrest Es-
tates''. Move in ready, finished
lower level, relax on rear deck
with view of Mohegan Sun.
MLS 13 1110
$115,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto Gir-
ard Ave; home is on the left.
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto
Girard Ave; home is on the left.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 9D
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
Classic 3 story brick home of-
fers spacious living on 3 floors.
Many areas nicely detailed
w/HW floors. Professional use
possible as separate entrance
leads to FR which could be an
office. New roof & soffets done
in 2011. 4 ductless heat/air
uni ts i mprove effi ci ency of
house. 2nd floor bedroom con-
verted to large laundry - easily
converted back. Large WI attic.
MLS 13 893
$125,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor.
MLS #13-2814
New Price $45,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
NEW LISTING!
22 BLAIR ST.
An i mpeccabl y mai ntai ned
town home inside & out. Three
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, living,
dining & family rooms, galley
kitchen. 3-season sun room
over l ooks a l evel yar d
bordered by flowering bushes.
Many upgrades include ceram-
ic flooring, new kitchen coun-
ters & several new appliances.
Private off-street parking. This
home is move-in ready & you
can probably own it for less
than your current rent. Now is
a good ti me to make your
dream of home ownership a
reality! For more details and to
view the photos online, go to:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
& enter PRU2A8T2 i n the
Home Search. Call today to
schedule a private showing.
#13-3274
$94,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral dcor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained Home, Great
location in Dallas School Dis-
trict. 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths,
vaulted ceilings, finished base-
ment with wood burning fire
place. Over sized 2 car gar-
age. Gas heat, mature land-
scaping. Must see. $259,000.
All buyers agents welcome.
Call for App. 704-906-6165
Houses For Sale
SHAVERTOWN
2103 Hillside Road
Recently renovated two story
on large lot features modern
kitchen with granite counters,
Living room and Dining room
with hardwood floors, large
treated deck overlooking level
yard. 3 Bedrooms, one on
first floor. Master Bedroom
upstairs with full master bath.
Oversized Detached 2 car
garage. Gas heat. Well water
and public sewers.
Great opportunity.
MLS#13-27
$157,500
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazing, well maintained.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049.
$59,000
Vieve 570-474-6307, ext.
2772
474-6307
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
SWOYERSVILLE
221 Kossack St.
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x
188 lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
New Price $82,000
Carl Georinger
696-5429
696-1195
Houses For Sale
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WAPWALLOPEN
895 Hobbie Road
Wonderful Country Living de-
scribes the location of this
Well-Maintained 2-Story
Home. Features Remodeled
Kicthen, LR/DR Combo,
Den/Office, 3 Bdrms., 1.75
Baths, Enclosed Sunroom +
4-Car Detached Garage.
MLS# 13-2816.
$149,900.
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $47,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
WEST PITTSTON
Great value in this totally ren-
ovated 2 story, spacious living
room with brick fireplace and
hardwood floors. Beautiful kit-
chen and very nice size dining
room. Pl enty of storage i n
wal k-up atti c.
MLS# 13-2116
REDUCED TO $90,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
MULTI-FAMILY
Two houses for the price of
one! Two story i n front &
double-wide in rear. Great for 2
families or investor opportunity.
Off street parking & NOT in
flood zone. MLS #13-97.
$139,000
Call Cindy King Today!
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road. Single family
two story - a place for kids!
Four bedrooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has formal din-
ing room, living room, family
room & laundry room. Master
bedroom & bath added to the
1st floor. Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre.
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict.
$115,000
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
WEST PITTSTON
It's all about location. 2 story
home featuring living & family
rooms, eat-in kitchen, laun-
dry on 1st floor & updated 3/4
bath. 2nd floor has 3 bed-
rooms, full bath. gas hot air
heat & central air on the 1st
floor. Fenced rear yard.
MLS# 13 2586
$59,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
WEST PITTSTON
218 Warren St.
$159,900
Move in ready and wonder-
fully renovated. Hardwoods,
Granite, Stainless and char-
acter- this corner lot in West
Pittston has it all!
MLS# 13-3310
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WHITE HAVEN
178 West Woodhaven Drive
Relax on deck watching sun
rise over Woodheaven Lake -
- Home has 4 bedroom, 2 1/2
baths, living room with fire-
place, dining room with split
system wall A/C. And spiral
stair to 4th bedroom or office
& walk-in huge attic, family
room great stone fireplace
leads to patio, pool
room/game room features
split system in wall AC, Over-
size garage, with workshop,
matching shed, double lot 1/2
acre, Two paved driveways
one on each side of home.
Basketball court (26x40)
paved with Lights and ad-
justable basket, shared Dock,
and small helicopter pad
presently covered by double
swing facing lake. Appoint-
ment only.
MLS#13-3189
$314,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
WHITE HAVEN
178 Woodhaven Drive
Relaxing views on 200 ft.
lakefront, 2 fireplaces, 2 split
system A/Cs, 2 driveways.
Whole house generator. Over-
size garage with workshop.
Shed, paved and lit basketball
court. Walk in attic. Don't
Miss! 13-3189. $314,900
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED PRICE
$232,00
75 Mercedes Drive
Beautifully kept split level in
desirable Barney Farms. 3 car
attached garage, fin- ished
basement & at t i c. Land-
scaped lot, covered deck with
custom pul l down shades.
Hard- wood living room, form-
al dining room both freshly
painted, cathedral ceilings in
living room & kitchen. Full wet
bar in fin- ished basement,
walk out patio for your
parties/cookouts.
Option to Rent to Buy
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
83 Lawrence Street
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer
appl i ances and gas heat.
Nice level backyard and off-
st reet parki ng. Mot i vat ed
sel l er!
MLS #13 2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
276 High Street
Very Affordable property lov-
ingly cared for and ready for
you to move in! Heat-a-lator
fireplace provides cozy win-
ters and you can enjoy the
patio in the summer. Newer
kitchen, replacement win-
dows, new 200 amp electric
and low taxes. MLS#13-3212
$38,500
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Two story home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths & modern eat-
in kitchen. Double lot with
fenced in yard with flowers &
off street parking for 3-5 cars.
Gas heat. Near bus stops,
churches & schools. Small
12 X 16 house in rear with 2
picnic tables for entertaining.
$69,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Get all the advertising inserts with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
PAGE 10D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Immediate efficiency occupancy
Located near shopping & transportation. Temple Apartments
offers efficiencies & one bedroom apartments for income quali-
fied individuals ages 62 or older and/or needing the features of
a mobility impaired unit.
Apartment amenities include:
Accessible features-fully equipped kitchen-Wall to wall carpet-
ing-Ceramic tiled baths-On-site management-On-site mainten-
ance with 24-hour emergency response-On-site laundry-Inter-
com entry system-Social services coordinator on-site
Leasing office located at:
5 Heisz Street- Edwardsville, PA 18704
T: 570-283-2275-TDD 1.800.545.1833 x646
PENNROSE
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
SALES
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED COMMISSION
SALES PERSONS
WANTED TO SERVICE NEW AND EXISTING
ACCOUNTS. COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID TRAINING.
IF YOU WANT A CAREER AND NOT A JOB
CALL RICK AT 675-3283
TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW MON-FRI
OR VISIT WWW.CMSEAST.COM
PUBLIC AUCTION
HIGH END ESTATE AUCTION
Sunday Sept., 8, 2013, 11:00AM
101 Twinbrook Road, Bear Creek Township, PA
Riding tractor with attachments, exercise equipment, snow blower
and assorted yard tools, kitchen appliances, assorted holiday items,
dynamite boxes, camping supply, assorted dinner party items and so
much more... over 1,000 items!
Please check out our website for photos and listings!
No Previews Please!
(570) 883-1276 or www.lagauctions.com
Lic.# AU002629L-Buyers Premium
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH RIVER ST.
Modern 1 or 2 bedroom
home. Locat ed cl ose t o
Luzerne County Courthouse
and Kings College. Great
rental property potential New
carpeti ng throughout. 2nd
floor bath with laundry area.
Freshly painted. Walk-out to
backyard. Call to set-up an
appointment!
MLS #13- 2849
$39,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
Located on Madison St.
between Linden & Maple.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
MLS# 13-2431
REDUCED TO $84,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
PLYMOUTH
308 Stephanie Drive
Attractive Brick Front Ranch
with 3 Bedrooms, gas heat,
Sunroom (heated), attached
garage, large yard, 8x10
shed. Hardwood floors under
rugs. Great location. Most
windows on main floor are
Newer Triple Pane & double
pane in basement. Basement
can easily be finished (some
areas already sheet rocked &
electric installed)
Well-Maintained. $115,000.
MLS#12-1911
call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
WILKES-BARRE
486 Main Street N.
Nice, spacious 3 bedroom
with large walk-up attic. One
full and one half bath, large
bedrooms with closets, gas
heat, central air on first floor,
nice fenced yard,
3 season porch.
MLS#13-3324
$49,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
55 Nicholson Street
Enclosed rear porch 22x10,
and side enclosed porch
5x11. A very nice large yard.
Large walk-in hall closet.
Nice clean home.
MLS 12-3899 $40,000
Castrignano Real Estate
570-824-9991
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
589 Franklin Street N.
Nice residential home across
from Wilkes-Barre General
emergency room. Quiet zone.
Two parking permits. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, good
room sizes, fenced yard,
North End. of Wilkes-Barre.
MLS# 13-3115.
$49,900
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bed-
room, 1/1/2 bath with separate
driveway on a quiet street .
Lower level was finished for
former business - has separ-
ate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not in-
cluded in total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING/FRANKLIN TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
1705 W. 8TH ST.
This charming home in the
Dallas Sch. Dist. is waiting for
new owners to settle in and
celebrate the upcoming holi-
days with family and friends.
Relax on the deck and watch
t he l eaves change col or
around your large country lot.
Plan for great times next sum-
mer in your 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. This well main-
tai ned 2-story has 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 modern baths, a
modern kitchen with break-
fast nook, formal DR, large
LR and an added FR with
vaulted ceiling and fireplace.
2-car detached garage. De-
t a i l s a n d p h o t o s a t :
www.pruentialrealestate.com.
Ent er PRU7W7A3 i n t he
SEARCH f i el d.
MLS#13-2539
$227,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
Houses For Sale
WYOMING
Completely redone 3 bed-
room Cape Cod in lovely
neighborhood. Beautiful
woodwork throughout. Cent-
ral air, new windows,new car-
pet with hardwood floors un-
derneath, new electrical, new
hot water heater, the list goes
on! Nothing to do but
move in and enjoy.
$135,000
Call Christine
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
Bui l d your dream home i n
Goodleigh Manor. Beautiful
Views - Your choice of builder
All underground utilities. 2.02
acre corner lot - MLS #13-2090
priced at $152,500 or 2.06
acre lot MLS 13-2088 priced at
$135,000 The neighborhood
has over 2 acres of walking
trails Great place to live. Call
Rhea Simms at 570-696-6677.
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HUNLOCK CREEK
297 MIZDAIL Road
6 ACRES
Septic, well, electric, 2 story
barn, carport & shed. $60,000.
570-506-5986
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
MOUNTAIN TOP
S. Main St. & S. Church Rd.
Alberts Corners
Property for Sale
3.5 Commercially
Zoned Acres
Owner 011-44-7741870497
Land (Acreage)
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
WHITE HAVEN
Middleburg Road
Fabulous 5 acre flat wooded
lot. Public sewer. Old rock
wall along south property line.
Zoned rural agriculture.
MLS#12-3503. $57,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
Lots
ACREAGE FOR SALE
No Closing Costs
No Time Frame to Build
Dallas School District
10% Down Financing
Lots of Elbow Room for Privacy
3ac 425 ft. rd. Frontage $49,900
7ac 700 ft. rd. Frontage $89,900
Call 570-245-6288
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. 1st, last & se-
curity. No pets. Available
9/1/13. Water & sewer i n-
cl uded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment Homes
FALL SPECIAL
$500 Off
1st MONTHS RENT
FEATURING
- Washer & Dryer
- Central Air
- Fitness Center
- Pet Friendly
- Easy Access to I-81
Newly Renovated
Sundeck Pool
Mon Fri. 9 5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
(Off Route 309)
Call for a special app't
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
Apartments /Townhouses
DUPONT
4 room apartment for rent.
$450+utilities, No Pets. Refer-
ences required. Available Oct. 1.
570-241-6038
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, newly
remodeled. Refrigerator &
stove. Big yard.
$700 month + utilities.
570-842-0740 before 8 pm
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2
nd
floor 2 bdrm, 5
room apt. on River St. In-
cludes stove, frig, washer/dry-
er hook-up in basement, off-
street parking. $595/mo + util-
ities. 1 mo security deposit re-
quired. No Pets. Non-
smoking. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
BEDFORD ST.
Nice 1st floor. Off street park-
ing. $700 month + utilities &
lease. Call 570-814-8876
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
Hanover Township
West End Road
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3029 South Main st.
2nd floor very large 3 bed-
rooms, wall to wall carpeting
central air, eat in kitchen with
appliances. Off street parking.
Washer & dryer hookup. Heat
& cooking gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities.
1st, last & security. Available
Now! Garbage & sewer in-
cluded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
Immaculate 4 room, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath 1st floor apart-
ment overlooking park. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up. Stove &
fridge included. No pets. Non
smoking. $575/ month +
utilities & security. Call
(570) 457-2227
KINGSTON
1st floor, 2 bedroom. Off
street parking, freshly
painted, new carpet, bath-
room & kitchen. Water &
Sewer included. No pets.
$650/month, 1st month &
security. 570-332-4400
KINGSTON
287 Pierce Street
Corner of Pierce & Warren
1 bedroom, ki tchen, l i vi ng
room, bath, cl oset storage
area. Refrigerator & stove in-
cluded, off street parking. Ref-
erences, no pets. $400/month
+ security. Call 570-655-6743
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom, 2nd
floor, 1.5 baths & office. All appli-
ances, washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
Nice neighborhood, close to
schools, shopping & parks. One
modern 5 room, 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Dining & living rooms,
ample closets, front & back porch
and yard. Washer/dryer hookup.
$575, includes fridge, stove water
& sewer. Non smoker preferred.
570-545-6057
KINGSTON
Prime location, Poplar Street,
near Nesbitt Hospital. Modern
2nd floor, 1 bedroom/den,
open design. Dishwasher,
washer/dryer. No Pets. No
Smoking. References.
$650+utilities. 570-709-4360
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $570
+ utilities, security &
references. No pets.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON TOWNSHIP
1605 West 8th Street
1 bedroom over a garage, Kit-
chen, Living room, Bathroom,
closed in porch. Stove, refri-
gerator, washer/dryer in-
cluded. Newly Remodeled.
$575+Security. No Pets.
570-333-4005
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstons Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed, Cent-
ral Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. Ar-
chitecturally designed. Cent-
ral air. Off street parking.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LARKSVILLE
1 bedroom end unit apt. Wash-
er/dryer hookup. No pets. Se-
curity & lease required $450
month. 570-288-7753
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
Apartments /Townhouses
DALLAS
Meadows
Senior Living
Community
200 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-9336
One Bedroom
Apartment Available!
Included: All utilities, air
conditioning, maintenance,
and free parking.
Restaurant and Beauty Shop
on site.
Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
S. Hanover Street
1.5 bedrooms, 2nd floor, no
pets, washer/dryer hook-ups,
attic. $469 mo. 2 Car Garage,
$159 mo. INCLUDES HEAT,
WATER. 570-824-8786
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up. No pets. $475/month + se-
curity & utilities. 822-7657
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644.
NANTICOKE
EFFICIENCY
1 bedroom. $325 month.
Tenant pays electric.
570-735-2516
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom Eat-in kitchen,
living room, full bath, stove
/fridge, washer/dryer, $500. +
utilities. No Pets. 570-760-
3637 or 570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Nice, clean 1 bedroom. heat,
hot water, electricity, fridge,
st ove, ai r condi t i oni ng,
washer/dryer availability all in-
cluded. Close to town. No pets
o r s mo k i n g . S e c u r i t y
$525/month. 570-542-5610
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
NOXEN
2 bedroom 1/2 double block.
Wall to wall carpeting, electric
heat. Includes gas stove. Off
street parking. No pets. $430
month & 1 month security re-
quired.
570-466-8811 570-639-5882
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, washer/dryer hook
up 1 year lease. $385 + utilit-
ies. 570-237-0968.
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
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VALLEY CHEVROLET
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
EXIT 1708 OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1, BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL
*Prices plus tax & tags. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Prior use daily rental on select models. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors. XM Satellite & Onstar Free where applicable.
WE ACCEPT ALL
TRADES!
Cars, Truck, Campers, Boats,
Motorcycles, ATVs
YOU BRING IT...
WE WILL TRADE IT!
VISIT US 24/7 WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
SALE
PRICE
$
8,995
*
#Z2989A, 3.5L, A/C, PW,
PDL, Low Miles
SALE
PRICE
$
7,897
*
#13556B, 3.8L Auto,
Low Miles 2002 BUICK
LESABRE
CUSTOM
2006 CHEVY
IMPALA LS
SALE
PRICE
$
12,987
*
#13652B, 3.8LAT, 1 Owner,
ONLY 24K MILES 2005 BUICK
LACROSSE
CXL
SALE
PRICE
$
9,990
*
#Z3037, 4 Cylinder,
1 Owner, ONLY 45K MILES 2007 CHEVY
COBALT LS
SALE
PRICE
$
12 888
*
#13807A, 4 Cyl, AT, A/C,
45K MILES, 1 Owner 2011 MITSUBISHI
LANCER ES
SPORT
SALE
PRICE
$
15 888
*
#Z3007, 4 Cyl., AT,
30K Miles, 1 Owner 2011 CHEVY
CRUZE LS
SALE
PRICE
$
15,799
*
#13637A, 4 Cyl, Auto,
ONLY 5K MILES, 1 Owner
2012 CHEVY
SONIC LT
SALE
PRICE
$
19,900
*
#Z3016, 5.7L, 8 Cyl., Auto., Removable
Glass Roof Panel, Low Miles
1998 CHEVY
CORVETTE
COUPE
SALE
PRICE
$
21,950
*
#Z2950, 5.7L, 8 Cyl, Auto.,
ONLY 45K MILES, 1 Owner
2000 CHEVY
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
SALE
PRICE
$
22,941
*
#13824A, 4.6L, 8 Cyl., Manual,
Leather, R. Spoiler, 1 Owner
2009 FORD
MUSTANG GT
ONLY 7K MILES
SALE
PRICE
$
22,899
*
#Z2730, 3.0L, 6 Cyl., Auto,
Only 15K Miles, 1 Owner
2012 CHEVY
CAPTIVA LT
SALE
PRICE
$
17,900
*
#Z3025, 4.8L Automatic,
A/C, ONLY 14K MILES
2005 CHEVY
EXPRESS G2500
CARGO VAN
SALE
PRICE
$
12,967
*
#Z3031, 3.5L 6 CYL., 7
PASSENGER, ONLY 23K MILES
2006 CHEVY
UPLANDER LS
SALE
PRICE
$
5,999
*
#13747A, ONLY 41K MILES
1 Owner
2001 CHEVY
CAVALIER
2 DR. COUPE
SALE
PRICE
$
14,999
*
#13484A, 6 Cyl.,
46K Miles 2006 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
4X4
SALE
PRICE
$
21,579
*
#14048A, 6 Cyl, AT,
ONLY 19K MILES, 1 Owner
2010 BUICK
LUCERNE CXL
SALE
PRICE
$
15,737
*
#13200A, 2.4L, AT, A/C,
45K Miles, 1 Owner
2009 CHEVY
MALIBU LT
HONDA CRF 70
$
1,350
YAMAHA TT110
$
1,795
GRIZZLY 8
$
1,850
GRIZZLY 125 AUTO/REV
$
2,425
1999 CHEVY
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
SALE
PRICE
$
,997
*
#Z3067, All Power, Leather
ONLY 54K MILES, 1 Owner
SALE
PRICE
$
24,987
*
#Z2976, 3.6L, 6 Cyl., AT, AC,
PW, PDL, Only 41K Miles,
2008 BUICK
ENCLAVE CXL
$
5,999
*
#13747A, 1 Owner,
Only 41K Miles
2001 CHEVY
CAVALIER
SALE
PRICE
2 DR. COUPE
$
7,897
*
#13556B, 3.8L Auto,
Low Miles
2002 BUICK
LESABRE
SALE
PRICE
CUSTOM
$
8,995
*
#Z2989A, 3.5L, A/C, PW,
PDL, Low Miles
2006 CHEVY
IMPALA LS
SALE
PRICE
$
9,990
*
#Z3037, 4 Cylinder,
1 Owner, Only 45K Miles
2007 CHEVY
COBALT LS
SALE
PRICE
$
12,888
*
#13807A, 4 Cyl., AT, A/C,
1 Owner, Only 45K Miles
2011 MITSUBISHI
LANCER ES
SALE
PRICE
SPORT
$
12,967
*
#Z3031, 3.5L 6 Cyl., 7 Passenger,
Only 45K Miles
2006 CHEVY
UPLANDER LS
SALE
PRICE
$
12,987
*
#13652B, 3.8LAT, 1 Owner,
Only 24K Miles
2005 BUICK
LACROSSE
SALE
PRICE
CXL
$
14,999
*
#13484A, 6 Cyl.,
Only 46K Miles
2006 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SALE
PRICE
4X4
$
15,737
*
#13200A, 2.4L, AT, A/C,
1 Owner, Only 45K Miles
2009 CHEVY
MALIBU LT
SALE
PRICE
$
15,888
*
#Z3007, 4 Cyl., AT,
1 Owner, Only 30K Miles
2011 CHEVY
CRUZE LS
SALE
PRICE
$
19,900
*
#Z3016, 5.7L., Auto, Removable
Glass Roof Panel, Low Miles
1998 CHEVY
CORVETTE
SALE
PRICE
$
21,579
*
#14048A, 6 Cyl., AT,
1 Owner, Only 19K Miles
2010 BUICK
LUCERNE CXL
SALE
PRICE
$
22,899
*
#Z2730, 3.0L., 6 Cyl., Auto,
Only 15K Miles
2012 CHEVY
CAPTIVA LT
SALE
PRICE
$
22,941
*
#13824A, 4.6L., 8 Cyl., Mannual,
Leather, R. Spoiler, 1 Owner
2009 FORD
MUSTANG GT
SALE
PRICE
ONLY 7K MILES
$
15,799
*
#13637A, 4 Cyl., Auto,
1 Owner, Only 5K Miles
2012 CHEVY
SONIC LT
SALE
PRICE
HONDA CRF 70
YAMAHA TT 110
GRIZZLY 8
GRIZZLY 125 AUTO/REV
$
1,350
$
1,795
$
1,850
$
2,425
COUPE
$
21,950
*
#Z2950, 5.7L., 8 Cyl., Auto,
1 Owner, Only 45K Miles
SALE
PRICE
CONVERTIBLE
2000 CHEVY
CORVETTE
$
23,997
*
#Z3067, All Power, Leather,
1 Owner, Only 54K Miles
1999 CHEVY
CORVETTE
SALE
PRICE
CONVERTIBLE
$
27,950
*
#Z2890, 3.6L. Automatic,
1 Owner, Only 16K Miles
2012 CHEVY
CAMARO
1lt convertible
SALE
PRICE
$
24,987
*
#Z2976, 3.6 Cyl., At,
AC, PW, PDL, Only 41K Miles
2008 BUICK
ENCLAVE CXL
AWD
SALE
PRICE
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 11D
Apartments /Townhouses
PITTSTON
3 room apartment, 2nd floor,
wall to wall carpet, off street
parking. Enclosed porch.
$450/month + electric heat &
security. No pets.
570-655-1222
PITTSTON
3RD FLOOR
Available Now! 3 bedroom.
$600 + security. Sewer &
garbage included. 574-4380
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Clean & inviting 2nd floor, 2
bedroom apartment. Recently
renovated with new, modern
kitchen & bath, carpeting &
windows. Features bright liv-
ing room, small fenced back
yard & shed. $550/month +
utilities & security. Call Lynda
at 262-1196
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable.. ,
new appliances, off street
parking & sewer included. No
smoking inddoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570-855-3329.
SUGAR NOTCH
2nd floor contains 1,215 sq. ft.
of very spacious & sprawling
living space. 6 rooms. Numer-
ous closets. Bathroom is a
generous 10' x 11'. Gas heat,
water, sewer bill & cooking gas
- all included. Has washer/dry-
er hook ups. Only 2 miles to
Wilkes-Barre & close to I-81 &
Wyoming Valley Mall. Lease.
Credit & background checked.
$685 monthly .
570-650-3803
WARRIOR RUN
Close to Hanover Ind. Park.
Remodeled 1 bedroom, fridge,
stove, eat in kitchen. Sewer,
water & garbage paid, electric
by tenant. $425/mo + lease &
security. 570-301-8200
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom efficiency apart-
ment. No pets. $325 + utilities
& security deposit. Call
570-333-5499
WEST PITTSTON
1 or 2 bedrooms, washer/dry-
er hookup. Air conditioning.
Heat, water & sani tary i n-
cl uded.
570-430-3095
WEST PITTSTON
Boston Ave
Spacious, private 2 bedroom
apartment on 2nd floor with en-
closed porch. Refrigerator,
stove, dishwasher, washer/dry-
er, off street parking, air condi-
tioning & gas heat, storage
space. Water & sewer in-
cluded in rent. No pets, no
smoking. $550/month + secur-
ity. Available immediately.
417-2775 or 954-1746
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
ROOM
FOR RENT
1 room. Back ground check.
$350 month plus security de-
posit. 347-693-4156
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIV
CAMPUS
1, 2, 3, or 4 bedrooms. Wood
floors, no pets, starting $450.
all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
Wilkes-Barre
2 bedroom townhouse, end
unit. Near VA, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, sewer, water &
garbage included. $800/
month + security.
570-817-4475
WILKES-BARRE
2 BEDROOMS
Heat & hot water included,
$625./month + Security re-
quired. 973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
63 ELIZABETH ST.
Remodeled 1st floor apt.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, rear
porch. Gas heat, washer/dryer
hook- up, fridge, stove & dish-
washer. Absolutely no pets.
$600/month
+ utilities & 1 month security.
Reference check.
570-472-9453
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/ month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
Large 3 bedroom apartment on
two floors IN GOOD CONDI-
TION.Section 8 welcome. No
pets. $525 + utilities & security.
606-9917
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE
STUDIO near WILKES
Wood floors, parking, no pets,
short term OK. $425, all utilit-
ies included. 570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
KIDDER STREET
2 bedroom balcony apt., living
room, kitchen, bath, new car-
peting, freshly painted. $600
month + uti l i ti es. Cl ose to
Home Depot. 570-540-5312.
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled single home. 3
bedroom, hardwood floors.
No pets. 215-932-5690
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, very
clean, recently remodeled.
Washer & dryer hookup. Off
st r eet par ki ng. No pet s.
$550/mo. includes water &
sewer. 570-714-7272
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
Commercial
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
3,000 square feet. Suitable for
many businesses. Plenty of
parking. $600/month +
security. 570-540-0746.
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
WEST PITTSTON
1 CAR
GARAGE/STORAGE
FOR RENT
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
Condominiums
DALLAS
Private Senior Community,
1st floor, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
attached garage, window treat-
ments & appliances included.
C/A, deck, snow removal &
lawn care included. No pets.
References. $1,200 + utilities &
security. 570-371-8666
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 760- 5095
Houses For Rent
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-889-8432
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Home. 3 bedroom, liv-
ing room, kitchen, bath, Wi-fi, Dir-
ect TV, lake rights, washer/dryer.
$1,200/month + utilities. Students
Welcome. 570-639-5041
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath, $1,000
month. Month to month lease.
Not section 8 approved. Non
smokers. No pets. 2 car gar-
age. Outdoor woodburner for
heat & hot water.
570-506-5986
LEHMAN
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths,
$800/month.
570-477-3827
LEHMAN
IDETOWN ROAD
2 bedrooms, laundry facilities
on site. No pets. $900 month.
1st month & security required.
Available now. 570-639-0967
or 570-574-6974
LUZERNE
392 Bennett St.
2 BEDROOM
HOUSE
Gas heat. Washer/ dryer hook-
up, dish-washer, stove & refri-
gerator. Fenced in yard, par-
tially new carpet. Off-street
parking, yard. $680 + utilities.
(570) 288-3438
MOUNTAIN TOP
Mobile home
2 bedroom, 2 full baths, eat in
kitchen, living room, walk in
cl oset, deck, washer/dryer,
di shwasher & ref ri gerat or,
cent r al ai r on 2 acr es.
$600/month. + 1 & 1/2 month
security & 1st month rent.
570-592-5764/ 973-271-0261
EXETER TWP.
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
NANTICOKE
6 room house for rent call for
details.(570)735-2236
PITTSTON
Single home sale or rent. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath, move in
condition, nice yard.
570-540-0198
SHAVERTOWN
Immaculate, 2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in kitchen, hard-
wood floors, gas heat and de-
tached garage. $950/
month+utilities and security
deposit. 570-675-3178
THORNHURST
MUST SEE!!!
Large 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths house
for rent. Perfect for multi-genera-
tion. $900 month + utilities. 2
months security + references.
718-916-9872
WILKES-BARRE
40 Dexter Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath single
home. $600 + utilities & se-
curity. Section 8 Approved.
Call
357-2809 or 826-1795
Houses For Rent
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
Wyoming Street
Unfurnished house for rent.
$750 + utilities,
security required
570-961-3162
Storage
FORTY FORT
GARAGE FOR RENT
11ft. 6"x 23 ft. Cinder block
walls, interior walls, steel studs
with sheet rock. Concrete floor,
Steel overhead door with lock,
overhead lighting. $110/month.
1 year lease and security.
570-655-0530
PLAINS TWP.
2 GARAGE/STORAGE UNITS
14 x 24
Automatic overhead door.
Heat & electric included.
$205/month each.
Available separate or together.
Call 570-823-1466
Half Doubles
GLEN LYON
15 minutes from Power Plant
or W-B. 2 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/dryer hook up,
electric heat, new paint & car-
pet, non smoker. $625/month
+ security, references & 1 year
lease. Pet on approval.
570-218-2320
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
GOOSE ISLAND
2 bedrooms, 1 bath, tenant
pays all utilities, 1st and last
months rent and security.
$550. 570-823-2902
KINGSTON
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerat-
or and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, off-street parking. No
Smoking, No Pets. $650+
utilities & security.
570-639-1796
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled older
charm, stained glass win-
dows, front & rear porches,
Living /dining room combo,
eat-in kitchen with laundry
alcove, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
Half Doubles
WILKES-BARRE/
PARSONS
3 b e d r o o m, 1 . 5 b a t h ,
$700/month, security, utilities &
lease. No Pets. 570-288-7753
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, stove & refrigerat-
or, washer/dryer hook up. heat
& water included. $575/month
+ security. 570-906-7614
PITTSTON
Half-Double, freshly painted,
2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath,
washer/dryer hookup, cable
& satellite ready, enclosed
back porch & yard. Private
parking. $650 + utilities, se-
curity & references. No pets
or smoking. 570-239-4293
PLAINS
HALF-DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, all gas. No dogs.
$495/month. 570-417-5441
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, Living room, dining
room, off-street parking.
Security and Lease. No Pets.
$700 a month.
Includes Sewer and Trash.
570-675-4424
TRUCKSVILLE
1/2 RANCH
2 bedrooms, living & dining
rooms, kitchen, washer/dry-
er, basement, yard, Security,
references & lease. No Pets.
$700/month. Sewer & trash in-
cluded.
Call 570-474-9321
or 570-690-4877
WEST WYOMING
3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, quiet
area, off street parking. ABSO-
LUTELY NO PETS. $650/mo +
security and references. Utilit-
ies by tenant. 570-430-3851
leave message.
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Redman Trailer, 56'x14',
Located in park. 4 rooms,
2 bedrooms, 1.5 bath.
Screened in porch. $15,500.
Very Good Condition
570-706-5201
Resort Property For Rent
CANCUN MEXICO
ROYAL SANDS RESORT
TIMESHARE VILLA
2 bedrooms, 2 bath, week
16, 2nd floor ocean view,
overlooks pool. See
www.royalresorts.com
for general info.
Call 570-674-8927
for details.
THE OFFICE CENTERS
5 Kingston Locations
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovation Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information call 570-287-1161
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
PAGE 12D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
EQUIPMENT MECHANIC
Permanent full time position for repairing and installing of
automotive equipment, includes A/C lifts equipment, brake
lathes, tire changers and wheel balancers.
Experience as a automotive technician would be helpful.
Full benefits program.
To apply please send your resume to:
PANZITTA SALES AND SERVICE
72 George Ave, Wilkes Barre, PA 18705
or email bwas@panzittasales.com
Pets
BEAGLE PUPPIES
AKC registered. Males and
Females, Tri-color, shots,
wormed and vet checked.
$250 each. 570-467-3683
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
12, registered, both parents
on site. Males $400, Females
$450.. Contact Ang at
570-441-7826 or
accolie@yahoo.com.
Huskies, Poms,
Yorkies, Chihuahuas,
German Shephards & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
Autos Under $5000
CHEVY '99
PRISM LSI
137,000 mi l es, green/grey.
Very good condition, depend-
abl e, excel l ent mi l eage. 4
speed automatic, A/C, power
windows & door lock, rear win-
dow defroster, tachometer, tilt
steering wheel, cruise control,
am/fm/CD stereo, air bags,
ABS brakes, al l oy wheel s.
$2,200. 570-417-7671 or
570-474-9828.
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,295
Call for details 570-696-4377
Autos For Sale
BUICK '10 ENCLAVE
45k mi l es, si l ver/ l eat her,
captains seats, rear back up
camera, third row. $25,200.
570-814-0749
CHEVY '00 MAILBU
Dark blue. Automatic, loaded,
power sun roof, V6, new tires.
Very good condition. 106k.
$3,200, OBO. 570-822-0832
Chevrolet Impala LT 13'
25K, USA
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 08 COLORADO
5 cyl., auto, air, power steer-
ing, power brakes, AM/FM,
bedliner & fiberglass
bed cover.SPECIAL $7,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 10 MALIBU LS
Air, all power, cruise, tilt, CD.
Very economical..like
new..Sporty. Balance GM
warranty. SALE PRICE
$11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
DODGE '10 JOURNEY
Light grey, 4 cylinder, all
power, cruise, tilt, alloys,
Sirius radio, 56k. Balance of
factory warranty. Very
clean..very economical.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
FORD F150 04'
4X2. Nice Truck!
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD 12
FUSION SE
Auto, all power, cruise, tilt,
alloys. Black. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
HONDA ACCORD
EXL 10' 31,000K
Leather and well Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Autos For Sale
ACME
AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 NISSAN AKTIMA SL
grey, grey leather, sunroof
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE
Brown tan leather, 85k miles
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
blue3, V6, 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS
Black, V6, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS
Bluem V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS
Silver, V6, 3rd seat 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 CHEVY TRACKER LT
white V6 4x4 54k miles
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
98 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB
V8, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
HONDA CRV 10'
Low Miles, AWD.
2 Available, starting at
$17,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
LINCOLN '06
ZEPHER
Silver. Only 23,000 miles.
One Owner. Garage kept.
4 door, auto, all power
including sun roof.
4 new tires. $11,500.
714-833-8021
CADILLAC '07 DTS
Pearl white/tan leather,
heated & cooled seats.
43k miles. Warranty.
$17,997
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Autos For Sale
CHRYSLER '05
PT CRUISER
Purple, good condition.
Warranty
$4,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
VW '10 BEETLE GLS
Red/black leather, heated
seats, moon roof. 19k
miles. Factory Warranty.
$15,900
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
VW '10 JETTA
LIMITED
Red/black leather,
heated seats, 31k miles.
Warranty.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '12 ACCORD
SPECIAL EDITION
Grey/black leather, heated
seats. 15k miles.
Factory Warranty
$19,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '11 CIVIC LX
Burgundy/grey cloth,
4 new tires, 23k miles.
Factory Warranty.
$14,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
LEXUS '06 ES 330
Silver/grey leather, moon
roof, heated seats. Excel-
lent condition. 82k miles.
Extended Warranty
$13,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CADILLAC '00
SEVILLE
Grey/beige leather, heated
seats. 70k miles.
Two owners, local trade.
Excellent Condition
Extended Warranty
$5,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
NISSAN '11
ALTIMA
Auto, air, power steering,
power brakes, ABS, cruise,
tilt, power cloth seats. CD.
Much More! Like New!
Special $13,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
PONTIAC GRAND AM
02' $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Saturn `99 SL
Engine rebuilt, new radiator &
hoses. 4 new tires. Inspected
through 11/13. $1,000
570-472-1149
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
SATURN '07 ION
4 cylinder. 5 speed. REAL
SHARP CAR! $3,995.
570-696-4377
Autos For Sale
SUBARU OUTBACK 11'
Station Wagon, AWD.
43K Miles!
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOTOTA '11
CAMRY LE
4 door, auto, dark bl ue
metallic color. Original own-
er . Onl y 18, 900 mi l es!
Looks and drives like a new
car! ! ! Pri ce reduced t o
$14,400 for quick sale. Loc-
ated in the Back Mtn. Call
570-674-5673
to schedule an appointment.
TOYOTA
'12 SCION
TC COUPE
Dual sun roofs, 6 speed auto,
too many options to mention.
Asking $17,000. 570-472-1149
TOYOTA COROLLA 03'
5-Speed. $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA '06 COROLLA LE
Power windows, locks, air,
65k. EXCELLENT! $9,550.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Financing available.
CAR FAX 1 Owner
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02 BLAZER
4X4. V6. BARGAIN PRICE
$3,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '06
TRAILBLAZER
4X4. V6. EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995.
570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4495. 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,495.
570-696-4377
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '04 F150 X CAB
4X4 with cap. 1 owner. Clean,
Clean truck. $6,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '05 ESCAPE
4X4. Leather. Sunroof.
CLEAN SUV! $5,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
TOYOTA '06 HIGHLANDER
V6, 4X4, silver/grey cloth,
moon roof, 3rd row seats.
90k miles.
Extended Warranty.
$13,300
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
SUZUKI 12 SX4
5 door AWD, 6 speed, black,
all power, cruise, tilt, CD, al-
loys. Like new. Balance of
factory warranty. Sporty.
SPECIAL PRICE $11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Truck / SUV / Van Accessories
CHRYSLER '04
TOWN & COUNTRY
TOURING VAN
Power windows, locks, seats,
air, 55K. MUST SEE &
DRIVE! $7,975.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
Air Conditioners
AI R CONDI TI ONER 6000
BTUs EER 9. 9 $35.
570-574-6416
AIR CONDITIONERS, (1) Fri-
gidaire, 5450 BTU.
$50. 570-693-1454
Antiques & Collectibles
BASEBALL/football cards '90
Fleer baseball $3. '91 Score
Baseball $3. '92 Topps base-
ball $5. '92 Pinnacle football
$3. '90 Fleer football $3. '90
pr oset f oot bal l $3. 570-
3135214 or 570-3123-3859
Antiques & Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES $
$ BUYING $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
COCA COLA holiday caravan
truck $20. Linden hump back
clock Westminster chimes $75.
Hess '02 truck $20. Sight vise
for sighting guns USA $35.
Brown jug 2 gal. $30. Bolt cut-
ters $25. Humble toy gas truck
boxed $15. 571-735-1589
MATCH BOX models Yester
years 6 items $91. Days Gone
By 2 items $22. 571-287-6912
NASCAR variety 1.24 scale
cars 10 for $30. 15 trailers
$7.50 each. Bobby Labonte &
Rusty Wallace autographed
cars $75. each. Bud steins '93
- '03 $10. each. 570-239-2266
Appliances
GAS FRYER, commerci al
heavy duty, like new, Cecil-
ware 43lb. Asking $400.
570-574-2967
HD TV (32" Sony Vega) in per-
fect condition - $50.00.
570-406-7607
REFRIGERATOR white, top
freezer G.E. 18.1 cu. ft. 6
months ol d $500. Hotpoi nt
electric dryer, white 6.8 cu. ft. 6
months old with little use $300.
570-675-0667
STOVE, gas Tappan, still us-
ing, white with black oven door
L o o k s & wo r k s g r e a t !
Nanticoke. $125. 831-5778
TELEVISION, 19" with DVD
p l a y e r . P O R T A B L E
WASHER/DRYER with attach-
ment s, Mi cr owave oven.
Ever yt hi ng i s $200.
215-224-2913.
Baby Items
CRIB BEDDING by Pottery
Barns, boys blue, includes,
sheets, dust ruffle, bumpers,
seldom used, like new $70.
Also included 3 crib rail pro-
tectors. 570-287-9701.
Building Materials
DECORATI VE STONE 6
boxes. Fl at s. $500.
570-709-5178
FLOORING 20 sq. ft. 3/4" pre-
finished red oak flooring, short
lengths, tongue & groove 4
sides, 3 1/4 wide Bruce Dun-
dee. $50. CARPET PADDING
14'x14' room $45. 570-403-
0494
Clothing
COAT men' s wi nt er coat ,
Dockers XXL wool blend, char-
coal grey,plaid scarf, like new
$30. 570-287-6155
Exercise Equipment
GYM Impex Tech rod gym,
similar to Bow Flex. Great con-
dition $99. 570-829-4776
Furnances & Heaters
HEAT YOUR ENTIRE
HOME water, and more
wi t h a n OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C Out-
door Wood Furnace, LLC.
570-477-569
Furniture & Accessories
BEDROOM SET sol i d oak,
Pi er wal l uni t wi t h mi rror,
queen size bed & 12 drawers,
cabi net has 2 encl osed
shelves. Excellent condition
$400. 570-675-0502
CHAIRS 4 highback kitchen
chairs $25. George Forman
grilling machine $10. Call Bill
570-825-8256
CHINA CABINET Ethan Allen,
lighted, very good condition.
$500. 570-690-6451
DESK/COMPUTER & swivel
chair $50. Antique Cavalier ce-
dar chest $300. Used Compaq
computer, keyboard, speakers
$25. Accent table & matching
mirror $40. Oak coffee table
$50. Sony hand held Playsta-
tion $50. 570-829-2599
DESKS Sauder - desk with
hutch $25. Desk with side door
$15. Desk with drop leaf $15.
Desk wi t h 2 shel ves $15.
Bookcase $8. 570-654-2967
DINETTE SET Raymour &
Flanagan, drop leaf table, 4
upholstered chairs, like new
condition. Paid $660. sell for
$325. 570-287-6327
DINING ROOM SET table, 6
chai r s, br eakf r ont $150.
Double bed frame $50. Twin
bed frame $50. Microwavw
stand $25. 3 TVs 29" color
$25, 5 drawer oak dresser $35.
570-823-8442
Furniture & Accessories
FUTON complete metal frame,
floral cover, excellent condi-
tion $200. 570-287-3056
LIVING ROOM SET rattan, 2
sofas, 1 end table, 1 coffee ta-
ble with glass top $400, Rock-
er/recliner, dark green $50. Ex-
cellent condition.
570-654-4112
RECLINERS 2 matching wing
back recliners, claw feet, cran-
berry color $50. for both. 1
mauve swivel rocker recliner
$35. 1 dark green recliner $35.
570-740-2892
SECTIONAL taupe l eather
double hideabed, recliner &
chai se l ounge. Measur es
14'wx11' like new $900 OBO,
West Bend muffin toaster, 4
wide slots + egg cooker, warm-
er $45. Belgique stainless steel
skiller 6 quart $30. 570-2299
SOFA & love seat, beige floral
colors, very good condition
$100. 570-674-9716
SOFA & love seat, dark green,
gold & ivory $100. Gold swivel
rocking chair $40. Small end
tables with glass tops, white
wash wood (3) $60. Custom
drapes tan with gold tassels &
tie backs $100. Microwave
$25. 570-819-4951
SOFA 97" Bernhardt wi t h
down & 4 pillow, made in USA,
medium sage khaki color, ex-
cellent condition, like new, can
help with delivery $750.
570-905-7427
SOFA BED queen, very good
condition. $500 OBO.
570-655-0103 10am-4pm
SOFA floral 81" $110. Sharp
audio system, 4 features re-
mote & speakers $55. Polar-
oi d retro 60' s camera $20.
Juicer veg & fruit Omega $30.
Wesl o treadmi l l heart rate
sensor, $135. 570-740-1392
TABLE solid oak, high pub
style 60" round with 2 swivel
high oak chairs.paid $650. sell
$200 firm. Excellent condition.
570-262-6283
WOW! Beautiful Sealy & Serta
Mattress box-spring sets
W/Warranty in plastic bags,
cost over $900 each sell for
only $75 for full, All Sizes avail-
able. Pillow tops just $25 extra,
We Deliver
570-614-3877
Landscaping & Gardening
WEED WACKER, gas, needs
primer $25. 570-693-1454
Medical Equipment
MOTORCADDI E Model
EC1000 series, electric hand-
cart with portable battery char-
ger & caddy basket $350.
570-735-3886
Miscellaneous
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
AQUARI UM 35 gal . f i l t er,
hood, some accessories $50.
570-823-8157
BAR 5' entertainment bar, sol-
id wood $200. Washer/dryer
set good condition $300.
570-574-0028
BEVERAGE AIR BEER TAP,
good condi ti on. Runs wel l
$350. 570-696-1501
BIKE Vintage 1977 Schwinn
Varsity 10 speed, lime green,
excellent condition $265. 8'
fluorescent light fixture, 2 bulbs
& extra ballast $15. OBO.
Jake 570-829-7859
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
CHAIR Queen Ann green $40.
Wooden snack bar stools $30.
End table with cane top $5.
Radio, under couter $20. TV
11" Not HD novelty $20. Other
misc items buy all for one price
$100. 570-881-0877
LINER REPLACEMENT KIT
complete for 15x35 above
ground pool. Includes full prin-
ted liner, foam underlay, sides,
ski mmer basket & gaskets
/ accessor i es. Pai d $800.
sel l i ng f or $350. OBO.
570-881-2311
DVD/ VCR/ CD pl ayer $75.
TREADMILL Li festyl er Ex-
panse $100.
Call 5710-654-5141
OFFERS END 7/31/13
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
8
0
0
1
5
0
3
3
8
0
0
1
5
0
2
9
*Tax and Tags Additional
OFFER ENDS 9/18/13
USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ANNUAL
BLOWOUT
SALE!
ANNUAL
BLOWOUT
SALE!
Its the most highly acclaimed sale of the season! Dont miss out on these steller deals.
LIMITED TIME ONLY!
2010 CHEVY SILVERADO EXT CAB 4X4.........
$
26,500
*
1/2 TON LTZ
2010 JEEP WRANGLER 2WD SPORT............
$
21,500
*
2011 CHEVY SILVERADO 4X4 CREWCAB LT.
$
29,750
*
LEATHER
2013 CHEVY CAPTIVA LTZ.........................
$
21,750
*
14K MILES,4 CYL.
2010 CHEVY EQUINOX LS..........................
$
18,999
*
4 CYL.
2013 CHEVY CAPTIVA LT...........................
$
19,999
*
10K MILES,4 CYL.
2009 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT FWD.................
$
17,999
*
V-6
2010 CHEVY TAHOE LTZ............................
$
39,500
*
DVD, SUNROOF
2011 MERCEDES BENZ E350 AWD..............
$
39,999
*
10K MILES, 6 CYL.
2011 CHEVY CAMARO 2LS COUPE...............
$
19,999
*
AUTO, 6 CYL.
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT FWD.................
$
22,999
*
3RD ROW SEATING
2012 CADILLAC CTS AWD.........................
$
39,750
*
ONE OWNER, OFF LEASE
2012 CHEVY COLORADO CREWCAB 4X4 LT..
$
23,500
*
2011 CHEVY SILVERADO...........................
$
23,500
*
2010 CHEVY MALIBU...............................
$
14,800
*
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE LTZ......................
$
30,500
*
ONLY 9800 MILES
2012 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ....................
$
39,999
*
WHITE DIAMOND
2012 CHEVY IMPALA LT............................
$
17,900
*
10K MILES
2012 FORD FOCUS SE STICK.....................
$
13,999
*
ONLY 9500 MILES
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO LT CREWCAB 4X4.
$
29,999
*
6.2L V-8, LEATHER PACKAGE, WITH CAP
2010 GMC SIERRA CREWCAB SLE 2WD
$
22,999
*
2010 CHEVY AVALANCHE 4X4
SUPER CLEAN! PRICED RIGHT
$
27,999
*
2004 CHEVY SILVERADO 2500 H.D. 4X4 EXT CAB
WITH SNOWPLOW, 56K ORIG. MILES
$
16,999
*
2007 CHEVY IMPALA LS
FULL POWER,4 WHEEL DISC BRAKES
$
9,900
*
2007 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT 4X4
LEATHER, ROOF, DVD
$
19,999
*
#7565
#7568
#7569
#7574
#7557A
#7564
#13828A
#7559
#13035A
#12059A
#7550
#7552
#7548
#13585A
#13274B
#7537
#13214A
#12175A
#7518
#7513
#13444A
#13338A
#13373A
#13610A
#13849A
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 13D
Miscellaneous
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
EXERCISE machine ski/rower,
$10. Barbie books with book
bag $10. Lil Bratz comforter
$8. Melanie's mall sets $10.
Sponge Bob basketball game
$10. Pink bunny chair $5. Jazz
shoes size 5 + 6.5 $10 each.
570-696-3368
FLEA MARKET/Yard Sal e
items. Moving must go $50.
takes all 570-824-8586
FREE AD
POLICY
The Times Leader will
accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
GAZEBO 11x13 2 canvas
tops, decorative metal railing, 2
sets zippered mosquito netting
$70. 570-479-3707
GRILL George Forman holds 4
burgers $6. 2xl mens j ean
jacket $4. Purses 42. each.
VCR tapes $1. each. Box flea
market items $5.
570-735-0821
GRILLS (2) 1 with side burner
%50. 1 smoker $75, 24" moun-
tain bike $30. 570-239-2266
GYM LOCKER 7', 6 sections
each 18"Dx12"Hx10"W solid,
no dent s, $100. MOWER
Craf t sman sel f propel l ed,
needs simple minor repair $25.
40+ skeins of assorted colors,
weights & sizes, includes some
needles $35 for all. 735-5916
HANDHELD ORGANI ZER
Palm Pilot Vx with extras $29.
Cordless telephone, new bat-
tery $15. Call 570-283-2552
rick@wyomingvlley.net
J OGGI NG S T ROL L E R
Schwinn $90. Lawnmower self
propel l ed, Toro, si de di s-
charge runs good $80. Poulan
mower, side discharge, runs
good $60. After 3 pm call
570-655-3197
LCI AB 2000 pro series laser
with tripod, ro & receiver. $500.
570-388-6812
Miscellaneous
SUITCASES Samsonite, cran-
berry color, garment bag & me-
dium bag, wheeled fldable lug-
gage cart $50. 693-1454
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
MUFFLER '88 Chevy Berretta
$25. Tilted trailer handmade
49.5wx8'l, lights, new rims &
tires & spare $200. 740-1081
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
PICK YOUR OWN
RASPBERRIES
Limited number of PYO
Blackberries available
8 am to 1 pm
Closed Mon. & Thurs.
Rt. 29, Noxen
Call for availability 298-0962
WhistlePigPumpkin.com
PUNCH BOWL SET, Never
used, i n ori gi nal box. 18
pi eces, $10. 570-693-1454
PUNCH BOWL beaut i f ul l y
carved with 10 matching gob-
lets & ladle. Like new. $20.
570-332-3341
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
RECORD PLAYER Detrol a
combo record player, am/fm
radio, cassette player & DVD
player,like new asking $45.
Sauder light brown TV stand
47x28.5wx15deep $20.
570-287-1913
RIMS 4 16" alloy Toyota rims
$140. 570-945-2302
SEWING MACHINE Si nger
Vintage, cast iron, has cabinet,
works well $100.
570-862-2919
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
Miscellaneous
TOTE metal hitch tote expand-
able $50. Karaoke singing ma-
chine $50. White TV tray $10.
570-592-2549
TV Zenith 36" HDTV & stand
$75. Rust plush electric lift
chair $100. Deluxe fine china
service 8 $50. Propane gas
heater $50. Golf cart $20. 3 pc
Early American living room set,
3 tales $200. 693-3978
Musical Instruments
SPEAKER CAB Mar shal l
1960A $399. AMPEG 412
speaker cabinet $249. Call
570-283-2552 ri ck@wyom-
i ngvl l ey.net
Photo Equipment
C A M C O R D E R C a n o n
mini/DVD recorder with ac-
cessories $79. Digital camera
Kodak 3x zoom with telephoto
wide angle & close up lenses
$59. Cal l 570- 283- 2552
r i ck@wyomi ngvl l ey. net
Pools & Spas
POOL 24' round compl ete
wedding cake steps, solar cov-
er hangars ,Hayward sand fil-
ter, 3 yrs old, 1 1/2 HP Hay-
ward pump power flo 1 yr old,
Hercules pool wall & liner heat-
er, lighthouse 100,000 BTUs 7
yrs old. $650. 570-574-6953
Sporting Goods
BICYCLE boys 20" orange X
Factor Rampage $40. Very
good condition 570-675-1277
BOW PSE Stinger compound
bow, 6 new arows, hard case
& extras. Valued over $500.
Used one season asking $300.
570-823-5063
GOLF CLUBS Pi ng G15
graphite iron set, 7 clubs new
$450. 2 Ti tl ei st 60 degree
wedges $20. each. 1 Adams
sandwedge $25. Call Frank
570-262-7318
POOL TABLE 8' oak Wind-
song, 2 pc. slate, ball return in-
cludes ping pong removable
top 2 pc. paid over $2,000. sell
for $475. 570-954-1882
ROLLER BLADES 1 pai r
mens Europa model 1-221 size
12 $60. 1 pair women's Europa
size 8 $20. 570-735-1225
Stereos /Accessories
SATELLITE RADIO, XM, (1)
Delphi SA 1001 Boombox with
remote. (1) AC Adapter (also
battery operated) (1) Delphi
Receiver. In Box. $100. Leave
a message, 570-693-1454
Tools
LADDER, Gorilla Fiberglass
professional 4 in. 1,300 lb.
working load, 3' to 6' exten-
sion, like new $100.00.
570-696-2008
SNOWBLOWER sel f pr o-
pelled, used once, has bent
blade Paid $529 asking $150.
Suwanee river G scale train in
orig. box asking $200.
570-824-1031
Tools
TAPPING HEAD ATTACH-
MENT reversible, $100. 40
used & resharpened end mills
$80. 40 new taps 6/32, to 1/2
$80. 570-899-1910
Want To Buy
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES-BARRE
GOLD
(570)48gold8
(570)484-6538
Highest Cash Pay- Outs
Guaranteed
London Fix Gold Price
Sept. 4 - $1,390.00
Open 6 Days a Week
10am-6pm
Closed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
315N, 1/2 mile
before Mohegan Sun Casino
We Pay At Least 80% of the
London Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@yahoo.com
WANTED TO BUY
Old car books, brochures,
catalogs & paint chip binders.
$$Cash Paid! 570-516-2914
GET
ALL THE
ADVERTISING
INSERTS
WITH
THE
LATEST
SALES.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
PAGE 14D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 15D
PAGE 16D Saturday, September 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Air Conditioning & Heating
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all major
brands.
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME SHOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan Sun
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
www.bianepa.com
570-287-3331
Building & Remodeling
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-235-1840
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
Residential & Commercial
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, Insured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
Concrete & Masonry
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA Masonry, Inc.
Stonework - stucco -
concrete - patios - pavers -
brick - block - chimneys
www.nepamasonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-793-1391
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
Handyman
DAVE'S HANDY MAN
SERVICES
30 years experience
Full-Time-Affordable quality repairs,
Remodeling and Painting.
570-299-1127
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Hauling & Trucking
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Small Excavating New landscapes,
retaining walls/patios. Call:
570-760-4814
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups, landscaping, mow-
ing, mulching, trimming, plant-
ing. Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
Daniels Paint and Wall Covering
Lic. PA100671 & Ins.
20 YEARS EXP.
570-604-2961
danielspaintandwallcovering.com
JOHNS PAINTING
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S
ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Plumbing
D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING
Specializing in boilers,
furnaces & water heaters.
10% Sr. discount. Licensed,
insured & 24 hour service
570-793-1930
Pressure Washing
PJs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
TOM'S AFFORDABLE
Tree & Shrub Trimming
& Removal. Chipper service.
Gutter Cleaning
References available.
Free estimates. 570-814-9132
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 7, 2013 PAGE 17D
Sponsored by
GARAGE & YARD
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE SALE
AD
CALL 829-7130
TODAY
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
Yard Sale
ASHLEY ESTATE SALE
8 E. Hartford St.
Sun., Sept 8, 9am - 3pm
Furni t ure, t ool s, ant i ques,
household items. Priced to
Sell! CASH ONLY
AVOCA
1232 Main St.
ESTATE
TAG SALE
Saturday, Sept 7
8:00 3:00
An Old Clockmakers Estate
Par t i al Li st i ng: Cl ocks:
Joseph Doll Tall Case Clock
with inlaid marquetry; Antique
5 1/2 foot tall hanging oakE.
Howard, made i n Bost on;
dozens of pocket watches in-
cluding a 14KT gold and ster-
ling silver case; antique mantle
clocks; dozens of alarm clocks;
many clock cases and wrist-
watches (i ncl udi ng Mi ckey
Mouse); clock parts and mech-
anisms sold by bags. Civil
War era saber with scabbard;
many antique toys including a
cast iron Jonah and the Whale
bank; high end 6 Piece art
deco bedroom set with clear
and gol d mi rrors; 7 pi ece
carved oak kitchen set (buffet,
table and four chairs); slag
glass lamp; great antique oak
library table; antique round oak
china closet with claw feet and
carved backsplash; cherry and
mahogany occasional tables; 4
piece Victorian parlor set; circa
1880 carved Victorian ward-
robe; many prints and oil paint-
ings; antique mining items (i.e.
carbide lamps, plungers, picks,
etc.); antique railroad items
(i.e. lock, lantern, keys, etc.);
antique political items; old ad-
vertising; many pieces of an-
tique jewelry; old glassware in-
cluding Stegmaier plate, de-
pression glass, and antique
pottery; old DC comics (i.e.
Batman, Superman, etc.); old
license plates, trains, fishing
stuff including old licenses;
WWII battleship cards; many
old tools; also hundreds of
items normally found in old es-
tates. Real Estate for sale by
owner: $59,000.
BEAR CREEK TWP
340 OLD EAST END BLVD.
Sat., 9/7, 7:30am to 2pm
3 FAMILIES
Household items Little Tykes,
pi cni c tabl e, sl i di ng board,
desk, girls toddler canopy bed,
Precious Moments, Lenox, 350
engine, & more
DUPONT
GIANT OUTDOOR
FLEA MARKET
Over 50 vendors!
Country Store
Wide variety of fruits
& vegetables
Rain or Shine. All Tables
Under Tent
Food Menu Also Available
Potato Pancakes, Pierogies,
Haluski & More!
Saturday, September 7th
9am to 5pm
POLISH HARVEST
FESTIVAL
(DOZYNKI)
Sunday, September 8th
11 am to 7pm
Harvest Wreath
Ceremony & Blessing - 2pm
Polka Punch Band - 3pm
Games, Prizes
Country Store Stand
Wide variety of fruits
& vegetables
HOLY MOTHER OF
SORROWS CHURCH
212 WYOMING AVE.
CALL 655-0981
For More Information
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
ESTATE SALE
22 Laflin Road
Sat., Sept. 7, 2013
8:00-4:00
Directions: Off Main St.
Jenkins Twp.
Ent i r e Cont ent s of
House I ncl udi ng:
Lionel Trains, Living Room
Furniture, Bedroom Furniture,
Like New Futon, Lots of Nice
Glassware and Kitchenware,
Paintings and Prints, Decorat-
or Items, Wooden Handled
Gold Clubs, Like New Stair
Glide, Hand Tools, Crafts-
man Self Propelled Lawn-
mower and Much more!
This is a Nice Sale!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
HANOVER TWP.
1012 SIVELY ST
FRI. & SAT., 9-3
Legos, golf clubs, clothing,
games, books, toys, glass-
ware, & much more.
Reasonably priced.
Yard Sale
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
777 East Lake Road
Saturday, September 7
9am-4pm
Directions: Follow Rt. 115
South to Beaupland Rd. Fol-
low Beaupland Road to E.
Lake Rd, Turn Left onto E.
Lake Rd. Home is on Left.
Watch for Signs!!!
Complete Content of
Exceptional Home: Mu-
seum Quality 19th Century
Black Forest Italian Renais-
sance Heavily Carved Large
Sideboard and Buffet, Black
For est Car ved Mat i has
Bauerle Grandfather Clock,
Exquisite Italian Renaissance
Carved Desk, Pair of Antique
Heavi l y Car ved Cur ul e
Chairs, Renaissance Carved
Antique Bar Cabinet, High
Quality Red Leather Sofa &
Chai r, Si gned Bronzes by
Rudolph Kuchler, Otto Kainz,
& J. Moller, Rosenthal Tea
Set, Antique Black Forest
Cuckoo Clock, Sterling Silver,
Bronze Lamps, Black Forest
Antler Floor Basket & Gun
Rack, Ant l er Chandel i er,
Chi nese Bl ack Lacquer 3
piece Bedroom Set, Heavily
Carved Chinese Dresser, 3
piece Pine Bedroom Suite,
Wooden Table with 4 Chairs,
Two Modern Lane Recliners,
Wooden Futon, Maple Table
with 2 Benches, Tables, Kit-
chenware, Linens, Wall Art,
Religious, Cut Glass, Holiday
Decor, ESPN Pool Tabl e,
Models, Lighting, Rugs, Patio
Table Set, Simplicity Lawn
Tractor with Cart, Plus Gar-
age Contents, Tools, Out-
door Supplies, Wooden Play-
house, & Much More!!!
This is a Really Nice
Sale!!!
Sale by Wm. Lewis
www.wvestates.com
DALLAS
ESTATE SALE
224 Church Street
Sat. Sept. 7, 9-3
Entire Household Furnish-
ings of a clean, well main-
tained home. Antiques-Vic-
torian Ornately Carved Chairs
with Needle Point Seats- Vic-
torian Sofa, Marble Top Ta-
ble, Mahogany Games Table,
Marquetry Inlaid Round Ta-
ble, Stack Oak Barrister
Bookcase, Blanket Chest,
1920s Walnut Bedroom and
complete American Drew
Bedroom Set, Reverse
painted table lamp, dining
room set, Large pastel
Tapestry, Flo blue, Depres-
sion cut and Amber glass,
older Christmas Collectibles,
tools etc. and other general
household.
Sale conducted by:
Dick and Nancy Jayne
Indian Hill Antiques,
Laceyville, PA.
DALLAS
7 FAMILIES
562 HUNSTVILLE RD
SAT., 9/7 8AM-2PM
DALLAS
Gigantic Garage Sale
90 Monroe Ave.
Sat., Sept 7, 9-3
Selling contents of a lovely Es-
tate,Two blocks behind Disque
Funeral Home. Modern and
vintage furniture for bedroom,
dining room, living room and
nursery. Household items in-
cluding lamps, water cooler,
small appliances, china, glass-
ware and wall decor. All holi-
day items including Halloween,
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and
Easter. Artificial flowers and
plants. Vintage sewing ma-
chines, clothing, and cook-
books/books. Table and bed
linens, candles, playing cards,
toys, games, videos. All items
priced to sell.
First Assembly of
God Church
EYM Flea Market
Join us on Sat., Sept. 7th for
the First Assembly of God
Evidence Youth Ministry
Community Flea Market. We
will also be hosting a FREE
CAR WASH (donations ac-
cepted) and selling hot dogs,
water, and snacks.
When: Sat., Sept. 7
Time: 9-2
Where: First A/G Parking Lot
424 Stanton St,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
*Rain or Shine*
Yard Sale
DALLAS
HOUSE SALE
35 PHEASANT RUN
OFF IREM ROAD
SAT., 9 to 4 pm
Baldwin spinet piano, 9 pc.
Danish dining room, sofa bed,
TVs, & stands, chairs, tables,
bedroom furniture, wall units,
microwave, lamps, computer
desk, tea cart, entertainment
centers, pictures & frames,
Royal Dalton china, books,
jewelry, Pierco beekeepers
honeycomb unit, water cooler,
linens, kitchen items, glass
ware, golf clubs, CDs, DVDs,
Star wars, Nintendo, designer
clothes, shoes, purses, bikes &
carrier, skis & boots, gas
mower, 24' ladder, lawn
spreader & more!
DALLAS
YARD SALE
SEDLER RD
Corner of Campground Rd. &
Upper Demunds Rd.
SATURDAY
SEPT 7
10AM-5PM
NO EARLIER
I t ems i ncl ude: Ant i ques,
Pampered Chef, gun cabinet,
bedroom sui t, ki tchenware,
baby items, designer purses,
child race car bed. Must See!
Rain date: 9-14-13
DUPONT GARAGE SALE
204 Elm. Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-4
Tools, trains and accessories,
toys, books and something for
everyone!
DURYEA
STRAWBERRY LANE
BLUEBERRY HILLS
SAT., SEPT 7th ,9-2
MULTI FAMILY SALE
Fitness equipment, children's
toys, books and lots more!
EXETER
JUPITER MOON
STUDIOS ANTIQUES
250 PEPE COURT
Sat., 9/7, 9am-1pm
ESTATE FINDS
Vintage & modern, furniture,
1950's stove/oven & more!
EXETER
811 SCHOOLEY AVE.
Wyoming Ave to Schooley Ave
past Highland Manor
Sat & Sun 9.7 & 9.8
8 am until ?
FORTY FORT
YARD SALE
42 Bedford St.
Sat, Sept. 7th, 9-3
FORTY FORT
YARD SALE
305 River Street
Sat., Sept 7th, 8-1
Costume j ewel ry, cl othi ng,
pur ses, househol d, baby
equipment, books & clothes.
FORTY FORT YARD SALE
73 W. Pettibone Street
Sat. & Sun., Sept. 7 & 8, 9-3
NO EARLY BIRDS!
Pro Form treadmill, washer &
dryer, antiques, family clothing,
housewares, tools, end tables,
toddler toys, purses, leather
jackets, new boxed gifts, elec-
t roni cs, new 5. 8 Mot orol a
phone system, 5' family bar.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
In Hanover Green
7 Zack Street
Sat., & Sun., 8-3
Girls clothing 18-24 Months,
some adult clothing, house-
hold items, custom wheels and
tires, set of 4, pool table car
seats strollers and baby items.
Hanover Twp. Liberty Hills
237 Constitution Avenue
Sat. & Sun. 9-3
Furniture, household items, lots of
kids items, clothing & more.
HARVEYS LAKE
HUGE YARD SALE
19 Beaumont Hill Road
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 6 & 7, 9-1
Cleaning out! Household, fish-
ing equip, tons of sports col-
lectibles and cards, Barbies,
Breyer horses, Die cast, an-
tiques, bikes, wooden swing
set, treadmill, home gym.
HUNLOCK CREEK
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Thorny Apple Acres
& Neighbors
Rt 29, 1/2 mile from Moon
Lake, Fri. & Sat. 8-3
Wrought iron patio set, ce-
ment mixers, household, mis-
cellaneous, some free items.
Look for bal l oons on mai l -
boxes.
KINGSTON
202 Zerby Ave.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2
Many Great Finds for
Men and Women!
KINGSTON
327 Rutter Ave.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2:30
Glassware, lamps, lamp
bases, dishes, jewelry, picture
frames, garden tools, quart
canning jars, luggage, old
Flexible Flyer sled, stained
glass shade and more!
Yard Sale
KINGSTON
584 Warren Ave.
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-1
Talbot's clothing size 12.
Vests, slacks, blouses, skirts,
winter and summer. Volvo car
mats. New never used
Weathertech $115, now $60.
Some collectibles. Artwork, art
supplies, some jewelry, garden
pots and household items.
KINGSTON
93 East Bennett. St.
Sat. & Sun., 8-2
Books; art, novels, Bio, Philo-
sophy, Twin Bed, Antiques,
Large plants, M.K. Rolling Tote.
KINGSTON
MULTI FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
16 Seneca Place
Sat., Sept 7, 7-3
Dresser, espresso make, oth-
er small furniture, linens, baby
gear, strollers, toys, games,
scrap booking supplies, new
health & beauty, kitchenware,
books, clothes, shoes.
KINGSTON
32 W. Walnut St.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8 to 1
Everything reasonably priced,
most items under $1.
Rain Date, Sat., Sept. 14.
KINGSTON
57 S. GOODWIN AVE
SAT., 9/7 9AM-3PM
WESTMOOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
FLEA MARKET
LUNCH AVAILABLE
KINGSTON
EAST BENNETT ST
COMMUNITY
SALE
SAT., 9/7, 8am-1pm
KINGSTON
ESTATE SALE
118 West Dorrance Street
4 pc. mahogany bedroom
set, 7 pc. mahogany dinette
set, drop leaf kitchen set,
small appliances, pictures, 2
pc. living room set (blue),
glassware, recliner & much
mor e! House i s Sol d,
Ever yt hi ng Must Go!
Sale by Marva
KINGSTON
Rear of 57 Sharp St.
3 FAMILY SALE
SAT,. 9/7 7am-noon
Houseware, tools, baby items
KINGSTON
YARD SALE
44 w. Walnut Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
Ladies winter coats, Hess
trucks, household & more.
Cheap Prices!
KINGSTON
YARD SALE
54 Academy Lane
Sat, Sept. 7, 8-11
Sporting goods, bikes, DVD's,
Li f e & Spor t s I l l ust r at ed
magazines, other household
items. No Early Birds!
LUZERNE
740 BENNETT ST
SAT., 9/7, 8AM-1PM
GREAT STUFF CHEAP!
Clothing for adults, kids &
babies. Lots of DVDs, VHS,
toys, baby gear, much more!
LUZERNE
749 N WALNUT ST
SAT., 9/7, 9AM-2PM
MULTI FAMILY
Household, movies & more!
LUZERNE
MULIT FAMILY YARD SALE
840 BENNETT STREET
Sat, Sept. 7, 8-2
Exercise & stereo equipment,
CD's, books, clothes, house-
hold & holiday items, 18' above
ground pool. Something for
Everyone!
LUZERNE
MULTI FAMILY YARD
SALE
890 Bennett Street
Sat., Sept 7, 9-1
Girl's toys, baby, craft sup-
plies, fabric, rustic country
decor, multi-colored camo,
tools, DVD's, fishing rods.
MINERS MILLS
YARD SALE
147 St. Clair Street
Sat., Sept 7, 9-2
Granite wine bar, stroller, toys,
household items & much more!
MINERSMILLS
307 EAST MAIN ST.
SAT 9/7 & SUN 9\8
8AM TO 2PM
Electric scooter, girl's bike, TV,
ceramic Christmas decora-
tions, girl's & boys clothing,
household items, everything
priced to sell!
Minners Mills
188 & 190 Miller Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2
Kids clothes, Sears Hard Side
Luggage Carrier, Non-foldable
tables, portable TVs and More!
PLAINS
33 WARNER ST. Sat., 8-4.
HH items, antique cedar chest.
Dale Earnhardt die cast cars,
toys. Something for all!.
Yard Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
(Nuangola)
ESTATE SALE
625 Deer Rack Drive
(Laurel Lakes)
Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013
9:00-4:30
Directions: From 81 S take
Nuangola exit R on Van Ave.
to R on Aspen to L on Deer
Rack.
Entire Contents of
Home:
Beautiful Mahogany Dining
Room Set, like new living
room Furniture, Bedroom Fur-
niture, like new Recliner
Chairs, Oak Kitchen Set,
Fancy Antique Upright Piano,
Nice Glassware, Large
Pfaltzgraff Dinnerware Set,
Quality Kitchenware, Many
designer items, loads of Holi-
day, some Vintage. Lots of
Craft Supplies, Mountain
Bikes, Lots of Nice Lawn
Statuary, Lawn and Garden,
hand Tools and Much More!
This is a great sale!
CREDIT CARDS
ACCEPTED!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
MOUNTAIN TOP
31 Park Lane North
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-1
Assorted household items.
MOUNTAIN TOP
10 WASHINGTON BLVD.
COMMUNITY
GARAGE SALE
Sat., 9/7 & Sun 9/8
STARTS 8AM
Tools, furniture, garden tractor,
new faucets & door knobs, 2
sink vanity, clothes, several
families.
MOUNTAIN TOP
2 Garage Sales
9 & 11 Colony Drive
(Walden Park)
Sat., Sept. 7, 8 AM
Furniture, toys, clothes and
Much More!
MOUNTAIN TOP
912 Beaver Trail
Laurel Lakes
Sat., 9/7, 9am-2pm
Sun., 9/8, 9-12
Baby items, household items,
Dale Earnhardt Sr. memoribil-
ia & more.
MOUNTAIN TOP
GARGAE SALE
24 Brook Lane, Briarbrook
Sat., Sept 7th, 9-1
New items, glassware, house-
hold, 20 pies of ribbon & much,
much more!
MOUNTAIN TOP
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
11 Orchard View Lane
Summit Meadow Estates,
across from Fire Hall
Tons of girl's & boy's designer
clothes, shoes, coats, women's
clothing, Power Wheels Jeep,
baby items, housewares, gui-
tar, games, toys, Something
For Everyone!
MAYFIELD
ESTATE SALE
329 DELAWARE ST
SAT., 9/7, 8AM TO 3 PM
ENTIRE CONTENTS OF
HOME
MOUNTAIN TOP
Woodland Estates
220 Fairwood Blvd.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-3
Kitchenware, Leather Living
Room Set, Lawn Mower, Tele-
vision, Christmas Tree, Christ-
mas Ornaments, Christmas
Decorations, Home Interiors
Decorations, Tools, Girl Tod-
dler Clothes & Toys. Games,
Puzzles, Used High End
Bowling Balls & other Items.
MT. TOP NUANGOLA
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
630 Nuangola Road
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
Kitchen chairs, books, DVD's,
jewelry & lots more!
NANTICOKE
Multi-Vendor Sale!
147 E. Main St., Former
Bartuska Furniture Bldg.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
Vintage furniture, baby boy
clothes, holiday decor, dishes
& glassware, adult jeans, beer
trays & signs, HO trains, col-
lectibles & much more!
NANTICOKE
3 EAST NOBLE ST
MULTI FAMILY SALE
SAT. 9/7, 7:30am- 2pm
Toys, boys & girl's clothes all
sizes, household, items,
Halloween costumes, video
games & more.
PITTSTON
YARD SALE
156 Williams Street
Sat., Sept 7th, 9-3
Girl's clothes, shoes & boots,
winter coats, toys & bike &
much more!
Yard Sale
NANTICOKE
Honey Pot Section
Garage Sale
132 Garfield Street, across
from playground
Fri & Sat, 6 & 7 8-3
Sharke steam mop, (NIB), tow-
els, curtains, household, holi-
day items, clothes & more!
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
AGOSTINA DRIVE
COMMUNITY YARD SALE
Sat., Sept 7, 9-1
Lots of Great Stuff!
PITTSTON
GARAGE
SALE
351 South Main Street
Sat & Sun., Sept 7 & 8, 8-4
Appliances, furniture, clothing
tools, boat, electric motors,
doors & windows. Too Many
Items to List! Rain or Shine.
PITTSTON TWP.
HUGE GARAGE SALE
110 Sterling Street, off Oak St.
Sat., Sept 7th, 8-2
Furniture, home decor, house-
hold, clothes, games & much,
much more!
PITTSTON
YARD SALE
12 Curtis Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-3
Adult & kid's bikes, tools, cloth-
ing, housewares, printer, large
fi sh tank, basketbal l back-
board & net, 3 seat wooden
rocker, toilet, computer desk,
golf bag & clubs & much more!
PLAINS
104 Powell Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-2
Kids clothes 0-4T, stroller
system, toys, electric guitar
and much more!
PLAINS
Multi-Family Garage Sale!
15 Skidmore Street
Sat. & Sun 9/7 & 9/8
9am to 3 pm
Motorcycle, tools, housewares,
furniture, hand-made jewelry,
etc. RAIN OR SHINE.
Plains Township
Indoor/Outdoor 3 Family
Sale 130 Jason Drive
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-Noon
Women and Men's designer cloth-
ing, 2 TVs, DVDs, small furniture,
Holiday Decorations, Outdoor Fur-
niture, & Some Free Items!
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
166 North Main St.
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-4
bedroom suit, rocker, tables,
collectibles, household and
Much Much More!
PLYMOUTH
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Rear 40-42 ACADEMY
Sat & sun, 7 & 8, 9-4
Furniture, small appliances,
tires, back packs, tents, cloth-
ing, baby items & much more!
PLYMOUTH
ROAST CHICKEN
DINNER
First Reformed Church
33 Willow St.
Sat., Sept. 7th, 3-6
$8 ADULTS/$4 CHILDREN
Take Outs Available
PLYMOUTH
231 Nottingham Street
Saturday, September 7
8:30 AM to 4:00 PM
Large amount of indoor
decorations for Halloween,
Christmas, Easter, etc. We
also have jewelry, watches,
houseware items, toys and
games. If you were here
before then you know the
real deals are on the hill
It all has to go.
PITTSTON
St. John's
Lutheran
Church
7 Wood Street
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Pig Roast
Sat., Sept. 7, 2013, 3-6 p.m.
Games, Raffles and Theme
Baskets
TICKET PRICES:
$20 with Beer
$15 with Soda
Kids: $10 (Ages 6-10)
Under 5: Free
CONTACT:
JoeMerc10@aol.com
Subject Box: Pig Roast, or
leave a message
570-655-2505
TICKETS-QUESTIONS
DIRECTIONS
WILKES-BARRE
YARD SALE
54 Penn Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-3
Tools, furniture, lamps, pic-
tures, tapestry, electronics,
CD's, curtains, blinds, house-
hold, rugs, jewelry, printers. No
Early Birds! 970-8065
Yard Sale
SCRANTON
/GREENRIDGE
ESTATE SALE
2223 Capouse Avenue
Sat & Sun, Sept 7 & 8, 9-6
Entire contents of a 4 floor
home & back & front yard
owned by former collectors,
dealers & national artists.
Sale includes beautiful an-
tiques, Depression, Deco,
vintage, retro, modern & col-
lectibles. Furniture, porcel-
ai n, cryst al , Depressi on
etched & other glassware,
china, Rosenthal, Haviland,
Limoges, Belleek, Francis-
can, Lenox, Asian, Bavarian,
Fenton, Lefton, decorative,
this artist wall art & other
wall art, lighting, house &
cookware, utensils. Jewelry,
religious, curtains, bedding,
carpeti ng, cl othi ng & ac-
cessories, cameras, video,
electronics, stereo, speak-
ers, copier, heaters, air con-
di t i oners, vi ol i ns, CD' s,
DVD' s, t apes, r ecor ds,
stands, cabinets (office & kit-
chen), drafting tables, book
shelves, Christmas, season-
al, crafts, books, (art & oth-
er), collectors vintage bi-
cycles, patio furniture. lawn
& garden, garden art, bird
baths, handicapped metal
ramps, snow blower, freezer,
tools, electric & other, power
washers, industrial reserve
gasoline tank with cradle,
brass filler & events & much
much more! 1,000's of items
in this home, you will need
time to get through it. Fab-
ulous Sale, Don't Miss! DIR:
81 S. to exi t 188 toward
Dunmore, turn left onto N.
Bl akel ey St., ri ght on W.
Drinker St., W. Drinker St.
becomes Electric St. Turn
right on to N. Washington
Ave. turn left on to Grand-
view. Take 2nd right onto
Capouse, house is just past
Woodlawn St. Take 81 N. to-
wards Dunmore & Car-
bondale, exit 186 Drinker St.
toward Dunmore, turn left on
to E. Drinker St., E. Drinker
St. becomes Electric St, turn
right on to N. Washington
Ave, turn left on to Grand-
view. take 2nd right on to
Capouse Ave, house is just
past Woodlawn St.
SHAVERTOWN
38 Harford Avenue
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2
Twin poster bed, tools, toys,
glassware, some antiques,
holiday, weight bench, lawn
mower and Much More!
SHAVERTOWN
28 E. Meadows St.
Chase Manor
Sat., Sept. 7th, 9-4
Lamps, tools, DVD player,
Household items, ceramics,
holiday items, much more!
SHAVERTOWN
126 Hillcrest Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
309 to E. Center to
Goeringer to Hillcrest.
SHAVERTOWN
YARD SALE
112 LINCOLN DRIVE
Sat., Sept. 7th 9am-3pm
bedroom set, kitchen table with
4 chairs, buffet/hutch, 2 love
seats, play set & more
SLOCUM TOWNSHIP
565 Lily Lake Road
1 Mile from Mud Pond, Look
for Green Signs!
Fri.,7-7 & Sat., 7-Noon
WILKES-BAARE
YARD SALE
111 West River street
Sat., Sept 7th, 9-3
Tabl es, chai rs, el ectroni cs,
jewelry, toys & clothes (wed-
di ng gown), househol d &
much, much more!
WILKES-BARRE
YARD SALE!
252 S. Sheridan St.
Off Empire Street
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 6 & 7, 8-3
Antiques, household, furniture,
yard, clothing & much more!
WILKES-BARRE
45 Division Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-3
Advertisements, baby furniture
& clothes, collectibles, exer-
cise equipment, games, beer
memorabilia, toys, furniture
and hundreds of items!
WILKES-BARRE
Garage Sale
167 Laird Street
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 6 & 7, 8-3
Household items, furniture,
better clothes & much more!
WILKES-BARRE
MOVING SALE
14 Tenbrook Street
Sat., Sept 7, 8-12
Furniture, appliances, tools,
clothing and More!
813-731-9277
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
250 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd.
Across from Applebees
near carlot
Sun. Sept. 8, 8:30AM-2pm
F U N N I E S SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA