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VOL. 20 ISSUE 45 SEPTEMBER 18-24, 2013 THEWEEKENDER.

COM
NEPAS No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*
weekender
NEW COLUMN FEATURES
OUR FANTASY FOOTBALL
PICKS, P. 10
TROLLEY OFTERROR
HAS HAUNTED
HISTORY, P. 33
DeAd
inside
ZOMBIES INVADE SECOND
ANNUAL INFECT SCRANTON
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Dax Shepard@daxshepard1
Online comment
of the week.
This Bieber move by Mayweather
is counterintuitive to say the least. I
dont know that a win is even pos-
sible now.
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Chuck Shepherd, Jen Stevens, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Bill Thomas, Mark Uricheck, Robbie Vanderveken, Noelle Vetrosky,
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Interns
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* Scarborough Research
Kieran Inglis
Media Consultant 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
An islandor a Blockbuster.
No one would nd me there.
Amanda Dittmar
Graphic Designer 570.970.7401
adittmar@theweekender.com
Anywhere far away from
other people.
Rich Howells
Editor 570.831.7322
rhowells@theweekender.com
Prisons dont work out so
well, so maybe an empty
police station.
Sara Pokorny
StafWriter 570.829.7132
spokorny@theweekender.com
On a boat.
What is your ideal
hideout location for the
zombie apocalypse?
Tell @wkdr what your ideal zombie
apocalypse hideout would be.
Its no secret that Im a zombie fanatic, so if I dont have to drive to
Pittsburgh or New Jersey to attend a zombie convention, Im all for it.
Infect Scranton is back for a second year, and the guests are really
great, particularly for such a new event. Not only are there three stars
from The Walking Dead attending, but also a slew of featured zom-
bies from the show and several memorable undead faces from Dawn
of the Dead, which many believe to be the greatest zombie lm of all
time. (I have a tough time picking my favorite, but Ive seen Dawn
at least 100 times.) We talked to both the living and the dead on pages
28, 29, 34, and 35.
What makes this convention unique is that its not just a conven-
tion theres a survivor challenge race, a pub crawl, and an attempt
to break a Guinness World Record. What more could you ask for? For
those who dont get the zombie craze, just note that this whole thing
is for charity, so stop by one of the many events this weekend and sup-
port some worthy causes.
I must also extend a special thanks to Taneys Costume Shop in
Scranton and our photographer/designer Amanda Dittmar for bring-
ing out the dead in us for our front cover and inside image. The only
thing more fun than meeting zombies is joining them, so come in cos-
tume and impress the professionals.
-Rich Howells, Weekender Editor
Christopher Madden
Media Consultant 570.970.7211
cmadden@civitasmedia.com
In a place so safe I could tell
you, but Id have to kill you
after I did.
Jill Andes
Inside Media Consultant 570.970.7188
jillandes@civitasmedia.com
Under my bed.
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Melissa Hughes
Weekender Correspondent
Areturned smile
can you do to get your creep on the weekend before Halloween?
The F.M. Kirby Center has everything needed to send chills down your spine with the just-announced Splatterday!
Halloween Film Series.
This day-long event will take place on Oct. 26 and feature ve icks, for a very low ticket price of $5 a lm ($3 for
students with valid I.D.) or all ve lms for $20. Tickets are on sale now at the Kirby Center box ofce.
The lms and times are as follows: Ghostbusters, 2 p.m.; Young Frankenstein, 4:30 p.m.; Night of the Living
Dead, 7 p.m.; Halloween, 9:30 p.m.; and Rocky Horror Picture Show, midnight.
will be partnering with the Scranton Cultural Center for an audio recording of The Happy Elf?
None other than Harry Connick Jr., who will come to the area to complete the recording for one of his newest
productions. This is the nal piece that will bring the production to life, which premiered in 2012. SCC Executive
Director Michael Melcher served as the executive director of the production.
is the holiday season right around the corner?
Because tickets for the Trans-Siberian Orchestra are about to go on sale!
The nal performances of The Lost Christmas Eve will play arenas nationwide, and TSO is bringing the show to
the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza Dec. 6 at both 4 and 8 p.m.
Tickets, which start as low as $33, go on sale Sept. 20 at 10 a.m. and are available at ticketmaster.com, the Pennstar
Box Ofce at Mohegan Sun Arena, or charge by phone at 800.745.3000.
It is absolutely my pleasure to bring something like this to
NEPA. It was my honor as executive director to premiere this
production, and its just as much of an honor to see the fnal
pieces come together at the Scranton Cultural Center. -Michael
Melcher, executive director of The Happy Elf
Local musician
Ronnie Williams has
touched the lives of
so many people in
NEPA. He was voted
best solo artist for The
Weekender Readers
Choice Awards the past
three years in a row
and also singlehand-
edly started a social
movement last year by
creating Proj ect Smile,
a Facebook page that
encouraged our area to
create positive energy
and pay it forward with
happiness.
It is time for the com-
munity to take that
positive energy and
pay it back. Ronnie
was recently diagnosed
with cancer, so his
friends have all come
together and to give
back to someone who
has given all he can to
so many others.
Sunday, Sept. 22 at
Brews Brothers West
(75 Main St., Luzerne),
there will be a ben-
efit called Rocking for
Ronnie to help him
cover medical costs
and living expenses
while he is in treat-
ment. When word was
put out to the public
about the benefit, orga-
nizers received a huge
response. Ronnie has
played with, written
music for, and support-
ed so many local area
musicians that every-
one wanted to contrib-
ute to this great cause
and show Ronnie that
we can all still smile.
Doors open at 4 p.m.
The musicians playing
include Iron Cowboy,
Russello Proj ect, M80,
Stealing Neil, 40 lb.
Head, Bad Hair Day
(featuring both cur-
rent and former band
members), Gone Crazy,
Zamani, and additional
acoustic acts and open
j am time throughout
the day. There is a sug-
gested donation of $10
a person at the door.
There will also be priz-
es and raff les through-
out the day.
For those who arent
able to attend the
benefit, donations
are being accepted
online at gofundme.
com/43mr3g. Any
amount is appreciated
and all proceeds go
directly to Williams
and his family.
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ROCKING
FOR RONNIE
SCHEDULE
4-4:45 p.m.: Vinyl Daze
5-5:45 p.m.: Iron
Cowboy
6-6:45 p.m.: Russello
Project
7-7:45 p.m.: M80
8-8:45 p.m.: Stealing
Neil
9-9:45 p.m.: 40 lb. Head
10-10:45 p.m.: Bad Hair
Day
11-11:45 p.m.: Gone
Crazy
12-12:45 p.m.: Zamani
1-1:45 p.m.: TBA
Rocking For Ronnie:
Sept. 22, 4 p.m., Brews
Brothers West (75 Main
St., Luzerne). $10.
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sept. 18-24, 2013
Sweet harmony
Circus meets symphony in Cirque Musica
37
18
role-play becomeS reality
Wild West and magical arts at Hickory Run State
Park
See more photoS of our zombie photo Shoot
sept. 18-24, 2013
COVER STORY
Infect scranton 28-29, 34-35
LISTINGS
the W5
concerts 19
speaK & see 21
LIve entertaInment 22
theater 24
agenda36, 50
MUSIC
ronnIe WILLIams benefIt 5
Wrath ofthe goat bLacK metaL festIvaL 7
breaKIng doWnthe WaLLs 10
aLbumrevIeWs 16
charts 16
cIrque musIca18
musIc, motors, and more 39
fLoodWood 42
sound party 49
STAGE & SCREEN
movIe revIeW24
raLphIe report 27
starstrucK 27
InfInIte ImprobabILIty 30
doLLy partons 9 to 5 33
ARTS
noveLapproach 21
thIrd frIdayWILKes-barre 32
scranton hauntedtroLLey 33
LIFESTYLE
fIrstandted 10, 38
gIrLtaLK 20
sIngLe In scranton 38
parts unKnoWn 43
shoWus some sKIn 43
man ofthe WeeK 53
modeL ofthe WeeK 54
HUMOR & FUN
puzzLe 36
cooKIngWIth beer 40
Idtapthat 40
pet ofthe WeeK 27
sorry mom& dad 47
neWs ofthe WeIrd 47
sIgn Language 52
GAMES &TECH
Intothe breach 37
getyour game on 46
motorhead 46
ONTHE COVER
photos and desIgn byamandadIttmar
voLume 20 Issue 45
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Bill Thomas
Weekender Correspondent
Wrath of the Goat reveals thenegative art of black metal
Black metal is growing up.
According to Neill Jameson,
frontman/mastermind of New
Jersey-based band Krieg ,the
extreme heavy-metal subgenre
infamous for everything from
cartoonish Satanic posturing
to all-too-real criminal vio-
lence (most notably a rash of
church burnings and murders
in Norway in the early 90s)
has advanced beyond both the
destructive behavior and isola-
tionist musical mentality that
once dominated it.
When I think of black metal
in 2013, I dont think of that,
Jameson says. Modern black
metal is more idea-based, rath-
er than action-based.
With Krieg being one of the
most well-known, well-regard-
ed bands in todays American
black metal scene, Jamesons
observations come from
rsthand experience. This
Saturday, Jameson will bring
that experience with him to
NEPA, when Krieg headlines
the rst ever Wrath of the
Goat black metal festival at
The Rattler in Pittston.
Bringing together such acts
as Gravewrm from Virginia,
Murrum from Connecticut,
Hubris from New York, and
Sathanas and Neldreth from
Pennsylvania, the fest offers
fans a hydra-headed over-
view of the current state of
American black metal.
Black metal is a sort of
music where you can do pretty
much whatever you want,
Jameson says. I understand
that were steeped in tradi-
tion in the aesthetics and the
music, but I also understand
that this music is 20 or 30
years old. Things are going to
evolve. Im just happy to see
that theres a thriving in this
country of any kind of black
metal.
As if to bolster Jamesons
talk of thriving, festival orga-
nizer and Neldreth vocalist
Oz Bloodcurse reveals just
how ambitious he is about the
future of the event. In addition
to conrming a second Wrath
of the Goat to take place in
Chicago, Ill., this November,
Bloodcurse is already mak-
ing plans for next years
Pennsylvania show.
Ive seen a lot of festivals
popping up all over the U.S.,
but none of them really catered
a hundred percent to black
metal, especially not on the
East Coast, Bloodcurse says,
explaining that he expects
metalheads to come in from
all over for the event, from the
farthest fringes of the tri-state
area and beyond.
Hopefully this event will
open up some eyes and also
provide something for people
who are into black metal but
dont get to go to a lot of
shows because the tours dont
come around here.
What, then, is the appeal of
black metal? To attract fans
diehard enough to not only
travel miles on top of miles just
to jam-pack themselves into a
music venue like sardines in a
can, but also to withstand the
ire of the mainstream masses
that just dont get it, one
suspects there must be more
to black metal than just the
gleefully blasphemous rebel
magnetism of upside-down
crosses, monochrome face
paint, and illegible band logos.
For Jameson, its about
catharsis.
The essence of black metal
is negativity. There are peo-
ple for whom that negativity
comes as Satanism, there are
people for whom it is nihil-
ism, but negativity is the one
thread that binds the whole
thing together. Black metal
is negative music expressing
negative emotions and nega-
tive ideas, he says.
Life is an absurd journey.
Theres always going to be
multiple aspects to every-
thing, different sides to every
story, shadows to sunshine
Black metal, to me, is the per-
sonication of negative art.
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WraTh of The GoaT Black meTal
fesTival:
sept. 21, 6 p.m., the rattler (137 n. main st., Pittston). $10, 21+.
Info: 570.299.5054, facebook.com/events/455544277866632/.
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LocaL music with titLe Fights
Ned Russin | Special to the Weekender
It seems all too often
that periods in our life
are defined by tragedies.
Last week, Adam Slamas,
a friend and tour mate,
passed away. While its
an unimaginable loss, a
great tool for recovery is
to recount and reflect on
all the times that were
shared, and its safe to
say in the community that
there are a lot of memo-
ries to reflect on.
For me, many the
moments I remember
most fondly were dur-
ing the annual Slambfest
(pronounced Slahm-Fest)
held in the Slamas fam-
ily garage every summer.
The fest was started on a
whim to essentially pro-
vide a last show for my
old band, The Gnarlies.
The show went so well
that it continued to go on
for two more years each
year improving on the
last.
The fact that Adam
and his brother Nate
opened their garage to
not only their friends
but to an entire commu-
nity (even at the risk of
swift Kingstonian police
justice) is the ultimate
testament to Adams abil-
ity to support the bands,
friends, and music that
he loved. This is a quality
that I could only strive to
embody as well as Adam.
I spoke a couple of
weeks ago about how to
book shows and bring
bands to the area. When
we were in an era where
venues were few and far
between, Adam didnt let
that hold him back and let
us pack kids and bands
into his garage. These
shows cemented Adams
love and support for punk
and hardcore and contin-
ued to show his support
by helping out any way
he could by touring, put-
ting up bands, and simply
attending shows through-
out the years.
Its hard to sit here and
write about new shows
or new records without
acknowledging this huge
loss, but the best advice
that we were given before
we embarked on our cur-
rent tour with Title Fight
was to live like Adam, and
now the only way I can
approach this article this
week is with that advice.
Last time I wrote, I
rattled off so many shows
and events, so I will give
you a quick refresher:
Wednesday, Sept. 18
at the West Side Park
in Nanticoke, there is a
show with Wisdom in
Chains, Take Offense,
Fire and Ice, Malfunction,
and Alive and Well start-
ing at 6:30 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 28, also at West Side
Park, Disengage, Intent,
Demolition, Zoom, and
Stand Clear will be play-
ing.
I feel fortunate to be
able to share not only
upcoming shows with
you, but also my views
and thoughts, and there
will never be any way to
put into words how much
we will all truly miss
Adam, but the least we
can do is to continue to
have shows and have fun
just like Adam did.
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Remembering AdamSlamas
Fantasy football fan? Look no further
For those of you who
passed on a career in the
NFL due to a fear of helmet
hair or, you know, a concus-
sion, theres always the next
best thing: fantasy leagues.
Theyre a staple in every
sport, allowing the average
guy (or girl) to manage a
team to the best it can be,
whether the manager is
in the whole thing for the
money or simply ofce brag-
ging rights.
I currently manage teams
in a 14-team league and a
10-team ofce league; Ive
been stumbling and fum-
bling through the world of
fantasy football for the past
nine years. Each week, Ill
bring you some waiver wire
advice (who to grab and who
to pass up), the upcoming
weeks ranking by position,
and this weeks top sleeper
candidate.
Week 3
Top Adds:
James Starks: When
was the last time a Green
Bay RB had a 100-yard
game? October 2010. There
have been 44 regular season
games since the Pack had a
100-yard rusher. Theres no
telling when Eddie Lacy will
return to the Packers back-
eld, but in the meantime
Starks has earned at least
a time share (and possibly
goal line carries) moving
forward. He lacks the burst
and lateral movement that
Lacy brings to the table, but
hes a power runner who has
a knack for nding holes and
hitting them hard. Temper
your expectations and
Starks could be a solid ex/
RB2 if Lacy misses consider-
able time.
DeAndre Hopkins:
Overlooked in many drafts,
Hopkins ofcially had a
coming-out party this past
Sunday. He is only owned
in 49 percent of Yahoo!
Leagues and that number
is getting higher each pass-
ing day. Most defenses will
focus attention on Houstons
Andre Johnson, leaving
Hopkins in single coverage
most afternoons. Johnson
left this weeks game early
due to a concussion, and
that could mean even more
targets for Hopkins mov-
ing forward. Regardless of
Johnsons status, Hopkins
is a must-own in all 10-team
leagues moving forward.
Bernard Pierce: Its no
secret that Ray Rice has
been banged up over the
past few seasons. He left
Sundays game with a hip
exor injury and there is
currently no timetable for
his return. Pierce lacks the
game-breaking speed and
shiftiness of Rice, but he is
a downhill runner who has
no problem going through
defenders rather than
around them. Many people
believed Pierce would vul-
ture goal line carries from
Rice this season and with
Rices current hip situation,
Pierce may be looking at tak-
ing over even more.
Fred Jackson: Everyone
who drafted C.J. Spiller real-
ized their nightmare this
past week. All preseason the
word out of Buffalo was that
Spiller would carry the ball
until he puked. Spiller is
one of the most talented run-
ners in the league and the
thought of him carrying the
ball 30 times a game upped
his draft stock tremendously.
The only issue for Spiller
owners is that this plan has
yet to come to fruition. Week
1 saw Fred Jackson total up
17 touches followed by 16
more touches in Week 2.
Spiller is a more dynamic
player with a tremendous
amount of upside, but as
long as Jackson is seeing this
many carries he is worth an
add in your league.
Better off without:
Eddie Royal: Royals
fantasy stock went through
the roof after his huge per-
formance against the Eagles
on Sunday. He tallied up
ve touchdowns over his
rst two games this season.
Admittedly, those numbers
are jaw-dropping. Hes on
pace for 80 touchdowns.
Please take a moment and
let that sink in. The natural
laws of regression will take
over, and most likely soon.
Keep in mind that Royal
has scored a total of ve
touchdowns over the past
four seasons. If your team
is WR starved he might be
worth a yer, but I suggest
you realize that Royal could
very well be this years Kevin
Ogletree.
Charles Clay: There
arent many players in the
league similar to Clay. The
Dolphins coaching staff
still hasnt gured out if
hes a tight end or a fullback
(eligible as a TE in Yahoo!
leagues and eligible to play
RB in ESPN leagues). Clay
had his rst ever rushing
attempt on Sunday and it
resulted in a touchdown.
I wouldnt suggest fantasy
owners getting too excited
about this just yet. Miamis
backeld is already crowded
with both Lamar Miller and
Daniel Thomas, while Clay
gures to be the number
four option in sophomore
QB Ryan Tannehills passing
game, behind Mike Wallace,
Brian Hartline, and Daniel
Gibson. Id ag Clay as a
possible player to watch, but
until we have a more dened
role for him over the next
few weeks he isnt worth a
roster spot.
Montee Ball: I know
this years second round pick
from Wisconsin was heavily
touted across draft boards
this year but its been made
very clear that Knowshon
Moreno is the number one
back in Denver this year.
Ball is averaging 2.0 yards
per carry and had ball
security issues against the
Giants this week. Moreno
has shined early and has had
no problem picking up blitz-
es and protecting Peyton
Manning when need be.
Unless Moreno gets hit by a
bus, Ball looks to be stuck on
the sidelines for the foresee-
able future.
Terrelle Pryor:
Everyone loves a running
quarterback. Everyone. The
read-option has become
a trendy offense amongst
NFL offensive coordinators
and a quarterback with a
good set of wheels is every
See FANTASY
FOOTBALL |38
Your guide to FantasY FootbaLL
Ted Black | Special to the Weekender
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All Shows start @ 10 pm Doors @ 8pm
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STREET, PLAINS PA.
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Weekender13
weekender
10.11.13
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SenunaS
Bar &
Grill
133 n. Main St., W-B - (Right across fromKings College)
Happy HouR SpeCialS
Voted Best College Bar in Weekender 2013 Readers Choice
Thursday
DJ OShea
Friday
No Cover
saTurday
DJ Hersh
No Cover
Happy HOur:
Mon-Wed 9-11
Thurs-Sat 10-12
Friday - 5-7 & 10-12
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Whether you know them better
as Terror onthe Screenor the mon-
iker theyve more recently adopted,
Youngat Heart, fact istheScranton-
based pop punkers are among the
most promising, polished acts in
NEPA. With that in mind, its been
more than a little distressing that,
in the last four years, the band has
hardly uttered a peep.
Its rst releasesince2009s This
Times for Real, the ve-track EP
Youngat Heart is a returntoform
that sees the ve-piece sizzling
with renewed energy. The name
change, then, represents something
of a rebirth if not of style, then of
intensity.
Its like the members of Young at
Heart had a lot of music bottled up
in their bodies in those four years
of silence, and it all comes gallop-
ing out of the speakers with a fresh
feeling of urgency. Fromthe aggres-
sive, brooding buzz of Haymaker
andMakeIt Count tothebruised,
confrontational nger-pointing
of A Little Too Late and The
Prowl to the dynamic, standout
melodrama of If Daryl Dies We
Riot, the bands sound is as pas-
sionate as its heartbroken lyrics.
With blood owing in the same
veinas poppunkgiants NewFound
Glory and Pennsylvanias own The
Wonder Years, Young at Heart isnt
doing anything that hasnt been
done before. But it is doing it about
as deftly as it can be done and with
a sincerity that is undeniable.
If this Heart can keep that
blood pumping, in time, one can
easily envision the band following
inthe footsteps of The Menzingers,
Tigers Jaws (R.I.P.), or Captain,
Were Sinking to become one of
NEPAs agship acts. With their
emotive lyricism and catchy-as-a-
cold hooks, the only thing holding
them back is themselves. Heres
hoping its not another four years
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Young at Heart
Young at Heart
Pop punk by any other name just as sweet
8. Katy Perry: Roar
7. Avicii: Wake Me Up
6. Robin Thicke/Pharrell
Williams/T.I.: Blurred Lines
5. Lady Gaga: Applause
4. Zedd/Foxes-ClarityMaroon 5:
Love Somebody
3. Capital Cities: Safe and Sound
2. Calvin Harris/Ellie Goulding: I
Need Your Love
1. Macklemore/Ryan Lewis/Mary
Lambert: Same Love
1. Arctic Monkey: AM
2. Avenged Sevenfold: Hail To The
King
3. Nine Inch Nails: Hesitation
Marks
4. 2 Chainz: B.O.A.T.S. II #Metime
5. Five Finger Death Punch: Wrong
Side Of Heaven &Righteous Side
Of Hell V.1
6. Keith Urban: Fuse
7. Robin Thicke: Blurred Lines
8. Luke BryanL: Crash My Party
9. Clash: Hits Back
10. Sheryl Crow: Feels Like Home
Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa Top 10 Albums at Gallery of Sound
Rating:
WWWV
Neko Case
The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Try
The Harder I Try, The More I Love You
Rating: WWWW
Bufet seems
like hes
Somewhere
else
Jimmy Bufett
Songs from St. Somewhere
Rating: WW
Neko Cases The Worse Things
Get, The Harder I Try, The Harder
I Try, The More I Love You brings
to mind Fiona Apples latest wind-
ing title often curtailed to The
Idler Wheel not just in name,
but in spirit. Both albums tread
between different styles, layering
complex instrumentation dashed
through with moments of grit,
brazen vulnerability, and stare-
you-square-in-the- eyes lyrics.
commentary. The problem, how-
ever, is Buffetts voice doesnt
sound nearly as engaged as his
imaginative songwriting and a
few turns with inspired guests.
The 66-year-old veteran
sounds bored on the island
songs, snapping off each word
with a clipped tone and a bland
sense of phrasing an about-
face from the performances that
made Buffett such an enjoyable
performer in the past.
He sounds livelier on a series
of ambitious songs about the
mysterious adventures of a
world traveler, but the tunes lack
the hooks that made Buffetts
famous songs of long ago so
memorable.
There are positive exceptions,
especially when guests Mark
Knoper (on Oldest Surfer on
the Beach) and Latin singer
Fanny Lu (on a Spanish ver-
sion of I Want to Go Back to
Cartagena) stir up the proceed-
ings.
Best of all is a duet with coun-
try star Toby Keith. Too Drunk
to Karaoke bobs along with
common-man humor and vivid
writing and performing. Its the
one song from the new album
sure to become a favorite dur-
ing Buffetts ever-popular live
shows.
-Michael McCall, Associated
Press
In Man, a steady jolt of electric gui-
tar zaps through the driving melody
while Cases bold lyrics play with gen-
der roles: And if Im dipshit drunk on
the pink perfume / I am the man in the
fking moon / Cause you didnt know
what a man was / Until I showed you.
Calling Cards, a love song with on-
the-road realism, whispers of an earlier
Case ballad, Knock Loud, off 2001s
Canadian Amp. Spurts of baritone sax
and flute mix with the whining of pedal
steel in Bracing for Sunday.
Where Did I Leave That Fire dips
into the ephemeral with a minute of tone-
setting sonar samples before exploring
the vast within the mundane through
Cases dynamic vocals and a tempest of
instrumentation, including vibes, thun-
dering drums, banjo, and electric gui-
tar that winds like an eel pulsing a trail
of feedback. She also collaborated with
some of her fellow New Pornographers,
along with M. Ward and several members
of My Morning Jacket.
The Worse Things Get isnt Cases
mainstream breakout album. Shes been
releasing solo albums for over a decade,
mostly through her latest LPs label
ANTI-Records. The Worse Things Get
wows like a rough- cut gem mined by a
pro and pried from the matrix of a four-
year hiatus after her Grammy-nominated
Middle Cyclone. Dont be surprised if
this album gets a few Grammy nods, too.
-Kait Burrier, Weekender
Correspondent
The More we love
Neko Case
On Jimmy Buffetts rst album in four
years, the mayor of Margaritaville returns
to mixing softly swaying beach tunes with
pirate tales of foreign intrigue and social
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570-826-6931
or 570-970-9090
565 S. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702
Serving WiIkes-8arre & Surrounding Areas
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friDay starting at 9:30
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Friday, September 20th:
The Sperazza Band
Tuesday, September 24th:
The blend
Friday, September 20th:
John Lukas
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Aremarkable pairing of performances
The show, a coupling of
performance arts one would
rarely think to put together, is
so astounding that the people
in it can still hardly believe it
happens and that they are, in
fact, a part of it.
Its ridiculous, said
Christopher Walls, a man
who has studied music since
the age of 12 and has found
himself putting his talents
and musical passion to good
use as music director of
Cirque Musica, an over-the-
top spectacle that will take
over the Mohegan Sun Arena
at Casey Plaza Sept. 22.
Its a mash-up between
a circus and a symphony
orchestra; thats the best way
I can describe it, Walls said
with a laugh. Its two things
you never thought would be
put together, put together. Its
a remarkable pairing.
The show features the
clown of clowns David
Larible, who has headlined
circus in arenas and the-
aters across Europe and is
making his return to the
United States where he pre-
viously was the headliner for
Ringling Bros. and Barnum
& Bailey. The show will also
feature the world famous
Wallenda Highwire Duo, the
thrilling Espaa Family, and
a cast of world-renowned per-
formers.
Cirque Musica is produced
by Stephen Cook and TCG
Productions out of Dallas,
Texas.
Walls was asked to preview
the stage version of the show
in November, and he said it
has been a roller coaster ride
ever since. The show was
put together in an arena for
the rst time in June of this
year.
Its blowneveryone away,
he said. The audiences love
it, the circus performers love
it, the musicians love it we
all love it.
While the visuals are cer-
tainly stunning, its the large
span of musical genres that
back the show up that keep
it interesting, and accessible,
to all.
One of beautiful things
is that we have music that
appeals to everyone: Led
Zeppelins Kashmir to
[David Guetta and Sias]
Titanium are arranged
right now, Walls said.
Theres Beatles stuff in the
show, Beethovens Fifth,
Tchaikovskys violin concer-
to. Actually, a violinist plays
that frommemory beautifully
and actually performs an act
while shes doing it. Its ridic-
ulous.
While it may be easy to
see how kids coming to
enjoy the show could latch
on to the newer music pieces,
some may be left to wonder
how such classical pieces are
accessible to young ones,
or those who simply have
no interest in that genre of
music.
I grew up with Tom and
Jerry, Bugs Bunny, all of that
music, and none of it was
written for Tom and Jerry
or Bugs Bunny, Walls said.
Thats all classical, and were
making that music accessible
the same way those people
did.
A local orchestra is invited
to play at every show. The
Northeast Pennsylvania
Philharmonic will be a part of
the arena show.
We built it in a way where
its not very difcult for the
local orchestra, hesaid. The
hardest part is meeting a new
symphony in every town. In
every venue, we meet a new
orchestra that has to learn
the show quickly. Most musi-
cians are very much alike and
have the music worked out
before I showup.
Though there are some
hang-ups when it comes to
dealing with new musicians
at every arena.
Getting themto pay atten-
tion! Walls said with a laugh.
Its easy for me because my
back is to the audience and
to the acts; Im the only one
that doesnt get to see the
show. But then you have a
ute player up there that, like
the audience, has never seen
the show, so shes trying to
watch the performance, her
music, and me at same time.
Its almost like the local musi-
cians are performing their
own circus acts.
W
Courtesy photo
Sara Pokorny
Weekender stafWriter
Cirque musica: sept. 22,
7 p.m., mohegan sun
arena at Casey plaza
(255 Highland park
blvd., Wilkes-barre).
$25, $32.50, $49.50,
$65.
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ALICE C. WILTSIE PERFORMING
ARTS CENTER
(700n. Wyoming st., Hazleton)
570.861.0510, wiltsiecenter.org
Big BadVoodoo Daddy: Oct. 18,
8p.m.
THE COOPERAGE PROJECT
(1030Main St., Honesdale)
570.253.2020,
thecooperageproject.org
Claudia Nygaard: Sept. 21, 8p.m.,
$15-$18.
Mudras: Sept. 27, 7:30p.m.
(Donations accepted and
appreciated at the door at all
events.)
F.M. KIRBYCENTER
(71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre)
570.826.1100, kirbycenter.org
Alice Cooper: Oct. 18, 8p.m. $39,
$49, $59, $75 (limited pit seating).
Ghost Hunters Live: Oct. 23, 7:30
p.m., $25-$60.
JefRoss: Oct. 25, 8p.m., $35-
$75.
Merle Haggard: Nov. 2, 8p.m.
$40-$99.
YAMATO: The Drummers of
Japan: Nov. 20, 7:30p.m. $25-$35.
Elvis Costello: Nov. 25, 7:30p.m.,
$59-$95.
Kenny Rogers: Nov. 29, 7:30p.m.,
$50-$75.
HAWLEYSILKMILL
(8Silk Mill Dr., Hawley.
570.588.8077, silkmillharmony.
com)
NewEngland Performer of the
Year: Sarah Blacker: Sept. 21,
7:30-9:30p.m. $16, advance; $20,
at the door.
Blues &FolkArtists: Rebecca
Pronsky: Sept. 28, 7:30-9:30p.m.
$16, advance; $20, door.
MAUCHCHUNKOPERAHOUSE
(14W. Broadway, JimThorpe)
570.325.0249,
mauchchunkoperahouse.com
Dancin Machine: Sept. 20, 8:30
p.m. $20.
Splintered Sunlight: Sept. 21, 8
p.m. $15.
JimmyThackery and the Drivers:
sept. 26, 8p.m., $20.
Bill Kirchen andTexicali: Sept. 27,
8:30p.m. $23.
Soft Parade: Sept. 28, 8p.m. $23.
Simon &Garfunkel
Retrospective: Oct. 4, 8:30p.m.,
$25.
Jefery Gaines Band: Oct. 5, 8
p.m., $23.
Swearingen &Kelli: Oct. 6, 6p.m.,
$15.
The Steepwater Band: Oct. 10,
8:30p.m., $15.
MEETINGOFTHE MINDSVI
Sept. 27-29, Meshoppen,
featuringTea Leaf Green, Orgone,
Cabinet, The Heavy Pets, Flux
Capacitor, more. $65, presale; $90,
day of show. Info: jibberjazz.com.
MOHEGANSUNARENA
(255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-
barre)
800.745.3000,
mohegansunarenapa.com
Cirque Musica: Sept. 22, 7 p.m.
$25-$65.
MOUNTAIRYCASINORESORT
(44Woodland Rd., Mount Pocono)
877.682.4791, mountairycasino.
com
Amy Schumer: Oct. 5, 8p.m.,
$35-$50.
The Stylistics: Oct. 19, 8p.m.,
$30-$45.
Ru Pauls Drag Race Show: Oct.
26, 8p.m., $15.
Aaron Lewis: Nov. 16, 8p.m.,
$45-$65.
Scott Weiland &TheWildabouts:
nov. 30, 8p.m., $45-$65.
JefRoss: Dec. 7, 8p.m., $35-$50.
PENNS PEAK
(325 Maury Rd., JimThorpe)
866.605.7325, pennspeak.com
JoshTurner: Sept. 26, 8p.m.
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band: Sept. 27,
8p.m.
Hinder &Candlebox with Devour
The Day and OpenAir Stereo: Sept.
29, 7 p.m.
The Swing Dolls: Tribute to
Andrews Sisters and McGuire
Sisters: Oct. 1-3, 1 p.m.
Chris Cagle: Oct. 4, 8p.m.
Melvin Seals &JGB: Oct. 10, 8
p.m.
King Henry and the Showmen:
Oct. 15-17, 1 p.m.
Back to the Eighties Showwith
Jessies Girl: Oct. 18, 9p.m.
Real Diamond: Neil Diamond
Tribute: Oct. 23-24, 1 p.m.; Oct. 25,
8p.m.
Gordon Lightfoot: Oct. 26, 8p.m.
America: Nov. 2, 8p.m.
Get the Led Out: Nov. 9, 8p.m.
38Special: Nov. 16, 8p.m.
Dark Star Orchestra: Nov. 27, 8
p.m.
RhondaVincent andThe Rage:
march 22, 8p.m.
RIVER STREETJAZZCAFE
(667 n. river st., Plains)
570.822.2992, riverstreetjazzcafe.
com5
Tribute to Prince (SpadysAll-Star
Band): Sept. 21, 10p.m. $10/$15.
Pigeons Play Ping Pong: Sept. 26,
10p.m. $5/$8.
WhamBamBowie Band, Tribute
to David Bowie: Sept. 28, 10p.m.
$8/$10.
Joe LouisWalker: Oct. 4, 9p.m.
$10/$15.
The Manhattan Project with
HorizonWireless: Oct. 5, 10p.m.
$8/$10.
Start Making Sense, Tribute to
Talking Heads: Oct. 18, 10p.m.
$10/$15.
Alexis P. Suter Band: Nov. 2, 9p.m
.$10/$15.
Dead on LiveEurope 72: Nov. 8,
10p.m. $8/$12.
Marco Bennevento: Nov. 15, 10
p.m. $15/$20.
Zach Deputy: Nov. 22, 10p.m.
$10/$15.
Brothers Past: Nov. 27, 10p.m.
$12/$15.
SCRANTONCULTURALCENTER
(420n. Washingtonave.,
scranton)
888.669.8966,
scrantonculturalcenter.org
Up &Coming Comdey Series:
sept. 28, 8p.m., $16.
SHERMANTHEATER
(524 Main St., Stroudsburg)
570.420.2808, shermantheater.
com
moe./Sister Sparrowand the
Dirty Birds: Sept. 29, 7 p.m., $28.
SOJA: Oct. 10, 8 p.m., $17.50-
$20.
Taking Back Sunday/Polar Bear
Club/Transit: Oct. 14, 8 p.m.,
$25-$28.
Conspirator: Oct. 19, 9 p.m.,
$17-$20.
Umphreys McGee/The London
Soul: Oct. 24, 8 p.m., $25-$30.
The Misfts/The Attack/Take
Away The Ugly/The Big Empty/
Badtown Rude/The Curse of
Sorrow: Oct. 25, 7 p.m., $16-$18.
InThis Moment/Motionless In
White/Kyng/All Hail The Yeti: Nov.
8, 7 p.m., $20-$22.
Jake Miller: Nov. 19, 8 p.m.,
$20-$22.
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
(3421 WillowSt., Philadelphia)
215.LOVE.222, electricfactory.info
City and Colour: Sept. 18, 8 p.m.
Michael Franti and Spearhead:
Sept. 21, 8:30 p.m.
Neko Case: Sept. 25, 8:30 p.m.
Korn: Sept. 26, 8:30 p.m.
Local Natives/Wild Nothing:
Sept. 28, 8:30 p.m.
The Waterboys/Freddie
Stevenson: Sept. 29, 8:30 p.m.
Zeds Dead/Paper Diamond/
Green Lantern/Branchez: Oct. 3,
8:30 p.m.
Moe./Sister Sparrow* The Dirty
Birds: Oct. 4, 8:30 p.m.
Digitour: Oct. 5, 8:30 p.m.
The Naked and Famous/The
Colourist: Oct. 8, 8 p.m.
Sara Bareilles: Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m.
Timefies/Chiddy Bang: Oct. 11,
8:30 p.m.
Janelle Monae: Oct. 13, 8 p.m.
Mayday Parade/Man
Overboard/Cartel/Stages &
Stereos: Oct. 18, 7 p.m.
Rusko: Oct. 19, 8:30 p.m.
Austin Mahone/Becky G/
Midnight Red/W3The Future: Oct.
25, 7:30 p.m.
Minus the Bear/INVSN/Slow
Bird: Oct. 26, 8:30 p.m.
Frightened Rabbit/Augustines:
Oct. 27, 8 p.m.
We Came As Romans/
Silverstein/Chunk! No, Captain
Chunk!/The Color Morale/
Dangerkids: Oct. 30, 7 p.m.
Infected Mushroom/Zomboy:
Oct. 31, 8:30 p.m.
Fitz and the Tantrums/Captial
Cities/Beat Club: Nov. 1, 8:30 p.m.
Matt Nathanson/Joshua Radin:
nov. 2, 8 p.m.
Sleeping with Sirens/Memphis
May Fire/Breathe Carolina/
Issues: Nov. 4, 7 p.m.
Alkaline Trio/Newfound Glory:
nov. 13, 8 p.m.
Hoodie Allen/OCD: Moosh &
Twist/Mod Sun/D-Why: Nov. 23,
8:30 p.m.
Lamb of God &Killswitch
Engage/Testament/Huntress:
nov. 24, 7 p.m.
Frank Turner &The Sleeping
Souls/The Smith Street Band/
Koo Koo Kanga Roo: Nov. 29, 8
p.m.
Running of the Santas Mega
Festival: Dec. 7, noon.
Dark Star Orchestra: Dec. 29,
8:30 p.m.
THE FILLMORE ATTHE TLA
(334 South St., Philadelphia)
215.922.1011, tlaphilly.com
Stereophonics: Sept. 19, 8 p.m.
Icona Pop: Sept. 22, 8 p.m.
KESWICKTHEATRE
(291 North Keswick Ave.,
Glenside)
215.572.7650, keswicktheatre.com
Steve Hackett: Genesis
Revisited: Oct. 11-12, 8 p.m.
The Piano Guys: Oct. 18, 8 p.m.
The Fab Faux: Oct. 19, 8 p.m.
StevenWright: Nov. 3, 8 p.m.
NORTH STAR BAR
27th &Poplar St., Philadelphia
215.684.0808
Oct. 2: Calabrese
Oct. 3: The Toasters/Voodoo
GlowSkulls
Oct. 5: Mephiskapheles/
Inspector 7, Post SunTimes
TROCADEROTHEATRE
(1003Arch St., Philadelphia)
215.336.2000, thetroc.com
FLAG/TSOL/Cerebral Ballzy:
sept. 18, 8 p.m.
The Selector: Sept. 19, 8 p.m.
The Chariot: Oct. 17, 6:30 p.m.
StephenRaggaMarley: Oct.
25, 7 p.m.
Less ThanJake/Anti-Flag/
Masked Intruder/Get Dead: Nov.
8, 7:30 p.m.
SUSQUEHANNABANK CENTER
(1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, N.J.)
609.365.1300, livenation.com/
venues/14115
Thirty Seconds to Mars: Sept.
29, 7:30 p.m.
The Weekend: Oct. 4, 8 p.m.
Pretty Lights: Nov. 1, 8 p.m.
Paramore: Nov. 8, 7 p.m.
Slayer: Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m.
WELLS FARGO CENTER
(3601 South Broad St.,
Philadelphia)
215.336.3600,
wellsfargocenterphilly.com
Michael Buble: Sept. 21, 8 p.m.
Selena Gomez: Oct. 18, 8 p.m.
Drake: Oct. 19, 7 p.m.
Pearl Jam: Oct. 21, 7:30 p.m.
Josh Groban: Nov. 3, 7:30 p.m.
JustinTimberlake: Nov. 10, 8
p.m.
P!nk: Dec. 6, 8 p.m.
Rod Stewart: Dec. 11, 8 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
BRYCE JORDAN CENTER
(127 University Dr., State College)
814.865.5500, bjc.psu.edu
OneRepublic: Oct. 3
B.B. King: Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m.
nine inch nails: Oct. 19, 8 p.m.
Macklemore &Ryan Lewis: Nov.
7, 7:30 p.m.
CROCODILE ROCK
(520West Hamilton st, allentown)
610.434.460, crocodilerockcafe.
com
Great White: Sep. 18, 7 p.m.
Hollywood Ending: Sept. 20,
5:30 p.m.
ASkylit Drive: Oct. 4, 5 p.m.
Teddy Geiger: Oct. 16, 5:30 p.m.
The WordAlive: Nov. 16, 5 p.m.
GIANT CENTER
(950 Hersheypark Dr., Hershey)
717.534.3911, giantcenter.com
Selena Gomez: Oct. 22, 7 p.m.
The Fresh Beat Band: Dec. 4, 7
p.m.
SANDS BETHLEHEMEVENT
CENTER
(77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem)
610.2977414, sandseventcenter.
com
Sarah Brightman: Sept. 22, 8
p.m.
Steely Dan: Sep. 27, 7 p.m.
Celtic Thunder: Oct. 9, 8 p.m.
Diana Krall: Oct. 10, 8 p.m.
ADay To Remember/Pierce the
Veil/All Time Low: Oct. 12, 6:45
p.m.
Barenaked Ladies: Oct. 18, 8
p.m.
WHITAKER CENTER
(222 Market St., Harrisburg)
717.214.ARTS, whitakercenter.org
Ana Popovic: Sept. 19, 8 p.m.
Bo Bice: Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m.
NEWYORK / NEWJERSEY
BEACONTHEATRE
(2124 Broadway, NewYork, N.Y.)
212.465.6500, beacontheatre.
com
Tedeschi Trucks Band: Sept.
20-21, TIMESVARY
Joe Satriani: Sept. 26, 8 p.m.
An Evening with IanAnderson:
Oct. 11, 8 p.m.
The Fab Faux: Oct. 26, 8 p.m.
Zappa Plays Zappa: Oct. 31, 8
p.m.
IRVING PLAZA
(17 Irving Place, NewYork, N.Y.)
212.777.6800, irvingplaza.com
Hinder and Candlebox: Sept. 26,
7 p.m.
Streetlight Manifesto: Oct. 1, 7
p.m.
Marky Ramones Blitzkrieg w/
AndrewW.K. on vocals: Oct. 3, 7
p.m.
3oh!3/The Summer Set: Oct.
21, 6 p.m.
IZOD CENTER
(50 State Rt. 120, East Rutherford,
N.J.)
201.935.3900, meadowlands.com
JustinTimberlake: Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN
(7thAve., NewYork, N.Y.)
212.465.6741, thegarden.com
Ed Sheeran: Oct. 29, 8 p.m. Nov.
1, 8 p.m.
Paramore: Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.
Rod Stewart: Dec. 9, 8 p.m.
RADIO CITYMUSIC HALL
(1260 6thAve., NewYork, N.Y.)
212.247.4777, radiocity.com
Sarah Brightman: Sep. 21, 8 p.m.
Neko Case: Sept. 26, 8 p.m.
Sara Bareilles: Oct. 9, 8 p.m.
Rodriguez: Oct. 10, 8 p.m.
Tony Bennett: Oct. 11, 8 p.m.
ROSELAND BALLROOM
(239 52nd Street, NewYork, N.Y.)
212.247.0200, roselandballroom.
com
Korn/AskingAlexandria/Love &
Death: Sept. 27, 8 p.m.
Blondie: Oct. 4, 8 p.m.
The Band Perry: Oct. 16, 8 p.m.
BORGATAHOTEL CASINO &
SPA
(1 Borgata Way, Atlantic City, N.J.)
609.317.1000, theborgata.com
Jerry Lewis: Sept. 20, 8 p.m.
Expanded listings at
theweekender.com.
W
Shake your groove thing with Dancin Machine, who will play at the Mauch Chunk Opera House (14
W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe) on Sept. 20 at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. For more info or tickets call
570.325.0249 or visit mauchchunkoperahouse.com.
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,
SAME SEX, DIFFERENT CITY
Melissa Hughes | Weekender Correspondent
Dont live like
the undead
The zombie phenome-
non has overtaken todays
society. Whether its The
Walking Dead on AMC,
any George Romero movie
fest, zombie pub crawls,
zombie parties, or zombie
hunters, we as a society
have become obsessed
with the undead subcul-
ture.
Imagine for a moment
that it was a possibility.
Not so much that you were
buried and came back a
gruesome, brain-craving
man-eater, but that you
went through life without
living.
I see it all the time: girls
not dancing to the music,
not singing cheesy kara-
oke songs, and not having
fun. They are out to be
the cool crew that sits
at tables and makes fun
of other girls. They laugh
at the ones with the guts
to go dance. What they
dont realize, and I per-
sonally didnt learn until
my later 20s, is that you
remember the nights you
danced. You laugh the
next day, and sometimes
years later, at the songs
you sang out of tune
with 10 other friends on
stage. You make the most
memories when you allow
yourself to live. Sitting at
a table being a mean girl
all night sounds about as
fun as getting ngered on
wing night.
I catch myself person-
ally saying remember
that time we so often,
none of those stories are
followed up by sat at
a table and made fun of
the girl wearing shoes
she couldnt walk in, sing-
ing songs with notes she
couldnt hit, or throwing
darts so bad she missed
the board completely.
Maybe its because I am
that girl. I laugh at the
fact that the last time I
played pool, the cue ball
ew across the room
while the balls on the
table remained in their
pretty triangular forma-
tion. That same night, I
danced at a dive bar with
an old man who smelled
like moth balls. I lived and
I live to laugh at myself.
So this one is dedicat-
ed to you, the girls who
dance like Elaine from
Seinfeld, the girls who
sing the Spice Girls, the
girls who laugh at them-
selves and unapologeti-
cally play New Kids on
the Block on the jukebox
and the girls who stuff
their faces with Taco Bell
at 1 a.m. while they speed
down Wyoming Avenue.
Life is much too short
to spend it undead.
Zombie movies are great,
but living life with a pulse
and a purpose is the stuff
that makes the ride worth-
while.
W
Mon-Sat 12-8 p.m. 570-501-9639
10% off services for those traveling from the WB/Scranton area
www.customtat2.com /customtat2
168 Susquehanna Blvd
West Hazleton, PA 18202
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Baklava, Falafel, Gyros,
Tabouli and Kibbi
35 E. South St. Wilkes-Barre
(570) 820-7172
Open Mon. - Fri. 10 am- 6pm
131 Main St. Luzerne 288.2987
GET CANNED
TUESDAY
$1
PBR
Cans
Aaron
Bruch
Live Acoustic
WED
KARAOKE
w/ DJ
Bounce
THUR
TACO
NIGHT
$1.50
TACOS
$1.50
STEG
PUMPKIN
10-12
KITCHEN
OPEN TIL
1AM
Sun - open @12
Mon- open @7
DJ Big Rigg-NO COVER FRI-.
NFL TICKET
RICCIS PIZZA &BEER
155 Park Avenue, W-B 825-3652
View our menu at:
www.menusNEPA.com
ALL M AJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED.ATM M ACHINE AVAILABLE
M O N D AY & W ED N ES D AY
15 Cu tsOf Sicilian $14.99
LargeRou nd 1 Topping $7.99
TUES D AY & THURS D AY
LargeRou nd 1 Topping $7.99
CHO O S E YO UR S P ECIAL FO R
FRID AY, S ATURD AY & S UN D AY
LargeRou nd A nd 10 Cu tsSicilian $18.49
Bu yOneLargeRou nd A tRe g . P ric e
Get2nd LargeRou nd For $6 .00
* M ention special wh en ordering
CO O RS 12 p k . c a n s $9.99 W O W !!
FRI, S AT, S UN P AG ACH AV AILABLE
M O N D AY & W ED N ES D AY
15 Cu tsOf Sicilian $14.99
LargeRou nd 1 Topping $7.99
TUES D AY & THURS D AY
LargeRou nd 1 Topping $7.99
CHO O S E YO UR S P ECIAL FO R
FRID AY, S ATURD AY & S UN D AY
NFL SUNDAY TICKET
Every Game - Every Sunday
September 15th
1:00pm
Panthers vs. Bills
Browns vs. Ravens
Vikings vs. Bears
Cowboys vs. Chiefs
Redskins vs. Packers
Titans vs. Texans
Dolphins vs. Colts
Chargers vs. Eagles
4:05pm
Lions vs. Cardinals
Saints vs. Buccaneers
4:25pm
Broncos vs. Giants
Jaguars vs. Raiders
8:30pm
49ers vs. Seahawks
La Cantina
at
$
2
Domestic
Drafts
Kings Deck
49 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountaintop 570-474-5464
Sun. Sept. 15
Pair of Nuts (on deck)
Wed. Sept. 18 (on deck)
Revolution 3 Beatles Tribute
and Classic Rock
Sat. Sept. 21 (La Cantina)
Tyme Band
Sat. Sept. 18 (on deck)
Revolution 3 Beatles Tribute
and Classic Rock
Wed. Sept. 18th
Revolution 3
Beatles Tribute and Classic Rock
Thurs. Sept. 19th
Strawberry Jam Duo
Sept. 28
Sunday,
September 22
Watch
All
The
Games
Here!
Live Music
8-11pm
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Holding the microphone,
he stares into the small
blue screen as he prepares
himself for those scrolling
white words. He is ready
to sing love to the audience
and make them swoon in
less than three minutes.
This is author, editor
and music journalist, Rob
Shefeld, back in action
with his latest work, Turn
Around Bright Eyes:
The Rituals of Love and
Karaoke.
Shefeld, who has
authored two previous
memoirs, Love is a Mix
Tape and Talking to Girls
About Duran Duran, is
perhaps one of the best
contemporary music mem-
oirists.
After decades of thrill-
ing readers with his pop
culture expertise, Shefeld
begins his new venture
with a love story, appropri-
ately titled, Total Eclipse
of the Heart:
Tonight we are setting
out to belt some of our
favorite songs. Well do
songs weve never tried
before. Well take on duets
we havent sung together.
And well do the standards
we always have to do. But
when you take that karaoke
microphone in your hand,
you dont know what kind
of adventure youre step-
ping into. So you just have
to surrender and let the
song take over. [] If youre
lucky, and the beer doesnt
run out, its more than just
a night of debauchery. Its a
spiritual quest.
The following chapters
share a commonality all
of them titled after a popu-
lar karaoke song. As each
chapter unfolds, readers
follow Shefeld down kara-
oke lane, beginning with
such artists as Bonnie Tyler
and Merle Haggard, only to
conclude with David Bowie
and Nirvana. While weav-
ing his personal experienc-
es throughout, Shefelds
vast knowledge as a music
journalist adds further lay-
ers to the work.
Similar to his earlier
memoirs, Shefelds writ-
ing style remains constant
conversational, witty
and upfront. In addition,
the book is heaving with
sentiment, humor and
cheer. Even after the loss
of his rst wife, Shefeld
emphasizes that happiness
is all around us, even at a
karaoke bar. In fact, it was
music that led Shefeld to
believe in love again, dem-
onstrating that music has
the power to bring people
together.
Interestingly enough,
Turn Around Bright Eyes
opens with an epigraph
from Sonic Youths song,
Erics Trip: We make up
what we cant hear. Then
we sing all night. Without
a doubt, Shefeld keeps
singing as each chapter
speeds forward in succinct
order. The last chapter
comes all too soon but,
luckily, we can read it again
knowing that Shefeld is
still out there, mic in hand,
conquering love in the time
of karaoke.
W
Love in the time of Karaoke
Book reviews and literary insight
Kacy Muir | Weekender Correspondent
Turn Around Bright Eyes: The Rituals of Love and Karaoke
By Rob Shefeld
Rating: WWWWW
POETIC
Forty Fort Meeting House
(across fromthe Forty Fort borough
building on river st. Forty Fort)
Lecture series
EarlyTravelers, Traders, &Residents
of WyomingValleywith Clark switzer:
sept. 15, 3:30p.m.
WyomingValleys First Jews: The
german Connectionwith dr. sheldon
spear: sept. 22, 3:30p.m.
Vesper Service with Rabbi Kaplan of
temple Israel: sept. 29, 5 p.m.
Friends of the Scranton Public
Library
(520Vine st., scranton, 570.348.3000)
Used Book Sale at Library Express in
the mall at steamtown: sept. 17-22.
Kings College
(133 north river st., Wilkes-barre,
570.208.5957 or kings.edu)
Campion Literary SocietyWriting
Workshops: sept. 17, 4p.m., sheehy-
Farmer Campus Center.
Campion Literary Society Open
readings: sept. 27, 4p.m., gold room,
administration building.
Gold Room, Administration
Building; Oct. 30, 7 p.m., Gold Room,
administration building.
Campion Literary SocietyWriting
Workshops: Oct. 17, 4p.m., Sheehy-
Farmer Campus Center.
Reading byAmy Bloom: Oct. 22, 7:30
p.m., burkeauditorium.
The Osterhout Free Library
(71 s. Franklin st., Wilkes-barre, www.
osterhout.info, 570.821.1959)
Socrates Caf Discussion Group: Sept.
12, 6:30-8p.m.
Knit &Crochet Group: Sept. 14, 28,
10:30a.m.-noon.
Franklin St. Sleuths Book Discussion:
Sept. 19, 6:30p.m.Murder in Little Italy,
byVictoriaThompson.
Personal Power Brown Bag Lunch:
sept. 23, 12:15-1 p.m.
Personal Power Evening Program:
sept. 23, 6-7:30p.m.
Fall Gala: Oct. 4, 6-11 p.m.,
Westmoreland Club (59S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-barre).
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 broad st., 570.654.9565,
pitmemlib@comcast.net)
Taste of Greater Pittston: Sept. 8, 2-5
p.m. $30.
Library expansion committee meeting:
sept. 11, 6:30p.m.
TeenAdvisory Group (TAG) meeting:
sept. 12, noon.
The Greater Pittston CharityTrain Ride:
Sept. 15, 9a.m., toJimThorpe. $65.
Lego Club meeting: Sept. 16, 4p.m.
Craft Club meeting: Sept. 16, 6p.m.
Snacks and Stories storytime for kids
of all ages: sept. 18, 4p.m.
Science Club meeting: Sept. 19, 4p.m.
Movie night: Sept. 26, 5:45 p.m.
Intro to Financial Aid and Scholarships
Workshop: sept. 26, 6p.m. Free for
parents and students presented by
nePaCareer and College Counseling
associates. no registration is required.
Scranton StorySlam:
Scranton StorySlam, Jessup: ATale of
Two Cities: Sept. 14, 7 p.m., St. Georges
Restaurant (304Church St., Jessup).
University of Scranton
Book signing with award-winning book
author Susan Campbell Bartoletti, Ph.D.:
sept. 7, 4-5 p.m., denaples Center.
West Pittston Library
(200Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org,
570.654.9847)
Book Club: First Tues., 6:45 p.m. Free.
Informal discussion of member-selected
books.
Weekly story time for children: Fri., 1
p.m. Free.
VISUAL
AFAGallery
(514Lackawannaave., scranton:
570.969.1040or artistsforart.org)
gallery hoursthurs.-sat., 12-5 p.m.
SeventyYears of Painting, Carol
Oldenburg and Earl Lehman: Sept. 5-28.
Gates to Infnity: Sept. 5-28.
Choose Freedom, drop-in meditation
classes: through sept. 19, 7-8:30p.m.
$10per class.
This ShowIs For The Birds: Oct. 4-29.
B &BArt Gallery
(222 Northern Blvd., S. Abington
township)
Third Friday Exhibit featuringTravis
Prince: Through September.
The Butternut Gallery &Second
Story Books
(204Church st, montrose, 570.278.4011,
butternutgallery.com). Gallery hours:
Wed.-sat., 11a.m.-5 p.m., sun., 12 p.m.-4
p.m.
Paintings, Potter, Life: Work of Bob
Smith &CaryJoseph:Through Sept. 8.
Third annual Fiber Arts exhibit: Sept.
11-Oct. 6. Opening reception Sept. 14,
3-5 p.m.
Center Street Caf and Gallery
(225 Center St. Bloomsburg.
570.204.7847)
gallery Hours: tuesday-thursday, 9a.m.-
4p.m.; Friday, 9a.m.-8p.m.; saturday,
10a.m.-2 p.m.)
Anthony Ferro /NewWorks 2013/
Oil Pastel on Paper: Oct. 1-26. Opening
reception Oct. 5, 3-6p.m.
Converge Gallery
(140W. Fourth st., Williamsport,
570.435.7080, convergegallery.com)
BeyondThe Surface: Sept. 5, Oct. 31.
Opening reception and artist talk by
Jason Bryant Sept. 5, 6-9p.m.
DietrichTheatre
(downtowntunkhannock,
570.996.1500)
Airing of the Quilts Civil War Era
Quilting: Oct. 1-Nov. 15.
Everhart Museum
(1901 Mulberry St., Scranton, PA,
570.346.7186, www.everhart-museum.
org)
Admission $5 adults; $3 students/
seniors; $2 children 6-12; members free.
Sidewalk Surfng: TheArt &Culture of
Skateboarding: Through Dec. 30.
Exhibit of Diane Grant Czajkowski,
Nature and Pet Portraits:
Sept. 12-25, Citizens Bank (Kingston
Corners, 196S. WyomingAve, Kingston).
Open during bank hours: Monday
throughthursday, 9a.m.-5 p.m.; Friday,
9a.m.- 6p.m.
HazletonArt League (225 e. broad st.,
Hazleton, hazletonartleague.org)
DylanFest: Seot. 22, 1 p.m.
Hope Horn Gallery (Hyland Hall,
University of Scranton, 570.941.4214)
gallery Hours: sun.-Fri., noon-4p.m.;
Wed., 6-8p.m.
Depths and Edges: Berenice
DVorzon: Sept. 6-Oct. 11.
Exhibit Lecture: Where Elements
meet: the Life andWork of berenice
DVorzonby Darlene Miller-Lanning,
Ph.d.: sept. 6.
the lamp post . chapter one
(47 north Franklin st., third foor, Wilkes-
barre.)
Creation Destruction Potential, a
collection of visual, theatrical, and
musical art &performance: Sept. 4, 8
p.m. $5.
The Linder Gallery at Keystone
College
(570.945.8335, keystone.edu/
lindergallery)
James Harmon: Planned Random
Occurrence: Sept. 21-Oct. 22. Opening
reception sept. 22, 4-6p.m. artist talk
sept. 23, 9:45 a.m., brookstheater.
Madelon Powers Gallery at East
Stroudsburg University
(gallery hours: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. tuesday
andWednesday, 11 a.m. to 4p.m.
monday, thursday and Friday)

Ciocca Prints/Yanashot Sculpture,


featuring works by Mark Ciocca and
DenisYanashot: Through Oct. 4. Opening
reception sept. 8, 1-3 p.m.
Marquis Art &Frame (122 s. main st.,
Wilkes-barre, 570.823.0518)
gallery hours mon.-sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Kindred Spirits: TheArt of Ellen
Jamiolkowski andJudith Lynn Keats:
Sept. 20-Nov. 2. Opening reception Sept.
20, 5-8p.m.
Misericordia University (301 Lake st.,
dallas, 570.674.6286)
Pauly Friedmanart gallery, tues.-thurs.,
10a.m.-8p.m.; Fri., 10a.m.-5p.m.; sat.-
sun., 1-5 p.m.
Capturing Realism2013: Through
Oct. 31.
Pauly FriedmanArt Gallery
(Misericordia University, 570.674.6250,
misericordia.edu/art)
gallery Hours: mon. closed, tue.-thurs.
10a.m.-8p.m., Fri. 10a.m.-5 p.m., sat.-
sun. 1-5 p.m.
Capturing Realism2013, a biennial
exhibit of works instructors, alumni
and apprentices fromthe nationally
renowned studios of theani art
academies and acclaimed modern
master AnthonyJ. Waichulis: Sept. 7-Oct.
31. Opening reception Sept. 7, 5-8p.m.
PoconoArts Council
(18N. Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
September artists show: Opening
reception sept. 7, 1-4p.m. runs through
sept. 30.
Sordoni Art Gallery
(150s. river st., Wilkes-barre,
570.408.4325)
gallery hours: tues.-sun., noon-4:30
p.m.
TheArt of Ballet: Through Oct. 20.
Opening reception Sept. 6, 5-7 p.m.
Schulman Gallery
(2nd foor of LCCCCampus Center, 1333
s. Prospect st., nanticoke, www.luzerne.
edu/schulmangallery, 570.740.0727)
gallery hours: mon.-Fri., 9a.m.-5 p.m.
Phone-tography, featuring art captured
by cell phone photos: Through Sept. 5.
Crayons and Care II, artwork by
children of the Litewska Hospital in
Warsaw, Poland: Sept. 13-Oct. 7.
Old Masters: Oct. 25-Nov. 28.
Annual Faculty/Alumni Exhibit: Dec.
6- Jan. 2
Something Special (23W. Walnut st.,
Kingston, 570.288.8386)
Open Mon.-Fri., 7:30a.m.-4p.m., Sat.,
7:30a.m.-2 p.m.
Quilt On, work by SabineThomas:
Runs through Oct. 4.
Verve VertuArt Studio
(Misericordia University, 570.674.6250,
misericordia.edu/art)
Exhibit: ThroughApril 2014.
Widmann Gallery
(Located in Kings Colleges Sheehy-
Farmer Campus Center between North
Franklin and north main streets, Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5900, ext. 5328)
gallery hours: mon. through Fri. 9a.m.
to 4:30p.m., sat. and sun. as arranged.
Free and open to the public.
Latinaexhibition, photographs by
Jose Galvez: Sept. 8-14. Public lecture
by Galvez Sept. 11, 7 p.m., Burke
auditorium.
Sept. 20- Oct. 25
The Eleventh Invitational Emerging
Artists Exhibition: Sept. 20-Oct. 25. Meet
theartist reception sept. 20, 6-8p.m.
The WyomingValley Art League
(47 n. Franklin st., Wilkes-barre, www.
wval.org, 570.288.1020)
3rd FridayArt Walk: Sept. 20, 5-8p.m.,
130s. Franklin st.
Expanded listings at theweekender.com.
W
Send your listings toWBWnews@civitasmedia.com, 90 E. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at
2 p.m. Print listings occur up until three weeks frompublication date.
BOOKS RELEASED
THE WEEK OF SEPT. 23:
Doctor Sleep by Stephen King
Killing Jesus: A History by Bill OReilly
Deadline by Sandra Brown
The Night is Forever by Heather Graham
The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri
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279 Bar & Grill: StingRay Blues
Bart and Urbys: Musicians Showcase @9:30p
Hops and Barleys: Karaoke w/ DJ Bounce
Kings, Mountain Top: Revolution 3
River Street Jazz Caf: Open Mic @ 9pm
Thursday:
279 Bar & Grill: NFL Free Jukebox
Avanti: Party on the Patio w/ The Weekender 8-10p
Bart and Urbys: Trivia Night
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: DJ Optimum @ 10
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Larry George
Chackos: Flaxy Morgan
Kings, Mountain Top: Strawberry Jam Duo
My Lower End: Tracey Dee/Cee
River Street Jazz Caf: Flux Capacitor
Senunas: DJ OShea
Woodlands: Kiss Theater Fundraiser @ 6pm - Club HD inside Evolution
Nightclub w/ DJ DATA. Streamside bandstand- DJ KEV - Hosted by 97 BHT
Friday:
279 Bar & Grill: Hat Tryk
Bart & Urbys: Front room-Sledgehammer of Silence on The Other side:
Dirtwind
Beaumont Inn Dallas: Matt Bennick Trio 8-11p
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Drop Dead Sexy @9:30
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: College Night w/ DJ Casey
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country Night Gone Wild
Grotto, Harveys Lake: The Sperazza Band
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: John Lukas
My Lower End: Free jukebox
River Street Jazz Caf: Subnotics Toots vs. Marley ft. members of Breaking
Benjamin, Collective, The Woody Browns Project, George Wesley Band.
Rox 52: DJ Big Rigg
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub 5 Day Happy Hour w/ DJ SlMJMMTop 40 &
Club Music w/ Host 98.5 KRZs Fishboy & Flaxy Morgan Streamside/Exec
Saturday:
279 Bar & Grill: Jon & Kate Plus Fate
Bart & Urbys: The Otherside The New Plush DJ Party
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Shorty Long @ 9:30
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Dave Matthews Tribute w/ Doug & Sean
Brews Brothers, Pittston: UFC 165
Kings, Mountain Top: Tyme Band
My Lower End: Stealing Neil
River Street Jazz Caf: Tribute To Princew/ Clarence Spady All Star Band
Senunas: DJ Hersh & Space Walk Pub Crawl
Woodlands: Evolution Nightclub - 98.5 KRZ Double Shot Weekend Your
Bachelorette Party Headquarters DJ Davey B & DJ Kev the Rev Playing Top 40
& Club Music w/ Host Fishboy from 98.5 KRZ &Xcluzive Soul -Streamside/
Exec
Sunday:
Beaumont Inn, Dallas: Big Daddy Dex 5-8p
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Rocking for Ronnie Williams Benefeit 4-2am ft.
4-4:45 Black Mountain Brews 5-5:45 Iron Cowboy 6-6:45 Russello Project
7-7:45 M80 8-8:45 Stealing Neil 9-9:45 40lb Head 10-10:45 Bad Hair
Day 11-11:45 Gone Crazy 12-12:45 Zamani 1-1:45 Open Jam
Kings, Mountain Top: NFL Ticket
My Lower End: Mick Wildoner
Monday:
279 Bar & Grill: Dustin Switzer &Aaron Bruch
My Lower End: Kamikaze Karaoke
Tuesday:
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Grotto, Harveys Lake: The Blend
Jim McCarthys: Wanna Bs Karaoke
Metro: Karaoke 8-12
My Lower End: Free Jukebox
TommyBoys: Open Mic
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A GREAT TRIP AT
A GREAT PRICE
TICKETS SENT
DIRECTLY TOYOU!
FROM BASEBALL
TO BROADWAY.
WINE & DINE
OCTOBER 19 AND OCTOBER 26 FOR $105
Join us while we travel to Seneca Lake NY and taste the fnest
wines! All trips include transportation to, from, and around the
wineries, lunch between wineries, and a sit down dinner afterwards.
BILLS VS STEELERS
NOTRE DAME VS PANTHERS
NOV 8-10, 2013 (2 NIGHT TRIP)
BILLS VS STEELERS NOV 9-10, 2013
DOLPHINS VS. STEELERS DEC 7-8, 2013
Overnight trip includes: Roundtrip transportation to Pittsburgh,
overnight stay at Hilton Green Tree, Double tailgate before and
after game, along with ferry ride.
OVERNIGHT WINE TRIP
OCTOBER 19-20, 2013 $225
Trip includes transportation to and from NY, Overnight stay at
the Ramada Geneva, transportation around wineries, and dinner
Sunday evening at the Belhurst Castle!
PENN STATE HOME GAMES
OCT 12TH - MICHIGAN
NOV 2ND - ILLINOIS
NOV 16TH - PURDUE
NOV 23RD - NEBRASKA
Games Starting @ $125 - Lower Level Seats
(certain games)
Bus & Tailgate available for any game
CLASSIC ROCK MUSIC FEST
DOUBLECROSS, THE FAB THREE & THE WANABEES
NOVEMBER 15, HILTON SCRANTON
THANKSGIVING EVE BRUCE BASH
THE BSTREETBAND
NOVEMBER 27, HILTON SCRANTON
(570)-344-2212 OR (570)-407-1225 JZTICKETS.COM
FACEBOOK.COM/JZTOURS @JZTOURS
JZ Tours
PRESENTS
DAY TRIP GAMES
10-21 MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL
v. Vikings starting at $189PP
11- 10 v. Raiders starting at $199PP
11- 17 v. Packers starting at $199PP
11-24 v. Cowboys starting at $229PP
10-20 v. Cowboys starting at $209PP
10-27 v. Giants starting at $199PP
10-13 v. Steelers starting at $169PP
DOUBLE TAILGATE + DJ
12-8 v. Raiders starting at $129PP
PSU VS UCF IRELAND TRIP
AUG 25-SEPT 1 2014
8 DAY TOUR W/AIR FARE ,
4 STAR HOTEL, MEALS
VISITS TO GUINNESS,
BLARNEY CASTLE
& CLIFFS OF MOTHER
CHECK WEBSITE FOR MORE INFO
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Dont joinThe Family
Rating: WW
Agoodmovieistrappedinside
The Family, French director
LucBessonscomedy-drama-con-
fused hyphenate. Occasionally,
theactorsbrieflyemergefromthe
layersofshtickandcamptoreveal
what weremissing. ThenRobert
De Niro beats a plumber with
a wrench and everyone is back
behindbars.
De Niros character, Giovanni
Manzoni, was a big shot in the
New York mob until he turned
rat. Now, Giovanni and his fam-
ily renamedthe Blakes move
throughFrance under the watch-
ful eyeof Stansfield(TommyLee
Jones), their Witness Protection
Programsupervisor.
Normandy is the latest fresh
start. The kids, 14-year-old
Warren(JohnDLeo)and17-year-
old Belle (a very non-paisana
Dianna Agron), head to school,
where they immediately wreak
their special brandof havoc. Wife
Maggie (Michelle Pfeiffer) cant
find her place, whether its at the
grocery store (which she torches
after the cashier insults her) or
church. Giovanni putters around
thehouse, discovers atypewriter,
and starts banging out his mem-
oirs.
Writingonlyoccupies someof
histime. Soon, Giovanniisresolv-
ing the ancient houses brown
water issuemob-style. Besson
also cant find his focus, so The
Family feels incomplete and,
worse, inattentive. Sometimes
its about adjusting to the sleepy
charms of small-town France.
Every once in a while, youre
led to believe its about living
life under constant surveillance,
which is great because Jones
laconic charm and De Niros
brusquecool battleitout.
And wont someone please
think of the children? Warren
makes allies through graft and
corruption; Belle, who is as
consistent as March weather,
takes time out from pummeling
handsy suitors to seduce (and
fall inlovewith)hermathtutor, a
creepyarrangementthatisplayed
straight. Bessons inability to cor-
ral these elements into anything
cohesively entertaining is stun-
ning; The Family is so frag-
mentedthat its script is probably
in Morse code. At least twice he
blowssurefirepunchlines, includ-
ingMaggiesvisit toconfessional.
We dont see the visit, but we
see the priests reaction which
occurssolongafterthesetupthat
thewholejokeisrenderedanticli-
mactic.
Besson has displayed a deft
touch with amoral characters
before, namely in 1994s The
Professional, where he turned
therelationshipbetweenahitman
andhisinfatuated12-year-oldpro-
tg into a heartbreaking tale of
en loco parentis. The Family
hasmomentslikethat: Jonesand
DeNirosannoyedbanter, Pfeiffer
waxing about olive oil with the
two suits who track her familys
every move. The acting carries
the movie, yet too often Besson
and Michael Caleos script does
the heavylifting, tryingtowinus
over with its ah-those-barbaric-
Americansshtick. Theylovepea-
nut butter and solve their prob-
lemswithviolenceandvulgarity!
Its a movie of short cuts,
includingBessons insistencethat
everyfamilymemberisthuggish,
which traps the movie in the
same mildly amusing joke. (Also
baffling: not takingfull advantage
of Jones crustiness.) At its best,
The Familys cast drapes its
well-wornperformancesoveryou
like a blanket on Sunday morn-
ing. But Bessonis insucha rush
toget tothe next punchline that
he doesnt realize that the actors
are actually saving the film from
hisownrudderlessapproach.
-To read more of Petes cin-
ematic musings, please visit
whatpeteswatching.blogspot.
comor followhimonTwitter, @
PeteCroatto.
W
The Family replays the same old mob jokes over and over again,
never amounting to much despite help from big names like Robert
De Niro and Tommy Lee Jones.
PETE CROATTO
Weekender Correspondent
OPENiNg
iNThEATERs
This wEEk:
Prisoners
Battle of the Year
Generation Iron
Thanks for Sharing
DVDs released Sept. 17:
World War Z
The Bling Ring
Augustine
Drift
The East
Actors Circleat ProvidencePlayhouse
(1256 Providence Rd, Scranton, reserva-
tions: 570.342.9707, actorscircle.org)
Ghost of a Chance: Sept. 19-22,
27-29, 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays,
2 p.m. Sundays. $12, general; $10, seniors;
$8, students. Sept. 19 tickets are $8, general
and seniors; 46, students.
Miracle on 34th Street: Sept. 22, 5:30
p.m.; Sept. 24, 7 p.m. Needed: children ages
8 through 11 and adults of all ages. Show
dates are Nov. 14-24.
The Corner Bistro Community
Theater
(76SMainSt, Carbondale. 570.282.7499)
Nunsense: Sept. 13-14, 8 p.m., Sept.
15, 2 p.m. $20; $2 off ticket price if use the
code word, Sr. Amnesia.
Jason Miller Playwrights Project
(570.591.1378, nepaplaywrights@live.
com)
Dramatists Support Group: Third
Thursday of each month, 7 p.m., The
Olde Brick Theatre (126 W. Market St.,
Scranton).
Kings College Theatre
(Admin. Bldg., 133 N. River St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5825)
Almost, Maine: Oct. 3-5, 7:30 p.m.;
Oct. 5-6, 2 p.m. $12; $5, students/senior
citizens.
KISS Theatre Company
The Jungle Book Kids: Sept. 20-21,
27-28, 7 p.m.; Sept. 21-22, 28-29, 2 p.m.
Children of Eden: Nov. 8-9, 15-16, 7
p.m.; Nov. 10, 17, 2 p.m.
Registrations upcoming workshops:
See www.kisstheatre.org for registration
forms.
My Son Pinocchio Jr.: Ages 8-16, starts
Sept. 23.
The Aristocats Kids: Ages 4-10, classes
begin Oct. 19.
the lamp post . chapter one
(47 North Franklin St - third oor -
Wilkes-Barre)
Creation Destruction Potential, a col-
lection of theatrical, visual, and musical art
& performance: Sept. 4, 8 p.m. $5.
Little Theatre of Wilkes-Barre
( 537 North Main StreetWilkes-Barre.
570.823.1875.)
Spamalot: Sept. 7-15, 8 p.m. Fridays
and Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays. $18.
The Moose Exchange
(203 W. Main St., Bloomsburg)
Lucy, Im Dead!: Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m.
$25 until Sept. 30, $30 after that date.
USO-style showto honor local veterans
at Veterans Day: Nov. 9. $35 until Sept. 30,
$40 thereafter.
M.P.B. Community Players
(531GareldSt.,Hazleton.570.454.3305,
mcgroganj@gmail.com)
Wonderful Town: Sept. 27,-29
Music Box Players (196 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville: 570.283.2195 or 800.698.
PLAY or musicbox.org)
Music Theatre Academy 2013: Theatre
Workshop for students ages 6 to 20. Tuition:
$250 - $200 if paid before Sept. 1. Sessions
begin Sept. 16. Students will perform
Seussical JR The Musical, Oct. 25-27.
Dolly Partons 9to5: Sept. 13-15, 20-22,
27-29. Fridays and Saturdays bar opens 6
p.m., dinner 6:30, curtain 8; Sundays bar
opens 1 p.m., dinner 1:30, curtain 3. $34.00,
dinner and show; $16, show only.
The Phoenix Performing Arts Centre
(409-411MainSt., Duryea, 570.457.3589,
phoenixpac.vpweb.com, phoenixpac08@
aol.com)
Phoenix Kids present Willy Wonka the
Musical: Sept. 13-29, 7 p.m. Fridays and
Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. $10.
Pines Dinner Theatre
(448 North 17th St., Allentown.
610.433.2333. pinesdinnertheatre.com)
Route 66: Sept. 6-Oct. 20,
Wednesdays through Sundays. $48.50,
adults; $46.50, seniors (60+); $20, children
under the age of 16. Includes dinner, bever-
ages during dinner, the show, and tax.
Shawnee Playhouse
(570.421.5093, theshawneeplayhouse.
com)
Roses in December: Sept. 13-14,
8 p.m.; Sept. 15, 2 p.m. $18, adults; $15,
seniors; $10, children 12 and under.
The Odd Couple: Sept. 20, 28, Oct.
4, 12, 18, 8 p.m.; Sept. 22, 26, Oct. 2, 6, 10,
16, 20, 2 p.m. $28, adults; $25, seniors; $15,
children under 12.
The Female Odd Couple: Sept. 21,
27, Oct. 5, 11, 19, 8 p.m.; Sept. 25, 29, Oct.
3, 9, 13, 17, 2 p.m. $28, adults; $25, seniors;
$15, children under 12.
Theatre at the Grove
(5177 Nuangola Road, Nuangola. nuan-
golagrove.com, 570.868.8212, grovetick-
ets@frontier.com)
Ticket pricing: $18, plays; $20, musicals;
$86, summer pass, rst ve shows; $120,
season pass. All shows are BYOB and fea-
ture cabaret seating.
The Mousetrap: Sept. 13, 14, 19-21,
8 p.m.; Sept. 15, 22, 3 p.m.
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of
Fleet Street: Oct. 18, 19, 25, 26, Nov. 1, 2,
8 p.m.; Oct. 20, 27, Nov. 3, 3 p.m.
Its a Wonderful Life: Nov. 29, 30,
Dec. 6, 7, 12-14, 8 p.m.; Dec. 1, 8, 15, 3 p.m.
Wilkes University
(84 W. South St, Wilkes-Barre, 1.800.
WILKES.U, wilkes.edu)
The Curious Savage: Sept. 26-28, 8
p.m., Sept. 29, 2 p.m.
Seussical, The Musical: Nov. 8-9,
15-16, 8 p.m., Nov. 10, 17, 2 p.m.
The No-Frills Revue: Feb. 14-15,
21-22, 8 p.m., Feb. 16, 23, 2 p.m.
Check out Chekhov, An Evening of One
Act Plays by Anton Pavlovich Chekov: April
3-5, 8 p.m., April 6, 2 p.m.
Expanded listings at theweekender.
com.
W
Send your listings to WBWnews@civitasmedia.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-
Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Print
listings occur up until three weeks frompublication date.
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you
We want
is looking for energetic and eager interns to become part of
a publication that has had its nger on the pulse of the NEPA
arts and entertainment scene for the past 20 years.
Were looking for both editorial and marketing interns that
are creative, deadline driven, team players, and have a good
work ethic with an outgoing personality.
If interested, please submit a resume with a brief paragraph
about why you think you t the job description to
weekender@theweekender.com by Sept. 18.
Our events are primarily at local entertainment venues,
making it a good way to network while also learning the ins
and outs of a weekly entertainment paper.
weekender t
h
e
EDITORIAL
- Must have an interest/
experience in writing
- Comfortable with
interviewing story subjects
- Willing to take on a broad
range of topics
- Willingness to help out
with all aspects of the
publication
MARKETING
- Energetic and motivated
- Willing to dedicate time
and effort to events and
projects
- Ability to generate ideas
and see them through
- Sense of design
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Pope pleased by Levines
blessing
In an interview almost
a year ago on The
Ralphie Show, Adam
Levine made it clear
that when it came to the
music industry, he was a
fan of second chances.
If I had to choose
between something to
watch, it would be the
person that had been
knocked down a couple
times, where youd want
to see, Oh my God, is
this person going to
finally do it? The
Voice coach responded
after I asked him about
Cassadee Pope, the for-
mer Hey Monday lead
singer who was shoot-
ing for higher stars after
a first attempt under
Columbia Records.
If its someones first
chance, sorry kid, you
know, tough call. Who
cares? Youre going to
have 10 more.
Pope was happy
enough just to receive
that second opportunity
and was also pleased to
hear Levines remarks.
I got a lot of com-
ments when I was on the
show about how I already
had my chance; I should
not be doing a show like
that, I already had some
success, the season
three winner recalled
during an interview with
The Ralphie Show that
aired last week. Hearing
him say that means a lot
because I felt like I had
been through the grind.
I had worked really hard,
and it didnt work out,
and this was finally a
chance to really knock it
out of the park.
In the process, Pope
would transform from a
pop rock princess that
played rough with the
boys on stage to a solo
country artist who felt
comfortable performing
in front of teenagers and
senior citizens alike.
The only thing that
has really stayed the
same are my friendships,
and my relationship,
and my family; were
still very close, Pope
remarked. She has dated
All Time Low drummer
Rian Dawson since her
days as the frontwoman
for Hey Monday. But,
everything (else) is dif-
ferent.
Popes debut album,
Frame by Frame, comes
out Oct. 8.
SAMBERG RETURNS
TO THE TUBE
Andy Samberg is
back on your TV screen
every week this fall,
just on a new night with
a different network.
The Saturday Night
Live alumnus stars in
Brooklyn Nine-Nine, a
comedy about a group of
detectives in a New York
precinct. The sitcom pre-
miered Tuesday on FOX.
Weve had meetings
with ex-detectives and
former cops and stuff
to make sure that were
not doing anything that
could be deemed disre-
spectful to law enforce-
ment, Samberg revealed
to The Ralphie Show.
The shows not really
in it to make fun of that
aspect of it. (The show
is) courteous of the
actual job but its also
what weve been told is
kind of honest to the fact
that theres a lot of down
time and a lot of silli-
ness going on behind the
scenes as well.
The latter is plentiful
in the show as a motley
group of law enforce-
ment officials attempt
to solve murders and
other crimes in the bor-
ough. Samberg explained
what he enjoys about
Brooklyn.
Certainly all of the
style, and the food, and
the people, he said
before adding, the
Hassids. Whats not to
love?
-Listen to The Ralphie
Show weeknights from
7 p.m.-midnight on 97
BHT.
W
Hey Monday singer Cassadee Pope is getting a second chance as
a recording artist when her debut solo album, Frame by Frame, is
released on Oct. 8.
ENTERTAINMENT REPORT
Ralphie Aversa | Special to the Weekender
RONNIE
WILLIAMS
NOWHERE
SLOW
ASIZ
TONY
HALCHAK
MIZ
IRON COWBOY
CABINET
102.3-FMThe Mountain
Every Sunday
from 8-9 p.m.
WITHALAN K. STOUT
Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the
Weekender wants your picture for our Starstruck.
It doesnt matter if it happened fve months ago or fve
years ago. Send us your photo, your name, hometown, the
celebrity you met, and when and where you met them, and
well run one photo here each week. E-mail high resolutin
JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.comor send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 1 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18703.
Rachel Myers, of White Haven, with IronE
Singleton, or T-Dog fromThe Walking Dead,
at Parafest at the Sands Casino in Bethlehem,
Sept. 6, 2013.
Enter your pet for Weekenders PET OF THE WEEK
by sending photo, pets name, breed if applicable, owners name
and hometown to: weekender@theweekender.com subject line:
Pet of the Week
Owner: Lil Burnett
Miners Mills
BOBBIE BURNETT
ORANGE TABBY
FACEBOOK.COM/
MUSICONTHEMENU
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By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
T
wo years ago,
a friend told
actor Vincent
Ward that he
should be on
AMCs hit TV series The
Walking Dead.
Why would I want to be
on a show about zombies?
he replied. A year later, Im
on a show about zombies.
Born and raised in
Dayton, Ohio, Ward was a
basketball star and a dancer
in a rap group before
catching the acting bug
after watching a play.
I fell in love with it
that day. That day I told
myself, I can do that,
and the following week, I
went and auditioned and I
got a part with that same
play company. I never even
thought about acting ever,
he recalled in an interview
with The Weekender just
after an audition.
I think it was more of
how the audience reacted,
that quick reaction for the
audience. I always felt like
Ive had the entertainment
bug in me.
After moving to Los
Angeles, where he has
resided for 13 years, he
has earned roles in lms
like Trafc and Oceans
Eleven and TV shows like
The Wire and Everybody
Hates Chris, noting that
the hardest part of the
industry is just not giving
up.
Ive had friends that
moved out here and they
couldnt cut it or they didnt
have enough patience,
man. Another hard thing is
having patience. You have
to be patient, he advised.
Though he looked at it
as just another audition,
Ward got a major break
when he tried out for
the character of Oscar in
the third season of The
Walking Dead, a part
shrouded in secrecy at the
time. The character was
called Mouse to avoid
leaks to the press.
The character of Mouse
was just like my character,
Oscar, and Oscar is just like
Vincent, to be honest with
you. I was really and truly
playing myself. When they
pulled a gun on me, Ive
had a gun pulled out on me
twice once by somebody I
knew! And I didnt plead for
my life then, neither time,
he emphasized.
I dont even read the
entire script; I just read
my part. I go through the
script and I look for Oscar
or whoever Im playing and
I focus on that.
He hadnt even seen the
record-breaking series until
his fourth episode, but he
loved every minute of his
time on set.
Even though at that
time I was staying like an
hour away from where we
were lming, every day I
would drive I dont care if
it was 5 or 6 oclock in the
morning I would drive
with a smile on my face
because I felt like I was
a part of something, you
know, even though I really
didnt know what The
Walking Dead was, Ward
explained.
Everybody thats in
prison isnt a bad guy; they
just made a mistake, and
thats what happened with
my character. I had a wife,
I had kids I got caught
stealing, once, and thats
how I ended up in prison
Thats why I say Oscar is
very close to how Vincent
is, or Vincent is very close
to how Oscar is. Im not
saying Ive been in jail, but
I just think they thought a
lot alike and I was basically
just being myself.
He wasnt the only one
invested in his character
during Wards often intense
scenes. In a showdown with
star Andrew Lincoln, who
plays group leader Rick
Grimes, Lincoln took the
scene a bit too far.
Andy was so hyped up
he kicked me! He kicked me
in the stomach and I didnt
even know what the hell to
do. I got pissed! he said
with a laugh. As soon as it
was over, hes like, Vince,
I am so sorry! I dont even
know what I was thinking
about!
And while the zombie
apocalypse scenario may be
fake, the action is very real,
as both Ward and Norman
Reedus, who portrays
fan-favorite Daryl Dixon,
discovered.
When Norman has the
knife to my neck, it was
a real knife and he didnt
want to do it. I said, Lets
go just dont press it
against me.
After starring in seven
episodes, it was Wards
death scene during a
gunght with an opposing
survivor group, though,
that was the most difcult
to shoot.
I was sad. I was really
and truly sad. It was for
a couple reasons: one,
because I wasnt going to
be around anymore to be
around my fellow co-stars,
and I had become close to
them as far as like being on
Surviving the Dead
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the set and working with
them. Everybody was so
professional all the time
and I loved it. There was no
egos. There wasnt no, Im
the lead and youre not.
There wasnt any of that,
even behind the scenes,
Ward said.
Two, it was sad, but I
have to admit, I was also
a little angry about the
situation for the simple
fact that its like OK, yeah,
I know its called The
Walking Dead and you
never know whos going to
go, but I think my death
could have been a lot better
than what it was.
And then when I read
an interview with (creator)
Robert Kirkman and
somebody asked him, Well
why did Oscar have to
die? and his answer was,
Because we didnt want
him to kick the Governors
ass, that really pissed
me off. That was a bogus
excuse, a bogus reason to
me.
Ward was also not invited
to be a guest on the live
after-show Talking Dead
and refers to the end of his
role as bittersweet.
Give (Oscar) an
opportunity to really go
ahead and do something.
Hes proved himself, he
showed that hes strong
and got your back, so why
not let him be around a
little longer? And then even
with Twitter and Facebook,
one thing I hate and I cant
control is when somebody
calls me T-Dog 2.0 or the
token black guy because a
lot of fans have brought to
my attention or asked why
cant they have more than
one black guy on the show
at a time. And I never even
thought about that until
it happened to me, he
pointed out.
It was like OK, T-Dog is
dead, heres Vincent. OK,
Infect Scranton:
Sept. 20-22. Info:
infectscranton.com.
Rates as they are listed
on the website (some fees
may apply):
VIP Survivor: $50
Ultimate Survivor:
$199.99
Ofcial Infect Scranton
T-shirt: $15; $20 for XXL
and larger
Saturday General
Admission: $25
Sunday General
Admission: $20
General Admission
Weekend Pass: $40
Weekend Family Pass:
$70
Sunday Ticket, Free
T-shirt: $20
ZOMBIE
KICK-OFF
The weekends festivities
will begin with the Undead
Fed, a world record-
breaking attempt that will
also help out a local charity.
Dress up as a zombie and
join the Infect Scranton
Infect Scranton
team on Sept. 20 at 6 p.m.
at the Mall at Steamtown
and bring a non-perishable
food item. The goal is to
have as many zombies as
possible in one place, while
also collecting goods for the
Scranton Rescue Mission.
Travis Love, one of the
Governors henchmen on
The Walking Dead, will
be on hand for free photos
and autographs.
All participants must
register online, though
tickets are free. Theyre just
required as proof of a total
number for the Guinness
World Record folks.
Afterward, be sure to
put that zombie costume
to good use and hit up
the zombie pub crawl,
which will travel through
several establishments
in downtown Scranton
starting at 9 p.m.
THE BIG RACE
The Zombie Survivor
challenge is a zombie-
infested 5K (3.1-mile)
obstacle course that will be
held at Montage Mountain.
Runners will carry
their lives on their
belts. During the race,
participants will avoid
zombies (both shamblers
that hang about in an
assigned place and hypers
that actually run the course
starting ve minutes
after the humans), tackle
obstacles both man-made
and natural and try to
survive.
There is an added
element this year, as
Luzerne County Paintball
will have a special obstacle
(that has the option of
being skipped). Runners
will be provided (from a
stationary position, after
putting on safety goggles)
a weapon with only three
rounds (paintballs).
Runners will have to hit
targets. If you dont have
three successful shots, you
have the potential of losing
one life before proceeding
on the course.
First wave starts at 10
a.m. with waves following
every 15 minutes.
Participants must be
14-years-old on the day of
the race.
All race participants will
receive the following as
part of their experience:
1. A super cool, high-
quality performance
running T-shirt.
2. A medal (survivor
or infected) to use when
bragging to your friends.
3. Having a celebrity
(from The Walking Dead,
Dawn of the Dead, and
more) actually greet you at
the nish line and present
your medal.
4. A pretzel dog, soda,
and bag of chips.
5. Admission to the
Green Zone (party area and
where the beer will ow
from nice cold taps).
6. Admission to the
Infect Scranton convention.
Race proceeds will go to
efforts to build a childrens
splash park in Taylor
Borough.
Photo by Amanda Dittmar
Makeup for the cover and the above photo was provided by Taneys Costume Shop, NEPAs only full service costume
shop since 1926. Taneys will also be creating zombies at Infect Scranton.
then kill Vincent, heres
Tyreese. I think whoevers
behind the scenes really
and truly need to look at
that because the fans are
starting to look at that and
a lot of black people are
starting to look at that.
Who knows whats
going to happen with
Oscar? They didnt show
me get shot in the head, so
who knows?
The 42-year-old said he
had a great time despite
this, and its opened up
many other doors since,
even leading to an unlikely
friendship with co-star
Lew Temple, who will
be appearing with Ward
at Infect Scranton this
weekend.
Thats my brother
from another mother,
man. Lew is a great guy,
and I probably never had
chemistry with somebody
like this, on the set and off
the set. You would think me
and Lew have been friends
for years. We call ourselves
the new Danny Glover and
Mel Gibson, and I told
him, Somebodys going
to give us a spinoff or our
own show, because our
chemistry is on-point. Were
talking about trying to do
something together, but
well see, he said.
Ward has since traded
in his prison jumpsuit
for a suit and tie, which
he is often seen in at
conventions, but what
would the up-and-coming
actor do if zombies were
real? Arm himself with an
ax or tire iron and pray.
Just watching over my
shoulder a lot, just like we
did on The Walking Dead.
I would just be praying.
Thats it. Praying with
whatever weapon I have
and just be ready to go
to war to protect me and
mine.
W
I think my death could have been a
lot better than what it wasA lot of
fans have brought to my attention
or asked why cant they have more
than one black guy on the show at
a time. And I never even thought
about that until it happened to me.
Vincent Ward
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Geek Culture & more
Rich Howells | Weekender Editor
Retro Con is the future
of con experiences
AsI sit hereandadmiremy
custom sketch of the mirror-
masked Cobra Commander
fromthe original G.I. Joe: A
Real American Hero series
by his very creator, Larry
Hama, I think its safe to say
that the second annual Retro
Con, held at the Greater
Philadelphia Expo Center in
Oaks, Pa., on Saturday, Sept.
14, was another rousing suc-
cess, particularly for this
nostalgia-loving nerd.
As I pulled into the park-
ing lot, I wondered which
building the con was in until
I saw the Mystery Machine,
General Lee, KITT,
Bumblebee, a Jurassic
Park jeep, and other custom
vehicles displayed out front.
Then I knew I had come to
the right place.
I may have arrived a bit
late for the Angry Video
Game Nerd and Nostalgia
Critic signings, but I did get
there just in time for their
Q&A panel, complete with a
musical introduction by Kyle
Justin, Internet-famous for
his AVGN theme song. They
answered many funny and
serious questions, includ-
ing from a puppet and your
obligatory guy in a Deadpool
costume, then snuck off
together right after, so I
expect another video col-
laboration relatively soon.
The main oor was twice
as big this year, with two
full rooms of dealers selling
everything from your child-
hood. If your parents never
got you that giant He-Man
playset you always wanted,
then Christmas is better
late than never because you
could buy it there still in its
original box. The two ware-
house rooms echoed with
the sounds of 80s cartoon
themes and other recogniz-
able tunes from a DJ booth
in the corner while fans
haggled for rare and obscure
toys or that one action g-
ure thats been missing from
their collections. I picked up
a few Marvel gures mint
on card for the same price I
would have paid back in the
90s, along with a Marvel
Super Heroes Secret Wars
Kang from 1984 still in the
package for a mere $8. If
that doesnt excite you, you
may be reading the wrong
column.
The guests signing auto-
graphs ranged from Don
Fullilove, who played future
mayor Goldie Wilson in
Back to the Future to Neil
Ross, the voice of many
memorable characters in
Transformers, G.I. Joe,
Voltron, and countless
other beloved cartoons.
Ross and I chatted about the
Pryde of the X-Men pilot
he worked on that wasnt
picked up for a full series,
recalling that the recordings
took all day and into the
night with take after take as
he signed a G.I. Joe comic
for me.
I then discussed that same
star-spangled franchise with
author Mark Bellomo, who
writes the most complete
toy guides one could pos-
sibly imagine along with
amazing behind-the-scenes
information for the complete
collections of the original
Marvel comic series, now
published by IDW. Learning
about his writing process
and how it ties in with his
massive collection of every
toy line from the 60s on
(not an exaggeration) made
my own fandom seem lack-
ing in comparison, but very
fan is created equal in a room
like this were here to share
more than brag.
Though there was one
competitionacostumecon-
test that had some amazing
entries. A woman dressed as
the Sharknado won, tak-
ing home a custom-made
Skeletor trophy, and many of
the unique door prizes were
also hand-crafted. Her getup
wasnt exactly retro, but it
was extremely creative. The
creativity I admired most
came from Larry Hama,
however. Wearing black
cap and a t-shirt with the
Arashikage clan symbol
on it, he quietly sat next to
Bellomo throughout the day
sketching any character fans
requested I chose Cobra
Commander because he was
always my favorite of all the
Joes and Cobras he created,
and even those who asked
for the same character were
given completely different
drawings.
He graciously posed for a
picture (appropriately taken
by a man dressed in a Cobra
uniform) after signing a
stack of my Joe comics and
listening to me thank him
and blather on. The opportu-
nity really made me appreci-
ate Retro Con even more; it
may not be some massive,
sold-out gathering with
movie stars and directors y-
ing in from the West Coast
for big announcements and
even bigger lines, but thats
not what its all about.
From the custom door
prizes to the fan-favorite
guests to the insane amount
of toys and collectibles from
years gone by, and even the
opportunity to shoot Nerf
darts at Stormtroopers for
charity, Retro Con is quickly
becoming one of my favor-
ite conventions of the year
because its small, simple,
and DIY.
Many of the best cons in
the tri-state area have turned
into expensive investments
with less and less payoff as
prices continue to climb and
focus on whats important
continues to fall, but Retro
Con grew this year without
losing sight of the reason
why it did. Im already sav-
ing for next year.
Rich Howells is a lifelong
Marvel Comics collector,
wannabe Jedimaster, and
cult lm fan. E-mail him at
rhowells@civitasmedia.com.
W
weekender
10.11.13
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SARA POKORNY
Weekender stafWriter
Third Friday combines with
Wilkes-Barre Restaurant Week
Now is the perfect time
to take a stroll downtown:
the evenings are turning
chilly, making it perfect
weather for a light jacket,
warm drink, and the soft
glow of sunset as it washes
over the many buildings
that line Main Street.
This months Third
Friday Art Walk in Wilkes-
Barre is upon us and, as
always, its bringing a
variety of cultural events
in the citys galleries, res-
taurants, boutiques, and
businesses.
No matter your taste
the itch to try some new
cuisine, the need to lay
eyes on beautiful artwork,
the urge to hear original
local music theres some-
thing for everyone.
This months Third
Friday brings with it
another event, the rst
of its kind: Wilkes-Barre
Restaurant Week.
The Downtown
Wilkes-Barre Business
Association, Diamond
City Partnership, Humford
Equities, and NEPA Geeks
are putting on the event
that allows local folks to
sample cuisine from area
restaurants that they may
not have previously had a
chance to dine at.
Those participating
include Anthracite, Barnes
& Noble, Bart & Urbys,
Boscovs, Bottlenecks, Cafe
Toscana, Froyo Mania,
IBOP Coffee Company, III
Guys Pizza, Katana, King
of Kings Gyros, Maers
BBQ, Mimmos Pizza,
Oyster Restaurant, Petes
Place Middle Eastern
Restaurant, Rodanos,
S&W Restaurant, and
Senunas Bar and Grill.
View menus and more
online at wbrestaurant-
week.com.
W
ThiRd FRidAY
ART WAlK
sept. 20, 5-8 p.m.,
downtown Wilkes-barre.
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SARA POKORNY
Weekender stafWriter
MARYTHERESE BIEBEL
Fromthe times Leader
Uncovering the Legend
of the Black Diamond
The time for hauntings is
upon us.
September comes to a
close in less than two weeks,
and with it comes a rash of
haunted attractions all over
Northeast Pennsylvania,
from houses to cornelds
and hayrides but have
you ever entered a historic
trolley to get your seasonal
scares in?
For the third year, the
Lackawanna Historical
Society will play host to the
Trolley of Terror, a vicious
voyage on a rail line in
downtown Scranton.
The trolley travels
through the historic Laurel
Line, a Pennsylvania third
rail electric interurban
streetcar line that oper-
ated commuter train ser-
vice from 1903 to 1952
and freight service until
1976. Its also known as the
Lackawanna & Wyoming
Valley Railroad.
The line is commonly
referred to as the Laurel
Line due to the predomi-
nance of the aforementioned
wildower throughout its
route. That, however, is
where the sweetness of the
line stops at least in terms
of the Trolley of Terror.
On the ride, there
are some actors who are
called out as characters of
a plot line that deals with
the Legend of the Black
Diamond, in order to
reect our areas history,
said Mary Ann Moran-
Savakinus, executive direc-
tor of the historical society.
Supposedly, there was
some gem discovered by
a miner that brought him
disaster in his life, and that
pushes the plot line as the
trolley goes along.
Moran-Savakinus said
they dont encourage chil-
dren under 12 to board the
trolley, as there are tradi-
tional scares and dark spots
in the ride.
Youll denitely be fright-
ened, but were not looking
to traumatize anyone, she
said with a laugh.
The Laurel Line has an
already-existing area that
makes the trolley ride per-
fect.
There is a tunnel, and its
so dark, Moran-Savakinus
said. You could be in there
at noon and its still pitch
black. Its a mile-long tun-
nel.
In previous years, a walk-
ing tour was offered prior
to boarding the Trolley of
Terror, but this year that
turned into a wagon ride
that seats 15 people, the
tickets for which have sold
out for this weekend. The
wagon ride concludes where
the trolley boards, serving
as a precursor to the scares.
The wagon makes it
a little more historical
in nature, said Moran-
Savakinus. We talk about
the history of the city,
whereas the trolley is more
of a haunted hayride attrac-
tion.
The entire production
would not be possible with-
out the volunteers, who
Moran-Savakinus said go
above and beyond.
Most of them made their
own costumes and do their
own makeup, she contin-
ued.
The society has also
received help from
Brookvalley Farm in
Carbondale, who has pro-
vided horses for the wagon
rides, and members of two
other local haunted attrac-
tions who have lent their
services: Reapers Revenge
and Circle of Screams.
W
TROLLEY Of TERROR
Presented by the Lackawanna Historical society sept.
20-21. the tour will meet at the societys headquarters,
the Catlin House, at 232 monroe avenue.$25, society
members; $30, nonmembers. tickets are available
at the Lackawanna Historical society or by calling
570.344.3841.
Terrible boss
makes great play
How obnoxious is Mr.
Hart?
Oh, hes terrible.
He likes to hit on his
employees, and hes very
misogynistic, said Cate
McDonald of Scranton,
who plays ofce worker
Doralee in Dolly Partons
9 to 5, which opened last
weekend at the Music Box
Playhouse in Swoyersville.
He feels theres no place
for women in the work-
place.
Unless theyre his play-
things?
Exactly, McDonald
said. (My character has
to) climb a ladder to get a
le from the highest shelf
and he looks up my skirt.
Its pretty gross.
From sexual harass-
ment to spreading untrue
rumors to taking credit for
other peoples ideas, Hart
commits just about every
offense on the bad boss
list.
He really deserves his
comeuppance, said Dana
Feigenblatt, who is direct-
ing the show.
I think anyone whos
had to deal with a terrible
boss has dreamed of kid-
napping him and taking
over the workplace, said
McDonald, explaining
thats just what Doralee and
her co-workers Judy and
Violet, played respectively
by Ericka Law and Amanda
Reese, manage to do.
But before they tie him
up and suspend him (liter-
ally, from the ceiling), the
trio engages in some wild
fantasies about doing him
in.
In the cowgirl fantasy,
Doralee comes out with
a lasso and hogties him,
Feigenblatt said. In the
Snow White fantasy, he is
poisoned with coffee and
dies on a desk. We have the
ensemble dressed as wood-
land creatures for that.
And, in Judys fantasy, she
does a seductive dance and
leaves him tied up.
When the women aban-
don fantasies in favor of
actual revenge, they put
Hart into a harness and
leave him dangling over the
stage.
This is the second
show Im doing where it
happens, said Bill Lipski
of Nanticoke, who plays
Hart. In Les Mis, I was
Javert, another mean per-
son. When I jumped off the
bridge, they suspended me
in mid-air until the end of
the song.
Im used to it by now.
The show is set in
1979, which meant cos-
tumer Jimmy Williams
scoured every Salvation
Army for vintage clothes,
McDonald said.
Audiences will enjoy the
upbeat music, she predict-
ed, as well as the shows
very woman power-heavy
aspect, which shows the
female characters work-
ing together to accomplish
their goals and running
the ofce more efciently
when Hart isnt around.
As an added benet,
McDonald said, I get to
do the role with two very
dear friends of mine, and
we get to put our actual
caring into our perfor-
mance.
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Courtesy Photos
Mr. Hart (Bill Lipski) endures the revenge taken by Judy (Amanda
Reese), Doralee (Cate McDonald), and Violet (Ericka Law) in Dolly
Partons 9 to 5.
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BEHIND THE ROTTING FLESH
Mike Christopher
Film: Dawn of the Dead
(1978)
Character: Hare Krishna
Zombie
How did you end up
being cast as a zombie?
I was in a theatrical rock
band named FLUID. We
had a space-themed stage
show. I had a bald head
as part of my character.
Sharon Ceccatti-Hill
Film: Dawn of the Dead
(1978)
Character: Nurse Zombie
How did you end up
being cast as a zombie?
My husband, Clayton,
and I, who was the
featured lead Escalator
Sweater Zombie, were
doing stage work
(operettas) at the
Pittsburgh Playhouse
when we heard George
(Director) George
(Romero) was looking
for some zombies that
would be different than
blue jeans and plaid shirts.
He especially wanted
something different for my
part because since I was
the zombie who discovered
the hideout in the mall.
Did you have any say
in your appearance or
costume or your on-
screen death?
I didnt even read the
script when I showed up
for my scenes. Everything
I did was done on one
take George wanted
every zombie to make up
his own character.
What was shooting your
death scene like?
It was over in an instant.
Romero was looking for
talent for his upcoming
movie to be shot in and
around Pittsburgh. We both
interviewed with George
with portfolio in hand of
our singing and dancing
photos for consideration.
We both were cast as
lead zombies and to be
credited as such.
Were you a horror movie
fan before playing a
zombie or was this genre
new to you?
This genre was all new
to me! I had no idea what
One minute I was grasping
at Frans legs dangling in
front of menext instant
Roger was coming at me
with a rie butt to the head.
How do you prepare to
play a zombie?
I got a sick feeling in my
stomach like I was going to
puke then tried to maintain
that feeling all through my
scenes.
How do you think your
character became
a zombie?
I have thought of a
backstory for my character
but I dont have the
nancing to pull off the
movie since it would have
to be shot in the 70s.
How long did a typical
day of makeup and
shooting take?
a zombie was! George just
laughed.
Did you have any say
in your appearance or
costume?
There was a nurses
outt in wardrobe. He
said he wanted me to wear
that. With having no blood
applied to it, he wanted to
feature me pure-looking, so
I could stand out.
How long did a typical
day of makeup and
shooting take?
My makeup didnt take
that long, since I only
My makeup is easy
gray all over and a knot of
hair coming out the top of
my head. Takes about 45
minutes to blend it even.
I had three days shooting,
two in the mall which went
like this: Get to the mall
after it closes around 9 p.m.
Sit in a room full of people
turning into zombies by
the makeup people. Sit
around drinking coffee
all night until someone
frantically runs into the
room saying, I need
you, you, you,
you, you, you,
you, you, you,
you, you, you,
you, you, you,
and you. Follow
me. Everyone gets
needed to apply to my
hands, face, and neck. My
hair took the longest. I had
to have grease throughout
my hair Actually, John
Amplas who was a raider
and also Martin (another
Romero lm) at the time
was responsible for taking
control of my look We
shot most of the scenes at
Monroeville Mall, which is
east of the city, from 9 p.m.
to 7 a.m. Long hours but
not unusual for shooting a
lm.
How do you prepare to
into place in the mall until
George says action, then
we shamble around until
he yells cut, then we go
back into the room and
wait until someone runs
frantically back into the
room again!
What was going through
your mind during your
scenes?
Why didnt someone
think about the hot sulfur
sparks falling on the oor
that are burning the soles of
my feet?
play a zombie?
The way I prepared to
play a zombie was to always
stay in character no matter
what the scene. I would get
into my zombie by feeling
I was dead not really
sure how that is but to
look dazed. I would walk
slowly, roll my eyes to
the back of my head with
arms extended, looking for
human esh. At that point,
I just wanted to survive.
How do you think your
character became
a zombie?
I am assuming my role
became a zombie from all
the long hours working as
a nurse and dying due to
stress. And no, I never was
a real nurse working in a
hospital in Pittsburgh.
Is there anything else
youd like to mention?
I would like to mention
Do people ever recognize
you outside of your
makeup?
Only one time about
two years ago. I was in a
bar in Ybor City and a guy
was having his birthday
party there. He came over
and asked me if I was the
Hare Krishna Zombie from
Dawn of the Dead. I
gave him an autograph on
a small picture I usually
have with me and he was
thrilled.
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my husband, who passed
away four years ago, who
cannot be with us, but
only in spirit His name
is Clayton D. Hill. He was
known for his funny stint
on the escalator going up
backwards. The look on
his face is surreal. He also
was featured. He was the
weapons coordinator on
the lm. He loaded and
unloaded all the weapons
that were red. He would
collect the used shell
casings after the scene was
shot, put them in a bag, and
go to the next scene. He
saved these empty shell
casings. After all these
years, he put them to use.
I sell them at conventions.
They are enclosed in a case
with his autograph. It was
the last signature he did.
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Jim Krut
Film: Dawn of the Dead
(1978)
Character: Helicopter
Zombie
How did you end up
being cast as a zombie?
Well, Tom Savini, who
did all the makeup and
special effects for Dawn
asked me. Tom and I had
gone to college together at
Point Park University and
we also worked in theater
together Wed been in
touch and kind of been
friends for a long time. I
was living in Pittsburgh
at the time and I ran into
Tom and he said, Ive got
this great role for you in a
George Romero movie.
Travis Charpentier
TV Show: The Walking Dead
Characters: Zombied
Shawn Greene, RV Walker
(Screwdriver Zombie)
How did you end up getting
cast as a zombie?
I got extremely lucky with
the casting. I had just moved
near Atlanta with some friends
and they told me to apply for
extra work on TV and lm.
They told me it was about $300
a day and it would help me put
up rent money while looking for
a stable real job. They gave me
the e-mail to apply and boom,
I got cast for the rst scene of
the very rst episode and it
took off from there.
Did you have any say in your
appearance or costume or
your on-screen death?
I honestly had no say in what
I was put in but Eulyn, the
wardrobe coordinator for set,
has this great insight to each
persons style and which outts
would ow with whom they
were on. My on-screen death for
the most part is just complete
direction from the producers
and director. In the RV Walker
death, I was asked to improvise
and throw a bit of my own into
it, which was pretty fun and
they actually liked it and used
it in the show.
What was it like shooting
your death scenes?
Honestly, it was nerve-
racking. I started out worrying
how well Id be able to do
the scene and remembering
movements. But when the
cameras are rolling and its
time to lm the shot, I kind
of slip directly into the role
and just react naturally. If Im
shot in the leg, I instinctively
limp or drag it. Its all about
just giving yourself over to
the thought of becoming what
youre trying to convey, and
once I did that, it was very
liberating and freeing and made
the scene incredible to shoot.
How do you prepare to play
a zombie?
We did go to zombie school,
which is where we learned the
basic shufe and responses.
But its really an individual
study. You make it a apart of
who you are and think about
the backstory of your walker.
Were you a business man,
did you have kids, where and
what were you doing when you
turned? Theres a lot of things
to prepare for it, and its a
great way to keep each walker
different from the next.
Do people ever recognize
you outside of your makeup?
It hasnt been until recently
that people have recognized
me outside of makeup, but its
actually pretty funny when
they ask or freak out. I still
havent grasped that Im a small
celebrity. I see these people
fangirling and Im just like, I
work at Target and barely make
even. Im not spectacular, but
when I see how excited they
are when they meet me, it
makes my day.
What is it like having your
head immortalized as a DVD
box set?
It still hasnt sunk in yet.
I know its there, I know Im
in so many houses, but I just
brush it off. I guess they used
the mold they made of my
head for the role to make the
box set, so I really had no idea
until they announced it, and
that was a shock. Its pretty
awesome when Im out and
about and I see someone with
it and I laugh and point saying,
Hey, thats my head!
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How long did it take to
put your makeup on?
I went to Toms place. We
did makeup sessions in his
workshop. We did complete
head casts, twice, when you
have plaster just slathered
all over your face and then
youre breathing through a
straw for about 20 minutes
til it hardens. That was
the technology at the time,
so things got a little easier
over time. The rst one
cracked, so a few days later,
I had to go back and do it
again but it was probably
over a two-week period to
get the prosthetics and the
makeup things together.
What was shooting your
death scene like?
It was me and the blocks
there was no dummy
head, and I should say
that the helicopter blades
were cut in afterward. The
engine was running on the
helicopter, and you have all
the anticipation with the
music. You sort of kind of
guess what might
be coming next,
but as far as the
top coming off, I
was a couple of
boxes standing
up higher. The
makeup prosthetic
piece on top of my
head was, I dont
know, an inch and
half or something
like that high, and then
that was cut into chunks
and threaded together
with monolament line,
so it looked like it was one
complete piece, but then
from off camera at the right
moment, somebody yanked
on a piece of monolament
line attached to that piece
on top of my head. That
then ew off. The blood
came from two guys behind
the boxes using hand
pumps with tubes going
up through the back of my
trousers and shirt and into
the top of the head. One
of those guys was Tom
Savini.
What was Savini and
Romeros direction to you
during your scene?
Tom Savini said, Hey,
I want you to be like a
zombie. OK. I said,
Tom, I havent been to
any of the other scenes.
I havent seen any of the
other zombies. Is there
a particular thing Im
supposed to do? He said,
Well, you just kind of be
like a zombie, and so your
imagination takes over. I
said, Well do they talk?
Do they yell or moan or
do anything like that? He
said, You can do whatever
you want to do. So I did
some moaning.
What was it like
playing such an iconic
zombie?
I always wondered,
Wouldnt it be wonderful
to be a character like
Dracula, an iconic kind
of character? and so
when it came to having an
opportunity to do a role
in a lm that was a pretty
much a standalone role, I
denitely wanted to give
it my all. I was certainly
delighted with the response
Did you know just how
important this lm would
become?
If you go back and ask
anybody who was in Dawn
of the Dead, Did you
think this was going to be a
huge sensation and popular
across the world even
today? they would have
said, No, Im just making a
movie. They had no idea.
For me, I dont know about
that.
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SEE AGENDA, PAGE 50
last week
ACROSS
1 Sleeping
5 Avatar technology
(Abbr.)
8 Reverberate
12 Georgia city
13 Young fellow
14 Thick chunk
15 Poetic foot
16 Work with
17 Remedy
18 Wood nymphs
20 Meager
22 Deterioration
23 Annoy
24 Harbor structure
27 The Deant Ones
duo
32 Web address
33 Prot. or Cath.
34 Genetic letters
35 Breach in a levee
38 Hey, you!
39 Have a bug
40 Way back when
42 Lord Jim author
45 Soft fabric
49 Neighborhood
50 Havent paid yet
52 Early primary state
53 Dave of Mad maga-
zine
54 Rowing need
55 Dance lesson
56 Not good, not bad
57 - Doubtre
58 Dame Myra at the
piano
DOWN
1 Desertlike
2 Wild hog
3 TV trophy
4 Come ashore
5 Groups of grapes
6 Petrol
7 Mid-month date
8 Steep slope
9 Some old cars
10 Rodgers collaborator
11 Follow instructions
19 - as I say
21 Spy novel org.
24 French nobleman
25 Hockey great Bobby
26 Laundromat alterna-
tive
28 French possessive
29 Butchers tools
30 Type measures
31 Perched
36 Shrew
37 - carte
38 Shine
41 We Bring Good
Things to Life co.
42 Urban eet
43 Sandwich cookie
44 Armageddon
46 November responsi-
bility
47 Rams fans?
48 Spigots
51 Doves aversion
BAZAARS/FESTIVALS
33rd Annual Pennsylvania
Renaissance Faire:
saturdays and sundays through
Oct. 27, and Labor day monday,
mount Hope estate and Winery.
$29.95, adults; $10.95, children
ages 5 to 11. For more info
and tickets visit parenFaire.
comor call the box ofce at
717.665.7021.
Endless Mountains Nature
Center
(280Vosburg road,
tunkhannock. 570.836.3835.)
Wild Edible and Medicinal
Workshop with nathaniel
Whitmore: sept. 28, 10 a.m.-3
p.m. $20, per session; $35, whole
day; $15, per session stewards
fee; $25 whole day; $35, family
stewardship.
Freedom Fest:
asalute to americas Finest:
sept. 29, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.,
mountain sky (63 still meadow
Lane, Jermyn).
BENEFITS/CHARITY EVENTS
2nd Annual Hope for Hannah
Fundraiser:
sept. 22, 1-5 p.m., 356 north
everett ave., scranton
American Cancer Society
Cancer Prevention Study-3
(CPS-3): Nov. 2, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
nov. 6, 4-8 p.m., Keystone
College Hibbard Campus Center.
participants can register at www.
keystonecps3.org. For more info
call 570.562.9749.
American Lung Association
Fight for Air Walk: Oct. 3,
mcdade park, scranton.
registration 9 a.m., run beings
9:45, walkers at 10. For more info
visit lunginfo.org/scrantonwalk.
American Red Cross
11th Annual Golf Tournament:
sept. 23, registration 11 a.m.,
shotgun start at 12:30 p.m.,
Glenmaura National Golf Club.
dinner and awards ceremony at 6
p.m. Limited to 120 golfers. $300
per golfer. to make a reservation
for golf and/or dinner, contact
Carol Crane at 570.823.7161, ext.
329 or carol.crane@redcross.org.
The Kelci Ever After Memorial
Scholarship Inaugural 6K Run
and 2K Memory Walk
Oct. 6, 11 a.m., Francis slocum
state park pavilion no. 3, by boat
launch. registration begins at
9 a.m. $20, includes a tie-dye
t-shirt.
Luzerne County Pit Bull
Owners, Inc.
3rd Annual Pit Bull Awareness
Day and Carnival: Oct. 26, noon-6
p.m., Kirby park.
Polycystic Kidney Disease
Foundation
Chapter Kick-of: Sept. 20,
6-7:30 p.m., pocono medical
Center Main Building (206 E.
brown st., east stroudsburg).
S.A.F.E. Walk for Autism and
Resource Fair 2013:
sept. 28, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.,
Hazleton area High school track.
Susan G. Komen for the Cure
Black, White &ATouch of
pink gala: sept. 27, 6-9 p.m.,
Woodlands Inn (1073 Highway
315, Wilkes-barre). For more
info or to purchase tickets call
amy andrejko at 570.820.1670
or email patriciamichael@mdlz.
com.
Sweat for the Cure
Zumbathon:
Oct. 5, noon-3 p.m., pro Fitness
Club (3356 Birney Ave., Birney
plaza, moosic). $10. For
more info contact amy sekol
at570.479.1000 or amy.sekol@
wilkes.edu.
CAR & BIKE EVENTS
Fall Festival Car Cruise
(Eagle Rock Resort, 1 Country
Club Dr., Hazleton)
Oct. 12, 10 a.m.-midnight. Rain
date Oct. 13. Optional donation
of $12 day of show, $9 pre-
registration. pre-register by
mailing 1 Country Club Drive,
Hazle township, pa18202.
McDonalds (route 590 Hamlin,
pa)
Car Cruise: Every second Friday
of august, september, 6 p.m.
Montage Mountain Classics
(thurs., 6-9 p.m., Fri., 6-10 p.m.,
sat., 5-9 p.m.)
Car Cruises:
Sept. 21, 5-9 p.m., Johnny
rockets, montage mountain.
Cruise to Beneft Ronald
mcdonald House: sept. 22, 2-6
p.m. rain date sept. 29.
CHURCHES
Annunciation Greek Orthodox
Church
(32 east ross st., Wilkes-barre)
Greek Food Festival: Oct. 3-5,
11 a.m.-8 p.m. Orders more than
$30 will be delivered free within
a 2-mile radius of the church.
Customers are welcome but
not required to pre-order food
by calling 570.823.4805 during
festival hours or by ordering
online atgreekfoodfestival.
webs.com. For more info call
570.417.4465.
Corpus Christi
(montdale)
Annual Harvest Festival Turkey
dinner: Oct. 6, noon-5 p.m. $10,
adults; $5, children. take-outs
available.
Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church
(420 main rd., Hanover twp.,
570.823.6242)
Annual Chicken Barbecue/
Flea Market/Craft Sale: Sept.
15, noon-4 p.m. $9, dinner.
additional feamarket times sept.
20, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; sept. 21, 8
a.m.-noon and 6-7 p.m.; sept. 22,
10 a.m.-noon.
Soup for the Souls Committee
book, bake, and soup sale: sept.
19, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
First Presbyterian Church of
Clarks Summit
(300 School St., Clarks Summit,
570.586.6306, www.fpccs.org)
Excelsior Cornet Band, New
York States Authentic Civil War
brass band: Oct. 6, 4 p.m.
All-church recital with First
Presbyterian Church musical
ensembles: novl 17, 4 p.m.
Ss. Cyril and Methodius
Ukrainian Catholic Church
(135 river st., Olyphant)
Third Annual Rummage Sale:
sept. 20, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., sept.
21, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m., american
Legion Hall (raymond Henry post
no. 327).
125th Anniversary Celebration;
Oct. 27, beginning with liturgy at
3 p.m., followed by celebration
from5-9 p.m. $40, per person;
$12, children 12 and under.
For tickets contact sandra at
570.383.9487.
Ukrainian Culture Day: Oct. 26,
9 a.m.-3 p.m.
St. Michaels Ukrainian
Orthodox Church
(540 n. main ave., scranton,
570.343.7165)
11th Annual Ukranian Food
Festival: sept. 22. Features
homemade Ukrainian foods such
as holupki, halushky, pyrohy,
kapusta, kielbasa and baked
goods. For info call 570. 961.1795.
Shavertown United Methodist
Church
7th Annual Golf Tournament:
Oct. 5, registration 9 a.m.,
shotgun start at 10, mill race and
Golf Camping Resort (Benton).
$80 entry fee. For questions call
bev atherholt at 570.675.7295 or
bill runner at 570.675.5055.
Stufed cabbage dinner:
sept. 21, 4-7 p.m., sponsored
by the saint dymphna Knights
of Columbus, in the Holy Family
Church Hall, Sugar Notch. $8.
take-outs available. Limited
number of tickets available
at the door. For more info or a
reservation, contact dave at
570.824.0994.
EVENTS
Arcadia Chorale
(formerly the robert dale
Chorale)
Echoes of Arcadia: Oct. 19, 8
p.m., St. Lukes Episcopal Church,
scranton; Oct. 20, 3 p.m., st.
Stephens Episcopal Church,
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Rich Howells
Weekender editor
Comic books and video
games are now, more than
ever, socially acceptable and
mainstream, so why not live-
action role-playing?
Thats the question that
Into the Breach Productions,
a nonprot founded in 2009
inNEPAthat creates LARPs,
is asking, particularly since
what they do is quite differ-
ent from the average game.
Traditional LARPs are
set in the medieval fantasy
kind of a thing Lord of the
Rings, World of Warcraft,
that kind of setting. You have
your armor, swords, bows,
and dwarves With the
two games we have now, its
very different. To my knowl-
edge, I dont know where
the next Western LARP is.
I dont know where some-
one can go play cowboys for
the weekend I dont if you
can play it anywhere else in
Pennsylvania, writer Matt
Navin, 28, of Edwardsville,
explained.
Thats a big thing for us,
always trying to do some-
thing a little bit different, a
little bit outside of what you
see. It helps you distinguish
yourself fromthe established
games in the area.
Into the Breach has been
running two games since
March Grimdark West,
a Western fantasy set in
1875 Dakota Territory, and
Honors Arcana, set in mod-
ern times at Poor Richards
Academy of Magical Arts,
a nishing school for magi-
cians in training. Both are
run on weekends in Hickory
Run State Park in White
Haven, with Grimdark now
nished for the year and
Honors ending at the end of
September.
Were doing very well this
year. Our entire population
has grown. Even newer play-
ers have entered our player
base. A good aspect of the
Western game is that weve
introduced a new communi-
ty, a new genre of LARPing
to the area. And for Honors,
we have a much younger
crowd where parents, if they
play, can bring their kids to
play with them, and thats
worked out well for us. We
actually had less trouble
with 12-year-olds than we
had with the 30-year-olds,
cracked Chris Ormando,
a 35-year-old Edwardsville
resident and head director of
Into the Breach.
Looking to raise aware-
ness about their games as
well as LARPing in general,
he said his other favorite
title is nerd wrangler,
though he has plenty of help
with that from his team.
You are physically being
a character, dressing up
in a costume, which really
helps with your emergence.
Its not like youre sitting at
a table playing (Dungeons
& Dragons) where youre
rolling dice. Youre still role-
playing, youre still involved
in it, but youre still in your
t-shirt eating Cheetos at a
kitchen table at your friends
house, where withthis youre
in the woods and youre run-
ning around, designer and
art director Amy Zurko, 24,
of Nanticoke, explained.
Youve got the weight of
the armor on you. Youre car-
rying a big old piece of ply-
wood as a shield for a while.
Youve been ghting for a
couple minutes, so youre
feeling that fatigue. It puts
you there, Navin added.
You feel actually scared
sometimes. You feel that
dread when youre really
scared because its dark out
and theres people trying to
kill you and you have just a
dinky little sword and its
just so exciting, Zurko con-
tinued.
We want our players to
drive the story. Its their
story. Its not our story.
Writer Ralph Pierce, 30, of
Ashley, summed up the draw
of LARPing by comparing it
to other forms of entertain-
ment.
Its very much like when
you go to see a movie.
Depending on the genre of
movie youre going to see,
youre going there to experi-
ence a certain type of emo-
tional connection, whether
its a comedy or horror,
whatever. LARPing can give
you that in a way that sitting
in a theater doesnt always
give you, he began.
Its closer to an actual live
stage performance, when
youre sitting at the Kirby
(Center) or at Little Theatre
(of Wilkes-Barre) and you
see the actors. Theres more
of a connection there, but
nowyoure one of those char-
acters. One of the interesting
things about it is not only are
you one of the characters,
but its not just a script. Your
actions, how you react to it,
makes other people react dif-
ferently.
Whenever anybody reads
a good novel, sometimes
theyve thought, Wouldnt it
be really cool if it went this
way? Well, it does because
you acted and it changes it;
it changes the whole narra-
tive up. Thats actually one
of the things that we pride
ourselves on. As our players
react, as they move, as they
kind of shake things up, we
react to them. We give them
a living role, a living narra-
tive.
Those roles vary depend-
ing on the game, and the
group eagerly explains the
details of both, starting with
Grimdark West.
Grimdark West hap-
pens in 1875, one year
before Little Bighorn. Little
Bighorn happens in 1876
and you cannot change that.
Were just going to change
what happens. A full week-
end runs from Friday night
until Sunday about noon,
give or take, and if you try
to plan that 40 hours of the
weekend minute-by-minute,
things are going to go off the
rails, Navin noted.
Its not really steam-
punk, either. Its Western.
Its like dark Western, weird
West. There are undead,
Ormando claried, compar-
ing it to the video game Red
Dead Redemption: Undead
Nightmare with added
magical elements.
I knowthat theres a good
number of people that go to
the game because they like
that style of cast-iron camp-
re cooking and playing a
game set like that, Navin
pointed out. I think it does
a good job of bridging that
gap between a game and the
folks that like to go out and
do Civil War reenactment
Its very accessible for
people, and I think a lot of
people like to play it because
youre a pioneer in the West
for a weekend.
Honors Arcana, however,
is lighter and much more
whimsical.
The game currently is set
in a remote forest in Nova
Scotia. The players kind of
teleport there on the week-
end to do their thing, and
one of the things they were
asked to do by the elves
who live in secret in Nova
Scotia is to stop this logging
company from harvesting
their forest. But we gave the
players no indication about
how to do this. There was
no direction. Just gure out
a way to stop them, Navin
described.
Weve gotten feedback
from players that it was
some of the more rewarding
LARPing theyd ever done
because they really had to
think on their feet Thats
what we try to do with all of
our games, is give them the
dilemma, give them the situ-
ation theyre facing, but not
really guide them through
how to solve it leave it
totally open-ended.
The writers have learned
to expect the curveball
from players, but rather than
stress about what will be
thrown at them next, they
embrace this ongoing chal-
lenge, stretching the limits
of their creativity.
LARPing, as a whole,
is a way to experience life.
Its experiencing different
aspects of life that you cant
normally experience, Piece
said.
Thats the big thing
about LARP. Its Conan the
Barbarian, its Star Wars.
Whenever you put yourself
in or empathize with the
main character, you can put
yourself in a LARP and you
can play from that point.
Now the story revolves
around you because you
actually have anactive role in
it. Whatever you do impacts
it, Ormando enthused.
And despite what many
standing on the outside look-
ing in might say, its a very
social activity.
Its kind of funny a lot
of people look at it and go,
Well, LARPers are all anti-
social. Theres actually more
people at a LARP than there
is at your kitchen table,
Pierce said.
People I have met who
have role-played their entire
lives explain, Hey, look, I go
to a nine-to-ve job. During
the week, everything kind
of seems blas, but when
I game, or even go hiking
or shooting or to a reenact-
ment, whatever my hobby
is, it gives me that refreshing
taste, and thats what LARP
does. LARP, for many peo-
ple, is that extra step, that
extra input, that extra bit of
creativity that kind of feeds
that need that some people
have and lets them escape.
Its what makes the hobby
great.
So, in other words, theyre
nerds, theyre proud, and
theyre recruiting. For
details on joining Into the
Breach games, nd them
on Facebook or contact
Ormando at 570.406.3763.
I went to one event, I got
stuck in the mud and died,
and I had the best time of
my life, and nine years later,
I am running LARPs and
wrangling the nerds and still
getting lost in mud, Zurko
emphasized with a laugh. If
you think youll like it, you
will.
W
Cowboys and wizards head Into the Breach
Howtojoin
For more information on Into the breach live-
action role-playing games, visit facebook.com/
groups/400105640038753/ or facebook.com/
pages/Grimdark-west/437617026298563 for
grimdark West and facebook.com/HonorsArcana for
Honors arcana. Head director Chris Ormando can be
reached at 570.406.3763.
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Male Musings on love, roMance, and dating
Kenny Luck | Special to the Weekender
Hell is other people
Hell is other people.
This is the way the post-
WWII French philosopher
Jean-Paul Sartre described
the nature of human suf-
fering. For a long time,
I disagreed with Sartre.
Plenty of people made
me happy: friends, family,
girlfriends, co-workers
that is, until I met Mary.
A few years ago, after
the termination of a long-
term relationship, I was
faced with a dilemma: do
I stop dating, or do I con-
tinue to look? I decided
on the latter. I could sit
around and feel sorry for
myself, or I could move
forward. Then, right on
cue, a friend approached
me.
I think I might have
someone for you, he said.
She is looking for a guy,
and I think this one might
have potential.
I agreed to call her, and,
within a few days, we had
plans to meet for dinner.
At rst everything
seemed normal. There
was some irtatious ban-
ter which is always a
plus on the way to the
restaurant in Dickson
City. We talked music
and movies. We laughed.
Everything was going in
my favor.
But something changed.
After parking the car,
I got out and opened her
door.
Its not 1950, she
barked. Dont do that.
WTF?! I thought.
It was in that moment
when I realized something
was wrong. I kept my cool
and pretended everything
was normal, although it
wasnt.
We ate a quick meal,
but the irting had van-
ished. No more witty ban-
ter. No more jokes just
blank stares and awkward
silence.
I drove her back to her
apartment, and, as I pre-
pared to say good night,
Mary said something
unexpected: she asked me
if I wanted to come inside.
Seeing it as one last
opportunity to salvage the
evening, I agreed.
I sat on her couch sip-
ping a glass of water while
she disappeared upstairs.
Within a few minutes,
Mary reappeared, sexily
clad in tight PJs, and sat
on the couch next to me.
I can have you in a min-
ute if I wanted, she said.
Youre too easy. Women
dont like that. They want
an aggressive, take-charge
guy.
She lectured me for
almost an hour, and
the conversation went
nowhere. There was no
catharsis, no revealing
moment, no Aha, sec-
ond chance: this date was
dead.
After that night, I never
saw Mary again. But just
before I left, she had
asked me if I learned any-
thing from being with her.
I didnt.
But when I asked her
the same question, she
said, Maybe I should
treat guys a little better in
the future.
Now, every time I go
on a bad date, or ask for
someones number, or
think about Mary, Sartres
words resonate. I often
wonder why opening a car
door was such an affront
to her femininity. That
said, maybe I was wrong.
Maybe I did learn some-
thing from her: if hell
really exists, I was there.
If not, then it was at least
some bizarre version of
dating purgatory. Either
way, redemption isnt pos-
sible. Perhaps I should
forget this whole thing
and become a celibate
Buddhist monk. It might
not be a bad idea.
W
Something as simple as opening a door can close another one, at least for one of Kennys dates.
fantasy owners dream. The
only problem is that we get
so anxious whenever we see
a quarterback have a solid
game on the ground that we
get overly enamored and fall
in love after the rst date.
After Week 1 it was hard to
see anything besides Pryors
112 yards on the ground.
We all forgot about his two
interceptions against Indys
anemic pass defense. We
all knew who Terrelle Pryor
was while we refused to
consider him at draft time,
and its important that
we dont forget that now.
Hot start of the week:
Josh Gordon WR Cleveland.
Gordon is coming off a two-
game suspension and he will
be looking to pick up where
he left off last season. He
ended the 2012 season on a
hot streak and he might help
wake up Clevelands stum-
bling offense.
Must sit this week: Any
Jacksonville Jaguar. Not
even Cecil Shorts is safe
matching up against the
Seahawks defense.
Weekly match-up rank-
ings:
QB
P. Manning: Too good
of an arm to do anything
besides destroy the Raiders
secondary.
A. Rodgers: Cincinnati has
a stout defense, but Rodgers
has been in elite form so far
this year.
D. Brees: Brees loves let-
ting it y at home in the
dome and this week will be
no different.
C. Kaepernick: Look for
a nice bounce-back perfor-
mance against Indys strug-
gling pass defense.
M. Vick: The Eagles have
been rattling off more plays
than any other team this
year. Vick has been putting
up numbers reminiscent
of himself as a Falcon in
Madden 04.
M. Stafford: Washingtons
defense hasnt stopped any-
one this year. Stafford and
Megatron should be able to
play pitch and catch until
theyre bored and go home.
M. Ryan: Miamis defense
is proving to be strong, but
Ryan simply has too many
options to throw to between
Jones, White, and Gonzalez.
R. Wilson: Jacksonville
is just the opponent Wilson
needs to get back on track
after a tough match-up with
San Francisco.
C. Newton: Newtons
sophomore slump might still
be in effect, but his ability to
move the chains with his feet
will keep him in my top 10.
R. Grifn III: RG3 might
not have been himself over
the rst two games of the
season, but the Redskins
seem to be playing lots of
catch-up football and that
means Grifn will have
plenty of opportunities to air
it out.
RB
A . Peterson: Obviously
L. McCoy: Phillys upt-
empo offense bodes well for
Vick, Jackson, and especially
McCoy.
M. Forte: Forte has taken
a liking to the Bears new
offensive scheme. Hes
averaging 27.5 touches per
game.
D. Martin: Lets face it, the
Bucs offense might end up
being Muscle-Hamster-or-
bust week in and week out.
J. Charles: Hes already
banged up, but still totaled
over 100 all-purpose yards
this past week.
M. Lynch: Lynch handled
the 49ers defense as well as
one could expect. He will
be rewarded with the Jags
defense in Week 3.
C.J. Spiller: He might be
sharing the workload with
Fred Jackson, but I still love
Spillers big play ability.
A. Foster: Another top
back sharing carries. Foster
is still the favorite for
Houstons goal line carries
R. Bush: In typical Reggie
Bush fashion, hes already
banged up. Get what you can
from him while hes still on
the eld.
A. Morris: Morris has
had limited carries with the
Redskins, constantly playing
from behind, but its much
too soon to let a back like
Morris fall outside the top
10.
WR
C. Johnson: No surprise
here.
A.J Green: Green Bays
secondary is banged up and,
even if they werent, they
would still struggle to con-
tain Green.
D. Bryant- Many people
predicted Dez would have a
coming out party this year.
Those people were right.
He still has suspect hands
at times, but as long as hes
healthy you can start him
with condence.
D. Thomas: Theonlything
that can slow down Thomas
is Peyton Mannings other
options.
J. Jones: Monitor his knee
situation this week.
B. Marshall: Brandon
Marshall loves making
Cutler look good.
D. Jackson: Jackson has
been running wild since
Chip Kelly took over in
Philly.
R. Cobb: Rodgers and
Cobb have been in quite the
groove since last year. Dont
expect that to stop anytime
soon.
V. Cruz: Carolinas sec-
ondary is beat up and Eli will
bounce back last weeks loss
to Peyton and the Broncos.
W. Welker: Oaklands sec-
ondary cant contain all of
Denvers weapons. Look for
a big day from the Broncos
receiving core this week.
W
Fantasy football
From page 10
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Music, Motors, and More @ Toyota Pavilion at
Montage Mountain 09.15.13
Photos by Jason Riedmiller For more photos, visit theweekender.com
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Derek Warren
Weekender Correspondent
Cooking with beer
BEER REVIEWS
Derek Warren | Weekender Correspondent
Brewer: Terrapin Beer
Company
Beer: Pumpkinfest
Style: Fruit/Vegetable
Beer
ABV: 6.10%
Description: Terrapin
Pumpkinfest pours a dark
amber color with a thick
creamy beige head that
leaves a very thick lacing
on the glass. The aroma is
very enjoyable and alluring,
just what you would want
from a pumpkin beer. The
spices dominate the nose,
especially cinnamon up
front, and that wonderful
fresh pumpkin pie aroma
cuts right through with just
a hint of sweet malt. The
palate is also dominated by
the spices up front before
being washed over with
Munich malts that bring
about thoughts of a lovely
Oktoberfest beer, blending
with bready and caramel
malts. The beer nishes
long and dry with the spic-
es lingering on the palate.
The body of the beer leans
toward the medium side of
the spectrumwith a moder-
ate amount of carbonation
a very nice balance. This
is a well-balanced pumpkin
beer that does not overdo
with the spices and has an
excellent malt selection to
give the beer a nice body
a very enjoyable fall beer.
Food pairing: The rich-
ness and sweet malty bal-
ance of this beer makes it
a perfect pairing for rich
and hearty foods that are
great in the cooler months.
Pumpkinfest is a perfect
pairing with a rich and
hearty beef stew; the beer
is perfect for highlighting
the tender meat sweetness.
This beer also pairs very
well with many German
dishes and is at home with
any pork dish, with a malt
backbone that brings out
the caramel avors of the
meat but enough heft and
carbonation to cleanse the
palate and leave behind
a nice balance of spices.
However, Pumpkinfest also
nds a very happy partner
with roast chicken. Also,
feel free to try with rich
desserts such as carrot cake
or, of course, some warm
pumpkin pie or pumpkin
bread. Pumpkinfest is also
a fantastic beer to have on
hand to cook many dishes
with, so get out there and
be adventurous!
The nal word:
Terrapin Pumpkinfest is
certainly a pumpkin beer
worth a taste. In a market
that is beyond saturated
by pumpkin beers that
tend towards being over-
spiced, it is nice to nd
one that is very nicely bal-
anced and actually pulls in
some Oktoberfest inspira-
tion. Terrapin is a brewery
that consistently brews
high-quality beers, and
Pumpkinfest is no differ-
ent. The only major com-
plaint is that Pumpkinfest
is sold in four-packs, as a
nice six-pack of this one
would make the beer even
better. So be sure to pick
some up this fall season
and enjoy this beer while
breathing in that lovely
autumn air.
Rating: W W W V
Where can I get it?
Currently available in bot-
tles at: Wegmans, Dickson
City; J & H Beer, Wilkes-
Barre; Goldsteins Deli,
Kingston; and Krugels
Georgetown Deli & Beer,
Wilkes-Barre.
Remember, enjoy respon-
sibly! Cheers!
-Derek Warren is a beer
fanatic, avid homebrewer,
and beer historian. Follow
Dereks beer blog at idtap-
that.org.
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Agreat pumpkin
Treating oneself to the sim-
ple pleasures in life is a luxury
that wecanall affordandatrue
key to happiness. Great beer,
enjoyed in reasonable quanti-
ties, is certainly one of these. A
well-paired dish only enhances
the pleasure factor, one compli-
menting the other. However,
to improve the pleasure factor
even more, there is a move-
ment afoot to cook with your
beer for a fullyengrossingplea-
surable experience.
Sure, we have all had a beer
while cookinginthe kitchenor
onthe grill, but this movement
is far more than that and even
moves beyond the traditional
beer-battered sh and chips or
Guinness stew, not to knock
these traditional and wonder-
ful foods. However, the current
interest incraft beer goes hand
inhandwiththe rising interest
in artisanal food, so it would
be expected for the two inter-
ests to intersect. This naturally
gives rise to new and exciting
dishes that combine beer and
food, and while there is still
room for many traditional
meals, there is a vast array of
new dishes available to the
consumer.
Many breweries have
taken to incorporating fan-
tastic restaurants into their
tasting rooms, or as sepa-
rate institutions within the
brewery breweries such as
Stone, whose World Bistro &
Gardens in California offers
such fantastic dishes as garlic,
cheddar, and Stone Ruination
IPA soup; Stone Pale Ale
and garlic stir-fried Brussels
sprouts; and Stone Arrogant
Bastard battered onion
rings. A bit closer to home in
Cooperstown, N.Y., is Brewery
Ommegang, whose Belgian-
themed caf offers such deli-
cious choices as frites with
Abbey Ale and cumin ketchup
and mustard with Witte Ale
and honey or the magnicent
Three Philosophers chocolate
fondue. These are just some
samplesof wonderful combina-
tions that canarise fromcomb-
ingbeer withfood.
However, this movement
extends far beyondthe reaches
of brewery restaurants and
continues right at home with
a vast amount of recipes avail-
able to make delightful dishes
using your favorite craft beer.
If youre confused about where
to start, you can simply search
the Internet or nd a wonder-
ful array of cooking with beer
cookbooks nowavailable, such
as The Best of American
Food & Beer, The Craft
of Stone Brewing Co., or
The American Craft Beer
Cookbook. These are all great
starting points to get cooking
and contain a great abundance
of general information about
beer as well.
When creating dishes,
there are a few things to keep
in mind, but as with all cook-
ing, experimentation is not
only suggested, it is required.
One basic thing to keep in
mind, though, is to keep like
avors with like avors; that
is if you are looking to create
a dish with spices, try using a
beer with such a prole, like
an IPA, or if you want a more
chocolate base, say for a des-
sert, a stout or a porter are the
perfect starting points. Now
of course there are exceptions
to these, but for a base point
tostart from, these ideas work
best until you become more
acclimated to cooking with
beer.
Another great tip is to use
darker beer with red meat
and lighter beers with lighter
meats; a similar opinion falls
true for cooking with wine as
well. However, cookingaham-
burger made with grass-fed
beef and mixed with an impe-
rial stout will trump anything
that red wine could do in that
situation.
So, are you ready to get
adventurous now and get
cooking? Well, inkeepingwith
the impending fall season and
with the endless amount of
pumpkin beers available to us
now, I listedseveral recipes on
my blog, idtapthat.org, using
pumpkin ale as the beer base.
Recipes such as pumpkin
cheesecake, pumpkin beer
bread, and pumpkin ale cin-
namon rolls are all listed and
just waiting for you to give
thema try.
While food and beer have
long had a lovely relationship
with one another, this new
foodie dimension that has
been added to this relation-
ship has truly opened some
tasty doors into new frontiers
for cooking. So get into your
kitchen and get cooking just
dont drink all your ingredi-
ents before you nish!
W
Log on to idtapthat.org for some creative fall
recipes using pumpkin beers.
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Floodwood @ River Street Jazz Cafe 09.12.13
Photos by Tammy Heid For more photos, visit theweekender.com
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NEPA INDIE WRESTLING SPOTLIGHT
Bill Thomas | Weekender Correspondent
Bye bye, Banger
Banger Ritch Howe
jumped off the turnbuckle
for the last time on Friday,
Sept. 6. The ring shook as
he hit his opponent with his
signature top rope leg drop.
One pin and three seconds
later, Howes 14-year career
as a professional wrestler
was over.
Prior to the Orang-K Pro
Wrestling show that sig-
naled the end, Howe looked
back to the beginning.
I sent a letter to (World
Championship Wrestling)
when I was about 17,
Howe, now 33, said. WCW
was the biggest thing at the
time. I didnt have any delu-
sions that theyd say, Oh,
come work for us at 17 with
no experience. I was just
hoping Id hear something
back because otherwise I
had no idea what to do. I
didnt even knowhowto get
started.
To Howes surprise, he
actually did hear back from
WCW. A letter directed him
to the companys in-house
training school. Shortly
after that, however, Howe
learned his rst son was
on the way and hung up
his squared circle dreams
in order to take care of his
newly expanding family.
Nevertheless, when
underground wrestling
came to Pennsylvania in the
mid-90s with the formation
of Valley Championship
Wrestling, it wasnt long
before Howe found him-
self in the mix. Inspired by
VCWs self-trained brawlers,
Howes dreams got a new,
D.I.Y.-style lease on life.
It was a very long pro-
cess of Find whoever you
can to teach you however
much they can, Howe
said. After 14 years, I g-
ured out there is no way
to be trained. You have to
condition yourself to always
be learning. You dont stop.
Since then, there have
been few local promo-
tions Howe hasnt worked
with, and more than a few
he started himself. Hes
played major roles both
in the ring and behind the
scenes of such groups as
Pride of Wrestling, Action
Unlimited: Anthracite
Wrestling, Keystone State
Wrestling, and, most recent-
ly, Orang-K Pro Wrestling
(which he continues to be a
backer of).
One experience Howe
remembers fondly saw him
team with WWF superstar
Stevie Richards against
two other WWF super-
stars, Road Dogg and Billy
Gunn, for the main event
of a Championship Pro
Wrestling show. Exposure
matches such as that one
allowed Howe to make a
name for himself and wres-
tle for other promotions
around the country.
Still, it all begins to take
its toll over time.
It just clicked in my
head: Im done, Howe
said, grateful he was able
to bounce back from a knee
injury suffered earlier this
year that could have been
much worse.
I took up surng last
summer. I did a lot of surf-
ing this summer, and I want
to be able to do more next
summer. I did the wrestling
thing; I did what I wanted to
do. I want to be able to do
other things. So many peo-
ple get out of the business
because theyre injured. Im
not injured. Thats why I
want to get out now.
Recently married, Howes
retirement isnt just a gift to
himself, but to his family as
well.
Back to Howes last
match: In the middle of the
ring, the retiring Banger
sat down and untied his
wrestling boots. Then he
grabbed a mic.
Thank you for letting me
do this for as long as Ive
done it, Howe said. Ive
headlined shows. I didnt
deserve that. I was KSW
heavyweight champion. I
didnt deserve that either.
Im just a kid from Wilkes-
Barre who likes wrestling.
Howe invited his son,
Matt, into the ring and
handed the boy his boots.
Reecting on his long
career entertaining other
dads kids, Howe ended his
speech simply.
Dads coming home,
he said, and dads staying
home.
Until next time, remem-
ber: When fact is stranger
than ction, wrestling is
at least as real as anything
else.
W
Photos by mark griffin
Banger Ritch Howe ended his
14-year career as a professional
wrestler on Sept. 6.
Name:
Kyle Hamilton
Town:
Sweet Valley
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need for:
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MAinTEnAncE MEchAnicS
QuAliTy ASSuRAncE TEchniciAnS
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Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
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CALL CONCERN 800-654-6180
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Special Notices
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cherish your baby, offering
security, endless love
and opportunities.
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1-888-642-9650
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$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Highest Prices Paid Free Pickup
CA$H PAID 570-288-8995
Yard Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Unity of NEPA 140
140 S. Grant Street
(Parking off of Bethel)
Amazing Bag Sale
Sept. 20-21
Fri., 9-6, Sat., 9-3
Clothing, shoes, books, kit-
chen and more. Some items
individually priced. The rest get
bagged. Bags provided. Fri-
day AM bags start at $5 by
Sat PM bags are $1.
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
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can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
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from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Building / Construction / Skilled
FORKLIFT
Immediate openings for
FORKLIFT
OPERATORS/ORDER
PICKERS 2nd shift
in the Center Point
Industrial Park, Pittston.
We offer weekly pay and a
competitive benefit pack-
age including medical,
dental, vision, 401K and
PTO.
Qualified candidates must
have a valid driver's
license, your own transport-
ation, be able to pass
pre-employment drug
testing and a background
check.
Apply in person
Monday and Friday
9 A.M. to 2 P.M. at:
Team Employer Solutions
20 Reynolds St
Kingston PA 18704
570-714-5955
Drivers & Delivery
DRIVERS
New Higher Pay!
Local Hazleton Runs!
CDL-A, 1 yr Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics
Apply: www.goelc.com
1-866-213-1065
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
OUTDOOR
POWER
EQUIPMENT
(OPE)
TECHNICIAN/
MECHANIC
Minimum 5 years experience
diagnosing / repairing small
engi ne power equi pment ,
plows, tractors, mowers, etc.
Will h OPE f t t i i
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
p
Will have OPE factory training
on motors, transmissions, hy-
draulics, electrical, pneumat-
ics or other components. Must
have your own tools. Call Bri-
an at Harvis HR Service 570-
542-5330 or send resume to:
hilbertsequipment.jobs
@gmail.com
Logistics/Transportation
DRIVERS
NEEDED
CDL CLASS A
Full time. Home Daily.
Monday-Friday, night work.
Must have clean MVR & back-
ground with minimum of 1 year
experience. Must have doubles
endorsement. Benefits
available. Call Todd
570-991-0316
Production/Operations
MACHINIST
Local firm has immediate
opening for CNC Lathe
Operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train the right
applicant. 2nd shift - 4 day
work week.
Excellent benefits.
R&H Mfg., Inc.,
Woodward Hill,
Edwardsville, PA,
570-288-6648
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
Land (Acreage)
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
Apartments /Townhouses
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom Eat-in kitchen,
living room, full bath, stove
/fridge, washer/dryer, $500. +
utilities. No Pets. 570-760-
3637 or 570-477-3839
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1 Month Free Rent
(Qualified Applicant)
FORTY FORT RETAIL
(GLASS FRONT) STORE.
WYOMING AVE. $850. month.
2 YEARS SAME RENT.
A MONTH FREE RENT
(QUALIFIED) APPLICATION
REQUIRED. DETAILS CALL
570-288-1422
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Get news when
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Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
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GET
ALL THE
ADVERTISING
INSERTS
WITH
THE
LATEST
SALES.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Commercial
WYOMING
322 Wyoming Avenue
300 sq. ft. ideal for barbershop,
small convenience store, appli-
ance repair, locksmith, eBay
outlet, accounting office, travel
agency, designer, broker, con-
sultant, general office space.
Air, heat, garbage, sewer, hot
water & all maintenance in-
cluded. Street parking. Down-
t own Wyomi ng l ocat i on,
30,000 passing cars a day.
$350/month. Call
570-693-3492 for appointment.
Houses For Rent
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1st MONTHS RENT FREE
(Qualified Applicants)
EXCELLENT INVENTORY
CALL 570-288-1422
NO PETS EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION, APPLICA-
TION, FREE FIRST MONTH
(QUALIFY) HOME $900/mo +
UTI LI TI ES. Edwardsvi l l e /
Ki ngston APT. $500/mo +
UTILITIES. PLAINS/W-B. Call
for details, others.
LEHMAN
IDETOWN ROAD
2 bedrooms, laundry facilities
on site. No pets. $900 month.
1st month & security required.
Available now. 570-639-0967
or 570-574-6974
Land (Acreage)
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills/Charles Place
Only 2 one acre+ lots left!
570-498-9244
Half Doubles
PITTSTON CITY
HALF-DOUBLE
Half-Double for rent. Well
kept 3 Bedroom, 1 bath loc-
ated at 172 William Street.
$650/Mo requires: 1 month
security deposit ; credit/back-
ground check. No Pets, No
Smoking, Not Section 8. For
more info contact Norm at:
normandy225@comcast.net
or 570-606-7018.
Autos For Sale
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Highest Prices Paid Free Pickup
CA$H PAID 570-288-8995
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
Chimney Service
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
Excavating
All Types Of Excavating,
Demolition & Concrete Work.
Lot clearing, pool closing
& retaining walls, etc.
Large & Small Jobs. FREE EST.
(570) 760-1497
Hauling & Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
Miscellaneous
Painting & Wallpaper
Daniels Paint and Wall Covering
Lic. PA100671 & Ins.
20 YEARS EXP.
570-604-2961
danielspaintandwallcovering.com
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RIDE OF THE WEEK
Michael Golubiewski | Special to the Weekender
To submit your vehicle,
email: mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
Ive been taking this
car to shows almost
since the day I bought it,
Albright said. On top of
that, Ive put almost $13K
in improvements into it:
under the hood, in the
interior, trying to make it a
real performance Mustang.
W
2005
FORD MUSTANG GT
Owner:
JefAlbright
Forest City
VIDEO GAME REVIEWS
Robbie Vanderveken | Special to the Weekender
The Top 5zombie games of 2013
Every since 1968s Night
of the Living Dead, people
have been obsessive with
zombies. They have de-
nitely shambled into all
aspects of pop culture, from
movies to comic books, and
especially into video games.
There isnt just one type
of zombie out there: there is
the classic slow and sham-
bling zombies, the fast and
aggressive zombies, and
the walking dead variety,
which respond to smells
and sound. Just like these
types of zombies, there are
several different types of
zombie games.
This year has been huge
for zombie games. Here is
a short list of the top ve
zombie games of 2013 that
you have to try if you are an
undead fanatic.
5. Dead Island:
Riptide
Dead Island: Riptide
is the sequel to the origi-
nal Dead Island and
is an interesting mix of
rst-person action and
RPG. Riptide continues
the story of the survivors
as they try to escape an
island chain called Banoi
after being shipwrecked.
Riptide features new
characters, vehicles, chang-
ing weather conditions,
new weapons, and some
different types of zombies.
Riptide was a fun game
where you could explore
and dismember zombies
with a group of friends; it
was a bit buggy and had
pretty much no story, but it
was denitely an entertain-
ing and gory zombie game.
4. State of Decay
Just like Dead Island,
this is a open world survival
game. What makes SoD
interesting is it strives to
be more realistic; its like a
zombie apocalypse simula-
tion. A big part of this game
is meeting other survivors
and building a community.
This isnt an action-packed
game; it isnt about killing
zombies its about sur-
viving. You have to build
a base, get food, and scav-
enge for supplies while
staying alive. If your charac-
ter dies, he is dead, you lose
your gear, your home, and
everything. You cant just
load a save, so this really
creates an emotional attach-
ment. Just like last years
Walking Dead game from
Telltale, the choices you
make drastically change the
game and how other survi-
vors will act around you.
One of the best parts of
this game is you can cus-
tomize your outpost; you
can have towers, gardens,
storage, and extra secu-
rity barricades. Players will
have a great time setting
up their home and decid-
ing how you would set
up your house to survive
the undead. This is one of
the best zombie games out
there because of how realis-
tic it can be. It is a real test
of your survival skills.
3. ZombiU
A launch game for the
new Wii system, ZombiU
is an interesting and scary
experience. Just like State
of Decay, if you die, you
start over. You have to nd
yourself as a zombie and
kill it to recover your gear;
this adds a huge sense of
urgency to stay alive. What
makes this game so cool is
the two-screen experience
of the Wii U; you can use
the touch screen as a map
or to control your invento-
ry, and for all sorts of other
tools, such as hacking. This
is special because while you
are using the touch pad, you
can still be attacked on your
TV, so you have to keep
checking the TV screen
to see if you are being
attacked. It leads to some
really intense scary scenes.
It is a must-play showcase
of the touch screen on the
Wii U for zombie fans.
2. The Last of Us
This is not only one of
the best zombie games, but
one of the best games peri-
od. The protagonists arent
really zombies; they are
called the infected, but they
share a lot of similarities
with zombies. The game
focuses on two survivors,
Joel and Ellie, as they travel
across an America that has
been devastated by the out-
break of a virus that turns
people into zombie type
creatures. The real threat to
these travelers, though, is
the non-infected. Resources
are limited and everyone
is out to take them from
you, as is the government,
which is trying to contain
the outbreak. The Last of
Us looks amazing, and as
one of the best and most
heart-wrenching experienc-
es ever, it is a must-play for
every PS3 owner.
1. The Walking Dead:
400 Days
Last years Telltales The
Walking Dead was noth-
ing short of a masterpiece.
It not only changed what
people thought of zombie
games, but also changed
storytelling in games alto-
gether. It isnt an action
game; its a point-and-click
adventure game, and its all
about story. Nearly every-
thing you do in the game
changes what non-playable
characters think of you and
the outcome of the game.
400 Days is the follow-
up to original and is made
to bridge the gap between
season one and the highly
anticipated season two.
400 Days tells the story
of ve new characters each
having different stories
based on The Walking
Dead comic books. Its not
as compelling as Lee and
Clementines story, but it
does tell a very emotional
narrative and expands the
conventions of the last
game by adding more inter-
actions with surroundings
and more timed responses,
which impact the story.
Another interesting change
is the ability to switch
between the other charac-
ters story at any time. It
doesnt have the impact of
the main game, but it is a
great way to hold you over
until season two comes out.
-Robbie Vanderveken is
the digital operations spe-
cialist at The Times Leader.
E-mail him at rvanderve-
ken@timesleader.com.
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A 20-somethings wild Adventures
Justin Brown | Weekender Correspondent
My best friend from col-
lege had a baby last week.
On the same day, I had a
hangover. Both the baby
and I had to be held and
suck on a boob before we
stopped crying. I guess,
when I really think about
it, we were crying for the
same reasons. Neither
one of us were where we
wanted to be. The baby
wanted to be curled up in
a uterus, and I wanted to
be living anywhere other
than my parents house.
How long do you plan
on staying here? bad-
gered my mother as I
hauled my hungover ass
to the kitchen for some
remedying pickle juice
and Tylenol to cure the
aftermath of my poor
decisions from the night
before.
You say you want your
own TV show, she con-
tinued, her eyes still glued
to a basement makeover
on HGTV. Go get one!
Youre not going to be on
TV by managing a bar
and living in Carbondale!
Besides, I could use the
space.
I actually kicked off my
summer by presenting my
second television pitch to
a major production com-
pany in Los Angeles! I was
certain that my idea for a
show called Whatever
It Takes, which would
follow me coaching and
inspiring the Millenial
generation to go above
and beyond to reach their
goals, would be a smash!
As someone who brought
a marching band to apply
for a job, who better to
create and host a show
like that?
I could see, feel, and
even taste the impact
this show would have if
it were picked up. When I
met a group of filmmakers
during my stay in Cali,
my vision was even more
solidified.
We got a private tour
inside theChive office
today! they screamed
when they saw me at the
hostel we were staying at
together. All because of
you!
We asked for a tour.
They said no, one
explained.
However, began his
buddy, I said we need to
do whatever it takes like
Justin would!
They went into fur-
ther detail by telling me
they borrowed a guitar
from a performer on the
Venice Beach boardwalk
and started playing a
song outside about why
theChive should let them
in - until they came out-
side and actually did.
That enthusiasm was
matched with the mem-
bers of the development
team I met with the fol-
lowing day at my pitch
meeting! They loved it.
After discussing it with
the rest of their develop-
ment team, I received an
e-mail back.
We just adore you!
the e-mail read.
Then, it said they were
so sad to inform me that
they had to pass.
It borders on too ear-
nest, the e-mail noted,
which can be deadly
when selling a show.
I was never called too
earnest before, and it
confused the hell out of
me. I felt defeated and
stopped focusing on my
dream.
You know the differ-
ence between winners
and losers? I was recent-
ly asked. Nothing! Both
fail. Winners just get back
up.
So, for all dreamers, the
believers, the doers, the
twerkers with their heads
in the clouds and their
asses bent over on the
dance floor: be reckless,
be earnest, be yourself,
and follow your dreams.
Im going to. Third pitch
is the charm, right?
W
The importance of being earnest
HAPPINESS IS A CLEAN
TOILET
beginning in 2011, about
three dozen people in tokyo
have been meeting every
sunday morning at 6 a.m. on
a mission to scrub down, one
by one, the citys grungiest
public rest rooms. by 7:30,
according to an associated
Press reporter who witnessed
an outing in august, the team
had left behind a gleaming
public toilet, looking as good
as the day it was installed.
explained the hygiene- intense
satoshi Oda (during the week,
a computer programmer), the
mission is for our own good
work that leader masayuki
magome compares to the
training that buddhist monks
receive to find peace. (In fact,
to fulfill the groups motto,
Clean thyself by cleaning
cubicles, the scouring must
be done with bare hands.) a
squad supporter spoke of a
sad, growing apprehension
that the younger generation
no longer shares the Japanese
cultural conviction that rest
rooms should always be clean
and safe.
MEDICAL MARVELS
Colleagues were stunned in
may when abC news editor
don ennis suddenly appeared
at work wearing a little black
dress and a red wig and
declaring that he had begun
hormone therapy and wanted
to be called dawn ennis. as
co-workers accommodated his
wishes (which did not seem
so unusual in contemporary
professional society), ennis
began to have second
thoughts, and by July had
blamed his conversion on
transient global amnesia,
brought on by marital
difficulties, and had returned
to work as don. apparently the
primary lingering effect is that
he must still deal with dawns
hormone-induced breasts.
THE ENTREPRENEURIAL
SPIRIT
researchers at the
University of tokyo have
developed a mirror that makes
a person appear happy even
when not. a built-in camera
tracks facial features in real
time, then tweaks the image
to turn up the corners of
the mouth and to create the
beginnings of a smile in the
eyes. Of what practical use
would such a mirror be?
Other Japanese researchers,
according to a slate.com report
in august, believe that happy-
face mirrors in retail stores
would improve shoppers
dispositions and lead to more
sales.
a home ownership boom
in China has led to heavily
attended housing fairs, in
which builders compete
zealously to sell their homes,
leading to offbeat schemes
to draw attention. among the
latest, according to China daily,
is one that dresses female
models in bare-backed evening
wear, with sample floor plans
and other housing information
painted onto their skin, and
sends them wandering through
the crowds.
ANIMALS GONE WILD
syFy Channels recent
original movie sharknado
briefly became a media
sensation in July with a
storyline involving large
schools of oversized sharks
lifted from the ocean by
waterspouts and deposited,
alive (and angry!) on land
to wreak havoc. but as the
website mother nature news
subsequently reported,
animals actually have
been lifted to land in that
fashion in the past. Previous
documented news reports
of the phenomenon include
airborne fish (mudfish in the
Philippines, perch in australia);
frogs (in Odzaci, serbia, in
2005); jellyfish (bath, england,
in 1894); worms (Jennings, La.,
in 2007); and, according to an
1887 new york times story,
eight alligators in silverton
township, s.C.
two macaques escaped
from the straussberg
adventure Park in eastern
germany in July, apparently
on the run from the jealous
bullying of Cornelius, the
resident alpha male. When
park officials recaptured the
two, they reported that (even
though everyone seems to
be against bullying these
days) Fred and richard
would have to be castrated.
It was not punishment, the
officials explained; it was to
calm them and reduce the
overall hormone imbalance
in the park, since males greatly
outnumber females.
PERSPECTIVE
the Costa rican government
announced recently that
it would close all its zoos,
effective march 2014, and free
animals either to the wild or
to safe retirement shelters.
since the country is known
for its expansive biodiversity
(500,000 unique organisms,
despite occupying barely more
than 1/100th of 1 percent of
earths area), it is time, the
environment minister said, to
allow the organisms to interact
instead of imprisoning them.
Costa rica is also one of only
four countries to ban the
exploitation of dolphins.
LEADING ECONOMIC
INDICATORS
In July, following sustained
criticism, thomson reuters
business information company
suspended an advance-release
service for the crucial monthly
consumer confidence index
that has been known to signal
stock markets to abruptly
buy (driving up prices) or
sell (sending them lower).
the University of michigan
prepares and distributes the
index promptly at 10 a.m.
eastern time on its release
date, but thomson reuters
offers two advance peeks.
It pays the school about
$1 million a year to see the
index at 9:55 a.m., to share
with its best customers. the
suspended program gave
an even earlier tip-off at
9:54:58 and high-frequency
trading firms paid $6,000 more
a month for those two seconds,
which allowed their computer
robots to execute hundreds
of thousands of trades before
other professional traders had
access to the index.
First-World Problems:
self-indulgent new york City
parents have been hiring
play-date coaches for
their preschool youngsters,
apparently out of fear that the
kids skill set for just having fun
might not impress admissions
officers at the citys elite
private schools. the CeO of one
consulting outfit told the new
york Post in July that $400 an
hour gets expert monitoring of
a 4-year-old in small groups,
evaluating, for example, how
the child colors in a book,
shares the crayons, holds a
pencil and follows the rules of
simon says.
W
PEOPLE WITH ISSUES
John Anderson, the town administrator of
Derry, N.H. (pop. 34,000), was accused by
police in August of indecent exposure and
lewdness afer, naked, inviting a DirecTV
salesman into his home and performing
unspecifed conduct in front of the man.
Anderson was previously town manager of
Boothbay Harbor, Maine.
By Chuck shepherd
Weekender Wire Services
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LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED
Sound Party @ Sherman Theater 09.14.13
Photos by Jason Riedmiller For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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Wilkes-barre. $15, general
admission; $12, seniorsandWVIa
members; $7, students; free, children
12andunder.
Cal Verduchi, Joe Eichler and
Father Paul ComedyShow:
sept. 21, 9p.m.,theCaverna(602
Churchst.,Jessup). $14, advance.
seatingfrst comefrst serve.
ChicoryHouse andFolklore
Society
(www.folkloresociety.org,
570.333.4007)
CommunityContraDance: Oct. 5,
7p.m., Churchof Christ Uniting(776
market st., Kingston). $9, adults;
reducedadmissionfor families.
The CommonwealthMedical
College
(525pinest., scranton,
570.504.7000,
thecommonwealthmedical.com)
Annual golf tournament: Sept. 30,
Huntsvillegolf Club, shavertown.
registrationandbreakfast begins
9a.m., shotgunstart at 10. $300,
per golfer; $1,200, foursome.
For moreinfocall 570.504.9650
or toregister online, gotowww.
thecommonwealthmedical.com/
golf .
FifthAnnual Gala: Oct. 19, 6p.m.,
scrantonCultural Center.
DietrichTheater
(60e.tiogastreet,tunkhannock,
570.996.1500, www.dietrichtheater.
com).
Fall 2013FilmFestival Oktoberfest
OpeningNight Gala: Sept. 20, doors
5:30p.m. $35.
Fall 2013FilmFestival: Sept. 20-
Oct. 3. $9, evening(after 6p.m.); $8,
matinee(before6p.m.).
Fall 2013FilmFestival Post-Festival
Discussion: Oct. 4, 1 p.m.
OpenMicNight: Sept. 27, doors
6:30, openmicat 7.
19thCenturyAppliquedQuilts
AnAmericanTradition: Oct. 5, 11
a.m. $5.
Guitar Musicof SouthAmerica:
Oct. 6, 3p.m.
DietrichClassicMovieSeries:The
KingandI: Oct. 9, 1 and7p.m., $5.
Fall FoliageTriptoGreyTowers,
DingmansFerry&Milford: Oct. 12.
busdeparts8a.m., returns6p.m.
$100.
DoYouRememberThisMusic
for themoviesfromsilentstothe
1960s: Oct. 13, busdeparts1:30
p.m., concert atWVIamediaCenter
3p.m. Free.
TheMagicof Bill Dickson: Oct. 19,
11 a.m.
OpenMicNight: Oct. 25, 7p.m.,
featureat 8:15.
Sing! Sing! Sing!: Oct. 26, 11 a.m.
Glasswine.bar.kitchen. at
Ledges Hotel
(119Fallsave, Hawley. 570.226.1337,
www.ledgeshotel.com/glass-wine-
bar-bistro/)
LiveMusicwithEricRudyandJen
Kiesendahl: Sept. 20, 8-11 p.m.
LiveMusicwithKevinCampion:
sept. 27, 8-11 p.m.
The Greater ScrantonChamber
of Commerce
(222mulberryst., scranton)
SeptemberWomensNetwork
Luncheon: Sept. 18, noon.
Chamber Dayat RobaFamily
Farms: Sept. 22, 10a.m.
IremClubhouse
(64ridgewaydrive, dallas)
FluVaccinationclinic: Oct. 1, 9
a.m.-noon. register andpickup
aregistrationformintheIrem
ClubhouseBusinessOfcebySept.
26.youmust completeandreturn
theforminadvanceor bringit with
youonOct. 1.Youwill needyour
medicareor healthinsurancecard
whenreturningtheregistrationform.
If youdonot havehealthinsurance,
thecost is$25.99. Infuenza
vaccinesareprovidedbyWalgreens.
Octoberfest: Oct. 4, 11 a.m.-2p.m.
JessupArt Walk:
secondsaturdayof everymonth.
For moreinfovisit jessupartwalk.info
or email info@jessupartwalk.info.
JustusVolunteer Fire Co.
(159Fieldstonedr., scotttwp.,
570.587.4545)
KeepWine-ing, He Might Start
toLookLike Prince Charming
withauthor/ComedianJeannine
MLuby, Sept. 26, 7p.m., III Ponds
Winery, Dalton. Special guest Liz
russo. $16, advanceticketsat
JeannineLuby.com.
Kings College
(133northriver st.,Wilkes-barre,
570.208.5957or kings.edu)
ThirdAnnual KingsCollege
DiversityFilmFestival: Sept. 18, 25,
Oct. 2, 7p.m., BurkeAuditorium.
FilmScreening:EyesonthePrize
NoEasyWalk: Sept. 25, 7p.m.,
burkeauditorium.
BarbaraSabol Memorial Lecture:
sept. 26, 7p.m. burkeauditorium.
FilmScreening:Glory: Oct. 2, 7
p.m., burkeauditorium.
Feast of Saint FrancisLecture: Oct.
3, 7p.m., burkeauditorium.
St. BernardinesGospel Choir: Oct.
26, 7:30p.m.; LiturgyOct. 27, 11 a.m.
Thingsthat GoBOOMintheNight!:
Oct. 29, 7p.m., BurkeAuditorium.
Lackawanna College
(501Vinest., scranton,
1.877.346.3552, lackawanna.edu)
environmental Institute(10mofat
dr., Covingtontwp.)
Art Opening: WorksfromThe
Studio: Sept. 20, 5-7p.m.Through
nov. 1.
Natural Wonders: Fall Harvest:
Sept. 26, 1-2:30p.m., andevery
thursdaythroughdec. 5.ages3to
5. $40, sixclasses. pre-registration
required. Registrationlimited.
GettingtotheCore, programon
treeaging: Oct. 1, 5:30-7:30p.m.
ages7andup. $5. pre-registration
required.
Art inNature: BirdSeedWreath:
Oct. 12, 9a.m.-noon. $25. Pre-
registrationrequired.
Bearsinyour Backyard: Oct. 15, 6-8
p.m.$5. Pre-registrationrequired.
Wolf Visions: Oct. 26, 6-7:30p.m.
gearedfor childrenandfamilies. $5.
Pre-registrationrequired.
Misericordia University
MercyWeek2013: Sept. 22-28.
Mass, Sept. 22, 7p.m.; Liturgy, Sept.
24, 12:05p.m. followedbyMercy
Weekprayer aroundthepeacepole
incampusquadrangleat 12:30;
serviceFair, sept. 25, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.;
StuftheBuscharityevent, Sept.
26, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. For moreinfocall
570.674.1483.
Openhouse: Sept. 28, registration
9a.m.
Annual HealthCareLectureSeries
TheFutureof HealthCareinthe
UnitedStates,bySusanDentzer:
Oct. 4, 7:45a.m., Dudrick, Muth,
Huntzinger, andaldentrust rooms
of sandyandmarleneInsalacoHall.
Registrationrequired.
Interactivecookingdemo
andpresentationbyFather Leo
patalinghug, whoappearedon
ThrowDown! WithBobbyFlay:
nov. 14, 7p.m., Huntzinger andalden
trust rooms, sandyandmarlene
InsalacoHall.
NinthAnnual Fall Intertribal
Powwow
Sept. 28-29, 10a.m.-6p.m.,
noxenFireCo. grounds(3493
stull road, noxen). For more
informationcontact natalie
Wisteriaat 570.947.2097or email
wisteria18704@yahoo.com.
NorthPoconoCultural Society
HarmonicBrassof Munich,
Germany: Sept. 23, 7p.m., Saint
CatherinesCatholicChurch(220
Churchst., moscow). $8per person;
$15for two.
76Universitydrive, Hazleton,
570.450.3000, www.hn.psu.edu)
PennStateWilkes-Barre
(Rte. 115, Lehman, 570.675.2171,
wb.psu.edu)
FiveGreat Films, FiveGreat
Genres:Thursdayevenings
beginningSept. 26throughOct.
24, rCtheatersWilkes-barre.
pre-flmlecturenotesandpost-flm
discussionwill accompanyeach
screening. FilmsincludeAirplane!,
OnGoldenPond,Raidersof the
LostArk,TheDaytheEarthStood
Still, andHighNoon.
Friends of Salt Springs Park
(POBox541, Montrose.
570.967.7275, info@
friendsofsaltspringspark.org.)
MovieNight: Oct. 5, 7p.m. Nov. 2,
7p.m.
PicturesinthePark: LookatThose
Leaves!: Oct. 6, 2p.m.-5p.m.
Gameon!: Oct. 11, Nov. 8, 7p.m.-
8:30p.m.
Bats! OhMy!: Oct. 18, 7p.m.
Full MoonHike: Oct. 19, 5:30p.m.-
7:30p.m.
HalloweenFest: Oct. 26, 4p.m.-
9:30p.m.
TakeaStepBackinThyme: Nov. 3,
1 p.m.-3p.m.
ScrantonCultural Center
(420n.Washingtonave.,
scranton, 570.346.7369,
scrantonculturalcenter.org)
BadMovieThursday: Sept. 19, 7
p.m. $10
Settlers Inn
LiveMusicintheDiningRoomwith
danbradley. sept. 21, 6-9p.m.; sept.
28, 6-9p.m.
Unityof NEPA: ASpiritual Center
(140s. grant st.,Wilkes-barre.
570.824.7722.)
HowtoPraytoGodWithout
Talkingprayer class: Sept. 18, 11:30
a.m. post-service.
TheAmazingBagSale: Sept. 20, 9
a.m.-6p.m.; sept. 21, 9a.m.-3p.m.
HipSipCofeeHouseSeries80s
KaraokeNight: Sept. 28, 6:30p.m.
Special Guest Speaker - Rev.Ann
Marie: Sept. 29, 10a.m. service.
WaverlyCommunityHouse
(1115n.abingtonrd.,Waverly,
waverlycomm.org)
Basketball clinics: BeginningSept.
17, sixweekseverytuesdayfrom
3:30-5p.m. Boysandgirlsages6
to9. beginningsept. 19, sixweeks
everyThursdayfrom3:30-5p.m.
boysandgirlsingrade4through6.
$60per participant or $12per class.
BabySignsParentWorkshop: Sept.
19, 7-8:30p.m. $55per individual
or couple. For moreinformation
or toprint aregistrationform, visit
www.waverlycomm.orgor call the
570.586.8191, extension2.
BallroomDancinglessons: Session
1,Wednesdayeveningsbeginning
sept. 11, 6-7p.m., advanced,
americantango; 7-8p.m., beginners,
ChaChaandrumba; session2,
WednesdayeveningsOct. 23, 30,
nov. 13, 20, dec. 4, continuation
of session1 classesfor thosewho
completedit. $45per personfor
eachfve-weeksession.advanced
registrationrequired.Toregister call
Jill Wetzel at 570.954.1147or email
her at jgwetzel@epix.net.
WorldMusicDrumming, program
for special needschildren: Begins
Sept. 11, 3:45-4:30p.m. for children
Kthrough2ndgrade, 4:30-5:15p.m.
for 3rdthrough12thgrade. $95,
eachten-weeksession.
CommunityPledgeof Allegiance:
Sept. 11, 9:30a.m., fagpoleonthe
front lawn.
LearnItalian: Tuesdays, starting
Oct. 1. Session1BasicItalian:
6-7:15p.m.; Session2Introto
Conversational Italian(for advanced
beginners), 7:30-8:45p.m. $120,
eight-weeksession, includes
materials.
Childrenandteenetiquetteclasses:
HowtoSayit Best: Sept. 28,
10-11:30a.m.Ages4-7. $30.
TheCommunicationConnection:
sept. 28, noon-2p.m.ages8-14. $35.
SayPlease, SayThankYou: Oct.
12, 10-11:30a.m.Ages4-7. $30.
CommonCourtesiesCount: Oct.
12, noon-2p.m.ages8-14. $35.
PassthePeas, Please: Nov. 16,
10-11:30a.m.Ages4-7. $35.
DiningBoot Campfor Kids: Nov.
16, noon-2p.m.ages8-14. $35.
Great Events: Dec. 21, 10-11:30
a.m.ages4-7. $30.
Great Events: Dec. 21, noon-2
p.m.ages8-14. $30.
West Side Career andTechnology
Center SkillsUSAAnnual Fall
Craft Fair:
Oct. 5, 10a.m.-3p.m.
Wilkes University
(84W. southst,Wilkes-barre, 1.800.
WILKES.U, wilkes.edu)
FamilyBusinessForumeventsby
fnancial advisor FrancoLombardo:
TheGreatWhiteElephant of
Money,Sept. 18, 5-7:30p.m., Hawk
LectureHall inBusinessBuilding,
andSept. 19, 5-7:30p.m., Henry
student Center ballroom.
LOCALHISTORY
EckleyMinersVillage
(locatedninemileseast of Hazleton,
just ofroute940; 570.636.2070;
www.eckleyminers.org)
Monthlyvolunteer meeting: Sept.
14.
Traditional musicfestival: Sept. 15,
gateopensnoon.
Walkingtours: Mondaythrough
saturday, 9am-5pm. sunday,
noon-5pm.
HauntedLanternTours: Oct. 11-12,
18-19, 25-26. 6:30p.m. Children
6-12yrs$5,adults13+$10.
Everhart Museum:
1901 mulberryst., scranton,
570.346.7186, www.everhart-
museum.org
FarmtoTable: Sept. 20, 6:30p.m.-
10:30p.m.
Lackawanna Historical Society
(theCatlinHouse, 232monroe
avenue, scranton, 570.344.3841.)
HauntedScrantonandTrolley
of Terror tours: Sept. 13-14, 20-21.
$25, societymembers; $30, non-
members.
Annual Dinner: Oct. 12, 5p.m.,
CenturyClub(612Jefersonave.,
scranton). $45, members; $50, non-
members. Reservationsrequired
byOct. 8.
OldJail Museum
(128W. broadway,Jim
thorpe. 570.325.5259. www.
TheOldJailMuseum.com.)
TOURS: ThroughLabor Day, daily
(closedWednesday), noonto4:30
p.m. $6, adult; $5, senior over 65and
highschool; $4, childrenages6-12;
free, childrenunder 5.
LEARNING
DietrichTheater
(tunkhannock)
ChildrensClasses
Art ExplorersCampforAges58:
Oct. 11, 18, 25, Nov. 1, 4-5:30p.m.
$40.
Art ExplorersCampforAges912:
Oct. 10, 17, 24, 31, 4-5:30p.m. $40.
Preschool Art Explorers: Oct. 10, 17,
24, 31, 10-10:45a.m. Free.
Preschool Pottery&Sculpturefor
ages4and5: Series2, Nov. 7, 14, 21,
Dec. 5, 10-10:45a.m. Free.
Quiltingfor Kids: TumblingBlocks:
Wednesdayssept. 11 throughdec.
11, 3:30-5p.m.Ages6andup. $6per
class, fabricisfree.
SidewalkSurfng: TheArt &Culture
of Skateboarding: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29,
4-5:30p.m.Ages5to12. Free.
SingYour Heart Out: Oct., 26, Nov.
2, 9, 16, 23, 10a.m.-noon.ages8to
13. $50.
WritingYour Hat Of: Creative
Writingfor Kids: Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30,
Nov. 6, 4-5:30p.m.Ages10to16.
Free.
Intergenerational Classes
OpenStudio&PortfolioPrep:
Series2: Oct. 8, 15, 22, 29, 7-8:30
p.m.; Series3: Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26,
7-8:30p.m.Ages13andup. $15, per
class; $60, seriesof four classes.
Quiltingfor Everyone: Tumbling
Blocks: Wednesdays, Sept. 11-Dec. 11,
6-7:30p.m.Ages13andup. $6per
class, fabricisfree.
Classesforadults
BasicKnitting: Oct. 29, Nov. 5, 7
p.m.ages16andup. $30.
DecorativePainting: Oct. 16, 23, 30,
nov. 6, 13, 20, dec. 4, 11, 18, noon-3
p.m.ages16andup. $20per class
pluscost of paintingsurface.
DesignaPaintedSilkScarf: Oct. 8,
7p.m.ages16andup. $35.
GoldenDaysof RadioPlayers: Oct.
22, 29, nov. 5, 12, 19, 26, dec. 3, 7-9
p.m.ages18andup. Free.
IntroductiontoResinJewelry: Oct.
14, 6-9p.m.ages16andup. $35.
IntroductiontoStainedGlass: Oct.
21, 6-9p.m.ages16andup. $60.
JewelryMaking: Kumihimo
Beading: Oct. 16, 23, Nov. 6, 7-9p.m.
ages16andup. $75.
Kundalini Yoga: Series1: Sept. 30,
Oct. 7, 14, 21, 5:30-7p.m.; Series2:
Oct. 28, Nov. 4, 11, 18, 5:30-7p.m.
ages16andup. $40, four classes;
$15, drop-in.
Nia: Series1: Sept. 10, 17, Oct. 1, 8,
5:30-6:30p.m.; Series2: Oct. 15, 22,
29, Nov. 5, 5:30-6:30p.m.; Series3:
Nov. 12, 19, Dec. 3, 10, 5:30-6:30p.m.
ages16andup. $40, four classes;
$10, drop-in.
NutritionforWomen: Oct. 3, 10, 17,
24, 7-8:30p.m.Ages16andup. Free.
RecycledGlassArtwork: Series1:
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30, 7-8:30p.m.; Series
2: Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, 7-8:30p.m.;
Series3: Nov. 4, 11, 18, 25, 7-8:30
p.m.ages18andup. $65, four class
series, studentssupplyownsafety
glasses.
SimplyYoga: Series1: Sept. 4, 11,
18, 25, Oct. 2, 9, 10-11:15a.m.; Series
2: Oct. 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13, 20,
10-11:15a.m.Ages16andup. $60, six
consecutiveclasses; $15, drop-in.
WritersGroup: Thursdays, 7-8:30
p.m.ages18andup.
Yogafor theGuardiansof Your
Health: Sept. 23, 5:30-7p.m.Ages16
andup. Free, donations
Endless MountainsZendo
(104Hollowroad, stillwater.
570.925.5077, endless@epix.net)
ZenMeditationTraining
Introductory: Sept. 28, 9:30a.m.-
3:30p.m. Opendonationbasket, $10
for lunchandsnack.
Freestyle handdrumming
heldeverymonthonthesecond
andfourthsaturdaysat everything
natural healthfoodstore, 426south
statestreet, Clarkssummit.all
agesandnewcomerswelcome. no
experiencerequired. Drumsand
percussionprovided.attendanytime
between1:00-4:00PM.
PoconoArts Council
(18n. seventhst., stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
Oil Painting: Sept. 19, 26, Oct. 10, 17,
24, 31, 6:30-8:30p.m. $72, member;
$80, non-member; $60, senior; $65,
senior non-member.
AcrylicPainting: Sept. 23, 30, Oct. 7,
14, 21, 28, 9:30a.m.-12:30p.m. $85,
member; $95, non-member; $65,
senior; $70, senior non-member.
DecoupageAKeepsakeBox: Sept.
4, 11, 18, 25, 1-3p.m. $72, member;
$80, non-member; $60, senior; $65,
senior non-member. $10material
fee.all material supplied.
BasicDrawing: Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25,
6:30-8:30p.m. $72, member; $80,
non-member; $60, senior; $65,
senior non-member.
SOCIALGROUPS
Calligraphers Guildof
NortheasternPennsylvania
Meeting: Sept. 20, 7:30p.m.,
marywoodUniversityshieldsCenter
forVisual artsroom225. For details
call 570.296.6507.
Geisinger WyomingValley
Medical Center
Bereavement support groupseries:
everythursdaybeginningaug. 15,
2-3:30p.m. and6-7:30p.m.
Nar-AnonFamilyGroupMeetings
sun. 7p.m. Clear brookbldg. (rear),
FortyFort; Wed., 7p.m. United
methodist Church, mountaintop.
570.288.9892.
Expandedlistings at
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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Youve probably noticed how vul-
nerable or receptive towards Geminis
you are. Theres a surprising amount
of reciprocity there, too. But did you
know that you have the perfect Band-
Aid for your favorite Gems Achilles
heel? Luckily for you, theyve got a
similar remedy that will cure your own
most tender wound. It might be the
kind of thing where you can slap ban-
dages on each others sore spots, wish
each other well, and go on your merry
way. But if youre at all open to it, I
recommend sticking around and see-
ing what happens next. I have a feeling
itll be worth your while.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Keep your nose clean, kid. Im not
talking actual boogers; Librans are
famously well kempt. Im referring
to, instead, the slightly dirty affairs
youve been thinking of getting mixed
up with, in the name of profit or ego,
things you just know, deep down in
your gut, arent rightfor you or any-
one else with, like, morals. Dont sell
out, at least not in this wayyoud
give up too much and get way too
little. Besides, all ethics aside, the
kind of public cleaning-up youd suf-
fersomething like when your Mom
whipped a disgusting crumpled tissue
out of her purse to blot your mortified
six-year-old nosejust isnt worth it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
The secret to your popularity, such
as it is: you tend to wield just the right
amounts of in-the-sack filthiness, and
take-home-to-Mom sweetness. Its
a rare combination, and its largely
responsible for the disproportionate
number of head-over-heels admirers
you usually garner. Unfortunately,
your balance is out of whack right
now. Youve temporarily shifted so far
in one direction that youre attracting
all the wrong types: prudish pedants
who wish theyd saved themselves for
marriage (obviously so inappropriate
for you) or malign sluts who cant be
bothered to remember your name (not
quite as inapt, but still unsuitable, con-
sidering your current standards and
circumstances). In general, fervently
avoid new entanglements this week,
and by all means, if anyone proposes
marriage or even a no-strings lay, RUN
AWAY.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Although you can realistically claim
to have more energy than anyone you
know, its important to know what kind
of energy you have in abundance. Its
difficult to bridle your shifting flames
and ride them marathon distances.
Long hauls are much harder for you
than short sprints, which, as everyone
knows, you rock at. Thats not to say
you cant cover great expanses and
even make good time doing it. You
just have to take a different approach.
What is a long haul, except dozens
of short sprints? Break it down into
manageable chunks. You may not win
the race, but in this case winning isnt
importantwhats important is reach-
ing the finish line.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Youve been so hungry for thrills
lately that I dont want to even men-
tion the unspeakable places youve
been sticking your vibrating cell-
phone. Unfortunately, you cant just
force excitement to happen. Trying to
inject it into your life right now will
only result in the psychic equivalent
of a heroin addiction and ultimately
prevent you from experiencing some
of the more legit, healthy, and high-
quality adventures coming your way
soon. Luckily, although this week may
contain none of the tumultuous and
electrifying ups and downs youve
been craving, it should provide enough
gentle and engaging pleasures that you
can keep from indulging in any more
embarrassing perversions of modern
technology.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Patience isnt one of your best vir-
tues, so you can understand all too well
when those who are waiting on you
start to get antsy and worried. Theyre
used to your usual instantaneous
action. Youve spoiled them, by creat-
ing a world in which things are almost
easier done than said. Now, when what
youre working on simply cant be fin-
ished faster than it is, no matter how
efficient or dedicated you are, people
are bound to get impatient. Dont let
them rush you, though. Despite their
urgency, results really are more impor-
tant than a record time. And since you
rarely do anything half-assed, when
they see how well youve done, theyll
quickly forget how long it took.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Its not like you to plan to wait until
the last minute (it just happens), but
thats really what you ought to do
right now. Thats because your cur-
rent objective is more like a short
sprint with hurdles than a long-
distance marathon. Theres no point
in exhausting yourself cramming in
additional training now. Either youve
got what it takes or you dont, and
squeezing in a few extra practice
runs will only tire you out and make
you less on your game, come the big
event. Slack, even though it contra-
dicts your current ambitions. Loaf as
if your dreams and hopes depend on
it. They do. When its time to get off
your ass and fly, youll know.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Get down on the floor and play with
the kids. Its what you need, to sprawl
surrounded by toys and the joyful
egotism of a child, and just have fun.
Forget the misery of your responsibili-
ties for at least thirty minutes a day all
week. If you dont have a kid on hand
to play with, pretend. Buy some Legos
and build stuff or indulge in some good
old-fashioned crayon art. Your inner
child is lost in the big bad woods sur-
rounded by the big bad wolves of your
adult world. Find and befriend him or
her once again, before s/he gets eaten
alive.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
All your mineshafts are depleted.
Accept it. Youve been sending psy-
chic miners down these familiar holes,
day after day, and theyre returning
empty-handed, or with dead canaries.
Face it; youve unearthed every last
diamond, vein of gold, or even chunk
of coal from these exhausted dig sites.
Its time to seal them up well so you
dont lose any kids or puppies down
their dark depths, and start exploring
new ground. You may have to purchase
some mental territory traditionally
occupied by your neighbors, but its
in your nature to annex new land. No
need to be ashamed of it, especially
considering the good uses youll be
putting your newfound wealth to, once
you figure out where to dig it up from.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Youve got a problem; it may not be
especially big, but its taking up an
awful lot of mind space. Its like one
of those painful zits that you just wish
you could pop but its too deep to get
to. Like a pimple, its probably better
to just leave it alone, at least for now.
Its untouchable. Instead, concentrate
on the things you can control, the
mental equivalent of eating right and
gently cleaning your face with good
product. If youre good about it, youre
predicament will, like a zit, probably
just dissolve and disappear on its own.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
What youre trying to do is akin to
tearing the hairs off your own head, to
weave them into a new shirt to wear.
Its shortsighted; youll end up bald
with a collar and half a sleeve. Spare
yourself the pain and just look beyond
the tip of your own nose, darling. The
outcome of your current venture is
obvious to everyone but you. Thats
not to say you should abandon it, nec-
essarilyalthough that might really
be the best optionbut you ought to
consider at least changing your meth-
ods, to ones that could actually work.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Youre a dwarf with a battle-axe,
at once comical and very, very scary.
The problemyoure not used to
being laughed at unless youre the one
making the joke. Still, its all in good
fun, and theres no question about
your effectiveness; your weapon, as
usual, is razor sharp. Be big about the
dichotomy youre sporting right now.
Recognize that beneath the chuck-
leswhich you should, by all means,
participate in, if possiblepeople are
taking you very seriously. Then do
what youve got to do, laughing all the
way.
To contact Caeriel, send mail to
sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.
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By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
CELEBRITY
BIRTHDAYS
Jada Pinkett Smith
Sept. 18, 1971
Adam West
Sept. 19, 1928
GARY COLE
(pictured)
Sept. 20, 1956
Stephen King
Sept. 21, 1947
Billie Piper
Sept. 22, 1982
Ani DiFranco
Sept. 23, 1970
Stephani McMahon
Sept. 24, 1976
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