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WILKES-BARRE, PA MondAy, SEPtEMBER 9, 2013 50
6 09815 10011
A NEWS: Local 3A
nation &World 4A
obituaries 6A
Editorial 7A
Weather 8A
SPORTS: 1B
CLASSIFIED: 1C
CLICKS: 1D
Birthdays 2d
tV/Movies 3d
Puzzle 5d
Comics 6d
InsIde
DUCK, DUCK, EAGLE: Coach Chip Kelly is
moving up in the bird world. He used to be a
non-aggressive waterfowl fromOregon; now
hes a talon-wielding bird of prey fromSouth
Philly. Figuratively, of course. Kelly debuts
tonight as head coach of the Philadelphia
Eagles with a matchup against the Wash-
ington Redskins. Eagles fans are hoping he
can bring that same high-powered attack
he concocted as coach/ofensive guru of
the Oregon Ducks. Well fnd out at 7 p.m.
on ESPN.
ODD BODKINS: This just in, Wednesday is
Odd Day. Now, before you go out and wear
a watermelon on your head or take up the
ukulele and start singingTiptoe Through
the Tulips, remember its not THAT kind
of odd. Odd Day celebrates a numerical
holiday on which three consecutive odd
numbers make up the date. There was
Jan. 3, 2005 or 1/3/5, the next was March
5, 2007 (3/5/7) and so on. And so, this
Wednesday is 9/11/13 the second last
Odd Day of the century. Celebrate as you
wish. But if it does involve a ukulele, do it far
away fromme.
THEY HAVE TO PUSHTHE PRAMA LOT:
Theyre not knights of the round table,
although they dance whenever theyre able.
They do routines and chorus scenes with
footwork im-pecc-able. They dine well here
on North Main Street, they eat hamand jam
and put on the playSpamalot! OK, that
was bad, but if you want to hear that song
done well, check out the Little Theatre of
Wilkes-Barres presentation of the Monty
Python-inspired musical. Shows are going
on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and at 3
p.m. Sunday. It is a silly place, and youll
want to go there.
LIL COOKERS: Conventional wisdomholds
if you let kids loose in a kitchen youll end
up with Pop-Tarts soup or chocolate-
favored baloney. Plus, youll get a
mess that makes the old West
Side Landfll look like
Disneyland. But
lets not be so
pessimistic. The
Young Chefs Acad-
emy has declared
that Friday is Kids Take
Over the Kitchen Day
a day to let your
little Mario Batali
help plan and make
dinner. See, if they
trust the kids in the
kitchen, so should you.
BUT WAIT THERES MORE: Do you
like music? And cars? Then, youd
probably enjoy an event called
theMusic and Motors festival,
wouldnt you? Well, Montage
Mountain is willing to take that
one better. This Sunday, theyll
be putting onMusic, Motors
and More On The Mountain.The
all-day event features a host of
bands, including area favorites
The Badlees, a classic car
showand an ethnic food
festival and craft show.
(That would qualify as the
more.) Tickets are $10.
THINGS
YOU NEED
TO KNOW
THIS WEEK 5
In it to spin it
Is it possible nASCAR gafe was
intentional?
SPORTS, 1B
School spirit, down on the farmand a day at the fair
CLICKS, 1D
Hey, good lookin
JennIFeR LeARn-Andes
jandes@timesleader.com
Tens of thousands of residents
protected by the Wyoming Valley
Levee can breathe easier because
the federal government has repaired
most of the damage the system sus-
tained while holding back record-
setting Susquehanna River ood
water two years ago.
Ofcials had been relying on tem-
porary repairs until the work was
completed, though they had repeat-
edly stressed the 15-mile levee sys-
tem would still perform as required
in a ood.
Weve been doing signicant
work along the Wyoming Valley
Levee, and all is going very well.
Weve completed the majority of
the work, said U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers spokeswoman Ashley W.
Roberts.
The most signicant repair was
Repairs to levee nearly complete
Millions spent refortifying the
Valleys protection
times Leader file photo
Workers tend to a leak in the levee at the Forty Fort soccer fields during
the flooding in september 2011. The leak was one of several problems that
arose as the result of record river levels.
JOn OCOnneLL
joconnell@timesleader.com
WYOMING Pilot Joe
Scrobola banked over the
Susquehanna River, turning
back toward the airport.
See those two posts? Were
going to have to get right
between them, he crackled
over his headset.
He tossed a grappling hook
from the cockpit and started a
steep descent toward the grassy
eld, only to shoot skyward
after passing over the posts.
A gentle tug on the 1995
Husky aircraft let him know
his rst attempt at catching a
banner advertisement from its
docking posts succeeded.
We got it, he said with an
air of satisfaction.
Valley Aviation at the
Wyoming Valley Airport offers
aerial advertising, towing ban-
ners with messages up to 50
characters long.
They charge $350 per hour
with discounts for longer
ights. They also y graphic
banners on request.
PHILIP eLLIOTT
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
White House asserted
S u n d a y
that a
c o m -
m o n -
s e n s e
test dic-
tates the
S y r i a n
g o v e r n -
ment is
responsible for a chemi-
cal weapons attack that
President Barack Obama
says demands a U.S. mili-
tary response.
But Obamas top aide
says the administration
lacks irrefutable, beyond-
a-reasonable-doubt evi-
dence that skeptical
Americans, including law-
makers who will start vot-
ing on military action this
week, are seeking.
This is not a court of
law. And intelligence does
not work that way, White
House chief of staff Denis
McDonough said during
his ve-network public
relations blitz Sunday to
build support for limited
strikes against Syrian
President Bashar Assad.
The common-sense
test says he is responsible
for this. He should be held
to account, McDonough
said of the Syrian leader
who for two years has
resisted calls from inside
and outside his country to
step down.
Asked in another
interview about doubt,
McDonough was direct:
No question in my mind.
The U.S., citing intel-
ligence reports, says the
lethal nerve agent sarin
was used in an Aug. 21
attack outside Damascus,
and that 1,429 people
died, including 426 chil-
dren.
The number is higher
than that, said Khalid
Saleh, head of the press
ofce at the anti-Assad
Syrian Coalition who was
in Washington to lobby
lawmakers to authorize
the strikes. Some of those
involved in the attacks
later died in their homes
and opposition leaders
were weighing releasing
a full list of names of the
dead.
But Britain-based
Syrian Observatory for
Solid proof
on Syria
still sought
White House says it has
no doubt of chemical
attack, but skepticism
stilll remains
Aimee dilger photos | the times Leader
Joe scrobola looks over the instrument panel in Valley Aviations 1995 Husky at the Wyoming Valley Airport in Wyoming. The craft is a versatile plane bought
for towing ad banners.
Messages blowin in the wind
dAVId B. CARUsO
Associated Press
NEW YORK They
werent exposed to any-
where near the same level
of ash, grit and fumes, but
emergency workers who
rushed to the Pentagon
and the Pennsylvania
countryside on 9/11 are
signing up for the same
compensation and health
benets being given to
New Yorkers who got sick
after toiling for months
in the toxic ruins of the
World Trade Center.
Federal ofcials say at
least 91 people who were
at those two crash sites
have applied so far for
payment from a multibil-
lion-dollar fund for people
with an illness related to
the attacks. That includes
66 people who fought res
and cleaned up rubble at
the Pentagon and 25 who
responded to the wreck-
age of United Airlines
Flight 93 in Shanksville,
Pa.
Those numbers are
minuscule compared with
the more than 24,000 re-
ghters, police, construc-
tion workers and others
who applied for compen-
sation in New York after
developing illnesses pos-
sibly linked to long hours
spent in ground zeros
constant res and drifts of
9/11 responders
far fromNYC
seekpayments
As their summer break ends, Congress
will confront Mideast and domestic matters
See SYRIA | 8A
See 9/11 | 8A
See FLOOD | 5A
Zach scrobola coils rope for a 300-foot grappling hook the pilot will use to
catch the banner.
edITORs nOTe: Second of a
two-part series examining how
Luzerne County has coped since
the 2011 food.
Banner towing a high-fying art for family
FLOOd OF 2011: 2 YeARs LATeR
See PILOT | 5A
Obama
PAGE 2A Monday, September 9, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DETAILS
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILYNUMBER - 5-6-7
BIG4 - 7-3-2-5
QUINTO - 2-9-0-6-2
TREASURE HUNT
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EVENING DRAWING
DAILYNUMBER - 9-3-7
BIG4 - 2-8-0-4
QUINTO - 2-2-9-3-8
CASH5
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Two players matched all
fve numbers in Sun-
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drawing, each receiv-
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jackpot will be worth
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Lottery ofcials reported
158 players matched
four numbers, winning
$261.50 each; 6,359
players matched three
numbers, winning $11
each; and 76,577 players
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winning $1 each.
No player matched all
fve numbers in Satur-
daysPowerballjackpot
drawing. Wednesdays
jackpot will be worth
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The numbers drawn
were: 02-19-22-26-45
Powerball: 24
OBITUARIES
Baker, WilliamJr.
Bereznak, Robert
Bolita, Eleanor
Ciavarella, Bertha
Kreseski, Ann
Mooney, Holly
Schwartz, Leah
Simoncavage,
Thomas
Page 6A
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BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the newsroom at 829-7242.
THE TIMES LEADER ACIVITAS MEDIAcompany
SUSAN BETTINGER
Times Leader Correspondent
WILKES-BARRE
Assistant professor of biol-
ogy Linda Gutierrez told 120
undergraduate and graduate
students at Wilkes Universitys
2013 summer commencement
ceremony on Sunday that
dreams can come true, even
the unreachable.
The future is in the hands
of the strong, Gutierrez, a
native of Venezuela who earned
her postdoctorate fellowship at
Yale, said.
Gutierrez added a personal
story about how experts told
her there was no way that she
would receive funding for a
research project she needed
grants for. They told her she
was wasting her time.
Gutierrez replied to them, I
will write anyway.
She did, and received the
necessary funding.
She nalized her address to
the graduates by saying when
something seems impossible,
dare to dream, and it will come
true.
Gutierrez received the
2013 Carpenter Award for
Distinguished Teaching. The
honor was partly based on
Gutierrezs inclusion of under-
graduate students while con-
ducting extensive research in
inammatory bowel disease
and colorectal cancer.
Ashley Keath, of Lebanon,
Pa., received her masters of
science in education degree.
Keath, who teaches fth
grade at the Eastern Lebanon
County School District, stud-
ied under the satellite learning
program.
She said her goal is to nd
alternative ways to reach stu-
dents who are below grade
level. Keath added she may
also return to Wilkes for her
doctorate.
University President Patrick
F. Leahy told the graduates
that commencement is a new
beginning and not an ending.
He also said he wanted them
to remember two main objec-
tives.
The rst is gratitude; to
always express gratitude to all
those who helped them to get
to this day. The second is that
dreams give life meaning.
Leahy concluded with a quote
by Albert Einstein, noting
Imagination is more important
than knowledge.
Heather Taylor, of Piedmont,
Ohio, completed her second
year at Wilkes, and received
her master of arts in creative
writing.
Taylor said she will be back
here (at Wilkes) next year at
this same time to receive her
masters in ne arts degree.
Taylor currently runs the
writing center at Bethany
College in West Virginia. This
degree completes one of her
teaching tracks. Taylor also
made a seven-hour drive back
to Ohio in order to accompany
her mother to the ceremony.
Paget Taylor said she is very
proud of her daughter.
Barbara Di Caprio, of
Mahopac, N.Y., received her
bachelor of science in nurs-
ing from the one-year nursing
program. Di Caprio said she
will now be going home to nd
a job, hopefully in the eld of
oncology.
Di Caprio said Wilkes is a
great school and noted she
also earned her bachelor of sci-
ence in biology there in 2012.
Dawn DAries-Zera of Forty
Fort received her master of
ne arts in creative writing and
quoted Pulitzer Prize winner
Norman Mailer, stating Our
family is a ne tapestry that
must be taken care of, in order
not to unravel.
DAries-Zera said the stu-
dents, family, friends, faculty
and administration are the
tapestry and all are needed to
hold the work together.
DAries-Zera reminded the
graduates to keep your head
above water, and focus on your
goal.
Bill Tarutis | The Times Leader
Master of fine arts degree recipient Dawn DAries-Zera, of Forty Fort, offers
greetings during the Wilkes University summer commencement in Wilkes-Barre
on Sunday afternoon.
Wilkes grads told dreams come true
POLICE BLOTTER
WILKES-BARRE Police Saturday
said a follow-up investigation of a theft on
July 30 resulted in the ling of charges
of providing false identication to law
enforcement and receiving stolen prop-
erty against Amy Marcinkiewicz, 34, of
North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre.
HANOVER TWP. Police reported
the following:
Barbara Vahey of Little Street said
someone spit on her 1992 BMW 535I
while it was parked near her residence
Thursday.
Cari Safriwe of Harrison Street said
she received four harassing and threaten-
ing phone calls between Monday night
and Tuesday morning. Police are inves-
tigating.
Charles Jackson and Joseph Mazuka
Jr. of Spring Street said a 32-inch Element
LCD television and cash were among the
items stolen early Thursday morning.
The men said a woman known to them
is the suspect.
Kandia Collins of Dexter Street said
a Garmin GPS and change were stolen
early Saturday from her unlocked 2006
Chevrolet Trailblazer.
HAZLETON Police reported the
following:
Richard Wyatt-Kotsko, 23, of
Hazleton, was taken into custody on a
warrant around 4:45 p.m. Sunday by
police on foot patrol in the area of Laurel
and Broad streets. He was wanted for
failure to appear in court on burglary,
criminal trespass and other charges.
A residence in the 400 block of
East Diamond Avenue was burglarized
between 5 p.m. Thursday and 2:15 p.m.
Sunday. Appliances and several items
were stolen.
A door at a residence in the 100
block of East Noble Street was damaged
in an attempted burglary around 3 a.m.
Sunday.
The railroad trestle in the area of
South Church and Noble streets was
spray painted between 8 p.m. Saturday
and 7 a.m. Sunday.
Property at the Diamond United
Methodist Church, 519 N. Locust St. was
damaged over the last several weeks.
Anthony Polchek, 35, of Kelyares,
and David Meshofski, 35, of Drums,
were charged with possession of drug
paraphernalia after police responded to
a ght possibly involving a gun shortly
before 2 p.m. Saturday in the area of
Laurel Street and Diamond Avenue.
Polchek also was wanted by state parole
and was transported to the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility.
Police are investigating a reported
hit-and-run that occurred between Friday
night and Saturday morning. A 2001
Chevrolet Impala was struck while it was
parked in the area of South Poplar and
East Chestnut streets.
FOSTER TWP. State police are
investigating a burglary at the residence
of Roy Lee Dalton, 30, Main Street,
Upper Lehigh. A at-screen television, a
Sony PlayStation and an electronic tablet
were taken in the burglary that occurred
between 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Friday.
HANOVER TWP. The state police
Bureau of Liquor Control Enforcement
conducted age compliance checks at
licensed businesses in Lackawanna and
Luzerne counties between 5 p.m. and 10
p.m. Friday. Of the eight licensed busi-
nesses checked, three were not in compli-
ance.
The license holders in compliance
were: P&H Inc., doing business as The
Riverside Cafe, Wilkes-Barre; James
J. Januzzi, doing business as Januzzis
Pizza, Wilkes-Barre; Pittston Six Packs
to Go LLC, Pittston; Joanne M. Davis,
doing business as Mrs. Ds, Scranton; and
Scanlon Inc., doing business as Dunmore
Deli, Dunmore.
Donors eligible for prize
that includes race tickets
STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
LONG POND Pocono Raceway
is teaming up with the American Red
Cross to host its Eighth Annual Blood
Drive on Thursday in remembrance of
those impacted by the terrorist attacks
of Sept. 11, 2001.
Pocono Raceway will also sponsor
20 satellite blood drives across Eastern
Pennsylvania on Sept. 12 and Sept. 13.
As a thank-you to those who sup-
port this remembrance blood drive,
Pocono Raceway is giving all present-
ing donors (regardless of location)
the chance to win a Fantasy Race
Package.
The winner will receive four
Terrace Club seats and will meet all
the NASCAR drivers on stage during
the opening ceremony of the 2014
GoBowling.com 400.
There will also be other exciting
give-a-ways, including race tickets and
Sunoco gas cards.
Everyone who attends the event can
take part in a Ride for the Red event
and take a ride around the Pocono
Racetrack with their own vehicle for
a $10 donation (per lap). All dona-
tions benet the American Red Cross
Disaster Fund. Ride for the Red will
run noon to 6:30 p.m.
Blood Donors can participate in
Ride for the Red before donating
blood. But attendees do not have to
donate blood to participate in the
Ride for the Red.
To make an appointment to donate
blood, call 1-800-RED CROSS (733-
2767) or visit: www.redcrossblood.org
and enter sponsor code: POCONO.
Individuals who are at least 17 years
old (16 with parental permission),
weigh at least 110 pounds and are in
generally good health may be eligible
to donate blood.
High school students and donors
18 years old and younger also have
to meet certain height and weight
requirements.
Donors will be required to present
Red Cross blood donor cards or anoth-
er form of positive ID when they offer
to donate blood. Walk-ins are welcome.
Blood drives to commemorate 9/11
Driver dies
of injuries
fromcrash
Downed plane
discovered in
Susquehanna
County feld
Times Leader staf
HANOVER TWP. - Police said Adam
Slamas, 28, of Warrior Run and Fort
Meyers, Fla., died from injuries suffered
in a two-vehicle crash on Middle Road late
Saturday night.
The crash occurred around 10:50 p.m.
near the intersection with Tanya Drive,
police said.
Police said the other driver, Melissa
Roberts, 28, of South Hanover Street,
Nanticoke, was transported by ambulance
to a local hospital.
Police said Roberts was traveling north
on the roadway in a Jeep and Slamas was
traveling south in a Mazda. The drivers
were alone in their vehicles that sustained
severe damage and were towed from the
scene, police said.
The crash is under investigation.
The Associated Press
LENOX TWP. The burned remains
of a small plane missing since Labor Day
has been found in a eld in Susquehanna
County.
The National Transportation and Safety
Board says two people were believed to
have been onboard the Cessna T-50.
NTSB spokesman Peter Knudson said
the plane took off last Monday in Sandusky,
Ohio, destined for Wilkes-Barre.
State police say the plane was found
at about 10:30 a.m. Sunday in Lenox
Township, about 40 miles north of its des-
tination.
Knudson did not have any immediate
information on the pilot or passenger.
Newsroom
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AREA GRADUATES
Wilkes University awarded 374 doctoral, masters and bachelors
degrees at its summer commencement ceremony Sunday.
Area graduates included:
Michele Brague of West Wyoming; Jocelyn Holodick-Reed of
Nanticoke; Robert Antinozzi of Drums; Ryan Arcangeli of Mountain
Top; Geofrey Bell of Bear Creek; Sherry Bereznak of Conyngham;
Swati Bhardwaj of Wilkes-Barre; Carla Cain of Hazleton; and Ryan
Chlubicki of Wyoming.
Kimberly Cooney of Sweet Valley; Maureen Devine of Harveys Lake;
Marrissa Fedor of Hanover Township; Jennifer Ferro of Ashley;
Michael Fox of Nanticoke; Michael Galli of Swoyersville; Trilby
Greene of Kingston; Daniel Haddle of Wilkes-Barre; and Andrew
Hanadel of Swoyersville.
Jonathan Juka of Bear Creek Township; Gopu Kiron of Wilkes-Barre;
Edward Kopec of Kingston; Stephen Lucas of Drums; Zachary
Lukashefski of Wanamie; Kellie Matthews of Mountain Top; Jillian
Michaels of Forty Fort; Dana Miller of Kingston; and Diana Neglia of
Larksville.
Christopher Plaviak of Mountain Top; Laura Recene of Shickshinny;
Crystal Richardson of Wilkes-Barre; Bill Schneider of Edwardsville;
Shikha Sharma of Dallas; Jessica Staufer of Drums; Mohammed
Tharwan of Kingston; Tracy Toole of Hanover Township; and Jason
Wagner of Kingston.
Alyssa Waugh of Nanticoke; Sara Weron of Nanticoke; Dawn Zera
of Forty Fort; Suliman Alhojairi of Kingston; Margarite Carter of
Nanticoke; Stephen Castrignano of Hanover Township; Deborah
Chielli of Dallas; Suzanne Ciarcia of Wilkes-Barre; and Giovanna
DiBlasi of Hazleton.
Alyssa Elmy of Wilkes-Barre; Ryan Keiser of Wilkes-Barre; Sarah
Kennelly of Trucksville; Victoria Kishbaugh of Shickshinny; Amanda
Kowalek of Wyoming; Amie McNunis of Wilkes-Barre; Erica
Naperkowski of Ashley; and Erica Whitebread of Forty Fort.
LOCAL BLOOD DRIVES
Today:
Pocono Raceway, Long Pond Road,
Long Pond
Veterans Afairs Medical Center,
Liberty Hall, 1111 East End Center,
Plains, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
University of Scranton John Long
Center, Linden Street, Scranton, 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Nescopeck VFWSocial Hall, 435 W.
Third St., Nescopeck, 1 to 6 p.m.
Scranton Red Cross Donor Site, 3 W.
Olive St., Scranton, noon to 6 p.m.
First General Services Bloodmobile,
31 Ruddle St., Wilkes-Barre, noon to
5 p.m.
Tuesday:
Red Cross Blood Center Wilkes-
Barre, 29 NewCommerce Blvd.,
Ashley, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Scranton Red Cross Donor Site, 3 W.
Olive St., Scranton, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The Mall at Steamtown, Aeropostale
Storefront, 300 Lackawanna Ave.,
Scranton, 1 to 6 p.m.
Hazleton Red Cross, 165
Susquehanna Blvd., West Hazleton,
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
LOCAL
HAZLETON
Duo robs cab
driver with knife
A cab driver Sunday told police she
was robbed at knife-point by a man
and woman around 2:10 p.m. in the
area of 17th and James streets. The
driver was not injured.
She described the robbers as a
white male, 6 feet tall, 160 pounds,
with blond hair and a crew cut and
wearing jeans; a white female, 5 feet,
6 inches tall, 160 pounds, auburn hair
in a bun and wearing a purple top
and jeans. Anyone with information
is asked to contact Hazleton police at
570-459-4940.
WILKES-BARRE
Program marks
food anniversary
The Disaster Recovery Coalition of
Luzerne County will mark the two-
year anniversary today of the ood-
ing caused by Hurricane Irene and
Tropical Storm Lee.
The coalition, made up of non-
prot and faith-based organizations,
government entities and foundations,
will hold a program 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
at the Luzerne County Emergency
Management Agency, 185 Water St.
LONG POND
Racetrack allows
laps for charity
For the second year in a row Pocono
Raceway will host the Drive the
Triangle event to benet the United
Way of Monroe County on Sept. 18
and 19.
For a donation of $10 per lap driv-
ers will have the opportunity to take
their personal vehicles around the
2.5-mile raceway between 1 p.m. and
7 p.m. each day.
This event is rain or shine. For
more, visit www.poconoraceway.com/
trackdrive13.
SCRANTON
Bishop to honor
religious community
Bishop Joseph C. Bambera of the
Diocese of Scranton will celebrate
the contributions of sisters, bothers
and priests in religious communities
with a Mass at 2 p.m. Sept. 15 in the
Sette La Verghetta Performing Arts
Center on the campus of Marywood
University.
A reception with light refreshments
will follow in the Latour Room of
Nazareth Hall.
WILKES-BARRE
Leadership taking
applications for fall
Leadership Wilkes-Barre is accept-
ing applications for its Fall 2013
Executive Leadership Wilkes-Barre
program designed for executives who
are new to their position, new to the
region or executives who would like
to get reacquainted with our commu-
nity.
The program consists of six dinner
sessions, every other Monday from
Sept. 23 through Dec. 9. Tuition is
$1,500 per person and spouses are
welcome and encouraged to partici-
pate at no additional charge.
This falls program includes execu-
tives from Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs, Geisinger Wyoming Valley,
The Commonwealth Medical College
and Wilkes University, Huntsville Golf
Club, Penn Foster, Commonwealth
Health, and Medico Industries.
For more information , call 823-
2101 ext. 135 or visit www.leader-
shipwilkes-barre.org. Application
deadline is Thursday, Sept. 19.
WEST PITTSTON
Retailer launches
its mobile website
Online retailer igourmet LLC
has launched it mobile website,
m.igourmet.com. The company said
25 percent of its trafc comes from
smartphone users, yet less than 2 per-
cent of total sales come from mobile
visitors.
The site, developed in-house, was
launched in time to prepare for the
fourth-quarter gift basket season, the
company said. The next step is to
develop another version of the site
for larger format electronic tablets,
the company said.
IN BRIEF
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 3A
Luzerne County Manager Robert
Lawton has publicly issued a request
for proposals seeking a professional
recruiter to nd applicants for the
three remaining division head posi-
tions overseeing budget and nance,
human services and operational ser-
vices.
Interested recruiters must submit
proposals by Sept. 24.
According to the request, the cho-
sen search rm must work with the
county to develop desired quali-
cations, necessary experience and
recommended compensation for the
three positions and then provide a list
of qualied candidates to the county
within 45 days.
The proposal projects the rm will
be seeking applicants between Oct.
11 and Nov. 15, which means a new
budget and nance division head
would not be hired before the upcom-
ing 2014 budget process. Senior
accountant Brian Swetz has been
serving as interim budget/nance
head since June.
A newly created
election ofce deputy
director position pay-
ing $35,000 has been
posted on the career
opportunities section
of the county website,
www.luzernecounty.
org.
County Controller
Walter Mitchell is
examining how money
is withdrawn from the
sheriffs ofce prisoner
transport fund in light of a former
employees recent removal of $375
from the fund.
The fund is supposed to cover tolls,
gas and other miscellaneous expens-
es. Mitchell said he wants to deter-
mine if additional checks and bal-
ances are warranted to prevent theft.
Don Lasoski resigned as sheriff
lieutenant after acknowledging he
took the cash for a personal issue
with plans to repay it before anyone
noticed. Another worker performing
a routine check detected and report-
ed the missing money.
Council will meet at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the council meeting room
at the courthouse.
The agenda includes a vote by
council to initiate litigation against
D.A. Nolt Inc., seeking compensa-
tion for water damage to the court-
house interior in September 2011.
The Berlin, N.J.-based contractor
handled waterproong of the court-
house domes, which involved strip-
ping worn coating off the domes
terra cotta tiles and applying a new
protective coating. The water dam-
age occurred while the tiles were
stripped.
The administration will update
council Tuesday on banking consoli-
dation plans. Home rule called for a
reduction in the countys 70 to 100
bank accounts, and the administra-
tion sought proposals seeking one
banking institution.
Final approval of an ordi-
nance calling for a minimum 37.5-
hour county work week also is on
Tuesdays agenda. The switch to
more hours must be negotiated
into union contracts as they expire.
Lawton has said he will reduce staff
to compensate for the increased cost
paying some employees to work
more hours.
Councilman Harry Haas pro-
posal to hold a security summit on
crime also will be discussed Tuesday.
Haas cancelled a summit he had
scheduled last week after some coun-
cil members said he didnt obtain
authorization from council to hold
the event.
The latest property assess-
ments have been loaded into The
Times Leaders free online data-
base. The searchable database may
be accessed using the tax assess
icon near in the most popular box
at www.timesleader.com.
Recruiter to fll countypositions sought
Restored Church event features
prayer, scripture reading and
music
CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
WILKES-BARRE An open can of
Monster energy drink sat next to a dog-
eared Bible in the corner of a wooden
pewinthe former First UnitedMethodist
Church on Sunday.
The drink seemed out of place in an
already high-energy environment, but
the Bible was one of many in the hands of
nearly 400 people who came to the grand
opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony
at the new Restored Church on Public
Square on Sunday.
As they cheered a Christian rock band
with whistles and hoots, worshippers of
all ages and backgrounds sang along to
contemporary gospel music.
Alternating between prayer, scripture
reading and music, pastors Tim Walker,
24, and Dan Nichols, 25, explained what
the Restored Church is all about to the
attentive crowd.
If youre here and you feel broken and
cant bear it any longer, I have great news
for you, said Nichols. There is hope in
Jesus Christ. Jesus is the real deal and he
can radically change your life, but it takes
faith and understanding.
Lacey Payne, who oversees Restored
Kids, a program for children from infant
to 10 years old, told of her journey to
accept Jesus in her life. Raised as a
Methodist in the tiny town of Springville,
Payne says she stopped going to church
in high school and lived for me.
At the urging of a cousin, Payne said
she started by praying for her uncle who
had a heart attack and another cousin
who was killed in a car accident during
the summer of 2010. That was when she
attended one of the Restored Churchs
rst gatherings at another Springville
home.
Her initial fears of being judged were
dissolved when she met Walker and
Nichols. Choking back tears, Payne said
accepting Jesus has changed her life.
Ive just grown so much being a part
of this church, the young woman said.
Its changed the way I live. My life has
purpose, hope and faith.
Joanne Dougherty, 55, of Wilkes-
Barre, said she rst heard Walker preach
two years ago, when she was a volunteer
at the Wyoming Valley Rescue Mission,
a spiritual outreach program at the
Sherman Hills Apartment Complex.
The truth of the gospel is preached
here in an amazing way, said Dougherty,
noting she has been a born-again
Christian for 25 years.
In addition to Sunday services at the
church on Franklin Street, The Restored
Church holds several smaller, two-hour
house services duringthe weekinWilkes-
Barre, Mountain Top and Forty Fort.
Were here to tell you the truth
because we love you and we love this
city, said Nichols. We want everyone in
this city and world to have hope again, to
have freedom. We are in a broken, fallen
city that desperately needs hope.
More information about the Restored
church, including house church locations
can be found at www.restoredchurch.org.
Bill Tarutis/For The Times Leader
Members of the worship team sing a hymn during the inaugural service of the Restored Church in Wilkes-Barre on Sunday morning.
Receiving a message of hope
Americas frst settlers adapted cooking with the times
EILEEN GODIN
Times Leader Correspondent
FORTY FORT Imagine
following a recipe calling for
a portion of butter the size of
an egg or a small handful of
our. These were once com-
monplace cooking directions,
said Mary Babcock.
Babcock, a registered dieti-
tian, presented Colonial
Cooking, Foods, Recipes
and Cooking Equipment
on Sunday at the Forty Fort
Meeting House. This free lec-
ture is the rst in a series of
three the Forty Fort Meeting
House Preservation Fund
committee will hold this fall.
Babcock, from Laurel Run,
has been a dietitian for 52
years. She said when she rst
started researching colonial
cooking she found a lot of
information and needed to
focus on one aspect.
I decided to focus on veg-
etables and fruits because
Americans still do not eat
enough to this day, she said.
Starting with the rst
settlement in Jamestown in
1650, Babcock said, the set-
tlers were familiar with red
beets, cabbages, lentils and
potatoes, which they had in
Europe. In America, they
found corn, squash in the
form of pumpkins and lima
beans.
This meant they had to
adapt and learn how to pre-
pare these foods to survive.
With the lack of modern
conveniences, settlers dried
many of their foods in order to
preserve them. This method,
she said, removes the vitamin
C, so illnesses such as scurvy
became a problem.
About 50 percent of the
settlers died of malnutrition
and sickness, she said.
Pumpkins today are mostly
eaten as pumpkin bread or
pies. Back then, they were
eaten as a vegetable to sur-
vive. Pumpkins were very
abundant, she said. Their
vines would help protect the
soil.
In the northeast, grains
such as wheat did not grow
well, so corn and rye were the
primary grains used, Babcock
said.
Eating corn on the cob was
not done back then, she said.
Their teeth were too weak
to eat it off the cob. Instead
the corn would be grounded
down to make breads, Johnny
Bread, succotash, corn meal
mush and Indian Corn Sticks.
Honey or maple syrup were
the sweeteners available then.
Babcock said the original
recipes for corn bread never
called for sugar. Even today,
many New England recipes
for corn bread are sugarless,
she said.
Throughout her research,
a common thread found were
that the directions for cooking
vegetables all stressed cook-
ing them just long enough so
the natural color was not lost.
If the color is lost and the
vegetable is soft not crisp, the
vitamins are gone, she said.
We should follow this
advice now, Babcock said.
The cooking equipment
during colonial times was
mainly a cast iron kettle held
over a re with a tripod or a
bee-hive-shaped brick oven.
The only running water
was from a creek, she said.
To prepare the oven for
baking, Babcock said, colo-
nialists would line the oor
of the oven with bark, then
lay kindling over that and
then some leaves. She said
she read the oven was to be
lit and left to burn for two
hours before use.
Since temperature gauges
were not invented yet, cooks
of the time tested to see if
their ovens were hot enough
by sticking their arms in to
see if the hair on the arm got
singed, she said.
Fred Adams/For The Times Leader
Mary Babcock lectured Sunday at the Forty Fort Meeting House on colonial
cooking. She said she decided to focus on the use of fruits and vegetables
during colonial times, things that people still do not get enough of today.
Jennifer
Learn-
Andes
County
Notebook
Forty Fort Meeting
House hosts frst of three
scheduled lectures
PAGE 4A Monday, September 9, 2013 NATION & WORLD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DELAWARE TWP., N.J.
While his eighth-grade class-
mates took state standard-
ized tests this spring, Tucker
Richardson woke up late
and played basketball in his
Delaware Township driveway.
Tuckers parents, Wendy
and Will, are part of a small
but growing number of par-
ents nationwide who are
ensuring their children do not
participate in standardized
testing. They are opposed to
the practice for myriad rea-
sons, including the stress they
believe it brings on young stu-
dents, discomfort with tests
being used to gauge teacher
performance, fear that corpo-
rate inuence is overriding
education and concern that
test prep is narrowing cur-
ricula down to the minimum
needed to pass an exam.
Imjust opposed to the way
high-stakes testing is being
used to evaluate teachers, the
way its being used to dene
whats happening in class-
rooms, said Will Richardson,
an educational consultant
and former teacher. These
tests are not meant to evalu-
ate teachers. Theyre meant to
nd out what kids know.
The opt-out movement, as it
is called, is small but growing.
It has been brewing for sev-
eral years via word of mouth
and social media, especially
through Facebook. The Long
Island opt-out info Facebook
page has more than 9,200 mem-
bers, many of them rallying at
a Port Jefferson Station, N.Y.,
high school last month after a
group of principals called this
years state tests and their
low scores a debacle.
In Washington, D.C., a
group of parents and stu-
dents protested outside the
Department of Education.
Students and teachers at a
Seattle high school boycotted
a standardized test, leading
the district superintendent to
declare that city high schools
have the choice to deem it
optional. In Oregon, students
organized a campaign per-
suading their peers to opt
out of tests, and a group of
students in Providence, R.I.,
dressed like zombies and
marched in front of the State
House to protest a require-
ment that students must
achieve a minimum score on a
state test in order to graduate.
For many parents and stu-
dents, there have been few to
no consequences to opting out
of testing. Most parents are
choosing to take their young-
er children out of testing, not
older students for whom it is
a graduation requirement. Its
unclear if things will change
when the Common Core
Curriculum and the standard-
ized tests that will accompany
it are implemented in the
2014-15 school year.
Some states were granted
waivers for No Child Left
Behind, which requires dis-
tricts to have at least 95 per-
cent of students participate in
standardized testing or be at
risk of losing funding.
Maria Ferguson of the
Center on Education Policy
said she thinks the practice of
parents pulling their kids out of
standardized tests is symbolic.
I think it shows that peo-
ple are very scared and very
confused by tests, she said.
I think its representative
that testing has a branding
problem.
Michael Yaple, a spokesman
for the NewJersey Department
of Education, said about 98
percent of New Jersey stu-
dents take standardized tests.
Keeping a child home from
testing does no favor to the
child or the school, he said.
Morna McDermott, a
Baltimore college professor
who is a board member of
United Opt Out, likens the
battle against standardized
testing to a ght for corporate
reform.
Ultimately this is an
act of civil disobedience,
McDermott said. If this is
going to change, it has to fun-
damentally be grassroots.
PINE BLUFF, Ark.
107-year-old
killed by police
A 107-year-old man was killed after
SWAT ofcers shot back at him during
a standoff at a home, police in the south-
eastern Arkansas city of Pine Bluff said
Sunday.
Police were called to the home
Saturday afternoon about a disturbance
and say ofcers arrived to nd Monroe
Isadore had threatened two people by
pointing a weapon at them.
Ofcers had the pair leave the home
for their own safety and approached
a bedroom looking for Isadore. When
the ofcers announced who they were,
Isadore shot through the door at them
but missed hitting them, said Pine Bluff
Lt. David Price in a news release.
The ofcers retreated to a safer area,
and supervisors and additional help were
called, Price said. Supervisors started
negotiating with Isadore and continued
after SWAT ofcers arrived at the home
about 45 miles southeast of Little Rock.
The SWAT team inserted a camera
into the room and conrmed Isadore
was armed with a handgun, Price said.
NOrWALk, CONN.
Kids plunge on
fair ride; 13 hurt
Authorities say a swing ride at a fes-
tival in Connecticut lost power and sent
children falling to the ground, injuring
13 of them.
Police said Sunday most of the chil-
dren suffered minor injuries and were
treated Sunday at the Oyster Festival
in Norwalk, but several were more seri-
ously hurt and rushed to local hospitals.
Their conditions arent available.
The ride starts on the ground and
sends swings into the air. Authorities
say it lost power and the children in the
swings fell to the ground. It wasnt clear
how far off the ground they were when
they fell.
Police say the festival remains open
but all rides are closed.
Norwalk police have called in the state
re marshals ofce to investigate.
CAIrO
Gunships attack
Sinai militants
Smoke billowed in the sky as
Egyptian helicopter gunships rocketed
suspected Islamic militant hideouts in
the lawless northern Sinai Peninsula
for a second day on Sunday, killing 11
suspected ghters as part of the largest
military offensive in the region in years,
military ofcials said.
They say the assault aims to drive
out al-Qaida inspired groups from sev-
eral villages of the restive border region,
where militants have established strong-
holds and stockpiled an unprecedented
amount of weapons.
Also Sunday, a militant group in north-
ern Sinai allegedly claimed responsibility
for a failed assassination attempt on the
countrys interior minister last week.
MAIDUGUrI, NIGErIA
Attack kills at least
18, wounds 17
An attack by suspected Islamic sect
members on a town guarded by a vigilan-
te group in northeast Nigeria on Sunday
killed at least 18 people and injured 17,
residents and a government ofcial said.
The attack in Benisheik, 45 miles
west of Maiduguri, the birthplace of the
Boko Haram network, took place days
after the military said it killed at least 50
insurgents in an area to the north.
Zannah Fannami, a 27-year-old opera-
tive with the Civilian Joint Task Force
vigilante group, said its members were
attacked while awaiting Boko Harams
approach on the town.
He said the vigilante group, which
formed to ght the Boko Haram net-
work, was able to kill ve of the Islamic
sect members and take possession of four
AK-47 ries.
AP photo
Fashion all the rage in NYC
The DKNY Spring 2014 collection is modeled
Sunday during Fashion Week in NewYork.
More opt out of standardized tests
KATIE ZEZIMA
Associated Press
Newfles may
detail sex abuse
in Scouts
MINNEAPOLIS
Condential les turned over
for a lawsuit set to go to trial
in Minnesota may shed new
light on the problem of sexual
abuse within the Boy Scouts of
America.
The documents were pro-
duced in litigation brought
against the Boy Scouts and a
former scoutmaster, Peter Stibal
II, who is serving 21 years in
prison for molesting four Scouts.
Attorneys for one former Scout
won a court order for the nation-
wide internal les, commonly
known as ineligible volunteer
or perversion les. They cover
the years 1999-2008, much more
recent than similar les forced
into the open in an Oregon case
last year.
We are intending to use those
to show they have had a long-
standing knowledge of the scope
of a serious problem like Stibal,
said Jeffrey Anderson, the lead
attorney for the molested Scout.
They kept les not known to
the troops and members of the
public and had a body of knowl-
edge that was not made public.
Anderson, who built a national
reputation for frequent lawsuits
in clergy abuse cases, declined
to say what the new documents
might show ahead of the trial
that begins Monday in St. Paul.
He said he expects attorneys for
the Scouts to try to block the
introduction and release of the
les. He wouldnt say how many
former leaders the les cover.
But the release of more than
1,200 les in the Oregon case
suggests the number could be
large.
An attorney for the Scouts
did not return messages seeking
comment. The Scouts public
relations director, Deron Smith,
said in a prepared statement that
protecting Scouts is of para-
mount importance to the orga-
nization, which claims over 2.6
million young people and over 1
million adult leaders as members
in its various branches.
The BSA requires back-
ground checks, comprehensive
training programs for volun-
teers, staff, youth and parents
and mandates reporting of even
suspected abuse, Smith said in
the statement.
He didnt say whether the
Scouts would try to block release
of the les, but said the organi-
zation believes keeping them
private would make people more
likely to report abuse.
In the Oregon case, Boy Scout
les made public from the years
1965-1985 revealed a decades-
long cover-up, showing that men
suspected of abuse were often
excluded from leadership posi-
tions but rarely turned over to
law enforcement. The les also
contained accounts of alleged
pedophiles allowed to stay in
Scouting under pressure from
community leaders and local
Scouting ofcials.
Patrick Boyle, who as a
journalist was among the
rst to expose efforts by the
Scouts to hide the extent of
abuse by their leaders, said
the les could show how the
Boy Scouts evolved in their
response to abuse allegations
over the years or didnt.
STEVE KARNOWSKI
Associated Press
GROVELAND, Fla. In the ve
weeks since he declared his support for
a comprehensive immigration overhaul,
U.S. Rep. Daniel Webster has gotten an
earful.
One constituent told the second-term
Republican that immigrants carry dis-
ease. Another said immigrants would
steal jobs away from Americans.
You cannot stop illegal immigra-
tion by rewarding it, another man said
at a recent town hall-style meeting in
Groveland, a rural community west of
Orlando. Amnesty is a reward.
As Congress returns to work this week
after its summer break, Webster faces
perhaps an even tougher crowd: fellow
Republicans.
Webster is among about two dozen
GOP lawmakers who support an even-
tual path to citizenship for millions of
people who are living in the U.S. illegally.
These Republicans are facing the daunt-
ing challenge of trying to persuade col-
leagues to follow them.
Most Republicans oppose this
approach on citizenship, and there is lit-
tle political incentive for them to change
their minds. Only 24 of 233 Republicans
represent districts where more than
one-quarter of their constituents are
Hispanic.
Even so, some in the Republican Party
argue that its future hinges on whether
the House nds a way to embrace an
immigration overhaul, which is a crucial
issue for the countrys fast-growing bloc
of Hispanic voters.
Supporters of a path to citizenship
point to demographic changes and busi-
ness backing that have helped sway
Webster, who for years opposed immi-
grant-rights legislation, as potential
motives for wavering lawmakers to sign
on.
I think as a country we need to do
something, Webster said in an inter-
view, echoing the rhetoric of Florida
Sen. Marco Rubio and other prominent
Republicans. Doing nothing is amnes-
ty.
The small but growing band of
Republicans is trying to strike a balance
between conservative activists who want
border security and immigration advo-
cates who want a path to citizenship.
Many come from swing districts with
sizable Hispanic populations that could
make a difference in next years elec-
tions, tipping the balance of power in
the GOP-controlled House. The lawmak-
ers also feel the pressure from business
interests that rely on immigrant labor.
At the same time, conservative taxpay-
er groups who typically fund GOP pri-
mary challenges have remained largely
silent on immigration. Anti-immigration
activists have failed to organize large-
scale demonstrations or generate the
kind of public backlash that killed
Congress last attempt to remake immi-
gration policy, in 2007.
Immigrant advocates, on the other
hand, have waged a well-funded, aggres-
sive campaign to push for the legislation.
Congresspeople who may have been
on the fence are realizing its safe to get
in the water, said Ana Navarro, a GOP
strategist who led Hispanic outreach for
Sen. John McCains presidential cam-
paign in 2008. There is safety in num-
bers.
Political analysts said reluctant House
members should take note of the coun-
trys changing demographics.
According to research by Tom Wong,
a political scientist at University of
California, San Diego, who studies
the politics of immigration, six House
Republicans will see their margin of vic-
tory in last years election eclipsed in
2014 by the number of Hispanics and
Asians who reach voting age. More than
a dozen others, including Webster, will
experience similar changes over the next
decade.
AP photo
Republican Rep. Daniel Webster, R-Fla., has gotten an earful from his constituents, and as he returns to Washington this week, he faces an even
tougher crowd: fellow Republicans.
GOPbandpushes immigration
MICHAEL J. MISHAK
Associated Press
GOP NYC mayor hopefuls spar in last debate
NEW YORK The top
two Republican candidates
for New York City mayor
debated Sunday for the last
time before the party primary
on topics including the New
York Police Departments pol-
icies and the citys handling
of the emergency response on
9/11.
In the often testy debate,
former public transit chair-
man Joe Lhota accused gro-
cery store magnate John
Catsimatidis of being a bil-
lionaire businessman with
no government experience.
Catsimatidis countered that
Lhota was a bureaucrat out of
touch with New Yorkers.
Ive served in govern-
ment in different ways that
I choose not to talk about,
said Catsamatidis. Ive
also served in the (Greek
Orthodox) church, and if you
talk about church politics,
thats much worse than New
York City politics.
Catsimatidis described
Lhota as more of a techni-
cal person, contrasting that
quality with what he called
his own visionary capability.
Ive been a CEO for 44
years, and I am used to hiring
people to perform technical
tasks. Ive hired hundreds of
people with the qualications
of Joe, he said. He added,
But you need a visionary,
you need somebody that cre-
ates.
Lhota has had a consistent
leadinpolls over Catsimatidis,
who blanketed the airwaves
with ads in recent weeks.
Low Republican turnout is
expected in Tuesdays pri-
mary in a city where regis-
tered Democrats outnumber
Republicans by 6 to 1.
The two men traded barbs
and expressed exasperation
during heated exchanges,
with Lhota often shaking his
head as Catsimatidis spoke.
VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press
AP photo
Candidates for mayor of NewYorkJoe Lhota, left, andJohn Catsimatidis
participate in a debate, Sunday in New York.
IN BRIEF
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 5A
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section of the levee
behind the Forty Fort
Cemetery that was heav-
ily damaged.
This section had to
be reinforced with sand-
bags and several hundred
tons of rock and dirt in
September 2011 to plug
boils, or paths under the
levee that jeopardized its
stability.
Tri-State Design/
KC Construction Co. of
Elkins Park, which was
hired by the Army Corps,
removed the temporary
ll and replaced it with
ll that was properly
graded and compacted,
Roberts said.
The company also
repaired macadam along
the river side of the Forty
Fort ood wall and vis-
ible cracks that formed
in the levee concrete cas-
ing in this area, Roberts
said. The concrete casing
is more aesthetic because
the primary ood control
comes from hidden inter-
locked sheet pile driven at
least 30 feet in the ground,
ofcials have said.
The Army Corps also
completed a similar ll
removal and replacement
on levee boils that erupt-
ed at several other loca-
tions during the record
ood, including the coun-
ty recreational complex
near the Wyoming Valley
Airport in Forty Fort,
the Midway Shopping
Center in Wyoming, The
Laurels nursing home
in Kingston, at the end
of Fellows Avenue in
Hanover Township and
several spots in Plymouth.
The $2.4 million in
work also included
repairs to pump stations,
a diversion channel, cul-
vert and a relief well col-
lection system, Roberts
said.
Flood gate testing
The x for the portable
Market Street Bridge
ood gates that leaked
in 2011 ooding will be
tested the weekend of
Sept. 27.
Water pressure blew
out sections of the gates
rubber gasket seals on
both the Kingston and
Wilkes-Barre sides, forc-
ing crews to dump tons
of rock against the clo-
sure panels, which still
vibrated.
The Army Corps is
awaiting delivery of new
gaskets that are expected
to provide a more water-
tight seal where the
closure panels meet the
road, Roberts said.
The guide plates that
hold the panels in place
also will be modied
because they were too
long, causing the bot-
tom panels to sit off the
ground. That gap pre-
vented the panels from
putting weight on the
gaskets to keep them in
place, ofcials said.
The Army Corps also
must complete additional
repairs to several pump
stations. This work must
be handled in stages
so the stations remain
operational at all times,
Roberts said.
While pump stations go
largely unnoticed by the
public, they are as crucial
to preventing ooding as
the levee. The stations
are located where a lot of
water drains fromthe land
into the Susquehanna,
including creek outlets.
When the river rises,
gates are closed at these
drainage outlets so the
more forceful river water
cant escape.
The pump stations have
deep water wells to col-
lect the drainage since it
can no longer naturally
feed into the river. The
stations pumps lift the
collected water up over
the levee wall and dump it
onto concrete aprons into
the Susquehanna.
Weve gone in to each
station to make sure every
piece is operating at 100
percent, Roberts said.
Other repairs
Other non-levee ood
damage repairs are also in
the works.
County ofcials recently
approved the spending of
$10 million in federal ood
recovery funding to cover
lingering road, sewer and
other infrastructure dam-
age in multiple municipali-
ties caused by Hurricane
Irene and Tropical Storm
Lee in 2011, including
West Pittston, Shickshinny
and Plymouth Township.
Duryea Mayor
Keith Moss said the
state Department of
Environmental Protection
is close to seeking bids
to enhance the boroughs
levee.
The Lackawanna River
feeds into the Susquehanna
by the borough, and the
Lackawanna had nowhere
to drain in September 2011
because the Susquehanna
was so high, which caused
ooding of 139 low-lying
properties.
The state is spending
$1.77 million to repair the
existing levee and add pil-
ing to ll a gap in the dike.
Hopefully, they will
get started on that work
in October or November,
Moss said.
From page 1A
Flood
Pete G. Wilcox/The Times Leader
A bicyclist enjoys his trip along the Wyoming Valley Levee trail Sunday in Forty Fort.
From page 1A
Pilot
The Scrobolas make
running the county-
owned airport a fam-
ily affair. Just about
everyone prepping for
Saturdays banner ight
had the same last name.
Assembling the banner
took four young pilots
about 25 minutes.
They y a lot of per-
sonal messages, happy-
birthday wishes, con-
gratulatory messages for
college graduates and an
occasional marriage pro-
posal.
Dorothy Scrobola, who
is known around the tar-
mac as Gram, said one
such customer was suc-
cessful in winning his
bride.
Advertisers crow over
the exclusive advertising
avenues response, said
Jim Scrobola, the air-
ports caretaker. Luzerne
Bank noted a rise in new
customers in the days
after they ew a ban-
ner past Mohegan Sun
Casinos Party on the
Patio, Jim said.
Commercial pilot Ed
Topper of Nanticoke got
the Scrobolas banner-
towing enterprise off the
ground.
Topper earned his
pilots license towing ads
along the Jersey Shore
and got to know the busi-
ness.
He taught the Scrobolas
how to set up the ban-
ners, what kind of plane
was best for pulling them
and, most important, how
to catch them with a grap-
pling hook.
He was always friends
with the Scrobola family
and now he offers guid-
ance for Valley Aviations
aerial advertising.
We started the opera-
tion last June and it really
took off, Topper said.
No pun intended.
After connecting the letters of the banner Zach 16, Joe and Ian Screbola get it ready to lay out in the
field for pick up. Each letter is attached with 8 straps on each side.
Joe Scrobola brings down an advertising banner in his plane.
Aimee Dilger photos | The Times Leader
Joe Scrobola grabs an advertising banner with a rope and grappling hook attached to his 1995 Husky. Once up in the air, he throws out
the rope and flies as low as 10 feet from the ground to snag the banner.
We started the operation last June and it really took off.
No pun intended.
Ed Topper Commercial Pilot
PAGE 6A Monday, September 9, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477 80022591
ANGELELLA - Magdalene,
funeral Mass 11 a.m. Sept. 21
in Prince of Peace Parish, St.
Marys Church, West Grace
Street, Old Forge. Friends may
call 10:30 a.m. until Mass.
KOZEMKO - Dolores, funeral
8:45 a.m. today at Wroblewski
Funeral Home Inc., 1442
Wyoming Ave,, Forty Fort. Mass
of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m.
FuNErALs
LEAH KLOTT
SCHWARTZ, of Binghamton,
N.Y., formerly of Exeter,
died Sunday in Bridgewater
Nursing Home, Binghamton.
Graveside funeral
arrangements are being
nalized for Tuesday at
a time to be announced.
Arrangements are by
Rosenberg Funeral Chapel,
348 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre.
For more information, visit the
funeral home website at www.
rosenbergfuneralchapel.com.
WILLIAM L. BAKER JR.,
90, formerly of Mountain Top,
passed away on Wednesday at
Fellowship Manor, Whitehall.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N.
Main St., Ashley.
ELEANOR D. BOLITA,
96, formerly of Plains, died
Wednesday at Elderwood Health
Care, Riverwood, N.Y.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains.
ObituAry pOLicy
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral home representative can
call the obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email, please call to confrm. Obituaries
must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in
the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory, or must name who is handling
arrangements, with address and phone number.
rObErtr. tiNObrEZbErEZNAK
Sept. 5, 2013
Robert R. Tino Brez
Bereznak, 61, of Drums,
passed away late Thursday
evening at Abington Memorial
Hospital, Abington.
Born in Hazleton, July 24,
1952, he was the son of the
late Nicholas and Frances
(Marshlick) Bereznak and
spent most of his life in Drums.
He did, however, spend some of
his younger years in Germany
and Kentucky, and also spent
some time in Hughesville.
Brez, along with his wife,
Diane, was a Social Club
Manager and Caretaker at
Highland Lake Manor Social
Club, Hughesville, and Valley
Regional and Butler Township
re companies. He had also
previously worked as a chim-
ney sweep for Cherry Ridge
and Mr. Chips Chimney
Services.
He was a life member of the
Butler Township Fire Company.
He was also a member of the
Highland Lake Manor Social
Club and the Sons of the VFW.
He enjoyed hunting, NASCAR
and football, especially the
Miami Dolphins.
He was preceded in death,
in addition to his parents, by a
brother, Frank.
Surviving are his wife, the
former Diane Shelhamer, to
whom he would have been mar-
ried 18 years on Sept. 23, how-
ever, they had been together
for 29 years; two sons, David,
Ebervale, and Brian, Hazleton;
a granddaughter, Cambria;
two sisters, JoAnn Eckrote,
Hazleton, and Nicholene
Kokiko and her husband,
Andrew, Drums; three broth-
ers, David and his wife Judi,
Fort Worth, Fla.; Paul and
his wife, Patrice, Powhatan,
Va.; and Michael and his wife,
Deena, Tomhicken; and many
nieces and nephews.
His funeral will be held at
11 a.m. Wednesday at Harman
Funeral Homes & Crematory
Inc. (East), 669 W. Butler
Drive, Drums. Burial will fol-
low in Drums Community
Cemetery. Friends may call
from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at the
funeral home.
In lieu of owers, memo-
rial donations can be made to
Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333
Cottman Ave., Philadelphia,
PA 19111-2497, or online
at www.fccc.edu. Harman
Funeral Homes & Crematory
Inc. (East), 669 W. Butler
Drive, Drums, is assisting the
family with the arrangements.
Online condolences can be
entered and more information
is available at www.harmanfu-
neral.com.
in St. Nicholas Church, 226 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
NEArE - Ray Sr., memorial
Mass 9:30 a.m. Sept. 14 in St.
Joseph Marello Parish, 237
William St., Pittston.
rHOADs - Dorene, memorial
services 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28 in
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. Friends may call 10
a.m. to services.
bErtHA GLOriA ciAvArELLA
Sept. 9, 2013
Bertha Gloria Ciavarella,
81, formerly of Wilkes-Barre,
passed away Sunday morn-
ing surrounded by her fam-
ily at Keystone Garden Estates,
Larksville.
Gloria, as she was known
to many, was born in Wilkes-
Barre, Nov. 26, 1931, the
daughter of the late Julius and
Mary Bodovich Roskowski. She
was a graduate of the former
Wilkes-Barre Township High
School.
Gloria was a longtime mem-
ber of Holy Rosary Church in
Wilkes-Barre and was active in
the Altar & Rosary Society and
also was member of the Sons of
Italy. She was currently a mem-
ber of Our Lady of Hope Parish,
Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.
Gloria was a loving and
devoted wife, mother and
grandmother, who cherished
nothing more in life than spend-
ing time with and caring for her
grandchildren.
She has been preceded in
death by her husband of 53
years, Michael A. Ciavarella, in
2007, and by brothers Julius,
Joseph, Peter and Charles;
along with sisters, Helen,
Annie, Verna, Sophie and
Francy.
Surviving are her daugh-
ters, Linda Scarantino and
her husband, Lou, of Wilkes-
Barre Township, and Michele
Shaver and her husband, Mark,
of Trucksville; grandchildren,
Josh, Danielle and Dean Shaver;
Nataliya Scarantio; Andrea,
Michael and Louis Scarantino;
brother John Roskowski of
Florida and sister Terry ONeil of
Wilkes-Barre. Also surviving are
numerous nieces and nephews.
The family would like to
thank Dr. John Carey, M.D., and
his staff as well as the caregiv-
ers at Keystone Gardens and
Hospice of the Sacred Heart for
the tender and compassionate
care they administered to Gloria
while she was in their care.
Funeral services will be at
9 a.m. Wednesday at the Nat
& Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with
a funeral Mass to follow at
9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of Hope
Parish, 40 Park Ave., Wilkes-
Barre. Interment will be in
St. Marys Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call
from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the
funeral home.
Online condolences may be
sent by visiting Glorias obitu-
ary at www.natandgawlasfuner-
alhome.com.
tHOMAs p. siMONcAvAGE
Sept. 5, 2013
Thomas P. Simoncavage, 58,
a resident of Dallas, passed
away unexpectedly Thursday
evening at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
His loving wife is Karen
M. Golanoski Simoncavage.
Together Thomas and Karen
shared 36 wonderful years of
marriage.
Thomas was born in
Nanticoke, Jan. 6, 1955, and
was the son of Leon and Olga
Pretulak Simoncavage. He also
was a graduate of Nanticoke
High School, class of 1972,
and a member of the former St.
Stanislaus Church, Nanticoke.
Thomas was employed by
McClure Mechanical Co.,
Wilkes-Barre, for approxi-
mately the past 11 years as an
HVAC service manager.
He is presently survived, in
addition to his parents, Leon
and Olga Simoncavage, by his
loving wife, Karen Golanoski,
of Nanticoke; daughter,
Stefanie Fisher, and husband,
Justin, Dallas; grandchildren,
Ryan and Kayleigh Fisher; and
brother, James Simoncavage,
Wilkes-Barre.
A Blessing Service will
be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday by
the Rev. James Nash at the
Grontkowski Funeral Home
P.C., 51-53 W. Green St.,
Nanticoke. Friends may call
from 4 to 8 p.m.
As a request of the family,
no owers; all donations are to
be made to Valley with a Heart,
7 Alden Road, Nanticoke.
HOLLyJ. MOONEy
Sept. 7, 2013
Holly J. Mooney, 35, of
Dallas, died Saturday morning
at her home with her family by
her side.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she
was the daughter of Paul
Zukoski and Karen Sitar Urzen.
Holly was a graduate of
Wyoming Valley West High
School, and a graduate of
Wilkes-Barre Vocational
School of Nursing, receiv-
ing her degree as a Licensed
Practical Nurse. Before moving
back to Dallas, she was a nurse
with Ascera Care Hospice of
Harrisburg.
Holly was a member of St.
Theresas Church, Shavertown.
Surviving are her husband
of 10 years, Michael, and son,
Ethan Mooney, of Dallas;
father, Paul Zukoski, and step-
mother, Mary Ann Zukoski,
of Olympia, Wash.; mother,
Karen Urzen, and stepfather,
Albert Urzen; brother, Ryan
Urzen, Swoyersville, and sister,
Annie Zukoski, Salt Lake City,
Utah; paternal grandmother,
Patricia Zukoski, Askam;
maternal grandmother, Cecil
Sitar, Ashley; mother-in-law
and father-in-law, Linda and
Robert Nickerson, Plains.
Funeral will be held at
9:15 a.m. Wednesday at the
Corcoran Funeral Home Inc.,
20 S. Main St., Plains, with a
Mass of Christian Burial at 10
a.m. in St. Theresas Church,
Shavertown. Interment will
be in St. Marys Cemetery,
Hanover Township.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday at the funeral home.
Memorial donations if
desired may be made to Candys
Place, 190 Welles St., Forty
Fort, PA 18704. Online condo-
lences may be made at www.
corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Vision trumps hearing in study
JOsH sHAFFEr
The News & Observer
DURHAM, N.C. A Duke University
study used puppet-based comedy to demon-
strate the complicated inner-workings of the
brain and shows what every ventriloquist
knows: The eye is more convincing than the
ear.
The study, which appears in the journal
PLOS ONE, seeks to explain how the brain
combines information coming from two dif-
ferent senses. How, asks Duke psychology
and neuroscience professor Jennifer Groh,
does the brain determine where a sound is
coming from?
In your eyes, the retina takes a snapshot,
she said. It makes a topographic image of
whats in front of you. But the ears have
nothing concrete to go on. They have to rely
on how loud the sound is, how far away and
from what direction.
Thats where a ventriloquist comes in,
providing a model for this problem. With
a puppet, the noise and the movement are
coming from different places. So how does
the brain x this and choose where to look?
Duke researchers tested their hypotheses
on 11 people and two monkeys, placing
them in a soundproof booth.
They arranged speakers in various loca-
tions and attached lights to them.
Then they played a sound fromone speak-
er and ashed a light from another, tracking
peoples eye movements. Sometimes they
played the sound in time with the light,
but only for just a fraction of a second.
Sometimes they played the sound rst, then
followed up with the light.
Results: People moved their eyes much
more when the light came at a different time
with the sound. To sum up, it doesnt mat-
ter if sounds and lights happen at the same
time, in the same place. Its more important
that the eyes get a clue to give back to the
brain.
scHyDLOWsKi - Glenys,
funeral 8:45 a.m. today at
Bednarski Funeral Home, 168
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Mass
of Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in
Holy Savior Worship Site of St.
Andre Bessette Parish, Wilkes-
Barre.
sHOEMAKEr - Paul, friends
may call 5 to 7 p.m. today at the
Kielty-Moran Funeral Home, 87
Washington St., Plymouth.
tysON - Donald, service 7:30
p.m. today at Kniffen OMalley
Funeral Home, 465 S. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 6
p.m. to service.
uZDELLA - Alfred, friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. today at Davis-
Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E.
Broad St., Nanticoke.
Halfway through hurricane
season, no big storms in sight
FORT LAUDERDALE,
Fla. Usually by now,
three hurricanes have
emerged.
Yet not one has formed
and the storm season is
already half over. If a mon-
ster storm doesnt appear
by Wednesday morning,
it will set a record for the
latest-arriving hurricane
since the satellite era
began in the mid-1960s.
Its very unusual,
said Bryan Norcross, a
hurricane expert for the
Weather Channel. Why
this is happening is the
subject of a lot of conver-
sation, and not much clar-
ity.
Consider:
When Tropical Storm
Gabrielle failed to grow
into a hurricane last week,
it set a modern-era record
for the most named sys-
tems to arise before the
rst hurricane. Gabrielle
was the seventh named
storm, and the previous
record, set in 2002, was
six named storms before
the rst hurricane.
Sept. 10 Tuesday
is the peak of the sea-
son, when a hurricane is
most likely to be swirl-
ing in the Atlantic. Yet it
appears that no systems
in the eastern Atlantic will
develop until Wednesday
or after.
On average the rst
hurricane emerges on Aug.
10, the second on Aug. 28
and the third on Sept. 9,
putting this season about
a month behind schedule,
hurricane-wise.
Only ve times since
the satellite era have
there been no hurricanes
in August. And the rst
Category 3 or higher usu-
ally spins up on Sept. 4.
Why havent any hurri-
canes formed so far?
Large areas of dry sink-
ing air across the tropical
Atlantic have deprived
systems of the moist atmo-
sphere they need to devel-
op. Also, pockets of wind
shear have disrupted sys-
tems from growing, said
Dennis Feltgen, spokes-
man for the National
Hurricane Center.
Despite those factors,
Norcross said the Atlantic
waters are warm enough
to support development.
Further, there has been
above average rain in west
Africa, which nurtures
tropical waves and allows
them to intensify.
Yet the waves havent
been as robust as weve
seen in the past, he said.
Robert Molleda, meteo-
rologist with the National
Weather Service in Miami,
said South Florida needs
to be on alert. He noted 19
hurricanes have struck this
region during October, the
most of any month.
For that reason, he said
the real peak of the season
for South Florida is Sept. 21.
Half of our hurricane
strikes have occurred
before Sept. 21 and half
after, he said. The Sept.
10 peak of activity doesnt
really mean a whole lot for
this region.
KEN KAyE
Sun Sentinel (MCT)
Nyads team responds to skeptics doubting her swim
MIAMI Diana Nyads 110-mile swim from
Cuba to Florida has generated positive publicity
and adoration for the 64-year-old endurance ath-
lete along with skepticism from some mem-
bers of the small community of marathon swim-
mers who are questioning whether she accom-
plished the feat honestly.
On social media and the online Marathon
Swimmers Forum, long-distance swimmers have
been debating whether Nyad got a boost from
the boat that was accompanying her either by
getting in it or holding onto it during a par-
ticularly speedy stretch of her swim. They also
question whether she violated the traditions of
her sport many followstrict guidelines known
as the English Channel rules by using a spe-
cialized mask and body suit to protect herself
from jellysh.
When you know how hard it is, you kind of
want those details, said Andrew Malinak, a
Seattle long-distance swimmer who crunched
the data available fromthe GPS positions tracked
on Nyads website and concluded that he didnt
trust what he saw.
Nyads navigator and one of the swims ofcial
observers told The Associated Press this week-
end that Nyad didnt cheat and that she was aided
during the rapid part of her swim by a swift cur-
rent. And neither Nyad nor her team ever said
she would follow English Channel rules, devel-
oped for swimming the waters between England
and France. Those rules outlaw neoprene wet-
suits and contact with a support boat. Nyad wore
a full non-neoprene bodysuit, gloves, booties and
a silicone mask at night, when jellysh are a par-
ticular problem, and removed the suit once she
got over the reef on her approach to Key West.
According to Nyads team, she nished the
swim Monday afternoon after roughly 53 hours
in the water, becoming the rst to do so with-
out a shark cage. It was her fth try, an endeav-
or apparently free from the boat troubles, bad
weather, illnesses and jellysh encounters that
have bedeviled Nyad and other swimmers in
recent years.
Nyads progress was tracked online via GPS by
her team, and some critics say they think infor-
mation is missing.
Many wonder about a roughly seven-hour
stretch when Nyad apparently didnt stop to eat
or drink, recalling her 2012 attempt when she
got onto the boat for hours during rough weath-
er. Nyad eventually got back into the water to try
nishing, but her team was criticized for delay-
ing the release of that information to the public.
Malinak said the hours-long spike in Nyads
speed after 27 hours of swimming is particularly
questionable she went from her normal pace
of roughly 1.5 mph to more than 3 mph, then
slowed down again as she approached Key West.
Nyads spokeswomen did not immediately
return telephone calls this weekend, but her
navigator and Janet Hinkle, one of the ofcial
observers for the swim, told the AP that Nyad
didnt cheat.
Navigator John Bartlett said the increased
speed was due to the fast-moving Gulf Stream
working in her favor, nothing more.
At some points we were doing almost 4 miles
an hour, Bartlett said. Thats just the way it
works. If the current is in your favor at all, that
explains it.
The data collected by Bartlett and two observ-
ers will be submitted to three open-water swim-
ming associations and the Guinness World
Records for verication, Bartlett said.
An oceanographer not afliated with Nyads
team said the swimmer couldnt have picked a
more perfect current to get from Havana to Key
West.
Mitch Roffer of Melbourne-based Roffers
Ocean Fishing Forecasting Service Inc. said he
got an email questioning whether Nyads swim
was a hoax, so he decided to look at the charts
for himself. What he saw convinced him that she
could do it.
Many times that current runs west-east and
youre constantly ghting the current if youre
swimming north. In this case, it was in the shape
of an S, and the angle was almost exactly from
Havana to Key West, Roffer said.
Janet Hinkle, a Key West boat captain and
acquaintance of Nyads, was calledtobe anobserv-
er for the swim when Steve Munatones, a former
U.S. national open-water coach, was unable to
make it. I can say unequivocally she swam every
stroke without question, Hinkle said.
Critics have said Hinkle was too close to Nyad
to be an independent observer of her swim.
Hinkle has in the past helped Nyad by providing
housing for her when the swimmer stayed in the
Florida Keys, but she said she remained on the
periphery of Nyads team. I think anyone who
knows me knows me as a person of high integ-
rity. I believe thats why Diana asked me, and I
took my job very seriously, Hinkle said. She
was giving her all and I would give her my best.
Since none of the various open-water swim-
ming associations dictate how someone should
swim from Cuba to Florida ofcially accom-
plished only by Nyad and Susie Maroney, who
used a shark cage Nyad just had to followgen-
erally accepted rules about not getting out of the
water or using equipment such as ns.
Australian Chloe McCardel followed English
Channel rules in her attempt to swim the Florida
Straits in June. She had to be pulled from the
water after 11 hours after being stung jellysh.
Generally the rules are: You walk in, you
swim across and you walk out, and you do it
under your own power, said Munatones, who
consulted with Nyad for this swim and observed
her attempts in 2011 and 2012.
The elaborate, full-body suit and protective
mask Nyad wore to protect herself from ven-
omous jellysh actually weighed her down,
Munatones said.
To put that on is like putting on a wedding
gown in the ocean, he said. Its different from
the English Channel rules, but the water is differ-
ent from the English Channel.
JENNiFEr KAy
Associated Press
AP photo
Diana Nyad emerges from the Atlantic Ocean on sept.
2 after completing a 111-mile swim from cuba to Key
West, Fla.
ANN M. KrEsEsKi
Sept. 8, 2013
Mrs. Ann M. Kreseski, 86, of
Brown Street, Duryea, passed
away Sunday at Commonwealth
Hospice, Scranton.
Born in Duryea, she was the
daughter of the late Arnold and
Marie Fedorski Urban. She was a
graduate of Duryea High School
and Wilkes-Barre Business
College. She was employed by
the former JS Hope and Co.,
Scranton, and prior to her retire-
ment, she was employed by
Reilly Associates, Pittston. She
was a member of Nativity of Our
Lord Parish, Duryea. She was
the president of the Crossin 500
Club, Duryea, for the past 15
years.
She enjoyed reading, word
searches and bingo.
She was preceded in death by
her sister Celia Wascavage.
Survivingaredaughter, Joanne
Roberts, and her husband, David,
of Bear Creek Township; grand-
daughter, Jennifer Roberts of
Wilkes Barre; brother. Arnold
Urban, and his wife, Irene, of
Northampton; sister Louise
Tighe and her husband, James,
of Duryea; nieces and nephews.
Funeral will be held at 9:30
a.m. Wednesday at the Bernard
J. Piontek Funeral Home Inc.,
204 Main St., Duryea, with Mass
of Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,
Duryea, with the Rev. Andrew
Sinnott ofciating. Interment
will be in St. Johns Cemetery,
Duryea. Friends may call from 5
to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral
home.
To leave the family an online
condolence or for further infor-
mation, please visit our website,
www.piontekfuneralhome.com.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made to
Commonwealth Hospice, 746
Jefferson Ave., Scranton.
Editorial
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
Children need
family and God
There are those who have com-
pared the Trayvon Martin case to the
recent murder of the Australian ath-
lete Christopher Lane in Oklahoma.
Although one could say that race is
an issue, it goes much, much deeper
than that.
Both tragedies affected me pro-
foundly, but it was not until I heard
the family of Christopher Lane say
that they would not recommend
travel to the US any longer because
of our gun culture.
I wanted to say to the grieving fam-
ily, Please, this is not who we are.
We are good people. I know your
heart is broken and my prayers are
with you.
Then I started to think about the
individuals who could do such a
horric thing. What have we turned
into?
There is something going on in our
culture that we desperately need to
address. Listening to my grandchil-
drens friends and their schoolmates,
many of these children lack security
and stability that we took for granted
when we were young.
Our mothers stayed home while
our fathers worked. We were con-
dent that we could rely on them for
support.
What kind of homes did these
young men come from? Why are so
many of them angry and misdirected?
It seems the family nucleus is gone.
There is very little regard or sensitiv-
ity shown to each other.
I remember my father being a very
perceptive person. He told me that
every young man should serve in the
military for two years; especially if he
needed direction in school.
Another important component in
this equation is the lack of God and
faith. Very few children are exposed
to organized religion and/or choices
regarding faith and religious belief sys-
tems. It must not be in vogue or PC
these days.
I know we should embrace and
accept change in this world, but there
is one thing I have a lot of trouble
accepting. This is not the America I
grew up in and I am afraid.
I am afraid because my grandchil-
dren will never know the America I
have always known and loved.
We need to pray for all the children.
Fran Spencer
Nanticoke
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER SERVING THE PUBLIC TRUST SINCE 1881 Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 7A
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Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Fast food: What would HenryFord Do?
The Service Employees
International Union
(SEIU) has prom-
ised fast food work-
ers that, if they will
only unionize and,
of course, pay dues
to the SEIU, they
can have $15 an
hour for work that
is worth $7.50 an
hour. Shakespeares
Jack Cade prom-
ised similarly to
decree that seven
half-penny loaves
of bread would sell
for a penny, and even the
least educated members
of Shakespeares audiences
recognized this as an outra-
geous joke. We cannot have
wealth that we do not pro-
duce, and todays fast food
jobs are simply not worth
$15 an hour. The good
news is that they can prob-
ably be redesigned to pay
this much, or even more,
but the SEIU is clearly not
the right entity to do it.
Henry Ford wrote, The
only true labour leader is
the one who leads labour to
work and to wages, and not
the leader who leads labour
to strikes, sabotage, and
starvation (and, by impli-
cation, unemployment; the
obvious prognosis
for workers whose
output does not jus-
tify their pay). Ford
did not pay his work-
ers unprecedented
wages because a
union demanded it.
He paid these wages
because he designed
jobs that would jus-
tify them, and the
workers did not even
have to ask. This
made Ford himself a
genuine labor leader, and a
far better one than the Jack
Cades of the SEIU.
None of the following
constitutes formal engi-
neering advice, but, from
what I could see of a fast
food restaurants opera-
tions, the jobs are simply
not worth much more than
minimum wage. This does
not mean that the peo-
ple who do them are not
worth more. Masonry is,
for example, skilled con-
struction work, but nobody
can pay the worlds best
brick layer high wages to
effectively do 125 squat
exercises per hour. This is
exactly what brick layers
did through the early 20th
century, when they had to
pick up the bricks from
the ground. They could lay
350 per hour, and with less
effort, after Frank Gilbreth
introduced a scaffold that
delivered the bricks at
waist level.
I watched a fast food
employee who was working
very hard, and probably a lot
harder than any employer
deserves for the minimum
wage. Most of his effort,
however, went into taking
six or so steps back and
forth, opening boxes into
which to put orders, and
similar non-value-adding
activities. Ford said emphat-
ically that you cannot pay
somebody to walk, and that
no job should require any-
body to take more than one
step in any direction.
It is also wasteful to do
the same job twice, which
is what happens when
the cashier forwards the
customers order to the
workers who prepare the
meals. Why not replace
the cashiers with kiosks
into which customers
enter their orders on a
touch screen, and pay with
cash or a credit card? The
burger order could then
conceivably go directly
to a hamburger making
machine without human
intervention. Momentum
Machines, for example,
makes an automated min-
iature assembly line that
delivers burgers to order.
Lesson 1: you cannot pay
somebody $15 an hour to
walk, fumble with packag-
ing, and engage in other
non-value-adding activity,
but you can pay somebody
$15 or even $25 an hour to
run and maintain a machine
that does all the repetitive
and mind-numbing work.
Lesson 2: any fast food chain
that does not adopt this kind
of technology will end up like
the automakers who con-
tinued to build cars one at
a time after Ford developed
the moving assembly line.
WilliamA. Levinson, P.E., is a
coauthor of The Expanded and
Annotated My Life and Work: Henry
Fords Universal Code for World-
Class Success, and other books on
quality, management, and industrial
productivity. Disclaimer; the author
has no fnancial interest in Momen-
tumMachines.
COMMENTARY: WILLIAMLEVINSON
Korea is standing its ground at a
time when some Asian countries,
such as India and Indonesia, and
other emerging economies are tak-
ing a drubbing as the United States
prepares to phase out quantitative
easing. The Korean currency remains
stable while stocks are rallying.
No wonder Korea is now touted as
one of the most attractive investment
markets among the emerging econo-
mies. The Korean economy, policy-
makers say with condence, will be
able to ght back a nancial squeeze,
should it come as a consequence of
cheap nancing coming to an end.
Their optimism is based on what
they call sound fundamentals.
Indeed, foreign exchange reserves
have expanded to $330 billion as
Korea has continued to generate con-
secutive monthly current account
surpluses since February 2012. Its
short-term foreign debt as a percent-
age of the total external debt is the
lowest since the third quarter of
1999 at 29.1 percent at the end of
June. Growth is recovering, albeit at
a snails pace.
But not all economic fundamentals
are sound, as evidenced by an enor-
mous scal decit the Korean gov-
ernment sustained in the rst half
of this year. The decit, the largest
ever, amounted to 46.2 trillion won.
Policymakers sound smug when
they claim that it is not unusual to
sustain a huge scal decit in the
rst half of a year. The reason, they
say, is that the government customar-
ily frontloads spending. Maybe so. As
they say, more money was allocated
for the rst half this year.
But here the size matters.
Fiscal soundness, if sacriced to
meet a growing demand for welfare,
will undermine the nations creditwor-
thiness. That is why the Park admin-
istration will have to strive to balance
annual budgets in the near future.
Options are few. The administration
will have to spend less, collect more
taxes, in particular from the wealthy,
or both, if growth remains sluggish.
The Korea Herald, Seoul
WORLD OPINION: KOREAN ECONOMY
Weathering downturn
requires careful policy
The Central African Republic is
falling into chaos and no one, includ-
ing France, the former colonial power,
shows any signs of caring.
The C.A.R. has borders with six
countries Cameroon, Chad, Congo
(Brazzaville), the Democratic Republic
of the Congo, South Sudan and Sudan.
Each plays a role in the world oil indus-
try. The C.A.R. has enough resources
itself, with agriculture and diamonds
for cash, to support its small, majority
Christian, 4.6 million population if it
were governed reasonably. But nobody
seems to care about its collapse.
By comparison, Syria has borders
with Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and
Turkey. It is the focus of the world
during the G-20 conference in St.
Petersburg, at the United Nations and
in Congress. The difference is Syria is
in the powder-keg Middle East. The
C.A.R. is in the heart of Africa and
receives little media or diplomatic
attention.
In the meantime, the C.A.R., after
holding elections in 1993, its rst since
independence in 1960, endured a mili-
tary coup in 2003. The general who
came to power in that coup was over-
thrown in another coup in March by a
movement called Seleka which named
Michel Djotodia, as its rst Muslim
president.
Selekas and Mr. Djotodias idea of
governance has turned out to be con-
tinued disorder and looting across
the country that has been marked by
many deaths, rapes and other crimes.
The absence of education, health care
and other basics have led to the ight
of citizens to neighboring countries.
So, why Mali and Syria, but not
the C.A.R.? That is a good question,
missing an obvious answer. It might
be, because it is Africa, except that
Mali is in Africa, too. The C.A.R.
badly needs attention from the
African Union, the United Nations or
France.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Kim Jong-un is once again playing
host to Dennis Rodman. The United
States basketball player, though on a
private sojourn to the Stalinist state,
has stirred the media over his pos-
sible role as an emissary to build
bridges between Pyongyang and
Washington.
But that doesnt seem to be the
case. Apparently, Rodman before y-
ing off to Pyongyang from Beijing
said that he will be meeting his
best friend, who is a great fan, and
his visit is merely part of basketball
diplomacy tour. So far so good! But
the fact is that the reclusive leader
had agreed to host Rodman just days
after refusing a formal diplomatic
request from the US special envoy
for North Korean rights, who wanted
to deliberate with Kim over the fate
of jailed Korean-American Kenneth
Bae, who is facing a sentence for ille-
gally entering the country and alleg-
edly plotting to topple the regime.
Thus, this faceoff speaks for itself.
As they say in diplomacy too many
explanations also make it smell a rat.
So is the case here. Though it would
not be appropriate to get judgmen-
tal in this case, nonetheless, it goes
without saying that while Kim is
eager to reach out to the corridors of
power in the White House, Rodman
can inevitably help broker that deal.
Rodman credentials speak for him,
as he remains the most high-prole
American to meet Kim since the
leader took over after his father died
in 2011. It is also a fact that Kim
had expressed his personal desire to
Rodman, in his previous visit, to be
invited by Barack Obama and nurse
his dream of rubbing shoulders with
the whos who in Washington.
If ping-pongdiplomacycouldbroker
the worlds greatest diplomatic thaw
between China and the United States
in the 1970s through the auspi-
cious of Pakistan what is stopping
a repeat now between Pyongyang
and Washington? Rodman can take a
lesson or two from Henry Kissingers
yesteryears policies and help Kim
and Obama opt for a handshake over
a game of basketball anywhere in the
world! Let sportsmanship triumph in
the midst of brinkmanship.
The Khaleej Times, Dubai
OTHER OPINION: CENTRAL AFRICA
OTHER OPINION: DENNIS RODMAN
Save a forgotten nation
Former basketball star
could play ambassador
William
Levinson
Contributing
Columnist
pulverized concrete and glass.
But thePentagonor Shanksville
applicants are notable because, to
date, no medical study or envi-
ronmental survey has suggested
that people who responded to
either site were exposed to simi-
lar health hazards. They were
on the scene for days rather than
months. And there have been no
reports of a strange rash of ill-
nesses. Responders at those sites
were given eligibility by Congress
mostly out of a sense of fairness,
without any clear indication that
anyone was sick.
A separate program adminis-
tered by the National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health
expects as many as 1,500 Virginia
and Pennsylvania responders to
apply for free health monitoring
and treatment. So far, just 19 have
applied.
The trickle of people signing
up for compensation includes
Alexandria Fire Department
Capt. Scott Quintana, who dug
through feet of scorched rubble
at the Pentagon to nd bodies
in 2001. He was diagnosed with
chronic myeloid leukemia, a type
of cancer, in 2010.
Research has suggested the
genetic mutation that causes his
type of cancer might be triggered
by some environmental toxins.
But even Quintana acknowledged
its unlikely his leukemia was
caused solely by the few days he
spent at the Pentagon.
Its part of a long exposure
to triggers that create this in
your body, Quintana said.
Could I absolutely tie it to 9/11?
Absolutely not. Can I tie it to my
career in the re service? Yes.
What that means for his com-
pensation claim isnt entirely
clear.
If they are making an award,
Ill take it. If they dont, Im not
going to cry about it, Quintana
said, adding that his $8,000-per-
month chemotherapy bill is
already covered by insurance,
thanks to a Virginia law that pre-
sumes that any reghter diag-
nosed with cancer got it from an
on-the-job exposure.
No such presumption exists for
people applyingtothe victimcom-
pensation fund. The funds special
master, Shelia Birnbaum, said
claims coming in from Pentagon
and Shanksville responders have
yet to be reviewed, so she couldnt
say how many might be granted.
It has to be an injury that is
related to your exposure at that
site, she said. That means that
applicants, to start with, will
need to have a doctor ll out a
form verifying that their illness
was caused, or worsened, by a
harmful exposure during the
9/11 rescue and recovery.
Initially, compensation was
only available for a limited list
of health conditions linked to
the unique blend of toxins and
caustic agents in the trade center
dust, most notably respiratory ill-
nesses. But the programhas since
been expanded to include anyone
suffering from many common
types of cancer, which has raised
the possibility that the $2.78 bil-
lion appropriated for the program
wont be enough to cover claims.
As of late August, the pool
of 24,000 applicants included
967 cancer claims.
Birnbaum said she anticipated
getting some cancer claims from
the Pennsylvania and Virginia
sites but was concerned about
authorizing big payouts for com-
mon illnesses that might be unre-
lated to the terror attacks.
Ted Shaffer, former chief of
the Shanksville Volunteer Fire
Company, who was on duty
on 9/11, said he was shocked
anyone led a claim over the
response to Flight 93, saying
the crash scene struck him as no
more dangerous than a regular
building or vehicle re.
I nd it difcult to believe
that any permanent, long-lasting
injury came from this, he said,
adding: Nobody that I know of
had any health problems.
At outreach meetings in recent
weeks, NIOSH ofcials and
health advocates suggested that
responders at least enroll in the
health program as a precaution,
even if they are currently healthy.
That logic appealed to for-
mer Arlington County Fire
Department battalion chief James
Daugherty, who said he got more
than the usual dose of smoke at
the Pentagon and then developed
a persistent cough a month or
so later. He still uses an inhaler
today.
It could be a coincidence. But
I never had any breathing prob-
lems before, he said.
We were nothing compared to
what happened in New York. We
were done in two weeks. Those
guys were down there in that
stuff for months, he said. But, he
added, a person would be crazy
not to protect themselves by
enrolling in the health program.
Who knows whats going to
happen down the road? he said.
What happens if we all end up
with mesothelioma in ve or
10 years?
Human Rights, which collects
information from a network of
anti-government activists, says
it has so far only been able to
conrm 502 dead.
The actual tally of those
killed by chemical weapons is
scant compared to the sum of
all killed in the upheaval: more
than 100,000, according to the
United Nations.
In an interviewSunday, Assad
told U.S. journalist Charlie Rose
there is not conclusive evidence
about who is to blame for the
chemical weapons attacks and
again suggested the rebels were
responsible. From Beirut, Rose
described his interview, which
is to be released Monday on
the CBS morning program that
Rose hosts, with the full inter-
view airing later in the day on
Roses PBS program.
Asked about Assads claims
there is no evidence he used
the weapons, Secretary of State
John Kerry told reporters in
London: The evidence speaks
for itself.
At the same time, Obama has
planned his own public relations
effort. He has scheduled six
network interviews on Monday
and then a primetime speech
to the nation from the White
House on Tuesday, the eve of
the rst votes in Congress.
Sunday night, Obama
dropped in on a dinner held
by Vice President Joe Biden
for Republican senators.
Obama will meet with Senate
Democrats Tuesday, a Senate
aide said, speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity because he
was not authorized to publicly
discuss the meeting before its
ofcial announcement.
Obama faces a tough audi-
ence on Capitol Hill. A survey
by The Associated Press shows
that House members who are
staking out positions are either
opposed to or leaning against
Obamas plan for a military
strike by more than a 6-1 mar-
gin.
Lobbing a few Tomahawk
missiles will not restore our
credibility overseas, said
Rep. Mike McCaul, the Texas
Republican who chairs the
House Homeland Security
Committee.
Added Rep. Loretta Sanchez,
D-Calif.: For the president to
say that this is just a very quick
thing and were out of there,
thats how long wars start.
Almost half of the
433 House members and a
third of the 100-member Senate
remain undecided, the AP sur-
vey found. Two seats in the
435-member House are vacant.
Just because Assad is a mur-
derous tyrant doesnt mean his
opponents are any better, said
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas.
But some of Assads oppo-
nents are pleading for aid.
The world is watching, and
Syrians are wondering: When
is the international community
going to act and intervene to
protect them? said Saleh.
On Saturday, a U.S. ofcial
released a DVD compilation of
videos showing attack victims
that the ofcial said were shown
to senators during Thursdays
classied brieng. The graphic
images have become a rallying
point for the administration.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.,
chairwoman of the Intelligence
Committee, also posted videos
on the committees website.
But McDonough conceded
the United States doesnt have
concrete evidence Assad was
behind the chemical attacks.
Recent opinion surveys show
intense American skepticism
about military intervention in
Syria, even among those who
believe Syrias government used
chemical weapons on its people.
Congress, perhaps, is even
more dubious.
Its an uphill slog, said Rep.
Mike Rogers, the Republican
chairman of the House
Intelligence Committee who
supports strikes on Assad.
I think its very clear hes
lost support in the last week,
Rogers added, speaking of the
president.
Complicating the effort in the
Senate is the possibility that
60 votes may be required to
authorize a strike.
Republican Sen. Rand Paul
of Kentucky said he would
consider a libuster, but noted
the delay tactic was unlikely to
permanently nix a vote. Paul
would, however, insist his col-
leagues consider an amendment
to the resolution that would bar
Obama from launching strikes
if Congress votes against the
measure.
Still, Sen. Harry Reid, the
Democratic leader, has pre-
dicted authorization and
McDonough, too, on Sunday
telegraphed optimism.
They do not dispute the
intelligence when we speak
with them, McDonough said,
of members of Congress.
But while the public discus-
sion lacks a direct link between
Assad and weapons, the private
briefs are no better, two law-
makers said.
The evidence is not as strong
as the public statements that
the president and the adminis-
tration have been making, said
Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich.
There are some things that are
being embellished in the public
statements. The briengs
have actually made me more
skeptical about the situation.
Rep. Buck McKeon, R-Calif.,
said they have evidence show-
ing the regime has probably the
responsibility for the attacks.
But thats not enough to start
military strikes. They havent
linked it directly to Assad, in
my estimation, said McKeon,
chairman of the House Armed
Services Committee.
McDonough, an Obama for-
eign policy adviser dating back
to his 2008 presidential cam-
paign, said the dots connect
themselves.
The material was delivered
by rockets which we know the
Assad regime has and we have
no indication that the opposi-
tion has.
Congress resumes work
today after its summer break,
but a heated debate about Syria
is already underway.
Vice President Joe Biden
planned to host a dinner
Sunday night for a group of
Senate Republicans.
Obamas national secu-
rity adviser, Susan Rice,
plans to discuss Syria in a
speech Monday at the New
America Foundation and later
meet with members of the
Congressional Black Caucus.
Bipartisan, classied briengs
for Congress are set for today
and Wednesday.
McDonough plans to meet
Tuesday with the House
Democratic Caucus.
Obama planned to address
the nation on Tuesday ahead
of Wednesdays rst showdown
vote in the Senate over a reso-
lution that would authorize
the limited and specied use
of U.S. armed forces against
Syria for no more than 90 days
and barring American ground
troops from combat. A nal
vote is expected at weeks end.
A House vote appears likely
during the week of Sept. 16.
McDonough spoke with
ABCs This Week, CBS
Face the Nation, NBCs
Meet the Press, CNNs State
of the Union and Fox News
Sunday. McCaul and Sanchez
were on NBC. Cruz appeared
on ABC. Rogers and Amash
spoke to CBS. Paul was inter-
viewed on Fox. McKeon was on
CNN.
PAGE 8A Monday, September 9, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
87/68
Chihuahua
74/60
Los Angeles
94/68
Washington
79/69
New York
73/65
Miami
89/77
Atlanta
90/71
Detroit
80/69
Houston
93/74
Kansas City
100/72
Chicago
91/73
Minneapolis
97/69
El Paso
88/69
Denver
83/56
Billings
80/56
San Francisco
79/59
Seattle
76/58
Toronto
71/62
Montreal
68/52
Winnipeg
69/58
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
TUE THU
FRI SAT
WED
SUN
TODAY
75
58
A blend of
sun and
clouds
83 66
Thunder-
shower
83 59
Not as
warm
75 52
Mostly
sunny
67 49
A thunder-
storm in
spots
89 66
Clouds and
sun
70 50
Cool in
the morn-
ing; sun-
shine
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 3
Month to date 32
Year to date 734
Last year to date 860
Normal year to date 546
Anchorage 59/51/r 58/51/r
Baltimore 78/67/s 89/69/pc
Boston 69/60/s 78/68/pc
Buffalo 75/66/pc 85/70/t
Charlotte 87/65/pc 88/65/pc
Chicago 91/73/s 94/70/pc
Cleveland 82/67/s 89/70/t
Dallas 98/75/s 96/75/s
Denver 83/56/t 72/54/t
Honolulu 89/75/s 89/74/pc
Indianapolis 89/71/s 94/71/pc
Las Vegas 93/77/t 92/69/t
Milwaukee 83/72/pc 90/67/t
New Orleans 90/74/pc 89/75/pc
Norfolk 80/68/t 83/69/pc
Okla. City 96/70/s 95/68/s
Orlando 90/72/pc 90/72/pc
Phoenix 91/75/t 93/80/t
Pittsburgh 81/64/s 88/70/t
Portland, ME 67/51/s 75/62/pc
St. Louis 98/75/s 99/74/s
San Francisco 79/59/s 74/58/s
Seattle 76/58/s 81/61/s
Wash., DC 79/69/s 87/72/pc
Bethlehem 1.87 none 16
Wilkes-Barre 3.29 -0.81 22
Towanda 1.90 -0.58 16
Port Jervis 2.94 -0.24 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Sunday.
Today Tue Today Tue Today Tue
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Sept 12 Sept 19
Sept 26
First Full
Last New
Oct 4
6:38 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
7:23 p.m.
9:34 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 67-73. Lows: 52-58. Mostly sunny today; cool in the morning,
then pleasant in the afternoon.
Highs: 69-75. Lows: 61-67. Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Partly
cloudy tonight. Partly sunny and humid tomorrow.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 70-76. Lows: 56-62. Mostly sunny today; cool in the morning,
then nice in the afternoon. A passing shower tonight.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 73. Low: 65. Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Increasing clouds
tonight. Partly sunny and humid tomorrow.
High: 77. Low: 67. Mostly sunny and nice today. Partly cloudy and
humid tonight. Partly sunny and humid tomorrow.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Sunday
High/low 74/62
Normal high/low 75/55
Record high 92 (1959)
Record low 41 (1940)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. Trace
Month to date 0.10"
Normal m-t-d 1.01"
Year to date 18.47"
Normal y-t-d 26.04"
75/58
74/59
77/67
75/61
74/59
74/60
74/63
72/59
72/58
75/56
70/58
73/59
71/54
72/53
73/65
Summary: Today, showers and storms will move through the Upper Midwest
through the central Rockies and Southwest, leading to the chance for flash
flooding. High pressure will keep it dry and cool in the Northeast.
From page 1A
Syria
From page 1A
9/11
AP photo
Alexandria, Va., firefighter Capt. Scott Quintana, who has chronic myeloid leukemia that was diagnosed in 2010, talks
about his health at his fire station in Alexandria. Quintana was a first responder to the Pentagon on 9/11.
AP photo
Protesters against any potential U.S. military action in Syria march Saturday to Capitol Hill from the White House in Washington.
STEPHEN HAWKINS
AP Sports Writer
ARLINGTON, Texas
Tony Romo threw
two touchdown passes
to Jason Witten, Barry
Church returned a fum-
ble 27 yards for a score
and the Dallas Cowboys
downed the turnover-
plagued New York Giants
on Sunday night 36-31.
Giants running back
David Wilson, who also
fumbled on New Yorks
rst running play in the
game, was stripped early
in the second half by Nick
Hayden. Church scooped
up the ball and ran into
the end zone.
Brandon Carr returned
an interception 49 yards
in the fourth quarter to
give Dallas another defen-
sive TD. The Cowboys
forced six Giants turn-
overws.
Eli Manning and the
Giants are no longer unde-
feated in Cowboys owner
Jerry Jones $1.2 billion
showplace stadium. They
were 4-0 in the building,
including a victory in the
rst regular-season game
there in 2009.
Manning had two TD
passes to Victor Cruz,
including an 18-yarder
with 1:44 left in the third
quarter.
The Giants turnovers
included two fumbles by
Wilson, three intercep-
tions by Manning and a
botched punt return.
The Cowboys had three
turnovers in their rst
6 minutes playing in
new defensive coordina-
tor Monte Kifns 4-3
scheme.
A play after a possible
pass interference call on
Dez Bryant didnt draw a
penalty and the Cowboys
p u n t e d ,
the ball
hit Giants
b l o c k e r
Tr u ma i ne
M c B r i d e
and was
rec overed
by rookie
D e Vo n t e
Hol l oma n
at the
Giants 16.
That set
up Romos
4-yard TD throw to
Witten, the eight-time
Pro Bowler who had only
three scores last season,
for a 27-10 lead.
Romo threw a 15-yard
score to Witten before
halftime, and Dan Bailey
also had two eld goals
(30 and 38 yards) by then
for a 13-10 lead.
In the nal minute of
the rst half, Romo was
hit in the ribs and had the
wind knocked out after
being crushed between
Mathias Kiwanuka and
Justin Trattou after throw-
ing an incompletion. Kyle
Orton came on to nish
the half, but Romo was
back after halftime.
Manning hit 27 of 42
passes for 450 yards, and
Cruz had ve catches for
118 yards.
Romo was 36 of 49
for 263 yards. Miles
Austin had 10 catches
for 72 yards and Witten
had eight catches for 70
yards.
Wittens rst TD catch
with 3 minutes left in the
rst half made it 13-3
and came with linebacker
Mark Herzlich trying
to cover him in the end
zone.
The grab put him over
9,000 yards receiving. He
also had a 21-yard catch
on the previous play.
517 Pierce Street Kingston (570)283-DELI (3354)
www.PierceStreetDeli.com
Back to School September Specials
ALL TEACHERS & STUDENTS
10%OFF YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE
ATTENTIONALL STUDENTS &TEACHERS
Breakfast Special
$2.99
Monday- Saturday
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SPORTS
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Monday, September 9, 2013
SECTION B
Are playofs nowCheat for the Cup?
NASCAR investigating Bowyer spin at Richmond
JENNAFRYER
APAuto RacingWriter
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
With one suspicious snap
of the steering wheel,
Clint Bowyer changed
the outcome of a race and
maybe the championship,
too.
Accidental or inten-
tional, his spin in the
closing laps at Richmond
International Raceway
set in motion a chain of
events that has shrouded
the start of the Chase for
the Sprint Cup champi-
onship and raised many
questions about the
potential for a race team
to manipulate pivotal
moments of a race.
Now NASCAR is
reviewing evidence to
determine if Michael
Waltrip Racing deliberate-
ly altered Saturday nights
race, potentially costing
both Ryan Newman and
Jeff Gordon spots in the
Chase, to benet MWR
driver Martin Truex Jr.
NASCAR President
Mike Helton told The
Associated Press before
Sundays Truck Series
race at Iowa that ofcials
in the scoring tower did
not immediately see any-
thing to believe Bowyers
spin with seven laps
remaining at Richmond
was suspicious. The spin
came while Newman was
leading and brought out
the caution that set in
motion a chain of events
that cost Newman both
the race and a berth in the
12-driver Chase eld. He
was battling Truex for the
nal spot.
AP photo
Clint Bowyer (15) spins out as Dale Earnhardt Jr. (88) passes by during the
NASCAR Sprint Cup race at Richmond International Raceway on Saturday.
Early returns promising for PSUdefense
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
Glenn Carson had heard this
refrain before. Frankly, he was
getting a little tired of it.
Sure, Michael Mauti and
Gerald Hodges were gone.
Jordan Hill, too. All three were
NFL draft picks in April and
Penn State had to move on
without them. The conclusion
might be that the Nittany Lions
defense would be taking a step
back this season.
To be honest, Ive been
around for awhile now, and I feel
like they say that almost every
year, the senior linebacker said
before the 2013 campaign start-
ed. And then new guys come up
in the making. A (rebuild) year?
I dont really believe in that.
I remember specically a fan
coming up to me when Mauti
and Gerald were in the lineup,
and they were like, Oh, its
not like in years past when we
had Sean (Lee) and (NaVorro)
Bowman playing. Well, (Mauti
and Hodges) became superstars
for us. Know what I mean?
So its just one of those things
that I hear every year. And then
the new guys come out to be the
next big thing.
So far, so good.
Led by Carson and defensive
tackle DaQuan Jones, the Lions
defense is off to a strong start
under new coordinator John
Butler.
Granted, the opposition hasnt
been all that potent. Syracuse
was replacing its NFL-bound
head coach and its record-set-
ting quarterback while Eastern
Michigan is a perennial doormat
in the MAC.
But the defense hasnt dis-
appointed, handling both as
expected despite being put
in some tough spots by the
offenses six turnovers in two
games.
Penn State is allowing 221.5
yards (10th best in the nation)
and 12.0 points (20th) per game
thus far. And that latter number
is misleadingly high.
The seven points the Eagles
scored Saturday came on a
fumble return with the Lions
defense on the sideline. Syracuse
AP photo
Penn State defensive tackle DaQuan Jones (91) pursues the ball during the
first quarter Saturday against Eastern Michigan in State College. Penn State
won 45-7.
Steelers rusty
WILLGRAVES
APSportsWriter
PITTSBURGH The Tennessee
Titans began the season with an
embarrassing step back. It merely
set the stage for a signicant leap
forward.
Chris Johnson eschewed his usual
ashfor 70clock-chewingyards, new
defensive assistant Gregg Williams
wasted little time working some of
his old magic, and the Titans smoth-
ered the Pittsburgh Steelers 16-9 on
Sunday.
Jackie Battle ran for a 3-yard
touchdown in the second quarter
and Rob Bironas
kicked three eld
goals. Tennessees
revamped defense
did the rest.
Yes, we were a
little sloppy at spots,
yes we wish we
scoredmore points,
Tennessee coach
Mike Munchak said.
And well x some
of those things. But
we did what we had
to do to win the
football game.
Pittsburgh managed just 195
total yards and lost Pro Bowl center
Maurkice Pouncey, likely out of the
year with torn ligaments in his right
knee. Linebacker Larry Foote is also
done after rupturing his right biceps.
Weve got a lot of work to do,
Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said.
Nobody cares about our problems.
Theyre glad weve got them. We
need to understand that. We need to
stick together and persevere.
Pouncey is the linchpin of a
retooled offensive line; Foote is the
wise sage for one of the NFLs best
linebacking groups.
Anytime you lose guys that are
Ofense struggles, Pouncey out
See NASCAR | 5B
See STEELERS | 6B
See PSU | 3B
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AP photo
Pittsburgh Steelers running back LaRod Stephens-Howling (34) looks to the sideline after being tackled in the
fourth quarter Sunday against the Tennessee Titans in Pittsburgh. The Steelers managed 32 yards on the ground
in a 16-9 loss to the Titans.
16
Titans
9
Steelers
Williams
wins 5th
US Open
HOWARDFENDRICH
APTennisWriter
NEW YORK Fussing with
her skirt and ubbing her shots,
Serena Williams was troubled in
the U.S. Open nal by the swirl-
ing breeze and the strong play of
Victoria Azarenka.
After one early miss, Williams
declared, I cant play in this
wind. After blowing a big lead
and dropping the second set,
Williams chucked her racket
toward the sideline, and it
bounced back onto the court.
In the end, Williams pulled her-
self together, as she usually does
when it matters the most. Facing
her only test of the past two
weeks, the No. 1-seeded Williams
overcame No. 2 Azarenka 7-5,
6-7 (6), 6-1 on Sunday for a
fth championship at Flushing
Meadows and second in a row.
Williams raised her Grand
Slam singles title count to 17,
the sixth-most in history and one
shy of Martina Navratilova and
Chris Evert. Williams collected
a $3.6 million prize, including a
$1 million bonus for producing
the best results during the North
American summer hard-court
circuit leading up to the U.S.
Open.
Helped by nine aces, one at
126 mph, Williams improved to
67-4 with a career-high nine titles
in 2013. Since a rst-round exit
at the 2012 French Open, she is
98-5 with 14 titles, winning four
of the past six Grand Slam tour-
naments.
Yes, this one did not come eas-
ily, even though it appeared to be
nearly over when Williams went
ahead by two breaks at 4-1 in the
second set. Williams served for
the match at 5-4 and 6-5 only
to have the gutsy Azarenka break
each time.
Still, Williams regrouped and
regained control.
This was a rematch of last
years nal, also won by Williams
in three sets, and two-time
Australian Open champion
Azarenka provided another chal-
lenge with her big swings off
both wings.
See US OPEN | 5B
36
Cowboys
31
Giants
AP photo
Serena Williams reacts after a point
against Victoria Azarenka during the
womens singles final of the U.S.
Open on Sunday in New York.
Dallas defense has
Giants number
PAGE 2B Monday, September 9, 2013 SCOREBOARD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
latest line
Major league Baseball
FaVORite line UnDeRDOG line
national league
at Cincinnati -190 Chicago +180
Atlanta -160 at Miami +150
Washington -135 at NewYork +125
at Los Angeles -155 Arizona +145
at San Francisco -120 Colorado
american league
at Baltimore -130 NewYork +120
at Cleveland -115 Kansas City +105
Los Angeles -150 at Minnesota +140
Detroit -140 at Chicago +130
at Seattle -165 Houston +155
interleague
at Texas -180 Pittsburgh +170
nFl
FaVORite OPen tODaY O/U UnDeRDOG
at Washington 4 3 (52) Philadelphia
Houston 2 4 (44) at San Diego
Thursday, Sep. 12: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
x-Friday, Sep. 13: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Trenton at Harrisburg, TBA
(x-if necessary)
newYORk - Penn leaGUe
First Round
(Best-of-3)
state College 2, Jamestown 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Jamestown 6, State College 5
Saturday, Sep. 7: State College 12, Jamestown 4
Sunday, Sep. 8: State College 6, Jamestown 0
tri-City 2, aberdeen 0
Friday, Sep. 6: Tri-City 1, Aberdeen 0
Saturday, Sep. 7: Tri-City 3, Aberdeen 0
PaCiFiC COast leaGUe
First Round
(Best-of-5)
salt lake 3, las Vegas 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Thursday, Sep. 5: Salt Lake 5, Las Vegas 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Las Vegas 3, Salt Lake 2
Saturday, Sep. 7: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 4
Friday, Sep. 6: Omaha 7, Oklahoma City 6
Championship
(Best-of-5)
salt lake vs. Omaha
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Salt Lake at Omaha, 8:05 p.m.
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Salt Lake at Omaha, 8:05
p.m.
Friday, Sep. 13: Omaha at Salt Lake, TBA
x-Saturday, Sep. 14: Omaha at Salt Lake, TBA
x-Sunday, Sep. 15: Omaha at Salt Lake, TBA
MaJOR leaGUe BaseBall
satURDaYs late GaMes
angels 8, Rangers 3
texas aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
Profar 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .240
Andrus ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .266
Kinsler dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273
A.Beltre 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .319
Rosales 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .193
Pierzynski c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .281
Rios rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .279
b-Adduci ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .429
Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .241
Dav.Murphy lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .221
c-E.Beltre ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263
L.Martin cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .265
totals 35 3 9 3 1 6
los angeles aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
Shuck lf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .291
Aybar ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .272
Trout cf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .338
Trumbo 1b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .235
J.Hamilton dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .239
Iannetta c 3 1 2 1 1 0 .217
Cowgill rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .286
a-Calhoun ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .263
L.Jimenez 3b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .260
An.Romine 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244
G.Green 2b 3 1 1 3 0 0 .250
totals 33 8 11 8 3 5
texas 110 000 0013 9 4
los angeles 311 003 00x8 11 1
a-popped out for Cowgill in the 7th. b-singled
for Rios in the 9th. c-fouled out for Dav.Murphy
in the 9th.
E_A.Beltre (13), Pierzynski (1), Andrus (13),
D.Holland (2), L.Jimenez (4). LOB_Texas 6, Los
Angeles 8. 2B_Andrus (17), Shuck (18), Aybar
(27), L.Jimenez (6), G.Green (5). HR_Pierzynski
(17), of Cor.Rasmus; Trumbo (31), of D.Holland.
RBIs_Profar (25), A.Beltre (84), Pierzynski (61),
Shuck (38), Trout (84), Trumbo 2 (89), Iannetta
(33), G.Green 3 (11). SB_Profar (2), L.Martin 2
(32), Trout (32), Trumbo (5). CS_L.Jimenez (2).
S_Aybar, Cowgill. SF_G.Green.
Runners left in scoring position_Texas 5 (Rios,
Andrus, Kinsler, A.Beltre, L.Martin); Los Angeles 5
(Cowgill, Aybar, An.Romine 2, Trumbo). RISP_Tex-
as 2 for 11; Los Angeles 3 for 13.
Runners moved up_Kinsler, Pierzynski.
GIDP_A.Beltre, Rios.
DP_Los Angeles 2 (L.Jimenez, G.Green, Trum-
bo), (G.Green, Aybar, Trumbo).
texas iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
D.Holland L, 9-85 2-3 8 8 4 1 4 103 3.17
Frasor 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.59
Soria 1 1 0 0 2 1 28 2.81
Feliz 1 2 0 0 0 0 23 0.00
los angeles iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
Richards W, 6-6 7 6 2 1 1 5 110 3.90
Cor.Rasmus 1 3 1 1 0 0 15 4.70
Kohn 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.21
Cor.Rasmus pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scored_Frasor 1-0, Kohn
1-0. IBB_of Soria (Iannetta). HBP_by D.Holland
(L.Jimenez). WP_Kohn.
Umpires_Home, Bill Welke; First, Fieldin
Culbreth; Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Adrian
Johnson.
T_3:10. A_40,558 (45,483).
Mariners 6, Rays 2
tampa Bay aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
De.Jennings cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .245
Zobrist 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .277
Longoria 3b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .267
D.Young dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .294
W.Myers rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .289
Loney 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .303
S.Rodriguez lf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .244
a-DeJesus ph-lf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .268
Lobaton c 2 0 0 0 2 0 .263
Y.Escobar ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260
totals 32 2 5 2 4 6
seattle aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
B.Miller ss 4 1 0 0 0 0 .256
A.Almonte cf 2 0 1 1 1 0 .250
Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .281
K.Morales dh 4 1 3 2 0 0 .282
Ibanez lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .255
En.Chavez lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .271
Smoak 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .254
M.Saunders rf 3 0 2 1 1 0 .236
Zunino c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .229
Franklin 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .220
totals 32 6 11 6 3 7
tampa Bay 000 002 0002 5 1
seattle 111 012 00x6 11 1
a-walked for S.Rodriguez in the 7th.
E_Loney (7), Seager (13). LOB_Tampa Bay 7,
Seattle 7. 2B_M.Saunders (18), Franklin 2 (17).
HR_Longoria (29), of Paxton; Smoak (16), of
Archer; K.Morales (19), ofArcher. RBIs_Longoria
2 (74), A.Almonte (3), K.Morales 2 (74), Smoak
(40), M.Saunders (40), Franklin (43). SB_A.
Almonte (1). CS_M.Saunders (5). S_B.Miller,
A.Almonte.
Runners left in scoring position_Tampa Bay 3
(Lobaton, Zobrist 2); Seattle 2 (B.Miller 2). RISP_
Tampa Bay 0 for 4; Seattle 2 for 8.
Runners moved up_Seager. GIDP_Y.Escobar.
DP_Seattle 1 (B.Miller, Franklin, Smoak).
tampa Bay iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
Archer L, 8-7 4 4 3 2 1 2 75 3.19
Al.Torres 1 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 34 1.62
J.Wright 2-3 2 1 1 0 0 10 3.15
W.Wright 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 3.83
C.Ramos 1 1 0 0 1 2 19 4.55
seattle iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
PaxtonW, 1-0 6 4 2 1 1 3 95 1.50
Wilhelmsen 1 0 0 0 2 0 26 4.22
Rufn 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 10 3.86
Luetge 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.31
Farquhar 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 4.20
Inherited runners-scored_J.Wright 1-0, Luetge
1-0. WP_Wilhelmsen.
Umpires_Home, Chad Fairchild; First, Paul
Schrieber; Second, Jef Kellogg; Third, Mike
Muchlinski.
T_3:04. A_17,773 (47,476).
Padres 2, Rockies 1
Colorado aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
Co.Dickerson lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .295
LeMahieu 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .284
Tulowitzki ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .314
Cuddyer rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .328
Helton 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250
Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269
Torrealba c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Blackmon cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .273
Chatwood p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .303
Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-R.Wheeler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .190
1-Culberson pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .220
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
totals 31 1 6 0 2 6
san Diego aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
Venable rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .275
Denorfa lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .273
Gyorko 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .244
Headley 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238
Guzman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .232
Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Amarista cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .266
R.Cedeno ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .292
Hundley c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .238
T.Ross p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .192
a-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .197
Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Blanks 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .251
totals 30 2 6 2 3 3
Colorado 000 000 0101 6 0
san Diego 100 000 01x2 6 2
a-lined out for T.Ross in the 7th. b-grounded
into a felders choice for Corpas in the 8th.
1-ran for R.Wheeler in the 8th.
E_Hundley (9), Headley (10). LOB_Colorado 5,
San Diego 7. 2B_Co.Dickerson (12), Helton (15).
HR_Gyorko (17), of Belisle. RBIs_Gyorko (44),
Amarista (31). SB_Culberson (2), Venable (17).
Runners left in scoring position_Colorado 2
(Cuddyer, Tulowitzki); San Diego 5 (R.Cedeno 2,
Denorfa, Venable 2). RISP_Colorado 1 for 6; San
Diego 1 for 5.
GIDP_LeMahieu.
DP_San Diego 3 (Gyorko, R.Cedeno, Guzman),
(Venable, R.Cedeno), (Amarista, Blanks).
Colorado iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
Chatwood 6 5 1 1 2 2 97 3.17
Corpas 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 4.24
Belisle L, 5-6 1 1 1 1 0 1 8 4.50
san Diego iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
T.Ross 7 3 0 0 2 5 105 2.79
Gregerson,6-7BS,5-8 1 2 1 0 0 1 16 2.98
Street S, 28-29 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 2.77
WP_Chatwood.
Umpires_Home, Bill Miller; First, Todd
Tichenor; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Dale Scott.
T_2:26. A_25,272 (42,524).
Diamondbacks 2, Giants 1
arizona aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
Pollock cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .251
Eaton lf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .263
Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .294
Er.Chavez 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .290
A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .299
Nieves c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .308
G.Parra rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .268
Owings ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .250
McCarthy p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000
b-Bloomquist ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .354
Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
totals 32 2 10 2 6 4
san Francisco aB R H Bi BB sO avg.
Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .264
Scutaro 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .295
Belt 1b 4 0 1 0 0 3 .282
Pence rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .289
Sandoval 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .276
H.Sanchez c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264
G.Blanco lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .252
B.Crawford ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .260
M.Cain p 0 0 0 0 1 0 .068
Machi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Abreu ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .239
Dunning p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Hembree p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
totals 31 1 6 1 1 6
arizona 000 110 0002 10 0
san Francisco 001 000 0001 6 0
a-struck out for Machi in the 7th. b-walked for
McCarthy in the 9th.
LOB_Arizona 9, San Francisco 5. 2B_G.Parra
(34). 3B_Goldschmidt (2). RBIs_Goldschmidt
(107), G.Parra (41), Scutaro (29). SB_Owings (1).
CS_Goldschmidt (7). S_M.Cain.
Runners left inscoringposition_Arizona 5(Ow-
ings, McCarthy 2, A.Hill, Eaton). RISP_Arizona 1
for 11; San Francisco 1 for 2.
Runners moved up_Pagan. GIDP_Pollock,
Goldschmidt, Sandoval.
DP_Arizona 1 (Owings, A.Hill, Goldschmidt);
San Francisco 3 (Pagan, Belt), (Sandoval, Scuta-
ro, Belt), (Scutaro, B.Crawford, Belt).
arizona iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
McCarthy W, 4-9 8 6 1 1 1 6 99 4.66
Ziegler S, 9-11 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 2.33
san Francisco iP H R eR BB sO nP eRa
M.Cain L, 8-9 6 1-3 8 2 2 4 3 99 4.37
Machi 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.66
Dunning 1 1 0 0 1 0 14 2.95
Hembree 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 19 0.00
J.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 1.82
Inherited runners-scored_Machi 1-0, J.Lopez
1-0. IBB_of M.Cain (Owings).
Umpires_Home, Chris Guccione; First, Ron
Kulpa; Second, TomHallion; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T_2:45. A_41,076 (41,915).
POCOnO DOwns ResUlts
saturday
First - $10,000 Pace 1:51.3
2-Stonebridge Cowboy (Ge NapolitanoJr)
6.40 4.00 2.80
9-Ccs Lover N(Da Rawlings)
5.40 5.60
5-Theetownlittleguy (Ma Kakaley)
4.60
EXACTA(2-9) $49.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(2-9-5) $165.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $41.35
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(2-9-5-4) $495.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $24.77
Scratched: Dear Mac
second - $8,500 Pace 1:53.4
3-Tyree (Ge NapolitanoJr)
6.20 2.20 2.10
7-One Chaser (Da Rawlings)
34.80 9.60
1-Caviart Spencer (Ro Pierce)
2.20
EXACTA(3-7) $68.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(3-7-1) $172.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $43.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(3-7-1-2) $660.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $33.03
DAILYDOUBLE (2-3) $12.00
third - $40,000trot 1:54.2
1A-Choose Happy (Br Miller)
3.40 2.40 2.10
2-GlidingTo Glory (An Miller)
4.80 5.20
7-Omnipotent (An McCarthy)
25.00
EXACTA(1-2) $24.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-2-7) $365.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $91.35
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-2-7-6) $3,044.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $152.22
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(2-3-1) $34.00
Fourth - $12,000 Pace 1:51.0
3-Tamayo (Si Allard)
4.40 2.80 3.40
8-PHPowerplay (Ma Kakaley)
8.00 7.40
2-Mattoxs Spencer (Br Miller)
8.80
EXACTA(3-8) $33.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(3-8-2) $355.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $88.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(3-8-2-1) $680.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $34.02
Fifth - $8,500 Pace 1:51.4
7-Bagel Man (ThJackson)
49.80 16.40 8.40
1-Two Beers Away (An Napolitano)
12.20 7.80
5-UBettor Watch Out (Si Allard)
3.00
EXACTA(7-1) $284.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(7-1-5) $1,186.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $296.55
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(7-1-5-4) $8,867.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $443.38
sixth - $40,000 Pace 1:50.4
5-Antigua Hanover (Ty Buter)
12.20 6.40 3.80
9-Juice Hanover (Ma Romano)
48.60 18.20
8-Icommandmyspirit (An McCarthy)
4.20
EXACTA(5-9) $803.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-9-8) $3,632.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $908.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-9-8-ALL) $8,912.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $445.60
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(3-7-5) $640.00
seventh - $14,000 Pace 1:49.1
6-Competition Cam(Ty Buter)
16.60 9.20 3.20
3-Allamerican Daddy (An McCarthy)
6.40 4.20
7-Best Ears (Si Allard)
4.40
EXACTA(6-3) $74.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(6-3-7) $677.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $169.30
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(6-3-7-4) $5,837.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $291.85
eighth - $40,000trot 1:53.0
6-Rossini (Ho Parker)
8.40 3.20 3.20
3-Sailer Eddie (Ro Pierce)
3.60 2.40
7-TeamSix (Ma Kakaley)
3.20
EXACTA(6-3) $30.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(6-3-7) $189.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $47.30
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(6-3-7-8) $2,297.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $114.85
ninth - $16,000 Pace 1:50.3
6-Orse Power (Ma Kakaley)
9.80 6.20 3.40
5-Fanelli Royal (Da Palone)
4.00 3.00
2-Sir Howies ZTam(Br Miller)
3.20
EXACTA(6-5) $33.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(6-5-2) $112.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $28.05
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(6-5-2-7) $439.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $21.98
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(6-6-6) $409.20
Scratched: Sky Desperado, Flight Exec
tenth - $40,000 Pace 1:50.1
1-Shock It ToEm(Ro Pierce)
5.00 2.60 2.80
7-Ultimate Beachboy (Da Palone)
2.40 2.80
1A-Good Day Mate (Si Allard)
2.80
EXACTA(1-7) $8.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-7-3) $27.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $6.90
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-7-3-8) $164.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $8.21
eleventh - $18,000 Pace 1:51.2
2-Johnny Z(Ma Kakaley)
9.20 5.20 3.20
4-China King (Da Rawlings)
9.40 6.00
7-Light UpThe Sky (Ge NapolitanoJr)
3.20
EXACTA(2-4) $99.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(2-4-7) $285.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $71.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(2-4-7-1) $3,400.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $170.03
twelfth - $25,000trot 1:52.0
7-Dws Ny Yank (Ma Kakaley)
3.60 2.40 2.20
6-FromAbove (An McCarthy)
3.20 3.20
1-Mr Ridgetaker (Ho Parker)
11.60
EXACTA(7-6) $12.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(7-6-1) $69.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $17.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(7-6-1-2) $365.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $18.25
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(1-2-7) $115.40
thirteenth - $19,000 Pace 1:50.0
8-Alsace Hanover (Br Miller)
7.00 6.20 3.40
3-PHJackpot (Da Rawlings)
23.20 6.40
2-Maytime Terror (Ge NapolitanoJr)
2.40
5-No Bu (An Napolitano)
2.80
EXACTA(8-3) $141.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(8-3-2) $446.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(8-3-5) $266.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent 8-3-2) $111.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent 8-3-5) $66.50
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(8-3-2-5) $1,886.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(8-3-5-2) $1,791.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent 8-3-2-5) $94.30
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent 8-3-5-2) $89.59
Fourteenth - $21,000 Pace 1:48.0
5-Johny Rock (An Miller)
4.20 2.60 2.10
4-Uncle Goodfellow(Da Rawlings)
11.40 3.80
2-Meirs Hanover (Ma Kakaley)
2.40
EXACTA(5-4) $79.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-4-2) $169.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $42.25
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-4-2-3) $484.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-4-2-6) $475.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent 5-4-2-3) $24.21
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent 5-4-2-6) $23.77
Scratched: Tobago Cays
Fifteenth - $15,000 Pace 1:50.3
2-Rescue Plan (An Miller)
10.60 3.60 2.40
1-Mccedes (An McCarthy)
3.60 2.20
3-Special Terror (Ge NapolitanoJr)
2.60
EXACTA(2-1) $30.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(2-1-3) $54.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $13.70
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(2-1-3-6) $338.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $16.90
sixteenth - $19,000 Pace 1:49.3
3-Townslight Hanover (An McCarthy)
3.40 2.40 2.20
5-In Mint Condition (An Napolitano)
5.80 3.40
4-Art Of Illusion (Ma Romano)
6.20
EXACTA(3-5) $23.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(3-5-4) $200.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $50.10
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(3-5-4-6) $1,799.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $89.97
LATE DOUBLE (2-3) $18.80
total Handle-$456,065
harness raci ng local calendar
MOnDaY
HiGH sCHOOl FielD HOCkeY
Abington Heights at Wyoming Seminary
Coughlin at HazletonArea
Crestwood at WyomingArea
Dallas at WyomingValley West
Delaware Valley at Nanticoke
Lake-Lehman at Holy Redeemer
HiGH sCHOOl GOlF
Berwick at Coughlin
Crestwood at Tunkhannock
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
Holy Redeemer at Nanticoke
Meyers at Hanover Area
MMI Prep at GAR
WyomingArea at Lake-Lehman
WyomingValley West at Dallas
HiGH sCHOOl BOYs sOCCeR
Holy Redeemer at WyomingArea
MMI Prep at PittstonArea
Tunkhannok at Berwick
Crestwood at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
HiGH sCHOOl GiRls sOCCeR
Berwick at Tunkhannock
Crestwood at Meyers
HazletonArea at Coughlin
Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke
PittstonArea at MMI Prep
WyomingArea at Holy Redeemer
WyomingValley West at Dallas
HiGH sCHOOl GiRlstennis
Coughlin at Wyoming Seminary
Crestwood at WyomingArea, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Tunkhannock
HazletonArea at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
GAR at PittstonArea
WyomingValley West at Berwick
HiGH sCHOOl GiRlsVOlleYBall
Coughlin at MMI Prep
Meyers at Berwick
PittstonArea at Dallas
WyomingArea at Nanticoke
WyomingValley West at Tunkhannock
COlleGe GOlF
PSUWilkes-Barre at Penn College, 11 a.m.
Kings at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
tUesDaY
HiGH sCHOOl FielD HOCkeY
Berwick at Meyers
Hanover Area at PittstonArea
Tunkhannock at GAR
HiGH sCHOOl GOlF
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Seminary
HiGH sCHOOl BOYs sOCCeR
Berwick at WyomingArea
HazletonArea at Dallas
Meyers at Crestwood, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area
HiGH sCHOOl GiRlsVOlleYBall
Crestwood at GAR, 4:30 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Hanover Area
HazletonArea at North Pocono
Lake-Lehman at Holy Redeemer, 4:30 p.m.
COlleGe FielD HOCkeY
Misericordia at Alvernia, 7 p.m.
COlleGe Mens sOCCeR
PSUMont Alto at PSUHazleton, 6 p.m.
COlleGe CO-eD sOCCeR
PSU Worthington Scranton at PSU Wilkes-Barre,
4 p.m.
COlleGe wOMenstennis
Misericordia at Keystone, 3:30 p.m.
COlleGe wOMensVOlleYBall
PSU-Hazleton at Kings, 7 p.m.
Wilkes at Susquehanna, 7 p.m.
weDnesDaY
HiGH sCHOOl CROss COUntRY
Dallas/Coughlin/MMI Prep/Wyoming Seminary/
Crestwood at Holy Redeemer, 4:15 p.m.
HiGH sCHOOl GOlF
Crestwood at Berwick, 3:30 p.m.
Hanover Area at WyomingArea
HazletonArea at WyomingValley West
Lake-Lehman at Wyoming Seminary
MMI Prep at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Nanticoke at Meyers
PittstonArea at Coughlin
Tunkhannock at Dallas
HiGH sCHOOl FielD HOCkeY
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Nanticoke at Crestwood
WyomingArea at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin
WyomingValley West at Delaware Valley
HiGH sCHOOl BOYs sOCCeR
GAR at Holy Redeemer
HiGH sCHOOl GiRls sOCCeR
Berwick at Meyers
Crestwood at Tunkhannock
WyomingArea at HazletonArea
Wyoming Seminary at Coughlin
HiGH sCHOOl GiRlstennis
Coughlin at Berwick
Crestwood at WyomingValley West, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Wyoming Seminary
Hanover Area at Tunkhannock
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
Holy Redeemer at MMI Prep, 4 p.m.
GAR at WyomingArea
HiGH sCHOOl GiRlsVOlleYBall
Dallas at Coughlin
MMI Prep at Meyers
PittstonArea at Wyoming valley West
Tunkhannock at WyomingArea
COlleGe FielD HOCkeY
Kings at Muhlenberg, 7:30 p.m.
COlleGe GOlF
PSU-Hazleton at Penn College, 11 a.m.
COlleGe Mens sOCCeR
Misericordia at Susquehanna, 7 p.m.
COlleGe wOMens sOCCeR
Kings at Alvernia, 7 p.m.
Marywood at Misericordia, 7 p.m.
COlleGe wOMensVOlleYBall
PSUYork at PSUWilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
tHURsDaY
HiGH sCHOOl FielD HOCkeY
Berwick at Hanover Area
GAR at Elk Lake
Meyers at PittstonArea
Northwest at Tunkhannock
HiGH sCHOOl BOYs sOCCeR
Coughlin at Wyoming Seminary
Crestwood at Tunkhannock
Dallas at Holy Redeemer
HazletonArea at PittstonArea
MMI at Nanticoke
WyomingValley West at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
HiGH sCHOOl GiRls sOCCeR
Holy Redeemer at Dallas
Lake-Lehman at WyomingValley West
MMI Prep at Nanticoke
PittstonArea at Hanover Area
HiGH sCHOOl GiRlsVOlleYBall
Berwick at HazletonArea
Crestwood at North Pocono, 4:30 p.m.
GAR at Hanover Area
Holy Redeemer at Delaware Valley, 4:30 p.m.
Nanticoke at Lake-Lehman
COlleGe GOlF
Kings at Moravian (Woodstone), 1 p.m.
COlleGe Mens sOCCeR
Wilkes at Baptist Bible, 4 p.m.
COlleGe wOMens sOCCeR
LebanonValley at Wilkes, 4:30 p.m.
COlleGe wOMensVOlleYBall
PSUHazleton at Penn College, 1 p.m.
PSU-York at PSUWilkes-Barre, 7 p.m.
WilliamPaterson at Kings, 7 p.m.
MlB
7 p.m.
MLB Kansas City at Cleveland
SNYWashington at N.Y. Mets
YES N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore
8 p.m.
ROOTPittsburgh at Texas
nFl
7 p.m.
ESPNPhiladelphia at Washington
10:15 p.m.
ESPNHouston at San Diego
tennis
5 p.m.
CBS U.S. Open, mens championship, at
NewYork
what s on tv
sPRint CUP ResUlts
saturday
at Richmond international Raceway
Richmond, Va.
lap length: .75 miles
(start position in parentheses)
1. (26) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400 laps, 111.2 rat-
ing, 47 points.
2. (2) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 400, 129.6, 43.
3. (24) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 100.9,
42.
4. (7) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 114.1,
41.
5. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 400, 90, 40.
6. (5) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 400, 104.3, 39.
7. (11) MartinTruex Jr., Toyota, 400, 87.8, 37.
8. (1) Jef Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 101.9, 37.
9. (16) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 400, 75.9, 35.
10. (21) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 400, 77.2,
34.
11. (17) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 92.1, 33.
12. (9) Greg Bife, Ford, 400, 99.3, 32.
13. (14) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400,
81.8, 31.
14. (18) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 400, 78.8, 30.
15. (34) AJ Allmendinger, Toyota, 400, 71.2, 29.
16. (12) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 400,
81.5, 28.
17. (3) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 400, 118.9, 29.
18. (19) Jef Burton, Chevrolet, 400, 97.2, 26.
19. (13) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 92.3, 25.
20. (15) Aric Almirola, Ford, 400, 83.4, 24.
21. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 399, 73.3, 23.
22. (8) Joey Logano, Ford, 399, 67.6, 22.
23. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 399, 60, 21.
24. (20) BrianVickers, Toyota, 399, 62.9, 0.
25. (4) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 398, 104.5, 20.
26. (25) Casey Mears, Ford, 397, 53.8, 18.
27. (32) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 397, 56.6, 17.
28. (33) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 397, 45.8, 16.
29. (23) David Ragan, Ford, 397, 57.2, 15.
30. (36) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 396, 39.1,
14.
31. (40) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 396, 47, 13.
32. (35) David Reutimann, Toyota, 395, 46, 12.
33. (41) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 395, 36.6, 0.
34. (28) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 395, 46.3,
0.
35. (38) RyanTruex, Chevrolet, 395, 34.1, 0.
36. (43) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 393, 32.9, 8.
37. (42) Ken Schrader, Ford, 393, 36.8, 7.
38. (29) David Stremme, Toyota, 391, 30.8, 6.
39. (31) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 388, 31.6, 0.
40. (10) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 372, 46.8,
4.
41. (27) JoshWise, Ford, vibration, 142, 43, 0.
42. (39) Reed Sorenson, Ford, brakes, 126,
25.8, 0.
43. (30) Michael McDowell, Ford, brakes, 76,
31.9, 1.
Race statistics
winners average speed: 105.028 mph.
time of Race: 2 hours, 51 minutes, 23 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.668 seconds.
Cautions: 5 for 29 laps.
lead Changes: 17 among 9 drivers.
lap leaders: J.Gordon 1-49; B.Keselowski
50-65; Ku.Busch 66-94; J.McMurray 95-96;
B.Keselowski 97-104; M.Kenseth 105-109;
Ku.Busch 110-137; J.McMurray 138-141;
B.Keselowski 142-208; Ku.Busch 209-217;
B.Keselowski 218-268; Ku.Busch 269; C.Bowyer
270-341; Ku.Busch 342-347; C.Edwards 348-
390; R.Newman 391-394; P.Menard 395-397;
C.Edwards 398-400.
leaders summary (Driver, times led,
laps led): B.Keselowski, 4 times for 142 laps;
Ku.Busch, 5times for 73laps; C.Bowyer, 1 timefor
72 laps; J.Gordon, 1 time for 49 laps; C.Edwards, 2
times for 46 laps; J.McMurray, 2 times for 6 laps;
M.Kenseth, 1 time for 5 laps; R.Newman, 1 time
for 4 laps; P.Menard, 1 time for 3 laps.
top 12 in Points: 1. M.Kenseth, 2,015; 2.
J.Johnson, 2,012; 3. Ky.Busch, 2,012; 4.
K.Harvick, 2,006; 5. C.Edwards, 2,006; 6.
J.Logano, 2,003; 7. G.Bife, 2,003; 8. C.Bowyer,
2,000; 9. D.Earnhardt Jr., 2,000; 10. Ku.Busch,
2,000; 11. K.Kahne, 2,000; 12. M.Truex Jr., 2,000.
auto raci ng
baseball
inteRnatiOnal leaGUe
First Round Playofs
(Best-of-5)
Durham3, indianapolis 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Durham2, Indianapolis 0
Thursday, Sep. 5: Durham6, Indianapolis 5
Friday, Sep. 6: Durham2, Indianapolis 1
Pawtucket 3, Rochester 2
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Rochester 7, Pawtucket 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Pawtucket 7, Rochester 2
Friday, Sep. 6: Pawtucket 5, Rochester 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Rochester 9, Pawtucket 1
Sunday, Sep. 8: Pawtucket 3, Rochester 0
easteRn leaGUe
wild-Card
(Best-of-5)
trenton 3, Binghamton 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Trenton 6, Binghamton 5, 10
innings
Thursday, Sep. 5: Trenton 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Trenton 3, Binghamton 0
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Harrisburg 3, erie 1
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Harrisburg 5, Erie 4
Thursday, Sep. 5: Erie 2, Harrisburg 1, 12 innings
Friday, Sep. 6: Harrisburg 4, Erie 1
Saturday, Sep. 7: Harrisburg 5, Erie 1
Harrisburg vs trenton
Tuesday, Sep. 10: Harrisburg at Trenton, 7:05 p.m.
Wednesday, Sep. 11: Harrisburg at Trenton, 7:05
p.m.
Football
COlleGe FOOtBall
aPtop 25 Poll
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press
college football poll, with frst-place votes in pa-
rentheses, records through Sept. 7, total points
based on 25 points for a frst-place vote through
one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Alabama (57) 1-0 1,494 1
2. Oregon (1) 2-0 1,385 2
3. Clemson (1) 2-0 1,332 4
4. Ohio St. (1) 2-0 1,327 3
5. Stanford 1-0 1,271 5
6. Texas A&M 2-0 1,133 7
7. Louisville 2-0 1,105 8
8. LSU 2-0 1,075 9
9. Georgia 1-1 1,036 11
10. Florida St. 1-0 1,011 10
11. Michigan 2-0 872 17
12. Oklahoma St. 2-0 834 13
13. South Carolina 1-1 829 6
14. Oklahoma 2-0 675 16
15. Miami 2-0 615 NR
16. UCLA 1-0 488 18
17. Northwestern 2-0 452 19
18. Florida 1-1 405 12
19. Washington 1-0 392 20
20. Wisconsin 2-0 378 21
21. Notre Dame 1-1 333 14
22. Baylor 2-0 295 23
23. Nebraska 2-0 277 22
24. TCU 1-1 170 24
25. Mississippi 2-0 78 NR
Others receiving votes: Arizona St. 64, Fresno
St. 26, Michigan St. 26, Texas 26, N. Illinois 21,
Virginia Tech 15, BYU 14, Georgia Tech 10, Arizona
9, Illinois 9, Bowling Green 7, Penn St. 7, Boise St.
3, Tennessee 1.
Usatoday top 25 Poll
The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll,
with frst-place votes in parentheses, records
through Sept. 7, total points based on 25 points
for frst place through one point for 25th, and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Alabama (58) 1-0 1,545 1
2. Oregon (1) 2-0 1,447 3
3. Ohio St. (2) 2-0 1,429 2
4. Stanford 1-0 1,327 4
5. Clemson 2-0 1,307 5
6. Texas A&M(1) 2-0 1,242 7
7. Louisville 2-0 1,121 8
8. LSU 2-0 1,067 11
9. Florida St. 1-0 1,040 10
10. Georgia 1-1 1,021 12
11. Oklahoma St. 2-0 866 14
12. Michigan 2-0 860 17
13. Oklahoma 2-0 800 15
14. South Carolina 1-1 788 6
15. Nebraska 2-0 478 19
16. Northwestern 2-0 473 20
17. UCLA 1-0 471 18
18. Wisconsin 2-0 455 21
18. Miami 2-0 455 24
20. Florida 1-1 410 9
21. Notre Dame 1-1 348 13
22. Baylor 2-0 297 NR
23. Washington 1-0 253 23
24. TCU 1-1 195 24
25. Mississippi 2-0 91 NR
Others Receiving Votes: Michigan State 74;
Fresno State 59; Arizona State 48; Texas 38;
Northern Illinois 27; Arizona 21; Brigham Young
18; Arkansas 16; Georgia Tech 12; Virginia Tech 8;
Texas Tech 7; Central Florida 6; East Carolina 6;
Southern California 5; Bowling Green 3; Illinois 3;
Kansas State 3; Boise State 2; Tennessee 2; Utah
2; Utah State 2; Boston College 1.
golF
satURDaY
at national Golf links of america
southampton, n.Y.
Yardage: 6,986; Par: 72
United states 8, Britain and ireland 4
Foursomes
Britain and Ireland 2, United States 1
Nathan Kimsey and Max Orrin, B&I, halved
with Bobby Wyatt and Cory Whitsett, U.S.
Matthew Fitzpatrick and Neil Raymond, B&I,
def. Jordan Niebrugge and Nathan Smith, U.S.,
1 up.
Garrick Porteous and Rhys Pugh, B&I, def. Mi-
chael Weaver andToddWhite, U.S., 3 and 1.
Patrick Rodgers and Justin Thomas, U.S., def.
Gavin beating Moynihan and Kevin Phelan, B&I,
2 and 1.
singles
United States 6, Britain and Ireland 1
Max Homa, U.S., def. Max Orrin, B&I, 5 and 3.
Bobby Wyatt, U.S., def. Neil Raymond, B&I, 2
up.
Michael Kim, U.S. def. Callum Shinkwin, B&I,
2 and 1.
Cory Whitsett, U.S., def. Jordan Smith, B&I, 1
up.
Jordan Niebrugge, U.S., def. Garrick Porteous,
B&I, 1 up.
Michael Weaver, U.S., def. MatthewFitzpatrick,
B&I, 3 and 1.
Nathan Kimsey, B&I, halved with Justin Thom-
as, U.S.
Gavin Moynihan, B&I, def. Patrick Rodgers, 2
and 1.
sUnDaYs PaiRinGs
Foursomes
Bobby Wyatt and Cory Whitsett, U.S., def. Na-
than Kimsey and Max Orrin, B&I, 2 and 1.
Matthew Fitzpatrick and Neil Raymond, B&I,
def. Michael Weaver andToddWhite, U.S., 3 and 2.
Max Homa and Michael Kim, U.S. def. Garrick
Porteous and Rhys Pugh, B&I, 1 up.
Gavin Moynihan and Kevin Phelan, B&I, def.
Patrick Rodgers andJordan Niebrugge, U.S., 2 up.
singles
Bobby Wyatt, U.S., def. Neil Raymond, B&I, 4
and 3.
Justin Thomas, U.S., def. Max Orrin, B&I, 6
and 4.
Matthew Fitzpatrick, B&I, def. Michael Weaver,
U.S., 3 and 2.
ToddWhite, U.S., def. Rhys Pugh, B&I, 4 and 3.
Nathan Smith, U.S., def. Nathan Kimsey, B&I,
4 and 3.
Callum Shinkwin, B&I, def. Cory Whitsett, U.S.,
2 up.
Michael Kim, U.S. def. Garrick Porteous, B&I,
4 and 2.
KevinPhelan, B&I, def. Max Homa, U.S., 2and1.
Jordan Niebrugge, U.S. def. Jordan Smith, B&I,
6 and 5.
Patrick Rodgers, U.S. def. Gavin Moynihan,
B&I., 1 up.
BeRwiCk GOlF ClUB
Mens Club Championship
Championhip Flight
1. Chris Banyas 70-73-79222; 2. Thomas Cicini
Jr. 73-78-75226; 3. Robert A. Bull 80-75-76
231; 4. Jack Miller 73-81-77231; 5. John Arndt
75-78-81234; 6. Carl Hinkle 73-81-83237; 7.
Jason Holloway 70-80-87237; 8. Ed Kosteva
76-82-90248.
First Flight
1. Richard Brewington 84-79-74237; 2. Chris
Lopes 77-86-81244; 3. Dennis Mackert 81-87-
81249; 4. Scott Scheirer 85-83-82250; 5.
Don Fries 83-86-83252; 6. Michael Vogt 82-
81-90253; 7. Gary Powlus 83-82-920255; 8.
Joseph Banks Jr. 80-88-88256.
second Flight
1. Charles Pitchford 83-87-78248; 2. Tom Gray
85-87-86258; 3. Jef May 89-88-84261; 4.
Mike Powlus 88-83-91262; 5. Sam Kuhn 86-
89-88263; 6. Lou Dipippa 90-88-88266; 7.
Anthony Palombo 86-86-95267; 8. Joe Demelf
87-91-90268; 9. John Kocher 92-86-97275.
third Flight
1. Vito Covino Sr. 89-92-85266; 2. Rod Good
98-92-86276; 3. Chris Sult 92-97-89278; 4.
Ed Edstrom 100-90-91281; 5. Dick Cashman
99-96-94292; 6. JackWallner 98-100-95293;
7. Gerard Owens 100-114-115329; 8. Fred Kluck
108-112-112332; 9. Angelo Spezialetti 87-97-
NCNC.
transacti ons
BaseBall
american league
BOSTONREDSOXRecalled RHPAllenWeb-
ster fromPawtucket (IL).
national league
CHICAGOCUBS Designated INF Cody Ran-
somfor assignment. Activated RHP Scott Baker
fro the 60-day DL.
HOCkeY
national Hockey league
CAROLINA HURRICANES Fired executive
vice president and assistant general manager
Jason Karmanos. Announced vice president of
hockey operations Ron Francis, and video scout
and hockey operations assistant Darren Yorke
will take over Karmanos duties.
BlUe RiDGe GOlF COURse
Blue Chips ladies Golf league
Best Poker Hand on Back nine
First Flight: Kerrie Wincek
Second Flight: Judy Cameron
Third Flight: Dee Kovaleski
Fourth Flight: Sue Pohutski
Chip-ins: Maribeth Girton (Blue 7)
wYOMinGValleYCOUntRY
ClUB
Club Championship
Results: 1. Joe Weiscarger (219), 2. Frank Schiel
Jr. (221), 3. Chad Rado (223), 4. Tom Biscotti
(224), 5. Mike Blazick (227), 5. John Olszewski
(227).
Flights Division
Championship Flight: TimBurns (156)
First Flight: Steve Bolinger (171)
second Flight: Dave Bienias (175)
Medal Play-Open Day
First Flight Gross: Natalie Sokoloski
First Flight low net: 1. Carol Lippincott; 2. Sally
Price
second Flight Gross: Rebecca Kulbaski
second Flight low net: 1. Linda Shypulefski; 2.
Crystal Hritzik
third Flight Gross: Rose Senunas
third Flight low net: 1. Michelle Hazleton; 2.
Dorothy Callahan
Fourth Flight Gross: PegThomas
Birdies: Marie Mahalos (Hole 6), Carol Lippin-
cott (Hole 6), Natalie Sokoloski (Hole 11), Julie
Chmielowski (Hole 13), Linda Shypulefski (Hole
15)
Chip-ins: Karen Hazleton (Hole 7, Hole 12),
Diane Kocik (Hole 12), Michelle Hazleton (Hole
13), Crystal Hritzk (Hole 14), Nancy McLaughlin
(Hole 17)
ertley makes ace
Sis Ertley of Dallas had her ffth
hole- in-one at IremCountry Club
on Aug. 27. The ace was on the
par 3 17th hole using a 7 iron. This
was the frst hole-in-one for a
woman at Iremin 14 years. It was
witnessed by Julie Conklin, Diane
Kocik, and Betsy Thomas.
Umphred posts hole-in-one
Mark Umphred recroded a
hole-in-one Wednesday at the
Wyoming Valley Country Club on
hole 13 at a distance of 130 yards.
Witnesses were Wayne Baer and
Charlie Obeid.
CaMPs/CliniCs
sem Cradle lacrosse is ofering
a clinic for boys and girls ages
4-8 at Wyoming Seminary Upper
School in Kingston. Program
sessions will be held Saturdays
fromnoon to 1 p.m. at Klassner
Field on North Maple Street
beginning Saturday, Sept. 21 and
continuing through Nov. 2. Cost
is $120. The programprovides
all necessary equipment with no
additional feel. The curriculum
is designed to teach the basics
of lacrosse. It will be directed
by Semcoach Catie Kersey. For
more information or to register,
contact Kersey at ckersey@
wyomingseminary.org.
leaGUes
Georgetti Painting Mens
Bowling league needs two
bowlers for it Monday night
league at Modern Lanes, which
starts Sept. 9. If interested, call
Rich at 829-0740.
MeetinGs
Back Mountain little league
will hold a board meeting
Monday, Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. at the
Daddow-Isaacs American Legion
located on Route 415 in Dallas.
General meeting, open to the
public, will be held at 8 p.m.
Berwick Boys Basketball
Boosters, 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9
in the varsity gymlobby.
Crestwood Boys Basketball
Booster Club will hold its next
meeting at 7 p.m., Monday, Sept.
9 at Cavanaughs Grille.
Crestwood Football Booster
Club will have a meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 11, at 7 p.m.
at Tonys Pizza. Parents of all
junior high and varsity players are
welcome to attend.
Hughestown sports Club will
have a meeting at 2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 18, at Granteeds,
Parsonage St. in Pittston. Game
tickets and season tickets are
available and can be purchased
at the meeting or by contacting
any club member. For more
information, call Barbara Kapish
at 457-5705.
Jenkins twp little league
will hold its monthly meeting
on Monday, Sept. 9 at 6:30 p.m.
at the feld house. All ofcers,
managers and interested parents
are requested to attend.
nanticoke area little league
will meet Sept. 11 at 7 p.m.
Location will be announced soon.
Elections for all positions will take
place at end of meeting.
Plains Yankees Football and
Cheerleading Organization
will have its monthly meeting
Monday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m. at the
PAVin Hudson. All are welcome
to attend.
west side soccer Club will
have a meeting of the parents/
coaches committee at 7 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 9, on the second
foor of the Plymouth Borough
Building on Shawnee Ave. For
more information, call Matthew
at 574-7699.
wyoming Valley asa Chapter
of Umpires will have its annual
dinner meeting at Konefals
Restaurant Sept. 9 at 6 p.m. If
attending, call Dave Miller at 332-
9105. The cost is $5.
ReGistRatiOns/tRYOUts
Back Mountain Bandits
Boys and Girls lacrosse
Registration for 2014 season
will be Saturday Sept. 21 from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dallas
American Legion. The league
is for boys in age groups from
U9 to U15 and girls in grades
3-8. Family discounts apply and
there are no mandatory fund
raisers. Registration fee includes
U.S. Lacrosse registration,
U.S. Lacrosse magazine and
a teamuniform. The league is
also looking for volunteers for
board positions and all aspects
of the organization. For more
information, visit www.laxteams.
net/bmylax/ or email bmtlax@
gmail.com.
Dallas Youth Basketball is
holding registration for its winter
youth basketball leagues on
Tuesday, Sept. 10 and Thursday,
Sept. 12. The registrations will be
held from6-9 p.m., both nights
at Wycallis Elementary school
cafeteria. Boys and girls who live
in the Dallas School District who
attend third though eight grade
are eligible to participate. Call
Scott at 570-690-2190 for more
information.
UPCOMinG eVents/OtHeR
assembly 59 will have a golf
tournament Saturday, Sept. 21
at the Hollenback Golf Course
on North Washington Street in
Wilkes-Barre. The tournament
begins at 9 a.m. The cost is $40
per person. For more information,
call Butch at 829-3398 or
825-3584. Refreshments will be
served afterwards at the North
End Slovak Club.
Bass Fishing tournament will
be held Sept. 21 at Blytheburn
Lake on Blytheburn Rd. in
Mountain Top. Boats in the
water at 6:30 a.m. and out at 11
a.m. The fee is $40 per team.
The tournament is limited to 10
boats. Reserve early. This is a
fundraiser for the Blytheburn
Lake Association. For more
information, call 868-6895 or
678-5261.
Commonwealth Medical
College will have its ffth annual
golf tournament Monday, Sept.
30, at Huntsville Golf Course in
Shavertown. Registration is at 9
a.m. and the tournament begins
at 10 a.m. All proceeds beneft
The Commonwealth Medical
College scholarships. For more
information, call 504-9619.
Dallas Rotary Clubs 30th
annual Golf Classic, to support
Dallas Rotary charities, will
be held at the IremCountry
Club on Monday, Sept. 23. The
tournament starts at 12:30 p.m.
The sponsorship donation is
$100 and the player entry fee is
$110. The format is captain and
crew. Individuals are welcome
and will be teamed up with others
in a group. For more information
or an entry form, call Kevin
Smith at 696-5420. Sponsors
and players should respond by
Sept. 12.
Harper Family will have its
annual event Saturday, Sept. 21
at Blue Ridge Trail Golf Course.
The tournament starts at 1
p.m. and will be a captain and
crewformat. The cost is $95
per person, which includes the
golf, a gift for each golfer and
dinner to be held at Blue Ridge
Trail following play. Awards will
be given to three fight winners.
There will also be prizes for
closest to the pins and a pot of
gold hole. There will also be door
prizes. All proceeds will beneft
the American Heart Association.
For more information, call Paul F.
Harper at 592-5191 or email him
at harperpunar@yahoo.com. The
deadline for entry is Sept. 14.
Holy Rosary Golf tournament
is set for Sept. 15 at Pine
Hills Country Club in Taylor.
Registration is at noon for a 1
p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $90
per player, $360 for a foursome,
and includes lunch and dinner.
Contact Debbie at 451-1762 or
Holy Rosary School at 457-2553
for information, registrations and
sponsorships.
kings softball will have a golf
tournament Sunday, Sept. 29,
at Four Seasons Golf Course.
The cost is $75 per golfer, which
includes 18 holes of golf, cart,
beverages and a meal. The
format is captain and crew.
Reservations are required by
Sept. 20. For more information,
email softball@kings.edu or call
208.5855.
kingston/Forty Fort little
league Board of Directors has
nominations for all positions.
In order to submit your name
for nomination, please email
bbordow@ptd.net indicating
your interest. Nominations for all
positions will be submitted at the
KFF Board meeting on Monday,
Sept. 16. Adetailed description of
these positions are available on
our website- www.kfl.org.
knights of Columbus Pittston
Council no. 372 local level
soccer challenge will be held at
noon Sept. 22 at the James Clark
Park located along Curry Street
in Pittston for all area boys and
girls ages 10-14. Winners progress
through local, district and state
competitions. Participants will
compete in their respective
age groups. There is no cost
for admission. Participants are
required to have proof of age
and written parental consent to
compete. For more information,
call Don Mac Rae at 815-4454 or
Mitch Megliola at 335-3002.
luzerne County special
Olympics Golf tournament will
be held Sunday, Sept. 22 with
a noon check-in and a 1 p.m.
shotgun start at Four Seasons
Golf Course in Exeter. The
tournament will beneft Luzerne
County Special Olympians fall/
winter/spring training. To register
or to donate, please email Frank
at fvt315@netzero.comor call
510-5600.
Milton Brown Memorial Golf
tournament will be held Sept.
9 at Fox Hill Country Club. The
tournament starts at 1 p.m. and
the format is captain and crew.
The tournament supports the
JCC day camp. The day includes
golf, dinner, prizes, pot of gold,
mulligans, whiskey tasting, a
cigar smoker and a $15,000 hole-
in-one give away.
BUlletin BOaRD
scored 17 in the opener,
but 10 were direct results
of two more turnovers.
The Orange got a eld goal
right after a fumble and a
touchdown after return-
ing an interception to the
1-yard line.
With that game on
the line, the Lions twice
stopped Syracuse in the
nal ve minutes with the
Orange needing a touch-
down to win.
It carried over into the
Eastern Michigan game,
where the defense buckled
down after a so-so start to
smother the Eagles in the
second half, allowing only
55 yards in the nal 30
minutes.
Theyre playing very
well right now, Lions
coach Bill OBrien said.
Theres some veteran guys
over there that have played
a lot of football for us,
which is good. Very, very
pleased with our defense.
One of those veteran
guys has made the biggest
impact so far.
DaQuan Jones, hes
taken his game to the next
level, Butler said. Hes
played very physically. As
long as he continues to do
that, its going to be chal-
lenging for teams to run the
ball on us.
Jones has announced his
presence with authority in
the rst two games, racking
up 18 tackles while leading
the Big Ten in tackles for
loss (5.0) and sacks (2.0).
It all goes back to me
being the best that I can
be, Jones said. Im not
looking to get numbers but
have fun with my team-
mates, and thats something
that we did (Saturday). I
can be a playmaker to help
this defense out and thats
something that I really
want to prove out there
early. I can go out there, I
can be that guy.
Last year I was just try-
ing to do my job to help my
seniors out. This year
Im trying to go out there
and make plays and be an
impact guy.
A fellow senior, Carson,
led the squad Saturday
with 10 stops. Most impor-
tantly, he has been a stabi-
lizing force for a linebacker
corps that got very thin
very quickly with inju-
ries to Mike Hull and Ben
Kline.
A year ago, Carson often
found himself heading
to the sideline on obvi-
ous passing downs as the
Lions went with Mauti,
Hodges and Hull as part of
a big nickel package.
This season, he didnt
leave the eld for a defen-
sive snap until the fourth
quarter against the Eagles
with the Lions up by four
touchdowns.
Thats really what I was
working towards, Carson
said. Being in that pack-
age, a lot of times the
games on the line. Its
great to be on the eld in
those crucial situations.
I want to play the guys
that I trust the most in
critical situations, Butler
said. There may be some
times in dime where he
may not be the best match-
up, but hes one of our best
players. Id be a fool to take
him off the eld.
TOM COYNE
Associated Press
SOUTH BEND, Ind.
Michigan quarterback
Devin Gardner did what
Denard Robinson and just
about every opponent out-
side of Alabama failed to
do last season: make the
Notre Dame defense look
ordinary.
Gardner was 21-of-33
passing for 294 yards and
four touchdowns and ran
for another 82 yards and
a rushing touchdown in a
41-30 victory Saturday in
the nal scheduled game
in Ann Arbor that saw the
11th-ranked Wolverines
(2-0) score the second-
most points theyve had
in the 41-game rivalry that
will end, at least for the
foreseeable future, after
the teams play next season
in South Bend.
No. 21 Notre Dame
(1-1) gave up 460 yards to
Michigan, which is more
than the Irish defense
gave up in any game on
its way to a 12-0 regular
season last year. Only the
Crimson Tide with 529
yards in a 42-14 win in
the national championship
game had more.
Michigan coach Brady
Hoke said Gardner, who
was the Wolverines lead-
ing receiver in a 13-6 loss
to the Wolverines a season
ago when Robinson threw
four interceptions and
lost a fumble, allows the
Wolverines to run the pro-
style offense they want.
Were going to be multi-
ple enough personnel-wise
and also multiple enough
from a formation stand-
point, with two backs,
three backs, whatever it
takes, another offensive
tackle in, a lot of different
things that we like to do,
Hoke said. This was more
like what we want to do.
Gardner said it was
great to display what the
Michigan offense can do
in front of a record crowd
of 115,109, saying he
believes the offense can be
as good as he allows it to
be.
I feel like if I limit my
mistakes we can go as far
as we want, he said.
For the Irish, who
repeatedly failed to tackle
Gardner in the backeld
when it had opportunities,
the defense is left looking
for answers. After allow-
ing an average of just 305.4
yards and 12.8 points a
game last season, the Irish
have allowed an average of
411 yards and 23.5 points
against Temple (0-2) and
Michigan.
Notre Dame coach Brian
Kelly seemed more disap-
pointed in the failure of
the offense to take advan-
tage of opportunities
against than the defensive
problems, which included
a pair of key pass interfer-
ence calls and some blown
coverages.
Last year we had to rely
on our defense to win foot-
ball games. I dont want
to have to do that week
in and week out, Kelly
said during his weekly
teleconference Sunday. I
think there are going to
be some times when our
offense has to win some
ballgames.
Kelly said he is not say-
ing he doesnt believe the
Irish cant play dominant
defense, but said some
players have to grow into
their roles, such as Dan
Fox who replaced Manti
Teo at inside linebacker
and freshman Jaylon
Smith, the starter at out-
side linebacker.
Kelly isnt happy with
the way the Irish played
Saturday, but said hes
condent Notre Dame has
the talent needed to win.
Im condent that we
can x the things that
need to be xed and devel-
op the players that need
to be developed, he said.
I think that is the most
important thing from my
perspective.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com sports Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 3B
AT PLAY
Photo provided
The Max Impact Blast U8 travel baseball team went 4-0 to
claim the championship in the Westampton Walkoff Classic tour-
nament in New Jersey. First row, from left: Kyle Peters, Ryan
Covelens, Caleb Butczynski, Mason Butash, Ben Carswell, Matt
Lonczynski, Brian Walsh, Gavin Huey. Second row: Assistant
coach Eric Spencer, Justin Spencer, Jonas Aponick, head coach
Patrick Clark. Absent from photo: Chris Banas.
U8 Blast wins Westampton
Walkof Classic
Photo provided
Legendary basketball coach John Quinn recently put on a bas-
ketball clinic for the campers at the JCC Day Camp, located near
Harveys Lake. Coach Quinn is a member of the Pennsylvania
Basketball Hall of Fame and former coach at Coughlin High
School in Wilkes-Barre. The program was directed by Don Flynn,
JCC Day Camp director of stafng services.
Hall of Famer Quinn
leads camp
Photo provided
The Wyoming Valley Soccer Club U12 girls nished rst in
the March Into Cups Tournament in Doylestown. The team won
all three games it played for the tourney title. Team members,
front row, from left: Isidra Reitsma, Luchia Carabetta, Grace
Mimnaugh, Aleah Kranson. Second row: Lexi Concklin, Nicole
Mayers, Kayleigh Walker, Emily Matthews. Back row: Emma
Grimes, Christina Schappert, Trinity King, Kaitlyn Patla, Delaney
Kutchkus.
WVSC girls win March
Into Cups Tournament
AP photo
Michigan quarterback Devin Gardner (98) celebrates his touchdown during the second quarter
Saturday against Notre Dame in Ann Arbor, Mich.
Michigan makes Irish defense look ordinary
AP photo
Brigham Young quarterback Taysom Hill (4) runs down field in the
first half Saturday against Texas in Provo, Utah.
JIMVERTUNO
AP Sports Writer
AUSTIN, Texas Texas
red defensive coordinator
Manny Diaz on Sunday,
less than 24 hours after one
of the worst defensive per-
formances in the history of
the program.
Longhorns coach Mack
Brown announced that for-
mer Longhorns defensive
coordinator and Syracuse
coach Greg Robinson will
take over the job.
Our performance on
defense last night was
unacceptable, and we need
to change that, Brown
said.
BYU ran for 550 yards,
the most ever allowed by
Texas, in a 40-21 victory
against the Longhorns on
Saturday night, putting a
potential breakthrough sea-
son on the brink of another
big disappointment if
the Longhorns cant x
their defensive problems.
Texas (1-1) plays No. 25
Mississippi (2-0) at home
on Saturday.
Brown hired Diaz after
Texas nished 5-7 in 2010
and defensive coordinator
Will Muschamp left to be
the head coach at Florida.
The hire was a surprise
considering Diaz had been
defensive coordinator just
one season at Mississippi
State, but Brown called
him a rising star in coach-
ing who brought energy
and new ideas to his strug-
gling program.
Aside from a blowout
loss to Oklahoma, Diazs
rst season was a success
as Texas matured into the
best defense in the Big 12.
But the unit regressed into
the one of the worst in pro-
gram history in 2012. As
the season wore on, play-
ers complained that team-
mates werent lining up
correctly or playing hard
every game.
Texas hid some of those
problems with a 9-4 n-
ish and a bowl victory
and Brown shrugged off
questions if Diaz would be
replaced. But after the loss
to BYU, Diazs tenure was
being measured in min-
utes.
Texas fres defensive
coordinator after rout
From page 1B
PSU
Three frst half goals propel Colonels over Widener
The Times Leader staff
EDWARDSVILLE
The Wilkes mens soccer
team capped a perfect
weekend with a 3-0 vic-
tory over Widener.
The Colonels got goals
from Nicholas Patricia,
Eric McAnena and
Adbullah Albannay, while
Patrick Loube made three
saves for the shutout.
COLLEGE MENS TENNIS
Locals shine at Muhlenberg
Wilkes took four singles
and two doubles titles at
the Muhlenberg College
Fall Classic. Kings had
two winners and four sec-
ond-place nishes.
At No. 1 singles, Kings
George Parkhurst went
was the champion, posting
a 6-3, 6-1 win over Daniel
Lakhman of Muhlenberg
before downing Steven
Wilson of Wilkes 8-4.
In second singles,
Kings Stephen Brand was
also a champion, downing
Matt Tuorto of Moravian
6-7 (3-7), 6-4, 10-8, before
defeating Wilkes Michael
Kranz, 8-0.
Max Appello grabbed
the No. 3 singles crown
for Wilkes with an 8-2
win over Neil Shulman of
Muhlenberg in the nals.
Alex Makos, playing at
No. 4, took an 8-2 decision
over Kings Jake Rohring
in the nals on way to the
title. Connor Peckham
(No. 5) and Adam
Lefkandinos (No. 6) each
claimed singles titles with
scores of 8-4 over Kings
Chris DiMino and 8-2 over
Kings Andrew Panzitta,
respectively.
In doubles competi-
tion, the duo of Dominic
and Jacob Paranowicz
cruised to an 8-3 vic-
tory at No. 2 over Tony
Bevevino and Rohring
while Michael Kranz
and Brendon Blachowski
teamed at the No. 3 posi-
tion to win the nals 8-4.
COLLEGE fIELD HOCkEY
Wesley 2, Wilkes 1
Wesleys Madison
Leone scored the game-
winner late in the second
half to propel Wesley.
Senior Ashley Hahn tal-
lied late in the rst half for
Wilkes on an assist from
Taylor Rain. Alexis Reed
suffered the loss in net for
Wilkes, making four saves.
COLLEGE WOMENS
VOLLEYBALL
MU loses pair
Misericordia dropped
a pair of matches at the
Susquehanna Invitational,
losing to Susquehanna,
25-20, 25-14, 25-17 and
Haverford, 25-17, 25-8,
25-21.
In the opener, Shelby
Brochetti had eight kills
and seven digs and Kellyn
Swanson, Nicole Korgeski
and Meghan Stack all had
four kills. Swanson added
three aces and nine digs.
Korgeski had a team-
high seven kills against
Haverford and Brocheti
added six kills, three aces
and six digs.
COLLEGE MENS SOCCER
kings 1, Sage 0
Niall Croke scored the
games lone goal on a pen-
alty kick just 10 minutes
into the match.
Monarch goalie Mark
Labbadia made four saves
to pickup the shutout vic-
tory.
COLLEGE WOMENS
SOCCER
Wilkes 3, St. Mary 1
Sophomore Grace
Fazzi scored one goal and
added an assist to lead the
Wilkes.
Samantha Hockley put
Wilkes on the board in
the rst half and Alicia
Roberts extended the
lead.
COLLEGE fOOTBALL
MUs Puckett honored
Misericordia quarter-
back Jeff Puckett has been
named the Middle Atlantic
Conference Co-Offensive
Player of the Week.
Puckett, a sophomore,
is the rst Misericordia
player to earn the award,
sharing the honor with
Delaware Valley quarter-
back Aaron Wilmer.
Puckett ran for a school-
record 301 yards and ve
touchdowns in a season-
opening 62-40 loss to
Gettysburg.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS
SOCCER
Coughlin 8, Hazleton Area 0
Travis Keil, Aaron
Wrobleski and Tommy
Sebia all scored twice in
Coughlins win Saturday.
Coughlin 4 4 8
Hazleton Area 0 0 0
first half 1. COU, Aaron Wrobleski, 38:16;
2. COU, Dave Marriggi (Travis Keil), 25:05; 3.
COU, Tommy Sebia (Marriggi), 21:46; 4. COU,
Keil (Henry Sanchez), 4:15. Second half 5.
COU, Sebia, 36:41; 6. COU, Wrobleski (penalty
kick), 32:48; 7. COU, Keil (penalty kick), 22:41;
8. COU, Phil Torres (Sebia), 2:12.
Shots COU 41; HA 6. Saves COU 3
(Steve Johnson); HAZ 27 (Caleb Ancharski).
Corner kicks COU 6; HAZ 1.
PAGE 4B Monday, September 9, 2013 baseball www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 87 58 .600 8-2 L-1 47-25 40-33
Tampa Bay 78 64 .549 7 3-7 W-1 44-26 34-38
Baltimore 76 66 .535 9 2 5-5 L-1 41-30 35-36
NewYork 76 67 .531 10 2 6-4 W-1 44-31 32-36
Toronto 67 76 .469 19 11 8-2 W-3 35-34 32-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 82 61 .573 5-5 L-2 44-27 38-34
Cleveland 76 66 .535 5 2 5-5 L-1 44-28 32-38
Kansas City 75 68 .524 7 3 6-4 W-2 40-35 35-33
Minnesota 61 80 .433 20 16 4-6 L-4 28-39 33-41
Chicago 57 85 .401 24 21 1-9 W-1 32-34 25-51
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 83 60 .580 8-2 W-3 47-27 36-33
Texas 81 61 .570 1 4-6 W-1 39-29 42-32
Los Angeles 67 75 .472 15 11 7-3 L-1 35-40 32-35
Seattle 65 78 .455 18 13 5-5 L-1 33-39 32-39
Houston 47 96 .329 36 31 3-7 L-3 23-49 24-47
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 85 57 .599 5-5 L-4 51-20 34-37
Washington 73 69 .514 12 7 6-4 W-2 40-31 33-38
Philadelphia 66 77 .462 19 15 5-5 W-3 39-33 27-44
NewYork 64 77 .454 20 16 5-5 W-1 28-38 36-39
Miami 53 88 .376 31 27 4-6 L-2 30-41 23-47
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 83 60 .580 5-5 W-3 44-25 39-35
Pittsburgh 81 61 .570 1 4-6 L-4 45-25 36-36
Cincinnati 81 62 .566 2 7-3 W-3 46-24 35-38
Milwaukee 62 80 .437 20 18 4-6 W-2 31-40 31-40
Chicago 60 82 .423 22 20 4-6 L-2 29-46 31-36
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 83 58 .589 6-4 L-3 43-28 40-30
Arizona 72 70 .507 11 8 4-6 L-1 40-31 32-39
Colorado 66 78 .458 18 15 4-6 L-3 41-31 25-47
San Diego 65 77 .458 18 15 6-4 W-3 41-33 24-44
San Francisco 64 79 .448 20 17 5-5 W-1 36-37 28-42
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Saturdays Games
Boston 13, N.Y. Yankees 9
Baltimore 4, ChicagoWhite Sox 3, 10 innings
Oakland 2, Houston 1
Cleveland 9, N.Y. Mets 4
Kansas City 4, Detroit 3
Toronto 11, Minnesota 2
L.A. Angels 8, Texas 3
Seattle 6, Tampa Bay 2
Sundays Games
N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 3
N.Y. Mets 2, Cleveland 1
ChicagoWhite Sox 4, Baltimore 2
Kansas City 5, Detroit 2
Toronto 2, Minnesota 0
Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3
Oakland 7, Houston 2
Tampa Bay 4, Seattle 1
Mondays Games
Kansas City (E.Santana 8-8) at Cleveland
(U.Jimenez 10-9), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 13-11) at Baltimore (Till-
man 15-5), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 9-8) at Minnesota
(P.Hernandez 3-1), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 6-7) at Texas (Darvish 12-7),
8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 19-2) at Chicago White Sox
(Sale 10-12), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (Cosart 1-1) at Seattle (T.Walker 1-0),
10:10 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at ChicagoWhite Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Saturdays Games
Cincinnati 4, L.A. Dodgers 3, 10 innings
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 3
Cleveland 9, N.Y. Mets 4
Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 5
Washington 9, Miami 2
St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 0
San Diego 2, Colorado 1
Arizona 2, San Francisco 1
Sundays Games
N.Y. Mets 2, Cleveland 1
Washington 6, Miami 4
Philadelphia 3, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 2
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 3, Arizona 2, 11 innings
San Diego 5, Colorado 2
L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati (n)
Mondays Games
Atlanta (Medlen 12-12) at Miami (H.Alvarez 3-3),
7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 8-11) at Cincinnati (Arroyo
13-10), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 9-6) at N.Y. Mets
(C.Torres 3-3), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 6-7) at Texas (Darvish 12-7),
8:05 p.m.
Arizona (Delgado 4-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco
12-9), 10:10 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 13-8) at San Francisco (Lince-
cum9-13), 10:15 p.m.
Tuesdays Games
San Diego at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
MLB STANDINGS STATS AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP
NATIONAL LEAGUE ROUNDUP
Phillies 3, Braves 2
Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Upton cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .192
Simmons ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .251
F.Freeman 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .305
C.Johnson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .330
Gattis lf 3 2 2 2 0 0 .245
G.Laird c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .262
Uggla 2b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .182
Terdoslavich rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .239
D.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Maholmp 1 0 0 0 0 1 .128
Varvaro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-J.Upton ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257
Totals 27 2 2 2 2 10
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Hernandez cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .280
Rollins ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .243
Utley 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .276
Ruf rf-1b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .250
Frandsen 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .229
Rosenberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Asche 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266
Galvis lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .217
Kratz c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .207
Hamels p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .180
Bernadina rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .168
Totals 28 3 8 3 4 7
Atlanta 010 000 1002 2 1
Philadelphia 200 000 01x3 8 0
a-struck out for Varvaro in the 8th.
EUggla (13). LOBAtlanta 1, Philadelphia
7. 2BUtley (23). HRGattis 2 (18), of Hamels
2; Ruf (13), of D.Carpenter. RBIsGattis 2 (50),
Utley (54), Ruf 2 (23). SBRollins (19). CSC.
Hernandez (2). SMaholm, Hamels.
Runners left in scoring positionAtlanta 1
(Simmons); Philadelphia 3 (C.Hernandez, Ruf,
Hamels). RISPAtlanta 0 for 2; Philadelphia 2
for 6.
GIDPTerdoslavich, Utley, Galvis.
DPAtlanta 2 (Simmons, Uggla, F.Freeman),
(Simmons, Uggla, F.Freeman); Philadelphia 1
(Rollins, Frandsen).
Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Maholm 6 7 2 2 3 5 108 4.35
Varvaro 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 2.88
D.Carpenter L, 3-1 1 1 1 1 0 2 17 2.06
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hamels W, 7-13 8 2 2 2 2 9 99 3.45
Rosenberg S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.84
IBBof Maholm (Kratz). HBPby Maholm
(C.Hernandez).
UmpiresHome, Dan Bellino; First, TimWelke;
Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Mike Everitt.
T2:28. A38,706 (43,651).
Cardinals 9, Pirates 2
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
N.Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .258
J.Harrison 2b 0 1 0 0 1 0 .270
G.Jones rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .237
McCutchen cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .322
Pie cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211
Morneau 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261
G.Sanchez 1b 0 0 0 1 0 0 .250
Byrd lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .288
Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Farnsworth p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Snider ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222
P.Alvarez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .231
Buck c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .223
J.Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Lambo lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .227
Mercer ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .270
Morton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
Pimentel p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Mazzaro p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167
T.Sanchez c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .227
Totals 29 2 4 2 3 6
St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 2b 5 2 2 1 0 2 .316
S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Jay cf 4 2 2 1 1 0 .268
Holliday lf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .285
Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Wong ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .159
Beltran rf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .308
S.Robinson rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .274
Y.Molina c 4 0 0 1 0 2 .320
T.Cruz c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .212
Freese 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .265
R.Jackson 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ma.Adams 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .262
Kozma ss 3 2 2 0 1 0 .218
Wacha p 2 0 1 2 0 1 .133
a-B.Peterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .105
Chambers lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .133
Totals 35 9 12 8 4 7
Pittsburgh 000 000 0022 4 1
St. Louis 230 040 00x9 12 2
a-reached on error for Wacha in the 7th. b-
grounded out for Axford in the 8th. c-struck out
for Farnsworth in the 9th.
EP.Alvarez (27), Chambers (1), S.Freeman
(1). LOBPittsburgh 4, St. Louis 8. 2BG.Jones
(25), Mercer (17), M.Carpenter (48), Jay (25),
Beltran (27), Kozma (19). RBIsG.Jones (49),
G.Sanchez (35), M.Carpenter (69), Jay (63), Hol-
liday (79), Beltran(75), Y.Molina (65), Freese (54),
Wacha 2 (3). SWacha. SFG.Sanchez, Beltran.
Runners left in scoring positionPittsburgh 3
(N.Walker, T.Sanchez, P.Alvarez); St. Louis 3 (Ma.
Adams, Beltran 2). RISPPittsburgh 0 for 7; St.
Louis 6 for 12.
Runners movedupPimentel, Holliday. GIDP
Morneau, Buck.
DPSt. Louis 2 (M.Carpenter, Kozma,
Ma.Adams), (Kozma, M.Carpenter, Ma.Adams).
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Morton L, 7-4 1 2-3 6 5 5 2 0 46 3.44
Pimentel 2 2-3 2 2 2 1 4 46 4.15
Mazzaro 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 20 2.65
J.Hughes 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 22 4.97
Watson 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.57
Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00
St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Wacha W, 3-0 7 2 0 0 2 2 97 2.72
Axford 1 1 0 0 0 3 15 4.47
S.Freeman 0 1 2 2 1 0 15 3.24
Salas 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.21
S.Freeman pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scoredPimentel 1-0, Maz-
zaro 1-1, J.Hughes 3-1, Salas 2-1. WPMorton.
UmpiresHome, Manny Gonzalez; First, Brian
Gorman; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Larry
Vanover.
T3:06. A40,156 (43,975).
Yankees 4, Red Sox 3
Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Nava rf-1b-rf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .296
J.Gomes lf 5 0 2 0 0 2 .239
Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .297
D.Ortiz dh 4 2 2 0 0 2 .312
Carp 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .310
1-Berry pr-rf-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .667
Saltalamacchia c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .260
Drewss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246
Middlebrooks 3b 3 1 2 1 1 1 .245
Bradley Jr. cf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .172
b-Napoli ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .259
Totals 36 3 9 3 2 10
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
I.Suzuki rf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .270
V.Wells dh 5 0 1 0 0 0 .246
A.Soriano lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255
Cano 2b 4 0 3 2 0 0 .310
A.Rodriguez 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .286
Mar.Reynolds 1b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .225
Granderson cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250
Nunez ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .256
C.Stewart c 1 1 1 0 0 0 .215
a-Au.Romine ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212
c-Gardner ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .275
Totals 36 4 11 3 1 7
Boston 010 001 0013 9 0
NewYork 000 120 0014 11 0
Two outs when winning run scored.
a-grounded out for C.Stewart in the 6th. b-
struck out for Bradley Jr. in the 9th. c-struck out
for Au.Romine in the 9th.
1-ran for Carp in the 8th.
LOBBoston 8, NewYork 8. 2BD.Ortiz 2 (33),
Carp (16), Cano (32), Mar.Reynolds (13). HR
Middlebrooks (15), of M.Rivera. RBIsCarp (33),
Saltalamacchia (53), Middlebrooks (41), Cano 2
(97), Mar.Reynolds (60). SBI.Suzuki (20).
Runners left in scoring positionBos-
ton 5 (Nava 2, Bradley Jr., Pedroia 2); New
York 5 (Nunez, Granderson, Mar.Reynolds 2,
A.Rodriguez). RISPBoston 1 for 8; New York 2
for 10.
Runners moved upCarp, Saltalamacchia,
V.Wells. GIDPV.Wells.
DPBoston 1 (Pedroia, Drew, Carp).
Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lester 8 10 3 3 1 6 115 3.86
Workman L, 5-3 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 17 4.34
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Kuroda 6 5 2 2 2 6 117 2.99
Kelley H, 10 1 2 0 0 0 1 21 3.88
M.RiveraW,5-2BS,7-48 2 2 1 1 0 3 35 2.28
HBPby Lester (C.Stewart). WPWorkman,
Kelley. PBC.Stewart.
UmpiresHome, Andy Fletcher; First, Rob
Drake; Second, Joe West; Third, SamHolbrook.
T3:15. A43,078 (50,291).
Brewers 3, Cubs 1
Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aoki rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .287
Segura ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .301
Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284
Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .271
C.Gomez cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .282
Gennett 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .331
b-Bianchi ph-2b 2 1 1 2 0 0 .251
Y.Betancourt 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .208
L.Schafer lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .221
Gallardo p 3 0 1 1 0 0 .226
Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-J.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236
Henderson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 33 3 8 3 2 4
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
St.Castro ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241
Valbuena 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .226
Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .232
Schierholtz rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .254
Bogusevic lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .277
Do.Murphy 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .276
Lake cf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .309
Castillo c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .268
S.Baker p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
a-Watkins ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125
Grimmp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Russell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Villanueva p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .161
c-Sweeney ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .288
H.Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 30 1 3 1 1 8
Milwaukee 000 000 3003 8 0
Chicago 000 010 0001 3 0
a-struck out for S.Baker in the 5th. b-singled
for Gennett in the 7th. c-grounded out for Villan-
uevainthe8th. d-struckout for Kintzler inthe9th.
LOBMilwaukee 6, Chicago 3. 2BAr.Ramirez
2 (17), Gennett (7). HRLake (6), of Gallardo.
RBIsBianchi 2 (22), Gallardo (4), Lake (16).
SBC.Gomez (33), L.Schafer (7). CSSegura
(11). SSegura.
Runners left in scoring positionMilwaukee 4
(Ar.Ramirez, Aoki, Bianchi 2); Chicago 1 (Do.Mur-
phy). RISPMilwaukee 4 for 10; Chicago 0 for 2.
Runners moved upLucroy, Rizzo.
Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
GallardoW, 11-9 7 3 1 1 1 6 96 4.18
Kintzler H, 23 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 2.67
HendersonS,24-28 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.19
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
S.Baker 5 2 0 0 1 1 55 0.00
GrimmL,0-1H,1 11-3 2 2 2 0 1 16 7.71
Russell BS, 8-8 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 19 3.55
Villanueva 1 2 0 0 0 1 25 4.23
H.Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 5.48
Inherited runners-scoredRussell 2-2. IBB
of Russell (Y.Betancourt).
UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Wally Bell;
Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, TimMcClelland.
T2:44. A27,802 (41,019).
Mets 2, Indians 1
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf 4 0 2 1 1 1 .257
Dan.Murphy 2b 2 0 2 0 3 0 .284
Satin dh 5 0 1 0 0 1 .285
Duda 1b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .242
Ju.Turner 3b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .271
Lagares rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269
den Dekker cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .269
Recker c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .197
Quintanilla ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .228
Totals 32 2 8 2 6 12
Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260
Swisher 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .242
1-Jo.Ramirez pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
M.Carson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .750
Kipnis 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .282
C.Santana c-1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .262
Kubel lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .300
a-Y.Gomes ph-c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .302
As.Cabrera ss 3 0 0 1 0 0 .233
Giambi dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .186
2-Aviles pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267
Chisenhall 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .221
Stubbs rf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .233
Totals 30 1 5 1 5 9
NewYork 000 100 0012 8 0
Cleveland 000 001 0001 5 0
a-walked for Kubel in the 8th.
1-ran for Swisher in the 8th. 2-ran for Giambi
in the 9th.
LOBNew York 10, Cleveland 8. 2BE.Young
(22), Dan.Murphy (33). HRJu.Turner (2), of
Salazar. RBIsE.Young (27), Ju.Turner (14),
As.Cabrera (53). CSJu.Turner (1), Aviles (5).
SRecker.
Runners left in scoring positionNew York 5
(Ju.Turner, Duda, Lagares 2, Satin); Cleveland 5
(As.Cabrera 3, Giambi 2). RISPNewYork 1 for 9;
Cleveland 1 for 6.
GIDPAs.Cabrera.
DPNew York 1 (Dan.Murphy, Quintanilla,
Duda).
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Matsuzaka 5 2-3 3 1 1 3 6 103 8.00
Black BS, 1-1 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 24 3.86
Feliciano 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 4.70
F.FranciscoW,1-0 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 0.00
Hawkins S, 8-11 1 1 0 0 0 1 7 3.36
Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Salazar 4 4 1 1 2 8 80 2.92
Hagadone 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 5.34
M.Albers 2 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.32
Allen 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 17 2.44
R.Hill 0 0 0 0 1 0 7 6.32
J.Smith 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.40
C.Perez L, 5-3 1 2 1 1 1 1 19 3.70
R.Hill pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Black pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredBlack 3-1, Feli-
ciano 1-0, F.Francisco 2-0, M.Albers 1-0, R.Hill
2-0, J.Smith 3-0. IBBof C.Perez (Dan.Murphy).
HBPby Black (As.Cabrera).
UmpiresHome, Paul Emmel; First, Chris Con-
roy; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Jerry Meals.
T3:43. A13,317 (42,241).
White Sox 4, Orioles 2
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De Aza cf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .265
Le.Garcia 2b 3 0 0 0 2 2 .173
Al.Ramirez ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .284
A.Dunn dh 4 1 1 2 0 3 .224
Keppinger 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .244
Gillaspie 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .248
Viciedo lf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .263
Jor.Danks rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .239
Bry.Anderson c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000
Totals 36 4 10 4 2 11
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Roberts dh 5 0 1 0 0 1 .239
Machado 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .293
C.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .295
A.Jones cf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .294
McLouth lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .266
a-Morse ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .226
b-Urrutia ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .278
Wieters c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .233
Markakis rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269
Hardy ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .262
1-A.Casilla pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217
Flaherty 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .220
2-Ch.Dickersonpr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243
Totals 32 2 6 2 5 6
Chicago 010 120 0004 10 1
Baltimore 000 100 0012 6 0
a-was announced for McLouth in the 8th. b-
grounded into a double play for Morse in the 8th.
1-ran for Hardy in the 9th. 2-ran for Flaherty in
the 9th.
EGillaspie (13). LOBChicago 7, Baltimore 8.
2BKeppinger (10), Viciedo (21), B.Roberts (9),
Machado (48), Flaherty (10). HRA.Dunn (31),
of B.Norris; A.Jones (31), of Rienzo. RBIsDe
Aza (57), A.Dunn 2 (82), Viciedo (48), A.Jones
(101), Flaherty (21). SBAl.Ramirez (30). CS
Le.Garcia (1).
Runners left in scoring positionChicago 4
(A.Dunn, Bry.Anderson, Le.Garcia 2); Baltimore 6
(McLouth 2, B.Roberts 3, Urrutia). RISPChicago
4 for 10; Baltimore 0 for 11.
Runners moved upAl.Ramirez. GIDPUr-
rutia.
DPChicago 2 (Le.Garcia, Al.Ramirez, Kep-
pinger), (Le.Garcia, Keppinger).
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
RienzoW, 2-1 6 2-3 4 1 1 2 4 99 4.50
LindstromH, 18 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 2.89
Veal H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 10 5.82
N.Jones H, 12 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.86
A.Reed S, 37-43 1 1 1 1 2 0 23 3.55
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
B.NorrisL,10-11 41-3 9 4 4 1 6 100 4.12
McFarland 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 19 4.48
Hammel 2 1 0 0 1 1 23 5.11
Patton 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.81
S.Johnson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 7.62
Lindstrompitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredLindstrom 1-0, Veal
1-0, N.Jones 2-0.
UmpiresHome, Jim Reynolds; First, Bob Da-
vidson; Second, John Hirschbeck; Third, James
Hoye.
T3:05. A32,042 (45,971).
Blue Jays 2, Twins 0
Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Reyes ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .300
R.Davis cf-lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .267
Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .257
Lind dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .280
DeRosa 1b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .223
Sierra rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .234
Arencibia c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .204
Goins 2b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .314
Pillar lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .172
Gose cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232
Totals 32 2 7 2 1 6
Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Presley cf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .387
C.Herrmann c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .214
a-Pinto ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .526
Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243
Arcia lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .256
Doumit dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238
Ploufe 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .248
Colabello 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .206
Thomas rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .223
Florimon ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .224
Totals 32 0 5 0 1 6
Toronto 000 000 0202 7 0
Minnesota 000 000 0000 5 1
a-fied out for C.Herrmann in the 8th.
EPloufe (12). LOBToronto 5, Minnesota
6. 2BReyes (13), Florimon (16). RBIsReyes
(33), R.Davis (21). SBReyes (14). CSR.Davis
(5). SPillar.
Runners left in scoring positionToronto 1
(Lawrie); Minnesota 1 (Arcia). RISPToronto 2 for
4; Minnesota 1 for 4.
Runners moved upDozier. GIDPReyes.
DPMinnesota 1 (Dozier, Florimon, Colabello).
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.RogersW, 5-7 72-3 3 0 0 1 4 93 4.46
Cecil 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.98
S.Santos H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.04
Janssen S, 29-31 1 1 0 0 0 2 9 2.81
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
A.Albers 7 4 0 0 0 5 97 3.35
Burton L, 2-9 1 3 2 2 0 0 16 3.96
Perkins 1 0 0 0 1 1 22 2.59
Cecil pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredS.Santos 1-0.
UmpiresHome, D.J. Reyburn; First, Laz Diaz;
Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Cory Blaser.
T2:31. A29,450 (39,021).
Royals 5, Tigers 2
Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Jackson cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .277
Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .298
Mi.Cabrera 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .353
Fielder dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .274
V.Martinez 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .294
Dirks lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .260
Infante 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .325
Avila c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .210
Iglesias ss 3 1 1 2 0 0 .320
Totals 32 2 6 2 0 5
Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .271
Bonifacio 2b 3 2 1 0 1 0 .242
Hosmer 1b 4 1 3 3 0 0 .302
B.Butler dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .294
Moustakas 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .231
L.Cain rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256
Kottaras c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .179
J.Dyson cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .263
A.Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .234
Totals 33 5 10 5 1 6
Detroit 002 000 0002 6 0
Kansas City 000 130 10x5 10 0
LOBDetroit 3, Kansas City 5. 2BA.Jackson
(26), Fielder (31), V.Martinez (31). 3BJ.Dyson
(3). HRIglesias (3), of B.Chen; Hosmer (16), of
Fister. RBIsIglesias 2 (28), A.Gordon (76), Hos-
mer 3 (73), B.Butler (74). CSL.Cain (5).
Runners left in scoring positionDetroit 2
(Dirks, V.Martinez); Kansas City 2 (Kottaras,
B.Butler). RISPDetroit 0 for 4; Kansas City 3
for 8.
Runners moved upL.Cain. GIDPAvila.
DPKansas City 1 (Hosmer, A.Escobar).
Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Fister L, 12-8 6 1-3 8 5 5 1 4 111 3.77
Coke 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 8 4.82
Putkonen 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.55
Alburquerque 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 5.44
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
B.ChenW, 7-2 7 5 2 2 0 4 81 2.79
K.Herrera H, 19 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 3.40
G.HollandS, 40-43 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 1.40
Inherited runners-scoredCoke 1-1, Putkonen
2-0.
UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett; First, Mike DiMu-
ro; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Alfonso Marquez.
T2:22. A16,774 (37,903).
Nationals 6, Marlins 4
Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Span cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .279
Zimmerman 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .276
Werth rf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .323
Ad.LaRoche 1b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .236
Desmond ss 5 1 3 2 0 0 .285
W.Ramos c 5 2 3 2 0 1 .279
T.Moore lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .215
C.Brown lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286
Rendon 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .262
Strasburg p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .156
b-Hairston ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .182
Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
R.Soriano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 37 6 11 6 5 10
Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Coghlan rf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .265
D.Solano 2b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .253
Yelich lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .286
Ruggiano cf 4 1 3 0 0 1 .225
Morrison 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .256
Polanco 3b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .250
R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333
a-Dobbs ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .235
M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
A.Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Pierre ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245
Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Hechavarria ss 4 0 0 1 0 3 .230
Brantly c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .221
Ja.Turner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .097
Lucas 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .232
Totals 33 4 6 2 2 11
Washington 012 021 0006 11 1
Miami 030 001 0004 6 0
a-singledfor R.Webbin the 6th. b-struck out for
Strasburg in the 7th. c-grounded out for A.Ramos
in the 8th.
EDesmond (17). LOBWashington 10, Miami
6. 2BWerth (18), Desmond (35). 3BDesmond
(3), Rendon (1). HRW.Ramos (11), of Ja.Turner;
Zimmerman (20), of Ja.Turner. RBIsZimmer-
man (68), Desmond 2 (71), W.Ramos 2 (42),
Rendon (29), Dobbs (22), Hechavarria (36). SB
Ad.LaRoche (4), Desmond (19). SStrasburg,
Ja.Turner.
Runners left in scoring positionWashing-
ton 6 (Desmond, Span 2, Rendon, Ad.LaRoche,
W.Ramos); Miami 5 (Coghlan, Hechavarria 3,
Yelich). RISPWashington 4 for 15; Miami 1 for 7.
Runners moved upAd.LaRoche, Pierre,
Hechavarria.
Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
StrasburgW, 7-9 6 4 4 4 2 7 94 2.96
Storen H, 19 1 1 0 0 0 2 21 4.97
Clippard H, 30 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 2.25
R.Soriano S, 39-451 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.41
Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Ja.Turner L, 3-6 4 9 5 5 3 3 84 3.43
R.Webb 2 2 1 1 1 3 37 3.00
M.Dunn 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 20 2.95
A.Ramos 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.50
Cishek 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.48
Ja.Turner pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
Inherited runners-scoredR.Webb 1-1. HBP
by Strasburg (D.Solano). WPStrasburg. Balk
Strasburg 2.
UmpiresHome, Gary Cederstrom; First,
Angel Hernandez; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third,
Lance Barksdale.
T3:07. A18,990 (37,442).
Athletics 7, Astros 2
Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Villar ss 5 1 1 0 0 2 .273
Altuve 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .277
Crowe lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .248
Wallace 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .229
b-B.Laird ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .194
M.Dominguez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .237
Krauss dh 3 0 1 0 0 1 .180
c-Elmore ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .243
Hoes rf 2 1 2 0 2 0 .261
Pagnozzi c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .143
B.Barnes cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .243
Totals 34 2 8 2 3 10
Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Crisp cf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .257
Sogard 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .264
Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .288
Moss rf 4 1 3 2 0 1 .253
Cespedes lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .238
Callaspo 3b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .256
Barton 1b 2 1 2 1 2 0 .245
S.Smith dh 2 1 1 3 0 0 .241
a-Freiman ph-dh 2 0 1 0 0 0 .285
Vogt c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .255
Totals 34 7 11 7 4 3
Houston 100 000 1002 8 0
Oakland 007 000 00x7 11 1
b-grounded out for Wallace in the 8th.
ELowrie (17). LOBHouston 8, Oakland 7.
2BAltuve (25), Crowe (5), Moss (15). HRS.
Smith (8), ofHarrell. RBIsAltuve (46), B.Barnes
(40), Moss 2 (73), Cespedes (65), Barton (10),
S.Smith 3 (37). SBCrowe (5).
Runners left in scoring positionHouston
6 (M.Dominguez, B.Barnes, Pagnozzi, Krauss,
Altuve, Villar); Oakland 4 (S.Smith, Freiman 2,
Sogard). RISPHouston 1 for 14; Oakland 4for 10.
Runners moved upPagnozzi 2, Lowrie.
GIDPAltuve 2, Freiman.
DPHouston 1 (Villar, Altuve, Wallace); Oak-
land 2 (Lowrie, Sogard, Barton), (Lowrie, Sogard,
Barton).
Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Harrell L, 6-16 3 7 7 7 2 2 72 6.01
Bedard 4 2 0 0 2 0 47 4.47
De Leon 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 7.36
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ColonW, 15-6 6 5 1 1 1 7 94 2.85
Bre.AndersonS,3-3 3 3 1 1 2 3 36 5.95
UmpiresHome, Hunter Wendelstedt; First,
Jerry Layne; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Greg
Gibson.
T2:37. A18,824 (35,067).
Rangers 4, Angels 3
Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Kinsler 2b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .272
Andrus ss 4 0 2 2 0 1 .268
Rios rf 4 1 2 2 1 2 .281
A.Beltre 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .318
Je.Baker 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .287
a-Moreland ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241
G.Soto c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .229
b-Adduci ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .375
Gentry lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .254
c-Pierzynski ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .280
Profar dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236
L.Martin cf 3 2 2 0 1 0 .268
Totals 35 4 9 4 3 13
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Shuck lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .293
Aybar ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .269
Trout cf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .338
J.Hamilton dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .237
Calhoun rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .271
Trumbo 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235
Conger c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .256
G.Green 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250
An.Romine 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .244
Totals 35 3 9 3 2 7
Texas 100 010 2004 9 0
Los Angeles 010 200 0003 9 0
a-fied out for Je.Baker in the 7th. b-struck out
for G.Soto in the 8th. c-struck out for Gentry in
the 8th.
LOBTexas 8, Los Angeles 8. 2BKinsler (26),
Rios (28), L.Martin (16), Trout (37), Calhoun (4),
Conger (13), An.Romine (2). HRRios (16), of
Vargas; Calhoun (6), of Tepesch. RBIsAndrus
2 (53), Rios 2 (67), Calhoun (20), An.Romine 2
(3). SBAndrus 2 (37), G.Soto (1), Shuck (6).
SFAndrus.
Runners left in scoring positionTexas 6
(A.Beltre 2, Profar, Moreland 2, Rios); Los Angeles
5 (J.Hamilton 2, Aybar, Shuck, G.Green). RISP
Texas 2 for 9; Los Angeles 2 for 10.
Runners moved upKinsler 2, Trumbo,
An.Romine. GIDPJ.Hamilton.
DPTexas 1 (Kinsler, Andrus, Je.Baker).
Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Tepesch 3 1-3 4 2 2 1 5 63 4.70
J.Ortiz 1 1-3 3 1 1 1 1 25 4.08
OgandoW, 6-4 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 23 3.38
Frasor H, 9 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.55
Cotts H, 11 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 1.17
Scheppers H, 23 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.01
Nathan S, 39-41 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 1.46
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Vargas 6 6 2 2 1 8 112 3.76
Boshers H, 4 1-3 0 1 1 1 0 12 4.66
KohnL,1-2BS,2-2 2-3 2 1 1 1 0 16 3.35
D.De La Rosa 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 3.17
J.Gutierrez 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 4.18
Cotts pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredJ.Ortiz 1-1, Ogando
1-0, Scheppers 1-0, Kohn 1-1. IBBof Kohn
(A.Beltre). HBPby Tepesch (Conger). WP
Kohn.
UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Jordan
Baker; Second, AdrianJohnson; Third, Bill Welke.
T3:31. A35,423 (45,483).
Padres 5, Rockies 2
Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Co.Dickerson lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .293
Rutledge 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .230
Tulowitzki ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .311
Cuddyer rf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .328
Helton 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247
Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .267
Blackmon cf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .267
Pacheco c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .240
Bettis p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .217
Oswalt p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333
W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 33 2 6 2 2 13
San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Venable rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273
Amarista lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .263
Gyorko 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242
Headley 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .239
Blanks 1b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .255
R.Cedeno ss 4 2 2 0 0 0 .303
Fuentes cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .176
R.Rivera c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .178
c-Guzman ph 0 1 0 1 1 0 .232
Staufer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Kennedy p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .149
b-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .196
Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Vincent p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-Hundley ph-c 1 0 1 3 0 0 .241
Totals 30 5 8 5 3 8
Colorado 001 100 0002 6 0
San Diego 000 010 40x5 8 1
a-struck out for Bettis in the 4th. b-lined out for
Kennedy in the 5th. c-walked for R.Rivera in the
7th. d-doubled for Vincent in the 7th.
ER.Cedeno (2). LOBColorado 6, San Diego
5. 2BCuddyer (29), Pacheco (13), Headley (29),
Hundley (17). 3BCo.Dickerson (4). RBIsCud-
dyer (76), Pacheco (20), R.Rivera (3), Guzman
(32), Hundley 3 (40). SFR.Rivera.
Runners left in scoring positionColorado 4
(Helton 3, Co.Dickerson); San Diego 3 (Kotsay,
Gyorko, Fuentes). RISPColorado 2 for 7; San
Diego 2 for 12.
GIDPTulowitzki.
DPSan Diego 1 (R.Cedeno, Blanks).
Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Bettis 3 2 0 0 0 4 48 5.02
Oswalt L, 0-5 3 1-3 4 5 5 2 2 66 8.57
W.Lopez 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 20 3.93
Boggs 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 9.35
San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Kennedy 5 5 2 1 2 7 87 4.86
Boxberger 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 3.06
Vincent W, 4-2 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 2.41
Staufer H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 3.29
Street S, 29-30 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.72
Inherited runners-scoredW.Lopez 3-3.
UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, CB Buc-
knor; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Bill Miller.
T2:52. A18,656 (42,524).
Giants 3, Diamondbacks 2, 11 innings
Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bloomquist lf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .356
Pollock cf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .253
Goldschmidt 1b 3 0 0 0 2 2 .293
A.Hill 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .293
Davidson 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .189
1-Campana pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .289
W.Harris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
f-Nieves ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .306
Thatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
M.Montero c 5 0 1 0 0 4 .236
Owings ss 5 1 2 0 0 2 .308
Eaton rf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .267
Miley p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .098
b-Er.Chavez ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .290
D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Prado 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .284
Totals 40 2 10 2 3 12
San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Arias 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .278
Abreu 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .232
Posey 1b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .310
Pence rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .287
H.Sanchez c 5 0 3 1 0 2 .281
2-Adrianza pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 ---
F.Peguero lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .160
c-G.Blanco ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .254
J.Perez cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .226
d-Pagan ph-cf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .266
B.Crawford ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .260
Bumgarner p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .118
Machi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Pill ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222
S.Casilla p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
e-Sandoval ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .276
Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 37 3 9 2 4 4
Arizona 000 000 020 00210 0
San Fran 000 200 000 013 9 0
No outs when winning run scored.
a-grounded out for Machi in the 7th. b-hit a
sacrifce fy for Miley in the 8th. c-singled for
F.Peguero in the 9th. d-grounded out for J.Perez
in the 9th. e-was intentionally walked for Romo in
the 9th. f-grounded out for Bell in the 11th.
1-ran for Davidson in the 9th. 2-ran for
H.Sanchez in the 11th.
LOBArizona 9, San Francisco 10. 2B
Bloomquist (5), Pollock (26), Posey (33). RBIs
Pollock (34), Er.Chavez (43), H.Sanchez (19),
Pagan (25). SBPollock (11). CSCampana (2).
SAbreu, G.Blanco. SFEr.Chavez.
Runners left in scoring positionArizona 3
(A.Hill 3); San Francisco 5 (Arias 3, B.Crawford,
H.Sanchez). RISPArizona 2 for 8; San Francisco
2 for 10.
Runners moved upPagan, B.Crawford,
Bumgarner. GIDPMiley, Pence.
DPArizona 1 (A.Hill, Owings, Goldschmidt);
San Francisco 1 (Abreu, B.Crawford, Posey).
Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Miley 7 5 2 2 2 3 109 3.73
D.Hernandez 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 5.26
W.Harris 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 2.20
Bell 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 4.58
Thatcher L, 3-2 0 2 1 1 0 0 10 3.38
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Bumgarner 6 4 0 0 0 9 89 2.82
Machi H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.60
S.Casilla BS, 1-2 2-3 3 2 2 1 0 28 1.98
Romo 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 16 2.49
Kontos 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 22 4.78
J.Lopez W, 3-2 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 1.78
Thatcher pitched to 3 batters in the 11th.
Inherited runners-scoredRomo 2-0. IBBof
D.Hernandez (Pence), of W.Harris (Sandoval),
of S.Casilla (Goldschmidt), of Kontos (Gold-
schmidt). WPMiley, S.Casilla.
UmpiresHome, Ron Kulpa; First, TomHallion;
Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Chris Guccione.
T3:38. A41,050 (41,915).
Rays 4, Mariners 1
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
DeJesus rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250
b-D.Young ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .278
Jo.Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
f-C.Gimenez ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .500
Rodney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Zobrist ss-2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .278
Longoria 3b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .266
Scott dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .246
1-De.Jennings pr-cf1 1 1 1 0 0 .246
Loney 1b 4 1 3 1 1 0 .306
Joyce lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .245
c-S.Rodriguez ph-lf2 0 1 1 0 1 .247
Ke.Johnson 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .246
d-Y.Escobar ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260
Lobaton c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .263
Fuld cf 0 0 0 0 2 0 .203
a-W.Myers ph-cf-rf1 0 1 0 1 0 .292
Totals 33 4 10 3 8 6
Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Miller ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .260
A.Almonte cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .231
Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .279
K.Morales dh 2 1 1 1 2 0 .282
2-En.Chavez pr-dh0 0 0 0 0 0 .271
F.Gutierrez rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .242
M.Saunders lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237
e-Ibanez ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .254
Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .252
Ackley 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .257
H.Blanco c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .143
g-Franklin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .220
Totals 30 1 5 1 5 7
Tampa Bay 000 000 0314 10 0
Seattle 010 000 0001 5 1
a-walked for Fuld in the 7th. b-grounded into a
double play for DeJesus in the 7th. c-singled for
Joyce in the 8th. d-fied out for Ke.Johnson in
the 8th. e-struck out for M.Saunders in the 8th.
f-doubled for Jo.Peralta in the 9th. g-struck out
for H.Blanco in the 9th.
1-ran for Scott in the 8th. 2-ran for K.Morales
in the 8th.
EA.Almonte (1). LOBTampa Bay 11, Seattle
8. 2BC.Gimenez (1), De.Jennings (26), Loney
(26). HRK.Morales (20), of M.Moore. RBIs
De.Jennings (43), Loney (63), S.Rodriguez (19),
K.Morales (75). SBFuld (7). CSW.Myers (2).
SA.Almonte.
Runners left in scoring positionTampa Bay
6 (Zobrist 3, Joyce, S.Rodriguez 2); Seattle 5
(H.Blanco, F.Gutierrez 2, Seager, Ibanez). RISP
Tampa Bay 4 for 10; Seattle 0 for 6.
Runners moved upDeJesus, A.Almonte.
GIDPD.Young, Lobaton, A.Almonte.
DPTampa Bay 1 (Ke.Johnson, Zobrist, Loney);
Seattle 2 (Furbush, H.Blanco, Smoak), (B.Miller,
Ackley, Smoak).
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
M.Moore 6 1-3 5 1 1 3 3 103 3.18
McGee W, 4-3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.07
Jo.Peralta H, 36 1 0 0 0 2 2 20 2.80
Rodney S, 33-41 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.59
Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.Ramirez 6 4 0 0 4 5 106 4.57
Furbush H, 17 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 3.10
MedinaL,4-5BS,3-4 0 1 3 3 1 0 8 2.95
O.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.78
Noesi 1 4 1 1 2 1 29 5.79
E.Ramirez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Medina pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredMcGee 1-0, Furbush
2-0, O.Perez 2-2. IBBof M.Moore (K.Morales),
ofNoesi (Longoria). HBPby Medina (Longoria).
WPM.Moore.
UmpiresHome, Paul Schrieber; First, Jef
Kellogg; Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, Chad
Fairchild.
T3:24. A18,645 (47,476).
AP photo
NewYork Yankees Ichiro Suzuki, left, reacts after scoring on a wild
pitch to win a game against the Boston Red Sox at Yankee Stadium
on Sunday.
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Ichiro
Suzuki scored on Brandon
Workmans wild pitch
with two outs in the ninth
inning, and the New York
Yankees overcame Mariano
Riveras blown save to
avoid a four-game sweep
by the Boston Red Sox,
winning 4-3 on Sunday.
The AL East-leading Red
Sox had won ve in a row.
Rivera (5-2) came in
to start the eighth for the
rst time since 2006. Will
Middlebrooks leadoff
homer in the ninth gave
Rivera his seventh blown
save in 48 chances.
White Sox 4, Orioles 2
BALTIMORE Pinch-
runner Chris Dickerson got
lost on the bases and was
doubled up for the nal out,
and the Chicago White Sox
ended a nine-game losing
streak by holding off the
Baltimore Orioles.
Down 4-1, Baltimore load-
ed the bases with no outs in
the ninth against Addison
Reed. After Ryan Flaherty
grounded into a forceout at
second base that scored a
run, Dickerson ran for him.
Rays 4, Mariners 1
SEATTLE Pinch-
hitter Sean Rodriguez
had a go-ahead single in
the eighth inning and the
Tampa Bay Rays rallied
past Seattle to build their
wild-card edge.
The Rays lead Baltimore
and Cleveland, who both
lost, by two games for the
second AL wild-card spot.
Royals 5, Tigers 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
Bruce Chen picked up
Kansas Citys beleaguered
starters with seven solid
innings and the Royals
defeated Detroit.
Chen (7-2), who moved
into the rotation on July 12
after 19 relief appearances,
limited the AL Central-
leadingTigers tove hits and
two runs over seven innings,
earning the rst victory for a
starter on the Royals seven-
game homestand.
Athletics 7, Astros 2
OAKLAND, Calif.
Bartolo Colon won for
the rst time in more
than a month, Seth Smith
homered during a seven-
run third inning and the
Oakland Athletics beat
Houston.
Brandon Moss had three
hits and drove in two runs
while Yoenis Cespedes
added two hits and an RBI
for the AL West-leading As.
Rangers 4, Angels 3
ANAHEIM, Calif.
Alex Rios homered in the
rst inning and drove in the
go-ahead run with a bloop
double in the seventh, Elvis
Andrus also had two RBIs,
and the Texas Rangers beat
the Los Angeles Angels.
The Rangers remained
1 games behind AL West-
leading Oakland.
Blue Jays 2, Twins 0
MINNEAPOLIS
Esmil Rogers pitched well
into the eighth inning and
Jose Reyes late double
broke a scoreless tie that
led the Toronto Blue Jays
past Minnesota for a three-
game sweep.
Rogers (5-7) allowed
three hits and a walk while
striking out four over 7 2-3
innings.
INTERLEAGUE
Mets 2, Indians 1
CLEVELAND Eric
Youngs two-out double
in the ninth inning gave
the New York Mets a vic-
tory that ended Clevelands
four-game winning streak.
Juan Lagares started the
ninth with a single off Chris
Perez (5-3) and moved to
second on a sacrice. Omar
Quintanilla struck out, but
Young lined a 2-0 pitch
down the right eld line.
NewYork avoids
sweep on wild pitch
The Associated Press
ST. LOUIS Michael
Wacha pitched seven shutout
innings anddroveintworuns
as the St. Louis Cardinals
routed the Pittsburgh Pirates
9-2 Sunday for a three-game
sweep.
The Cardinals outscored
Pittsburgh 26-10 overall in
taking the NL Central lead.
Phillies 3, Braves 2
PHILADELPHIA
Darin Ruf hit a tiebreaking
solo homer in the eighth
inning to back a strong out-
ing by starting pitcher Cole
Hamels and lift the Phillies
to a victory and three-game
sweep over the Braves.
Hamels (7-13) gave up
just two hits, both homers,
and two runs over eight
innings. He struck out nine
and walked two. He retired
the side in order four times.
Giants 3, Dbacks 2 (11)
SAN FRANCISCO
Angel Pagan singled home
the winning run in the 11th
inning to lead the Giants
past the Diamondbacks.
Pagan singled sharply
off Joe Thatcher (3-2) after
Hector Sanchez singled and
Gregor Blanco reached safe-
ly on a elders choice. Pinch
runner Ehire Adrianza beat
the throw home.
Padres 5, Rockies 2
SAN DIEGO Pinch-
hitter Nick Hundley deliv-
ered a three-run double
in the seventh inning that
lifted the Padres to a win
over the Rockies.
After reliever Roy
Oswalt (0-5) walked home
the tying run, Hundley hit
a sharp grounder down the
third-base line off Wilton
Lopez to clear the bases.
Brewers 3, Cubs 1
CHICAGO Yovani
Gallardo tossed seven
strong innings and Jeff
Bianchi delivered a key
pinch-hit single, leading
the Brewers over the Cubs.
Gallardo (11-9) allowed
one run and three hits. He is
3-0 with a 1.35 ERA in ve
starts since coming back
from a hamstring injury that
put him on the disabled list.
Nationals 6, Marlins 4
MIAMI Stephen
Strasburg got past a shaky
start and pitched six
innings to earn his rst vic-
tory in nearly a month as the
Nationals beat the Marlins.
Strasburg (7-9) struck
out seven and allowed four
runs and four hits. He also
hit a batter, threw a wild
pitch and had two balks. It
was his rst win since Aug.
11 against Philadelphia.
Cardinals fnish sweep,
extend Central lead
It is a toughloss, but to be
in the nal and play against
the best player who
deserves to win today its
incredible, said Azarenka,
who is from Belarus. I gave
it all today. We showed our
hearts. We fought hard.
Four times, Azarenka
was only two points from
taking the opening set. At
one such moment, with
Williams serving at deuce
after a double-fault, she was
called for a foot fault, erasing
what would have been a 121
mph ace. There was another
foot-fault call in the second
set, too. They brought back
memories of the Americans
loss to Kim Clijsters in
the 2009 seminals, when
Williams was docked a point,
and later ned, for a tirade
against a line judge over a
foot-fault call.
There was no such out-
burst directed at ofcials
this time, although there
was that racket toss. After
the call in the matchs 10th
game, Williams simply put a
hand to her face, composed
herself, and won the point
with a down-the-line back-
hand she celebrated with a
st pump, some foot stomp-
ing and a yell of Come on!
Williams wound up hold-
ing there with a 104 mph
ace, part of what seemed to
be a match-altering stretch.
She won ve consecutive
games and 16 of 18 points to
take the rst set and go up a
break in the second.
You could see she
clicked, Mouratoglou said.
She realized she was not
aggressive enough. She
was letting Vika dictate too
much, and all of a sudden,
things completely changed.
No. 1-seeded Novak
Djokovic faces No. 2 Rafael
Nadal in the mens nal
Monday. Its the rst time
since 1996 that both U.S.
Open singles nals are 1-vs.-
2 matchups.
On Sunday, with for-
mer President Bill Clinton
among the announced crowd
of 23,584 in Arthur Ashe
Stadium, and Williams older
sister Venus in a front-row
seat, the fans were mostly
cheering for the American.
I denitely felt the love,
Williams said, so thank you
all so much for the support.
She equaled Stef Graf
with ve U.S. Open titles,
one behind Everts record of
six in the Open era, which
began in 1968. Williams
never had won two consecu-
tive U.S. Opens, but nowshe
has, adding to the trophies
she earned in New York in
1999 at age 17 then
2002 and 2008.
Those go alongside ve
from Wimbledon, ve from
the Australian Open, and
two from the French Open,
which she won this year.
Williams also became the
rst woman to surpass $9
million in prize money in a
single season, while topping
$50 million for her career.
Its incredible what shes
achieving, Azarenka said.
Shes playing denitely
her best tennis right now.
It really shows how focused
and how composed and
how much she can raise the
level.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER SPORTS Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 5D
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After wrestling with it, IOC adds sport back
STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
Wrestling, a sport as ancient
as the games themselves, is back
in the Olympics after seven
months in limbo and even more
determined to keep its place for
centuries to come.
The International Olympic
Committee fixed what it admits
was a big mistake Sunday, voting
wrestling back onto the program
for the 2020 and 2024 Games.
Presenting new leadership and
a revamped sport, wrestling eas-
ily defeated bids from baseball-
softball and squash to regain its
Olympic status.
The result capped a fran-
tic six-month campaign by the
wrestling body FILA to save its
Olympic status after the IOC
executive board surprisingly cut
it from the list of core sports in
February.
We are aware of our mis-
takes and they will not happen
again, FILA President Nenad
Lalovic said. This crisis gave
us the strength to change and
we finally found out that we
can change. This was the most
valuable experience of all of this
journey.
Wrestling received 49 votes to
win in the first round of the secret
balloting by the International
Olympic Committee. Baseball-
softball got 24 votes and squash
22.
Wrestling has shown great
passion and resilience in the
last few months, IOC President
Jacques Rogge said. They have
taken a number of steps to mod-
ernize and improve their sport.
The vote followed final pre-
sentations by all three sports,
with Lalovic calling it the most
important day in the 2,000-year
history of our sport.
Wrestling goes back to the
ancient Olympics in Greece and
has been on the program of every
modern games except 1900.
The sport was caught off guard
when it was axed by the board
a decision that surprised even
most IOC members.
FILA reworked its structure,
giving women and athletes a
role in decision making. It added
two weight classes for women. It
adopted rule changes to make
the sport easier to understand
and more fun to watch, and
reward more aggressive wres-
tling.
Powerful countries and unlike-
ly political allies like the United
States, Iran and Russia threw
their weight behind the cam-
paign.
Wrestling was approved by the
IOC on Sunday as an additional
sport for 2020 and 2024. FILAs
goal now is win back a place in
the list of 25 core sports.
With wrestlings return, no
new sport has been added to
the 2020 Games, defeating the
original purpose of the IOCs
program review process.
Wrestlings reinstatement was
cheered by some of the biggest
names in the sport.
Its almost like you expect-
ed that to happen, former
American Olympic gold medal-
ist and coach Dan Gable told
The Associated Press. But we
certainly didnt expect what hap-
pened in February to happen,
and because of that you learn
and work through the whole pro-
cess.
Russian great Alexander
Karelin called it a big result for
us and for the new guys who are
coming (into the sport).
I think we have a great story,
great history and Olympic tradi-
tions, Karelin said.
Squash and baseball-softball
could potentially get another
chance to make it onto the 2020
program.
Squash was trying to make
the Olympics for the third time.
Mens baseball and womens
softball merged into a single
federation to try to return after
being dropped for the 2012 and
2016 Games.
Americans roll to Walker Cup victory
The Associated Press
SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y.
Nathan Smith won
the deciding point in the
United States 17-9 vic-
tory over Britain and
Ireland in the Walker
Cup on Sunday, beating
Englands Nathan Kimsey
4 and 3 in the fth singles
match at historic National
Golf Links of America.
The United States,
ahead 8-4 entering the
nal day in the biennial
amateur event, split the
four morning foursomes
matches and won seven of
the 10 afternoon singles
matches.
The U.S. leads the
series 35-8-1. In 2011,
Britain and Ireland won
14-12 at Royal Aberdeen
in Scotland.
The 35-year-old Smith,
a four-time U.S. Mid-
Amateur champion from
Pittsburgh, won the par-3
13th and par-4 14th with
pars and ended the match
with a halve for bogey on
the par-4 15th.
Alabama teammates
Bobby Wyatt and Justin
Thomas, 45-year-old
Todd White, Californias
Michael Kim, Oklahoma
States Jordan Niebrugge
and Stanfords Patrick
Rodgers also won singles
matches.
Chiquita Classic
DAVIDSON, N.C.
Andrew Svoboda won the
Chiquita Classic, beating
Will MacKenzie with a
par on the rst hole of a
playoff in the second tour-
nament in the four-event
Web.com Tour Finals
series.
Svoboda tapped in for
par on the par-5 18th, and
won when MacKenzie
who eagled the hole
in regulation missed
a 5-footer. Svoboda shot
a 2-under 70 to match
MacKenzie at 12 under.
MacKenzie nished with
a 67.
Montreal Championship
SAINTE-JULIE, Quebec
Esteban Toledo won the
Montreal Championship
for his second Champions
Tour victory of the sea-
son, chipping in for birdie
to beat Kenny Perry on
the third extra hole.
Toledo shot a 3-under
69 to match Perry at
5-under 211 on La Vallee
du Richelieus Rouville
Course. Perry, the Senior
Players Championship and
U.S. Senior Open winner
in consecutive tour starts
this summer, had a 70.
They each parred the
par-4 18th twice in the
playoff, and Toledo won
on the par-3 10th.
Pitino leads class of 12 into hoops Hall
HOWARD ULMAN
AP Sports Writer
SPRINGFIELD, Mass.
Rick Pitino remem-
bers the training meals at
the pizza place where his
Boston University teams
ate more than 30 years
ago.
Even Hall of Famers
have to start somewhere.
That obscure begin-
ning provided a founda-
tion for a coaching career
that took him to two NBA
teams and three other
colleges, all reaching the
Final Four and two win-
ning NCAA champion-
ships.
Coaches dont get in
the Hall of Fame, Pitino
said Sunday at his induc-
tion. Players put them in
the Hall of Fame and Ive
had a great journey along
the way.
It started for him as a
head coach in 1978 just 90
miles east of Springeld
Symphony Hall, where
the ceremony was held for
him and 11 other honor-
ees.
He had to learn the
trade from the bottom
at Boston University,
Pitino said. There were
those training meals, he
said, and the time when
champagne was served at
Midnight Madness.
Nine drunks showed
up, he said, and no one
else.
He spent ve years with
the Terriers, then two
as an assistant with the
New York Knicks before
spending the next two as
head coach at Providence,
leading the Friars to a sur-
prising berth in the Final
Four. He kept moving
two years as head coach
with the Knicks, eight
with Kentucky, four with
the Boston Celtics and the
past 12 with Louisville.
Just ve months ago, he
led the Cardinals to the
championship.
At BU, you learn how
to build the right way. At
Providence, I learned how
to dream. I always thought
anything is possible after
coaching that team,
Pitino said during his
20-minute speech, the last
of the day. At Kentucky, I
learned all about pressure
every single day. It was
unbelievable pressure and
it was very difcult and
that pressure brought out
the best in everybody.
Two former college
coaches were inducted as
part of the second straight
12-member class, the larg-
est in the Halls history
Jerry Tarkanian, 83,
who led UNLV to the 1990
NCAA championship,
and Guy Lewis, 91, who
took Houston to ve Final
Fours. Tarkanian, who had
heart surgery less than
two months ago, came on
stage with a walker. Lewis
was in a wheelchair. Both
smiled as they received
standing ovations.
Also inducted Sunday
into the Naismith
Memorial Basketball Hall
of Fame were Gary Payton,
the only NBA player with
20,000 points, 8,000
assists, 5,000 rebounds
and 2,000 steals; Bernard
King, who averaged 22.5
points in 15 NBA seasons
with ve teams; North
Carolina womens coach
Sylvia Hatchell; ve-time
WNBA All-Star Dawn
Staley; former Knicks
guard Richie Guerin; for-
mer NBA deputy com-
missioner Russ Granik;
and Oscar Schmidt, who
played in ve Olympics
for Brazil.
E.B. Henderson, who
learned basketball at
Harvard in 1904 then
introduced it to African-
American students in
Washington, D.C., and
four-time ABA All-Star
Roger Brown of the
Indiana Pacers were
enshrined posthumously.
Henderson laid the
foundation for the prog-
ress of African-Americans
from exclusion to domi-
nation of basketball,
Nikki Graves Henderson,
wife of Hendersons grand-
son, said in a recorded
message.
Payton was known for
his defensive prowess,
aggressiveness and trash-
talking.
I played hard because
I wanted to win every
time, he said of his
17-year career, nearly 13
of them with the Seattle
SuperSonics. It was all
for my crazy love for the
game.
For King, playing bas-
ketball as a kid involved
sometimes clearing snow
from a playground court
in Brooklyn.
I fell in love with bas-
ketball the rst time I
made a basket, he said.
Ten days before his 61st
birthday, Pitino stood on
stage with Hubie Brown,
head coach of the Knicks
when he was an assistant,
and Dick Vitale, the pair
he chose to present him
for induction.
Pitino never came close
in the pros to the success
he had in college. He had
losing records in ve of
his six NBA seasons.
After a loss to Toronto
on March 1, 2000, an agi-
tated Pitino urged people
to focus on the future,
saying, Larry Bird is not
walking through that door,
fans. Kevin McHale is
not walking through that
door, and Robert Parish is
not walking through that
door. And if you expect
them to walk through that
door, theyre going to be
gray and old.
On Sunday, while Pitino
posed for photos before
the ceremony, a blonde-
haired Bird showed up.
He nally walks
through the door, and I
said, What took you so
long to walk through that
door? And he said to me,
You dont want me now,
Pitino said, grinning.
Bird had his turn on
stage as the presenter of
Schmidt, a prolic scorer
who said he chose not to
play in the NBA because
that would have barred
him from playing for his
national team.
AP photo
Inductee Rick Pitino speaks during the enshrinement ceremony for the 2013 class of the Naismith
Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame at Symphony Hall in Springfield, Mass., on Sunday.
We didnt see anything
that indicated that anything
like that was taking place.
And its natural when every-
thing was as close as it was
between who was going
to get in and not go in to
scratch your heads and try
to gure out and wonder
why, Helton said. But we
didnt see anything initially
(Saturday) night that indi-
cated that, but certainly well
go back through all the video
and everything to be sure,
because we take the responsi-
bility very serious to be sure
that its that everybody
has had a fair chance.
But an ESPN replay that
included communication
between Bowyer and his
team implied the spin was
deliberate. Bowyer was
shown the video after the
race and denied he spun
intentionally, a claim he
repeated throughout the
post-race activities.
We had a at tire or
something. It just snapped
around, Bowyer said, later
adding, I know its a lot of
fun for you guys to write a lot
of wacky things. Go ahead if
you want to, get creative. But
dont look too much into it.
In-car audio framed the
situation as his crew goad-
ing him into spinning his car
to bring out the yellow in an
effort to prevent Newman
from winning the race.
Thirty-nine is going to
win the race, Bowyer was
told over his radio.
Is your arm starting to
hurt? crewchief Brian Pattie
asked. After a pause, Pattie
said, I bet its hot in there.
Itch it.
Bowyers car then spun.
NASCAR did not have
access to that footage until
well after the race, and it is
presumably among the mate-
rials Helton was reviewing
Sunday.
Also, it became apparent
early Sunday morning that
Bowyer and teammate Brian
Vickers further aided Truex
by taking a dive over the nal
three laps.
When the race resumed
with three laps to go, four-
time series champion Jeff
Gordon was poised to claim
the 10th spot in the Chase,
and Joey Logano was ahead
of Truex in position to claim
the second wild-card.
But Bowyer and Vickers
both made pit stops in the
nal three laps that allowed
Logano to improve his nish-
ing position and move ahead
of Gordon to claim the 10th
Chase berth. That bumped
Gordon from contention and
freed the wild card for Truex.
Gordon was not eligible for
the wild card.
The AP reviewed team
communications for both
Bowyer and Vickers on
Sunday, and Vickers was told
by MWR general manager
Ty Norris to pit because we
need that 1 point.
Were probably going to
pit here on green, Norris
says.
Are you talking to me? a
surprised Vickers asks.
Vickers continued to ques-
tion the call, at one point ask-
ing, I dont understand, pit
right now?
Youve got to pit this time.
We need that 1 point, Norris
replies.
10-4. Do I got a tire going
down? Vickers asked.
Vickers then pitted as
the eld went green. When
he asked after if his crew
found anything with the tire,
Norris replied, Ill see you
after the race, Brian, I owe
you a kiss.
Bowyers radio communi-
cation was not as verbose,
but he had already pitted
twice after his spin, once to
change the tire and once for
Pattie to double-check for
any damage. The team then
called him down pit road a
third time with no explana-
tion just as the eld went
green.
From page 1B
NASCAR
From page 1B
US Open
AP photo
Victoria Azarenka returns a shot to Serena Williams during the
womens singles final of the U.S. Open Sunday in New York.
PAGE 6B Monday, September 9, 2013 football www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
NewOrleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-0-0
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-0-0
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7 0-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28 1-0-0 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0
Thursdays Game
Denver 49, Baltimore 27
Sundays Games
NewOrleans 23, Atlanta 17
Chicago 24, Cincinnati 21
NewEngland 23, Bufalo 21
Tennessee 16, Pittsburgh 9
N.Y. Jets 18, Tampa Bay 17
Kansas City 28, Jacksonville 2
Seattle 12, Carolina 7
Miami 23, Cleveland 10
Detroit 34, Minnesota 24
Indianapolis 21, Oakland 17
San Francisco 34, Green Bay 28
St. Louis 27, Arizona 24
N.Y. Giants at Dallas (n)
Mondays Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 6:55 p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.
NFL STANDINGS STATS NFL ROuNDuP
Thursday, Sep. 12
N.Y. Jets at NewEngland, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 15
Dallas at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
NewOrleans at Tampa Bay, 4:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 16
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:40 p.m.
Vikings-Lions Stats
Minnesota 7 7 10 024
Detroit 3 10 14 734
First Quarter
MinPeterson 78 run (Walsh kick), 10:39.
DetFGAkers 33, 4:55.
Second Quarter
DetFGAkers 42, 14:47.
MinPeterson 4 run (Walsh kick), 12:17.
DetBell 2 run (Akers kick), :10.
Third Quarter
DetBell 1 run (Akers kick), 10:19.
MinFGWalsh 52, 6:42.
DetBush 77 pass from Staford (Akers kick),
5:45.
MinPeterson 4 pass from Ponder (Walsh
kick), 1:37.
Fourth Quarter
DetFauria 1 pass from Staford (Akers kick),
6:47.
A62,461.
Min Det
First downs 16 28
Total Net Yards 330 469
Rushes-yards 22-105 33-117
Passing 225 352
Punt Returns 1-6 5-37
Kickof Returns 2-54 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 1-10 3-24
Comp-Att-Int 18-28-3 28-43-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-11 1-5
Punts 5-42.2 4-38.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 3-1
Penalties-Yards 5-52 11-88
Time of Possession 23:41 36:19
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGMinnesota, Peterson 18-93, Pon-
der 4-12. Detroit, Bush 21-90, Bell 6-25, Staford
5-2, Martin 1-0.
PASSINGMinnesota, Ponder 18-28-3-236.
Detroit, Staford 28-43-1-357.
RECEIVINGMinnesota, Simpson 7-140, Pe-
terson 4-18, Jennings 3-33, Rudolph 2-27, Patter-
son 1-10, Line 1-8. Detroit, Burleson 6-78, Bell 5-67,
Bush 4-101, Johnson 4-37, Edwards 3-30, Fauria
3-27, Pettigrew2-6, Durham1-11.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Buccaneers-Jets Stats
Tampa Bay 7 7 0 317
N.Y. Jets 2 10 0 618
First Quarter
NYJTeamsafety, 8:35.
TBWilliams 17 pass from Freeman (Lindell
kick), 1:07.
Second Quarter
NYJFGFolk 43, 11:01.
TBMartin 5 run (Lindell kick), 6:46.
NYJWinslow 7 pass from Smith (Folk kick),
:34.
Fourth Quarter
NYJFGFolk 30, 5:05.
TBFGLindell 37, :34.
NYJFGFolk 48, :02.
A76,957.
TB NYJ
First downs 12 22
Total Net Yards 250 304
Rushes-yards 25-65 29-90
Passing 185 214
Punt Returns 3-35 1-9
Kickof Returns 3-92 1-19
Interceptions Ret. 1-7 1-38
Comp-Att-Int 15-31-1 24-39-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-25 5-42
Punts 7-46.6 7-48.4
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 13-102 6-45
Time of Possession 27:38 32:22
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGTampaBay, Martin24-65, Freeman
1-0. N.Y. Jets, Smith6-47, Powell 12-29, Ivory 10-15,
Kerley 1-(minus 1).
PASSINGTampa Bay, Freeman 15-31-1-210.
N.Y. Jets, Smith 24-38-1-256, Kerley 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVINGTampa Bay, Jackson 7-154, Wil-
liams 4-52, Martin 2-(minus 1), Leonard 1-4, By-
ham 1-1. N.Y. Jets, Winslow 7-79, Hill 6-39, Powell
4-35, Kerley 3-45, Bohanon 1-21, Gates 1-17,
Holmes 1-13, Reuland 1-7.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Dolphins-Browns Stats
Miami 3 3 7 1023
Cleveland 0 7 3 010
First Quarter
MiaFGSturgis 45, 1:29.
Second Quarter
MiaFGSturgis 49, 13:37.
CleCameron 7 pass from Weeden (Cundif
kick), :28.
Third Quarter
MiaHartline 34 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis
kick), 6:46.
CleFGCundif 39, 3:02.
Fourth Quarter
MiaDan.Thomas 1 run (Sturgis kick), 6:48.
MiaFGSturgis 36, 3:59.
A71,513.
Mia Cle
First downs 18 20
Total Net Yards 275 291
Rushes-yards 23-20 13-47
Passing 255 244
Punt Returns 3-7 2-31
Kickof Returns 1-24 4-103
Interceptions Ret. 3-2 1-29
Comp-Att-Int 24-38-1 26-53-3
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-17 6-45
Punts 5-53.8 5-45.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0
Penalties-Yards 10-77 9-57
Time of Possession 32:47 27:13
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGMiami, Dan.Thomas 8-14, Miller
10-3, Tannehill 5-3. Cleveland, Richardson 13-47.
PASSINGMiami, Tannehill 24-38-1-272.
Cleveland, Weeden 26-53-3-289.
RECEIVINGMiami, Hartline 9-114, Gibson
7-77, Clay 5-54, Wallace 1-15, Miller 1-7, Dan.Thom-
as 1-5. Cleveland, Cameron9-108, Bess 5-47, Little
4-26, Benjamin 3-44, Richardson 2-30, Gurley
1-15, Ogbonnaya 1-10, Barnidge 1-9.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Patriots-Bills Stats
NewEngland 10 7 0 623
Bufalo 0 14 7 021
First Quarter
NEEdelman 9 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 10:46.
NEFGGostkowski 48, 4:47.
Second Quarter
BufSearcy 74fumble return(Carpenter kick),
8:25.
NEEdelman 8 pass from Brady (Gostkowski
kick), 1:55.
BufWoods 18 pass from Manuel (Carpenter
kick), :34.
Third Quarter
BufJohnson 18 pass fromManuel (Carpenter
kick), 11:03.
Fourth Quarter
NEFGGostkowski 33, 10:48.
NEFGGostkowski 35, :05.
A65,519.
NE Buf
First downs 26 15
Total Net Yards 431 286
Rushes-yards 35-158 34-136
Passing 273 150
Punt Returns 3-32 0-0
Kickof Returns 2-35 1-19
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0
Comp-Att-Int 29-52-1 18-27-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 0-0
Punts 6-39.3 9-45.8
Fumbles-Lost 2-2 3-2
Penalties-Yards 4-36 10-75
Time of Possession 37:43 22:17
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGNew England, Vereen 14-101, Rid-
ley 9-46, Blount 7-15, Brady 5-(minus 4). Bufalo,
Jackson 13-67, Spiller 17-41, Manuel 3-23, Graham
1-5.
PASSINGNew England, Brady 29-52-1-288.
Bufalo, Manuel 18-27-0-150.
RECEIVINGNew England, Amendola 10-104,
Edelman 7-79, Vereen 7-58, Thompkins 4-42,
Hoomanawanui 1-5. Bufalo, Spiller 5-14, Jackson
4-41, Chandler 4-38, Johnson 3-39, Woods 1-18,
Goodwin 1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Titans-Steelers Stats
Tennessee 0 7 3 616
Pittsburgh 2 0 0 79
First Quarter
PitTeamsafety, 14:57.
Second Quarter
TenBattle 3 run (Bironas kick), :44.
Third Quarter
TenFGBironas 26, 4:29.
Fourth Quarter
TenFGBironas 44, 6:01.
TenFGBironas 27, 3:53.
PitCotchery 4 pass fromRoethlisberger (Su-
ishamkick), 1:23.
A61,585.
Ten Pit
First downs 17 14
Total Net Yards 229 195
Rushes-yards 42-112 15-32
Passing 117 163
Punt Returns 5-58 1-1
Kickof Returns 1-(-1) 4-78
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 11-20-0 21-33-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 5-28
Punts 5-41.6 7-44.1
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-1
Penalties-Yards 6-60 4-47
Time of Possession 34:01 25:59
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGTennessee, C.Johnson 25-70, Bat-
tle 8-21, Greene 4-18, Locker 5-3. Pittsburgh, Ste-
phens-Howling 6-19, Redman 8-9, A.Brown 1-4.
PASSINGTennessee, Locker 11-20-0-125.
Pittsburgh, Roethlisberger 21-33-1-191.
RECEIVINGTennessee,Washington4-46,Walk-
er 3-40, Wright 2-11, Britt 1-15, Williams 1-13. Pitts-
burgh, Sanders 7-57, A.Brown 5-71, Cotchery 4-34,
Stephens-Howling2-11, Redman2-7, D.Johnson1-11.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Chiefs-Jaguars Stats
Kansas City 14 7 0 728
Jacksonville 2 0 0 02
First Quarter
JaxThomas safety, 12:26.
KCAvery 5 pass fromA.Smith (Succop kick),
9:04.
KCHemingway 3 pass fromA.Smith (Succop
kick), 1:35.
Second Quarter
KCCharles 2 run (Succop kick), 6:26.
Fourth Quarter
KCHali 10 interception return (Succop kick),
12:51.
A59,416.
KC Jax
First downs 17 12
Total Net Yards 291 178
Rushes-yards 28-120 23-71
Passing 171 107
Punt Returns 7-80 1-0
Kickof Returns 0-0 2-48
Interceptions Ret. 2-42 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 21-34-0 19-41-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-2 6-50
Punts 10-36.3 11-50.5
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 3-20 5-30
Time of Possession 31:30 28:30
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGKansas City, Charles 16-77,
A.Smith 4-25, Davis 4-12, Gray 2-8, Daniel 2-(mi-
nus 2). Jacksonville, Jones-Drew 15-45, Gabbert
4-16, Forsett 1-7, Todman 1-2, Robinson 2-1.
PASSINGKansas City, A.Smith 21-34-0-173.
Jacksonville, Gabbert 16-35-2-121, Henne3-6-0-36.
RECEIVINGKansas City, Sherman 4-44,
Bowe 4-30, McCluster 3-43, Charles 3-23, Avery
2-11, Fasano 2-8, Gray 1-6, Davis 1-5, Hemingway
1-3. Jacksonville, Forsett 4-22, Shorts 3-40, Reis-
ner 3-31, Todman 3-20, Sanders 3-14, Brown 1-14,
Taufoou 1-11, Harbor 1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Falcons-Saints Stats
Atlanta 10 0 7 017
NewOrleans 0 13 7 323
First Quarter
AtlGonzalez 7 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick),
8:32.
AtlFGBryant 23, 1:28.
Second Quarter
NOFGHartley 48, 10:53.
NOColston 25 pass from Brees (Hartley
kick), 9:10.
NOFGHartley 31, 1:47.
Third Quarter
AtlJones 4 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick),
11:41.
NOGraham7 pass fromBrees (Hartley kick),
6:22.
Fourth Quarter
NOFGHartley 22, 3:12.
A72,348.
Atl NO
First downs 18 18
Total Net Yards 367 419
Rushes-yards 14-88 29-78
Passing 279 341
Punt Returns 2-21 4-7
Kickof Returns 0-0 1-23
Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-0
Comp-Att-Int 25-38-1 26-35-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-25 2-16
Punts 6-46.8 3-49.3
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 2-19 6-57
Time of Possession 24:49 35:11
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGAtlanta, Jackson 11-77, Ryan 1-12,
Rodgers 2-(minus 1). NewOrleans, Thomas 9-43,
Sproles 8-22, Ingram9-11, Brees 3-2.
PASSINGAtlanta, Ryan 25-38-1-304. New
Orleans, Brees 26-35-1-357.
RECEIVINGAtlanta, Jones 7-76, Jackson 5-45,
Douglas 4-93, Gonzalez 3-36, White 2-19, Snelling
2-17, Ewing 1-15, Rodgers 1-3. NewOrleans, Sproles
6-88, Colston 5-68, Graham 4-45, Thomas 4-16,
Watson 3-31, Stills 2-86, Moore 2-23.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Bengals-Bears Stats
Cincinnati 7 7 7 021
Chicago 7 3 7 724
First Quarter
ChiM.Bennett 8 pass from Cutler (Gould
kick), 9:52.
CinGreen 2 pass from Dalton (Nugent kick),
2:34.
Second Quarter
CinGreen 45 pass fromDalton (Nugent kick),
2:53.
ChiFGGould 58, :11.
Third Quarter
CinGreen-Ellis 5 run (Nugent kick), 7:52.
ChiForte 1 run (Gould kick), 3:22.
Fourth Quarter
ChiMarshall 19pass fromCutler (Gouldkick),
7:58.
A62,213.
Cin Chi
First downs 18 17
Total Net Yards 340 323
Rushes-yards 21-63 28-81
Passing 277 242
Punt Returns 1-13 2-1
Kickof Returns 0-0 1-31
Interceptions Ret. 1-12 2-41
Comp-Att-Int 26-33-2 21-33-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 0-0
Punts 4-48.3 5-46.4
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 8-84 4-59
Time of Possession 28:30 31:30
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGCincinnati, Green-Ellis 14-25,
Bernard 4-22, M.Jones 1-14, Dalton 2-2. Chicago,
Forte 19-50, Cutler 3-16, Bush 6-15.
PASSINGCincinnati, Dalton 26-33-2-282.
Chicago, Cutler 21-33-1-242.
RECEIVINGCincinnati, Green9-162, Eifert 5-47,
Gresham 5-35, Sanu 4-19, Bernard 1-8, M.Jones
1-7, Green-Ellis 1-4. Chicago, Marshall 8-104, Jefery
5-42, Forte4-41, M.Bennett 3-49, E.Bennett 1-6.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Seahawks-Panthers Stats
Seattle 0 3 3 612
Carolina 0 7 0 07
Second Quarter
SeaFGHauschka 27, 9:36.
CarS.Smith 3 pass fromNewton (Gano kick),
3:13.
Third Quarter
SeaFGHauschka 40, 2:22.
Fourth Quarter
SeaKearse 43 pass fromWilson (pass failed),
10:13.
A73,294.
Sea Car
First downs 18 16
Total Net Yards 370 243
Rushes-yards 26-70 25-124
Passing 300 119
Punt Returns 4-48 2-10
Kickof Returns 0-0 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 25-33-0 16-23-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-20 1-6
Punts 4-49.5 5-47.8
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 3-2
Penalties-Yards 9-109 4-46
Time of Possession 30:14 29:46
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGSeattle, Lynch 17-43, Turbin 3-17,
Wilson 5-7, Baldwin 1-3. Carolina, D.Williams 16-76,
Newton 5-38, Tolbert 4-10.
PASSINGSeattle, Wilson 25-33-0-320. Caro-
lina, Newton 16-23-0-125.
RECEIVINGSeattle, Baldwin 7-91, Tate 4-51,
Miller 3-42, Coleman 3-30, Kearse 2-49, Rice 2-35,
Turbin 2-13, Lynch 2-9. Carolina, S.Smith 6-51, Olsen
5-56, D.Williams3-14, GinnJr. 1-10,Tolbert 1-(minus6).
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
Raiders-Colts Stats
Oakland 0 7 3 717
Indianapolis 7 7 0 721
First Quarter
IndWayne12passfromLuck(Vinatieri kick),2:47.
Second Quarter
IndAllen 20 pass from Luck (Vinatieri kick),
10:47.
OakMcFadden 1 run (Janikowski kick), 4:53.
Third Quarter
OakFGJanikowski 38, 5:42.
Fourth Quarter
OakD.Moore 5 pass from Pryor (Janikowski
kick), 11:09.
IndLuck 19 run (Vinatieri kick), 5:20.
A65,412.
Oak Ind
First downs 20 18
Total Net Yards 372 274
Rushes-yards 33-171 26-127
Passing 201 147
Punt Returns 1-5 1-23
Kickof Returns 2-47 0-0
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-28
Comp-Att-Int 19-29-2 18-23-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 1-16 4-31
Punts 2-50.5 3-39.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0
Penalties-Yards 8-51 3-31
Time of Possession 32:47 27:13
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGOakland, Pryor 13-112, McFadden
17-48, Streater 1-9, Jennings 2-2. Indianapolis,
Ballard 13-63, Luck 6-38, Bradshaw7-26.
PASSINGOakland, Pryor 19-29-2-217. India-
napolis, Luck 18-23-0-178.
RECEIVINGOakland, Streater 5-70, D.Moore
5-43, McFadden 3-18, Rivera 2-26, Mastrud 1-41,
Reece 1-9, Butler 1-8, Ford 1-2. Indianapolis, Wayne
8-96, Heyward-Bey 3-33, Hilton 3-20, Allen 1-20,
Bradshaw1-7, Fleener 1-7, Ballard 1-(minus 5).
MISSED FIELD GOALSOakland, Janikowski
48 (WL).
Packers-49ers Stats
Green Bay 7 7 7 728
San Francisco 7 7 7 1334
First Quarter
SFV.Davis 20 pass fromKaepernick (Dawson
kick), 2:52.
GBCobb 5 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick),
1:05.
Second Quarter
SFBoldin 10 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson
kick), 8:57.
GBFinley 12 pass from Rodgers (Crosby
kick), :16.
Third Quarter
SFV.Davis 2 pass from Kaepernick (Dawson
kick), 9:46.
GBNelson 8 pass from Rodgers (Crosby
kick), 3:49.
Fourth Quarter
SFFGDawson 27, 14:17.
GBLacy 2 run (Crosby kick), 8:26.
SFGore 1 run (Dawson kick), 5:47.
SFFGDawson 33, :26.
A69,732.
GB SF
First downs 23 23
Total Net Yards 385 494
Rushes-yards 19-63 34-90
Passing 322 404
Punt Returns 2-25 2-8
Kickof Returns 3-40 2-60
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0
Comp-Att-Int 21-37-1 27-39-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 2-11 2-8
Punts 6-46.2 5-47.2
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0
Penalties-Yards 5-44 11-85
Time of Possession 21:25 38:35
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGGreen Bay, Lacy 14-41, Rodgers
2-13, Cobb 2-6, Kuhn 1-3. San Francisco, Gore 21-
44, Hunter 6-24, Kaepernick 7-22.
PASSINGGreen Bay, Rodgers 21-37-1-333.
San Francisco, Kaepernick 27-39-0-412.
RECEIVINGGreen Bay, Nelson 7-130, Cobb
7-108, Finley 5-56, Lacy 1-31, Starks 1-8. San
Francisco, Boldin 13-208, V.Davis 6-98, K.Williams
3-36, Miller 2-24, Gore 2-21, V.McDonald 1-25.
MISSED FIELD GOALSSan Francisco, Daw-
son 48 (WL).
Cardinals-Rams Stats
Arizona 0 10 14 024
St. Louis 0 10 3 1427
Second Quarter
AriFitzgerald4pass fromPalmer (Feelykick),
14:11.
StLFGZuerlein 36, 11:20.
AriFGFeely 30, 5:23.
StLCook 13 pass from Bradford (Zuerlein
kick), :26.
Third Quarter
StLFGZuerlein 25, 13:57.
AriD.Williams 2 interception return (Feely
kick), 10:34.
AriFitzgerald 24 pass from Palmer (Feely
kick), 1:47.
Fourth Quarter
StLCook 1 pass from Bradford (Bradford
run), 12:56.
StLFGZuerlein 38, 9:04.
StLFGZuerlein 48, :40.
A55,279.
Ari StL
First downs 25 20
Total Net Yards 390 366
Rushes-yards 26-86 24-67
Passing 304 299
Punt Returns 1-1 1-1
Kickof Returns 2-32 3-46
Interceptions Ret. 1-2 1-29
Comp-Att-Int 26-40-1 27-38-1
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-23 0-0
Punts 4-46.8 3-49.0
Fumbles-Lost 4-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 6-68 7-59
Time of Possession 31:25 28:35
INDIVIDuAL STATISTICS
RuSHINGArizona, Mendenhall 16-60, Smith
10-26. St. Louis, Richardson 20-63, Stacy 1-4,
Bradford 2-1, Austin 1-(minus 1).
PASSINGArizona, Palmer 26-40-1-327. St.
Louis, Bradford 27-38-1-299.
RECEIVINGArizona, Roberts 8-97, Fitzgerald
8-80, Floyd 4-82, Dray 2-21, Sperry 1-16, J.Brown
1-14, Ellington1-13, Mendenhall 1-4. St. Louis, Cook
7-141, Austin 6-41, Richardson 5-33, Kendricks
3-25, Pettis 3-16, Givens 2-27, Quick 1-16.
MISSEDFIELDGOALSArizona, Feely50(WR).
From page 1B
Steelers
key contributors to your
game, its frustrating, but
thats the business were in,
Steelers defensive end Brett
Keisel said. Someones got
to step up.
Better hurry.
The Steelers hadnt lost
a home opener in a decade
and gured to have little
trouble against the Titans,
who gave up more points
than any team in the NFL
last season and brought in
Williams as an assistant. A
year removed from his role
in the bounty scandal with
the New Orleans Saints that
to a league suspension, the
former defensive coordina-
tors impact was immediate.
While Munchak stressed
coordinator Jerry Gray is
in charge of the play calling,
theres little doubt Williams
presence has keyed an atti-
tude shift in a unit that took
the brunt of the blame for a
6-10 season.
The Steelers came in with
10 straight victories inhome
openers, the longest streak
in the league. They went
winless in the preseason,
but stressed they were ne.
Doesnt look like it.
Following a bumpy offsea-
son in which Mike Wallace,
James Harrison and
Casey Hampton departed,
Pittsburgh insisted it was
not rebuilding. Maybe, but
the refurbishing project is
going to take some time.
Running back Isaac
Redman fumbled twice,
including once deep in
Tennessee territory. The
defense limited big plays,
but failed to generate a turn-
over or a momentum-swing-
ing sack.
The Titans didnt domi-
nate. They didnt have to.
Content to work between
the tackles with Johnson
and Battle, Tennessee con-
trolled the clock. The Titans
held the ball for over 34 min-
utes and asked quarterback
Jake Locker to do little more
than avoid mistakes.
Locker completed 11 of
20 passes for 125 yards, but
led Tennessee on a lengthy
scoring drive early in the
fourth quarter that gave the
Titans a 13-2 lead and sent
most of the crowd stream-
ing toward the exit.
The Titans needed 42
carries to run for 112 yards,
but what their runs lacked
in pop they made up for in
persistence.
The subdued ending
hardly seemed possible after
one of the more memorable
opening weekend ubs by
Tennessee kick returner
Darius Reynaud.
Shaun Suishams squib
kick was elded at the
Tennessee 1. Reynaud shuf-
ed into the end zone and
dropped to a knee. Ofcials
originally called the play
a touchback, but referee
Jerome Boger signaled a
safety after ruling the ball
never actually crossed the
goal line.
Pittsburghs euphoria
lasted all of eight plays. The
Steelers were driving fol-
lowing the free kick when
guard David DeCastro fell
on Pounceys right knee.
Pouncey laid on the ground
for several minutes before
being taken off on a golf
cart.
AP photo
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) runs out of bounds as Green Bay Packers
outside linebacker Clay Matthews dives for him during the second quarter Sunday in San Francisco.
The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO
Frank Gore scored a go-
ahead, 1-yard touchdown
with 5:47 remaining, Colin
Kaepernick threw for a
career-high 412 yards and
three touchdowns, with
13 completions to Anquan
Boldin, and the San
Francisco 49ers beat the
Green Bay Packers 34-28
on Sunday.
Boldin had 208 yards
receiving in a spectacular
San Francisco debut and
Vernon Davis caught a pair
of touchdown passes from
Kaepernick, who marched
his team 80 yards on ve
plays to take the lead late.
The 49ers answered after
Packers rookie Eddie Lacy
put Green Bay ahead on a
2-yard run with 8:26 left.
Aaron Rodgers threw for
333 yards and three touch-
downs, but the Packers
departed from Candlestick
Park with another defeat
eight months after losing
45-31 in the NFC division-
al playoffs.
Saints 23, Falcons 17
NEW ORLEANS
Drew Brees passed for 357
yards and two scores, and
the Saints held on for the
win in coach Sean Paytons
return from his bounty ban.
Roman Harper secured
the win when he intercept-
ed a tipped fourth-down
pass in the end zone with
under a minute left.
Brees connected with
Marques Colston for a
25-yard touchdown pass
during which the receiver
also set a franchise mark
for catches with 533. Brees
also hit tight end Jimmy
Graham for a 7-yard score
in the third quarter.
Matt Ryan passed for
304 yards and touchdown
passes to Tony Gonzalez
and Julio Jones. He also
drove Atlanta to the Saints
3 in the nal minute before
falling just short.
Chiefs 28, Jaguars 2
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
Alex Smith threw two early
touchdown passes, Kansas
Citys defense dominated
all day and the Chiefs began
the Andy Reid era with a
victory at Jacksonville.
Jamaal Charles ran for
77 yards and a touchdown
before leaving the game
with a quadriceps injury,
but that was about the only
negative for the Chiefs.
Jacksonville advanced
past its own 36-yard line
just once, a stunning display
of offensive futility for the
rebuilding franchise. The
Jaguars nished with 178
yards, but for most of the
game were challenging the
team low of 117 yards set
last year against Houston.
It wasnt even close to
the start the new coach
Gus Bradley wanted, but
it was a clear indication of
how far the team has to go.
Bears 24, Bengals 21
CHICAGO Jay
Cutler passed to Brandon
Marshall for the go-ahead
touchdown in the fourth
quarter, helping Chicago
get the victory in Marc
Trestmans coaching debut
with the team.
It wasnt quite the dis-
play the Bears were looking
for after making some big
changes in the offseason.
But it was good enough.
The Bengals led by 11 in
the third quarter and were
up 21-17 early in the fourth
when Tim Jennings jarred
the ball from Mohamed
Sanu following a reception
and made the recovery.
Chicago took over at
its 19 and got an 8-yard
run from Matt Forte on
fourth-and-inches at the
Bengals 27to keep the
drive going. Cutler then
found Marshall in the front
corner of the end zone for
a 19-yard touchdown, giv-
ing Chicago a 24-21 lead
with 7:58 remaining.
Patriots 23, Bills 21
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
Stephen Gostkowski hit
a 35-yard eld goal with 5
seconds left to send New
England to the road win.
Tom Brady set up the
decisive score by leading
a 49-yard, 12-play drive
during which he twice
completed passes to con-
vert third downs. It was
Bradys 36th career victory
in which the Patriots were
tied or trailed in the fourth
quarter.
Brady nished 29 of 52
for 288 yards passing and
two touchdowns in help-
ing the Patriots win their
season opener for the 10th
straight season.
The new-look Bills nearly
pulled off a stunning upset
in the rst game under
coach Doug Marrone and
rookie quarterback EJ
Manuel, who completed 18
of 27 passes for 150 yards
and two touchdowns.
Colts 21, Raiders 17
INDIANAPOLIS
Andrew Luck ran 19 yards
for the winning touch-
down, giving Indianapolis
its rst opening-day win
since 2009.
Luck was 18 of 23 for
178 yards with two touch-
down passes, but earned
his eighth career fourth-
quarter comeback by
scrambling for a score with
5:20 to go.
Oakland started Terrelle
Pryor at quarterback. He
was 19 of 29 for 217 yards
and one TD, and he broke
the Raiders rushing record
for a quarterback with 13
carries for 112 yards.
Lions 34, Vikings 24
DETROIT Reggie
Bush turned a short pass
into a 77-yard touchdown
in the third quarter and
nished with 191 yards of
offense to help Detroit pull
away from Minnesota.
Joique Bell ran for two
TDs, including a go-ahead
score that gave the Lions
their rst lead early in the
third quarter.
Matthew Stafford was
28 of 43 for 357 yards with
two TDs. His last score
was a 1-yard lob to rookie
tight end Joseph Fauria
with 6:47 left that sealed
the win.
Rams 27, Cardinals 24
ST. LOUIS Greg
Zuerlein kicked a 48-yard
eld goal with 40 seconds
left to lift St. Louis to the
comeback victory.
It was Zuerleins fourth
eld goal of the game for
the Rams, who trailed
24-13 after three quarters.
Larry Fitzgerald caught
two touchdown passes from
new quarterback Carson
Palmer and Arizonas
defense had a TD.
Jets 18, Buccaneers 17
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. Nick Folk kicked
a 48-yard eld goal with
2 seconds remaining after
Lavonte Davids personal
foul penalty kept New
Yorks drive alive, and the
Jets pulled out an improb-
able opening victory.
With the Jets trailing
17-15 and time running
out, rookie Geno Smith
scrambled for 10 yards
and was shoved while
he was out of bounds by
David.
The 15-yard penalty
gave the Jets the ball at the
Buccaneers 30 and set up
Folks winning eld goal
on the next play.
Things appeared dim
for the Jets just moments
earlier when Rian Lindell
kicked a 37-yard eld goal
with 34 seconds left.
Seahawks 12, Panthers 7
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
Russell Wilson threw
for 320 yards for Seattle,
including a 43-yard touch-
down pass to Jermaine
Kearse in the fourth quar-
ter.
The Seahawks managed
just two eld goals before
Kearse beat cornerback
Josh Thomas down the
right sideline for the go-
ahead score with 10:13
left.
The Panthers held
Marshawn Lynch to 43
yards rushing, but Wilson
picked up the slack by com-
pleting 25 of 33 passes.
The Panthers threat-
ened to take the lead late,
but safety Earl Thomas
forced DeAngelo Williams
to fumble at the Seattle
8. Defensive tackle Tony
McDaniel recovered with
5:25 left. The Seahawks
ran out the clock from
there.
Dolphins 23, Browns 10
CLEVELAND Ryan
Tannehill passed for 272
yards and a touchdown,
leading the Dolphins to a
win over the Browns, who
fell to 1-14 in Week 1 since
1999.
Tannehill, who was given
more offensive weapons
for his second NFL season,
threw a 34-yard TD pass
to Brian Hartline in the
third quarter and drove the
Dolphins to a game-clinch-
ing TD in the fourth.
Daniel Thomas had
a 1-yard scoring plunge
with 6:48 left, putting the
Dolphins up by 10.
Miamis Cameron Wake
had 2 sacks and the
Dolphins defensive line
sacked Brandon Weeden
six times.
Niners pile up yards,
down Packers 34-28
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 1C
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ZONING HEARING BOARD
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
BEFORE THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE
ZONING HEARING BOARD
A public hearing will be held in City Council Chambers,
Fourth Floor, City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre,
Pennsylvania, on Wednesday, September 18, 2013, at 4:30
p.m., Daylight Savings Time, relative to the following zoning
appeal applications:
a) Continued Hearing: Nabil Abualburack for the property loc-
ated within a C-1 zone at 219-225 South Main Street for a spe-
cial exception under Uses Not Addressed Within Ordinance (sec-
tion 324) to establish a 6,656 square foot area Hooka Lounge. A
special exception request to permit parking at another location
and shared parking for 33 vehicles at 249 South Main Street rel-
evant to the proposed 6,656 square foot area Hooka Lounge
b) Coal Street Redevelopment, Inc. for the property located
within an Open Space Zone (OSP) at Coal Street Park for a
special exception under Uses Not Addressed Within Ordinance
((Section 324) to install a 10 x 12 freestanding business sign. A
variance to include a 4 x 8 electronic message board sign. A
variance to waive the front yard setback from the required 10 feet
down to 42 inches and to waive the maximum allowable height
from 15 feet increased to 25 feet pertaining to the proposed
freestanding sign.
c) Ignatius Rutkowski for the property located within an R-1
zone at 125 Austin Avenue for variances to waive side yard set-
backs of a corner lot from the required 10 feet down to 4 feet for
the placement of a 10 x 12 shed and down to 7 feet for the
placement of a 22 x 24 garage.
d) John Reese for the property located within an R-1 zone at
207 Mill Street for a special exception to change a nonconform-
ing use from three (3) dwelling units to three (3) dwelling units
with a business office for sales and installation of a school fur-
niture & equipment with the use of 378 square feet of an existing
garage for storage of business support items. Requesting to in-
crease the width of a previously approved 39 foot wide driveway
to a 65 foot wide driveway relevant to a variance waiving the
maximum allowable 20 foot width for driveways within an R-1
zone.
e) Joseph Mirin, M M Mirco Winery Inc. for the property loc-
ated within an R-1 zone at 373 High Street for a special excep-
tion to change a nonconforming use from a commercial sheet
metal fabrication ( plumbing and HVAC) business with offices to
include a 2300 square foot Winery as a use for a vintner to bottle
wine.
f) David Chiverrlla for the property containing an existing single
family home located within a C-4 zone at 157 North Diamond
Street for variances pertaining to a minor subdivision to: a)
waive the minimum lot area from the required 10,000 square feet
down to 6,335.8 square feet; b) waive the minimum lot width
from the required 100 feet down to 88 feet and c) waive the min-
imum lot depth from the required 100 feet down to 72 feet.
g) Dorothy Grilli for the property located within a C-N zone at
201 Old River Road for a special exception for a change in non-
conforming use from a 5 unit apartment building and a single
family home to a 4 unit apartment building with a 1000 square
foot real estate office and a single family home. A variance to
waive one parking space for the proposed office. A variance to
waive the required front yard setback from the required 10 feet
down to 5 feet in order to install a 6 x 8 business sign.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY APPEAR AT SUCH HEAR-
ING. CASES WILL NOT NECESSARILY BE CALLED IN THE
ORDER LISTED ABOVE. DISABILITIES NOTICE: This Hear-
ing is being held at a facility which is accessible to persons with
disabilities. Please notify Ms. Melissa Schatzel, Human Re-
sources Director, if special accommodations are required. Such
notification should be made within one (1) week prior to the date
of this hearing. Ms. Schatzel can be reached at (570) 208-4194
or by FAX at (570) 208-4124 or by e-mail at mschatzel@wilkes-
barre.pa.us
By Order of the Zoning Hearing Board of the City of Wilkes-
Barre
William C. Harris, Director of Planning & Zoning/Zoning Officer
THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE IS AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
THOMAS M. LEIGHTON, MAYOR
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
INVITATION TO BID
Sealed proposals will be receive by:
WEST PITTSTON BOROUGH
at:
555 EXETER AVENUE
WEST PITTSTON, PA 18643
until:
6:30 PM, on SEPTEMBER 24, 2013, for the following:
Project Name:
WEST PITTSON BOROUGH
POOL DEMOLITION
Project Location:
WEST PITTSTON BOROUGH
LUZERNE COUNTY
The proposed work for this contract will include:
WEST PITTSTON POOL DEMOLITION AND ASSOCIATED
RESTORATION
The Bidding Documents including Bidding Requirements, Con-
tract Documents, Specifications and Drawings indicate the ex-
tent of the work to be completed. The Bidding Documents may
be reviewed at the Issuing Office, Reilly Associates, 49 South
Main Street, Suite 200, Pittston, PA 18640, (570) 654-2473 dur-
ing normal business hours 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Copies of the
Bidding Documents must be obtained from Reilly Associates
(Address Above) by providing a non-refundable deposit of $25
made payable to Reilly Associates. Addenda, if any, will be is-
sued to only those persons whose names and addresses are on
record with Reilly Associates as having obtained the Bidding
Documents. All questions concerning the Bidding Documents
shall be addressed to: The Project Engineer c/o Reilly Asso-
ciates, 49 South Main Street, Suite 200, Pittston, PA 18640,
phone (570) 654-2473. A Bid must be accompanied by Bid se-
curity made payable to WEST PITTSTON BOROUGH in an
amount of 10 percent of Bidders Total of All Bid Prices for each
bid (not including bid alternates) and in the form of a certified
check, bank money order, or a Bid bond (on the form attached)
issued by an acceptable surety.
Attention is called to the following:
A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held for the project. The
pre-bid conference will be held on September 17, 2013 at 4 PM.
The pre-bid conference is mandatory for all Prime Bidders.
The Contractor must ensure that employees and applicants for
employment are not discriminated against because of their race,
religion, color, handicap, national origin, age or sex.
The following wage rate requirements are applicable to this con-
tract:
PENNSYLVANIA PREVAILING WAGE DETERMINATION
WEST PITTSTON BOROUGH reserves the right to reject any or
all bids and to waive any informalities in the bidding.
WEST PITTSTON BOROUGH
ELLEN RIDDLE
BOROUGH SECRETARY
AUCTION / ESTATE /
YARD SALE
MULTIPLE ESTATES AUCTION
ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES & GENERAL MERCHANDISE
TRAVERS AUCTIONS -
56 Dorchester Dr., Dallas, PA
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2013
Inspection: 3:30 PM Start Time: 5:00 PM
ANTIQUES FURNISHINGS COLLECTIBLES HOUSE-
HOLD FURNISHINGS GENERAL MERCHANDISE JEW-
ELRY BOX & TRAY LOTS + MUCH MORE!!
Visit us at: www.auctionzip.com (ID# 2280) or
www.traversauctions.com or call 570.674.2631
Travers Auction Barn: RH926 Auctioneer: Steve Traver
AU3367L
10% Buyers Premium
Building / Construction / Skilled
ESTIMATOR
Local Commercial General Contractor is seeking an
experienced Full Time Estimator. Candidate will work with
management & be responsible for attending pre-bid meetings,
entire bid process including blue print take offs, solicitation of
pricing, job site visits & pictures. Marketing experience is a
plus. Salary based upon experience. Company has been in
business for over 25 years and offers competitive wages, paid
vacation and holiday time off, health benefits and 401 (k) profit
sharing plan. Please forward your resume in confidence to:
Human Resource Dept.
Champion Builders, Inc.
239 Pringle Street, Kingston, PA 18704
www.championbuildersinc.com
timesleaderautos.com
Find
Your
Next
Vehicle
Online.
MARKETPLACE
Special Notices
ADOPT:
A teacher hopes to adopt a
baby! I promise to provide a
lifetime of unconditional
love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
CRAFTERS
WANTED
For Pittston Marching Patriots
Craft Fair Sat., Nov. 23.
Fair is 9am to 4pm.
For info & contract Call Kristen
570-499-4957 or email
marchingpatriotscraftshow
@gmail.com
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
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570-301-3602
Lilies, peonies, hydrangeas,
tulips and orchids represent
the trendier choices currently
in bridal fashion.
bridezella.net
A $Buck a Shuck Monday at
Oyster Bar! Genetti's
oysterrestaurant.com
570-820-0990
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
INVITATION TO BID
The Commission on Economic
Opportunity (CEO) will accept
sealed bids for a HUD CoC
Consul tant to assi st i n the
planning activities to evaluate,
support, and develop an over-
all community-wide collaborat-
ive process resulting in the
submission of an application to
the Department of Housing
and Ur ban Devel opment
(HUD) for the Continuum of
Care (CoC) Program.
Bid specification packages will
be available to any interested
bi dders by t el ephoni ng or
emailing the Commission on
Economic Opportunity, tele-
phone number (800) 822-0359
or email at ceo@sunlink.net
with subject HUD CoC bid. Any
questions on this bid can be
addressed to Barbara Gomb at
(800)822-0359.
Bids must be received in the
CEO Main Office, 165 Amber
Lane Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702,
by CERTI FI ED OR RE-
GISTERED mail not later than
5:00 p.m. EST on September
24, 2013. All envelopes must
be clearly marked (Bid for
HUD CoC).
Bids will be opened at 2:00
p.m. on September 25, 2013 at
the CEO Main Office.
CEO reserves the right to re-
ject any or all bids; otherwise
the bid will be awarded to the
l owest responsi bl e bi dder
whose bid conforms to all the
terms and conditions of this in-
vitation.
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
Lost & Found
FOUND. White binder, con-
t e n t s s e e m i mp o r t a n t .
Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter. on
8.5.13. Call 332-2786
Notices
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult-Payment Plan!
Atty Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
BANKRUPTCY
DUI-ARD
Social Security-Disability
Free Consultation
Attorney
Joseph M. Blazosek
570-655-4410 or 570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
CAREGIVER
Experi enced 24 hour mal e
caregi ver. Speaks Sl ovak.
$800 monthly with 2 days off.
570-814-9880
COMPANION/CARE GIVER
Reliable, Pleasant, Experi-
enced Woman seeking posi-
tion as companion. Appts, er-
rands, etc. 570-823-8636.
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fish-
ing & tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
KINKY BOOTS
WED. NOV. 6TH
$165. (MID MEZZ SEATS)
CINDERELLA
WED., NOV 6TH
$159 (ORCHESTRA SEATS)
JERSEY BOYS
WED., OCT 16TH
$129 (FRONT MEZZ
SEATS)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
MON DEC. 2ND
$99 (Orchestra Seats)
A CHRISTMAS STORY
SAT., DEC. 14TH
$165 (FRONT MESS SEATS)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
OCT. 5 & 6 SAT/SUN
CALL NOW LIMITED
SEATING AVAILABLE
F.L. Wright's
Fallingwater /Clayton/911
Memorial @ Shanksvillle
NOV.. 3 SUN
Chocolate World Expo
White Plains,
Lyndhurst Castle,
Tarrytown
Empire City Casino, Yonkers
NOV. 14 THURS. NYC
Vermeer Exhibit
@ the Frick
Dinner @ Four Seasons
Restaurant
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Child/Elderly Care
FAMILIES
URGENTLY NEEDED
More children than ever
before can no longer live in
their own homes. You can
help by becoming a foster
parent. Call FCCY at
1-800-747-3807. EOE
CHILD CARE AIDE
Part time position for after
school program avai l abl e.
Pl ease cal l 570-735-9290
Clerical
Administrative/
Personal
Assistant
Multi-Corporation CEO seeks
qualified individual to assist
on a number of tasks related
to said corporations and oth-
er duties. These duties in-
clude but are not limited to:
- Appointment setting
- Phone/E-mail
correspondence
- Clerical tasks
- Minor accounting work
- Errands
Position will begin as part-
time and will develop into full-
time as candidate acclimates
themself into role. Qualified
candidate must possess a
warm and charming person-
ality, be able to speak in front
of a group, must dress for
success, be able to type 40+
wpm, must be proficient in
Microsoft Office suite + Apple
computers and must have a
val i d dri vers l i cense and
automobile. Please submit
resume to sherry@posi t-
i veresul tsmarketi ng.com.
Automotive
Claims
Assistant
The Claims Team Leader is
responsible for directing a
team of claims assistants.
The Team Lead delegates
and distributes claims to the
team. They provide guid-
ance and training to assist-
ants during the claims pro-
cess. They assist with escal-
ated calls and customer is-
sues and works to resolve
problem situations. The posi-
tion requires extensive auto-
motive service experience
and superior customer ser-
vice skills.
Applicant must be well or-
gani zed, have excel l ent
phone skills, able to commu-
nicate effectively. Basic typ-
ing skills preferable. Full
time position Monday Fri-
day. E-mail resumes to
jennifer.davailus@
pennwarrantycorp.com
Education
HOLY REDEEMER
HIGH SCHOOL
159 S. Pennsylvania Blvd W-B
Accepting applications for
(1) Boys Swim Coach
(2) FT Housekeepers
Phone: 570-829-2424
Help Wanted General
TAX
PREPARER
Free Tax School. Earn extra
income after taking course.
Flexible schedules. Small fee
for books & supplies.
LIBERTY TAX
Edwardsville & West Pittston
570-288-4007
Pittston & Plains
570-883-7829
Dallas 570-675-2240
Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp
570-208-1096
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
OUTDOOR
POWER
EQUIPMENT
(OPE)
TECHNICIAN/
MECHANIC
Minimum 5 years experience
diagnosing / repairing small
engi ne power equi pment ,
plows, tractors, mowers, etc.
Will have OPE factory training
on motors, transmissions, hy-
draulics, electrical, pneumat-
ics or other components. Must
have your own tools. Call Bri-
an at Harvis HR Service 570-
542-5330 or send resume to:
hilbertsequipment.jobs
@gmail.com
IT/Software Development
WORDPRESS
WEB
DESIGNER
PRM, Inc. l ocated i n Ol d
Forge, PA is looking for a
qualified individual to assist
in Web Design and creation
using Wordpress. This indi-
vidual will create 5-10 page
websites for clients using a
Wordpress template or cus-
tom design. Full-Time with
benefits. Please e-mail re-
sume to Sherry@positiveres-
ultsmarketing.com.
Logistics/Transportation
ASSISTANT
DISPATCHER
Trucking Company with 24/7
operation seeks individual to
assist Dispatch office in fast
paced environment with
scheduling assignments,
drivers, etc. Exprience help-
ful, but will train the right can-
didate. Health & Life Insur-
ance, 401(k), plus. Reply to
hr@nichlostrucking.com
Logistics/Transportation
CLASS A CDL
DRIVER
Small trucking company
looking for qualified drivers to
run Regional and OTR. Must
be at least 24 yrs of age & a
minimum of 2 yrs experience,
with clean driving record.
Average over $1,000 a week.
Interested drivers can call
Howard at 570-417-4722
Maintenance / Domestic
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
PRM, Inc. located at 102 N.
Main St., Old Forge, is look-
ing for a part time mainten-
ance person to handle main-
tenance in and around our
7,500 sq. ft. building. Can-
didate must have reliable
transportation and be willing
to work a flexible on-call
schedule as an independent
contractor. Please contact
Sherry @570-457-7020 for
more details and to set up
an interview. Wage is $10
per hour. 1099 issued at
year end.
Medical/Health
CAREGIVERS
Looking for compassionate
people to assist the elderly in
their homes. Personal care
and transportation required.
All shifts and flexible hours
available. Call 338-2681
or visit homeinstead.com/494
to apply.
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Part time 20-24 hours per
week. Computer ski l l s a
must. Send resume to:
POSITION # 4510
c/o Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871
RSA's
Cook
Dishwasher
LPN, Part-time 11-7
Apply in Person
No Phone Calls.
TIFFANY COURT
700 Northampton St.
Kingston, PA
Technical Trades
Experienced Heavy
Equipment Mechanic
Class B CDL required. Must
have 3 years experience &
own tools. Working on
engines, electrical, hydraulics,
power train, welding.
Machine Shop experience a
plus. Apply in person:
703 S Township Blvd, Pitt-
ston, PA 18640
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, sideby-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
PAGE 2C Monday, September 9, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Mechanics
EQUIPMENT MECHANIC
Permanent full time position for repairing and installing of
automotive equipment, includes A/C lifts equipment, brake
lathes, tire changers and wheel balancers.
Experience as a automotive technician would be helpful.
Full benefits program.
To apply please send your resume to:
PANZITTA SALES AND SERVICE
72 George Ave, Wilkes Barre, PA 18705
or email bwas@panzittasales.com
Sales / Business Development
SALES
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED COMMISSION
SALES PERSONS
WANTED TO SERVICE NEW AND EXISTING
ACCOUNTS. COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID TRAINING.
IF YOU WANT A CAREER AND NOT A JOB
CALL RICK AT 675-3283
TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW MON-FRI
OR VISIT WWW.CMSEAST.COM
Clerical
Customer Service / Sales Associate
Our company currently has an opening at our Forty Fort loca-
tion. We are a small business that sells and repairs telephone
systems and parts to our customers located throughout the
USA.
Job Description:
Chosen candidate will address the needs of customers via
telephone, email and fax. Duties will include issuing price
quotes, entering sales orders, researching past orders, provid-
ing reports, and processing product returns. During peak hours
individual will be challenged with managing and prioritizing
many customer requests within a short period of time. Individu-
al will be required to develop a thorough understanding of
products as to effectively address customer requests. Periodic-
ally, individual will reach out to client base regarding current
promotions.
Details:
Monday through Friday - 8:30am-5:00pm
Benefits package offered.
Requirements:
3+ years customer service experience.
Proficiency working with multiple programs and windows on
a Microsoft Windows XP, Vista or 7 computer.
Interest in and working knowledge of consumer electronics,
smartphones and computer devices preferred, but not
required.
Excellent written communication skills. Concise and friendly
oral communication skills.
Must be able to work effectively in a fast-paced environment
and possess ability to multi-task.
Email your resume and salary requirements to:
nepajob@gmail.com
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Banking / Real Estate / Mortgage
SENIOR
TRUST OFFICER
Community Bank has an opening for a Senior Trust Officer who
will be responsible for managing the Financial Services
Department in order to meet the trust, estate, and employee
benefits services of customers within the bank's market area;
developing, implementing, and achieving annual goals and
objectives as established for the trust department and retail
investment program; organizing the division;
insuring the division's compliance with various operating
policies and procedures and various regulatory requirements;
supervising assigned personnel; communicating and
interfacing with other divisions and management personnel and
providing periodic management reports.
The successful candidate must possess a B.S. or B.A. degree
in a related field of study; a master's degree
preferred and specialized trust education and training. Must be
self-motivated and have excellent interpersonal and
communication skills. Position requires the ability to think and
work independently. We offer a competitive wage and benefits,
an incentive program, the opportunity for career advancement,
and the excitement and challenge of day to day
operational tasks.
Interested candidates should submit a cover letter, resume, and
salary requirements to:
The Times Leader
Position #4515
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Commercial
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve
570-474-6307, ex. 2772
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
SWOYERSVILLE
Great i nvestment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major high-
ways & conveniences. Bring all of-
fers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done. MLS #13-1983.
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901 or 696-2468
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
For Sale By Owner
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
PITTSTON
251 Broad Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath. Cape Cod
Home. With many upgrades,
finished basement, 2 fire-
places, sun room, pool and
deck, 2 car garage. $176,500
570-883-0412
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
OPEN HOUSE
Thurs., 9/5 4pm-7pm
Sun, 9/8 10am-3pm
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage
on 1.09 acre. Finished base-
ment with laundry room.
Hardwood floors and
carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located
on a quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
Houses For Sale
ASHLEY
8-10 E. Hartford Street
Well cared for home/invest-
ment property. Move in
ready. 2 spacious bedrooms
on each side with additional
3rd floor living/storage space.
Full basement, large back-
yard. Quiet area on
dead end street.
Pre-qualified Buyers
/Principal Only
$56,500
Call 570-287-2073
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
BEAR CREEK
Spaciously satisfying from the
open kitchen/eating area, im-
pressive. Fireplace in great
room to an expanded family
room, you will enjoy life more
in this picturesque 4 bedroom
in Laurel Brook Estates.
MLS 13 1587
$372,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied.
MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
TO SETTLE ESTATE
Two family, with garage, large
fenced yard, needs some
updating, new boiler,
water heaters & roof.
570-735-1058
570-704-8099
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
40 CLAUDE ST.
5 year young ranch home in
the Dallas Sch. Dist. Conveni-
ent 1-floor living includes
large modern kitchen with tile
floor & countertops, dining
area, LR, 3BRs & 2 full BAs.
For additional living space,
the LL is finished with a fam-
ily room & space for a gym,
playroom hobby room, etc. An
attached deck & a large level
yard provides ample space
for outdoor cooking & activit-
ies. OSP. For more details &
to view the photos online go
to: www.prudentialrealestate.com
and enter PRU9Y5P8 in the
Home Search. This home is
also for rent. #13-3371.
$199,900
Mary Ellen or Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
45 OLD GRANDVIEW AVE.
Make your new home a me-
ticulously maintained bi-level
in the Dallas Sch. Dist. This
property offers 3BRS, 2 mod-
ern baths, modern kitchen,
LR, and formal DR. For relax-
ation and entertaining there is
a 3-season room off the kit-
chen and a large FR in the LL
wi th Berber carpet and a
wood-burning fireplace. All
appliances and window treat-
ments remain, so it is truly
move-in ready. Call today
for your private showing.or
more details and to view the
phot os onl i ne, go t o:
www.prudenti al real estate.com
and enter PRU3J2D2 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3552
$196,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
Cozy, comfortable home with
3 bedrooms, living room with
cathedral ceiling & fireplace,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, screened in porch &
laundry room. Includes lovely
studio apartment with deck,
perfect for family member. 2
car garage.
$239,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
DUPONT
Very nice 2 story, move in con-
di t i on. Ori gi nal woodwork,
stained glass windows, hard-
wood under carpet, fenced
yard on corner lot.
MLS#13-2310
$95,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$87,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EXETER
206 Cedar Street
$88,900
Neat & tidy low maintenance
home with three bedrooms,
large unfinished basement,
rear carport. No grass to cut.
MLS #13-1914
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor family room, Large
master bedroom (15x16) with
lots of closet space.
Aluminum siding.
Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$117,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
52 Ransom Street
Recently renovated and up-
dated this double block is cur-
rently 100% occupied. Little
exterior maintenance or yard-
work for landlord. Current
rents $700 and $750 per
month plus utilities. Corner
lot. Off street parking for each
tenant. Granite kitchens,
hardwood floors, Living
Room, Dining Room, 3 Bed-
rooms and bath in each unit.
MLS# 13-809.
$114,900
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Sept. 8th 1-3 P.M.
3 Prince St.,
Hanover Green
Great Location, near schools,
Industrial Park, I-81.
Quality-Construction
3 BR, 2+ Bath, Ranch Home.
Immaculate, Move in immedi-
ately. Freshly-Painted Interi-
or & Exterior. Features:
Large Eat-In Kitchen with
New Flooring, plenty of stor-
age, Plaster Walls, Hard-
wood Floors, Refurbished
Tile Baths. Newer Roof, Gut-
ters, Windows, Doors.
Covered Patio, Finished
Basement with Laundry
Room, Workshop & Outside
Entrance. Plenty Off street
parking Lot 100' X 150' Level
& Fenced with Stucco Shed.
Economical 2-Zone Gas
Heat, inc. all gas appliances.
Reasonable Taxes.
One owner,
Selling to settle estate.
Reduced for quick sale:
$143,300Call/Text for
details 570-466-9843.
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
HANOVER TWP
Newer construction offers open
concept between ultra-modern
kitchen, eat-in area w/sliders &
FR; light & bright throughout!
Formal LR & office or den. 2nd
fl r l ends to MBR w/WIC &
MBA, 3 additional BRs & 2nd
fl r bath. Rear deck, huge
fenced yard, gas FWA & cent-
ral A/C, 2 car garage. Con-
venient to shopping, bus stop,
walking path, restaurants.
MLS# 13-3541
$260,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$54,900
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 3C
Medical/Health
Discover an exceptional opportunity to deliver
quality healthcare to Americas Veterans
Registered Nurse
Education Specialist-Critical Care
TheVAMedical Center Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvaniais currentlyacceptingapplications
for a Registered Nurse-Educational Specialist-Critical Care.
The requirements/responsibilities of the Education Specialist will include:
Masters Degree in Nursing or related Healthcare Field (If Masters is in a related Health
Care Field then a Bachelor of Science in Nursing required)
Current BCLS and ACLS certifcations; CCRN preferred
Minimum of fve (5) years recent (within past 2 - 3 years) Critical Care experience
Experience as an Educator preferred but not required
Assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating the educational needs of Patient Care
Services specifcally the Critical Care Areas
Profcient in developing and delivering curriculum in a variety of methods
Tour of duty: Full-Time; Monday through Friday (8:00am 4:30pm)
Interested applicants must submit the following information by September 23, 2013:
Registered Nurse: Application for Nurses and Nurse Anesthetists, 10-2850a;
Declaration for Federal Employment, OF-306; Resume/CurriculumVitae; copy
of license/degree.
For additional information and an application packet, please call (570) 824-3521 ext. 7209.
Please mail your complete application package to:
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
Medical Center (05)
1111 East End Boulevard Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
VA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must
see, home with many desirable
features. Lower level remodeled in
2009 is A-1 grade including family
room with fantastic gas fireplace,
wet bar, 3/4 bath & additional 4th
bedroom. Home also includes
new on demand tank less water
heater, securi ty system & i n
ground lawn sprinkler. Owners
have enjoyed this home for many
years, now it's your turn. Come &
take a look!
MLS# 13-2335
$259,900
Call Jim Banos
Call or text 570-991-1883
For appointment
jim.banos@
coldwellbanker.com
Town & Country
Real Estate
570-474-2340
HANOVER TWP.
Very neat & clean 2 story
single family home with 3
bedrooms, 1st floor bath, eat-
in kitchen, pantry, & formal
DR. Fenced yard. Gas
f orced ai r heat .
$59,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
Looking for an affordable home
in excellent condition, close to
grade school and high school,
this is the home for you! Re-
modeled throughout, private
driveway, fenced-in yard, new
ki t chen, f r eshl y pai nt ed
throughout, new windows, new
parquet floors and carpeting.
Property at 503 High St. also
for sal e. Sel l er wi l l accept
package deal. DIR: From WB
to San Souci Parkway, left on
Willow, right on High.
#13-691
$74,500
Louise Laine
283-9100, x 20
283-9100
BERWICK
Lovely 2-Story Home in Nice
Residential Neighborhood!
Features Living Room, Din-
ing Room, Kitchen/Adjacent
Family Room, 3 Bedrooms,
2.5 Baths with Gas Heat &
Central Air + 2-Car Attached
Garage.
MLS 20 52633
Price: $210,000
Call Patsy @ 570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
HUNTINGTON TWP.
Looking for that country living
while your still close to town?
Only 25 minutes from town.
Come live in this cozy 2 story
Cape Cod nestled in a coun-
try setting on a .99 acre lot.
Very well maintained, move in
condition, with lots of closet
space, a 11' x 21' deck and a
Florida room with a knotty
pine ceiling. Don't worry about
losing power, home comes
w/a portable generator w/its
own transfer box.
MLS 13 3364
$149,000
Call Michael Nocera
696-5412
696-1195
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
Great location - This 3 bed-
room 2 bath home is waiting
for i ts new owners. Entry
opens to living room/dining
room combo lovely large
rear yard garage with lots of
storage.
MLS #13-2659
$124,000
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room & re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
counter tops. Tile floor in foy-
er and kitchen, master bed-
room and master bath with a
whirlpool tub. The home has
Pella windows throughout.
MLS#13 3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
KINGSTON
283 REYNOLDS ST.
Spacious four bedroom home
with plenty of charm. Hard-
wood floors, leaded windows,
accent fireplace and built-in
bookshelves. First floor laun-
dry/power room, three-sea-
son porch and a 16x32 in-
ground pool. Move-in condi-
tion with newer roof, siding
and windows, ductless air, all
appliances and alarm system.
#13-3406
$189,900
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
NANTICOKE
Rear 395 E.
Washington St.
Double Block Home,
Each Side:
Large Living Rm., Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Vinyl Sid-
ing, Brand New Roof New:
Berber Carpets, Paint, Floor-
ing, With Backyard Deck
length of House Have In-
come Tomorrow or Live for
Free! Appraised at $65,000
listing at $47,950 or
BEST OFFER!!!
570-916-2043
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$268,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL ROAD
Spacious Modern Tri-Level,
4 bedroom with 3.5 bath,
Large Kitchen, family room
with fireplace, dining room
and living room. Attached 3
car garage, gas heat, cent-
ral air, central vac-system.
Closet and Storage Space.
Second lot included. Minutes
from I-81 and Pennsylvania
Turn pike. $374,900.
570-237-0101
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
Houses For Sale
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
PITTSTON
MLS 13-3293
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570 592 3966
MOUNTAIN TOP
A 1.17 acre serene setting &
a l arge pi cni c grove wi th
stream makes this move in
ready 3 BR bi level a must
see property! Theres an eat
in kitchen with breakfast bar,
a formal DR with sliders to a
private deck, ample LR with
picture window, Master BR
suite, 25 LL Rec Room with
bath, oversized 2 car gar-
age with large paved drive.
MLS 13 3516
$259,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
570-287-1196
MOUNTAIN TOP
Well cared for 2 story on quiet
street. Eat in kitchen, dining
room, living room along with
sun room comprise the first
floor. 2 generous bedrooms w/
closets and full bath on 2nd
floor. Walk up attic provides
easy storage. Hardwood floors
and beautiful wood. 2 addition-
al buildings on lot offer many
possibilities and Storage! 1
year Home Warranty to buyer.
MLS 13 2817
$124,900
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $47,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
cently painted & move-in
ready. This 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
level lot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
tos online, go to.
www.
prudentialrealestate.com &
enter PRU7R4L5 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3363
$142,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
Houses For Sale
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
Penn Lake
Lakefront Cottage
(pennlake.org).
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
large living room, large en-
closed heated porch, eat-in
kitchen, laundry room, at-
tached shed, wood burning
stove, electric baseboard
heat, 1300 sq. feet, public
sewer. Beautiful views and
wonderful lake community.
Some furniture negotiable.
No realtors please.
Call 856-217-9531
or 610-357-3338
or email preedys@aol.com
PITTSTON
47 Wine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS
''Busy People Compatible''.
Enjoy the daily convenience of
living in the vicinity of what's
happeni ng ' ' Woodcrest Es-
tates''. Move in ready, finished
lower level, relax on rear deck
with view of Mohegan Sun.
MLS 13 1110
$115,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
New Price $82,000
Carl Georinger
696-5429
696-1195
PAGE 4C Monday, September 9, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Commercial
THE OFFICE CENTERS
5 Kingston Locations
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovation Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information call 570-287-1161
Autos For Sale
2012 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER LIMITED 4X4
$36995.00
SILVER MET.,ASH LEATHER,
3RD ROWSEATS
6CYL, AUTOTRANS,
HEATED SEATS, MOONROOF
PW,PL,CC, ALLOY WHEELS,
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NAVIGATION,
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3K MILES!!!!!
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713 North State St.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-6676
Get all the
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with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Houses For Sale
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto Gir-
ard Ave; home is on the left.
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto
Girard Ave; home is on the left.
WILKES-BARRE
Two story home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths & modern eat-
in kitchen. Double lot with
fenced in yard with flowers &
off street parking for 3-5 cars.
Gas heat. Near bus stops,
churches & schools. Small
12 X 16 house in rear with 2
picnic tables for entertaining.
$69,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
Classic 3 story brick home of-
fers spacious living on 3 floors.
Many areas nicely detailed
w/HW floors. Professional use
possible as separate entrance
leads to FR which could be an
office. New roof & soffets done
in 2011. 4 ductless heat/air
uni ts i mprove effi ci ency of
house. 2nd floor bedroom con-
verted to large laundry - easily
converted back. Large WI attic.
MLS 13 893
$125,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor.
MLS #13-2814
New Price $45,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral dcor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained Home, Great
location in Dallas School Dis-
trict. 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths,
vaulted ceilings, finished base-
ment with wood burning fire
place. Over sized 2 car gar-
age. Gas heat, mature land-
scaping. Must see. $259,000.
All buyers agents welcome.
Call for App. 704-906-6165
WAPWALLOPEN
895 Hobbie Road
Wonderful Country Living de-
scribes the location of this
Well-Maintained 2-Story
Home. Features Remodeled
Kicthen, LR/DR Combo,
Den/Office, 3 Bdrms., 1.75
Baths, Enclosed Sunroom +
4-Car Detached Garage.
MLS# 13-2816.
$149,900.
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
Houses For Sale
SHAVERTOWN
2103 Hillside Road
Recently renovated two story
on large lot features modern
kitchen with granite counters,
Living room and Dining room
with hardwood floors, large
treated deck overlooking level
yard. 3 Bedrooms, one on
first floor. Master Bedroom
upstairs with full master bath.
Oversized Detached 2 car
garage. Gas heat. Well water
and public sewers.
Great opportunity.
MLS#13-27
$157,500
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazing, well maintained.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049.
$59,000
Vieve 570-474-6307, ext.
2772
474-6307
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
SWOYERSVILLE
221 Kossack St.
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x
188 lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
Houses For Sale
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WEST PITTSTON
Great value in this totally ren-
ovated 2 story, spacious living
room with brick fireplace and
hardwood floors. Beautiful kit-
chen and very nice size dining
room. Pl enty of storage i n
wal k-up atti c.
MLS# 13-2116
REDUCED TO $90,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road. Single family
two story - a place for kids!
Four bedrooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has formal din-
ing room, living room, family
room & laundry room. Master
bedroom & bath added to the
1st floor. Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre.
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict.
$115,000
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
218 Warren St.
$159,900
Move in ready and wonder-
fully renovated. Hardwoods,
Granite, Stainless and char-
acter- this corner lot in West
Pittston has it all!
MLS# 13-3310
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
Houses For Sale
WHITE HAVEN
178 West Woodhaven Drive
Relax on deck watching sun
rise over Woodheaven Lake -
- Home has 4 bedroom, 2 1/2
baths, living room with fire-
place, dining room with split
system wall A/C. And spiral
stair to 4th bedroom or office
& walk-in huge attic, family
room great stone fireplace
leads to patio, pool
room/game room features
split system in wall AC, Over-
size garage, with workshop,
matching shed, double lot 1/2
acre, Two paved driveways
one on each side of home.
Basketball court (26x40)
paved with Lights and ad-
justable basket, shared Dock,
and small helicopter pad
presently covered by double
swing facing lake. Appoint-
ment only.
MLS#13-3189
$314,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
WHITE HAVEN
178 Woodhaven Drive
Relaxing views on 200 ft.
lakefront, 2 fireplaces, 2 split
system A/Cs, 2 driveways.
Whole house generator. Over-
size garage with workshop.
Shed, paved and lit basketball
court. Walk in attic. Don't
Miss! 13-3189. $314,900
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
PLYMOUTH
308 Stephanie Drive
Attractive Brick Front Ranch
with 3 Bedrooms, gas heat,
Sunroom (heated), attached
garage, large yard, 8x10
shed. Hardwood floors under
rugs. Great location. Most
windows on main floor are
Newer Triple Pane & double
pane in basement. Basement
can easily be finished (some
areas already sheet rocked &
electric installed)
Well-Maintained. $115,000.
MLS#12-1911
call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
83 Lawrence Street
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer
appl i ances and gas heat.
Nice level backyard and off-
st reet parki ng. Mot i vat ed
sel l er!
MLS #13 2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
276 High Street
Very Affordable property lov-
ingly cared for and ready for
you to move in! Heat-a-lator
fireplace provides cozy win-
ters and you can enjoy the
patio in the summer. Newer
kitchen, replacement win-
dows, new 200 amp electric
and low taxes. MLS#13-3212
$38,500
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH RIVER ST.
Modern 1 or 2 bedroom
home. Locat ed cl ose t o
Luzerne County Courthouse
and Kings College. Great
rental property potential New
carpeti ng throughout. 2nd
floor bath with laundry area.
Freshly painted. Walk-out to
backyard. Call to set-up an
appointment!
MLS #13- 2849
$39,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Located on Madison St.
between Linden & Maple.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
MLS# 13-2431
REDUCED TO $84,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
WILKES-BARRE
486 Main Street N.
Nice, spacious 3 bedroom
with large walk-up attic. One
full and one half bath, large
bedrooms with closets, gas
heat, central air on first floor,
nice fenced yard,
3 season porch.
MLS#13-3324
$49,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
589 Franklin Street N.
Nice residential home across
from Wilkes-Barre General
emergency room. Quiet zone.
Two parking permits. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, good
room sizes, fenced yard,
North End. of Wilkes-Barre.
MLS# 13-3115.
$49,900
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bed-
room, 1/1/2 bath with separate
driveway on a quiet street.
Lower level was finished for
former business - has separ-
ate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not in-
cluded in total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Monday, September 9, 20133 PAGE 5C
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08 PILOT EX Gray, 48K ......................................NOW $18,532
09PILOTTOURINGBlack,48K.............................NOW$25,170
11 PILOT EXL Red, 44K .....................................NOW $25,581
11PILOTEXLWhite,31K......................................NOW$26,853
11PILOTEXL Silver, 23K......................................NOW$27,309
PILOT 4WD
08 CRV LX Lt Blue, 75K......................................NOW $13,457
09 CRV LX TITANIUM, 44K.................................NOW $16,896
08 CRV EX Silver, 56K......................................NOW $16,969
11 CRV LX WHITE, 37K......................................NOW $17,682
10CRVEX Titanium, 56K......................................NOW$17,738
10 CRV LX GREEN, 24K ......................................NOW $18,289
10 CRV EX SILVER, 40K ......................................NOW $18,319
10CRVEX Black,35K.........................................NOW$18,947
11 CRV SE titanium, 31K....................................NOW $18,793
10 CRV EXLBLACK, 38K............................................... NOW$19,499
11 CRV EX Silver, 29K.........................................NOW $19,533
10 CRV EXL Red, 43K ........................................NOW $19,993
11CRVEXTitanium, 38K......................................NOW$20,485
11CRVEXTitanium, 35K......................................NOW$20,564
10CRVEXL Black, 23K........................................NOW$20,677
12 CRV LX Silver, 9K...........................................NOW $21,278
11 CRV EXL Gray, 28K.........................................NOW$21,965
12 CRVEX Gray, 17K...........................................NOW$22,932
CRV 4WD
08ACCORDEX SDNGrey,53K..............................NOW$14,221
09ACCORDEXSDNBlack,64K..............................NOW$14,749
09 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 53K ...........................NOW $14,982
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Black, 35K......................NOW $16,528
11 ACCORD LX SDN Gray, 30K ...........................NOW $16,717
12ACCORDLXSDNBlack,36K..............................NOW$16,728
11ACCORDSESDNBlack,11K..............................NOW$17,838
12ACCORDLXPSDNBlack,20K............................NOW$17,871
10 ACCORD EX SDN Black, 21K .........................NOW $18,168
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 21K..................NOW $18,989
12 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 9K............................NOW $19,720
ACCORDS
10 ODYSSEY EX Blue, 47K ...............................NOW $19,477
10 ODYSSEY TOURING NAV-DVD Gray, 42K...NOW $25,978
11ODYSSEY EXL Black, 36K ...............................NOW$25,779
11 ODYSSEY EXL-DVD Black, 19K...................NOW $26,741
ODYSSEY
08 CIVIC LX 5SPD SDNBLACK, 78K......................NOW $9,789
10 CIVIC LX CPE Black, 35K............................NOW $13,541
11 CIVIC LX SDN Silver, 25K ..............................NOW $14,461
11 CIVIC LX SDN BLUE, 36K .............................NOW $14,490
10 CIVIC LX SDNWhite, 33K ..............................NOW$14,584
10 CIVIC LX SDN Grey, 21K ..............................NOW $14,879
10 CIVIC LX SDN Blue, 9K ..............................NOW $15,364
12 CIVIC LX CPE Black, 12K...............................NOW $15,783
12CIVICLXSDNTitanium,20K..............................NOW$15,870
12 CIVIC EX-NAVI Crimson, 31K...................NOW $17,932
12 CIVIC EXL-NAVI SDNWhite, 10K...................NOW$18,804
CIVICS
Call: 1-800-NextHoNda View: www.mattburnehonda.com
10INSIGHTEXGray, 38K....................................NOW$13,487
INSIGHT
$5,260
04 TOYOTA COROLLAS SDN
NOW
Gray, 132K
Was
$7,250
04 HONDA ACCORD SDN EXL V-6
$9,898
Red, 81K
NOW
$10,996
NOW
07 GMC ENVOY EXT
4X4
White, 60K
Was
$12,500
$19,862
NOW
07 CHEVY TAHOE LT 4WD
Navy, 95K
Was
$20,950
$8,992
04 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4WD
Blue, 77K
Was
$10,950
NOW
$10,970
NOW
08 HYUNDAI TIBURON
CPE 5SP
Silver, 44K
Was
$11,950
$13,594
10 JEEP PATRIOT 4WD
NOW
Gray, 51 K
Was
$13,950
NOW
$23,925
10 NISSAN PATHFINDER SL 4WD
Red, 42K,
Was
$25,950
$22,227
NOW
09 BUICK ENCLAVE
AWD
Brown, 57K
$19,191
09 HONDA RIDGELINE TRL 4WD
NOW
Gray, 63K
Was
$19,950
$3,999
01 DODGE NEON SE SDN
AS TRADED
Burgundy, 88K
NOW
$15,247
07 HONDA PILOT LX 4WD
White, 61K
Was
$16,950
NOW
$15,641
07 FORD EDGE AWD
Cream, 54K,
Was
$16,950
$16,300
NOW
06 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER LTD 4WD
Navy, 33K
Was
$17,950
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
NOW
Silver, 9K
$13,759
Was
$15,750
$14,535
08 NISSAN XTERRA S 4WD
NOW
Red, 53K
Was
$15,750
$7,590
01 HONDA CRV SE 4WD
NOW
Silver, 101K
$11,011
NOW
07 HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
LX
Blue, 61K
$8,715
NOW
10 CHEVY AVEO
LT SEDAN
Blue, 56K
Was
$9,950
$7,438
04 TOTYOTA CAMRY LE SDN
NOW
Gold, 114K
Was
$8,350
07 EX CARBON, 27K $14,582
HONDA ACCORD SEDAN
05 EX GOLD, 89K $9,746
$9,271
02 HONDA CRV EX 4WD
NOW
Navy, 76K
Was
$9,750
$9,999
NOW
07 NISSAN SENTRA S
SEDAN
Brown, 58K
Was
$10,950
$10,456
06 PONTIAC G6 GTP CPE
NOW
V6, Black, 64K
Was
$11,500
07 JEEP COMPASS AWD
$10,492
Blue, 46K
NOW
Was
$11,950
$10,796
07 SUBARU IMPREZA AWD
NOW
Silver, 67K
Was
$12,500
$10,977
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 4WD
NOW
Silver, 63K
Was
$11,950
06 HONDA CIVIC EX SDN
NOW
Silver, 54K
$12,867
Was
$13,250
$14,567
10 FORD FUSION SE SDN
NOW
Black, 9K
Was
$16,950
15,801
09 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING R-DVD
NOW
red, 57K
07 HONDA ODYSSEY
EXL NAV/DVD, SLATE 54K $16,872
EXL DVD, BLUE, 26K $18,478
Due to the success of our , we are extending i t one more week!
WHAT YOU SEE
IS WHAT YOU PAY!
WHITE, 89K
03 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
4WD
$7,795
NOW
Matt Burne Honda Pre-owned Center
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
GET
ALL THE
ADVERTISING
INSERTS
WITH
THE
LATEST
SALES.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Air Conditioning & Heating
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all major
brands.
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME SHOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan Sun
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
www.bianepa.com
570-287-3331
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-235-1840
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
Residential & Commercial
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, Insured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA Masonry, Inc.
Stonework - stucco -
concrete - patios - pavers -
brick - block - chimneys
www.nepamasonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
Concrete & Masonry
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-793-1391
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
Handyman
DAVE'S HANDY MAN
SERVICES
30 years experience
Full-Time-Affordable quality repairs,
Remodeling and Painting.
570-299-1127
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
Foltz Landscaping
Small Excavating New landscapes,
retaining walls/patios. Call:
570-760-4814
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups, landscaping, mow-
ing, mulching, trimming, plant-
ing. Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
Landscaping
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
Daniels Paint and Wall Covering
Lic. PA100671 & Ins.
20 YEARS EXP.
570-604-2961
danielspaintandwallcovering.com
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
Painting & Wallpaper
JOHNS PAINTING
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S
ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Plumbing
D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING
Specializing in boilers,
furnaces & water heaters.
10% Sr. discount. Licensed,
insured & 24 hour service
570-793-1930
Pressure Washing
PJs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
Roofng & Siding
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
PAGE 6D Monday, September 9, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Autos For Sale
*Prices plus tax & tags. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Prior use daily rental on select models. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors. XM Satellite & OnStar Fees where applicable
Visit Us 24/7 WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
WE ACCEPT ALL
TRADES!
Cars, Trucks, Campers, Boats,
Motorcycles, ATVs
YOU BRING IT...
WE WILL TRADE IT!
2007 Chevrolet Silverado
1500 Extended Cab LT 4x4
#13694A, 5.3L Automatic
onE
ownEr
$
17,999
*
2005 Chevrolet Silverado
1500 Extended Cab 4x4 Z71
#13294A, 5.3L 8 Cyl., Automatic
onE
ownEr
Low
MiLES
$
18,950
*
2006 GMC Canyon
Extended Cab SLT 4x4
##12093CC, 3.5L Automatic
$
17,888
*
ONLY
35K
MILES
2007 Chevrolet Silverado
1500 Crew Cab LT 4x4
#13382A, V8 Automatic, Remote Start
$
23,987
*
ONLY
43K
MILES
2004 Chevrolet Silverado
2500 HD regular Cab 4x4
#Z2834, 6.0L 8 Cyl., Automatic
$
17,965
*
ONLY
12K
MILES
2004 Chevrolet Silverado
1500 Crew Cab LT Z71
#13420A, V8 Auto., Leather Heated Seats,
Power Options
onE
ownEr
$
20,950
*
ONLY
47K
MILES
$
27,941
*
2009 Chevrolet Silverado 1500
LTZ Extended Cab
4x4 Z71
#13699A, 5.3L Automatic
onE
ownEr
ONLY
28K
MILES
2001 Chevrolet Silverado 2500
HD regular Cab 4x4
#13289A, 8Cyl., AT, A/C, R. Boards
$
17,989
*
ONLY 55K MILES
2009 Chevrolet Silverado 1500
Extended Cab 4x4 LTZ
#14036A, 5.3L V8, Power Options, Remote Start
Low
MiLES
$
25,926
*
onE
ownEr
2012 Chevrolet Avalanche
1500 4x4 LTZ
#13605A, Navigation, DVD, Sunroof, Power Options
$
44,980
*
ONLY
4K
MILES
2012 Chevrolet Silverado
3500 regular Cab 4x4 w/T
#14005A, 6.0l V8 Automatic
onE
ownEr
$
27,960
*
ONLY
31K
MILES
2005 Chevrolet Colorado
Extended Cab 4x4
$
15,993
*
ONLY
45K
MILES
#Z3020, 3.5L Automatic
2010 Toyota Tacoma
Double Cab 4x4
$
26,723
*
ONLY
41K
MILES
#137563A, 6Cyl., AT, A/C, PW, PDL
$
15,900
2005 Chevy Silverado regular
Cab 4x4 1500
#13625A
4.3L, AT, A/C,
Step Bar,
Tonneau Cover
2005 Ford ranger Supercab XLT 4x4
$
15,950
ONLY
32K
MILES
#Z3029
4DLAT, A/C, Step Bar
2010 Dodge nitro Heat AwD
$
21,980
*
#13414A, AT, A/C, Chrome Pkg
onE
ownEr
ONLY
12K
MILES
2009 Ford Escape Limited 4x4
$
13,971
*
#14010B, 3.0L Auto., A/C, Leather
2003 Chevrolet Astro Cargo Van
$
12,450
*
#Z3030, 4.3L 6 Cyl., Auto., Air
ONLY
32K
MILES
2009 Cadillac
Escalade ESV AwD
SALE PRiCE
$
35,987
*
#12567B
Luxury Collected Edition, 22
Chrome Alum. Wheels, Nav., Rear
Camera, Heated/Cooled Seats,
DVD, All Power Options
2003 Hummer H2 4x4
#13405A, V8 Automatic, Leather, Sunroof
$
23,427
*
Low
MiLES
2008 Chevrolet Avalanche
1500 LT 4x4
#13361A. 5.3L Automatic
$
28,999
*
ONLY
33K
MILES
onE
ownEr
ONLY
21K
MILES
2006 Chevrolet Tahoe
1500 4x4
#Z3051, 8 Cyl., AT, A/C, PW, PDL
$
15,995
*
ONLY
47K
MILES
#Z2985, 5.4L 8 Cyl.
$
21,850
*
ONLY
12K
MILES
2004 Ford F250 Super
Duty 4x4 w/Myers Plow
2011 Ford ranger Supercab
XLT 4x4
#13572B, 4DL, A/C, Toolbox, PW, PDL
$
20,874
ONLY
13K
MILES
2008 Toyota
Tacoma regular Cab 4x4
#13842A, Air, 1-owner
$
13,999
*
Houses For Sale
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING/FRANKLIN TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
1705 W. 8TH ST.
This charming home in the
Dallas Sch. Dist. is waiting for
new owners to settle in and
celebrate the upcoming holi-
days with family and friends.
Relax on the deck and watch
t he l eaves change col or
around your large country lot.
Plan for great times next sum-
mer in your 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. This well main-
tai ned 2-story has 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 modern baths, a
modern kitchen with break-
fast nook, formal DR, large
LR and an added FR with
vaulted ceiling and fireplace.
2-car detached garage. De-
t a i l s a n d p h o t o s a t :
www.pruentialrealestate.com.
Ent er PRU7W7A3 i n t he
SEARCH f i el d.
MLS#13-2539
$227,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
WYOMING
Completely redone 3 bed-
room Cape Cod in lovely
neighborhood. Beautiful
woodwork throughout. Cent-
ral air, new windows,new car-
pet with hardwood floors un-
derneath, new electrical, new
hot water heater, the list goes
on! Nothing to do but
move in and enjoy.
$135,000
Call Christine
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
Bui l d your dream home i n
Goodleigh Manor. Beautiful
Views - Your choice of builder
All underground utilities. 2.02
acre corner lot - MLS #13-2090
priced at $152,500 or 2.06
acre lot MLS 13-2088 priced at
$135,000 The neighborhood
has over 2 acres of walking
trails Great place to live. Call
Rhea Simms at 570-696-6677.
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HUNLOCK CREEK
297 MIZDAIL Road
6 ACRES
Septic, well, electric, 2 story
barn, carport & shed. $60,000.
570-506-5986
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
WHITE HAVEN
Middleburg Road
Fabulous 5 acre flat wooded
lot. Public sewer. Old rock
wall along south property line.
Zoned rural agriculture.
MLS#12-3503. $57,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
Lots
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lots
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. 1st, last & se-
curity. No pets. Available
9/1/13. Water & sewer i n-
cl uded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DUPONT
4 room apartment for rent.
$450+utilities, No Pets. Refer-
ences required. Available Oct. 1.
570-241-6038
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, newly
remodeled. Refrigerator &
stove. Big yard.
$700 month + utilities.
570-842-0740 before 8 pm
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2
nd
floor 2 bdrm, 5
room apt. on River St. In-
cludes stove, frig, washer/dry-
er hook-up in basement, off-
street parking. $595/mo + util-
ities. 1 mo security deposit re-
quired. No Pets. Non-
smoking. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
All utilities included. Clean, 4
room, 2nd floor. Appliances.
Covered parking. Non
smoking, cat considered,
starting at $700/month.
570-714-2017
LARKSVILLE
1 bedroom end unit apt. Wash-
er/dryer hookup. No pets. Se-
curity & lease required $450
month. 570-288-7753
Apartments /Townhouses
FORTY FORT
BEDFORD ST.
Nice 1st floor. Off street park-
ing. $700 month + utilities &
lease. Call 570-814-8876
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
Hanover Township
West End Road
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3029 South Main st.
2nd floor very large 3 bed-
rooms, wall to wall carpeting
central air, eat in kitchen with
appliances. Off street parking.
Washer & dryer hookup. Heat
& cooking gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities.
1st, last & security. Available
Now! Garbage & sewer in-
cluded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
Immaculate 4 room, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath 1st floor apart-
ment overlooking park. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up. Stove &
fridge included. No pets. Non
smoking. $575/ month +
utilities & security. Call
(570) 457-2227
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom, 2nd
floor, 1.5 baths & office. All appli-
ances, washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
1st floor, 2 bedroom. Off
street parking, freshly
painted, new carpet, bath-
room & kitchen. Water &
Sewer included. No pets.
$650/month, 1st month &
security. 570-332-4400
KINGSTON
287 Pierce Street
Corner of Pierce & Warren
1 bedroom, ki tchen, l i vi ng
room, bath, cl oset storage
area. Refrigerator & stove in-
cluded, off street parking. Ref-
erences, no pets. $400/month
+ security. Call 570-655-6743
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
KINGSTON
Nice neighborhood, close to
schools, shopping & parks. One
modern 5 room, 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Dining & living rooms,
ample closets, front & back porch
and yard. Washer/dryer hookup.
$575, includes fridge, stove water
& sewer. Non smoker preferred.
570-545-6057
KINGSTON
Prime location, Poplar Street,
near Nesbitt Hospital. Modern
2nd floor, 1 bedroom/den,
open design. Dishwasher,
washer/dryer. No Pets. No
Smoking. References.
$650+utilities. 570-709-4360
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up. No pets. $475/month + se-
curity & utilities. 822-7657
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $570
+ utilities, security &
references. No pets.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON TOWNSHIP
1605 West 8th Street
1 bedroom over a garage, Kit-
chen, Living room, Bathroom,
closed in porch. Stove, refri-
gerator, washer/dryer in-
cluded. Newly Remodeled.
$575+Security. No Pets.
570-333-4005
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstons Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed, Cent-
ral Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. Ar-
chitecturally designed. Cent-
ral air. Off street parking.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
DALLAS
Meadows
Senior Living
Community
200 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-9336
One Bedroom
Apartment Available!
Included: All utilities, air
conditioning, maintenance,
and free parking.
Restaurant and Beauty Shop
on site.
Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
Apartments /Townhouses
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
S. Hanover Street
1.5 bedrooms, 2nd floor, no
pets, washer/dryer hook-ups,
attic. $469 mo. 2 Car Garage,
$159 mo. INCLUDES HEAT,
WATER. 570-824-8786
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644.
NANTICOKE
EFFICIENCY
1 bedroom. $325 month.
Tenant pays electric.
570-735-2516
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom Eat-in kitchen,
living room, full bath, stove
/fridge, washer/dryer, $500. +
utilities. No Pets. 570-760-
3637 or 570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Nice, clean 1 bedroom. heat,
hot water, electricity, fridge,
st ove, ai r condi t i oni ng,
washer/dryer availability all in-
cluded. Close to town. No pets
o r s mo k i n g . S e c u r i t y
$525/month. 570-542-5610
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, washer/dryer hook
up 1 year lease. $385 + utilit-
ies. 570-237-0968.
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom efficiency apart-
ment. No pets. $325 + utilities
& security deposit. Call
570-333-5499
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 7D
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Apartments /Townhouses
Immediate efficiency occupancy
Located near shopping & transportation. Temple Apartments
offers efficiencies & one bedroom apartments for income quali-
fied individuals ages 62 or older and/or needing the features of
a mobility impaired unit.
Apartment amenities include:
Accessible features-fully equipped kitchen-Wall to wall carpet-
ing-Ceramic tiled baths-On-site management-On-site mainten-
ance with 24-hour emergency response-On-site laundry-Inter-
com entry system-Social services coordinator on-site
Leasing office located at:
5 Heisz Street- Edwardsville, PA 18704
T: 570-283-2275-TDD 1.800.545.1833 x646
PENNROSE
Apartments /Townhouses
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
Apartments /Townhouses
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
Apartments /Townhouses
PITTSTON
3 room apartment, 2nd floor,
wall to wall carpet, off street
parking. Enclosed porch.
$450/month + electric heat &
security. No pets.
570-655-1222
PITTSTON
3RD FLOOR
Available Now! 3 bedroom.
$600 + security. Sewer &
garbage included. 574-4380
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Clean & inviting 2nd floor, 2
bedroom apartment. Recently
renovated with new, modern
kitchen & bath, carpeting &
windows. Features bright liv-
ing room, small fenced back
yard & shed. $550/month +
utilities & security. Call Lynda
at 262-1196
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable.. ,
new appliances, off street
parking & sewer included. No
smoking inddoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570-855-3329.
SUGAR NOTCH
2nd floor contains 1,215 sq. ft.
of very spacious & sprawling
living space. 6 rooms. Numer-
ous closets. Bathroom is a
generous 10' x 11'. Gas heat,
water, sewer bill & cooking gas
- all included. Has washer/dry-
er hook ups. Only 2 miles to
Wilkes-Barre & close to I-81 &
Wyoming Valley Mall. Lease.
Credit & background checked.
$685 monthly .
570-650-3803
WARRIOR RUN
Close to Hanover Ind. Park.
Remodeled 1 bedroom, fridge,
stove, eat in kitchen. Sewer,
water & garbage paid, electric
by tenant. $425/mo + lease &
security. 570-301-8200
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1 or 2 bedrooms, washer/dry-
er hookup. Air conditioning.
Heat, water & sani tary i n-
cl uded.
570-430-3095
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
ROOM
FOR RENT
1 room. Back ground check.
$350 month plus security de-
posit. 347-693-4156
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
Wilkes-Barre
2 bedroom townhouse, end
unit. Near VA, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, sewer, water &
garbage included. $800/
month + security.
570-817-4475
WILKES-BARRE
2 BEDROOMS
Heat & hot water included,
$625./month + Security re-
quired. 973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
63 ELIZABETH ST.
Remodeled 1st floor apt.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, rear
porch. Gas heat, washer/dryer
hook- up, fridge, stove & dish-
washer. Absolutely no pets.
$600/month
+ utilities & 1 month security.
Reference check.
570-472-9453
WILKES-BARRE
Large 3 bedroom apartment on
two floors IN GOOD CONDI-
TION.Section 8 welcome. No
pets. $525 + utilities & security.
606-9917
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
KIDDER STREET
2 bedroom balcony apt., living
room, kitchen, bath, new car-
peting, freshly painted. $600
month + uti l i ti es. Cl ose to
Home Depot. 570-540-5312.
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled single home. 3
bedroom, hardwood floors.
No pets. 215-932-5690
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, very
clean, recently remodeled.
Washer & dryer hookup. Off
st r eet par ki ng. No pet s.
$550/mo. includes water &
sewer. 570-714-7272
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
Commercial
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
WEST PITTSTON
1 CAR
GARAGE/STORAGE
FOR RENT
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
Condominiums
DALLAS
Private Senior Community,
1st floor, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
attached garage, window treat-
ments & appliances included.
C/A, deck, snow removal &
lawn care included. No pets.
References. $1,200 + utilities &
security. 570-371-8666
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 760- 5095
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-889-8432
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath, $1,000
month. Month to month lease.
Not section 8 approved. Non
smokers. No pets. 2 car gar-
age. Outdoor woodburner for
heat & hot water.
570-506-5986
LEHMAN
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths,
$800/month.
570-477-3827
LEHMAN
IDETOWN ROAD
2 bedrooms, laundry facilities
on site. No pets. $900 month.
1st month & security required.
Available now. 570-639-0967
or 570-574-6974
LUZERNE
392 Bennett St.
2 BEDROOM
HOUSE
Gas heat. Washer/ dryer hook-
up, dish-washer, stove & refri-
gerator. Fenced in yard, par-
tially new carpet. Off-street
parking, yard. $680 + utilities.
(570) 288-3438
MOUNTAIN TOP
Mobile home
2 bedroom, 2 full baths, eat in
kitchen, living room, walk in
cl oset, deck, washer/dryer,
di shwasher & ref ri gerat or,
cent r al ai r on 2 acr es.
$600/month. + 1 & 1/2 month
security & 1st month rent.
570-592-5764/ 973-271-0261
EXETER TWP.
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
NANTICOKE
6 room house for rent call for
details.(570)735-2236
PITTSTON
Available Oct. 1st. very nice
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Move in
condition. Gas range, fridge,
dishwasher, washer &dryer
included. Large yard. Beauti-
ful front porch. Corner lot with
2 car driveway parking. Nice
neighborhood. No pets. No
Smoking. $800/mo plus utilit-
ies, security & references.
570-655-4950
PITTSTON
Single home sale or rent. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath, move in
condition, nice yard.
570-540-0198
SHAVERTOWN
Immaculate, 2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in kitchen, hard-
wood floors, gas heat and de-
tached garage. $950/
month+utilities and security
deposit. 570-675-3178
WILKES-BARRE
40 Dexter Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath single
home. $600 + utilities & se-
curity. Section 8 Approved.
Call
357-2809 or 826-1795
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
Houses For Rent
WILKES-BARRE
Wyoming Street
Unfurnished house for rent.
$750 + utilities,
security required
570-961-3162
Storage
FORTY FORT
GARAGE FOR RENT
11ft. 6"x 23 ft. Cinder block
walls, interior walls, steel studs
with sheet rock. Concrete floor,
Steel overhead door with lock,
overhead lighting. $110/month.
1 year lease and security.
570-655-0530
Half Doubles
GLEN LYON
15 minutes from Power Plant
or W-B. 2 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/dryer hook up,
electric heat, new paint & car-
pet, non smoker. $625/month
+ security, references & 1 year
lease. Pet on approval.
570-218-2320
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
KINGSTON
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerat-
or and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, off-street parking. No
Smoking, No Pets. $650+
utilities & security.
570-639-1796
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled older
charm, stained glass win-
dows, front & rear porches,
Living /dining room combo,
eat-in kitchen with laundry
alcove, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
WILKES-BARRE/
PARSONS
3 b e d r o o m, 1 . 5 b a t h ,
$700/month, security, utilities &
lease. No Pets. 570-288-7753
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, stove & refrigerat-
or, washer/dryer hook up. heat
& water included. $575/month
+ security. 570-906-7614
PITTSTON
Half-Double, freshly painted,
2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath,
washer/dryer hookup, cable
& satellite ready, enclosed
back porch & yard. Private
parking. $650 + utilities, se-
curity & references. No pets
or smoking. 570-239-4293
PLAINS
HALF-DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, all gas. No dogs.
$495/month. 570-417-5441
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, Living room, dining
room, off-street parking.
Security and Lease. No Pets.
$700 a month.
Includes Sewer and Trash.
570-675-4424
TRUCKSVILLE
1/2 RANCH
2 bedrooms, living & dining
rooms, kitchen, washer/dry-
er, basement, yard, Security,
references & lease. No Pets.
$700/month. Sewer & trash in-
cluded.
Call 570-474-9321
or 570-690-4877
WEST WYOMING
3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, quiet
area, off street parking. ABSO-
LUTELY NO PETS. $650/mo +
security and references. Utilit-
ies by tenant. 570-430-3851
leave message.
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Redman Trailer, 56'x14',
Located in park. 4 rooms,
2 bedrooms, 1.5 bath.
Screened in porch. $15,500.
Very Good Condition
570-706-5201
Resort Property For Rent
CANCUN MEXICO
ROYAL SANDS RESORT
TIMESHARE VILLA
2 bedrooms, 2 bath, week
16, 2nd floor ocean view,
overlooks pool. See
www.royalresorts.com
for general info.
Call 570-674-8927
for details.
Pets
BEAGLE PUPPIES
AKC registered. Males and
Females, Tri-color, shots,
wormed and vet checked.
$250 each. 570-467-3683
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
12, registered, both parents
on site. Males $400, Females
$450.. Contact Ang at
570-441-7826 or
accolie@yahoo.com.
Huskies, Poms,
Yorkies, Chihuahuas,
German Shephards & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
Autos Under $5000
CHEVY '99
PRISM LSI
137,000 mi l es, green/grey.
Very good condition, depend-
abl e, excel l ent mi l eage. 4
speed automatic, A/C, power
windows & door lock, rear win-
dow defroster, tachometer, tilt
steering wheel, cruise control,
am/fm/CD stereo, air bags,
ABS brakes, al l oy wheel s.
$2,200. 570-417-7671 or
570-474-9828.
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,295
Call for details 570-696-4377
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2002 Z06 Coupe 13295 ........................................$27,778
2003 BMW Z43.0i ConvertiBle 53232 ...............$13,999
2003 SilverADo XCAB 4X4 lt eXt. 46582 ..............$15,999
2004 S2000 roADSt ConvertiBle 87617 ..........$16,495
2004 venture lS eXt. 97840 ............................$4,500
2004 Corvette Coupe 17167 .............................$26,986
2005 MuSt Gt ConvertiBle 32500 ...................$18,999
2005 tACoMA 4X4 CreW 87132 ........................$18,898
2006 F150XCAB 4X4 Xl 62084 .........................$15,999
2006 HuMMer H3 Suv 50591 ...........................$18,999
2006 350Z tourinG ConvertiBle 22128 ...........$19,495
2007 MuSt Gt Coupe 32569 ........................$16,999
2007 GXp v8 SeDAn 82306 ...............................$11,495
2007 MerC C350 SeDAn 59231 ........................$16,990
2007 HArley 883 SportSter 5353 ......................$6,000
2007 F350 XCAB 4X4 lAriAt 91235 .................$21,999
2008 MuSt Gt Coupe 3012 ..........................$23,898
2008 F150 KinG rAnCH CreW 50457 ..................$27,980
2008 SilverrADo lt2 74414 ..............................$18,999
2009 Cr-v eX Suv 42978 .................................$16,990
2009 HonDA Si SeDAn 45585 .............................$17,495
2010 MuSt v6 ConvertiBle 40332 .................$15,999
2010 tiGuAn Se Suv 22065 ...........................$17,499
2011 ForD FuSion i4 Se 82321 .........................$10,989
2011 MitSu outlAnDer 4X4 Se Suv ...................18124
2012 vW Gti 4 Door 12199 ...........................$21,999
2012 JettA Se SeDAn 32392 ............................$14,999
2012 Beetle 2.5l 30751 ...................................$14,999
2012 iMpreZA SeDAn 33059 .............................$17,495
2012 SCion tC 7.0 21125 ................................$19,898
We Buy CArS
CADILLAC '00
SEVILLE
Grey/beige leather, heated
seats. 70k miles.
Two owners, local trade.
Excellent Condition
Extended Warranty
$5,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
NISSAN '11
ALTIMA
Auto, air, power steering,
power brakes, ABS, cruise,
tilt, power cloth seats. CD.
Much More! Like New!
Special $13,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
TOTOTA '11
CAMRY LE
4 door, auto, dark bl ue
metallic color. Original own-
er . Onl y 18, 900 mi l es!
Looks and drives like a new
car! ! ! Pri ce reduced t o
$14,400 for quick sale. Loc-
ated in the Back Mtn. Call
570-674-5673
to schedule an appointment.
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
Autos For Sale
ACME
AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 NISSAN AKTIMA SL
grey, grey leather, sunroof
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 CADILLAC SEDAN DEVILLE
Brown tan leather, 85k miles
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
blue3, V6, 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS
Black, V6, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS
Bluem V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS
Silver, V6, 3rd seat 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 CHEVY TRACKER LT
white V6 4x4 54k miles
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
98 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB
V8, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
BUICK '10 ENCLAVE
45k mi l es, si l ver/ l eat her,
captains seats, rear back up
camera, third row. $25,200.
570-814-0749
CHEVY '00 MAILBU
Dark blue. Automatic, loaded,
power sun roof, V6, new tires.
Very good condition. 106k.
$3,200, OBO. 570-822-0832
Autos For Sale
Chevrolet Impala LT 13'
25K, USA
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 08 COLORADO
5 cyl., auto, air, power steer-
ing, power brakes, AM/FM,
bedliner & fiberglass
bed cover.SPECIAL $7,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 10 MALIBU LS
Air, all power, cruise, tilt, CD.
Very economical..like
new..Sporty. Balance GM
warranty. SALE PRICE
$11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
DODGE '10 JOURNEY
Light grey, 4 cylinder, all
power, cruise, tilt, alloys,
Sirius radio, 56k. Balance of
factory warranty. Very
clean..very economical.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
FORD F150 04'
4X2. Nice Truck!
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD 12
FUSION SE
Auto, all power, cruise, tilt,
alloys. Black. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
HONDA ACCORD
EXL 10' 31,000K
Leather and well Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDA CRV 10'
Low Miles, AWD.
2 Available, starting at
$17,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
CADILLAC '07 DTS
Pearl white/tan leather,
heated & cooled seats.
43k miles. Warranty.
$17,997
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CHRYSLER '05
PT CRUISER
Purple, good condition.
Warranty
$4,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
PAGE 8D Monday, September 9, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Autos For Sale
Autos For Sale
VISIT US 24/7 AT WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
CORVETTE HEADQUARTERS
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-8:00pm; FRIDAY 8:30-7:00PM; SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
2000 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
$
21,949
$
23,997
$
19,898
#Z2950,
5.7L 8 Cyl., Automatic,
All Power, Air Leather, 1 Owner,
Only 45K Miles
#Z3067,
5.7L V8 Manual Transmission, Air, Leather,
All Power, 1 owner, Only 54K Miles,
Victory red
1999 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE
1998 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
COUPE
#Z3016,
5.7 8 Cyl., Automatic, Glass
Roof Panel, All Power, Leather,
Only 53K Miles,
Bermuda Blue Metallic
Price plus tax and tags. Not Responsible for typographical errors.
Autos For Sale
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-8:00pm; FRIDAY 8:30-7:00PM; SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
WEVE GOT TOYOTAS!!!
#13842A,
2.7L 4 Cylinder Manual
Transmission,
Bedliner, Dual Airbags,
Tilt Steering Wheel
$
24,980
#13557A,
4.0L V6 Automatic, Air, PW, PDL, Cruise Control,
Tow & Package,
Sliding Rear
Windows, Tonneau Cover, Alloy Wheels
2008TOYOTA
REGULAR CAB
4X4
2012TOYOTA
TACOMA
ACCESS CAB
V6
OnLY
13 K Miles
OnLY
41 K Miles
2010TOYOTA
TACOMA
DOUBLE CAB
4x4
#13753A,
4.0 L, 6- Cyl., Automatic, AC, TRKSPORT PACKAGE,
Alloy Wheels,
Hill Start Assist
Control, Bedliner
$
26,950
*Tax and tags additional, not responsible for typographical errors.
$
13,999
2011TOYOTA
TACOMA
REGULAR CAB
4x4
#13851A,
4 Cylinder Automatic
Transmission,
Air Conditioning,
Tonneau Cover
$
19,950
OnLY
16 K Miles
2012TOYOTA
TACOMAACCESS CAB
4x4
#13621A,
V6 Automatic
Transmission, Air
Conditioning, Power Windows,
Power Door Locks, LEER CAP, TRD
OFF ROAD PACKAGE
$
24,980
AUTO
Autos For Sale
VW '10 BEETLE GLS
Red/black leather, heated
seats, moon roof. 19k
miles. Factory Warranty.
$15,900
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
VW '10 JETTA
LIMITED
Red/black leather,
heated seats, 31k miles.
Warranty.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '12 ACCORD
SPECIAL EDITION
Grey/black leather, heated
seats. 15k miles.
Factory Warranty
$19,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '11 CIVIC LX
Burgundy/grey cloth,
4 new tires, 23k miles.
Factory Warranty.
$14,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
LEXUS '06 ES 330
Silver/grey leather, moon
roof, heated seats. Excel-
lent condition. 82k miles.
Extended Warranty
$13,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
PONTIAC GRAND AM
02' $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
SATURN '07 ION
4 cylinder. 5 speed. REAL
SHARP CAR! $3,995.
570-696-4377
SUBARU OUTBACK 11'
Station Wagon, AWD.
43K Miles!
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA
'12 SCION
TC COUPE
Dual sun roofs, 6 speed auto,
too many options to mention.
Asking $17,000. 570-472-1149
TOYOTA COROLLA 03'
5-Speed. $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02 BLAZER
4X4. V6. BARGAIN PRICE
$3,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '06
TRAILBLAZER
4X4. V6. EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995.
570-696-4377
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4495. 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,495.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '04 F150 X CAB
4X4 with cap. 1 owner. Clean,
Clean truck. $6,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '05 ESCAPE
4X4. Leather. Sunroof.
CLEAN SUV! $5,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
TOYOTA '06 HIGHLANDER
V6, 4X4, silver/grey cloth,
moon roof, 3rd row seats.
90k miles.
Extended Warranty.
$13,300
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
SUZUKI 12 SX4
5 door AWD, 6 speed, black,
all power, cruise, tilt, CD, al-
loys. Like new. Balance of
factory warranty. Sporty.
SPECIAL PRICE $11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Air Conditioners
AI R CONDI TI ONER 6000
BTUs EER 9. 9 $35.
570-574-6416
AIR CONDITIONERS, (1) Fri-
gidaire, 5450 BTU.
$50. 570-693-1454
Get all the
advertising
inserts withthe
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start
your home delivery.
K
CLICK
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Monday, September 9, 2013
SECTION D
Farm to Table touts
locally grown foods
Lindsey Sorber, left, and John McGeehan, both of Dupont
Bill Tarutis photos | For The Times Leader
Ashley and Justin Ash, of Shavertown, attended Saturdays Farm to Table
celebration conducted by The Lands at Hillside Farms, the areas nonprofit
group espousing sustainable living practices. Funds were raised to ben-
efit the organizations Green Guides program, which offers animal-assisted
activities and therapies for vulnerable children.
Marcia and Ralph Frank, of Shickshinny Lake
Lori Kozelsky, left, and Melissa McLaughlin, both of Mountain Top
Carl and Susan Charnetski, of Harveys Lake
Wilkes students display
pride in university
Emily Grady, of Pottstown, left, and Jackie Reiss, of Gilbertsville
Catelyn Sofio, of Exton, left, and Cameron Low, of Rome
Taylor Moyer, of Pen Argyl, left, Himil Desai, of Mount Pocono, and Kara
Serfass, of Lehighton
Madison Batt, of Blakeslee, left, and Emily Ketterman, of York
Bill Tarutis photos | For The Times Leader
John Atkinson, of Old Bridge, N.J., left, and Tyler Suruskie, of Sinking
Springs, joined Wilkes University students gathered Saturday for a school
spirit contest and the Colonels March a procession from the River
Common to the universitys football field.
Fair draws crowds
to Lehman Twp.
Katie Cavanaugh, left, and Heaven Pratz, both of Dallas
Bridget Pearson, of Bushkill, left, and Eric Butruce, of Shavertown
Breezy Coolbaugh, of Kunkle, left, and Joey Irvin, of Shavertown
Mike Ventura, left, and daughter Olivia, 3, both of Nanticoke
Bill Tarutis photos | For The Times Leader
Miss Luzerne County Fair Queen Brooke Evans, of Dallas, left, and Thomas
Roccograndi, of Kingston, were among those to take in the amusement rides,
livestock displays and familiar, if not always healthy, foods at this years fair.
PAGE 2D Monday, September 9, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
80023385
Public Notice
Transmission Line Construction
PPL Electric Utilities plans to add a second set of wires to an existing transmission line in Plains, Exeter, and
Jenkins townships, Wyoming and Exeter boroughs, Luzerne County, to improve reliability of electric service
in the region.
The new, 8.5 mile, 230 kV circuit will be added to the open side of existing transmission structures which
currently carry one 230 kV Circuit. The Project is located entirely within existing PPL Electric right-of-way or
on property which PPL Electric currently owns. No additional property rights are required to complete this
project. The Project will begin at PPL Electrics existing Jenkins Substation in Plains Township and terminate
at PPL Electrics existing Stanton Substation in Exeter Township.
If you would like more information on this project, please contact PPL Electric via Richard R. Beasley at
570-348-1622.
On August 26, 2013, PPL Electric Utilities led a Letter of Notication with the Pennsylvania Public Utility
Commission (PUC), which must approve the project before construction can begin. A copy of the Letter of
Notication is available for public inspection on weekdays during business hours at the following locations:
Exeter Township Municipal Building Plains Township Municipal Building
2305 State Route 92 126 North Main Street
Harding, PA 18643 Plains, PA 18705
If you wish to participate in the process before the PUC, you should contact:
Rosemary Chiavetta, Esquire
Secretary
Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission
P.O. Box 3265
Harrisburg, PA 17105-3265
As a reference aid, be sure to include the projects docket number, which is A-2013-2380667.
80071270
News for Veterans
DORRANCE TWP.:
The Dorrance Township
American Legion Post 288
will meet at 7 p.m. on Sept.
16 at the Slocum Township
VFW Post 7918, 6592
Nuangola Road. For more
information, call Robert at
570-474-5721.
DUPONT: The Dupont
VFW Post 4909 will meet
at 7:30 tonight at the post
home. Items of importance
will be discussed and reports
given. Commander Gary
Carwardine will preside.
The Home Association meet-
ing will take place after the
regular meeting. Food and
refreshments will be served
after both meetings.
GLEN LYON: The
American Legion Post 971
will meet at 7 tonightat the
Glen Lyon American Legion
Post 539, 62 Newport Street.
All members are urged to
attend.
KINGSTON: Kingston
American Legion Black
Diamond Post 395 board
of directors will meet on
Tuesday. The executive
board will meet at 6:30 p.m.
and the regular board meet-
ing will follow. All members
are urged to attend. The
regular legion meeting will
take place after the board
meeting.
MOUNTAIN TOP:
Mountain Post American
Legion Auxiliary Unit 781
will meet on Sept. 16. The
executive committee will
meet at 7p.m. andthe regular
meeting will be held at 7:30
p.m. All members are urged
to attend. New members are
welcome. For more informa-
tion, call Casey Eigenbrod at
570-885-2519.
PLAINS TWP.: The
Lani VFW Post 6325, 35-37
Cleveland St., Hudson, will
hold its post meeting at 7:30
p.m. on Tuesday. All regular
members are urged to attend.
A social hour will take place
after the meeting.
PLAINS TWP.: The
Plains American Legion
Auxiliary will meet at 6 p.m.
on Tuesday at the legion. All
members are asked to attend.
Plans for the installation of
ofcers dinner on Saturday
and other topics will be dis-
cussed. Membership dues for
2014 are being collected.
Lani VFWPost 6325 installs ofcers
The Lani VFW Post 6325, 35-37
Cleveland St., Hudson, recently held
the installation of ofcers at the
post home. Paul Bednarczyk was
sworn in as the post commander.
Steve Malewjko, past District 11 all-
state commander, was the installing
ofcer. A social hour with food and
beverages was held after the event.
At the installation ceremony, from
left, rst row: Frank Yale, patriotic
instructor; Roger Burridge, adjutant
and trusteee; Malewjko; Bednarczyk;
Alex Rilko, junior vice commander;
Mike Zavec, trustee; and Mike Basta,
ofcer of the day. Second row: Ron
Viola, trustee; Jack Liparella, quarter-
master; and Doyle Kioski, chaplain.
Dallas Harvest Festival participating in food drive
The Dallas Harvest
Festival committee
recently announced that
it will collaborate with
the Dallas School District
and the Shavertown and
Dallas Thomas Family
Markets locations to
help collect food items
for the Back Mountain
Food Pantry through its
Friends Feeding Friends
Campaign. People attend-
ing the festival are encour-
aged to bring a non-perish-
able item to drop off from
noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday
at the Friends Feeding
Friends booth. Donations
will also be accepted
until Friday during the
Dallas School District
classroom food drive or at
drop-off receptacles at the
Thomas Family Markets.
Participants from the
Dallas School District
(above), from left, rst
row: Tom Traver, princi-
pal, Wycallis Elementary;
Dawn Keifer, special edu-
cation director; Frank
Galicki, superintendent;
and Bill Gartrell, technol-
ogy director. Second row:
Brian Bradshaw, assistant
principal, Dallas High
School; Barb Roberts and
Donna Davies, co-chairs,
Friends Feeding Friends;
Paul Reinert, princi-
pal, Dallas Elementary
School; Mark Kraynack,
buildings and grounds
supervisor; Tom Duffy,
principal, Dallas Middle
School; and Jeff Shaffer,
principal, Dallas High
School. Representatives
at Thomas Food Markets
(below), from left: the
Rev. Roger Grifth, presi-
dent, Back Mountain Food
Pantry; Barb Roberts,
co-chair, Friends Feeding
Friends; Chris Evans, co-
owner, Thomas Markets;
and Larry Seward, man-
ager, Thomas Markets.
Bar Association
supports YMCA
The Luzerne County Bar
Association Charitable
Foundation, Inc. recent-
ly awarded $500 to the
Greater Pittston YMCA.
The money will be used
to support youth pro-
gramming. At the check
presentation, from
left: William Anzalone,
Bar Association; Craig
Lukatch, chief executive
ofcer, Greater Pittston
YMCA; Larry Keiser,
Bar Association; and Bill
Burke, Bar Association.
FNCBdonates to
Habitat for Humanity
First National
Community Bank (FNCB)
recently donated $500
to representatives from
Habitat for Humanity of
Wayne County. The dona-
tion will help Habitat build
homes for qualied low-
income partner families.
At the check presentation,
from left: Scott Irwin,
vice president, Habitat
for Humanity of Wayne
County; Mary Murray,
board member, Habitat
for Humanity of Wayne
County; Sheri Rutledge,
FNCB Honesdale; Lena
Warren, president,
Habitat for Humanity
of Wayne County; and
Ellen Pritchard, commu-
nity ofce manager, FNCB
Honesdale.
CAN DO recognizes
scholarship recipients
The CANDOCommunity
Foundation recently rec-
ognized ve North Penn
Bank Charitable Trust
scholarship recipients who
attended Ferrwood Music
Camp this summer. The
scholarship recipients were
Morgan Gonzalez, Drums,
Drums Elementary Middle
School; Nadine Mumaw,
Hazleton, Heights Terrace
Elementary Middle School;
Keenan Overa, Drums,
MMI Preparatory; Kayla
Paredes, Fern Glen, Valley
Elementary Middle School;
and Brian Rigotti, Hazleton,
Heights Terrace Elementary
Middle School. For more
information on the CAN
DO Community Foundation
and how to donate to com-
munity projects, contact
Nancy Stasko at 570-455-
1508 or nstasko@hazleton-
cando.com or visit www.
candocommunityfounda-
tion.com. Some of the par-
ticipants, from left, rst
row, are Mumaw, Rigotti,
Gonzalez and Overa. Second
row: Nancy Stasko, CAN
DO, selection commit-
tee chairman; and Chris
Stamatopoulos, CEO, and
Phil Latella, Heights Terrace
Elementary Middle School,
selection committee mem-
bers. Jerry Panisak was also
a member of the selection
committee.
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HAPPY
BIRTHDAY!
JosephA. Bonomo
JosephAnthonyBonomo,
son of Tony and Jessica
Bonomo, Shavertown, is
celebrating his rst birth-
day today, Sept. 9. Joseph
is a grandson of Joseph
and Miriam Bonomo, West
Pittston, and John and
Norina Conden, Wyoming.
He has a sister, Sara, 3.
Channing Stesney, son
of Cathy and Rob Stesney,
Swoyersville, is celebrating
his third birthday today,
Sept. 9. Channing is a
grandson of Ed and Barbara
Zera, Exeter, and Bob and
Sandy Stesney, Luzerne.
He has a sister, Tesa, 5.
Channing Stesney
VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITIES
Editors note: View a list
of Volunteer Opportunities
at www.timesleader.com by
clicking Community News
under the People tab. To
have your group listed, visit
the United Way of Wyoming
Valleys volunteer page at
www.unitedwaywb.org. For
more information, contact
Kathy Sweetra at 970-7250 or
ksweetra@civitasmedia.com.
Wife ball tourney benefts
Fallen Ofcers Remembered
Fallen Officers Remembered and the Backyard Wiffle Ball League (BWBL) recently partnered for a
charity wiffle ball tournament and a horseshoe tournament at Diamond City Park, Wilkes-Barre. The
tournaments helped raise $1,220 for Fallen Officers Remembered, an organization that purchases bul-
let-proof vests for local police officers. The winning teamof the wiffle ball tournament was Bad Meets
Evil. Jack Petcaugh and John Petcaugh won the horseshoe tournament. The BWBL will be hosting their
Autumn Classic on Sept. 21 at Diamond City Park. For more information on joining the event for either
wiffle ball or horseshoes, contact the league at www.facebook.com/BackyardWiffleBallLeague or call
Kevin Sickle at 570-704-8344. Fallen Officers Remembered will be hosting its third annual Airport Day
fundraiser on Saturday. For more information go to www.fallenofficersremembered.org or call Gina
Boyle at 570-690-6003. At the check presentation, from left: Matt Morgan, council member, BWBL;
Jaclyn Pocceschi Mosley, president and co-founder, Fallen Officers Remembered; Kevin Sickle, com-
missioner, BWBL; and Tom Hannon, council member, BWBL.
PITTSTON: The Pittston
Knights of Columbus
Council 372 is holding its
second annual family out-
ing on Saturday at the Plains
Pavilion, Clarks Lane. There
will be food, beverages and
covered dishes. Music will
be provided by Optimum
Entertainment. There will
also be games and contests
for children and adults. Cost
is $15 per person for Council
372 members and family;
$20 for non-members; and
$50 for a family of four.
Children younger than 10
are free.
For tickets call Fran
Ankenbrand at 954-8147
or the council home at 655-
8311.
WEST WYOMING: Cub
Scout Pack 366, sponsored
by St. Monicas Parrish, West
Wyoming, is conducting reg-
istration for the 2013 - 2014
season at 7 p.m. on Tuesday
on the second oor of the
West Wyoming Borough
Building, West 8th Street
and Shoemaker Avenue.
Any boy in rst through
fth grade is eligible to join.
A parent is required to be
present at registration. The
fee is $25 and the program
book is $7 for rst-grade
Tigers and $9 for second-
through-fth- grade Wolfs,
Bears and Webelos.
The rst pack meeting
will take place at 6:30 p.m.
on Sunday at Our Lady of
Sorrows Church Hall, St.
Monicas Parrish, West 8th
Street, West Wyoming. New
registrations will take place
at 6 p.m. before the pack
meeting.
For more information,
contact Barbara Stahley, Cub
master, at 693-1425.
WHITE HAVEN: Boy
Scout Troop 25 and Cub
Pack 25 are hosting an open
housefor families withyoung
boys interested in scouting
from 6-8 p.m. on Sept. 16 at
the White Haven VFW Post
6615, 3 VFW Way.
Cub Scout are boys from
ages 7-11 in rst through
fth grade. Boy Scouts are
ages 12-18 in grades 6-12.
The scouting programteach-
es outdoor skills, problem
solving, life skills and group
interactions while having fun
swimming, camping, shing,
doing science experiments,
shooting archery and more.
The open house will have
demonstrations of the scout-
ing programs for both age
groups. A model campsite
will be set up with an out-
door cooking demonstra-
tion, knots and ropes, out-
door games and skill games.
Hot dogs, drinks and food
fromthe cooking demonstra-
tion will be provided. For
more information, call Herb
King at 401-7679 or 443-
7431.
Blind Association planning awards gala
The Association for the Blind will hold its 95th anniversary and awards gala on Oct. 9 at the Woodlands Inn and Resort. The dinner will pay tribute to the John C. Metz fam-
ily, recipients of the Distinguished Community Service Award; Peter J. Danchak, recipient of the Community Partnership Award; and Cynthia Kennelly, D.C., recipient of the
Arline Phillips Achievement Award. The evening will also feature a silent and live auction. Proceeds will support programs and services provided by the Association for the
Blind. To make reservations, arrange for table sponsorships, or to place ads in the program book, contact the Association for the Blind at 570-693-3555 or 877-693-3555.
Event organizers, fromleft, first row: Ron Petrilla; Kathi Bankes; Jason Reilly; Mary Erwine, dinner chair; CeCe McCarthy; and Angelo DeCesaris. Second row: Bobbie Steever,
TomRobinson, TomPugh, Chris Borton, Craig Phillips, Greg Polk, Michael MacDowell, Kathleen Dunsmuir, Patti Potenza and Jennifer Throop. Also serving on the committee
are Dwight Davis, Bob Loftus, Tina MacDowell, David Payne, Marilyn Santarelli, attorney Murray Ufberg and Vanessa Weaver.
Scouts hold welcome-back nights
Cub Scout Pack 303 and Troop 303 of Pittston are holding welcome-back nights for all boys in first
grade or ages 7-18 from 1-3 p.m. on Saturday and 6-9 p.m. on Sept. 16 at Oblates of St. Joseph. All
boys and their family members are invited to learn about the scouting programs. Children will develop
character, a strong sense of family and respect for their environment. Monthly activities are held for
the entire Pack and Troop and families. Scouts visit museums and other local attractions, participate
in parades, the Pinewood Derby and the Rain Gutter Regatta, camp outs and hiking. They learn the
art of sword fighting and much more. For more information, contact Cub Master Jake at 606-9262 or
assistant Cub Master Diane at 570-855-4112. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Alex
Lein, Dylan Kwiak, Anthony Cerreta, Jeff Mazonis and Luke Galli. Second row: Josh Gustinucci, Peyton
OBoyle, Devin Markert, Mark McFarland, Daniel Silsby, Lucas Williams and Adian OBoyle.
IN BRIEF
Today
PITTSTON: Pittston
High School Class of 1964
reunion committee, 6 p.m.,
Savos Pizza, Dinosaur
Room, Pittston Commons.
Classmates are asked to
bring 1964 yearbooks and
addresses of classmates.
Plans for the 50th anniver-
sary reunion will be dis-
cussed.
Tuesday
PITTSTON: St. Patricks
Parade and Festival com-
mittee, 6:30 p.m. at Pittston
City Hall. Representatives
from West Pittston,
Jenkins Township, Port
Grifth, Exeter, Wyoming,
Yatesville, Pittston
Township, Hughestown,
Dupont, Avoca and Duryea
are urged to attend to help
plan the parade and festival
to be held on March 8 in
downtown Pittston.
MEETINGS
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER BIRTHDAYS/COMMUNITY NEWS Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 3D
PAGE 4D Monday, September 9, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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RIDDICK NEWMOVIE (xd)
(r) 1:30am 4:25pm 7:25pm
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You must be 17 with id or accompanied by a parent to attend r rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend r rated features after 6pm
**note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating.
8
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2 GUNS (digital) (r)
4:20pm 10:20pm
BLUE JASMINE (digital) (pg-13)
1:40pm 4:45pm 7:15pm 9:45pm
CLOSED CIRCUIT (digital) (r)
12:05pm 2:30pm 4:55pm 8:00pm
10:15pm
CONJURING, THE (digital) (r)
1:55pm 4:35pm 7:50pm 10:35pm
ELYSIUM (digital) (r)
12:45pm 3:20pm 6:20pm 9:55pm
GETAWAY, THE (digital) (pg-13)
12:15pm 2:30pm 4:45pm 7:00pm
9:15pm
JOBS (digital) (pg-13)
1:20pm 7:20pm
KICK-ASS 2 (digital) (r)
9:20pm
LEE DANIELS BUTLER, THE
(digital) (pg-13)12:30pm 3:40pm
7:05pm 10:05pm
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS (digital)
(pg-13) 12:25pm 3:45pm 6:45pm
9:45pm
ONE DIRECTION, THIS IS US (3d)
(pg) 11:55am 2:20pm 3:25pm
4:40pm 7:10pm 8:25pm 9:40pm
ONE DIRECTION, THIS IS US
(digital) (pg) 12:55am 5:55pm
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3d) (pg) 1:25pm
6:55pm
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (digital) (pg) 4:05pm
9:50pm
PLANES (3d) (pg) 2:30pm 7:10pm
PLANES (digital) (pg)12:10pm
4:50pm 9:35pm
RIDDICK (digital) (r)12:20pm
3:10pm 6:05pm 8:50pm
RIDDICK (xd) (r)1:30pm 4:25pm
7:25pm 10:10pm
SMURFS 2 (3d) (pg)4:00pm
SMURFS 2 (digital) (pg) 12:50pm
6:50pm
THIS IS THE END (digital) (r)
12:00pm 2:35pm 5:10pm 7:40pm
10:15pm
ULTIMATE LIFE, THE (digital)
(pg) 11:50am 2:25pm 5:00pm
7:35pm 10:10pm
WERE THE MILLERS (digital)
(r) 2:05pm 4:50pm 7:35pm
10:25pm
WORLDS END, THE (digital) (r)
12:00pm 2:35pm 5:10pm 7:45pm
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RIDDICK(XD) (R) NEW
MOVIE 1:30PM 4:25PM
7:25PM 10:10PM
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating. 8
0
0
2
4
6
4
9
2 GUNS (DIgItal) (R)
4:20PM 10:20PM
BLUE JASMINE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
1:40PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:45PM
CLOSED CIRCUIT (DIgItal) (R)
12:05PM 2:30PM 4:55PM 8:00PM
10:15PM
CONJURING, THE (DIgItal) (R)
1:55PM 4:35PM 7:50PM 10:35PM
ELYSIUM (DIgItal) (R)
12:45PM 3:20PM 6:20PM 9:55PM
GETAWAY, THE (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
12:15PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM
9:15PM
JOBS (DIgItal) (Pg-13) 1:20PM
7:20PM
KICK-ASS 2 (DIgItal) (R) 9:20PM
LEE DANIELS BUTLER, THE
(DIgItal) (Pg-13)12:30PM 3:40PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
MORTAL INSTRUMENTS
(DIgItal) (Pg-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM 9:45PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (3D)
(Pg) 11:55aM 2:20PM 3:25PM 4:40PM
7:10PM 8:25PM 9:40PM
ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (Pg)
12:55PM 5:55PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (3D) (Pg) 1:25PM
PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF
MONSTERS (DIgItal) (Pg) 4:05PM
PLANES (3D) (Pg) 2:30PM 7:10PM
PLANES (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:10PM
4:50PM 9:35PM
SMURFS 2 (3D) (Pg) 4:00PM
SMURFS 2 (DIgItal) (Pg) 12:50PM
6:50PM
THIS IS THE END NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal) (R) 12:00PM 2:35PM
5:10PM 7:40PM 10:15PM
ULTIMATE LIFE, THE NEWMOVIE
(DIgItal)
(Pg) 11:50aM 2:25PM 5:00PM 7:35PM
10:10PM
WERE THE MILLERS (DIgItal) (R)
2:05PM 4:50PM 7:35PM 10:25PM
WORLDS END, THE (DIgItal)
(R) 12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:20PM
YOURE NEXT (DIgItal)
(R) 12:40PM 3:05PM 5:30PM 7:55PM
10:30PM
RIDDICK NEWMOVIE (DIgItal) (R)
12:20PM 3:10PM 6:05PM 8:50PM
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The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
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PG13 140 min
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Friday September 6th - Thursday September 12th
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Seating R, 1 hr 59 min - 1:50p 4:25p 7:20p
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AP file photo
Arsenio Hall performs at Eddie Murphy: One Night Only, a celebration of Murphys career in Beverly
Hills, Calif. After two decades, Hall is returning to late-night television with The Arsenio Hall Show,
premiering tonight.
FRAZIER MOORE
APTelevision Writer
LOS ANGELES Did
fate decree that Arsenio
Hall would return to late
night after two decades
absence?
If so, hes answering
that comeback call tonight
with the premiere of The
Arsenio Hall Show (syn-
dicated; check local list-
ings for time and channel).
And hes itching to get
going.
You know how certain
things make you nervous?
he asked recently. I dont
like to y, but once Im on
the plane and were over
the Rockies and Im watch-
ing a movie, Im ne.
Right nowI feel like I do
when Im in the airport.
It was in 1987 that a
then-unknown Hall, brief-
ly stepping in for Joan
Rivers short-lived Fox
talk show, took ight as
the cool, hip alternative
to NBCs Tonight Show
titan Johnny Carson.
Then, in January 1989,
he debuted with his own
syndicated late-night show
against Carson. He proved
a formidable rival with
his party atmosphere (the
Dog Pound audience
greeted him with woofs
and other animal sounds
as well as applause) and
a wide range of guests,
including presidential can-
didate Bill Clinton (sport-
ing shades and wailing
Heartbreak Hotel on his
sax) and basketball great
Magic Johnson shortly
after announcing he was
HIV positive.
But by 1994, Hall was
facing new competition
from Tonight host Jay
Leno and David Letterman
on CBS. With ratings slip-
ping, he announced he
was leaving the late-night
arena, and, gracefully, he
did.
In the years that fol-
lowed, he kept a low pro-
le. A sitcom came and
went. He hosted Star
Search for a season. He
co-starred on a CBS drama
Martial Law for a couple
of years. Did standup.
He also devoted himself
to his son, Arsenio Jr., now
13, whose mother is Halls
ex, former manager and
down-the-street neighbor
Cheryl Bonacci.
I love being a dad,
he said. When kids got
together at Chuck E.
Cheese, there were a lot of
mothers and me.
But Hall yearned to
return to late night. In
June 2012 he announced it
was happening.
People say, How did
you know when to do it?
Several times before I had
tried!
False starts included a
meeting with studio big-
wigs he skipped because
his son was sick. Or the
nail in a piece of sushi that
broke his tooth the night
before an all-important
guest-hosting gig.
Signs like that, Hall
said, seemed to mean I
wasnt ready yet.
Now hes sure hes ready,
whatever skeptics may say.
I hear all the long-shot
talk: This is an impos-
sible thing to do after all
this time. The eld is so
crowded. But I still have
to pursue my dream!
Meeting with a reporter
at a rehearsal space in a
rawboned section of North
Hollywood while his new
house band was tuning up,
Hall radiated the charm
and high energy that made
him a hit with viewers so
long ago. At 58, he comes
across much the same
as ever lanky, boyish,
wide-open grin. The big-
gest difference: his mus-
tache is long gone. It had
too much gray in it, he
conded.
As part of his strategy
to reintroduce himself,
Hall became a contes-
tant on The Celebrity
Apprentice early in 2012
and ended up not only
gaining the exposure he
sought, but also winning
the competition.
Even so, do enough
viewers know who he is
or remember him to
get his new show off the
ground?
When people ask that,
Im like, Well, NO ONE
knew me the FIRST time!
I used to joke that people
thought Arsenio Hall was
a dorm at UCLA. So dont
I have a better shot THIS
time?
Aquarter-century ago, he
broke the late-night color
barrier, but in many ways
his show was refreshingly
color-blind. Inclusiveness is
his goal again.
I became the black
show before because the
other shows were really,
really not, he said. But
now (ABC late-night host
Jimmy) Kimmels MUCH
blacker than me: He is
juiced in to everybody
from Kobe (Bryant) to
(rapper) Rick Ross.
Besides, talk shows traf-
c in many of the same
guests, Hall observed.
What distinguishes one
show from the next is its
host and how he interacts
with those guests.
With opening night just
around the corner, Hall
will be receiving his rst
guests soon and staking
his new claim in late night.
I dont even know if I
can live through that rst
minute, he said excitedly.
You come out there, back
after a billion years, theres
gonna be all kind of animal
noises and people scream-
ing. What do you say? It
was a long doggone hia-
tus?
But he used a stronger
word than doggone, then
burst into laughter.
Arsenio fulflls dreamwith late-night return
MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 9, 2013
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Monday, September 9, 2013 PAGE 5D
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: Our
nanny, who is 58,
was diagnosed with
breast cancer just be-
fore I delivered baby
No. 2. The boys are
now 15 months and 4
weeks old.
Nora has started chemotherapy
after having surgery. I completely
understand that she has to attend to
her needs right now and focus on her
health, but she wanted to continue
working without it being an issue.
Nora has had to take off several days
already in addition to being as I
expected tired and unable to keep
up with my active toddler.
I start back to work soon and my
job is a demanding one. My husband
and I have discussed options and
feel it would be best to mandate that
Nora take this time off. We will have
to make other arrangements for child
care, and I cant guarantee Noras job
when she feels better.
She has taken such good care of our
first son it kills me to have to let her
go, especially while shes dealing with
cancer. Any advice?
Mommy of Two in South Carolina
Dear Mommy: Have a meeting with
Nora and explain your concerns. Ask
if she knows someone reliable who
could watch the children on those
days when she is too weak to do so.
Or contact a staffing agency about
getting a temporary fill-in.
Dear Abby: My 61-year-old father
was arrested recently for 30 counts of
possession of child pornography. He
has had a rough past he cheated
on my mother and has had multiple
stints in rehab for alcohol abuse. My
mother is in denial about the entire
situation.
Nine months ago, my husband
and I were blessed with the birth of
our beautiful baby girl. I feel I must
protect her from my parents and my
father in particular. Some of my fam-
ily agree with my decision, others
disagree. Am I wrong for not wanting
my father and possibly my mother
any longer in my life?
Tough Love in Florida
Dear Tough Love: No. And as for the
reaction of your relatives, remember
that you cant please everyone, and
the well-being of your child must
come first.
Dear Abby: How do I keep a co-work-
er from borrowing money from me?
I have my paycheck direct-deposited,
which means the money is available
earlier than Anitas.
She asked me yesterday if I would
lend her money for cigarettes, and I
told her I didnt have any cash on me.
When I went on break to buy lunch
with my ATM card, Anita came waltz-
ing over and immediately told the
cashier to ring up the cigarettes on
my ATM card! She said shed pay me
back more than the amount charged
to my card.
In the future, how can I handle
this if it happens again? I needed the
money for my own use, and now I
must wait until next week for her to
pay me back.
Buck Stops Here in Massachusetts
Dear Buck: One way to handle it
would be to be proactive and tell
Anita that what she did was rude and
you didnt like it. Another would be
to inform the cashier that what Anita
did was NOT OK with you, and to
never do it again.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Ailing nanny of two small boys should be given the chance to fully heal
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You love
life, and life loves you right back.
But you may want to have a talk
with life and explain the par-
ticular ways in which you like to
receive love.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). The
proud man will take less than he
needs. Maybe that seems fool-
ish to less dignified types, but
such stoicism shows the world a
breadth of spirit that will make
great things possible.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). If you
know what youre doing, you
will only need a few tools to do
todays work well. If you dont
know what youre doing, you can
avoid overspending on tools by
asking an expert.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). With
whom you spend time matters
to you. Social influences will
change your mood. Thats why
youd rather skip lunch than eat
it with someone you dont enjoy.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Go for the
easy jobs first. Rack up a few
wins. People will investigate
what youre up to. If they see
you winning, they will have the
sense that youre a winner.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Staying
positive is as good for your
health as it is for your social life.
It doesnt make you happy to
know that many in the world are
suffering, but it does help you to
appreciate what you have.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Focus
on one thing, not many things.
Doing one thing will bring plea-
sure; whereas, splitting your time
among many tasks will make you
feel as though youre not getting
anything done.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). People
value things that they put effort
into. Thats why you are better
off asking for other peoples help
and contribution than you would
be serving up the things you
believe they want.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). If
the one in charge seems to have
no idea what to do next, its a
troubling feeling. Whats needed
is a strong leader with a vision.
Youd rather break out on your
own than waffle in a situation
thats going nowhere.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Life
will feel like a swing: Theres
momentum but a limited range
of motion. You move forward
only to be brought back to where
you started, but thats more fun
than hanging in the middle.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Go
ahead and spend some money
on making yourself look and feel
better. It only makes sense that
if you invest in yourself youll
value yourself more.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Making
it too easy for people will not
only inspire them to be lazy, but
they wont have as much fun.
Instead of performing to please
people, create a vacuum. Ask
them to make an effort, and then
wait expectantly.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept. 9). You
work tirelessly to achieve your
hearts desire. The important
thing to remember is to be per-
sistent in one direction. If you
keep changing your mind, youll
waste time. This month brings
a relationship commitment.
June is for whimsy. Your lucky
numbers are: 2, 4, 11, 20 and 15.
PAGE 6D Monday, September 9, 2013 COMICS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA