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ANDREWM.

SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Beginning today, scores of
would-be callers in Northeastern
and Central Pennsylvania will hear
a computerized message on their
phones instructing them to hang up
and dial local numbers again using
both the area code and number.
Its a day Bob Rossi has seen
coming for years.
The Hazleton sign maker, who
owns Rossis Graphics, said hes
been adding the 570 area code
to the majority of clients signs,
marketing items and other things
that display the companies phone
numbers for years. Those custom-
ers are appreciative now that the
states mandated 10-digit dialing
for the entire 570 area code region
has gone into effect.
I knew they were going to
eventually do it, Rossi said of the
10-digit dialing, so he took it upon
himself to either add the area code
to products he prints or to encour-
age others to make sure they did so.
While things have been quiet for
him, he expects to begin receiving
calls soon from business owners
seeking new signs and banners.
People usually wait until the last
minute, Rossi said.
Debbie Dourant, owner of
Fieseler Signs in Pittston, said she
thought she would see a spike in
calls from business owners look-
ing for new signs and banners. She
was disappointed. I really didnt,
she said, theorizing that business-
es either dont have the money to
spend on sign changes or theyre
hoping customers will just get in
the habit soon enough of dialing
the area code with all local calls.
Michelle Levine, owner of Fast
Signs in Wilkes-Barre, said she
thinks once people start to realize
the change is in effect, shell begin
to get calls from businesses seeking
a 570 addition.
timesleader.com
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Bill tarutis | For the times Leader
Instructor Mindy Ritko of the YMCA in Dunmore leads a group of seniors in Zumba Gold during the Flu + You education event and
vaccine clinic for adults over 65 at PNC Field in Moosic on Friday afternoon. The event was hosted by the Area Agencies on Aging
of Lackawanna County and Luzerne-Wyoming Counties.
Having fun and fghting the fu
iPhone fngerprint
technology gets
senators attention
BUSINESS, 10B
Two teams entered.
One left unbeaten.
Who won the WVW-Berwick game? SPORTS, 1B
NEWS:
Local 3A
Nation &World 6A
Obituaries 8A
INSIDE
Editorial 9A
Weather 10A
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Stocks 10B
AT HOME, 1C
Birthdays 3C
television 4C
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CLASSIFIED: 1D
Comics 24d
Area priest accused of having sexwith boy
SCRANTON A priest who
has served at more than a dozen
Northeastern Pennsylvania parish-
es including several in Luzerne
County has been suspended from
his post in Old Forge after he alleg-
edly was caught in a car on a college
campus having sex with a boy.
Security ofcers at Penn State
Worthington Scranton say they dis-
covered the Rev. William Jeffery
Paulish, 56, parked in a red Toyota
Thursday night with a 15-year-old
boy who wasnt wearing any pants,
according to an afdavit.
The priest told investigators he
arraigned the liaison via postings on
the website Craigslist, Lackawanna
County Deputy District Attorney
Jennifer McCambridge said Friday
night.
Paulish initially told police he was
walking around campus working on
his homily, according
to the afdavit. He
said he encountered
the boy by chance,
learned that the teen
was in emotional dis-
tress and was coun-
seling the youth,
police said.
Under questioning at the Dunmore
police station, Paulish allegedly
admitted having placed an ad in
the casual encounters section of
Craigslist in search of companion-
ship. He said he received an email
from an unknown male and agreed
to meet at the college, according to
police.
Paulish stated he asked the male
approximately three times if he was
18 years old, police wrote. The af-
davit does not indicate whether or
Paulish
10-digit dialing may be
hang-up for businesses
Sign company owners foresee food
of requests as businesses update
materials with 570 area code
Clark Van Orden | the times Leader Photo
Pizza Fellas on South Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, does not include the area code on
its outdoor sign. Starting today, anyone
dialing a phone number within the 570 area
code must dial the area code and seven-
digit phone number in order for the call to
be placed.
WHO IS IMPACTED?
the change to 10-digit dialing within
the 570area code impacts those
people in all or parts of 29 counties
stretching fromthe Harrisburg area
in the south to the Poconos in the
east, the Newyork state line in the
north and Clinton County in the
west. Lackawanna, Luzerne and
Wyoming counties are among them.
See DIALING | 10A
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
PLAINS TWP. Flood
victim James Herron Jr.
said Friday he needs a lit-
tle more time to nd a per-
manent residence. Federal
authorities believe he has
exhausted all his resourc-
es including his stay in
a Federal Emergency
Management Agency-
supplied trailer at the East
Mountain Ridge Mobile
Home Park.
Federal prosecutors led
a civil complaint against
Herron seeking to repos-
sess the trailer at Lot 446,
the only FEMA trailer left
in the park.
Its only me and my two
boys, Herron said, noting
his sons are 13 and 15. Im
trying to do my best; Im
working on making pay-
ments on a trailer, but its
hard when you only make
$400 in welfare and Im
ghting disability after I
got hit by a backhoe.
Herron was living in
Exeter Township along
state Route 92 in a beau-
tiful house, he said, when
the Susquehanna River
ooded in September
2011. The river reached a
record crest of 42.66 feet
that destroyed his home
and possessions, he said.
Herron and his sons
in November 2011 were
provided a temporary
housing unit, a trailer, in
East Mountain Ridge. By
accepting the FEMA trail-
er, Herron had a duty to
obtain and occupy alter-
nate housing at the earliest
Flood victimin jeopardy
of losing FEMAtrailer
Prosecutors allege James
Herron Jr. has not done
enough to fnd a new,
permanent place to live
Clark Van Orden | the times Leader Photo
James Herron Jr. was told he had 15 days to vacate this trailer on
Sept. 7, 2012.
See TRAILER | 10A
WASHINGTON
Charting a collision course
with the White House,
the Republican-controlled
House approved legisla-
tion Friday to wipe out
the three-year-old health
care law that President
Barack Obama has vowed
to preserve and simul-
taneously prevent a par-
tial government shut-
down that neither party
claims to want.
The American people
dont want the govern-
ment shut down, and they
dont want Obamacare,
Speaker John Boehner
said as members of his
rank and le cheered at
a celebratory rally in the
Capitol moments after the
230-189 vote. He stood at
a lectern bearing a slogan
that read, #Senate must
act.
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid said it will
but not the way Boehner
and his Republican con-
tingent want. Assured
of enough Senate votes
to keep the government
open and the health care
law in existence, the
Nevada Democrat accused
Republicans of attempt-
ing to take an entire law
hostage simply to appease
the tea party anarchists.
Behind the rhetoric lay
the likelihood of anoth-
er in a series of com-
plex, inside-the-Beltway
brinkmanship episodes
as conservative House
Republicans and Obama
struggle to imprint wide-
ly differing views on the
U.S. government.
In addition to the threat
of a partial shutdown
a week from Monday,
administration ofcials
say that without passage
of legislation to allow
more federal borrowing,
the nation faces the risk
of a rst-ever default
sometime in the second
half of next month.
House Republicans
intend to vote to raise the
nations debt limit next
week to prevent that from
happening. But they have
House opens fre
in budget fght,
kills Obamacare
GOP signals its
willingness to
battle White House
DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@timesleader.com
The Rev. WilliamJefery Paulish was based in Old
Forge, but had served Luzerne County parishes
See FIGHT | 10A
See PRIEST | 10A
HARRISBURG Gov.
Tom Corbett Friday nomi-
nated Dallas resident Ellen
M. Ferretti to the cabinet-
level post of secretary of the
Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources.
Ferretti had been serving
as deputy
s e c r e -
tary for
Parks and
Fore s t r y
until ear-
lier this
s u m m e r
when she
was named
acting secretary of the
Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources.
Ferretti accepted that post
in June after Corbett asked
for and received former
Secretary Rick Allans resig-
nation.
Allan, 60, a native of
Wilkes-Barre and now liv-
ing in Cumberland County,
had served in the post since
March 2011.
Corbett
nominates
Ferretti
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
The Dallas resident
would replace Rick Allan
as DCNR secretary
Ferretti
See FERRETTI | 2A
PAGE 2A Saturday, September 21, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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OBITUARIES
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Marcy, Michael Sr.
Nareski, Joseph
Redington, Grace
Swelgin, Ellen
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Corrections will appear in this
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Director &General Manager
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Executive Editor
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VP/Chief Revenue Ofcer
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Divorces sought and fled in the
Luzerne County Prothonotarys Ofce
fromSept. 16 through 20
Frank Bullock, Exeter, and Maryann
Bullock, Dupont
Geraldine Bevan, Dallas, and Robert
Bevan Sr., Harveys Lake
Jill Struckus, Wyoming, and Robert
Granick, Wyoming
Melanie Peternel, Roaringbrook
Township, and Robert Perternel,
Shickshinny
Walter Geiger Sr., Wilkes-Barre, and
Marjorie Geiger, Hanover Twp.
Jannene Pelchar, Shavertown, and
John Pelchar, Jr., Shavertown
Laura Mullery, Ashley, and Matthew
Mullery, Hanover Township
Brian Ealey, Tobyhanna, and Susan
Ealey, Plains Township
Marriage license applications fled in
the Luzerne County Register of Wills
Ofce fromSept. 16 through 20:
Stephen Zachary Jarrett, Kingston,
and Eileen Frances McGeehan,
Wyoming
Mark Jacob Deleeuw, Swoyersville,
and Molly Marie Giles, Swoyersville
Donald Boyd Lunger Jr., Benton, and
Ashley Elizabeth Barchik, Benton
Hugh Caldwell Taylor III, Mountain
Top, and Jonnelle Melissa Vinton,
Mountain Top
Michael David Richards, Sugarloaf,
and Linda Kay Kaplafka, Lost Creek, Pa.
Justin Daniel Kreitzer, Nanticoke, and
Alisha Amber Saxe, Nanticoke
Paul Lawrence Delaney, Wyoming,
and Jacqueline Alexandria Stone,
Wyoming
WilliamJohnathan Streif, West
Pittston, and Jessica Diane Plassio,
West Pittston
Christopher George Wash, Harding,
and Marta Iwona Dylewski, Harding
Ross Michael Boyle, Plains Township,
and Kristen Ann Siskovich, Plains
Township
Angelo Michael Gadola Jr., Hazle
Township, and Stacy Renee Jepko,
Hazle Township
Christopher Byron Hall, Clarks
Summit, and Tracey Marie Gavlick,
Wilkes-Barre
Kevin Clancy Boylan, Kingston, and
Abigail McElroy Faett, Kingston
MatthewAlan Selemon, Hazleton, and
Ashley Elaine Panzarella, Hazleton
Eric John Samanas, Kingston, and
Caitlin Bolinger, Kingston
Slawomir Bob Poczatek, Freeland,
and Lenora Betty Stephens, Freeland
James Charles Roccograndi,
Kingston, and Desirea Mark Harmon,
Kingston
Randall Thomas Johnson, Nescopeck,
and Paula Buholski, Dunmore
Kevin Michael McCandeless,
Hamilton, N.J., and Kristin Marie
ODonnell, Hamilton, N.J.
Randy Jay Royce Jr., Savannah, Ga.,
and Sarah Margaret Bryk, Pittston
Kevin Wesley Smith, Wilkes-Barre, and
Geraldine Viola Yablonski, Wilkes-Barre
Addresses unavailable for the following:
Kevin James Makarewicz Jr. and
Amanda Marie Wisneski
Eric MatthewCatalogna and
Randilynn Keiser
Joel Andres Tamares Reyes and
Monica Marrero Tamayo
Leo Anthony Insalaco and Patricia
Kelly Williams
Jason Gesek and Kristen Miller
PuBLIC RECORD
WILKES-BARRE A campaign rally for
Joe Caffrey, candidate for Wilkes-Barre Area
School Board, will be held 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday at The Woodlands Inn and Resort,
Route 315, Plains Township. Tickets are $30
and can be obtained at the door or by calling
570-905-4960.
WILKES-BARRE TOWNSHIP The
next meeting of the Wilkes-Barre Township
Democratic Organization will be 7 p.m. Oct. 8
at the Wilkes-Barre Township American Legion,
Post 815. Plans for the upcoming rally will be
discussed. All township residents are invited to
attend. Chairman John Quinn will preside.
EDWARDSVILLE New recycling contain-
ers are available for pickup by Edwardsville
residents only at the Department of Public Works
Garage, Hoblak Street, between 7:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. weekdays. Proof of residency is required.
LUZERNE The rebate period for Wyoming
Valley West School taxes ends Sept. 26. Payments
can be made at the borough building, 144
Academy St., from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays and 1 to
3 p.m. Saturdays. The building is handicapped
accessible.
Beginning Sept. 27, hours are 6 to 7 p.m.
Mondays and 1 to 2 p.m. Saturdays.
When making payments, present the entire
bill if a receipt is requested. If mailing payment,
include a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
For those paying on the installment basis, the
second payment is due Oct. 11 and the third on
Nov. 25. A 10 percent penalty is added to install-
ment payments made after their respective due
dates.
The 2013 county/municipal real estate and
municipal per capita taxes are being accepted at
penalty value through Dec. 31.
MuNICIPAL BRIEFS
POLITICAL BRIEFS
JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
SCRANTON A former
fast-food restaurant worker
has sued the owners of the
Shavertown McDonalds
where he worked, claiming he
could not access his payroll
debit card to collect his wages
after he was fired last year.
Michael Rogers, 24, of
Bennett Street, Luzerne,
is owed between $190 and
$240, said attorney Michael
Cefalo, who represents him
in the lawsuit filed Friday in
Lackawanna County Court.
The filing named Albert and
Carol Mueller, owners of the
McDonalds on state Route
309 in the Back Mountain,
as defendants. They also
are defendants in a class-
action suit filed by Cefalo &
Associates of West Pittston
regarding the use of debit
card with fees to pay workers.
Rogers suit deals with
alleged violations of the state
Wage Payment and Collection
Act and is separate from
the class-action suit, Cefalo
said.
The complaint was filed in
Lackawanna County because
the Muellers business, Albert
and Carol Mueller LTD
Partnerships, is located in
Clarks Summit, Cefalo said.
According to the complaint,
Rogers was hired to work at
the McDonalds restaurant on
April 12, 2012, at an hourly
rate of $8.25 until he was ter-
minated on June 30, 2012.
He was not paid for his
last pay period from June 17
to June 23, the suit states.
On July 14, 2012, he tried to
access the JP Morgan Chase
Payroll Debit Card issued
by McDonalds only to be
informed that the card was
in unauthorized use status,
the suit states.
More than a year later
Cefalo contacted the law
firm of Littler Mendelson
of Philadelphia, which rep-
resents McDonalds, and
demanded payment for
Rogers. But attorney Matthew
Hank of the law firm replied
in a July 24 letter, Our
client has reviewed its
records and confirmed that
Mr. Rogers has been paid all
of his wages.
Rogers is seeking payment
of his remaining wages, attor-
neys fees, interest, costs and
damages.
Ex-McDonalds worker alleges he is owed wages
Michael Rogers, 24, of
Luzerne, claims restaurant
failed to pay him between
$190 and $240
WILKES-BARRE A
Pittsburgh man has led a law-
suit against the Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs casino, alleging
he was visibly intoxicated and
workers continued to serve him
beverages, leading to alcohol poi-
soning.
Nicholas Mullins led the
suit this week through his
attorney, Stewart Niemtzow, of
Havertown, requesting $50,000
in monetary damage.
Mullins says in the suit he
was at the casino in November
2011 playing poker with $4,000
in gambling chips over a several-
hour period. During that span,
Mullins alleges he was served
between 10 and 15 alcoholic
drinks, was visibly intoxicated
and was asked by workers to
leave.
Workers learned Mullins was
a military veteran and called
the Veterans Administration
Hospital for assistance.
Mullins had to stay at the hos-
pital for a number of days because
he had suffered from alcohol poi-
soning, the lawsuit states.
WILKES-BARRE A
Shavertown couple has led a
lawsuit against a beauty salon
after their daughter allegedly
was bitten by the salon owners
dog.
Gary and Christine Vincelli
reled the suit this week
through their attorney, Michael
Lombardo, III, against Theresa
Perry, of Dallas.
According to the suit,
Christine Vincelli was with her
young daughter at Perrys salon
in February 2012 for about two
hours. When the Vincellis were
leaving, the girl went to pet
Perrys Jack Russell Terrier, Jack.
The dog, which previously had
injured two other patrons, bit the
girls cheek and lip, the lawsuit
states.
The suit alleges carelessness,
negligence and recklessness in
that Perry allowed her dog to
remain at the salon despite the
previous incidents and that Perry
allowed the dog to roam free and
didnt restrain it.
The suit requests monetary
damages for past and future sur-
geries the girl needs for perma-
nent scarring as well as pain and
suffering.
WILKES-BARRE The
trial of ve men charged with
causing a riot at an area state
prison has been rescheduled to
begin in December.
The ve men were sched-
uled to be tried on charges they
caused a riot in 2010 at the
State Correctional Institution at
Dallas, but they appeared before
Luzerne County Judge Lesa Gelb
on Thursday where a continu-
ance of their Sept. 30 trial was
requested.
Derrick Stanley, 43, Anthony
Locke, 34, Andre Jacobs, 31,
Carrington Keys, 32, and Duane
Peters, 41, claim they were
being retaliated against after
civil complaints and complaints
with several other agencies were
led against several corrections
ofcers. The men covered and
tied their cell doors and had to
be removed from their cells in
the prisons restrictive housing
unit, police said. The inmates
said they attempted to get the
attention of prison guards to talk
about the injustices they were
receiving.
Stanley, Locke, Jacobs and
Keys represent themselves in the
case with the assistance of stand-
by counsel.
Gelb said a pretrial hearing
will be held on Oct. 11 and that a
trial will begin with jury selection
on Dec. 9.
COuRT BRIEFS
Writ issuedtoseize former judges unclaimedproperty
Government pursues utility refunds of
less than $20 owed to a Mark Ciavarella
JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
SCRANTON The pace of pay-
ing off the $1.1 million restitution by
former Luzerne County Judge Mark
Ciavarella has been slow, and it s likely
to stay that way with the federal gov-
ernments latest effort to seize property
supposedly belonging to him.
The clerks office in the U.S. Middle
District Court of Pennsylvania issued a
writ of execution Friday, ordering the
U.S. Marshals Service to go after two
accounts held by the state Treasury
Department as unclaimed property.
The department said there are two
utility company refunds totalling
$19.55 to a Mark Ciavarella, but it
could not verify that it was the former
judge.
Ciavarella, 63, began serving a
28-year sentence in federal prison in
2011 following his conviction earlier
that year on corruption-related charg-
es in the Kids for Cash juvenile jus-
tice scandal. He is held at the Federal
Correctional Institution in Pekin, Ill.
and has a release date of Dec. 30,2035.
He and former county Judge Michael
Conahan were indicted in 2009 on
charges they participated in a $2.8 mil-
lion kickback scheme related to the con-
struction of the PA Child Care facility
in Pittston Township and the Western
PA Child Care Center in Butler County
and the placement of youths in the
facilities.
Conahan, 61, pleaded guilty to rack-
eteering conspiracy and was sentenced
to 17 1/2 years in prison. He is held
at Coleman Low Federal Correctional
Institution in Florida with a release
date of Dec. 18, 2026.
Last May a three-member panel of
the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
vacated one of the 12 guilty counts
from Ciavarellas February 2011 trial
and ordered his $1,200 fine reduced by
$100. But the panel let stand his con-
viction.
At the time of Ciavarellas sentenc-
ing in August 2011, he was ordered to
pay $1,174,991 in restitution. He has
a balance of $1,127,191, according to
the writ.
From page 1A
Ferretti
Ferretti, 56, has more than
20 years of experience work-
ing to protect the states
natural resources, having
served as the Pennsylvania
Environmental Councils direc-
tor of its northeast regional
ofce, where she worked
closely with DCNR and its
partners on landscape conser-
vation.
Im honored, and thats put-
ting it lightly, Ferretti said.
And I am extremely grateful
to the governor for this oppor-
tunity.
Ferretti said she has no
grand sweeping initiative in
mind, and she cited DCNRs
extraordinary work. I have
nothing new in the works for
the near future, other than to
protect our parks and forests
and to assure our staff has
what it needs to do their jobs.
Ferretti grew up near the
scarred landscape of strip min-
ing and learned to appreciate
nature by traveling to state
parks, she said.
As I travel around the state,
I nd so many people who
share my love for our parks,
she said. We have so many,
especially in Northeastern
Pennsylvania, that are often
taken for granted.
Maybe we dont have a lot of
natural beauty in our neighbor-
hoods, but our region certainly
does.
In addition, Ferretti
has served as: director of
Environmental Resources at
Borton-Lawson Engineering,
as a land protection specialist
for The Nature Conservancy
and as a project manager at
Westinghouse Environmental
and Geo-technical Services
Inc.
A graduate of Wilkes College
with a degree in environmental
science and biology, Ferretti
has completed many continu-
ing education courses on
conservation, environmental
assessments, redevelopment,
forest stewardship, trail, park
and recreational planning.
Corbett also nominated E.
Christopher Abruzzo as sec-
retary of the Department of
Environmental Protection.
Abruzzo, of Hershey, was serv-
ing as Corbetts deputy chief
of staff until he was appointed
acting secretary of the DEP in
April.
Corbett said Ferretti has
devoted much of her career
toward the development, pro-
motion and protection of state
parks and forest lands.
That experience and insight
will make her an excellent
secretary, Corbett said. She
understands the unique quali-
ties of our state park and forest
systems. I am condent the cit-
izens of Pennsylvania will ben-
et from her continued stew-
ardship of our public lands.
Pennsylvania Growing
Greener Coalition Executive
Director Andrew Heath
endorsed the governors nomi-
nation of Ferretti. Her lead-
ership and expertise, coupled
with her commitment to
Pennsylvanias natural resourc-
es, make her a strong choice to
head DCNR, Heath said. She
has a proven record in caring
for the commonwealths rich
natural resources.
Paul King, president of the
Pennsylvania Environmental
Council, issued the follow-
ing statement supporting
both nominees: The PEC has
worked well with both indi-
viduals and has found them
committed to the missions
of the agencies. We appreci-
ate Governor Corbett naming
two thoughtful stewards of the
environment and we look for-
ward to continuing our work
with them.
The nominations now go to
the state Senate for its consid-
eration.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 3A
Times Leader staf
KINGSTON Police
and agents with the Luzerne
County Drug Task Force
arrested two people Friday
when they allegedly attempted
to ee a Market Street resi-
dence with a large amount of
heroin and crack cocaine.
Authorities knocked on the
door at 476 Market St. just
before noon as Kevin A. Klass,
25, and Shannon Morton, 35,
attempted to escape out the
front door. Klass and Morton
were stopped on the front
porch, where they encoun-
tered a police sergeant and a
canine, police said.
Klass allegedly had 171
heroin packets stamped
Superman, eight bags of
crack cocaine
and $750
cash. Morton
allegedly had
a heroin pack-
et hidden in
her mouth,
police said.
Police said
they found
a loaded
.45 caliber
handgun and
a 12-gauge
s h o t g u n
inside the
residence.
Klass and
Morton were arraigned by
District Judge Paul Roberts
in Kingston on four counts
of possession with intent to
deliver a controlled substance,
three counts each each of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance and criminal conspir-
acy, two counts of possession
of drug paraphernalia and one
count of criminal use of com-
munication facility. Each was
jailed at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack
of $150,000 bail each.
Klass and Morton said dur-
ing their separate arraign-
ments that they are heroin
users and unemployed. Klass
said he previously was arrest-
ed in New York City on drug-
related offenses.
Authorities searched
the house after Klass and
Morton allegedly sold heroin
in Edwardsville on Sept. 18.
They told Roberts that they
had been living at the Market
Street residence since April.
Authorities condemned the
residence as a drug house.
A baby carriage and an empty
beer box were on the front
porch of the residence.
Preliminary hearings are
scheduled on Oct. 2.
HARRISBURG
Tigue appointed
to judicial board
Gov. Tom Corbett has appointed
Thomas M. Tigue to the Judicial
Conduct Board. Tigue will serve as a
non-lawyer, lay member of the 12-mem-
ber board.
Tigue, of Hughestown, is a for-
mer member of the state House of
Representatives. The Democrat rep-
resented the 118
th
district from 1981
until his retirement
in 2006 and served as
Democratic chair of
the House Veterans
Affairs and Emergency
Preparedness
Committee.
He is a 1964 gradu-
ate of St. Johns High School, earned
a degree in government from Kings
College in Wilkes-Barre in 1968, and has
pursued graduate studies at Marywood
University. Tigue retired from the U.S.
Marine Corps as a colonel after having
served more than 27 years and earned
the Silver Star in the Vietnam War.
Tigue was appointed to a four-year
term expiring on Sept. 3, 2017. He was
appointed to the vacancy created by
the expiration of the term of C. Eugene
McLaughlin, a printing company execu-
tive from Montgomery County.
The Judicial Conduct Board is a con-
stitutionally created independent board
charged with the responsibility of inves-
tigating allegations of misconduct by the
commonwealths judges. If the board,
by majority vote, decides that there is
probable cause to believe that a judge
engaged in misconduct, the board may
le a complaint in the Court of Judicial
Discipline where the board is required
to prove the charges against the judge by
clear and convincing evidence.
LUZERNE COUNTY
DUI enforcement
planned for area
The Luzerne County DUI Program
will conduct checkpoints and roving
patrols this weekend. The police depart-
ments participating in the events are
Courtdale, Forty Fort and Swoyersville
boroughs and Lehman and Kingston
townships.
LUZERNE COUNTY
Agency to provide
free fu shots
If you are 50-plus years of age and
interested in receiving a u vaccination,
they will be available at the Area Agency
on Aging Active Adult Centers through-
out September and October for Luzerne
and Wyoming counties. Pre-registration
is required; take your insurance/
Medicare cards with you.
The schedule:
Monday: Shickshinny, call 570-542-
4308; Tunkhannock, call 570-836-2324
Tuesday: Kingston, 570-287-1102
Thursday: Hazleton, 570-459-1441
Oct. 2: Plymouth, 570-779-9664
Oct. 3: Falls, 570-388-2623
Oct. 7: Lee Park, 570-825-9883
Oct. 8: Charles T. Adams
(Wilkes-Barre), 570-825-3484; Jewish
Community Alliance Center, 570-824-
4646
WILKES-BARRE
Red Cross plans
holiday craf show
The American Red Cross, Wyoming
Valley chapter, is holding its 20th annual
holiday craft show Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 in
the 109th Field Artillery Armory, where
more than 100 vendors will sell their
handmade wares, jewelry, home decor
and glassware. Wineries from around
Pennsylvania will be offering samples.
Admission costs $5 for adults.
Children 18 and younger will be admit-
ted at no charge. After 2 p.m. tickets cost
$3. Vendors wishing to reserve a spot
should call 570-823-7161, ext. 336, or
visit www.redcross.org/pa/wilkes-barre.
PITTSTON
Latest Blogfest
set for Friday
Northeastern Pennsylvania bloggers
will gather at Blogfest at The Red Mill,
340 S. Main St. Pittston, starting at 6
p.m. Friday. This is an informal gather-
ing of bloggers, candidates for ofce,
elected ofcials and anyone interested in
politics or blogging. Admission is free.
For more information, call 570-823-4508.
No speeches are allowed, and the rule
is this: Agree to disagree, but dont be
disagreeable. Many local and statewide
candidates will attend the event, which
was rst held three years ago.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Kingston police arrested two people on drug charges Friday after a raid on
this home at 476 Market St.
2 arrested in Kingston drug raid
Steroid
dealer
to plead
again
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
SCRANTON A Nanticoke
man who served two years in fed-
eral prison for operating a drug
ring that distributed steroids
and Ecstasy in 2007 has agreed
to plead guilty a second time to
trafcking steroids from overseas,
according to federal court docu-
ments.
Peter Sepling, 43, submitted
a statement saying he plans to
plead guilty to importing gamma
butyrolactone from China in April
2011.
Sepling and John Nikoloff,
of West Fourth Street, West
Wyoming, were indicted by a
federal grand jury in June 2011.
Nikoloff, age unknown, pleaded
guilty on Feb. 23, 2012, to con-
spiring to distribute the perfor-
mance-enhancement drug. His
sentencing hearing has been con-
tinued several times as Seplings
case remained open.
Sepling was scheduled for trial
in federal court in October.
U.S. District Court Judge A.
Richard Caputo must accept
Seplings guilty plea before it
becomes ofcial.
Sepling could face up to 20
years in prison and a $1 million
ne, court records state.
According to court records:
Customs ofcers working at a
DHL Courier facility in Kentucky
targeted a parcel from China to
Nikoloff in April 2011. The par-
cel contained 1.1 kilograms of
Gamma Butyrolactone. The par-
cel was delivered to Nikoloffs
address on April 26, 2011.
Authorities served a search
warrant the same day, nding
the empty parcel box behind a
garage on the property, and ste-
roids, pills, syringes and packag-
ing from previous deliveries in
Nikoloffs apartment above the
garage, court records state.
Nikoloff told authorities he
accepted the parcel at his resi-
dence on behalf of Sepling. He
delivered the parcel to Sepling
when they met later on April 26,
2011, along Wyoming Avenue in
Kingston.
A search of Seplings residence
uncovered 111 bottles of anabolic
steroids and numerous bottles of
pills and liquids, court records
state.
In 2007, Sepling pleaded guilty
to conspiring to distribute ket-
amine, a tranquilizer that is a pop-
ular club drug. Authorities said
Sepling obtained large quantities
of the drug from a source in India.
Back Mountain event held in honor of POW/MIARecognition Day
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@timesleader.com
TRUCKSVILLE Fred Searles
shipped off to Korea six decades ago
knowing the risks all too well.
He counted among his ancestors
a settler killed in the 1778 Battle of
Wyoming. His own grandfather had
been killed in action in World War I,
he said.
Searles didnt suffer the fate of his
forefathers.
Instead, as Searles told people at a
sunset gathering Friday outside The
Rock Recreation Center and Back
Mountain Harvest Assembly, he spent
33 harrowing months as a prisoner
of war, enduring cold, hunger, thirst
and vermin while watching colleagues
die around him in the mud huts that
became their prison.
Most of us were 18, 19 years old.
But that is who you get to fight a war,
because at that age, you think you are
invincible, the Kingston man recalled
Friday night during a ceremony hon-
oring American POWs and military
personnel who remain missing in
action.
Youre scared, sure, but you dont
think anything is going to happen to
you, added Searles, who served in
the U..S. Army from 1950 to 1953.
The ceremony was held in honor of
National POW/MIA Recognition Day,
but also to raise awareness of plans
to erect a POW/MIA memorial at the
Carverton Road site.
Several dozen people gathered in
the flickering light of a blaze known
as a watch fire, a military tradition
used across the centuries to call scat-
tered soldiers home at the end of bat-
tle, organizers said.
It was held in conjunction with
another fundraiser, in which orga-
nizers at The Rock also plan to cre-
ate an artificial turf outdoor sports
playing field in the name of Matthew
Benjamin Rondina, a Kingston
Township Raiders youth football play-
er who died from brain cancer at age
13 in 1998.
Elijah Miller, development director
at Rock Recreation, was attempting
to run 54 miles on Friday recalling
Rondinas number as well as doing
540 pull-ups to help raise funds for
both projects.
He was busy running as the ceremo-
ny got underway.
Fridays ceremony was part of a full
weekend of activities, including a 5K
trail run today, 3 on 3 basketball at the
Rock Center and an 11 a.m. memorial
service on Sunday at Back Mountain
Harvest Assembly.
There were other speakers Friday,
including New York resident Debra
Kay Anderson, who told the audi-
ence about her fathers death as an
Air Force pilot in Vietnam, and how
it took a quarter century to find his
remains.
Searles, meanwhile, choked back
tears as he recalled his ordeal in
Korea, and those people who did not
make it home with him.
There were times when the prison-
ers only had a thimble full of stale rice
to eat, he said, and drank runoff water
from rice fields that had been fertil-
ized with human feces.
If a prisoner died overnight, survi-
vors often didnt tell the Korean cap-
tors until after rations had been hand-
ed out, so the living might share the
tiny bit of extra food reserved for their
lost compatriots, Searles explained.
The American people are hungry if
they go 20 minutes past a meal time,
Searles said, adding that he didnt
mean to insult his audience but that
few people in this country can under-
stand the level of starvation POWs
endured, or that many North Korean
people might still be forced to endure.
Amanda Hrycyna | For The Times Leader
Army veteran and former Korean War POWFred Searles tears up as he talks about his experiences as a prisoner of war. He was one of the honored
speakers at the National POW/MIA Recognition Day held Friday night in Trucksville.
Getting their due in due time
IN BRIEF
K
LOCAL
Police say suspects
tried to fee with
heroin, cocaine
Klass
Morton
Tigue
Nanticoke man
spent two years
in prison afer
2007 conviction
ONTHE WEB
For more information on this
weekends events, see www.
thestrongrun.com/strong-run-
challenge
Most of us were 18, 19 years
old. But that is who you get
to fight a war, because at that
age, you think you are invin-
cible. Youre scared, sure, but
you dont think anything is
going to happen to you.
Fred Searles,
Former prisoner of war
gunshot wound to the
chest and a grazing
wound on his forehead.
His trial is scheduled to
begin Monday morning
with jury selection.
Barnes attorneys, John
Pike and Paul Galante,
were seeking to
have evidence
thrown out, includ-
ing statements
Barnes made to
police while at
a hospital being
treated for the
gunshot wounds.
Barnes agreed to
several search warrants
and detailed the events
that led to the shooting.
Barnes told police he
went to visit a friend at the
apartment complex, but
his friend was not home
so he was in the process of
leaving when a Hispanic
male pointed a gun at his
head. Barnes said there
was a struggle and the
gun went off a number of
times, so he ed.
While running, Barnes
said, he became short of
breath and real-
ized he had been
shot. He went to
his nearby home
and his girlfriend
called 911.
Barnes said the
man with whom
he struggled was
someone famil-
iar, but that he could not
remember the mans name,
according to testimony.
Barnes said he could iden-
tify the mans clothing and
some tattoos, and recog-
nized him to be in the
Philly maa street gang.
SHEENADELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
Luzerne County Judge
Michael Vough ruled on
Friday that statements a
homicide suspect made
to police will be permitted
at his trial next week, but
prosecutors cannot mention
any prior criminal activity.
Vough made the rul-
ings after hearings on
requests made by defense
attorneys and prosecu-
tors in the case of George
Lee Barnes, 23, who is
charged with killing Daron
Rhashan Trollinger, 26,
at an Edwardsville apart-
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
Hes known as Bone
Daddy and Lucifer,
and he was wanted on an
alleged probation viola-
tion by the Pennsylvania
Department of Probation
and Parole until
Thursday when
city police say
they found him
hiding inside
a North Fulton
Street house.
Jesse Geasey,
33, attempted
to hide behind
a bed in a second-floor
bedroom in an attempt
to evade capture, police
said. He was taken into
custody and turned over
to state parole officers,
police said.
Geasey was released
from state prison in June
after serving 14 months
of a two-year, four
months to five-year state
prison sentence out of
Luzerne County.
According to court
records: Geasey was
charged by city police
for slashing several
people with a box cutter
during a melee on Coal
Street on May 6, 2011.
City police also
charged Geasey with
cutting a lock at a mau-
soleum in Hollenback
Cemetery and smashing
a marble faceplate to a
crypt. He forced open
a rusty coffin and stole
the skull of Louise Bana
Kidder on July 16, 2010.
Kidder was one of
six people entombed
in the mausoleum.
She had died Dec. 31,
1926, according to the
smashed faceplate.
Geasey carried the
skull in a backpack for
several days, police said
in the criminal
complaint. While
he was fishing
with another per-
son, he tossed
the skull into
the Susquehanna
River.
It wasnt the
first time Geasey
had stolen bones from
Hollenback Cemetery.
Police accused him in
May 1998, when he was
18 years old, of forcing
open a mausoleum door
and stealing bones from
several caskets. He was
sentenced to probation
in 1999, according to
court records.
Geasey pleaded guilty
to aggravated assault for
the Coal Street slashing
and criminal trespass
and abuse of a corpse
on April 17, 2012.
PAGE 4A Saturday, September 21, 2013 NEW www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
570.287.4329
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Epitome Lee Kammerer Brace EPI
6/26/99-9/2/13
With the gentle assistance of her mom and dad, Epi crossed over
the Rainbow Bridge on Monday, September 2, 2013. Finally a
whole once more, she was able to walk to meet her patiently
waiting mate, Te Duke or Earl.
Epi was a Llewellyn English Setter and an accomplished bird
hunter who, with no professional training, successfully pointed
and retrieved 8 out of 10 pheasant and chukhar partridge at the
age of 8 months. She continued to hunt for 8 years before retiring
to the back yard, where she would point robins and mourning
doves. Before her illness, she loved to lounge on the patio with the
family and watch for and chase the feral cats that would come
through the yard on occasion. She will be sorely missed y all who
knew and loved her.
Preceding her in the walk over the bridge was her signifcant other and best friend, Te Duke of Earl on 12/26/06 and her porcine sister
Althea Maria on 11/2/09
She leaves behind her parents Lois and David Brace, porcine sister Bristol Ann, feline sister Elizabeth of Hanover Twp. and Luzerne,
and brother, Baxter (Bubby) Kern of Trucksville.
Lois and Dave would like to thank the staf at Back Mountain Veterinary Hospital in Dallas especially Dr. Brock Phillips and Gina
Masters for the expert and compassionate care she received for the past 2 years since her decline in health. She defed all odds!!
I love you, with all my heart Always & Forever.
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Lifes too shot to be alone
Judge to W. Wyoming hauler: Clean up property or face jail
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARREAcounty
judge said Friday that the owner
of Russells Hauling in West
Wyoming has 10 days to clean
up the property or he could face
additional nes or even jail time.
At a hearing Friday the bor-
ough requested Joseph Russell
be held in contempt for violating
Luzerne County Judge Michael
Voughs cease-and-desist order
of his hauling company in early
August. Russell was found not to
have proper zoning or licensing
to operate the business.
The borough said in court
papers this month that despite
Voughs order, Russell continued
to operate his business.
A hearing Friday began with
testimony froma West Wyoming
police ofcer, but then was put
on hold while attorneys dis-
cussed issues.
About an hour and a half later,
Vough emerged from his cham-
bers and said the borough and
Russells attorney, Erik Dingle,
came to an agreement.
You agree you did violate
the order? Vough asked Russell.
Yes, sir, Russell replied.
Russell has 10 days to clean up
the business at 12 Apollo Drive,
Vough said.
If Russell does not clean and
clear his property at the end of
10 days, hell have to pay $1,300
to the borough and a $200 ne
for every day thereafter that he
is still on the property, the judge
said.
The next step is prison,
Vough told Russell. Do you
understand that?
Yes, sir, Russell said.
The borough, through its
solicitor Linell Lukesh, alleged
Russell continued to operate
his business at a neighboring
auto dealer to the Apollo Drive
business, and that the borough
continues to receive complaints
from neighbors regarding noise.
Russell told The Times Leader
last week that he has not been
operating his business and had
been asked by the owner of VP
Auto Parts, located next door,
to operate and manage a salvage
yard there.
Russell also said his hauling
business is in the process of
opening an ofce in the borough
of Wyoming. I have to work and
support my family, Russell told
the newspaper. Working for
(VP Auto Parts) allows me to do
that. Imjust trying to make a liv-
ing. Am I not allowed to work at
any other business?
Between April 2012 and the
present, the borough originally
argued, nearby property owners
have experienced detrimental
living conditions due to noise,
smells, smoke and other viola-
tions coming from Russells
Hauling Co.
Russell testied previously
he had not received violations
from the state Department of
Environmental Protection or
any similar agency.
Russells Hauling opened in
February 2012 and sought zon-
ing for a special exception to
operate a multi-use recycling and
junkyard at the 12 Apollo Drive
business. That re-quest was later
denied, and Russell appealed
that decision, but no followup
hearing was ever scheduled.
Man known as Bone
Daddy is captured
Jesse Geasey, 33,
taken into custody in
Wilkes-Barre for alleged
probation violation
Homicide suspect loses bid to have evidence tossed
George Lee Barnes
scheduled to go
to trial Monday
Geasey
Barnes
ment complex on May 16.
Barnes allegedly shot
Trollinger during a marijua-
na sale inside an apartment
building at Eagle Ridge on
Beverly Drive. Federal mar-
shals captured Barnes in
Philadelphia on May 25.
Barnes suffered a
This was in the fort at
Forty Fort. Nathan Denison
used it to sign the articles of
capitulation, Bachman said
of the British victory. That
was on the Fourth of July
1778, two years to the day
after we had declared our
independence, he added.
Happier times
The home also harbors
memories of happier days,
as guests will learn.
It was enlarged many
times over the years, and
pictures show numer-
ous additions, including a
Victorian-era porch, that
were stripped away when
the home was restored for
preservation in the 1970s.
Bachman can remember
visiting as a young man
more than 50 years ago,
before the house became a
museum.
It looked like a typi-
cal 1950s house inside,
Bachman said as he stood
in the north room, which
was used as a family room,
and explained how the
Denison family would have
dined at a large table, pulled
close to the re during bit-
ter Pennsylvania winters.
The roomalso is believed to
be the only one in the house
with original ooring.
The whole thing is kind
of a time machine experi-
ence for people, and a very
pleasant way to spend a
Sunday, Bachman said.
I think everyone who vis-
its will come away having
learned something about
what life was like in the
Wyoming Valley in the
1790s.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 5A
Denison House event to ofer glimpse at 18th century life
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@timesleader.com
Festival on Sept. 29 at Forty Fort site will feature Colonial-type crafs, activities and foods
FORTY FORT
Expect hearty traditional
soups to be on the menu at
the Nathan Denison House
Harvest Festival next
weekend, but no hot dogs.
The popular sausages,
beloved by generations of
Americans since the late
1800s, would have been
unknown to Col. Nathan
Denison and his family
when they built a home-
stead on the western bank
of Abrahams Creek in the
late 1700s.
Cookies and cider
will be served, said Bill
Bachman, a member of
the volunteer Denison
Advocates, who are orga-
nizing the event to benet
the historic property and
its educational programs.
But no chocolate chips,
Bachman quickly added, as
the morsels didnt appear
until the 20th century.
Such attention to period
detail wont be limited to
food, as Bachman and the
Advocates assemble a col-
lection of artisans whose
work is intended to edu-
cate visitors about early
American life even as it
helps raise money.
Guests will be treated
to exhibitions of 18th cen-
tury crafts ranging from
chair caning, wheat weav-
ing and clothes making to
writing with quill pens,
vintage rearms displays
and cross-cut sawing all
accompanied by the strains
of Colonial music per-
formed by the Wyoming
Valley West string ensem-
ble.
Wealthy family
While most activities
will be arranged around
the homes neatly trimmed
lawns, visitors also will be
able to tour the ground
oor of the two-and-a-half
story, wood-frame dwell-
ing, which was built about
1790. It originally was
home to Denison, his wife
Elizabeth, seven children,
an elderly member of the
family and one servant,
Bachman said.
Its not a large house
by our standards, but in
the 18th century, this was
a castle, Bachman said,
adding that most Wyoming
Valley settlers of the period
would be lucky to have a
log home, as many still
lived in houses cobbled
together from mud and
what little lumber they
could get their hands on.
IF YOU GO
What: Denison House
Colonial Harvest Festival
When: 1-5 p.m. Sept. 29,
rain or shine
Where: 35 Dennison St.,
Forty Fort
Cost: $5 for adults, $3
for children under 12
Attractions: 18th
century-style crafts,
food, music, frearms,
tools and period music
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Bill Bachman, a Denison Advocate, talks about period furnishings inside the Nathan Denison House
as the Denison Advocates get ready to host the Colonial Harvest Festival on Sept. 29 at the historic
property in Forty Fort.
But Denison and his
family werent most set-
tlers. He was the scion
of a New England family
who headed west prior to
the Revolutionary War,
when the Wyoming Valley
was still contested terri-
tory between Denisons
native Connecticut and
Pennsylvania.
A justice of the peace,
Denison served as a militia
colonel during the revolu-
tion. One piece of furniture
in Denisons restored home
plays mute testimony to his
role as second in command
during the bloody Battle of
Wyoming, fought nearby on
July 3, 1778.
Bachman somberly laid a
hand on the dark wood of a
small table inthe southroom
of the home, which served
as Denisons ofce and a
receiving area for guests.
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PAGE 6A Saturday, September 21, 2013 NATION & WORLD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
JULIE PACE
and LARAJAKES
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
President Barack Obama and
Irans new president might
meet briey next week for the
rst time, marking a symbolic
but signicant step toward
easing their countries tense
relationship. An exchange of
letters between the leaders
already has raised expectations
for a revival of stalled nuclear
talks, though Iran is still likely
to seek an easing of interna-
tional sanctions in exchange
for signicant progress.
In small steps and encour-
aging statements, Irans lead-
ers appear to be opening a
door more widely to detente
in their nuclear dispute with
the U.S. Cautiously optimistic
yet still skeptical, Washington
is weighing whether Iranian
President Hasan Rouhanis
recent overtures actually rep-
resent new policies or just new
packaging.
Negotiations with the
Iranians is always difcult,
President Barack Obama said
in a recent interviewwith ABC
News. I think this new presi-
dent is not going to suddenly
make it easy. But, you know,
my view is that if you have
both a credible threat of force,
combined with a rigorous dip-
lomatic effort, that, in fact, you
can strike a deal.
Both Obama and Rouhani
will be in New York next week
for the annual meeting of the
U.N. General Assembly. The
White House hasnt ruled
out the possibility of a direct
exchange, though spokesman
Jay Carney said no meeting is
scheduled.
Obama has long said he
would be open to discussions
with his Iranian counterparts
if Tehran shows it is serious
about curbing its nuclear pro-
gram.
There have been a lot of
interesting things said out of
Tehran and the new govern-
ment and encouraging
things, Carney said Thursday.
But actions speak louder than
words.
Iran has repeatedly said it
wants sanctions eased as a rst
step to make any signicant
progress in nuclear negotia-
tions. Sanctions levied by the
U.S. and Europe have contrib-
uted to a rapid rise in ination
and unemployment in Iran.
Tehran insists its nuclear
program is peaceful and that it
is enriching uranium to levels
needed for medical isotopes
and reactor fuel. But Western
powers, including the U.S.,
fear Iran is trying to build a
nuclear bomb.
Whether any headway is
made on the nuclear issue
could hinge on how the U.S.
and Iran handle negotiations
to dismantle Syrias vast chem-
ical weapons stockpile. Iran is
the chief benefactor to Syria,
where an Aug. 21 chemical
weapons attack on Damascus
suburbs killed as many as
1,400 people, according to
U.S. and Western intelligence
agencies, who blame the gov-
ernment of Syrian President
Bashar Assad.
Yet Iran has been vocifer-
ous in its condemnation of
chemical weapons attacks in
Syria. In an op-ed published
in Thursdays Washington
Post, Rouhani said Syria
has become the scene of
heartbreaking violence and
pledged to help facilitate dia-
logue between Assads regime
and the rebel opposition.
THE HAGUE, NETHErlANds
Syria outlines
weapons cache
Syria has sent the Organization for
the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons
an initial declaration outlining its
weapons program, the organization said
Friday.
Spokesman Michael Luhan told The
Associated Press the declaration is
being reviewed by our verication divi-
sion. The organization will not release
details of what is in the declaration.
U.S. State Department spokeswoman
Marie Harf said the United States
and other nations that have joined the
chemical weapons organization will be
making a careful and thorough review of
the initial document.
VATICAN CITY
Pope denounces
abortion culture
Pope Francis offered an olive branch
of sorts to the doctrine-minded, conser-
vative wing of the Catholic Church on
Friday as he denounced abortions as a
symptom of todays throw-away cul-
ture and encouraged Catholic doctors
to refuse to perform
them.
Francis issued a
strong anti-abortion
message and cited
Vatican teaching on
the need to defend
the unborn during an
audience with Catholic
gynecologists.
It came a day after he was quoted as
blasting the churchs obsession with
small-minded rules that are driving the
faithful away. In an interview that has
sent shockwaves through the church,
Francis urged its pastors to focus on
being merciful and welcoming rather
than insisting only on such divisive, hot-
button issues as abortion, gay marriage
and contraception.
WAsHINGTON
Obamas to attend
Navy Yard memorial
President Barack Obama and rst
lady Michelle Obama will visit with
families of victims of the Washington
Navy Yard shooting and attend a memo-
rial at the Marine Barracks Washington,
the White House said.
The memorial is scheduled for
Sunday at the historic barracks, not far
from the Navy Yard where 12 people
were fatally shot by 34-year-old Aaron
Alexis, who was killed by law enforce-
ment Monday.
HArrIsBUrG
PSU approves
borrowing $750M
A relatively low-key meeting of Penn
State trustees has concluded with
approval of a $750 million borrowing
plan to help nance capital improve-
ments over the next ve years.
The trustees also voted Friday to
seek $300 million in state aid for the
2014-15 budget year, an increase of
about 5 percent.
Outside, about 200 protesters chant-
ed and demanded the trustees resig-
nations because of their handling of
the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse
scandal. The protesters, who included
former Pittsburgh Steeler Franco
Harris, are angry over allegations in a
university-commissioned report that
the late Penn State football coach Joe
Paterno helped cover up Sanduskys
crimes.
The borrowing package includes $30
million to help the athletic department
cover the costs of NCAA sanctions
imposed because of the Sandusky
scandal.
AP photo
Iranian President Hasan Rouhanis recent comments might signal a soft-
ening of Iranian relations with the United States.
AP photo
Nation remembers its POWs/MIAs
Alarge POW/MIAflag is displayed during a
ceremony at Washington states POW-MIA
memorial on Friday in Olympia, Wash. The
event honored people who have been prison-
ers of war and those who are still missing in
action. The Olympia event was one of many
held nationally.
Are US, Iran relations defrosting?
In a signifcant move, President Obama and
Irans newpresident may meet next week
Obama
moves to
limit carbon
pollution
DINA CAPPIELLO
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Linking
global warming to public health,
disease and extreme weather, the
Obama administration pressed
ahead Friday with tough require-
ments to limit carbon pollution
from new power plants, despite
protests from industry and
Republicans that it would dim
coals future.
The proposal, which would set
the rst national limits on heat-
trapping pollution from future
power plants, is intended to help
reshape where Americans get
electricity, moving from a coal-
dependent past into a future red
by cleaner sources of energy. Its
also a key step in President Barack
Obamas global warming plans,
because it would put in motion
plans to end what he called the
limitless dumping of carbon pollu-
tion from all power plants.
Under the law, once the
Environmental Protection Agency
controls carbon at new plants, it
will also control carbon at existing
plants a regulation the agency
said Friday it would start work on
immediately to meet a June 2014
deadline.
Yet the federal governments own
analysis of the newpower plant pro-
posal concludes that it would have
a negligible impact on carbon
dioxide emissions, pose little to no
costs for the industry and provide
no additional benets to the public
by 2022. Thats because it essen-
tially locks in what was widely
expected to happen anyway. Even
without new federal regulations,
the agency concluded that no new
coal plants would have been built.
Instead, the bulk of new power in
this country would be supplied by
natural gas, which already meets
the standard announced Friday.
The EPA does not anticipate
this rule will have any impacts on
the price of electricity, employ-
ment or labor markets or the U.S.
economy, the EPA wrote in its
analysis.
The industry, and its allies in
Congress, quickly dismissed that
conclusion.
Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said
the agency was holding the coal
industry to impossible standards.
EPA administrator Gina
McCarthy said in a speech Friday
that rather than damage an indus-
try, the proposed regulations
would help the industry to adapt,
by encouraging energy companies
to develop ways to reduce carbon
dioxide, the chief greenhouse gas,
from burning coal.
Despite some tweaks, the
rule packs the same punch as
one announced last year, which
received more than 2.5 million
comments and was legally vulner-
able because it required coal and
natural gas to meet the same limit.
Critics of proposed regulations
say they would be death knell
for future coal-powered plants
rescuers say 68 people reported missing in village of la Pintada
MICHAEL WEISSENSTEIN
Associated Press
ACAPULCO, Mexico Mexican
soldiers dug through tons of mud and
dirt Friday in their continuing search
for landslide victims, as authorities
looked for a federal police helicopter
that went missing while carrying out
relief operations on the ood-stricken
Pacic coast.
The helicopter with three crew
members on board was returning from
the remote mountain village of La
Pintada, where the mudslide occurred,
when it went missing Thursday, said
federal security spokesman Eduardo
Sanchez.
We still dont know anything,
Sanchez said. (The helicopter) was
in La Pintada and then we didnt
hear anything more from it.
Search efforts continued in the
town north of Acapulco, where 68
people were reported missing follow-
ing Mondays slide. Two bodies have
been recovered, but it was unclear if
they were among those on the list of
missing.
Federal police have been helping
move emergency supplies and aid vic-
tims of massive ooding caused by
Tropical Storm Manuel, which washed
out bridges and collapsed highways
throughout the area, cutting Acapulco
off by land and stranding thousands of
tourists.
Survivors of the La Pintada land-
slide staying at a shelter in Acapulco
recounted how a tidal wave of dirt,
rocks and trees exploded off the hill,
sweeping through the center of town,
burying families in their homes and
sweeping wooden houses into the bed
of the swollen river that winds past
the village on its way to the Pacic.
Everyone who could ran into the
coffee elds. It smothered the homes
and sent them into the river. Half the
homes in town were smothered and
buried, said Marta Alvarez, a 22-year-
old homemaker who was cooking with
her 2-year-old son, two brothers and
parents when the landslide erupted.
La Pintada was the scene of the sin-
gle greatest tragedy in the twin paths
of destruction wreaked by Manuel
and Hurricane Ingrid, which simul-
taneously pounded both of Mexicos
coasts over the weekend, spawning
huge oods and landslides across hun-
dreds of miles of coastal and inland
areas.
Manuel later gained hurricane force
and rolled into the northern state of
Sinaloa on Thursday morning before
weakening over land. By Thursday
night it had degenerated into an area
of low pressure over the western
Sierra Madre mountains, the U.S.
National Hurricane Center said.
Three people were reported dead
in Sinaloa: a sherman swept from
his boat, a small boy who fell into a
ditch and a young man whose vehicle
was swept away by ood waters that
reached waist-deep in some places in
Culiacan, the Sinaloa state capital.
The death toll from the weekend
storms, not including the dead in
Sinaloa, stood at 97. But it was certain
to rise because the gure also doesnt
include the missing in La Pintada.
AP photo
Search efforts continued Friday near the village of La Pintada, Mexico, north of Acapulco, where 68 people were reported missing following
Mondays landslide.
Mexico digs for landslide victims
13 wounded in shooting at Chicago park
The Associated Press
CHICAGO Those
behind a late-night attack at
a southwest Chicago park
in which 13 people were
wounded, including a 3-year-
old, used an assault-style
weapon to spray the crowd
with bullets, making it a
miracle no one was killed,
the citys police superinten-
dent said Friday.
Ballistics evidence shows
that those behind Thursday
nights attack used a 7.62
mm rie fed by a high-
capacity magazine, police
Superintendent Garry
McCarthy told reporters.
That type of weapon, he said,
belongs on a battleeld, not
on the street or a corner or
a park in the Back of the
Yards, the neighborhood
where the shooting took
place.
Its a miracle in this
instance that there have been
no fatalities based upon the
lethality of the weapon used
at the scene, McCarthy
said, calling on lawmakers
to restrict the sale of such
weapons and choke off the
ow of illegal guns into the
city.
The attack happened
shortly after 10 p.m. while
the Cornell Square Park was
still crowded with people
watching a basketball game
and enjoying a warm late
summer night.
Investigators believe sev-
eral people took part in
the attack but werent sure
yet how many red shots.
McCarthy said that based
on witness interviews, it
appears the attack was gang-
related and that several vic-
tims are gang members.
AP photo
Emergency responders tend to a victim at the scene where a number
of people, including a 3-year-old boy, were shot Thursday night in a city
park in Chicago.
IN BRIEF
Pope Francis
Victims, including a 3-year-old,
were sprayed by bullets from
assault-style rife, police say
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 7A
Editors note: This is
one in an occasional
series by The Associated
Press about the impact
of the Afordable
Care Acts health
insurance exchanges.
Open enrollment for
these exchanges, or
marketplaces, begins
Oct. 1.
As many as nine in 10
Texans buying health insur-
ance on the new feder-
ally run exchange will get a
break on costs, according to
federal health ofcials. Steve
and Maegan Wolf wont be
among them.
The Wolfs, who live in an
upscale area outside Austin,
make too much money to
qualify for tax credits that
will help other people afford
coverage. That leaves them
wondering howmuch theyll
wind up paying.
Steve Wolf, 50, coordi-
nates stunts and special
effects for feature lms
and TV shows. Last year,
he helped the Discovery
Channel blow up scale rep-
licas of the Hindenburg. He
owns Stunt Ranch, where
schoolchildren come to
learn about the science and
math of movie stunts.
His wife, 34, is a full-time
mom who spends many
hours each week getting
their three boys, 16-year-old
Clayton, 12-year-old Paxton
and 8-year-old Dashton, to
school, swim lessons, speech
therapy and math tutoring
appointments.
Like many who run family
businesses, the Wolfs annual
income varies, but its typi-
cally $115,000 to $140,000.
That means they make too
much to be eligible for the
tax credits that will help
some Americans pay for
health insurance under the
Affordable Care Act. They
also worry that changes in
coverage required by the
law will mean their pre-
miums will increase. That
includes setting minimum
coverage requirements for
insurance companies that go
well beyond what many offer
nowand prohibiting insurers
frombanning those with pre-
Middle-class family braces for higher premiums
The Wolfs, of Texas, have purchased health insurance on the individual market for about 12 years
CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer
existing medical conditions.
The Wolfs have pur-
chased their familys health
insurance on the individual
market for about 12 years,
during which time their pre-
miums have risen steadily.
They now pay about
$650 a month for insurance.
While their general health is
excellent, each of them has
had their share of medical
expenses. Their policy has
a $5,000 annual deductible
for each adult, meaning the
Wolfs in many years have
had to pay $10,000 out of
pocket toward medical bills
on top of the $25 copays for
doctor visits and $20 copays
for covered generic medi-
cine.
Next to their mortgage
($2,300 a month with prop-
erty taxes), their health
insurance is one of their
biggest expenses. Private
school for two of the three
boys adds nearly $3,000
per month. One of the boys
is both dyslexic and has
celiac disease, requiring
additional educational and
AP photo
Steve Wolf, a self-employed stunt and special effects coordinator for filmand television, lives with his
wife Maegan and their sons Clayton, 16, Paxton, 12, and Dashton, 8, in Austin, Texas. The Wolf family
worries their income is too high to qualify for new tax credits implemented under the Affordable
Care Act.
grocery expenses. There
also are bills for life insur-
ance, orthodontia, utilities,
cellphones, car insurance for
a teenage driver, and home
and auto maintenance.
When all is said and
done, we live well, but there
is no money left over, Steve
Wolf said. Any increase in
health insurance costs will
create a nancial strain.
But I keep it all in per-
spective. Unlike most
people on the planet, weve
never missed a meal, been
unable to nd safe drinking
water, lacked for a home
to sleep in or had to go
without medical care. So
while this pinches us in
the pocket, Im very lucky
to have these problems.
Based on the Kaiser
Family Foundations online
calculator, the Wolf fam-
ilys annual premium costs
for health insurance would
be almost double their cur-
rent costs if they purchase
a benchmark plan through
the federal exchange that
will be offered to Texas
residents.
If a yearly income of
$130,000 is assumed, the
Wolfs would pay an annual
premium of $14,804 for the
mid-range insurance plan,
called a Silver Plan. Their
current annual premium is
about $7,800.
Instead, they could buy a
less comprehensive Bronze
plan for $12,270 a year. Or
they would be eligible to
purchase catastrophic cov-
erage for even less, although
its not clear how much this
type of coverage would cost
the Wolfs. All the plans
would come with an annual
cost-sharinglimit of $12,700
for the family, meaning they
wouldnt have to pay more
than that out-of-pocket after
paying their premiums.
Many health care expen-
ses arent predictable and
there is risk inherent in
choosing a plan with a
higher out-of-pocket costs
and lower premiums, but
the Wolfs are willing to take
their chances.
Despite our experience,
we continue to hope that
well have low out-of-pock-
et expenses, so wed rather
have a lower premium and
the possibility of low costs
than to be locked in to high-
er premiums that cover
services that we might not
use, Steve Wolf said.
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BOLOGNA
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LEBANON
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2.99 LB.
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ITALIAN
HARD SALAMI
SLICING PEPPERONI
PROSCIUTTO
3.99 LB.
4.49 LB.
6.99 LB.
TURKEY
OVEN ROASTED
BUTTERBALL LOW SALT
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HONEY TURKEY
3.99 LB.
4.99 LB.
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WE OFFER ALL OF OUR ITEMS AT
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2.99 LB.
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3.99 LB.
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OVEN ROASTED
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3.99 LB.
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HAZLE PARK HOT DOGS (3 LB. PACK)
HAZLE PARK FOOTLONG HOT DOGS
JOHN MARTIN SHREDDED
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PLUMROSE BABY BACK RIBS
4.49
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Rt. 309 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd (Near Home Depot) 822-2025 Prices Expire 9/27/13
HATFIELD ROAST PORK
CORNED BEEF
PASTRAMI
4.99 LB.
4.99 LB.
4.99 LB.
SPECIALTY
ROAST BEEF
SLAB BACON
HATFIELD ROAST PORK
CORNED BEEF
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3.99 LB. WOW!
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CHICKEN
CHICKEN BREAST
CHICKEN ROLL
BUFFALO CHICKEN
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LEBANON
SWEET LEBANON
2.99 LB.
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TURKEY
OVEN ROASTED
BUTTERBALL LOW SALT
CAJUN TURKEY
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HONEY TURKEY
3.99 LB.
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FOR DETAILS
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ICE CREAM
GET 1 FREE SOFT ICE
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FOR $3.99
(Youth Small to XXL, 10 Colors)
2 for
5
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ALL FRUIT
(MIX OR MATCH)
99
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Gala apples
McIntosh apples
BraeBurn apples
reD DelIcIous apples
GolD DelIcIous apples
pInK laDY apples
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00
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LB. 99

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1
49
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lARGE SliCiNG
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29
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PiZZA 12 CUT
4
99
WHiTE AMERiCAN 2.99 lB
SWiSS 3.99 lB
PROVOlONE 3.99 lB
HOT PEPPER 3.99 lB
MUENSTER 3.99 lB
COOPER 3.99 lB
lAND OlAKES 4 Cheese Blend 4.99 lB
COOKED HAM 2.99 lB
CHOPPED HAM 2.99 lB
iMPORTED HAM 3.99 lB
OVAl SPiCE HAM 3.99 lB
SAHlENS HAM OFF THE BONE 4.99 lB
OVEN ROASTED TURKEY 3.99 lB
SMOKED TURKEY 4.99 lB
BUTTERBAll lOW SAlT TURKEY 4.99 lB
CAJUN TURKEY 4.99 lB
HATFiElD ROAST PORK 4.99 lB
CORNED BEEF 4.99 lB
PASTRAMi 4.99 lB
SlAB BACON 4.99 lB
ROAST BEEF 3.99lB WOW!
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BEFORE SHINGLE PRICES INCREASE
ANGELELLA- Magdalene,
funeral Mass 11 a.m. today in
Prince of Peace Parish, St. Marys
Church, West Grace Street, Old
Forge. Friends may call 10:30 a.m.
until Mass.
CYWINSKI - Edward, funeral
services 9 a.m. today at Davis-
Dinelli Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad
St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. in St. Faustina
Kowalska Parish/St. Mary of
Czestochowa Church, 1030 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke.
DZURY - John, friends may call
5 p.m. Sunday until 6:45 p.m.
service at S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, Plymouth.
FLESCHUT - Donald Sr., funeral
services 10a.m. today at Simon S.
Russin Funeral Home, 136 Mafett
St., Plains Township. Friends may
call 9 a.m. to services.
GEORGE - Mary, funeral services
9:30 a.m. today at Harold C.
Snowdon Funeral Home Inc.,
140 N. Main St., Shavertown.
Mass of Christian Burial 10
a.m. in St. Thereses Church,
Pioneer Avenue and Davis Street,
Shavertown.
GONSKY - Helen, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. today
in St. Robert Bellarmine Parish
at St. Aloysius Church, corner
of Division and Barney streets,
Wilkes-Barre.
HERBERT - June, memorial
service 11 a.m. today in Forty
Fort United Methodist Church.
Luncheon at the church
immediately following the service.
KEMPINSKI - Alicia, funeral Mass
10 a.m. Monday in Exaltation of
Holy Cross Church, Buttonwood.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
Sunday at Mamary-Durkin
Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St.,
Wilkes-Barre.
KIZELOWICZ - Josephine,
funeral services 9:30 a.m. today
at George A. Strish Inc. Funeral
Home, 211 W. Main St., Glen Lyon.
Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in
Holy Spirit Parish/St. Adalberts
Church, Glen Lyon. Friends may
call 8:30 a.m. to services.
KNAPPMAN- Cecelia,
celebration of life Mass 10 a.m.
today in St. Andre Bessette Parish
at Holy Savior Worship site,
Wilkes-Barre
KRUEGER- Edythe, memorial
service 10 a.m. today in Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church,
South Main Street, Wilkes-Barre.
LAMOREAUX- Mary, funeral 9
a.m. today at S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, 530W. Main St.,
Plymouth. Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. inAll Saints
Parish, 66WillowSt., Plymouth.
MASAKOWSKI - Rev. Edward,
viewing 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday in
St. Maria Goretti Church, 42
Redwood Drive, Lafin. Solemn
vespers 7 p.m. Pontifcal Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. Monday
at St. Maria Goretti Church.
Friends may call prior to the
Mass.
MIHOCH- Margaret, funeral
services 11 a.m. today in St. Pauls
Lutheran Church, Tunkhannock.
Friends may call 10 a.m. to
services.
PETROSKI - AndrewJr., funeral
11:15 a.m. today at Kopicki
Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave.,
Kingston. Mass of Christian Burial
noon in St. Thereses Church,
Shavertown.
RANSOM- Marion, celebration
of life 8:30 a.m. today at
McLaughlins The Family
Funeral Service, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral Mass 9 a.m. in the Church
of St. Mary of the Immaculate
Conception.
RHOADS- Dorene, memorial
services 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28 in
Trucksville United Methodist
Church. Friends may call 10 a.m.
to services.
VILKOSKI - Mary, funeral
services 11 a.m. today with a
Mass of Christian Burial in Holy
Family Church, Main Street, Sugar
Notch. Those attending are to
gather by 10:50 a.m.
WATKINS- Esther, funeral 9:30
a.m. today at E. Blake Collins
Funeral Home, 159 George Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Benedicts
Church, AustinAvenue, Wilkes-
Barre.
YURICK- Joseph, funeral service
9 a.m. today at Lehman Family
Funeral Service Inc., 689 Hazle
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in St.
Nicholas Church, Wilkes-Barre.
ZAJULKA- Clara, funeral 9:30
a.m. today in Holy Rosary Church,
Duryea.
PAGE 8A Saturday, September 21, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477 80022591
ELLEN SWELGIN,
84, of West Main Street,
Plymouth, passed away Friday
in the Celtic Health Care
Hospice unit at Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14
W. Green St., Nanticoke.
JOSEPH S. NARESKI,
76, of Hagerstown, Md., and for-
merly of Plymouth, passed away
on Thursday at the University of
Maryland Medical Center.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the S.J.
Grontkowski Funeral Home,
Plymouth. A full obituary will be
in Tuesdays edition.
MICHAELINE C.
CONSTANTINO, 90, of West
Pittston, passed away Friday in
Highland Manor, Exeter.
Funeral arrangements are
pending and will be announced
from the Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home, 251 William St.,
Pittston.
MICHAEL J. MARCY SR.,
53, of Pringle, died unexpect-
edly on Wednesday in Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the Kopicki
Funeral Home, 263 Zerbey Ave.,
Kingston.
GRACE A. REDINGTON,
87, formerly of Pittston, passed
away Friday in Mercy Center,
Dallas.
Funeral arrangements are
pending and will be announced
from the Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home, 251 William St.,
Pittston.
HELEN KOLBICKA
Sept. 20, 2013
Helen Kolbicka, 91, a lifelong
resident of the Careys Patch
section of Ashley, passed away
peacefully on Friday morning,
Sept. 20, 2013, at the Hampton
House, Wilkes-Barre, where
she was recently a guest. Her
beloved husband was the late
Michael Kolbicka, who passed
away on Oct. 15, 1988. Together,
Michael and Helen shared nearly
50 wonderful years of marriage.
Born on Feb. 23, 1922, in
the Careys Patch section of
Ashley, Helen was the daughter
of the late Benjamin and Helen
(Olexa) Karboski.
A homemaker most of her
life, Helen lovingly tended to
the daily needs of her home
and family. After her husband
became disabled from a coal
mining incident, Helen became
employed as a quilter for the
former Funkes Quilting, Ashley,
working there for almost 15
years.
Helen was a faithful member
of Holy Family Roman Catholic
Church, Sugar Notch.
A woman of many enjoy-
ments, Helen especially enjoyed
cooking for her family, cleaning
her home and entertaining com-
pany at her home.
Helen will forever be remem-
bered as a loving and devoted
wife, mother, grandmother,
great-grandmother, sister, aunt
and friend. Though her pres-
ence will be deeply missed, her
beautiful spirit will continue to
live on in the hearts of her loved
ones.
In addition to her parents,
Benjamin and Helen Karboski,
and her husband, Michael
Kolbicka, Helen was preceded
in death by her beloved son,
Michael Kolbicka, who passed
away in 1980; her broth-
ers, Benjamin and Anthony
Karboski; and her sisters, Regina
Gardzilla, Loretta Karboski and
Mary Diamonte.
Helen is survived by her
son, Lawrence Kolbicka and
his wife, Michaeline, Orlando,
Fla.; her daughter-in-law, Anna
Mae Kolbicka Hanlon and her
husband, Mark A. Hanlon,
Ashley; her six grandchildren,
Tara Pearson and her husband,
Erik, Todd Kolbicka and his
wife, Dawn, Michael Kolbicka
II and his wife, Maureen,
Lawrence Kolbicka II and his
wife, Erin, Mark Hanlon and
Beth Ann Hanlon; her ve great-
grandchildren, Todd Kolbicka
Jr., Benjamin Kolbicka, Kylee
Kolbicka, Jayna Kolbicka and
Hunter Pearson; her sister,
Jeanette Karboski, Ashley; and
numerous nieces and nephews.
The family of Helen Kolbicka
extends their thanks to the staff
of Hampton House for their
heartfelt care, as they were an
extended family to Helen.
Relatives and friends are
respectfully invited to attend
the funeral at 9 a.m. Tuesday
from the Joseph L. Wroblewski
Funeral Home, 56 Ashley St.,
Ashley, followed by a Mass of
Christian Burial to be celebrat-
ed at 9:30 a.m. in Holy Family
Church, 828 Main St., Sugar
Notch, with the Rev. Joseph R.
Kakareka, her pastor, ofciating.
Interment with the rite of com-
mittal will follow in Maple Hill
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Family and friends are invited to
call from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at
the funeral home.
EDWARD J. LAZEVNICK SR.
Sept. 19, 2013
Mr. Edward J. Lazevnick Sr.,
76, of West Pittston, formerly of
Duryea, passed away Thursday
at home.
Born in Duryea, he was the
son of the late John and Nell
Carey Lazevnick. He was a
graduate of Duryea High School
and Williamsport Technical
Institute. He was employed for
10 years by the International
Salt Co., Clarks Summit, and
prior to his retirement he
was the owner of Edward J.
Lazevnick Contracting.
He was a loving father, grand-
father, brother and uncle. He
loved to golf. He was a social
member of the American Legion
Post 585, Duryea, and the Polish
Falcons Nest 127, Duryea. He
was formerly involved with the
Duryea Little League and the
Duryea Wildcats.
He was proceeded in death by
his rst wife, the former Rose
Prusch; son, Edward Lazevnick
Jr.; brothers, John and Robert;
and sister, Lucille.
Surviving are his wife, the
former Susan J. Rutkowski, of
Duryea; son, Michael Lazevnick
and his wife, Kim, of West
Wyoming; daughter, Sharon
Lazevnick, of Avoca; daughter,
Wendy Lazevnick, of Duryea;
stepson, Dale Klush and his
wife, Stephanie, of Pittston;
stepdaughter, Susie Sarin and
her husband, Alook, of Plains;
brother, Bernard Lazevnick
and his wife, Laura, of Pittston;
grandchildren, Rachel and
Nicole Lazevnick, Courtney
Guzzy, Dana and Abigail Turner;
step-grandchildren, Zach and
Nina Meighan, Harmonie Marie
Hurgrave, Ani Grace Sarin and
Dylan Robert Klush; and nieces
and nephews.
A viewing will be held from
2 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the
Bernard J. Piontek Funeral
Home Inc., 204 Main St.,
Duryea, with services at 3 p.m.
by Dr. Al Cremard, pastor of
the Independent Bible Church,
Duryea. Interment will be in
Marcy Cemetery, Duryea. To
leave the family an online con-
dolence or for further informa-
tion, please visit our website:
www.piontekfuneralhome.com.
Alicia L. Kempinski, of West
Nanticoke, passed away sud-
denly at home.
Born Nov. 4, 1981, in
Kingston, she was a daughter of
George E. and Sandra DeCurtis
Kempinski of West Nanticoke.
She was a graduate of
Nanticoke High School, class
of 2000, Luzerne County
Community College and Wilkes
University. She was employed
as an Internet sales manager
with her father at Buttonwood
Bakery, Hanover Township.
She was a member of
Exaltation of Holy Cross
Church, Buttonwood.
Alicia was an outstanding
basketball player at Nanticoke
High School, and she was loved
by everyone she came in contact
with, always bringing a smile or
laugh.
She will be sadly missed by
all.
In addition to her parents, she
is survived by her sister and best
friend, Jennifer Lee Kempinski
Bedford, West Nanticoke;
paternal grandmother, Helen
Kempinski, Hanover Township;
numerous aunts, uncles and
cousins; and her loving cat, Miss
Josie.
She was preceded in death
by her paternal grandfather,
Chester Kempinski; mater-
nal grandparents, Carmine G.
and Alba DeCurtis; and cous-
ins, Thomas Kempinski and
Anthony DeCurtis.
Funeral Mass will be held at
10 a.m. Monday in Exaltation
of Holy Cross Church,
Buttonwood. Friends may call
5 to 8 p.m. Sunday at Mamary-
Durkin Funeral Service, 59
Parrish St., Wilkes-Barre.
Those who desire may give
memorial contributions to Blue
Chip Farms Animal Refuge,
974 Lockville Road, Dallas, PA
18612-9465.
OBITUARY POLICY
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. Afuneral home representative can
call the obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email, please call to confrm. Obituaries
must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in
the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory, or must name who is handling
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To view
Legacy
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FUNERALS
ALICIA L.
KEMPINSKI
Sept. 18, 2013
MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
GETTYSBURG The
autograph hounds wait-
ing expectantly in a hotel
lobby werent drawn by
actors, musicians or politi-
cians, but by a few dozen
men whose rare and distin-
guished achievements have
earned them the nations
highest military honor.
Nearly half of the 79 liv-
ing recipients of Medal of
Honor are attending the
gathering in Gettysburg,
where some of its rst
recipients fought 150 years
ago.
The Medal of Honor
Society annual conven-
tion gives the public an
opportunity to collect
the signatures of the men
who have been honored
by Congress for risking
their lives beyond the call
of duty in combat, and
dozens of people waited
Thursday for them to
return from a luncheon at
a nearby farm once owned
by President Dwight
Eisenhower.
Dave Loether, 62, a
computer analyst from
Pittsburgh, was hoping to
add to the 55 signatures of
Medal of Honor recipients
he has collected on a U.S.
Army ag. Loether knows
many of their faces by
sight and their stories
by heart.
Its a piece of cloth
with some ink on it its
worthless, Loether said.
On the other hand, its
priceless.
The recipients auto-
graphs sometimes end up
on public auction sites, but
Loether said he collects
them as a hobby that began
as a way to honor his sons
in the military.
Recipients sat at tables
ringing a hotel ballroom,
including Clinton L.
Romesha, of Minot, N.D.
President Barack Obama
presented him with the
honor in February for brav-
ery in defending an Army
outpost in Afghanistan
four years ago.
Now working in safety
for a construction com-
pany, Romesha, 32, said
he tries to remind himself
that hes still the same per-
son he was before, a man
who has to take out the
trash himself.
I never thought in a
million years Id ever meet
a recipient, let alone be
one, said Romesha, who
was attending his rst con-
vention.
Eight soldiers died in
the daylong barrage by
the Taliban in the moun-
tains near Pakistan, and
Romesha was one of 22
wounded among the badly
outnumbered Americans.
He helped lead others to
safety and retrieve the
bodies of the U.S. dead.
Donald E. Ballard, the
societys treasurer, became
a member for his bravery
while serving as a Navy
corpsman in Vietnam. He
threw himself on a grenade
while directing Marines to
carry a wounded comrade
to safety. The grenade did
not detonate.
Ballard, who now owns
a funeral home in Grain
Valley, Mo., said being a
Medal of Honor recipient
means being a role model,
like it or not.
There is no Hero 101
book, I didnt take the
course, Ballard said. I
have to live up their expec-
tations, or my expectations
of what they expect.
Ballard said a major
focus of the organization
these days is its character
development program for
middle and high school
students promoting values
like courage and sacrice.
Recipients were scheduled
to meet Friday with local
students.
Other scheduled events
included a town hall forum
at Gettysburg College
and a concert on the
Gettysburg battleeld with
the United States Marine
Band on Friday and an
award dinner on Saturday.
Next years convention will
be in Knoxville, Tenn.
Fans followheroes trail to Gettysburg
Convention gives
public a chance to
get the autographs
of some Medal of
Honor recipients
AP photo
Clarence E. Sasser signs autographs alongside his girlfriend, Patricia Washington, on Thursday in
Gettysburg,. Private First Class Sasser served in Vietnam as a combat medic.
KANTELE FRANKO
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio An Ohio
police chief who invited his nearly
85,000 Facebook followers to his
small towns community festival
this weekend expects at least 1,000
from near and far to show up.
Brimeld Township Chief David
Oliver started the departments
Facebook page more than three
years ago in the hopes of reach-
ing a few hundred people in his
northeast Ohio community. But his
posts mixing humor, blunt opin-
ion, community engagement and
rants against mopes criminals
and other neer-do-wells draw
an audience much larger than the
approximately 10,000 residents the
department serves.
The departments Facebook fans
surpassed that of the Philadelphia
police page this summer and trail
only the much larger Boston and
New York departments.
Oliver said more than 1,000
signed up to visit this weekend.
They hail from all over, Arkansas
and Arizona to Maryland and
Mississippi.
Andy Marek, who is making the
seven-hour drive from Interlochen,
Mich., said Olivers character and
outsize following convinced him
theres something to that town,
and hes eager to see it.
You cant have a police chief like
him unless youve got some other
quality people, the 41-year-old
sales associate said. Im curious
to see what the towns like, and to
meet Chief Oliver.
Overall, local ofcials expect
several thousand more people
than usual to come to the annual
Brimfest. The only folks not wel-
come are the mopes, and any who
risk a visit may get acquainted
with several other law enforcement
agencies on hand patrolling for
trouble.
The event started Thursday
and includes reworks, fair foods,
competitive line-dancing and a
Saturday parade that Oliver has
transformed this year into a tribute
for veterans. More than 400 will
participate, including some World
War II veterans and two busloads
of patients from the Louis Stokes
Cleveland VA Medical Center.
I think that people are coming
out because of the idea and because
of, you know, its kind of an all-
American thing, Oliver told The
Associated Press.
Another draw will be the big,
beefy chief himself and the launch
of his book, No Mopes Allowed.
The book proceeds go to a non-
prot foundation he and his wife
created to benet local programs
and sexually abused children. Its
the latest community betterment
project by the chief and his ofcers,
who also have pitched no mopes
gear made by a local shop to raise
more than $10,000 for school secu-
rity improvements.
Kelly Whelan is driving for a lit-
tle over ve hours from Ashburn,
Va., to attend Brimfest and get
a signed copy of Olivers book.
Whelan, 45, made hotel reserva-
tions in April after reading Olivers
invitation.
Whelan will attend the festival
in a group of six. She and a friend
bought Virginia police badges and
are hoping to swap them for one
from Brimeld.
Big time small-town chief
invites online fans to fest
About 1,000 of Brimfeld Twp., Ohio, Chief David Olivers
85,000 Facebook friends plan on taking himup on the ofer
AP photo
Brimfield Police Chief David Oliver invited
his nearly 85,000 Facebook followers to
his small towns annual community festival
this weekend and expects at least 1,000
from near and far to show up.
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
Black women are joining
traditionally white sorori-
ties at the University of
Alabama amid efforts to
end racial segregation
within Greek-letter social
groups, the head of the
school said Friday.
University President
Judy Bonner said 11
black students and three
students from other
minority groups received
bids, or invitations, to
join a historically white
sorority. Of that group,
four black students and
two students from other
minority backgrounds
have accepted those invi-
tations. Bonner said. She
expected the numbers to
rise as the academic year
continues.
I am condent that we
will achieve our objective
of a Greek system that is
inclusive, accessible and
welcoming to students of
all races and ethnicities,
Bonner said in a video
statement. We will not
tolerate anything less.
The universitys Greek
organizations have been
segregated by race since
the rst black students
enrolled and created
social organizations. One
oversight organization
has been composed of
white sororities and the
other composed of minor-
ity sororities. Only a
handful of blacks attempt-
ed to join the historically
white Greek groups at
Alabama, where there are
also historically black fra-
ternities and sororities.
White sororities admit black
students at U. of Alabama
The Associated Press
Count on tax-averse libertarians to
champion a user fee for the nations
highways.
A recently released study by the lib-
ertarian Reason Foundation proposes
tolling all 49,000 miles of the nations
interstate highway system at 3.5 cents
a mile for cars, 14 cents for trucks. The
toll could be adjusted annually for ina-
tion.
Pennsylvania has considered tolling
Interstate 80 before and this news-
paper opposed it. But year after year,
states are collecting lower gas-tax rev-
enues, the result of more fuel-efcient
vehicles, alternative-energy vehicles and
fewer miles driven. And year after year
of postponed repairs have placed the
essential maintenance of the nations
badly aging infrastructure out of reach
of the available funds. Tolling the inter-
states all interstates, not just I-80
deserves consideration.
Consider the issues:
An Associated Press analysis of
607,380 bridges in the most recent fed-
eral National Bridge Inventory showed
that 65,605 were structurally decient,
and 20,808 fracture critical. Of those,
nearly 8,000 were both, a situation
experts say represents a red ag. Some
of these bridges, like the I-23 bridge that
collapsed in 2007 in Minnesota, are in
the highway system.
Pennsylvania hosts an outsized
share of decient bridges, but the trans-
portation funding the state General
Assembly passed in the 2013-14 budget
wont begin to cover them and maintain
all the state roads, too. Last month the
state Department of Transportation
announced new weight restrictions
on some 1,000 state and local bridges
aimed at slowing their deterioration. Of
those, 53 are in Monroe County.
Roads are costly. The International
Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike
Association estimates that rebuilding
the entire interstate system over the
next half century will cost as much as
$2.5 trillion.
Interstate tolls will place an addi-
tional nancial burden on thousands
of Monroe County residents, from
commuters to truckers, and on the
thousands of tourists, who, like other
interstate drivers, already pay a toll to
cross the Delaware Water Gap bridge.
But Pennsylvania is scrounging for rev-
enues to support its roads and highway
system.
Implementing interstate tolls would
require Congress to change federal law,
andgettingelectedofcials tomakesuch
an unpopular move even one that
does not raise taxes hardly seems
likely. But like it or not, the nation must
properly support its interstate highway
systemsomehow. The economy and our
very freedom of movement depend on
it. Taxes alone no longer cover the cost.
Given the high stakes compro-
mised public safety and inadequate
funding tolling the interstates offers
Pennsylvania and other states a new
funding source that is desperately need-
ed.
Pocono Record
OTHER OPINION: CRUMBLING HIGHWAYS
Toll interstates
for needed cash
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
This week I traveled the com-
monwealth to talk about Healthy
Pennsylvania, my plan to make sure
every Pennsylvanian has access to qual-
ity, affordable health care.
From the Riverview Health Clinic in
Harrisburg to the Boys and Girls Club
in Pittsburgh, I shared a common-sense
plan that provides health care choices,
reforms a broken Medicaid system and
expands the private health care market,
while reducing government bureau-
cracy and helping Pennsylvanians get
healthy and nd jobs.
The goals of Healthy Pennsylvania
are common-sense and vital:
Make sure every child in the state
has medical coverage.
Be certain every resident has access
to a family doctor or health care pro-
vider.
Use our states world-class technol-
ogy to make certain that, no matter
where they live, every Pennsylvanian
has access to a specialist when they
need one.
In short: make sure that every
Pennsylvanian has access to direct
medical care.
This is a Pennsylvania solution to
the unique needs of a large and diverse
state. Its not enough to design a sys-
tem. It has to be a system that works
right here and right now.
We will work with the Legislature
to reauthorize the states Childrens
Health Insurance Program by the end
of 2013 and eliminate the six-month
waiting period so kids dont lose access
to their doctors.
At the same time, I plan to expand
the use of community-based pri-
mary care clinics around the state and
increase funding for loan forgiveness
programs to attract doctors and other
health care professionals to rural and
underserved areas of Pennsylvania.
We will continue to utilize and
grow technology so that specialists
can treat patients in every corner of
Pennsylvania through telemedicine.
We will extend the reach of our long-
term care services and supports for our
older Pennsylvanians
and people living with
disabilities. And we will
work with our communi-
ties to focus on overall
public health and well-
ness and ensure safe and
appropriate access to
prescription medication.
One of the key
pieces to the Healthy
Pennsylvania program
is nding the best way
to apply federal dollars
to insure more than a
half-million of our citizens who lack
health coverage.
The answer is two-fold: Use the
current Medicaid program more ef-
ciently, and expand coverage through
the private sector.
Currently, one in six Pennsylvanians
more than 2 million people are
on Medicaid, and it costs Pennsylvania
taxpayers $19 billion annually.
This week I sent a proposal to the
Obama Administration to reform the
current Medicaid system in a way
that will make certain it will be there
for our neediest in years to come. We
need to align Medicaid benets with
plans that now cover working, insured
Pennsylvanians. The current system
offers a confusing array of benet pack-
ages that dont match the needs of the
patients who rely on them.
As a result, Pennsylvania pays 34
percent more per recipient than the
national average.
We need to include cost sharing and
individual responsibility. We need to
eliminate confusing co-payments and
implement a modest monthly premium
giving people greater responsibility
for their own health care.
And, we must help able-bodied
Pennsylvanians nd a job through
job training and work search require-
ments. This plan requires able-bodied,
unemployed Medicaid recipients to use
Pennsylvanias Job Gateway program,
which connects people looking for
work with jobs and job training pro-
grams. It enables them to engage in a
meaningful work search similar to the
current requirements for those receiv-
ing unemployment compensation.
For newly eligible, uninsured
Pennsylvanians, we have the Healthy
Pennsylvania Option, which provides
them with high quality health care cov-
erage from the private sector.
If the federal government approves
Pennsylvanias plan to reform our exist-
ing Medicaid program, the common-
wealth would be in a position to use
federal dollars to offer access to a pri-
vate health care coverage option to low-
income, newly eligible Pennsylvanians
up to 133 percent of federal poverty
who are uninsured.
The Healthy Pennsylvania Option,
enables residents to buy private health
insurance plans through the recently
established federal health insurance
exchange.
Just like the reformed Medicaid
program, these individuals would
receive access to quality health care, be
enabled to search for work or partici-
pate in job training and pay a modest
monthly premium.
This is a plan that works for our
state, our people and our children.
We cant afford to expand a broken
Medicaid system to cover one-in-four
of our citizens because of a federal
mandate. We can insure every citizen
using our own initiative and sense of
personal independence.
We need a plan that works. Healthy
Pennsylvania will.
Tom Corbett is Republican governor of Pennsyl-
vania.
COMMENTARY: GOV. TOM CORBETT
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 9A
Editorial
It has been nearly six months since
Gov. Tom Corbett changed his tune a
bit about receiving a few billion fed-
eral dollars in Obamacare subsidies to
plug holes in Pennsylvanias health care
safety net. Yet the governor remains
a long way from delivering on the new
goal he announced Monday of giving all
Pennsylvanians access to quality and
affordable health care.
Many doubt that his plan to use fed-
eral Medicaid dollars to subsidize private
insurance policies for 520,000 uninsured
Pennsylvanians will gain required federal
approval. Critics who have already taken
to calling Corbett One-term Tom are
right to wonder whether the governors
Medicaid proposal is only a political
stalling tactic.
Corbetts track record on social pro-
grams offers little reason for optimism.
Since its rst month in power, the
Corbett administration has busied itself
with discussions of ideas to close wid-
ening gaps in health coverage and cash
aid for the states neediest, including
93,000 children who have been tossed
off the rolls of both the joint state-federal
Childrens Health Insurance Program
and Medicaid.
Earlier, Corbett was a spirited com-
batant in failed, Republican-led efforts
nationally to scuttle Obamacare a
rear-guard campaign still ring pas-
sions among tea-party faithful. At least,
that long, twisted road led Corbett to
the right place, with his declaration
Monday that hes nally ready to pro-
pose terms under which the state would
accept Obamacare funds earmarked
for expanding Medicaid to thousands
of people, many in jobs that dont offer
affordable health plans.
But apparently fearing what Grover
Norquist and his Club for Growth bud-
dies would think, Corbett wants current
Medicaid recipients to pay a modest
monthly premium, which is now barred
by law, and fulll a work-search require-
ment, which no other state has linked to
health care coverage.
Although the cost-sharing and job-
hunting mandates could potentially
help the state meet its budget bottom
line, and boost the job-market efforts of
individuals, they also could become the
gotcha provisions that result in people
losing their health coverage. Federal
ofcials, taking the correct stance in say-
ing they will try to work with Corbett,
should press to avoid any of the obvious
pitfalls in his plan.
While that process plays out, unfor-
tunately, the status quo on health care
under Corbett remains wholly unaccept-
able. The governors seemingly endless
deliberation over the right course for the
state in expanding health care coverage
will almost certainly result in a further
delay of a year or more in covering the
uninsured.
That means the state will lose out
on $1.6 billion in federal Medicaid dol-
lars due to ow in 2014, plus another
$2.8 billion in related economic impact
to the state economy, including 30,000
new jobs generated from a straight-line
expansion of Medicaids rolls under
Obamacare.
That potential gravy train further
undermines Corbetts insistence that the
state cant afford to expand Medicaid.
Three independent studies show the
returnonexpandingcoveragewouldmore
than cover the cost. Such analyses helped
drive a solid state Senate vote favoring
a traditional expansion of Medicaid. Its
not too late for Pennsylvania to take that
assured course, even now.
Philadelphia Inquirer
OTHER OPINION: MEDICAID
Delays and mandates
put Corbett plan at risk
LCTA numbers
just dont add up
I see where the Luzerne County
Transportation Authority, which
adopted the most expensive of the
various streetcar options (none of
which is a good idea), hopes for an
annual ridership of 1.4 million.
Lets do the math.
This works out to an average of
3,835 riders every day, 365 days a
year.
Seattles streetcar, in recent
Express-News articles, boasted about
averages of 1,400 a day. Tampa,
termed less successful by the Express-
News, averages 950 riders per day.
The LCTA boards ridership math
seemingly is as faulty as its math in
adopting a system that will cost mil-
lion more than LCTA has to spend.
Thanks for the great stewardship of
our tax dollars, guys!
James Killian
Plains Township
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR
SEND US YOUR OPINION
Letters to the editor must include the writers name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
We can solve health care dilemma
Gov. Tom
Corbett
Contributing
Columnist
PAGE 10A Saturday, September 21, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
84/70
Chihuahua
77/55
Los Angeles
74/60
Washington
77/63
New York
77/64
Miami
88/75
Atlanta
78/65
Detroit
69/47
Houston
78/68
Kansas City
78/55
Chicago
67/51
Minneapolis
65/47
El Paso
81/65
Denver
83/54
Billings
83/54
San Francisco
71/56
Seattle
65/53
Toronto
66/51
Montreal
70/55
Winnipeg
58/40
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
SUN TUE
WED THU
MON
FRI
TODAY
68
57
Clouds
and sun, a
shower
70 46
Mostly
sunny
73 48
Nice with
bright sun-
shine
76 51
Delightful
with sun-
shine
74 55
Mostly
sunny
67 43
Sunny
76 50
Heavy
rain and a
thunder-
storm
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 0
Month to date 69
Year to date 771
Last year to date 864
Normal year to date 565
Anchorage 52/42/c 48/37/c
Baltimore 76/63/r 76/52/pc
Boston 75/64/pc 72/53/r
Buffalo 68/50/r 59/44/c
Charlotte 78/63/t 79/56/pc
Chicago 67/51/s 67/48/s
Cleveland 68/51/c 64/46/pc
Dallas 82/62/pc 86/66/s
Denver 83/54/s 81/49/pc
Honolulu 89/74/s 89/73/s
Indianapolis 72/48/pc 69/49/s
Las Vegas 92/67/s 81/66/s
Milwaukee 64/48/s 61/47/s
New Orleans 84/73/r 84/71/r
Norfolk 80/67/t 75/59/pc
Okla. City 82/55/s 82/55/s
Orlando 90/73/pc 89/74/t
Phoenix 101/79/s 98/70/s
Pittsburgh 69/53/r 61/44/c
Portland, ME 70/60/pc 71/47/r
St. Louis 75/53/s 75/54/s
San Francisco 71/56/sh 71/58/pc
Seattle 65/53/sh 62/53/r
Wash., DC 77/63/r 77/54/pc
Bethlehem 1.64 -0.01 16
Wilkes-Barre 1.99 -0.30 22
Towanda 1.34 -0.14 16
Port Jervis 2.63 -0.08 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Friday.
Today Sun Today Sun Today Sun
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Sept 26 Oct 4
Oct 11
Last New
First Full
Oct 18
6:50 a.m.
8:09 p.m.
7:02 p.m.
9:08 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 67-73. Lows: 50-56. Heavy rain and a thunderstorm this after-
noon. Rain at times tonight. A shower in places tomorrow.
Highs: 71-77. Lows: 61-67. Some sunshine giving way to clouds, breezy
and humid today. Periods of rain, some heavy tonight.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 65-71. Lows: 51-57. Mostly cloudy and not as warm today with
rain becoming heavier, a thunderstorm late.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 77. Low: 64. Breezy and humid today with clouds and sun.
Breezy and humid tonight with periods of rain, some heavy.
High: 79. Low: 64. Breezy and humid today with some sun, then
clouds; a couple of afternoon thunderstorms.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Friday
High/low 79/50
Normal high/low 71/51
Record high 92 (1895)
Record low 33 (1993)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.69"
Normal m-t-d 2.67"
Year to date 19.06"
Normal y-t-d 27.70"
68/57
68/55
79/64
77/62
72/56
76/61
74/58
68/51
68/54
68/52
66/50
68/54
74/59
74/61
77/64
Summary: Heavy showers and thunderstorms will bring drenching downpours to
the Northeast and the South today. Flooding will be a concern across portions of
the Deep South.
While Democrats U.S.
Sen. Bob Casey and U.S.
Rep. Matt Cartwright
denounced the vote by the
House of Representatives
to cut an additional
$40 billion from the
Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program
(SNAP), Republican U.S.
Rep. Lou Barletta defend-
ed the action, saying it
will help eliminate fraud.
Casey, D-Scranton,
said the Houses extreme
plan builds upon already
unprecedented cuts to
the SNAP program even
though economic data
show every dollar in
SNAP spending gener-
ates $1.70 in economic
activity. Casey vowed to
ght against the Houses
new plan and detailed
the impact that this new
round of cuts will have on
vulnerable Pennsylvania
children, families and
seniors.
The House of
Representatives plan to
institute further draconian
cuts to the SNAP program
is bad for the economy,
Pennsylvanias children,
families and
seniors, Casey
said.
B a r l e t t a ,
R-Hazleton, said
no one in America
should go hun-
gry, and every-
one who needs
assistance should
have access to
it. However, he
said, the pro-
gram should
prevent people
from defrauding
the system, tak-
ing benets and
hurting those
who actually need
them.
Under this
plan, no one who
is eligible for food
stamps will be
denied coverage,
Barletta said. It prevents
lottery winners, tradi-
tional college students,
the deceased, illegal immi-
grants and those convicted
of drug offenses from
accessing benets.
Barletta said the GOP
plan allows states to drug-
test recipients if they
choose to do so and it
stops the use of taxpayer
money to advertise in an
effort to encourage
people to enroll in
the food stamp pro-
gram. These steps
will reduce costs
and preserve the
benets for eligible
recipients, he said.
Casey said fraud
numbers in the
SNAP program
have never been
lower. Its not
zero, Casey said.
But its a lot lower
than other federal
programs.
C a r t w r i g h t ,
D-Moosic, said
the cuts would
deny basic food
for nearly 4 million
Americans next
year. The measure
passed the House
by a vote of 217 to
210.
Some 28,000 people
in Cartwrights district
struggle to put food on the
table for their families, he
said. More than 90 per-
cent of people on SNAP
are children, the elderly,
disabled or already work-
ing, he said.
These devastating
cuts will harm children,
seniors, veterans and
Americans looking for
work, Cartwright said.
SNAP is a vital tool to
ght hunger and help
unemployed Americans
feed their families as they
seek new employment,
send their children to
school and get themselves
back on their feet.
Casey said projections
call for an estimated 14
million people to leave
the program over the next
10 years as the economy
improves. The average
benet per individual is
about $4.28 per day, he
said, while the national
average is $4.40 per day.
For the 2012 scal year,
the average monthly ben-
et was $128.42, he said.
The House bill now
goes to the Senate, where
Casey said he will do
whatever he can to stop it.
They will never succeed
in cutting $40 billion, he
said. But Im sure there
will be some compromise
and there will be cuts. But
not $40 billion.
Cartwright said the
House bill will cut school
lunches for more than
200,000 children and
eliminate food assistance
for 170,000 veterans.
Casey, Cartwright against SNAP cuts;
Barletta supports vote in House
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Barletta
Casey
Cartwright
how the boy responded.
When the teen got into
Paulishs vehicle, the con-
versation turned sexual,
the priest told police, and
the pair began removing
their pants, according to
the afdavit. The teen,
who was interviewed and
examined at the Childrens
Advocacy Center, told
police he then performed a
sex act on the priest.
Paulish, whose address
was listed as 450 Third St.,
Blakely, has been serving
as an assistant pastor at
Prince of Peace Parish in
Old Forge, but in past years
he was assigned to posts in
Exeter, Hazleton, Wilkes-
Barre and Bear Creek,
according to Diocese of
Scranton records.
I wish to acknowl-
edge how unsettling this
is to me personally and
to countless others,
Scranton Bishop Joseph C.
Bambera said, as the dio-
cese released a statement
pledging to cooperate with
investigators.
Upon being notied
of this incident, the cleric
was immediately removed
from his assignment and
his faculties to exercise
priestly ministry were
suspended, the diocesan
statement read.
Diocesan ofcials asked
that anyone who might
have been sexually abused
by Paulish or any mem-
ber of the clergy notify
the Lackawanna County
District Attorneys Ofce
at 570-963-6717 or local
law enforcement.
As for the potential
for other victims we will
continue to review all
of the evidence and fol-
low any potential leads,
McCambridge told The
Times Leader.
The leader of a national
organization for victims of
priestly abuse on Friday
questioned whether the
dioceses actions go far
enough. What do I think
of the (bishops) state-
ment? In three words:
the bare minimum, said
David Clohessy, executive
director of the Chicago-
based Survivors Network
of those Abused by Priests.
Instead, Clohessy said,
Bambera needs to person-
ally take his appeal to wor-
shippers at parishes where
Paulish worked.
Were talking about
centuries of Catholic
parishioners thinking, If
I say anything, Ill bring
shame onto my parish,
my faith, Clohessy said.
It should be an emphatic
personal appeal that will
jolt people into coming
forward and calling 911 if
they have anything further
to report.
The diocese also
released a list of Paulishs
assignments over the quar-
ter century since he was
ordained, including several
stays in Luzerne County.
Paulishs rst twoassign-
ments were in Clarks
Summit and Williamsport,
but he went on to serve as
an assistant pastor at St.
Cecilias in Exeter from
January to June 1992,
followed by a posting to
Most Precious Blood,
Hazleton, from June 1992
to July 1993. He returned
to Luzerne County in
January 1994, serving as
chaplain of Little Flower
Manor, Wilkes-Barre, until
July 2000.
Paulish returned to
Luzerne County again
in 2006, serving seven
months back at St. Cecilia
in Exeter. He later served
as administrator and pas-
tor at St. Elizabeth in Bear
Creek between 2008 and
2011.
Lackawanna County
detectives charged Paulish
with involuntary deviate
sexual intercourse with a
person under 16, indecent
assault of a person under
16, unlawful contact with
a minor (sexual offenses),
corruption of minors and
indecent exposure.
Paulish was arraigned
beforeDistrict JudgeJames
A. Gibbons and committed
to the Lackawanna County
Prison in lieu of $50,000
bail. A preliminary hearing
was set for Wednesday.
From page 1A
Priest
said they will include a one-
year delay in Obamacare
in the measure to reinforce
their determination to
eradicate the program.
The same bill will
include provisions to
reduce decits and stay
the administrations envi-
ronmental agenda as the
GOP seeks gains for its
own priorities. Raising the
cost of Medicare for nan-
cially better-off benecia-
ries is one likely provision
to be added, according to
numerous ofcials. So,
too, is a ban on federal
regulations on greenhouse
gas emissions.
Obama responded in
remarks before an audi-
ence at a Ford assembly
plant near Kansas City,
Mo.
He blamed a faction
on the far right of the
Republican Party for
threatening to shut down
government operations
or default on government
debts. Theyre focused
on trying to mess with
me, he told plant work-
ers. Theyre not focused
on you.
Unlike other budget
showdowns of the recent
past, this one pits younger
Republicans in the House
against GOP veterans in
the Senate, although not
to the extent it does one
party against the other.
Republicans are united
in their opposition to the
health care law, which
they say will force the
price of coverage higher
and prompt employers
to reduce work hours for
workers. But they disagree
on how to attack it.
The bill that won pas-
sage on Friday was all but
forced on Boehner and fel-
low House GOP leaders,
who fear a repeat of the
twin government shut-
downs nearly two decades
ago that inicted seri-
ous political damage on
Republicans.
Caution on the part
of GOP elders was over-
whelmed by tea party-
aligned lawmakers, who
were in turn responding
to the urgings of outside
groups and their allies in
the Senate, Sens. Ted Cruz
of Texas and Mike Lee of
Utah among them.
The vote in the House
was almost completely
along party lines, and the
administration threatened
in advance to veto the bill
if it should pass the Senate
as well. Among Democrats,
only Reps. Mike McIntyre
of North Carolina and Jim
Matheson of Utah support-
ed the measure. Virginia
Rep. Scott Rigell was the
only Republican voting
against it.
The Republican rally
in the Capitol afterward
was unusual for its overtly
political tone.
You know, many
Senate Republicans have
promised to leave no
stone unturned ghting
for this bill, and all of us
here support that effort.
Were calling on Senate
Democrats to do the same
thing, said Majority
Leader Eric Cantor of
Virginia, who then asked
how four Democrats who
face re-election in swing
states next year will be
voting. Among the four,
Sens. Mark Pryor of
Arkansas, Mark Begich
of Alaska, Kay Hagan of
North Carolina and Mary
Landrieu of Louisiana all
voted for the law when
it passed Congress, and
none has indicated a vote
for nullication.
Instead, the likelihood is
that the Senate will strip
off the provision to defund
the health care law, as well
a different section that
prioritizes debt payments
in the event the Treasury
lacks the funds to meet all
its obligations. Reid and
other Democrats then plan
to send back to the House
a bill whose sole purpose
would be to prevent any
interruption in govern-
ment services on Oct. 1.
The next move would
be up to Boehner and
his famously fractious
rank and le. Unless they
decide to surrender quick-
ly, they could respond with
yet another attack on the
health care law, perhaps
a one-year delay in the
requirement for individu-
als to purchase insurance.
Senate Republican Leader
Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky backs legislation
to that effect, and Obama
has already announced a
one-year postponement
in a requirement for busi-
nesses to provide coverage
to their employees.
In recent years, the
threat of massive interrup-
tions in government ser-
vices has waned as agen-
cies rene their plans for
possible shutdowns, but
lawmakers cautioned the
effects could be harmful.
From page 1A
Fight
time possible, according
to the civil complaint.
The complaint alleges
FEMA officials were in
frequent contact with
Herron about finding
permanent housing dur-
ing 2012. Herron alleg-
edly told FEMA officials
that he had contacted
rental sources, but rents
were too high for his lim-
ited income.
Im doing my best,
what do they want me to
do? Herron said. I have
my two boys. I have to
keep my head together.
FEMA on Sept. 7,
2012, told Herron he
had 15 days to vacate the
trailer. A second 15-day
notice to vacate was
issued on Oct. 17.
Despite the notices to
leave the trailer, Herron
remained.
FEMA officials met
with Herron on Nov.
21 to determine efforts
at finding a permanent
residence.
FEMA only had evi-
dence that Mr. Herron
applied for one facil-
ity/rental and could not
provide FEMA with a
firm commitment that
he would put in applica-
tions at other facilities
available to him, the
suit states.
FEMA claims the agen-
cy had provided Herron
with $28,000 in replace-
ment housing assis-
tance, including $1,700
in rental assistance. The
lawsuit alleges Herron
was unable to validate
that he used the funds
for housing.
Theyre charging me
$1,125 a month to live
there, Herron said. I
have to feed my kids.
How am I supposed to
pay them?
Herron said he has not
seen the complaint and
was made aware of it by
a reporter.
From page 1A
Trailer
A month from now,
Im sure Ill have gone
through rolls and rolls of
vinyl, Levine said.
There was one company
she declined to name that
ordered 21 new signs dis-
playing the area code.
I think businesses are
thinking about dialing the
area code themselves to
make call, but not think-
ing it through to the next
step of informing their
customers that theyll
have to do the same,
Levine said.
While most businesses
have marketing material,
business cards and let-
terhead featuring area
codes because they often
interact with those out
of town, the signage dis-
played locally doesnt
always follow suit.
Anyone driving
throughout the Wilkes-
Barre area Friday would
have noticed signs hang-
ing from facades along
Wyoming Avenue missing
the area code. Burgitts
City Taxi cabs all lacked
the three digits, too.
Several businesses along
Public Square, includ-
ing Leo Matus News and
Liberty Tax, had only sev-
en-digit numbers on their
windows or doors.
Several food business-
es, including Mimmos
and Circles on the Square,
send out hundreds of
faxes every day of their
daily specials. Their fax
recipient lists have to be
re-entered with the 570
area code added.
From page 1A
Dialing
ParIshassIgnmEnTs
The Diocese of Scranton provided a list of The Rev.
WilliamJefrey Paulishs assignments since his
ordination 25 years ago:
Sept. 3, 1988 ordained
Sept. 9, 1988 June 19, 1991: assistant pastor, Our
Lady of the Snows, Clarks Summit
June 20, 1991 Jan. 14, 1992: assistant pastor,
Annunciation, Williamsport
Jan. 15 June 21, 1992: assistant pastor, St.
Cecilias, Exeter
June 22, 1992 July 6, 1993: assistant pastor, Most
Precious Blood, Hazleton
July 7, 1993 Jan. 23, 1994: assistant pastor, Sacred
Heart, Peckville
Jan. 24, 1994 July 4, 2000: chaplain, Little Flower
Manor, Wilkes-Barre
July 5, 2000 July 5, 2004: pastor at St. Francis
Xavier, Friendsville, St. Patricks, Middletown, and St.
Thomas the Apostle, Little Meadows
July 6 Nov. 9, 2004: leave of absence, health
reasons
Nov. 10, 2004 June 28, 2005: assistant pastor at
St. Josephs, Minooka, Immaculate Conception and
St. John the Baptist, Taylor
June 29 Sept. 12, 2005: chaplain, St. Marys Villa,
Elmhurst
Sept. 13 Nov. 8, 2005: assistant pastor, St.
Patricks, Scranton
Nov. 9, 2005 March 24, 2006: leave of absence
(no reason listed)
March 24 Oct. 11, 2006: residence at St. Cecilia,
Exeter
Oct. 11, 2006 July 8, 2008: assistant pastor, St.
Marys, Old Forge
July 9, 2008 July 6, 2011: administrator, St.
Elizabeth, Bear Creek (and pastor fromJuly 7, 2010 -
July 10, 2011)
July 11, 2011 Aug. 5, 2012: leave of absence, health
reasons
Aug. 6 Nov. 14, 2012: assistant pastor, Holy Cross,
Olyphant
Nov. 15, 2012 - July 14, 2013: leave of absence, health
reasons
July 15 - Sept. 20: assistant pastor, Prince of Peace,
Old Forge
Sept. 20: leave of absence pending investigation of
alleged sexual misconduct with a minor
JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
BERWICK Those black
shirts worn by many Wyoming
Valley West students had a mes-
sage on them for the football team
Strive For Five.
Berwick had another motto
Friday night No More After
Four.
The Dawgs used a strong run-
ning game in the second half to
snap a four-game losing streak to
Valley West with a 42-28 victory
in a Wyoming Valley Conference
interdivisional football game at
Crispin Field.
Berwick (4-0) hadnt defeated
the Spartans (3-1) since 2008. The
Dawgs were embarrassed in last
years meeting 33-15.
To reverse the curse my senior
year, Berwick left tackle Kyle
Stearley said, its a dream.
Stearley and the big boys up
front turned the contest in the sec-
ond half. Berwick threw only four
times in the second half while run-
ning the ball 31 times.
Running back Dain Kowalski,
who lost a fumble on his second
carry of the game and rushed just
one more time in the rst half,
scored two fourth-quarter touch-
downs to help the Dawgs pull
away. Kowalskis 20-yard TD run
with 4:03 to play gave Berwick a
42-21 lead and sent many of the
black-shirt crew to the exits. He
nished with 65 yards on 11 car-
ries.
Berwick also utilized fullback
Jorden Stout quite often in the
second half. He had six of his eight
rushes over the nal two quarters.
I thought we had a better line
sports
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Saturday, September 21, 2013
SECTION B
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
Lions anxious to rebound fromdefeat
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
Paul Haynes practically sighed when
he said it. The rst-year Kent State coach
has been tasked with preparing his team
for back-to-back games at LSU and Penn
State.
It doesnt get any easier, Haynes
said. We go from Death Valley to Happy
Valley. Which isnt very happy right now.
No, indeed.
The Nittany Lions have been in an
ornery mood this week, particularly on
defense, following their 34-31 loss to
Central Florida. It was the rst time since
joining the Big Ten that the Lions had
allowed 34 points in a non-conference
game at Beaver Stadium.
They return there today to face the
Golden Flashes in their nal tune-up
before their Big Ten schedule opens in
October.
Senior leaders like safety Malcolm
Willis have tried to set the tone right at
the start of the week.
Willis got in everybodys ear after
practice on Monday and let guys know
we have to be on everything this week,
sophomore corner Jordan Lucas said.
We cant let up on anything in practice.
Run to the ball, and when we get there,
we have to be nasty.
He stepped up and let us know we
have to get it done.
Penn State had reversed its 0-2 start
from a year ago and the defense had
done its job, shutting down two strug-
gling offenses in Syracuse and Eastern
Michigan.
Senior linebacker Glenn Carson
wouldnt go so far as to say the Lions
were overcondent before facing
See PSU | 6B
robinsons frst goal propels Crusaders in ot
JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE
Savannah Robinson just
wouldnt stop smiling.
Her grin was wide and
bright long after meeting
with her teammates, and then
returning to her teams bench
and sending out a text or two.
So what caused all this joy
to come over the Coughlin
sophomore? A moment that
shell remember forever.
Robinson scored in the 13th
minute of overtime to lift the
Crusaders to a 1-0 victory over
Wyoming Seminary in WVC
eld hockey Friday.
Its pretty stressful in over-
time, Robinson said of her
rst varsity goal, which led to
a pile of Crusaders celebrat-
ing on the eld and an ice bag
for her shoulder afterward. I
ran to my best friend Brigid
(Wood). I think I gave her a
concussion (from the celebra-
tory collision).
It was a wild urry that led
to the games only goal, as
Coughlin came down the eld
after repelling a Wyoming
Seminary penalty corner and
ensuing long corner oppor-
tunity. Brigid Wood started
the attack inside the Blue
Knights circle with a reverse-
stick shot that Sem goalkeeper
Mackenzie Gagliardi swatted
down with the blocker on her
left hand.
The rebound was pounced
on by Kaitlyn Lukashewski,
who red a ticketed shot
toward the Sem goal. Gagliardi
was able to get her left boot
on what looked like a sure
goal. Then Wood pushed that
rebound to Robinson.
I was really nervous as
the ball came toward me,
Robinson said. I just tried to
hit it as hard as I could.
Despite a lack of goals, the
game was an exciting up-and-
down the eld extravaganza.
As quickly as Sarah Zbierski
or Katie Colleran would send a
long ball upeld for Coughlin,
Tali Dressler and Isabella
DelPriore were ring the ball
right back into Crusaders ter-
ritory.
Theyve started the last
two years, Coughlin coach
Colleen Wood said of her
defensive backs. They are
able to combine with the
speed we have with our mids.
Theyre really been working
together.
It would ease my mind if
they could connect for a goal
or two earlier in the game,
though, Wood added with a
laugh.
This was the third time the
teams had met at Guthrie
Field, having weather post-
pone them Sept. 11, then
being halted by storms after
playing 21:36 of the rst half
Sept. 12. The game resumed
Friday with 8:24 remaining in
the rst half.
The Blue Knights had some
great chances that just didnt
connect.
Midway through the second
half, a 40-yard drive by Marina
Barnak looked to be heading
over the end line, but instead
clanged off the goal post and
sat in front of the goal, only to
be cleared away by Crusaders
keeper MKensie Lee.
In overtime, Mallory
Lefkowicz capped a great
game with two chances that
were nearly converted.
Her reverse-stick shot on a
penalty corner led to a battle
in front between Lee and
Sems Alexis Quick for the
ball at the post. Lee won that
battle with a glove save.
On the ensuing long corner,
Morgan Malone centered to
Lefkowicz for a shot that went
just wide to the long side.
We know this is always
a tough battle, Sem coach
Karen Klassner said. We
put ourselves in position to
succeed, but you get a game
like this sometimes. We
had some good chances but
just had trouble nishing.
Dawgs stop
ValleyWest
Mazonkey runs wild for Northwest
JOE BARESS
For The Times Leader
SHICKSHINNY From the rst
snap, Northwests offensive game-
plan was clear. Give the ball to
Austin Mazonkey and let him lead
the team to a 4-0 start.
Thirty-seven carries, 352 yards
and four touchdowns later, the
Rangers remained undefeated with
a 26-20 victory over GAR at home
on Friday.
Hes a great workhorse and
he plays both sides of the ball,
Northwest coach Carl Majer said.
He has the ability to break it, he
runs hard and he has good vision.
Mazonkey took his rst carry to
the house on a 72-yard touchdown
run on the rst play of the game to
give the Rangers a 6-0 advantage.
On the ensuing Northwest pos-
session, the Rangers called on
Mazonkey six times, leading to
another touchdown.
GAR fought back in the second
quarter when Rashaun Mathis
found Rashaun Jackson streaking
down the left side of the eld for a
27-yard touchdown reception.
Rich Sickler then scurried for a
45-yard touchdown run before the
end of the half to tie the game at 13.
Sickler nished the game with 117
yards rushing on 19 carries.
The game remained scoreless
in the second half until Mazonkey
ended the defensive struggle in the
fourth quarter with a 1-yard touch-
down run to give the Rangers a
20-13 lead.
Mazonkey added his fourth touch-
down with 3:39 remaining in the
game to give Northwest a 26-13
advantage.
With the game almost out of reach
the Grenadiers (0-4) continued
to battle. Facing fourth down and
under tremendous pressure, Mathis
PSU GAMEDAY
KENT STATE (1-2) AT PENN STATE (2-1)
3:30 p.m., today
Beaver Stadium, State College
TV:
Big Ten Network
Radio: 103.1-FM, 910-AM, 980-AM, 1300-AM

Other key games:


Michigan St. at Notre Dame, 3:30 p.m., ABC
Michigan at Connecicut, 8 p.m., ABC
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Coughlins Kalie Reed and Wyoming Seminarys Molly Turner make the dirt fly as they battle in front of Sems goal
during Fridays WVC field hockey game in Wilkes-Barre.
See COUGHLIN | 6B
Don Carey | For The Times Leader
Wyoming Valley quarterback Michael Baur, with ball, runs past Berwick defenders during the first half of a high school football game Friday in Berwick.
Spartans had won last 4 meetings
See DAWGS | 4B
See NORTHWEST | 4B
Hes a great workhorse and he plays both sides of the ball.
He has the ability to break it, he runs hard and he has good
vision.
Northwest coach Carl Majer
On running back Austin Mazonkey
PAGE 2B Saturday, September 21, 2013 SCOREBOARD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
latest line
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baseball
MaJOR leaGUe BaseBall
FaVORite line UnDeRDOG line
Atlanta -120 at Chicago +110
at Pittsburgh -110 Cincinnati +100
NewYork -110 at Philadelphia +100
at Washington -280 Miami +240
St. Louis -135 at Milwaukee +125
at Colorado -125 Arizona +115
Los Angeles -175 at San Diego +165
american league
at Tampa Bay -140 Baltimore +130
at Oakland -230 Minnesota +210
at Cleveland -260 Houston +230
at Detroit -135 Chicago +125
at Boston -165 Toronto +155
Texas -115 at Kansas City +105
at Los Angeles -150 Seattle +140
interleague
at NewYork (AL) -155 San Francisco +145
nCaaFOOtBall
tonight
FaVORite OPen tODaY O/U UnDeRDOG
at Georgia 36 33 (67) NorthTexas
at Louisville 41 42 (55) FIU
at Iowa 19 16 (47) W. Michigan
Vanderbilt 36 30 (52) at UMass
at Florida 15 16 (47) Tennessee
Wake Forest 3 2 (49) at Army
Pittsburgh 6 4 (50) at Duke
Michigan 18 18 (51) at UConn
at Wisconsin 22 23 (48) Purdue
Ball St. 8 10 (57)at E. Michigan
at Penn St. 14 22 (54) Kent St.
at Virginia Tech 11 9 (51) Marshall
Cincinnati 24 23 (53) at Miami
at Georgia Tech 3 6 (58) N. Carolina
Maryland-x 4 5 (53) West Virginia
at Minnesota 5 4 (50) SanJose St.
at Mississippi St. 13 13 (60) Troy
at Baylor 30 30 (75) LA-Monroe
Wyoming 2 4 (66) at Air Force
at BYU 6 7 (62) Utah
at Nevada 14 7 (57) Hawaii
at Southern Cal 7 6 (50) Utah St.
at Texas A&M 26 28 (78) SMU
Houston-y 4 3 (65) Rice
at Notre Dame 6 5 (41) Michigan St.
at Texas 7 5 (58) Kansas St.
Arkansas St. 3 4 (53) at Memphis
atKansas 9 10 (50) LouisianaTech
at Alabama 36 39 (51) Colorado St.
at Rutgers Pk 2 (44) Arkansas
at Stanford 6 6 (51) Arizona St.
La.-Lafayette 6 6 (64) at Akron
at Washington St. 35 31 (58) Idaho
Middle Tenn. 4 3 (48) at FAU
at Syracuse 10 17 (54) Tulane
Toledo 14 13 (56) at Cent. Mich.
at Texas Tech 25 27 (58) Texas St.
OregonSt. 8 8 (53) atSanDiegoSt.
at LSU 14 17 (55) Auburn
UTSA +1 2 (61) at UTEP
Missouri 3 2 (71) at Indiana
at UCLA 38 42 (66) NewMex. St.
x-at M&TStadium
y-at Reliant Stadium
nFl
sunday
FaVORite OPen tODaY O/U UnDeRDOG
at Tennessee 3 3 (44) San Diego
at Minnesota 3 6 (40) Cleveland
at NewEngland 7 7 (44) Tampa Bay
Houston 2 2 (44) at Baltimore
at Dallas 3 3 (47) St. Louis
at NewOrleans 7 7 (48) Arizona
at Washington 2 1 (49) Detroit
Green Bay +1 2 (49) at Cincinnati
N.Y. Giants +2 1 (47) at Carolina
at Miami 1 2 (44) Atlanta
at San Francisco 10 10 (46) Indianapolis
at Seattle 16 19 (40) Jacksonville
at N.Y. Jets 2 2 (39) Bufalo
Chicago 2 2 (40) at Pittsburgh
Monday
at Denver 14 15 (49) Oakland
thURsDaYs late BOx sCORe
athletics 8, twins 6
Minnesota aB R h Bi BB sO avg.
Presley cf 4 0 0 1 1 1 .278
Dozier 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .243
Ploufe 3b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .249
E.Escobar 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .215
Arcia rf 5 2 2 1 0 2 .251
Doumit dh 5 0 1 0 0 2 .243
Willinghamlf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .210
Pinto c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .360
Parmelee 1b 3 1 3 0 1 0 .232
1-Bernier pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231
Florimon ss 2 0 1 1 1 0 .226
d-C.Herrmann ph 1 1 0 1 0 0 .216
Colabello 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .196
totals 38 6 10 6 5 10
Oakland aB R h Bi BB sO avg.
Crisp cf 4 2 2 2 1 0 .257
Donaldson 3b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .304
Lowrie ss 5 1 1 3 0 0 .285
Moss lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .258
Reddick rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .216
S.Smith dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .249
c-Choice ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273
Vogt c 1 0 0 1 0 1 .261
a-D.Norris ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .238
Barton 1b 2 1 1 0 2 1 .256
Sogard 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .264
b-Callaspo ph-2b 2 1 1 1 0 1 .251
totals 32 8 11 8 6 3
Minnesota 001 002 1206 10 0
Oakland 000 204 02x8 11 2
a-popped out for Vogt in the 6th. b-homered
for Sogard in the 6th. d-grounded into a felders
choice for Florimon in the 8th.
1-ran for Parmelee in the 8th.
ELowrie (18), Donaldson (16). LOBMin-
nesota 10, Oakland 7. 2BMoss (21), Reddick
(17), Barton (1). HRArcia (13), of Bre.Ander-
son; Callaspo (8), of Duensing; Lowrie (13), of
Swarzak; Crisp (21), ofMartis. RBIsPresley (8),
Dozier (63), Arcia (37), Pinto (8), Florimon (41),
C.Herrmann(18), Crisp2(61), Lowrie 3(70), Red-
dick (52), Vogt (15), Callaspo (49). CSReddick
(1). SFVogt.
Runners left in scoring positionMinnesota 5
(Dozier 2, Presley 2, Arcia); Oakland3(Donaldson
2, S.Smith). RISPMinnesota 3 for 11; Oakland 2
for 6.
Runners moved upFlorimon. GIDPDozier.
DPOakland 1 (Lowrie, Sogard, Barton).
Minnesota iP h R eR BB sO nP eRa
Correia 5 6 2 2 5 1 101 4.29
Duensing BS, 3-42-3 2 2 2 0 1 21 4.08
Swarzak 0 2 2 2 0 0 5 3.01
Thielbar 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 1.93
Martis L, 0-1 12-3 1 2 2 1 1
31 5.06
Oakland iP h R eR BB sO nP eRa
Straily 52-3 3 3 2 3 6 105 4.08
Otero BS, 1-1 0 1 0 0 1 0 8 1.47
Bre.Anderson 11-3 3 1 1 0 3 34 6.37
Cook H, 23 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 14 2.69
J.Chavez BS, 1-2 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 4.19
Doolittle W, 5-5 11-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.22
Otero pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Swarzak pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Football
BUlletin BOaRD
BaseBall
american league
NEW YORK YANKEES Announced the re-
tirement of LHP Andy Pettitte at the end of the
season.
Can-amleague
QUEBEC CAPITALES Released C Marc
Mimeault and OF Dany Deschamps.
FOOtBall
national Football league
NFL Fined Tennessee RB Jackie Battle
$21,000 for lowering the crown of his helmet
into an opponent. Fined N.Y. Jets G Willie Colon
$34,125 $26,250 for contact with an ofcial,
and $7,875 for punching an opponent; New Eng-
land DE Chandler Jones $15,750for roughing N.Y.
Jets QB Geno Smith; N.Y. Jets OT DBrickashaw
Ferguson $15,000 for punching a New England
player, and New England DE Michael Buchanan,
CB Alfonzo Dennard and DT Vince Wilfork $7,875
each for throwing punches. Fined Tampa Bay DE
Adrian Clayborn $21,000 for a helmet-to-helmet
hit on NewOrleans QB DrewBrees.
hOCKeY
national hockey league
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Assigned G Mac
Carruth to Rockford (AHL).
NASHVILLE PREDATORS Assigned D Tay-
lor Aronson, D Anthony Bitetto, F Zach Budish,
D Charles-Olivier Roussel and F Josh Shalla to
Milwaukee (AHL). Reassigned F Felix Girard to
Baie-Comeau (QMJHL), Mikko D Vainonen to
Kingston (OHL) and FTommy Veilleux toVictoria-
ville (QMJHL). ReleasedDKayle Doetzel, FSebas-
tian Geofrion, G Eric Levine, D Michael Mofat, G
Cody Reichard, D Teddy Ruth and G Allen York
fromtheir tryout agreements.
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Assigned F Adam
Erne to Quebec (QMJHL).
WINNIPEGJETS Reassigned F Austen Bras-
sard, RW Blair Riley, D Brenden Kichton, D Cody
Sol, F J.C. Lipon, LWJason Jafray, F John Albert,
GJussi Olkinuora, CKael Mouillierat andDWill O<
eChl
READING ROYALS Sent F David Marshall, F
Domenic Manardo, DMike Banwell, DRyan Kava-
nagh and D Bryant Molle to Hershey (AHL) and F
Louie Caporusso and F Marc Zanette to Worces-
ter (AHL), F Ian OConnor and D Matt Campanale
to Manchester (AHL) and F Sean Wiles to Bridge-
port (AHL) and F Bobby Shea to Rockford (AHL).
COlleGe
RANDOLPH-MACON Named Kirkland Lewis
womens assistant lacrosse coach.
WASHINGTON (MD.) Named Ambreelinne
Ortman womens assistant basketball coach and
Steven Howard womens volunteer assistant bas-
ketball coach.
transacti ons GolF
aUto raci nG
ChaMPiOnstOUR PaR sCORes
at Kapolei Golf Club
Kapolei, hawaii
Purse: $1.8 million
Yardage: 7,002; Par 72
First Round
Mark Wiebe 31-3364 -8
Mark Calcavecchia 34-3266 -6
John Cook 32-3466 -6
Brian Henninger 33-3467 -5
Bart Bryant 35-3368 -4
Brad Faxon 34-3468 -4
Corey Pavin 34-3468 -4
Gene Sauers 34-3569 -3
John Inman 34-3569 -3
JimGallagher, Jr. 35-3469 -3
Bernhard Langer 34-3569 -3
David Frost 33-3669 -3
Kirk Triplett 33-3669 -3
Willie Wood 31-3869 -3
Olin Browne 37-3269 -3
Vijay Singh 33-3669 -3
Rocco Mediate 36-3369 -3
Jef Sluman 34-3569 -3
Joel Edwards 33-3770 -2
Scott Simpson 34-3670 -2
Mark OMeara 36-3470 -2
Mark McNulty 36-3470 -2
Sandy Lyle 35-3570 -2
Bob Niger 33-3770 -2
Dufy Waldorf 36-3571 -1
R.W. Eaks 36-3571 -1
Steve Pate 35-3671 -1
Steve Elkington 36-3571 -1
Jef Hart 35-3671 -1
Rod Spittle 36-3571 -1
Roger Chapman 35-3671 -1
EstebanToledo 34-3771 -1
Fred Couples 35-3671 -1
Larry Mize 37-3471 -1
Jay Don Blake 36-3571 -1
Doug Garwood 36-3571 -1
Steve Jones 35-3772 E
Peter Senior 36-3672 E
Steve Lowery 36-3672 E
Brad Bryant 36-3672 E
Bob Gilder 36-3672 E
TomKite 37-3572 E
Kenny Perry 36-3672 E
Hale Irwin 37-3572 E
Joe Daley 35-3772 E
Mark Mouland 36-3672 E
Dick Mast 35-3772 E
Mike Goodes 37-3673 +1
Ronnie Black 36-3773 +1
Chien Soon Lu 36-3773 +1
Russ Cochran 35-3873 +1
John Riegger 36-3773 +1
Nick Price 37-3673 +1
TomPernice Jr. 35-3873 +1
BobTway 35-3873 +1
Dan Forsman 35-3873 +1
Barry Lane 39-3473 +1
Jef Freeman 34-3973 +1
Anders Forsbrand 34-4074 +2
Bobby Wadkins 38-3674 +2
Morris Hatalsky 36-3874 +2
Bill Glasson 37-3774 +2
David Eger 36-3874 +2
TomPurtzer 36-3975 +3
Bobby Clampett 39-3675 +3
Joey Sindelar 37-3875 +3
TomByrum 37-3875 +3
Kohki Idoki 35-4075 +3
JimRutledge 38-3775 +3
Rick Fehr 38-3876 +4
Tommy Armour III 39-3776 +4
David Ishii 37-3976 +4
AndrewMagee 36-4076 +4
IsaoAoki 36-4076 +4
Gary Hallberg 40-3676 +4
Gene Jones 37-3976 +4
Mark Brooks 41-3677 +5
Craig Stadler 36-4177 +5
Gary McCord 36-4278 +6
Nobuo Serizawa 38-4078 +6
Bruce Summerhays 40-4282 +10
nasCaR sPRint CUP
QUaliFYinG
after Friday qualifying; race sunday
at newhampshire Motor speedway
lap length: 1.058 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 136.497.
2. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 136.082.
3. (24) Jef Gordon, Chevrolet, 136.053.
4. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 135.868.
5. (56) MartinTruex Jr., Toyota, 135.636.
6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 135.525.
7. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 135.463.
8. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 135.41.
9. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 135.371.
10. (16) Greg Bife, Ford, 135.208.
11. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 135.126.
12. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 135.097.
13. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 135.073.
14. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 135.021.
15. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 134.987.
16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 134.892.
17. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 134.477.
18. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 134.42.
19. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 134.292.
20. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 134.217.
21. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 134.193.
22. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 134.132.
23. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 133.981.
24. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 133.792.
25. (31) Jef Burton, Chevrolet, 133.769.
26. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 133.637.
27. (51) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 133.548.
28. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 133.52.
29. (55) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 133.408.
30. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 133.301.
31. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 133.282.
32. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 133.17.
33. (30) Kevin Swindell, Toyota, 132.365.
34. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 132.232.
35. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 132.2.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 132.163.
37. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
38. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
39. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
40. (95) Scott Riggs, Ford, Owner Points.
41. (98) Johnny Sauter, Ford, Owner Points.
42. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points.
43. (35) JoshWise, Ford, Owner Points.
satURDaY
hiGh sChOOl FielD hOCKeY
Lake-Lehman at Donegal Tournament, 10 a.m.
COlleGe FOOtBall
Kings at LebanonValley, 1 p.m.
Misericordia at Lycoming, 1 p.m.
Widener at Wilkes, 1 p.m.
COlleGe CROss COUntRY
Misericordia, Wilkes at Lock Haven, 10:30 a.m.
PSUWilkes-Barre at PSUFayette, 1 p.m.
COlleGe FielD hOCKeY
Misericordia at Catholic, 1 p.m.
Alvernia at Wilkes, 6 p.m.
COlleGe CO-eD sOCCeR
PSU Wilkes-Barre at PSU Greater Allegheny,
1 p.m.
COlleGe Mens sOCCeR
Wilkes at LebanonValley, 3 p.m.
Elizabethtown at Misericordia, 3:30 p.m.
PSUHazleton at Berkeley, 6 p.m.
Arcadia at Kings, 7 p.m.
COlleGe WOMens sOCCeR
Messiah at Misercordia, 1 p.m.
Arcadia at Wilkes, 5 p.m.
Kings at Albright, 5:30 p.m.
COlleGe Menstennis
Kings at Alvernia, 11 a.m.
COlleGe WOMensVOlleYBall
Bucks at LCCC, Noon
Harcumat LCCC, following frst match
PSUHazleton at PSUWorthington, noon
PSUWilkes-Barre at PSUDuBois, noon
Rutgers-Camden at Misericordia, 10 a.m.
Catholic at Misericordia, 2 p.m.
sUnDaY
COlleGe CO-eD sOCCeR
PSU Wilkes-Barre at PSU New Kensington, 1
p.m.
COlleGe Menstennis
Kings at Susquehanna
COlleGe WOMenstennis
Kings at Susquehanna
MOnDaY
hiGh sChOOl FielD hOCKeY
Crestwood at Wallenpaupack
Dallas at Coughlin
GAR at Elk Lake
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Seminary
Lake-Lehman at Abington Heights
Nanticoke at Lackawanna Trail
WyomingArea at Honesdale
WyomingValley West at HazletonArea
hiGh sChOOl GOlF
Pre-Districts at Fox Hill, 9 a.m.
hiGh sChOOl BOYs sOCCeR
Berwick at Hanover Area
Coughlin at PittstonArea
GAR at WyomingArea
Holy Redeemer at Nanticoke
Meyers at HazletonArea
Wyoming Seminary at MMI Prep
WyomingValley West at Tunkhannock
hiGh sChOOl GiRls sOCCeR
Berwick at WyomingValley West
Coughlin at PittstonArea
Hanover Area at Dallas
Nanticoke at Holy Redeemer
Tunkhannock at Lake-Lehman
hiGh sChOOl GiRlstennis
Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4 p.m.
MMI Prep at HazletonArea
PittstonArea at Hanover Area
Tunkhannock at GAR
WyomingArea at Dallas
Wyoming Seminary at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m.
WyomingValley West at Coughlin
hiGh sChOOl GiRlsVOlleYBall
Crestwood at Coughlin, 4:30 p.m.
Delaware Valley at PittstonArea
HazletonArea at Meyers
Lake-Lehman at WyomingValley West
WyomingArea at Dallas
COlleGe WOMensVOlleYBall
Penn College at PSUWilkes-Barre, 6 p.m.
Central Penn College at PSUHazleton, 7 p.m.
tUesDaY
hiGh sChOOl FielD hOCKeY
Crestwood at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Elk Lake at Northwest
Meyers at Northwest
Montrose at Berwick
PittstonArea at Tunkhannock
hiGh sChOOl GiRls sOCCeR
Meyers at WyomingArea
hiGh sChOOl GiRlsVOlleYBall
GAR at Tunkhannock
Hanover Area at MMI Prep
Holy Redeemer at Berwick, 4:30 p.m.
North Pocono at Nanticoke
COlleGe FielD hOCKeY
Kings at Marywood, 4 p.m.
COlleGe CO-eD sOCCeR
PSUWilkes-Barre at PSUSchuylkill, 4 p.m.
COlleGe Mens sOCCeR
Wilkes at Elmira, 4 p.m.
PSUYork at PSUHazleton, 6 p.m.
COlleGe WOMensVOlleYBall
Kings at Delaware Valley, 7 p.m.
LCCCat Manor, 7 p.m.
Misericordia at FDU-Florham, 7 p.m.
Wilkes at Manhattanville, 7 p.m.
aUtO RaCinG
7:30 p.m.
ESPNEWS NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Kentucky 300, at Sparta, Ky.
11:30 p.m.
ESPNEWS NHRA, qualifying for Fall Nation-
als, at Ennis, Texas (tape)
1 a.m.
NBCSN Formula One, qualifying for Singa-
pore Grand Prix (tape)
COlleGe FOOtBall
noon
BTNFlorida A&Mat Ohio St.
BTNWestern Michigan at Iowa
CBSSNWake Forest at Army
ESPNNorth Carolina at Georgia Tech
ESPN2 SanJose St. at Minnesota
ESPNEWS Vanderbilt at Massachusetts
ESPNUMarshall at Virginia Tech
FS1 Louisiana Tech at Kansas
12:30 p.m.
PLUS, ROOT Tulane at Syracuse
Onthe MaRK
MaRK DUDeK
For The Times Leader
Hats go off to trainer Chris Oakes and his trotter
Frau Blucher! The 3-year-old Broadwall Hall lly trot-
ted a world record mile in 1:53.1 over the half-mile
Delaware County Fair oval, in a $52,194 division of the
Buckette on Wednesday afternoon.
This comes just ve short days after she dead-heated
for victory in the $250,000 PASS Final at the Meadows
last Friday with her stablemate Classic Martine.
Certainly its been one super season for Oakes and his
trio of 3-year-old trotting llies.
Congratulations go out to Oakes and all the connec-
tions of these ne trotters. It will be interesting to
see what happens now with the Breeders Crown right
around the corner.
BEST BET: TUI (13TH)
VALUE PLAY: VITAMIN HANOVER (3RD)
Post time 6:30 p.m.
all races 1 mile
First-$13,000 Cond.trot;n/w 2 pm races life
1 Home Turf A.McCarthy 1-2-3 Controls it all in the opener 5-2
5 Bullish J.Pavia 2-2-6 Fast of the wings 3-1
4 DominumDeo T.Buter 8-3-2 2yr old tries older foes 5-1
8 Sorrento Hall T.Jackson 1-2-3 Super in winning KYSS champ 4-1
9 Hep D.Rawlings 4-4-5 Rawlings in for another visit 12-1
3 Stevonya R.Allen 1-6-8 Comes of a nice debut 15-1
2 Icy Chisel S.Allard 5-2-4 In this class a long while 10-1
6 Marion Mad Dash K.Wallis 9-5-8 Winless in 22 career starts 20-1
7 Perfect Tententen M.Simons 2-1-1 Scores badly 6-1
second-$9,000 n/WClm.Pace;clm.price $11,000
1 Heavenly Way T.Buter 4-2-7 Completes pair of aces double 3-1
8 Stirling Bella A.McCarthy 8-4-5 Daley-McCarthy nice duo 9-2
5 Pura Vida M.Simons 3-5-6 Closer type 7-2
7 Senorita Bella D.Rawlings 3-4-1 Second time lasix user 4-1
4 Yankee Tattler H.Parker 7-2-7 Kavolef training at .118 8-1
6 Twisted Sis K.Wallis 5-9-3 Peterson doing ok in NY 10-1
9 Destinys Desire M.Kakaley 8-4-5 Just a winner of one race life 15-1
2 Scirocco Caliegirl A.Napolitano 4-8-3 ANap coming around of recent 6-1
3 Dvc Itsanattitude J.Antonelli 7-9-8 Again in the back of the pack 20-1
third-$13,000 Cond.trot;n/w 2 pm races life
7 Vitamin Hanover T.Buter 6-4-4 Barn change does it 6-1
8 Moon Lit Trail J.Pavia 2-x-7 The early speedster 3-1
4 Gliding Boy M.Kakaley 2-7-6 Yankee Glide youngster 7-2
5 Karets S.Allard 3-7-8 Note the equipment change 9-2
6 Marion Mayday T.Jackson 5-3-5 Jackson driving at .135 8-1
3 Keystone Wallace A.McCarthy 7-3-4 Rough spot for a maiden 4-1
9 Flufer Nutter M.Simons 5-6-2 Smothered 15-1
2 Mac Kemp K.Wallis 5-3-7 One of two 2-year-olds in here 10-1
1 Big Sea Liger M.Romano 8-3-7 Bad habits 20-1
Fourth-$6,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $7,500
4 U Bettor Watch Out S.Allard 3-3-3 Digs in 4-1
3 Card Hustler G.Napolitano 9-4-3 Simon opted of this one 5-2
2 Nathaniels Big Boy A.McCarthy 4-1-2 Back fromYonkers 3-1
9 Lucky Land D.Rawlings 7-1-3 Rawlings picks up Pena mount 10-1
6 Joans Bad Boy M.Kakaley 9-2-2 Looking for a check 5-1
7 Absolutely Michael K.Wallis 7-7-4 Takes too long to kick in 8-1
1 Seawind Dropper E.Carlson 6-5-9 Gaps of the gate 12-1
5 Western Artwork H.Parker 8-3-7 Lacks color 15-1
8 Lifetime Louie A.Napolitano 5-8-3 Easy toss 20-1
Fifth-$13,000 Cond.trot;n/w 2 pm races life
1 All Trot T.Buter 7-2-5 Only question is himstaying fat 3-1
2 Hold On Tightly M.Kakaley 9-4-4 There if No. 1 isnt right 5-2
4 The Manipulator M.Miller 7-7-1 In fromCanada 4-1
3 Triumph R.Allen 6-1-3 Rod owns-trains-reins 12-1
9 Hi Po Mon Roe T.Jackson 1-6-6 Nine post the major hinderance 6-1
6 Abbis Gabbi A.McCarthy 6-6-6 Again sixth 5-1
7 Jetta Liner S.Allard 7-1-9 Lear Jetta colt in tough 10-1
5 Continuous Hanover K.Wallis 4-5-7 Yet to hit the board 20-1
8 Cabo San Lukas M.Simons 1-2-5 Overmatched 15-1
sixth-$12,000 Clm.hndcp Pace;clm.price $12-15,000
2 Fire In The Night T.Buter 5-2-3 Grinds themdown 4-1
9 We Adore Thee G.Napolitano 1-2-5 First start of the claim 3-1
8 Traveling Jeanie S.Allard 3-8-3 Didnt fre at 4-5 odds 7-2
5 American Shuttle A.McCarthy 2-7-1 Certainly worth a look 9-2
4 Notorious Terror M.Kakaley 6-1-2 Rides the rail 8-1
6 ImSo Happy J.Pavia 8-6-1 Turning sad 6-1
7 Mach This Way M.Miller 8-4-6 Rocked 10-1
3 Day Traker H.Parker 4-6-5 Back fromTioga 20-1
1 Ashlees Cool Gal M.Romano 6-6-6 Ice cold 15-1
seventh-$6,000 Clm.trot;clm.price $7,500
6 Nordic Venture G.Napolitano 5-3-8 Coast to coast 7-2
1 Judith A.Napolitano 1-2-6 Right there fromthe pole 3-1
3 Captain Brady H.Parker 2-3-3 Keeps getting checks 9-2
7 Streetwise Hall A.McCarthy 4-2-4 11-year-old keeps going 4-1
9 Savage Pride T.Jackson 7-4-7 TJ won at Monti on Wed 6-1
2 Intimidator M.Kakaley 5-7-9 Developed bad habits 15-1
4 Ashscroft M.Simons 4-8-7 Remains a tad of 8-1
5 Trickledowntheory K.Wallis 6-4-6 Winless in 2013 10-1
8 Keystone Torch M.Miller 4-4-5 Burned 20-1
eighth-$10,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $12,500
7 Miss Old Vines S.Allard 4-1-4 Fine barn heating up 3-1
4 Blissfull Dreamer G.Napolitano 8-1-1 The one to beat up 5-2
5 Aubsession M.Romano 2-3-8 Raced well right of purchase 5-2
6 Grace Seelster M.Kakaley 2-2-7 Very competitive group 9-2
8 Lil Miss Snowfake A.McCarthy 1-4-7 Just upset similar 10-1
2 Express Jet J.Pavia 4-8-2 Pavia down to just .220 12-1
1 Flyustothemoon M.Miller 6-9-5 Wont be seen to soon 15-1
3 Just Breathe A.Napolitano 6-6-3 Newcomer to PD 6-1
ninth-$11,000 Cond.trot;n/w $6,000 last 5
3 Keystone Wyatt G.Napolitano 6-5-3 Been racing much better 5-2
7 HAnd Ms Hit M.Kakaley 5-3-4 Another in fromSaratoga 4-1
9 Swan Image M.Romano 1-8-3 Winner of over $600k life 7-2
8 Bossy Volo M.Simons 6-1-4 Bounced of that win 6-1
2 Zuerest J.Pavia 2-9-9 Has to stay on his feet 5-1
4 Mister King E.Carlson 6-5-3 Carlson having rough meet 8-1
1 Broadways Heir A.McCarthy 8-6-6 Stalling 12-1
6 Casanova Lindy K.Wallis 6-5-6 Seen better days 15-1
5 Enflade T.Jackson 7-4-1 Little since the win 20-1
tenth-$19,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $18,500 last 5
5 Stacked Deck G.Napolitano 4-3-3 Nap makes the diference 5-2
2 Certifed Ideal A.McCarthy 1-2-1 Romped over lesser at Freehold 4-1
8 Franciegirl K.Wallis 1-1-6 Anewhorse under Adams 9-2
3 Keepers Destiny T.Buter 4-2-3 7-year-old winless this season 4-1
4 Sir Lehigh ZTam M.Kakaley 4-1-4 NYSS winner two back 6-1
1 Janie Bay M.Miller 7-6-1 Tailing south 12-1
6 Lillywhites M.Kimmelman 8-8-7 Turns the wrong color 15-1
7 Shawnee Dancer A.Napolitano 4-8-1 Chopped down to size 10-1
eleventh-$15,000 Cond.trot;n/w $11,000 last 5
3 Twin B Spike Man M.Simons 8-3-2 Softer group a big help 4-1
9 Sassy Syrinx C.Conte 5-5-4 Coming on the end of it 6-1
8 Frisky Strike S.Allard 8-6-3 Been a high priced claimer 9-2
1 On The Tab M.Kakaley 3-7-6 Certainly has that gait speed 3-1
4 Dr Cal G.Napolitano 6-1-2 Bounced of that career mile 7-2
6 Like AHush A.McCarthy 3-2-1 Not been able to beat lesser 8-1
5 Windsong Ingenius J.Pavia 7-8-6 Continues to fail 15-1
7 Mr Fenwick K.Wallis 8-8-7 Distanced 10-1
2 Believable D.Rawlings 5-2-3 Aquick toss 20-1
twelfth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
7 Sweet Lady Jane K.Wallis 7-7-6 Kicks the door down 3-1
1 Tessla Blue Chip A.McCarthy 4-6-9 First time lasix 4-1
6 Moonless Night G.Napolitano 3-4-3 Coming up short on engine 9-2
3 The Beach Nextdoor H.Parker 1-2-5 Tough spot for lone 2-year-old 7-2
8 Rachelles Beat T.Buter 7-3-4 Rucker still on downward slope 6-1
2 Little Miss Marie B.Filion 5-7-6 Filion with rare drive 10-1
4 Beach Treasure E.Carlson 7-1-1 Overpowered 8-1
5 Ellas Twin M.Kakaley 6-8-8 In this class a long while 15-1
9 Western Cullen S.Allard 6-5-3 Field fller 20-1
thirteenth-$13,000 Cond.trot;n/w $8,000 last 5
1 Tui M.Romano 4-3-9 Not been this cheap in a while 5-2
3 P L Eureka J.Pavia 1-4-4 Capable on best day 4-1
4 Vacation Day M.Miller 4-9-9 Yet to fash his best at PD 3-1
7 Magglio E.Carlson 8-6-5 Overdue for better try 6-1
6 Maravich M.Kakaley 5-2-5 Use in supers 5-1
5 Windell Winkie G.Napolitano 4-1-3 Notch belowthese 12-1
2 Simone Hall M.Simons 1-8-4 Last quarters hurt 10-1
9 Abby T.Jackson 8-1-4 Swept away quickly 20-1
8 Habanero T.Buter 2-7-2 One more race to go 15-1
Fourteenth-$11,000 Cond.trot;n/w $6,000 last 5
5 Keystone Cheyenne G.Napolitano 1-3-9 Its a chalky late double 5-2
3 Proude Moment T.Buter 5-3-5 Classy veteran 3-1
1 Berkshire K.Wallis 4-2-6 Wallis catch drives 4-1
8 Order By Texas E.Carlson 1-7-7 Last win came fromleft feld 5-1
9 QuantumCashman M.Miller 6-7-6 Cashes in for a check 12-1
4 AGentleman W.Millin 1-9-6 Mullin makes rare steer 6-1
7 Free Rollin M.Kakaley 3-9-1 Tioga import 15-1
6 R Sam M.Simons 7-5-7 ..next 10-1
2 Around And Over H.Parker 7-7-1 See you tomorrow 20-1
natiOnal FOOtBall leaGUe
aMeRiCan COnFeRenCe
east
W l t Pct PF Pa
NewEngland 2 0 0 1.000 36 31
Miami 2 0 0 1.000 47 30
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 28 30
Bufalo 1 1 0 .500 45 46
south
W l t Pct PF Pa
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 61 52
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 41 41
Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 40 39
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 11 47
north
W l t Pct PF Pa
Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 41 34
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 41 55
Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 16 37
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 19 36
West
W l t Pct PF Pa
Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 34
Denver 2 0 0 1.000 90 50
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 36 30
San Diego 1 1 0 .500 61 61
natiOnal COnFeRenCe
east
W l t Pct PF Pa
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 52 48
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86
N.Y. Giants 0 2 0 .000 54 77
Washington 0 2 0 .000 47 71
south
W l t Pct PF Pa
NewOrleans 2 0 0 1.000 39 31
Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 48 47
Carolina 0 2 0 .000 30 36
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 31 34
north
W l t Pct PF Pa
Chicago 2 0 0 1.000 55 51
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 55 49
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 66 54
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 54 65
West
W l t Pct PF Pa
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 41 10
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 51 55
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 37 57
Arizona 1 1 0 .500 49 48
thursdays Game
Kansas City 26, Philadelphia 16
sunday, sep. 22
San Diego at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Arizona at NewOrleans, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Houston at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Washington, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at NewEngland, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Cincinnati, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Jacksonville at Seattle, 4:25 p.m.
Bufalo at N.Y. Jets, 4:25 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, sep. 23
Oakland at Denver, 8:40 p.m.
thursday, sep. 26
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:25 p.m.
sunday, sep. 29
N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 1 p.m.
Baltimore at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 1 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 4:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 4:25 p.m.
NewEngland at Atlanta, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Monday, sep. 30
Miami at NewOrleans, 8:40 p.m.
thURsDaYs GaMe sUMMaRY
ChieFs 26, eaGles 16
Kansas City 10 6 0 10 26
Philadelphia 6 0 3 7 16
First Quarter
KCFGSuccop 33, 12:08.
KCBerry 38 interception return (Succop
kick), 11:12.
PhiAvant 22pass fromVick (runfailed), 5:06.
second Quarter
KCFGSuccop 31, 8:21.
KCFGSuccop 34, 2:26.
third Quarter
PhiFGHenery 29, 6:29.
Fourth Quarter
KCCharles 3 run (Succop kick), 12:57.
PhiMcCoy 41 run (Henery kick), 11:36.
KCFGSuccop 38, 3:21.
A69,144.
KC Phi
First downs 19 21
Total Net Yards 395 431
Rushes-yards 37-147 28-260
Passing 248 171
Punt Returns 2-12 3-14
Kickof Returns 3-96 3-78
Interceptions Ret. 2-34 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 22-35-0 13-30-2
Sacked-Yards Lost 5-25 5-30
Punts 5-43.6 4-37.0
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 4-3
Penalties-Yards 9-65 6-45
Time of Possession 39:07 20:53
inDiViDUal statistiCs
RUSHINGKansas City, Charles 20-92,
A.Smith 10-33, Davis 6-25, McCluster 1-(minus
3). Philadelphia, McCoy 20-158, Vick 5-95, Brown
3-7.
PASSINGKansas City, A.Smith 22-35-0-273.
Philadelphia, Vick 13-30-2-201.
RECEIVINGKansas City, Avery 7-141, Charles
7-80, McGrath 4-31, Sherman 1-10, Jenkins 1-6,
Bowe 1-4, McCluster 1-1. Philadelphia, Avant 5-87,
Jackson 3-62, Cooper 2-29, Celek 2-18, Ertz 1-5.
MISSED FIELD GOALSKansas City, Succop
51 (WR). Philadelphia, Henery 48 (WL).
CaMPs/CliniCs
sem Cradle lacrosse is
ofering a clinic for boys and
girls ages 4 to 8 at Wyoming
Seminary Upper School in
Kingston. Programsessions
will be held Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. at Klassner
Field on North Maple Street
beginning Saturday, Sept. 21 and
continuing through Nov. 2. Cost
is $120. The programprovides
all necessary equipment with no
additional feel. The curriculum
is designed to teach the basics
of lacrosse. It will be directed
by Semcoach Catie Kersey. For
more information or to register,
contact Kersey at ckersey@
wyomingseminary.org.
leaGUes
newport Biddy Basketball
registration for grades 1-7 will be
Sept. 22 from6-8 p.m. at K.M.
Smith Elementary School.
MeetinGs
Crestwood Boys Basketball
Booster Club will have its next
meeting Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. at
Cavanaughs Grille.
hanover area Boys Basketball
Booster Club will meet Sept.
24 at 7 p.m. at Major Leagues in
Sugar Notch.
ReGistRatiOns/tRYOUts
Back Mountain Bandits
Boys and Girls lacrosse
Registration for 2014 season
will be Saturday Sept. 21 from10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Dallas American
Legion. The league is for boys
in age groups U-9, U-11, U-13
and U-15 and girls in grades
3-8. Family Discounts apply and
there are no mandatory fund
raisers. Registration fee includes
US Lacrosse registration, US
Lacrosse Magazine and a
teamuniform. The league is
also looking for volunteers for
board positions and all aspects
of the organization. For more
information, visit www.laxteams.
net/bmylax/ or email bmtlax@
gmail.com.
hanover area Youth Basketball
signups for boys and girls
grades 3-6 will be held Sept. 29
and Oct. 6 from6 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. at Memorial Elementary.
The cost is $40 for a single child
and $70 for two children. For
more information, text or call Jim
Richmond at 817-1102 or email
jimkim1020@verizon.net.
Wyoming Valley West lady
spartans Jr. Basketball
league will be holding
registrations for girls grades 3-6
that reside in the WVWSchool
District on Saturday, Sept. 21
fromnoon to 2 p.m. at the WVW
Middle School Gymon Chester
Street in Kingston.
The cost is $45 plus a fundraiser.
Applications for coaching and
teamsponsors will be accepted
at these times. Please contact
Chris 406-3181 for additional
information.
UPCOMinG eVents/OtheR
assembly 59 will have a golf
tournament Saturday, Sept.
21 at the Hollenback Golf
Course on North Washington
Street in Wilkes-Barre. The
tournament begins at 9 a.m.
The cost is $40 per person. For
more information, call Butch
at 829-3398 or 825-3584.
Refreshments will be served
afterwards at the North End
Slovak Club.
Benjamin august Memorial
3-Mile Run and Walk will be
held Sunday, Oct. 20 at 10:30
a.m. The event is organized by
the Jewish Community Alliance
of Northeastern PAs Physical
Education Department and
sponsored by Sandy Arnold
Rifkin in memory of Sandys
father, Benjamin August.
The course will be through South
Wilkes-Barre with the start at
Northampton Street and fnish
on the River Commons. Runners
and walkers registration fee
before Oct. 7 is $17. the fee is
$20 after Oct. 7 or on race day.
Preregistration race packets may
be picked up starting at 9:15 a.m.
Race day registration will be
held at the JCC beginning at
9:15 a.m. Registration closes 10
minutes prior to the race start.
Registration forms can also be
found at NEPARunner.com. Make
checks payable to JCA
WQMYPittsburgh at Duke
3:30 p.m.
ABCPurdue at Wisconsin
BTNKent St. at Penn St.
BTNMaine at Northwestern
BTNSouth Dakota St. at Nebraska
CBS Tennessee at Florida
ESPNArkansas at Rutgers
ESPN2 Utah St. at Southern Cal
ESPNUWest Virginia at Maryland
NBCMichigan St. at Notre Dame
4 p.m.
FS1 Louisiana-Monroe at Baylor
6 p.m.
NBCSNLehigh at Princeton
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Colorado St. at Alabama
ESPNUSouthern Methodist at Texas A&M
FOXArizona St. at Stanford
PLUS Texas St. at Texas Tech
7:45 p.m.
ESPNAuburn at LSU
8 p.m.
ABCMichigan at Connecticut
BTNMissouri at Indiana
10:15 p.m.
ESPN2 Utah at BYU
ESPNUWyoming at Air Force
GOlF
10 a.m.
TGC PGA Tour, TOUR Championship, third
round, at Atlanta
noon
NBC PGA Tour, TOUR Championship, third
round, at Atlanta
TGC European PGATour, Open dItalia, third
round, at Turin, Italy (same-day tape)
6:30 p.m.
TGCChampionsTour, Hawaii Championship,
second round, at Kapolei, Hawaii
MlB
12:30 p.m.
FOXSan Francisco at N.Y. Yankees
4 p.m.
WGNAtlanta at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m.
ROOTCincinnati at Pittsburgh
SNYN.Y. Mets at Philadelphia
YES San Francisco at N.Y. Yankees
nhl
4 p.m.
NHL, ROOT Preseason, Columbus at Pitts-
burgh
7 p.m.
NHLPreseason, Toronto at Bufalo
10 p.m.
NHLPreseason, Vancouver at Edmonton
sOCCeR
7:40 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Aston Villa at Nor-
wich
9:55 a.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Tottenham at
Cardif
12:25 p.m.
NBCSNPremier League, Fulhamat Chelsea
8:30 p.m.
NBCSNMLS, Seattle at Los Angeles
Inherited runners-scoredSwarzak 1-1, Otero
2-1, Bre.Anderson 3-1, J.Chavez 2-1, Doolittle 2-0.
WPCorreia, Straily 2, Cook.
UmpiresHome, Marty Foster; First, Wally Bell;
Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, TimMcClelland.
T3:41. A11,461 (35,067).
tOUR ChaMPiOnshiP PaR sCORes
Friday
at east lake Golf Club
Purse: $8 million
Yardage: 7,307; Par 70
second Round
Henrik Stenson 64-66130 -10
AdamScott 65-69134 -6
Jordan Spieth 68-67135 -5
Justin Rose 68-68136 -4
DustinJohnson 68-68136 -4
Billy Horschel 66-70136 -4
Keegan Bradley 72-65137 -3
Nick Watney 72-65137 -3
Gary Woodland 70-67137 -3
ZachJohnson 69-68137 -3
Steve Stricker 66-71137 -3
Phil Mickelson 71-67138 -2
JimFuryk 70-68138 -2
Roberto Castro 67-71138 -2
D.A. Points 72-67139 -1
Hunter Mahan 70-69139 -1
Bill Haas 70-69139 -1
GrahamDeLaet 68-71139 -1
Webb Simpson 68-71139 -1
Sergio Garcia 68-71139 -1
Luke Donald 70-70140 E
Kevin Streelman 69-72141 +1
Brendon de Jonge 70-72142 +2
Jason Day 68-74142 +2
Matt Kuchar 69-74143 +3
Tiger Woods 73-71144 +4
Jason Dufner 74-70144 +4
Brandt Snedeker 69-75144 +4
BooWeekley 70-75145 +5
Charl Schwartzel 68-79147 +7
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 3B
PittstonArea defense holds for frst win
Nick Wagner
nwagner@psdispatch.com
TUNKHANNOCK
Pittston Area has had a monkey
clinging to its back through the
rst three weeks on 2013. The
Patriots have played well, just
not well enough to win.
But after a gutsy, defen-
sive effort Friday night in
Tunkhannock, the Patriots
nally got over the hump with
a 12-10 win over the Tigers in
a Wyoming Valley Conference
football game.
Although the Patriots didnt
win the battle in the box score,
they did win the battle on
the eld. The Tigers totaled
nearly 80 more yards than the
Patriots while rushing for 225
on the ground.
But the feeling of getting
that rst win throws all the
stats out the window.
Its great, Pittston Area
coach Mike Barrett said. You
get that monkey off your back.
It wasnt pretty. But I thought
we came out and played well
early on.
They did play well early,
scoring all 12 of their points
in the rst half. And it was the
defense that was most impres-
sive.
Although Tunkhannocks
Brian Cywinski ran for 142
yards on 23 carries, including
a 40-yard touchdown early in
the fourth quarter, the Patriot
defense looked as fast as it has
all season.
We came together on
defense a lot better than we did
in the rst three weeks, run-
ning back/linebacker Hassan
Maxwell said. Guys were
on point and everyone was
focused. We just have to step
up and try and get that win
next week.
The Patriots defense was
good getting to the football.
But sometimes tackling was a
problem. Cywinski made a few
highlight reel plays breaking
would-be tacklers and gaining
a few extra yards on multiple
plays.
I thought we were in the
right spots but we gave them
a lot of yards after contact,
Barrett said. But its some-
thing we can go back and work
on.
Tunkhannocks offense
started well moving the foot-
ball. Its rst drive, however,
was derailed near mideld by
a few penalties. That led to a
punt that put the ball back to
Pittston Area for its second
possession.
It didnt take long for
Pittston Area to ignite the
Tunkhannock scoreboard.
It was a six-play drive that
burned 3:30 off the clock that
got Pittston Area its rst score.
Quarterback James Emmett hit
a sliding Michael Harth in the
end zone from 12 yards out and
a 6-0 lead.
Following a three-and-out
from the Tigers, and a 22-yard
punt return from Josh John,
the Patriots needed just three
plays, capped off by a Maxwell
15-yard run, to balloon the lead
to 12-0.
Pittston Area 12, Tunkhannock 10
Pittston Area 6 6 0 0 12
Tunkhannock 0 3 0 7 10
First quarter
PA Michael Harth 12 pass from James Emmett (run
failed), 0:30
Second quarter
PAHassan Maxwell 15 run (kick failed), 9:22
TBrian Beauchemin 22 feld goal, 0:23
Fourth quarter
TRyan Cywinski 40 run (Beauchemin kick), 11:09
Teamstatistics Pitt Area Tunk
First downs 6 7
Rushes-yards 21-84 44-225
Passing yards 95 32
Total yards 179 257
Passing 5-12-95 4-9-32
Sacked-yards lost 1-7 3-22
Punts-avg. 5-32 5-33.2
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING PA, Kyle Gattusso 14-54, Maxwell 5-32, Zach
Hofman 1-3, Josh John 1-(-5). Tunk, Cywinski 23-142,
Beauchemin 17-71, Joey Leon 2-12.
PASSING PA, Emmett 5-12-95-0. Tunk, Beauchemin
4-9-32-0.
RECEIVING PA, Rich Weinstock 2-54, Schwab 2-42,
Harth 1-12. Tunk, Cywinski 1-18, Mike Markovitz 1-8, Brett
Stage 2-6.
AP photo
Pittston Area running back Kyle Gattuso, left, gets good yardage as
Tunkhannock line backer Jarod Bernosky closes in for the tackle in WVC foot-
ball action Friday night in Tunkhannock.
Defensive battle
goes to Crusaders
WILKES-BARRE
Coughlins Dave Parsnik
only touched the ball
four times during Friday
nights game against
Dallas.
The quantity didnt mat-
ter much as the senior
wide receiver/defensive
back made the most of
his touches hauling in the
lone touchdown of the
game then grabbing a late
interception to seal the
Crusaders 7-0 win over
Dallas at Wilkes-Barre
Memorial Stadium.
Parsnik wasnt the only
contributor on defense
for Coughlin (4-0) as
the the unit only allowed
67 total yards to the
Mountaineers, picked off
quarterback Justin Mucha
three times and recovered
a fumble. Darik Johnson
had a pair of interceptions
for the Coughlin defense.
We hung around on
defense. We had some
good offensive plays and
when we had to make
to them we had to make
them, Parsnik said. We
covered well (defensively)
and we prepared well and
we knew what they were
going to try to run on us
and we had good depth.
Dallas (0-4), which has
scored just seven points all
season, is known around
the Wyoming Valley
Conference for having a
stout defense as well.
In fact, Coughlin was
coming off a game against
Western Wayne when
it rolled up nearly 450
yards of offense. But the
Mountaineers defensive
lineman Ryan Monk,
Rocky Rutkoski and Mark
Michno kept pressure
on Crusaders quarter-
back Tim Pilch sacking
the senior four times and
holding the team to just
149 total yards.
Their three guys up
front, Monk, Michno and
Rutkoski are three studs,
Coughlin coach Ciro Cinti
said. Theyre three loads
and they play hard. They
come and theyll put the
leather to ya.
At halftime, the teams
combined for just 99 total
yards with Dallas hold-
ing the edge in the score-
less rst 24 minutes. The
Mountaineers also had
three sacks in the rst
half.
Cinti and his staff made
some blocking adjust-
ments at halftime and it
worked like a charm.
On the opening drive of
the second half, Coughlin
drove 54 yards on nine
plays capped off by a
20-yard scoring strike
from Pilch to Parsnik for
the only touchdown of the
game with the clock read-
ing 7:07.
Coughlin 7, Dallas 0
Dallas 0 0 0 0 0
Coughlin 0 0 7 0 7
Third quarter
COU Dave Parsnik 20 pass from Tim Pilch
(Brandon Butry kick) 7:07
Teamstatistics Dallas Cough
First downs 3 11
Rushes-yards 21-44 44-72
Passing yards 23 77
Total yards 67 149
Passing 5-14-3 6-16-1
Sacked-yards lost 2-24 4-30
Punts-avg. 6-36.1 4-40.0
Fumbles-lost 1-1 1-0
Penalties-yards 5-59 6-35
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING DAL, Logan Brace 7-31, Bill Gately
3-10, Justin Mucha 7-4, Mike Olenginski 1-0, Brett
Storrs 2-0, TEAM1-(minus-1). COU, Paul Cole 26-
84, TimPilch12-(minus-15), Tyler Layton3-3, Tom
Mitchell 1-2, TEAM1-(minus-2).
PASSING DAL, Justin Mucha 5-14-3-23. COU,
TimPilch 6-16-1-77.
RECEIVING DAL, Logan Brace 1-7, Bill Gately
1-1, Omar Nijmeh 2-13, David Simpson 1-2. COU,
Dave Parsnik 3-49, Tom Mitchell 1-4, Darik John-
son 2-24.
INTERCEPTIONS DAL, Justin Mucha. COU,
Darik Johnson 2, Dave Parsnik
MISSED FGs none
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Meyers Nate Mahalak (33) opened the scoring with a 6-yard touchdown late in the first quarter Friday at Nanticoke. Mahalak had 64 of
the Mohawks 245 yards on the ground.
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Mohawks fatten Trojans
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
NANTICOKE
Already the leading pass-
er and rusher for Meyers,
Matt DeMarco was pre-
pared to add something
new to his repertoire on
Friday.
With Mohawks kicker
Cal Lisman abruptly side-
lined with a knee injury,
DeMarco was tabbed to
take over punting duties
if needed.
I got a call about 8
oclock last night and
heard Ive got no kicker
and no punter, Meyers
coach Corry Hanson said
with a laugh. We went to
Plan B real quick.
The Mohawks didnt
need DeMarco to actu-
ally boot the ball, but
the senior quarterback
did everything else, rack-
ing up 203 yards of total
offense and four touch-
downs in Meyers 36-0
win at Nanticoke.
Matts a tough kid,
he really is, Hanson
said. Hes resilient.
We bounced back after
a tough loss last week.
He handled the pressure
and he performed well
tonight.
DeMarco lined up to
punt twice. The rst time
he ripped off a 17-yard
gain on fourth-and-7 to
set up a touchdown late
in the second quarter.
He nished the day
with 135 yards and three
scores on the ground and
added 68 yards passing,
including a 45-yard touch-
down to a wide-open
Tyon Thomas just two
plays after the fake punt.
His rst rushing score
covered 77 yards.
DeMarcos a great
athlete. Any team with
him has an advantage,
Nanticoke coach Ron
Bruza said. He basically
broke our backs tonight.
Meyers (2-2) scored
two touchdowns in the
nal 1:14 of the rst half,
with the second one effec-
tively ending the Trojans
hopes.
With time winding
down, T.J. Cistrunk
blasted quarterback
J.T. Levandowski on
third-and-long. Tyler
Smallcomb scooped
up the loose ball and
returned it 30 yards to
the Nanticoke 10 with
15.4 seconds left before
the break.
It took DeMarco two
plays to nd the end zone,
beating the defense to the
corner off right tackle to
make it 28-0 at halftime.
I told the defense
to just be aggressive,
Hanson said. Last week
I thought we were a little
passive, especially in the
second half when the
game was on the line.
Meyers rebounded nice-
ly from back-to-back road
losses a blowout at Old
Forge and a heartbreaker
at Lackawanna Trail. The
Mohawks defense held
Nanticoke (1-3) under
100 yards of offense and
just 18 in the second half.
Levandowski had 48
yards passing to lead the
Trojans. Nate Mahalak
(64 yards rushing) had
the Mohawks other
touchdown on the night.
Lineman Carlo Telesco
took over kickoff duties
for Meyers, sticking most-
ly to squib kicks. Meyers
didnt attempt an extra
point, going for two after
all ve touchdowns and
converting three times.
Meyers 36, Nanticoke 0
Meyers 8 20 8 0 36
Nanticoke 0 0 0 0 0
First quarter
MEYNate Mahalak 6 run (Mark Robinson run),
0:05
Second quarter
MEYMatt DeMarco 77 run (pass failed), 7:15
MEYTyonThomas 45pass fromDeMarco(run
failed), 1:14
MEYDeMarco 10 run (Robinson run), 0:05
Third quarter
MEYDeMarco 3 run (Robinson run), 1:17
Teamstatistics Meyers Nan
First downs 18 5
Rushes-yards 42-245 22-37
Passing yards 103 48
Total yards 348 85
Passing 8-12-0 7-19-0
Sacked-yards lost 0-0 2-12
Punts-avg. 0-0.0 3-22.7
Fumbles-lost 3-1 1-1
Penalties-yards 4-20 4-30
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING MEY, Matt DeMarco 12-135, Nate
Mahalak 14-64, Zahir Dunell 7-19, Michael
Dempsey 3-19, Mark Robinson 4-5, Josh Schiow-
itz 2-3. NAN, Ron Kotz 6-17, Pat Hempel 7-13, J.T.
Levandowski 6-12, Blake Balderrama 1-2, Tyler
Myers 1-(minus-2), Kyle Gavrish 1-(minus-5).
PASSING MEY, DeMarco 7-10-0-68, Dunell
1-2-0-35. NAN, Levandowski 7-19-0-48.
RECEIVING MEY, Dunell 3-8, Tyon Thomas
1-45, Dempsey 1-35, Schiowitz 1-10, Robinson
1-6, Jake Brominski 1-(minus-1). NAN, Tyler
Hanna 3-22, Myers 3-18, Gavrish 1-8.
INTERCEPTIONSNone.
MISSED FGs None.
HAZLETON Nick
George scored two touch-
downs, and Zach Zukoski
piled up 190 yards on the
ground and a touchdown,
as Hazleton Area rolled
to a 30-7 victory over
Williamsport in WVC
football action Friday
night.
Zukoski, a junior, car-
ried the ball 29 times for
the Cougars. He scored
on an 8-yard run in the
rst quarter to open a 7-0
lead for Hazleton Area.
Zukoski also caught two
passes for another 29
yards.
Georges rst 1-yard
plunge made it 17-0 mid-
way through the sec-
ond quarter. He added a
2-yard scoring run in the
third quarter and capped
his night with an intercep-
tion.
Ryan Heller threw for
100 yards, including a
25-yard TD pass to Jeff
Ochs just before halftime.
HazletonArea 30, Williamsport 7
Williamsport 0 7 0 0 7
Hazleton Area 10 13 7 0 30
First quarter
HA- Z. Zukoski 8 run (Williams kick), 8:32
HA- Williams 29 feld goal, 2:00
Second quarter
HA- George 1 run (Williams kick), 5:51
W- Harris 88 kickof return (Hillman kick), 5:34
HA- Ochs 25 pass fromHeller (kick failed), 1:50
Third quarter
HA- George 2 run (Williams kick), 8:58
Teamstatistics Will Haz Area
First downs 8 17
Rushes-yards 29-96 55-248
Passing yards 61 100
Total yards 157 348
Passing 5-9-1 6-12-0
Fumbles-lost 1-1 1-0
Penalties-yards 4-28 4-34
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING WIL, Foust 17-68, Martin 4-13,
Berkheimer 5-13, Reeves 3-2. HAZ, Z. Zukoski 29-
190, George 17-51, Heller 3-23, McCallum 1-(-3),
Team5-(-13).
PASSING WIL, Berkheimer 5-7-1-61; Reeves
0-2-0-0. HAZ, Heller 6-12-0-100.
RECEIVING WIL, Hofman 2-25, Gardner 1-26,
Manzitti 1-6, Martin 1-4. HAZ, Ochs 2-40, G. Kopc-
zynskie 2-31, Z. Zukoski 2-29.
Cougars romp
over Millionaires
Mark Robinson (right) and the Meyers defense smothered Nanticoke on Friday, holding the Trojans to
just 85 total yards in a shutout win.
Bucks
defense
holds
tough
TOM FOX
For The Times Leader
DUNMORE Tyler
Lasher knew the ball was
coming his way. And the
Dunmore junior made
sure he got his hands up
to knock down the pass.
Lasher broke up Jake
Manettis last-second
throw in the end zone as
the Bucks held off Old
Forge twice at the 10-yard
line in the fourth quar-
ter for a 21-16 victory
between two state-ranked
Class A teams.
Dunmore (4-0) remains
undefeated while the Blue
Devils fall to 3-1.
We are fortunate to get
out with a win, Dunmore
head coach Jack Henzes
said. We were able to
take advantage of some
of their mistakes, and we
capitalized on them. Their
quarterback is a great ath-
lete and he tried to make a
nice play at the end. Our
defense stepped up and
made a play. We are proud
of them.
Old Forge, bit hard by
the turnover bug, gave
itself two incredible
opportunities in the nal
quarter.
The rst drive, which
started on its own 38,
advanced all the way to
a rst-and-goal at the
Dunmore 10 only to
see the Bucks stop three
straight runs and force a
Manetti incomplete pass
on fourth down.
Then, following a
Dunmore safety after the
ball was snapped over
quarterback Brandon
Kujawskis head and land-
ed in the end zone, the
Blue Devils had one last
hope.
Old Forge (3-1) took
advantage of a short eld
and drove to the Dunmore
10. Lasher batted down a
pass on rst down and the
Bucks stopped the Devils
on two consecutive runs
to force the nal fourth
down with 1:22 left.
Dunmore 21, Old Forge 16
Old Forge 7 7 0 2 16
Dunmore 7 0 14 0 21
First quarter
DUNJosh Zilla 35 pass fromBrandon Kujawski
(Kyle Dougherty kick), 11:47
OF Brandon Yescavage 3 run (Christian Moze-
leski kick), 4:13
Second quarter
OF Yescavage 13 run (Mozeleski kick), 5:47
Third quarter
DUN Shakal Blackwell 30 pass from Kujawski
(Dougherty kick), 9:12
DUN Daiqwon Buckley 1 run (Dougherty kick),
0:38
Fourth quarter
OF Safety, Kujawski tackled in end zone, 3:43
Teamstatistics OF Dunmore
First downs 18 8
Rushes-yards 53-234 27-102
Passing yards 65 114
Total yards 299 216
Passing 5-13-0 6-12-0
Sacked-yards lost 1-2 0-0
Punts-avg. 2-27.5 3-33.6
Fumbles-lost 5-3 1-1
Penalties-yards 3-15 4-40
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING OF, Brandon Yescavage 35-156,
Jake Manetti 8-40, Joey Gutowski 4-29, Jorden
Sekol 3-5, Shane Schuback 1-1, TEAM 2-3. DUN,
Daiqwon Buckley 19-110, Josh Sawka 2-6, Colin
Holmes 1-2, Brandon Kujawski 2-2, TEAM3-(-18).
PASSING OF, Manetti 5-13-0-65. DUN, Ku-
jawski 6-12-0-114.
RECEIVING OF, Schubak 2-25, Yescavage
2-12, Gutowski 1-28. DUN, Josh Zilla 5-84, Shakal
Blackwell 1-30.
INTERCEPTIONSNone.
MISSED FGs None.
Division 4A W L PF PA CP
WyomingValley West 3 1 131 68 26
HazletonArea 1 3 84 106 9
Williamsport 1 3 31 109 9
Division 3A W L PF PA CP
Coughlin 4 0 71 31 33
Berwick 4 0 176 49 33
Crestwood 3 1 129 95 24
PittstonArea 1 3 44 127 8
Tunkhannock 1 3 64 65 8
Dallas 0 4 7 101 0
Division 2A-A W L PF PA CP
Northwest (A) 4 0 108 51 27
Lake-Lehman 3 1 182 42 22
Meyers 2 2 120 82 13
Nanticoke 1 3 69 96 8
WyomingArea 1 3 48 130 7
Hanover Area 1 3 89 126 7
Holy Redeemer 1 3 164 157 6
GAR 0 4 46 128 0
NOTE: CP is Championship Points toward the
divisional title.
Teams get nine points for defeatinga Class 4Aop-
ponent, eight for a Class 3Aopponent, seven for a
Class 2Aopponent andsix for a ClassAopponent.
The team with the most Championship Points is
the division winner.
PAGE 4B Saturday, September 21, 2013 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
delivered a strike to
Kyle Merth for the rst
down. Mathis followed
it up with another strike
to the streaking Merth,
who scampered in for the
score.
We faced some adver-
sity and guys stepped up,
GAR coach Paul Wiedlich
Jr. said. I proud of these
guys. They didnt quit and
I think we really became a
football team tonight.
The Rangers corralled
the ensuing onside kick,
and on fourth down
Northwest caused the
defense to jump offsides
to secure the victory.
Weve been going into
this game for ve years
now and havent beaten
them, Mazonkey said.
We wanted to beat this
team bad and we knew
this was the year we could
do it.
GAR 0 13 0 7 20
Northwest 13 0 0 13 26
First quarter
NW Austin Mazonkey 72 run (kick
failed), 11:40
NW Mazonkey 6 run (Jeremy Walsh
kick), 1:46
Second quarter
GAR Rashaun Jackson 27 pass from
Rashaun Mathis (Dawin Reyes kick), 9:29
GAR Rich Sickler 45 run (kick failed),
4:50
Fourth quarter
NW Mazonkey 1 run (Walsh kick), 8:46
NW Mazonkey 10 run (kick no good),
3:39
GAR Kyle Merth 41 pass from Mathis
(Reyes kick good), 2:44
Team statistics GAR NW
First downs 10 15
Rushes-yards 29-120 45-352
Passing yards 128 12
Total yards 248 364
Passing 5-15-1 1-5-1
Sacked-yards lost 1-5 2-16
Punts-avg. 5-22.4 3-28.3
Fumbles-lost 2-1 2-1
Penalties-yards 7-40 7-65
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING GAR, Rich Sickler 19-117,
Anthony Maurent 4-20, Rashaun Mathis
3-(minus-2), Marqahn Kemp 1-7, Justin
Crosby 1-(minus-9), TEAM 1-(minus-13);
NW, Austin Mazonkey 37-352, Logan
Womelsdorf 4-(minus-14), Adam Schecter-
ly 4-26, Tyler Burger 1-(minus-2), TEAM
1-(minus-10).
PASSING GAR, Mathis 5-15-1-128;
NW, Womelsdorf 1-5-1-12.
RECEIVING GAR, Kyle Merth 3-81,
Rashaun Jackson 1-27, Kemp 1-20; NW,
Nick Long 1-12.
INTERCEPTIONS GAR, Jackson;
NW, Long.
and I thought we were more physi-
cal, Berwick coach George Curry
said. We played physical. Theyre
big, but I thought we had a little
more quickness.
That fact didnt escape Valley
West coach Pat Keating.
They out-physicaled us,
Keating said. That was the most
disappointing thing. The bottom
line is we didnt make plays when
we needed to make plays. They
had a third-and-18, we drop eight
(into coverage) and we still let
them complete the pass.
That third-and-18 play a
20-yard pass from C.J. Curry to
Andrew Force allowed Berwick
to keep a scoring drive alive in the
third quarter after Valley West had
tied the score 21-21.
Running back Nate Maczuga
capped the drive with a 30-yard
touchdown run, breaking through
tackles 20 yards fromthe end zone,
to give the Dawgs a 28-21 lead.
Berwicks next two scores
came after Valley West turnovers.
Linebacker Zach Andress inter-
cepted a pass, leading to a 3-yard
TD run by Kowalski. A fumble
on a fourth-down attempt set up
Kowalskis 30-yard score.
It was aheckof agame, George
Curry said. Two good teams went
at it. We just rallied a little more.
Momentumswung several times
in the rst half, but it was eeting
for both teams.
Valley West scored on its rst
drive of the game on a 20-yard run
by Eric Acosta. Berwick rebound-
ed by scoring on its next two pos-
session for a 13-7.
The Spartans, though, answered
with a 12-play scoring drive
capped by a 20-yard scoring run
by Troy Yashinski. Again Berwick
answered with a 10-play drive that
Stout nished with an 8-yard TD
run. The Dawgs were aided by
a pass interference penalty on a
third-and-7 from the Valley West
19-yard line. Stout scored on the
next play.
Berwick 42, Valley West 28
Wyoming Valley West 7 7 7 7 28
Berwick 13 8 7 14 42
First quarter
WVW Eric Acosta 20 run (Ian Ultsh kick), 8:46
BER Nate Maczuga 13 run (Olivia Seely kick),
3:58
BER C.J. Curry 1 run (kick failed), 2:08
Second quarter
WVW Troy Yashinski 20 run (Ultsh kick), 9:02
BER Jorden Stout 8 run (Maczuga run), 5:11
Third quarter
WVW L.J. Wesneski 19 pass from Mike Baur
(Ultsh kick), 9:02
BER Maczuga 30 run (Seely kick), 3:15
Fourth quarter
BER Dain Kowalski 3 run (Seely kick), 10:04
BER Kowalski 20 run (Seely kick), 4:03
WVW Acosta 9 run (Ultsh kick), 1:58
Teamstatistics WVW Berwick
First downs 18 21
Rushes-yards 34-140 43-254
Passing yards 174 124
Total yards 288 378
Passing 13-24-2 7-16-1
Sacked-yards lost x-x x-x
Punts-avg. 2-7 1-9
Fumbles-lost 2-2 1-1
Penalties-yards 5-31 7-55
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING WVW, Acosta 10-46, Baur 20-72,
Yashinski 1-20, Mike Sands 1-3, Bill Davison 1-0,
Brady Davison 1-(minus-1). Berwick, Kowalski 11-
65, Maczuga 9-75, Stout 8-49, Curry 8-22, Kyle Tr-
enholm 3-26, Nick Telanca 3-18, team 1-(minus-1).
PASSING WVW, Baur 11-19-2, Brady Davison
2-4-0-26, Sands 0-1-0-0. Berwick, Curry 7-16-1-124.
RECEIVINGWVW, Sands 7-74, Chris Baranski
1-7, Sean Judge 1-42, Wesneski 1-19, Baur 2-26,
Jermichael Bunch 1-6. Berwick, Trenholm 3-57, An-
drew Force 2-38, Ian Mazonkey 1-10, Trevon Sim-
mons 1-19.
INTERCEPTIONS WVW, Baur 1-17. Berwick,
Kowalski 1-8, Zach Andress 1-0.
MISSED FGs None.
LEHMAN TWP. The
sign in front of the Lake-
Lehman student section
appropriately read Lake-
Lehman Faithful.
Somehow, the Black
Knight fans stood stand-
ing throughout all 83
points, 620 yards and
150 minutes of Lake-
Lehmans 61-22 triumph
over Holy Redeemer in
its home opener.
Overall, to have that
many points on the board
at the end of the rst half,
you cant complain about
that, Lake-Lehman
coach Jerry Gilsky said. I
mean really we could have
run the ball wherever we
wanted. It is what it is,
guys.
Lake-Lehman held Holy
Redeemer to 14 rushing
yards on 24 carries. The
Black Knights sacked
quarterback Jimmy
Strickland ve times for
25 yards.
They took us out of
what we wanted to do
defensively, Gilsky said.
Guys are playing differ-
ent roles.
Lake-Lehman pounced
Holy Redeemer early
and often, racking up 20
points within the games
rst 10 minutes, thanks
to a terric 103-yard,
two-touchdown rst quar-
ter by running back Joey
Vigil. He broke out for 57
yards on a fourth down
play to give the Black
Knights a 20-0 lead with
2:27 left in the quarter.
Vigil nished the game
with 140 yards on only
six carries.
The Royals struggled
on offense in the early
going and failed to get
past their own 20-yard
line before the Black
Knights 20-point lead.
Charles Ross nally gave
the Royals some life when
he returned a kick 67
yards to the Lake-Lehman
9 yard line to set up an
Eric Kerr receiving touch-
down.
The second quarter was
dominated by the Black
Knights 27 points. The
quarter was highlighted
by two key defensive
plays. Pete Borum bat-
ted down a fourth down
red zone pass, and Josh
Winters returned an
interception 42 yards for
a touchdown.
Brady Butler and
Dustin Jones joined Vigil
with 100-plus yard rush-
ing games. Butler carried
the ball for 120 yards and
a touchdown, and Jones
ran nine times for 172
yards and two scores.
Holy Redeemer 6 0 8 8 22
Lake-Lehman 20 27 14 0 61
First quarter
LL Dustin Jones 3 run (pass failed),
10:26
LL Joey Vigil 27 run (Mike Symion
kick), 6:04
LL Vigil 57 run (Symion kick), 2:27
HR Eric Kerr 9 catch from Jimmy
Strickland (pass failed), 1:13
Second quarter
LL Bobby Wright 25 run (Symion
kick), 11:22
LL Brady Butler 8 run (Symion kick),
6:22
LL Josh Winters 42 interception re-
turn (run failed), 6:08
LL Jones 2 run (Symion kick), 4:04
Third quarter
LL Nick Eury 18 run (Symion kick),
5:53
LL Kody Pachamovitch 27 intercep-
tion return (Symion kick), 4:30
HR Jason Hoggarth 75 pass from
Strickland (Kerr pass from Strickland),
2:09
Fourth quarter
HR Eric Shorts 47 pass from Strick-
land (Pat Villani run), 5:00
Team statistics Redeemer Lehman
First downs 8 14
Rushes-yards 24-14 39-366
Passing yards 240 0
Total yards 254 366
Passing 10-23-2 0-1-1
Sacked-yards lost 5-25 3-15
Punts-avg. 4-47 1-35
Fumbles-lost 1-1 2-1
Penalties-yards 2-10 4-40
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING HR, P. Villani 5-6, Kerr
2-(minus-2), Strickland 8-(minus-18),
Charles Ross 5-11, Justin Renfer 1-0,
Jarrett Gabriel 3-17. LL, Jones 9-172,
Butler 10-120, Josh Sayre 2-(minus-2),
Vigil 6-140, Antonio Ferrari 3-(minus-10),
Wright 2-35, Eury 2-19, Jacob Yaple
1-(minus-7), Hunter Nice 2-11, TEAM
2-(minus-2).
PASSING HR, Strickland 10-23-2-
240. LL, Ferrari 0-1-1-0.
RECEIVING HR, Kerr 5-99, Vince
Villani 2-26, Shorts 2-50, Hoggarth 1-75.
INTERCEPTIONS HR, Ross 1-8. LL,
Winters -42, Pachamovitch 1-27.
Home opener easywin
for Black Knights 61-22
JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
Lake-Lehmans Joey Vigil carries the ball as Holy Redeemers Robert Bertram tries for a tackle during
a high school football game Friday night.
Charlotte Bartizek | The Times Leader
HANOVER TWP.
Hanover Area gave the
ball away on muffed punts
twice early.
Wyoming Area took the
ball away on pass plays
later to hold on to its rst
victory, taking advantage
of four turnovers to beat
the Hawkeyes, 20-12,
Friday night.
Ryan Murray recovered
a fumble to set up the rst
touchdown, caught a pass
for the second score and
made an interception to
turn away a Hanover Area
threat.
The win helped the
defending District 2 Class
2A champion Warriors
bounce back from a 54-7
home-eld loss to Lake-
Lehman that dropped
them to 0-3.
It was tough, but we
do have a good team and
I knew we could do it,
Murray said.
Farrad Condry caught a
pass for the rst Wyoming
Area score and made an
interception with 1:31 left
and Hanover Area out of
timeouts.
A ag for apparent
Wyoming Area pass inter-
ference was thrown on
the Condry interception,
but after the ofcials con-
sulted about the play, they
ruled that there was no
penalty.
That decision brought
Hanover Area coach Ron
Hummer onto the eld
yelling in anger when
the game ended with
Wyoming Area kneeling
down three times.
The ofcials are terri-
ble, quote Ron Hummer,
Hummer said while ask-
ing to be quoted about
the play to make his dis-
pleasure clear. To make
that call, in a situation
like that
Hanover Area got itself
in trouble by mufng
punts twice in the rst
7:15.
Ryan Gorki hit Condry
with a 10-yard pass and
Danielle Stillarty hit the
rst of her two extra
points for a 7-0 lead with
8:07 left in the rst quar-
ter.
The second fumble
resulted in a missed eld
goal.
Wyoming Area gave up
a 50-yard pass play from
Jacob Peters to Elido
Veras, but held Hanover
Area to minus-20 yards on
its other plays while tak-
ing a 14-0 lead in the rst
17 minutes.
The Warriors held fol-
lowing the long pass and
Gorki hit Ben Steve for
35 yards to set up the
11-yard touchdown pass
to Murray.
When Hanover Area
nally put together its
rst threats, Murray
broke up a fourth-down
pass from the 14, then
intercepted a third-down
pass at the 13 in the nal
two minutes of the half.
Wyoming Area 20, Hanover Area 12
Wyoming Area 7 7 0 6 20
Hanover Area 0 0 6 6 12
First quarter
WA Farrad Condry 10 pass from Ryan
Gorki (Danielle Stillarty kick), 8:07
Second quarter
WA Ryan Murray 11 pass from Gorki
(Stillarty kick), 7:08
Third quarter
HA Isaiah Taylor 1 run (run failed),
6:41
Fourth quarter
HA Taylor 2 run (pass failed), 5:25
WA Jason Wilson 10 run (kick
blocked), 1:44
Team statistics WA HA
First downs 13 11
Rushes-yards 43-114 25-139
Passing yards 134 76
Total yards 248 215
Passing 9-15-2 5-22-2
Sacked-yards lost 1-9 1-9
Punts-avg. 4-31.5 4-32.3
Fumbles-lost 1-0 3-2
Penalties-yards 13-112 4-27
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING WA, Robert Wargo 5-41,
Jason Wilson 12-37, Ryan Gorki 17-37,
Michael Lumley 1-6, Ryan Murray 2-5,
Team 4-minus 5, Kyle Borton 2-minus 7.
HA, Isaiah Taylor 21-110, Mike Kremenic
3-38, Jacob Peters 1-minus 9.
PASSING WA, Gorki 6-11-1-93, Bor-
ton 3-4-1-41. HA, Peters 5-22-2-76.
RECEIVING WA, Ben Steve 4-70,
Jeremy Seabridge 2-31, Lumley 1-12,
Murray 1-11, Farrad Condry 1-10. HA, El-
ida Veras 2-56, D.J. Linker 1-20, Stephen
Morgan 1-15, Taylor 1-minus 15.
INTERCEPTIONS WA, Murray 1-30,
Condry 1-29. HA, Veras 2-14.
MISSED FGs WA, A.J. Lenkaitis 25.
Wyoming Area
takes advantage
of turnovers
TOM ROBINSON
For the Times Leader
Aigeldinger and
Comets hang on
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@civitasmedia.com
HAWLEY The
star running back for
Crestwood High School
didnt need 300 yards or
long-distance touchdown
sprints to help his team
secure a victory this time.
Rather than his
explosive legs, Frank
Aigeldinger relied more
on his hands. Because
they helped Crestwood
hang onto victory.
Aigeldinger and
Michael Legg teamed up
to stop Wallenpaupack
three yards short of
the end zone and
also shy of a rst down
Friday, sealing
Crestwoods 27-19 vic-
tory over the Buckhorns
at Wallenpaupack High
School.
Denitely defensive
play, Aigeldinger said,
referring to his favorite
moment of the night.
We scrapped it out, were
able to make the tackle. It
helped us beat them.
Of course, Aigeldingers
three rushing touchdowns
didnt hurt.
The hard-running tail-
back crossed the goal line
on bursts of 3, 5 and 3
yards to produce three of
Crestwoods four scores.
That didnt match
Aigeldingers eye-pop-
ping career-high day of
323 rushing yards and
four touchdowns against
Pittston Area last week,
but his workman-like
performance Friday was
every bit as meaningful to
the Comets.
A lot of people see
his numbers on offense,
what he did last week,
Crestwood coach Greg
Myers said. Tonight, I
dont think he had crazy
numbers. But he did score
three touchdowns. Most
importantly, he stepped
up on defense and made a
great play at the end.
For the record,
Aigeldinger nished with
88 yards on 16 carries.
Doesnt matter to me,
Aigeldinger said. All that
matters is we get the win
at the end of the day.
Aigeldinger made sure
the Comets secured it.
With little more
than a minute to play,
Wallenpaupack faced
a fourth-and-3 from
Crestwoods 4-yard line
while driving toward
a potential score and
conversion that would
have tied the game. The
Buckhorns gave the ball
to their star running back
Jovaughn Marshall, who
nished with 181 rushing
yards on the night.
But Aigeldinger dove in
from his linebacker spot
to make a low tackle, and
Legg nished the play
off from up top to thwart
Wallenpaupacks hopes of
catching Crestwood.
We knew it was going
to be a stght, Myers
said. I thought we
answered the bell.
Crestwood 7 7 7 6 27
Wallenpaupack 7 12 0 0 19
First quarter
C Frank Aigeldinger 3 run (George
Gendler kick), 9:37
W Jovaughn Marshall 30 run (Matt
Vosburg kick), 6:29
Second quarter
W Marshall 8 run (kick failed), 9:01
C Aigeldinger 5 run (Gendler kick),
5:20
W Marshall 4 run (kick failed), 0:48
Third quarter
C Jay Popson 1 run (Gendler kick),
4:41
Fourth quarter
C Aigeldinger 3 run (kick blocked),
9:27
Team statistics Crest Wall
First downs 17 13
Rushes-yards 36-153 42-277
Passing yards 119 48
Total yards 201 325
Passing 6-16-1 5-8-2
Sacked-yards lost 0-0 0-0
Punts-avg. 2-26 1-33
Fumbles-lost 1-0 2-1
Penalties-yards 3-29 8-40
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING CRES, Frank Aigeldinger
16-88, Jay Popson 8-45, Tanner Kahlau
6-21, Matt Bobeck 2-7, TEAM 4- (minus
8). WAL, Jovaughn Marshall 32-181, Rick
Smith 6-71, John Steffen 2-25, TEAM 2-0.
PASSING CRES, Popson 6-16-1-
119. WAL, Steffen 5-8-2-48.
RECEIVING CRES, Timothy Tokash
3-64, Matt Bobeck 1-20, Connor Sheloski
1-21, Andrew Chang 1-14. WAL, Ryan
Worzel 3-39, Brad Bieski 1-7, Brad Day
1-2.
INTERCEPTIONS CRES, Lance
Blass 1-6, Matt MacDonald 1-0. WAL,
Dominick Basilicata 1-0.
Berwick quarterback C.J. Curry looks to evade Wyoming Valley West defenders during the first half of a high school foot-
ball game on Friday.
Don Carey | For The Times Leader
Berwicks Nate Maczuga runs into the end zone for a touchdown during the first
half of a high school football game with Wyoming Valley West on Friday night.
Dawgs
From page 1B
Northwest
From page 1B
We knew it was
going to be a fist-
fight. I thought we
answered the bell.
Greg Myers
Crestwood coach
They out-physicaled us.
That was the most disap-
pointing thing. The bottom
line is we didnt make plays
when we needed to make
plays. They had a third-
and-18, we drop eight (into
coverage) and we still let
themcomplete the pass.
Pat Keating
ValleyWest head coach
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 5B
NatioNal league RouNdup
ameRicaN league RouNdup
mlB StaNdiNgS StatS
mets 6, phillies 4
NewYork aB R H Bi BB So avg.
E.Young lf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .248
Dan.Murphy 2b 5 3 3 1 0 0 .284
D.Wright 3b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .310
Satin 1b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .279
Duda 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .232
A.Brown rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .237
Atchison p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Black p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Feliciano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Hawkins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Lagares cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248
T.dArnaud c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .169
Quintanilla ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .227
Matsuzaka p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .200
den Dekker rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245
totals 38 6 10 6 1 8
philadelphia aB R H Bi BB So avg.
C.Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .313
Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .252
Utley 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .279
Ruiz c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .280
D.Brown lf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .273
Ruf 1b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .254
Asche 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .262
Mayberry rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .227
Hamels p 2 0 0 1 0 0 .185
a-Frandsen ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .230
De Fratus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
C.Jimenez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
totals 32 4 5 3 3 8
NewYork 301 100 1006 10 1
philadelphia 000 400 0004 5 1
a-grounded out for Hamels in the 7th.
EE.Young (4), Asche (5). LOBNew York 6,
Philadelphia 4. 2BE.Young (25), Ruf (10), As-
che (8). HRD.Wright (17), of Hamels. RBIsE.
Young (29), Dan.Murphy (72), D.Wright 2 (56),
Satin (16), A.Brown (23), Ruf 2 (28), Hamels (5).
SBE.Young (40), Dan.Murphy (20), Rollins (22).
Runners left in scoring positionNew York
1 (den Dekker); Philadelphia 3 (Mayberry,
C.Hernandez, D.Brown). RISPNew York 3 for 7;
Philadelphia 1 for 9.
Runners moved upSatin, Quintanilla 2,
Hamels.
NewYork ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Matsuzaka W, 2-3 6 4 4 2 3 6 96 5.52
Atchison H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.07
Black H, 3 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.46
Feliciano H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 4.66
Hawkins S, 11-14 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.06
philadelphia ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Hamels L, 8-14 7 10 6 6 0 8 115 3.62
De Fratus 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 16 4.12
C.Jimenez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.45
Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.72
Inherited runners-scoredFeliciano 1-0,
C.Jimenez 1-0.
UmpiresHome, Chris Guccione; First, Mark
Ripperger; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Ron Kulpa.
T3:00. A33,117 (43,651).
Reds 6, pirates 5, 10 innings,
cincinnati aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Choo cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .283
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
A.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
B.Phillips 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .259
Votto 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .306
Ludwick lf 5 1 3 1 0 0 .250
Bruce rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .268
Frazier 3b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .236
Cozart ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .255
2-B.Hamilton pr-cf1 1 0 0 0 0 .375
Mesoraco c 4 0 2 2 0 0 .242
3-D.Robinson pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .247
Hanigan c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .202
Latos p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .130
Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
a-Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .225
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Paul ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .246
C.Izturis ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .194
totals 39 6 9 5 4 8
pittsburgh aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Tabata lf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .280
1-S.Marte pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .279
N.Walker 2b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .251
McCutchen cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .323
Morneau 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283
e-G.Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .255
Byrd rf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .287
P.Alvarez 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .229
R.Martin c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .229
Mercer ss 3 1 2 1 0 0 .282
c-Snider ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .218
Barmes ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .217
Liriano p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067
Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
d-G.Jones ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234
Farnsworth p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Morris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
totals 35 5 10 5 3 6
cincinnati 100010 003 16 9 0
pittsburgh 200200 100 05 10 1
a-struck out for M.Parra in the 8th. b-singled
for LeCure in the 9th. c-fouled out for Mercer in
the 9th. d-fied out for Watson in the 9th. e-struck
out for Morneau in the 10th.
1-ran for Tabata in the 7th. 2-ran for Cozart in
the 9th. 3-ran for Mesoraco in the 9th.
EMercer (14). LOBCincinnati 7, Pittsburgh
5. 2BMesoraco (13). HRFrazier (17), of
Liriano; Votto (24), of Farnsworth; Tabata (6), of
Latos; N.Walker (12), of Latos. RBIsVotto (71),
Ludwick (11), Frazier (70), Mesoraco 2 (41), Ta-
bata 2 (32), N.Walker (49), R.Martin (53), Mercer
(25). SBB.Phillips (5), B.Hamilton (10). CSS.
Marte (15), R.Martin (5). SLiriano.
Runners left in scoring positionCincinnati
3 (Choo 2, B.Hamilton); Pittsburgh 3 (P.Alvarez,
R.Martin 2). RISPCincinnati 3 for 9; Pittsburgh
3 for 8.
Runners moved upVotto, Bruce. GIDPLud-
wick, Byrd, R.Martin.
DPCincinnati 2 (Cozart, B.Phillips, Votto),
(Cozart, B.Phillips, Votto); Pittsburgh 1 (Liriano,
N.Walker, Morneau).
cincinnati ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Latos 6 8 4 4 2 1 88 3.23
Ondrusek 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 11 4.32
M.Parra 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 3.61
LeCure 1 0 0 0 1 2 26 2.72
Hoover W, 5-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.84
A.Chap. S, 38-43 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.63
pittsburgh ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Liriano 8 3 2 2 3 7 94 2.88
Melancon BS, 4-202-33 3 0 0 1 18 1.30
Watson 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 2.43
Farnsworth L, 1-12-3 2 1 1 1 0 20 1.35
Morris 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.65
Inherited runners-scoredM.Parra 1-0,
Watson 1-0, Morris 2-0. HBPby LeCure (Mc-
Cutchen).
UmpiresHome, Mark Carlson; First, Gerry
Davis; Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, Brian Knight.
T3:37. A37,940 (38,362).
Braves 9, cubs 5
atlanta aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Heyward cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .251
b-J.Schaf. ph-cf-rf 1 1 0 0 1 1 .252
J.Upton rf-lf 3 1 0 0 2 1 .259
F.Freeman 1b 3 2 1 3 1 0 .310
Gattis lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .235
Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
McCann c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .258
C.Johnson 3b 4 2 3 2 1 0 .331
1-Janish pr-3b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .189
Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 2 2 .182
Simmons ss 5 0 1 2 0 0 .246
Maholmp 3 0 1 1 0 0 .140
S.Downs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Ayala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
d-El.Johnson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250
D.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-B.Upton ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .187
totals 35 9 8 9 8 7
chicago aB R H Bi BB So avg.
St.Castro ss 5 2 1 1 0 1 .241
Barney 2b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .208
Rizzo 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .231
D.Navarro c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .299
Do.Murphy 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .250
Lake lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .306
D.McDonald rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .239
Sweeney cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .268
S.Baker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Bogusevic ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271
Rosscup p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
H.Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Valbuena ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .221
Grimmp 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Raley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
B.Parker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Gregg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
f-Schierholtz ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .254
totals 36 5 11 5 0 4
atlanta 013 100 0049 8 0
chicago 001 012 1005 11 0
a-struckout for S.Baker inthe4th. b-struckout
for Heyward in the 6th. c-singled for H.Rondon in
the 6th. d-struck out for Avilaninthe 8th. e-struck
out for D.Carpenter in the 9th. f-singled for Gregg
in the 9th.
1-ran for C.Johnson in the 9th.
LOBAtlanta 9, Chicago 6. 2BGattis (19),
C.Johnson (33), Simmons (25), Maholm (2),
Lake (16). HRC.Johnson (11), of S.Baker;
F.Freeman (22), of S.Baker; St.Castro (10), of
Maholm; Do.Murphy (11), of Maholm; D.Navarro
(13), ofAvilan. RBIsF.Freeman 3(103), McCann
(57), C.Johnson 2 (66), Simmons 2 (54), Maholm
(2), St.Castro (42), Rizzo (76), D.Navarro (32),
Do.Murphy (21), Valbuena (37). SS.Baker.
Runners left in scoring positionAtlanta 6
(Heyward, Uggla 2, C.Johnson, B.Upton 2); Chi-
cago 2 (D.Navarro, Bogusevic). RISPAtlanta 5
for 13; Chicago 2 for 8.
Runners moved upJ.Upton, Gattis, Sweeney.
GIDPSt.Castro.
DPAtlanta 1 (Uggla, Simmons, F.Freeman).
atlanta ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Maholm5 1-3 8 4 4 0 2 79 4.44
S.Downs H, 8 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 2.08
Ayala H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.48
Avilan BS, 2-2 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 15 1.60
D.Carpenter W, 4-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.86
Kimbrel 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 1.29
chicago ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
S.Baker 4 4 5 5 3 1 70 3.60
Rosscup 1 1 0 0 2 1 22 2.08
H.Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 5.15
Grimm 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.57
Raley 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.50
B.Parker 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.72
Strop 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.78
Gregg L, 2-5 1 3 4 4 3 1 37 3.45
Raley pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scoredS.Downs 1-1,
Ayala 1-0, Raley 1-0, B.Parker 2-0. IBBof Gregg
(F.Freeman), of Rosscup (C.Johnson). HBPby
Maholm (Lake), by Grimm (F.Freeman), by Raley
(McCann).
UmpiresHome, Paul Emmel; First, Chris
Conroy; Second, Gary Darling; Third, Jerry Meals.
T3:15. A29,539 (41,019).
indians 2, astros 1, 6innings,
Houston aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Villar ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .267
Altuve 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .285
Krauss lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .207
Carter 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .221
Crowe cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .230
B.Laird 3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .196
J.D.Martinez dh 3 0 1 0 0 2 .254
Corporan c 1 0 0 0 1 0 .234
Hoes rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .281
totals 23 1 4 1 2 7
cleveland aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Bourn cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .257
Swisher 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276
C.Santana c 2 1 1 0 1 1 .268
Raburn dh 3 1 1 0 0 0 .276
As.Cabrera ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .236
Brantley lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .276
Aviles 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .253
Stubbs rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .230
Totals 24 2 4 1 3 2
Houston 010 000 01 4 3
cleveland 010 100 x2 4 0
ECarter (5), B.Laird (1), Krauss (2). LOB
Houston 3, Cleveland 7. 2BAviles (15). 3B
Carter (2). HRB.Laird (4), of McAllister. RBIs
B.Laird (9), Aviles (42). CSAltuve (13).
Runners left in scoring positionHouston 3
(Crowe, Villar 2); Cleveland 4 (Stubbs 2, Bourn 2).
RISPHouston 1 for 3; Cleveland 1 for 7.
GIDPVillar.
DPCleveland 1 (Kipnis, As.Cabrera, Swisher).
Houston ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Oberholtzer L, 4-46 4 2 0 3 2 107 2.71
cleveland ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
McAllister W, 9-9 5 4 1 1 2 3 76 3.88
Rzepczynski H, 42-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.04
ShawS, 1-5 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 18 3.42
McAllister pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scoredRzepczynski 1-0.
UmpiresHome, Todd Tichenor; First, Jordan
Baker; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Dale Scott.
T2:08 (Rain delay: 1:09). A17,310 (42,241).
tigers 12, White Sox 5
chicago aB R H Bi BB So avg.
De Aza lf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .264
Al.Ramirez ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .282
Gillaspie 3b-1b 2 1 1 1 1 0 .255
Konerko 1b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .247
Semien 3b 0 0 0 1 0 0 .314
A.Dunn dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .218
b-Keppinger ph-dh1 1 1 0 0 0 .246
A.Garcia rf 4 1 2 3 0 0 .280
Jor.Danks cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .241
G.Beckham2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .268
Phegley c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .227
Mig.Gonzalez c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200
totals 34 5 9 5 2 6
detroit aB R H Bi BB So avg.
A.Jackson cf 6 2 2 0 0 1 .274
Tor.Hunter rf 5 2 4 3 1 1 .299
Mi.Cabrera 3b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .346
D.Kelly 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Fielder 1b 4 1 2 2 1 1 .284
1-Tuiasosopo pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .260
V.Martinez dh 3 2 2 2 1 0 .302
a-N.Castllans ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231
Dirks lf 4 2 3 2 0 0 .261
Infante 2b 5 0 2 1 0 1 .316
H.Perez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .197
Avila c 5 1 1 1 0 4 .222
R.Santiago ss 5 2 1 0 0 0 .225
totals 43 12 18 12 3 8
chicago 100 200 0205 9 2
detroit 214 050 00x12 18 0
1-ran for Fielder in the 7th.
ETroncoso(2), G.Beckham(12). LOBChica-
go 6, Detroit 11. 2BDe Aza (27), Keppinger (11),
G.Beckham(19), A.Jackson(30), Tor.Hunter (35),
Fielder (36). 3BGillaspie (2), A.Garcia (3), Infan-
te (3). HRA.Garcia (5), of Scherzer; V.Martinez
(13), of Purcey. RBIsGillaspie (36), Semien (3),
A.Garcia 3 (26), Tor.Hunter 3 (81), Mi.Cabrera
(135), Fielder 2 (105), V.Martinez 2 (80), Dirks 2
(34), Infante (49), Avila (46). CSAl.Ramirez (9).
SFGillaspie, Semien.
Runners left in scoring positionChicago
3 (Konerko 2, G.Beckham); Detroit 7 (Avila 4,
Fielder, V.Martinez 2). RISPChicago 2 for 8;
Detroit 7 for 20.
Runners moved upMi.Cabrera 3. GIDPA.
Jackson.
DPChicago 1 (Semien, G.Beckham, Gil-
laspie).
chicago ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Axelrod L, 4-10 22-310 7 7 2 3 75 5.72
Troncoso 2 2 2 0 1 2 44 4.82
Purcey 1 2-3 6 3 3 0 1 42 2.13
D.Webb 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 22 4.15
detroit ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Scherzer W, 20-3 6 6 3 3 1 3 90 3.00
Alburquerque 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 5.08
J.Alvarez 1 3 2 2 0 1 14 5.66
Putkonen 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.70
Inherited runners-scoredTroncoso 2-1, Purc-
ey 2-2, D.Webb 2-0. IBBofAxelrod (V.Martinez).
HBPby Purcey (Dirks). WPScherzer.
UmpiresHome, Tim Timmons; First, Mike
Winters; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Mark Wegner.
T3:32. A39,643 (41,255).
Red Sox 6, Blue Jays 3
toronto aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Reyes ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .295
R.Davis lf-rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .263
Lawrie 3b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .255
Col.Rasmus cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .276
Pillar lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .171
a-Lind ph-1b 1 1 1 2 0 0 .285
Sierra dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .313
DeRosa 1b-lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .234
Gose rf-cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267
Arencibia c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .195
Goins 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .232
totals 37 3 10 3 2 10
Boston aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Pedroia 2b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .301
Nava rf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .300
D.Ortiz dh 2 1 1 1 2 0 .308
Napoli 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .257
Carp lf 3 0 1 3 1 0 .302
1-J.Gomes pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .238
Saltalamacchia c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .266
Middlebrooks 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .236
Drewss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .246
Bradley Jr. cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .186
Victorino cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .295
totals 32 6 12 5 6 5
toronto 000 010 0203 10 0
Boston 101 000 31x6 12 2
a-homered for Pillar in the 8th.
1-ran for Carp in the 7th.
EDrew (8), Middlebrooks (10). LOBToronto
9, Boston 8. 2BR.Davis (16), Pedroia (42), Nava
(29), Saltalamacchia (38). HRLind (23), of
Tazawa. RBIsLawrie (43), Lind 2 (63), Pedroia
(83), D.Ortiz (97), Carp 3 (42). SBR.Davis 2
(44), Middlebrooks (3). CSLawrie (5).
Runners left in scoring positionToronto 4
(Arencibia 3, Lawrie); Boston 5 (Saltalamacchia
2, Pedroia, Drew, Nava). RISPToronto 3 for 10;
Boston 5 for 13.
Runners moved upLawrie, Nava. GIDP
Gose, Pedroia, Napoli, Saltalamacchia.
DPToronto 3 (DeRosa, Reyes, Jenkins),
(Goins, DeRosa), (Reyes, Arencibia, DeRosa);
Boston 1 (Middlebrooks, Saltalamacchia, Middle-
brooks, Saltalamacchia).
toronto ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
E.Rogers L, 5-8 21-3 3 2 2 5 2 60 4.52
Jenkins 3 1-3 2 0 0 1 1 36 3.07
Loup 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.51
Wagner 0 4 3 3 0 0 11 3.75
Jefress 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.93
Oliver 1 2 1 1 0 1 23 3.94
Boston ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Lester W, 15-8 7 5 1 1 2 8 123 3.67
Tazawa 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 20 2.96
Uehara S, 20-23 12-3 2 0 0 0 2 26 1.14
Wagner pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scoredJenkins 3-0, Loup
1-0, Jefress 3-2, Uehara 1-0. IBBof E.Rogers
(D.Ortiz). WPE.Rogers.
UmpiresHome, Larry Vanover; First, Manny
Gonzalez; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Tony Ran-
dazzo.
T3:26. A37,215 (37,499).
Yankees 5, giants 1
San Francisco aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Arias 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .271
a-Abreu ph-2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .243
J.Perez cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .261
Belt 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .290
Posey dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .300
Pence rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .290
Sandoval 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .272
H.Sanchez c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .274
Pill lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .222
G.Blanco lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267
B.Crawford ss 2 1 0 0 1 1 .255
totals 30 1 7 1 4 6
NewYork aB R H Bi BB So avg.
I.Suzuki rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .263
A.Rodriguez dh 4 1 1 4 0 1 .261
Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .310
A.Soriano lf 3 1 2 1 1 1 .263
Granderson cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239
Nunez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .253
Mar.Reynolds 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .219
Overbay 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242
Ryan ss 2 1 1 0 0 0 .197
J.Murphy c 3 1 0 0 0 0 .182
totals 30 5 6 5 2 8
San Francisco 001 000 0001 7 1
NewYork 010 000 40x5 6 0
a-singled for Arias in the 8th.
ESandoval (17). LOBSan Francisco 6, New
York 4. 2BJ.Perez 2 (4). HRA.Soriano (16), of
Lincecum; A.Rodriguez (7), of Kontos. RBIsJ.
Perez (6), A.Rodriguez 4 (18), A.Soriano (49).
SBNunez (10). CSPence (3), A.Soriano (4).
Runners left inscoringpositionSanFrancisco
3 (Posey 2, Pill); NewYork 2 (Cano, Granderson).
RISPSan Francisco 2 for 6; NewYork 1 for 4.
Runners moved upArias, Belt, A.Rodriguez.
GIDPJ.Perez, Posey, Pill.
DPNew York 3 (Ryan, Cano, Overbay),
(Nunez, Cano, Overbay), (Cano, Ryan, Overbay).
San Francisco ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
LincecumL, 10-14 6 2-3 5 4 4 2 6 121 4.44
Kontos 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 7 4.67
Hembree 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 0.00
NewYork ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Sabathia W, 14-13 7 7 1 1 3 4 107 4.78
D.Robertson 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 2.14
M.Rivera 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.21
Sabathia pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredKontos 3-3,
D.Robertson 1-0. HBPby Lincecum (Ryan).
WPLincecum2.
UmpiresHome, Dana DeMuth; First, Paul
Nauert; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Angel
Hernandez.
T2:54. A41,734 (50,291).
Nationals 8, marlins 0
miami aB R H Bi BB So avg.
D.Solano 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .252
Coghlan lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .259
Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .251
Ruggiano cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .223
B.Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Lucas 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .254
Morrison 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .243
Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .225
Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .189
Ja.Turner p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .086
Hatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Marisnick cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .183
totals 29 0 2 0 1 9
Washington aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Span cf 5 1 2 2 0 1 .282
Zimmerman 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .282
Werth rf 3 2 1 2 1 0 .321
C.Brown rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Harper lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .285
Desmond ss 4 0 2 1 0 1 .286
Ad.LaRoche 1b 2 1 0 0 2 1 .238
W.Ramos c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .281
Rendon 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .263
Zimmermann p 4 1 0 0 0 1 .111
totals 34 8 11 8 3 5
miami 000 000 0000 2 0
Washington 000 007 10x8 11 0
LOBMiami 3, Washington 5. 2BWerth (23),
Harper (23), Desmond (38). 3BSpan (10).
RBIsSpan 2 (44), Werth 2 (77), Harper (56),
Desmond (80), W.Ramos (56), Rendon (34).
Runners left in scoring positionWashington 3
(Zimmerman 2, W.Ramos). RISPMiami 0 for 0;
Washington 5 for 12.
Runners moved upDesmond, Zimmermann.
miami ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
Ja.Turner L, 3-8 51-3 7 5 5 2 3 75 3.74
Hatcher 2-3 3 2 2 0 0 2212.46
B.Hand 2 1 1 1 1 2 33 3.14
Washington ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
ZimmermannW, 19-8 9 2 0 0 1 9 107 3.18
Inherited runners-scoredHatcher 2-2.
UmpiresHome, Brian ONora; First, Fieldin
Culbreth; Second, Adrian Johnson; Third, Bill
Welke.
T2:22. A34,752 (41,418).
Royals 2, Rangers 1
texas aB R H Bi BB So avg.
Kinsler 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .273
Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .270
Rios rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276
A.Beltre 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .316
Pierzynski dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .278
Moreland 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .237
G.Soto c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .229
Dav.Murphy lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .220
L.Martin cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .262
totals 32 1 5 1 1 6
Kansas city aB R H Bi BB So avg.
A.Gordon lf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .269
Bonifacio 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .244
Hosmer 1b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .304
B.Butler dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .292
S.Perez c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .291
L.Cain cf-rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .254
Moustakas 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .235
Maxwell rf 1 0 1 1 2 0 .258
a-Lough ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .283
1-J.Dyson pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .265
A.Escobar ss 2 0 0 1 1 0 .238
totals 30 2 9 2 6 6
texas 010 000 0001 5 0
Kansas city 010 000 01x2 9 0
a-walked for Maxwell in the 8th.
1-ran for Lough in the 8th.
LOBTexas 5, Kansas City 11. 2BPierzynski
(22), Dav.Murphy (25), Maxwell (14). RBIsPier-
zynski (65), Maxwell (21), A.Escobar (52). SBL.
Martin (33), Moustakas (2). CSMaxwell (2).
Runners left in scoring positionTexas 3 (Dav.
Murphy, Andrus 2); Kansas City 6 (B.Butler,
A.Escobar 2, S.Perez, A.Gordon 2). RISPTexas 1
for 5; Kansas City 1 for 7.
GIDPB.Butler, Moustakas.
DPTexas 2 (Kinsler, Andrus, Moreland), (Kin-
sler, Moreland).
texas ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
M.Perez 5 2-3 7 1 1 4 3 108 3.54
Cotts 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.04
Frasor L, 4-3 2-3 2 1 1 1 2 30 2.72
Feliz 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0.00
J.Ortiz 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.23
Kansas city ip H R eR BB So Np eRa
E.Santana 7 1-3 5 1 1 1 4 94 3.16
Hochevar W, 5-22-3 0 0 0 0 0 12 1.74
G.Holland S, 44-471 0 0 0 0 2 11 1.29
Feliz pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scoredCotts 2-0, Feliz
3-1, J.Ortiz 3-0, Hochevar 1-0. HBPby M.Perez
(A.Escobar).
UmpiresHome, Jef Nelson; First, Jim Wolf;
Second, Ed Hickox; Third, SamHolbrook.
T2:59. A21,837 (37,903).
ameRicaN league
east division
W l pct gB WcgB l10 Str Home away
x-Boston 94 61 .606 7-3 W-2 52-27 42-34
Tampa Bay 83 69 .546 9 5-5 L-1 47-30 36-39
Baltimore 81 71 .533 11 2 5-5 L-1 42-33 39-38
NewYork 81 73 .526 12 3 5-5 W-1 45-31 36-42
Toronto 70 83 .458 23 13 3-7 L-1 38-40 32-43
central division
W l pct gB WcgB l10 Str Home away
Detroit 90 64 .584 8-2 W-2 50-29 40-35
Cleveland 84 70 .545 6 7-3 W-2 47-30 37-40
Kansas City 81 72 .529 8 2 6-4 W-2 43-36 38-36
Minnesota 65 87 .428 24 18 3-7 L-1 31-43 34-44
Chicago 60 93 .392 29 23 2-8 L-2 35-41 25-52
West division
W l pct gB WcgB l10 Str Home away
Oakland 90 63 .588 7-3 W-1 49-29 41-34
Texas 83 70 .542 7 2-8 L-1 39-35 44-35
Los Angeles 74 78 .487 15 9 7-3 W-1 35-40 39-38
Seattle 67 86 .438 23 16 2-8 L-1 33-42 34-44
Houston 51 103 .331 39 33 3-7 L-7 24-54 27-49
NatioNal league
east division
W l pct gB WcgB l10 Str Home away
Atlanta 91 62 .595 5-5 W-2 52-22 39-40
Washington 83 71 .539 8 5 8-2 W-2 46-33 37-38
Philadelphia 71 82 .464 20 16 5-5 L-2 43-36 28-46
NewYork 69 84 .451 22 18 5-5 W-1 32-45 37-39
Miami 56 98 .364 35 32 2-8 L-2 31-44 25-54
central division
W l pct gB WcgB l10 Str Home away
St. Louis 89 64 .582 6-4 L-1 48-27 41-37
Cincinnati 88 66 .571 1 6-4 W-4 48-26 40-40
Pittsburgh 88 66 .571 1 5-5 L-1 49-30 39-36
Milwaukee 68 84 .447 20 19 6-4 L-1 36-42 32-42
Chicago 64 90 .416 25 24 2-8 L-1 29-47 35-43
West division
W l pct gB WcgB l10 Str Home away
x-Los Angeles 88 65 .575 4-6 W-1 46-32 42-33
Arizona 77 75 .507 10 10 5-5 L-1 44-34 33-41
San Diego 71 81 .467 16 16 6-4 L-1 41-33 30-48
San Francisco 71 83 .461 17 17 6-4 L-1 38-38 33-45
Colorado 70 84 .455 18 18 4-6 W-1 43-33 27-51
x-clinched division
z-clinched playof berth
ameRicaN league
thursdays games
Detroit 5, Seattle 4
Cleveland 2, Houston 1, 11 innings
Toronto 6, N.Y. Yankees 2
Boston 3, Baltimore 1
Texas 8, Tampa Bay 2
Oakland 8, Minnesota 6
Fridays games
Cleveland 2, Houston 1, 7 innings
N.Y. Yankees 5, San Francisco 1
Detroit 12, ChicagoWhite Sox 5
Boston 6, Toronto 3
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City 2, Texas 1
Minnesota at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Saturdays games
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 10-7) at Tampa Bay
(Cobb 9-3), 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 3-5) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 8-5), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (P.Hernandez 3-1) at Oakland
(J.Parker 11-7), 4:05 p.m.
Houston (Clemens 4-5) at Cleveland (Kazmir
8-9), 6:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 11-13) at Detroit (Por-
cello 13-8), 7:08 p.m.
Texas (Garza 3-5) at Kansas City (Guthrie 14-11),
7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Buehrle 11-9) at Boston (Buchholz 11-0),
7:10 p.m.
Seattle (J.Saunders 11-15) at L.A. Angels (Wil-
liams 8-10), 9:05 p.m.
NatioNal league
thursdays games
Pittsburgh 10, San Diego 1
San Francisco 2, N.Y. Mets 1
Chicago Cubs 5, Milwaukee 1
Colorado 7, St. Louis 6, 15 innings
L.A. Dodgers 7, Arizona 6
Washington 3, Miami 2
Fridays games
Atlanta 9, Chicago Cubs 5
Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 5, 10 innings
Washington 8, Miami 0
N.Y. Mets 6, Philadelphia 4
N.Y. Yankees 5, San Francisco 1
Arizona at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Saturdays games
San Francisco (Vogelsong 3-5) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 8-5), 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 14-12) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood
9-11), 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 11-10) at Pittsburgh
(A.J.Burnett 8-11), 7:05 p.m.
Miami (Koehler 3-10) at Washington (Strasburg
7-9), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 11-10) at Philadelphia (Cloyd 2-5),
7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 13-10) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 11-
9), 7:10 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 7-10) at Colorado (McHugh 0-2),
8:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 14-9) at San Diego
(B.Smith 1-1), 8:40 p.m.
AP photo
pittsburgh pirates pedro alvarez (24) scores from third on an infield single by pirates Jody mercer
during the fourth inning Friday against the cincinnati Reds in pittsburgh.
TheAssociated Press
PITTSBURGH Joey Votto homered
off Kyle Farnsworth in the 10th inning and
the Cincinnati Reds edged Pittsburgh 6-5
Friday night to pull even with the Pirates
for the top wild-card spot in the National
League.
Cincinnati pushed across three unearned
runs in the ninth off Pittsburgh closer Mark
Melancon to tie it and Votto won it an
inning later when his y to left eld reached
the rst row of seats for his 24th homer of
the season.
JJ Hoover (5-5) earned the win for the
Reds, who have won four straight. Aroldis
Chapman worked the 10th for his 38th save.
Farnsworth (1-1) retiredBrandonPhillips
to start the 10th but left elder Starling
Marte couldnt quite grab Vottos shot down
the line and the Reds started a pivotal three-
game series with a stunning victory.
mets 6, phillies 4
PHILADELPHIA David Wright
homered in his return to the Mets lineup,
Daniel Murphy had three hits and Daisuke
Matsuzaka earned his second straight victo-
ry in New Yorks win over the Philadelphia
Phillies.
Eric Young Jr. singled, doubled and drove
in a run for the Mets, who have won four
of seven.
Darin Ruf doubled and drove in a pair of
runs for Philadelphia, which has lost four of
seven.
LaTroy Hawkins pitched a scoreless
ninth for his 11th save in 14 opportunities.
Hawkins got some help when a retreating
Juan Lagares made a leaping, one-handed
catch in front of the wall in center to rob Ruf
of extra bases leading off the frame.
The Mets jumped on Cole Hamels (8-14)
for three runs in the rst.
Matsuzaka (2-3) pitched six innings,
allowing four runs on four hits with six
strikeouts and three walks.
Braves 9, cubs 5
CHICAGO Chris Johnson went 3 for
4 with a home run, and the Atlanta Braves
beat the Chicago Cubs to reduce their magic
number to clinch the NL East to one.
The Braves broke open a tie game in the
top of the ninth inning with four runs all
with two outs.
Brian McCann and Johnson each had an
RBI single, and Andrelton Simmons fol-
lowed with a two-run double.
Nationals 8, marlins 0
WASHINGTON Jordan Zimmermann
pitched a two-hitter and picked up his
NL-leading 19th win Friday night, leading
the barely-still-alive Washington Nationals
to a victory over the Miami Marlins.
Zimmermann (19-8) took a no-hitter into
the sixth inning, struck out nine and faced
only three batters above the minimum. He
passed the 200-inning mark for the sea-
son and lowered his ERA to 3.18 for the
Nationals, who have essentially hit must-
win mode in their late push for the playoffs.
They began the day trailing the Cincinnati
Reds by ve games with nine to play for the
NLs second wild card berth.
Zimmermann had a one-hitter this sea-
son, on April 26 in a 1-0 win over the Reds.
Vottos homer lifts Reds
to 6-5win over Pirates
RedSox lockupALEast crown
The Associated Press
BOSTON The Boston Red Sox
clinched the AL East title on Friday night,
getting seven strong innings from Jon
Lester to beat the Toronto Blue Jays 6-3
and eliminate Tampa Bay from the division
race.
One night after securingtheir rst playoff
appearance since 2009, the Red Sox added
their rst division title since 07. Boston
entered the night with a magic number of
one meaning the next Red Sox win or
Rays loss would clinch the division.
Lester (15-8) allowed one run on ve
hits and two walks, striking out eight to
win for the seventh time in nine decisions.
It was his 100th career victory.
Toronto pinch-hitter Adam Lind hit a
two-run homer off Junichi Tazawa in the
eighth to make it 5-3 before Koji Uehara
got ve outs for his 20th save. With the
crowd standing for most of the nal inning,
he struck out Brett Lawrie to end the game
and the Red Sox poured out of the dugout
and bullpen.
Dustin Pedroia had three hits for the Red
Sox, who have won 19 of their last 25.
Toronto starter Esmil Rogers (5-8) did
not make it out of the third inning, allowing
two runs on three hits and ve walks and
striking out two while getting only seven
outs.
tigers 12, White Sox 5
DETROIT Max Scherzer became
baseballs rst 20-game winner, pitching
through a rainy six innings to help Detroit
defeat Chicago. Scherzer (20-3) was mak-
ing his fth attempt to win No. 20. He had
two losses and two no-decisions in his pre-
vious four starts. Torii Hunter had four hits
for Detroit, and Victor Martinez homered.
Dylan Axelrod (4-10) allowed seven runs
in 2 2-3 innings.
The AL Central-leading Tigers lowered
their magic number to eliminate second-
place Cleveland to three.
indians 2, astros 1, 6 1-2 innings
CLEVELAND Zach McAllister last-
ed ve innings and the Cleveland Indians
got two gift runs from Houston in a 2-1,
rain-shortened victory over the Astros on
Friday night to remain near the top of the
AL wild-card standings.
The game was delayed for 1 hour, 9 min-
utes before the umpires decided to call it
after 6 1-2 innings.
The Indians, who entered the night trail-
ing both Tampa Bay and Texas by one-
half game for a wild-card spot, scored an
unearned run in the second and fourth
innings off Brett Oberholtzer (4-4).
McAllister (9-9) allowed just one run
and got a key double play in the fth. Bryan
Shaw went 1 1-3 innings for his rst save.
iNteRlegeague
Yankees 5, giants 1
NEW YORK Alex Rodriguez set a
major league record with his 24th career
grand slam, passing Lou Gehrig with a
tiebreaking shot in the seventh inning that
sent New York Yankees to victory over
San Francisco. Rodriguezs slam helped
CC Sabathia (14-13) beat Tim Lincecum
in a matchup of former Cy Young Award-
winners having subpar seasons.
More importantly for the Yankees, it led
them to their second win in seven games as
they cling to faint playoff hopes. New York
began the day 3games behind Tampa Bay
and Texas for the second ALwild card, with
three other teams in between.
Alfonso Soriano also homered and New
York opened its nal homestand of the sea-
son with a much-needed victory, hours after
pitcher Andy Pettitte announced his plans
to retire again following this season.
AP photo
tampa Bay Rays second baseman Ben Zobrist
(18) flips over Baltimore orioles adam Jones
after throwing to first base to complete a double
play on danny Valencia during the fifth inning
Friday in St. petersburg, Fla. the teams were in
the 11th inning tied at 4 at press time.
Yankees Pettitte to retire afer season
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Andy Pettitte had
no interest in a farewell tour or some
big pronouncement regarding his
(second) retirement. Anything more
than a conference call the day after
the season would only feel embarrass-
ing.
Because Ive done this before,
said a sheepish Pettitte, who briey
stepped away from baseball two years
ago. I feel awkward doing this right
now, to tell you the truth.
Still, the New York Yankees pitcher
was having a hard time telling people
he wasnt sure if he would be back
next season when he already knew
this was it. And he wanted to thank
fans for all their support, something
he wished he had a chance to do the
rst time.
So after discussing it with several
close friends including Mariano
Rivera over lunch in Toronto
Pettitte chose to formally announce
his decision at a Yankee Stadium
news conference Friday.
Im ready to be home again,
Pettitte said. But the biggest thing
is, Im just done.
In a statement released Friday after-
noon, hours before the Yankees began
their nal homestand, the 41-year-old
Pettitte said he has reached the point
where he knows he has left everything
he has on the eld.
The left-hander initially retired
after the 2010 season, but sat out
only one year before returning to the
Yankees.
This time, he means it.
The time is right. Ive exhausted
myself, mentally and physically, and
thats exactly how I want to leave this
game, he said.
PAGE 6B Saturday, September 21, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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But the end result de-
nitely knocked them
down a peg.
Youve got to hate los-
ing more than you want to
win, Carson said. And
that loss was humbling to
us. I dont think anyone
wants to feel that again.
Fortunately for the
Lions, they go from facing
an NFL hopeful at quar-
terback in UCFs Blake
Bortles to a raw redshirt
freshman in Kent States
Colin Reardon. The
Flashes are also likely to
be without All-American
Dri Archer, who has bat-
tled an ankle injury since
the opener.
Reardon has four
touchdowns and no inter-
ceptions through three
games, but the Flashes
have largely played it safe
with the young signal-
caller, sticking mostly to
short passes.
Teams have done that a
lot against the Lions in the
early going, getting rid of
the ball quickly to try and
neutralize top pass-rusher
Deion Barnes.
Its worked. Barnes
has been held without a
sack or a tackle for loss
through the rst three
games.
I think you have to
look at the lm closely
on that, because I think
hes playing with great
effort, Penn State coach
Bill OBrien said. Hes an
excellent player. I believe
people are running away
from him and I think that
people are giving the
tackles help in protection
with him. I would, too.
Weve got to do things
to move him around and
help him out a little bit.
We will and we have. But
Deion, to me, is playing
well. Im glad hes on our
team, I can tell you that.
Finding ways to spark
the pass rush would go
a long way to getting the
defense back on track.
The Lions didnt man-
age any sacks against the
Knights, and Penn State
had trouble getting off the
eld on third downs as a
result.
Third downs remain a
concern for the offense
as well. Penn State con-
verted two third downs
against UCF, doubling
their season total. The
Lions moved up one spot
in the national rankings in
the category, now sitting
122nd out of 123 teams.
OBrien acknowledged
that its a problem, but
the Lions boss hasnt
been too concerned about
it because hes more inter-
ested in the nal result
the offense is averaging
33 points per game.
More than anything,
OBrien is pleased with
his teams attitude.
What Ive learned from
these kids is that theyre
resilient, OBrien said.
They come into the
ofce on Sunday on their
own. Thats their day off.
Theyre watching lm,
getting treatment, and are
ready to go on Monday.
Those are good things.
You can really see where
you need to improve.
Hopefully thats what we
do. Hopefully we learn
from it and we move on
and we do the best we can
to get a win this week.
PSU
From page 1B
JOE SOPRANO
jsoprano@timesleader.com
Tunkhannocks David
Novak will be able to don
the Stars-and-Stripes jer-
sey of a national champion
for the next year.
Novak, a junior at
Lindsey Wilson
College in
Kentucky, used a
late surge to win
the individual
pursuit race at
USA Cyclings
C o l l e g i a t e
Track National
Cha mpi ons hi ps ,
according to USA
Cyclings Twitter
feed.
Novak won in a
time of 4 minutes,
43 minutes, three
seconds faster than
second-place n-
isher Zack Noonan of Fort
Lewis College.
And Novak of @
LWCCycling takes the
title in the last heat with
incredible last few laps!
Noonan slots into 2nd,
USA Cycling tweeted.
Novak captures national title
Novak
ROB MAADDI
AP Pro Football Writer
P H I L A D E L P H I A
Whether hes in the
pocket or on the move,
Michael Vick keeps tak-
ing hits.
Vick limped off the
eld after injuring his
ankles on his nal play in
the Philadelphia Eagles
26-16 loss to Kansas City
Thursday night, but he
wouldve returned if the
game hadnt ended.
He may not be so lucky
next time.
Vick has taken plenty
of shots in the rst three
games, an ominous sign
for a quarterback who has
missed 13 games because
of injuries over the past
three years.
The combination of
pressure from the defense
and his poor decisions
resulted in a mistake-
lled performance for
Vick against the Chiefs.
Vick was 13 of 30 for
201 yards, one touch-
down and threw his first
two interceptions of the
season, including a pick
that was returned for a
score. He was coming off a
career-best 428-yard pass-
ing day against San Diego
and had a 119 passer rat-
ing through two weeks.
I thought Mike played
OK, coach Chip Kelly
said Friday. He has
played better. But its
always a combination
unfortunately. Its a team
game. Its not always on
one guy. We got a couple
balls tipped. (Linemen
have) got to get some
guys hands down. Weve
got to be able to stand
in the pocket at times
when weve got a situa-
tion where we got to be
able to get to the top of
our drop and not give
up so much pressure.
There are times for
Mike when the ball has to
get out a little bit quicker
in certain situations.
Vick ran for 95 yards
against the Chiefs, includ-
ing a career-long 61-yard
scramble that set up his
scoring pass. But he
misred repeatedly, was
sacked ve times and hur-
ried too often to count.
The Eagles (1-2) have
lost two in a row after
an impressive win at
Washington in their
opener. Next up is a trip
to Denver to face Peyton
Manning and Co.
We gave up too much
pressure, Kelly said. A
lot of times theyre just
rushing four and theyre
getting to the quarter-
back extremely quickly.
You know, were not even
getting to the top of our
drop and were getting
too much pressure on
them. We cant put Mike
Hits keep on coming
for QBVick, Eagles
The Times Leader staf
TUNKHANNOCK
Taking a 2-1 lead fol-
lowing singles action,
Hanover Area earned
a split in doubles to
earn the close win and
defeat Tunkhannock
3-2 in Wyoming Valley
Conference girls tennis
Friday.
Hawkeyes victo-
ries included Emily
Rinehimer and Elise
House in singles, while
Laren Richmond and
Marissa Kremenic won
in doubles.
The Tigers was led
by wins from Haley
Puterbaugh in singles
and Ellie Kuzma and
Jamie Smith in doubles.
Hazleton Area 3,
Wyoming Area 2
Alexa Austin and
Hifza Saeed each took
a win in singles, while
the team of Dasiy Cabral
and Bookre Malore took
the win in doubles to
earn Hazleton Area the
close win.
Wyoming Area was led
by a singles win from
Kiersten Grillo, and a
doubles win from Julia
Banas and Lauren Perry.
Wyoming Seminary
5, Hanover Area 0
The Blue Knights went
undefeated in both sin-
gles and doubles match-
es to earn the shutout
win on Thursday.
HIGH SCHOOL
BOYS SOCCER
Pittston Area 3,
Wyoming Area 0
After a scoreless first
half, Jordan Consagra
scored two goals and had
one assist as the Patriots
earned the shutout win.
Colin Tracey contrib-
uted a goal in the win.
Wyoming Valley
West 1, Coughlin 0
Eddie Thomas scored
the games only goal to
give the Spartans the
win.
Nick Singer contrib-
uted with an assist.
Tunkhannock 10,
Nanticoke 2
The Tigers took a 6-0
lead at halftime and also
outscored the Trojans
4-2 in the second half to
win the game.
Matt Dymond scored
two goals in the win.
Wyoming Seminary
7, Berwick 2
Andriy Molchanov
and Andrew Drewchin
scored two goals each to
help Wyoming Seminary
earn the victory.
Joshua Maron had one
goal and one assist for
Berwick.
Meyers 2, GAR 2,
2OT
Meyers and GAR
scored one goal apiece
in the first and second
half, but went scoreless
for two overtime periods
to end the game in a tie.
HIGH SCHOOL
GIRLS SOCCER
Coughlin 5, Hanover
Area 2
Emma Sukowaski
scored three goals and
had one assist to lead
the Crusaders to the
win.
Mary Tona contribut-
ed with two goals.
Hanover Area scores
came from Adessa
Donovan and Larissa
Bannon.
Pittston Area 8,
Wyoming Area 1
Allie Barber had three
goals and one assist in
the Patriots win.
The Warriors had one
goal from Alee Petit.
Lake-Lehman 5,
Hazleton Area 1
The Black Knights
were led by four goals
from Shoshana Mahoney
to earn the win over the
Cougars.
Madison Palumbo
scored the only goal for
Hazleton Area.
HIGH SCHOOL
GOLF
Wyoming Area 185,
MMI Prep 206
Courtney Melvin shot
a 41 in the Warriors win.
Sam Harmon led the
Preppers effort with a
48.
Crestwood 160,
Hazleton Area 183
Billy Dombroski shot
a 36 and earned medal-
ist honors as Crestwood
picked up the win on
Thursday.
Geran Triano shot a
44 for Hazleton Area.
HIGH SCHOOL
GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Hazleton Area 3,
Wyoming Valley West 1
The Cougars won by
scores of 25-14, 20-25,
25-23, 25-4.
Gavyn Giza had 10 ser-
vice points for Wyoming
Valley West.
COLLEGE MENS
CROSS COUNTRY
Kings finishes 11th
Kings College placed
11th of 22 teams at
Notre Dame.
Senior Robert
Moulton placed 30th in
the field of 169 runners
with a time of 26:58 in
the five-mile race while
T.J. Ferguson was 67th
with a 28:31.1.
C O L L E G E
WOMENS CROSS
COUNTRY
Kings finished 22nd
Kings College placed
22nd out of 26 at Notre
Dame.
Freshman Mariss
Durako was 58th among
the 207 runners with
a 20:10.4 in the 5K
race while Alexandra
Evangelista was 130th
with a 21:59.5.
C O L L E G E
WOMENS TENNIS
Wilkes 8, Scranton 1
Wilkes earned a win
over visiting Scranton.
Ally Kristofco, Ashli
Livermore, Gabrielle
Dubruille, Ana English,
and Amanda Rossi all
scored straight set wins
in singles competition.
In doubles play,
Kristofco and Livermore,
Kendra Croker and
Taylor Hoffman and
English and Rossi all
were victorious.
HIGH SCHOOL
GIRLS TENNIS
Hanover Area 3,
Tunkhannock 2
SINGLES Emily
Rinehimer (HAN) d.
Jill Patton 6-0, 6-2; Elise
House (HAN) d. Brianna
Grey 3-6, 6-2, 7-5; Haley
Puterbaugh (TUNK) d.
Gabrielle Keating 6-3,
5-7, 7-5.
DOUBLES Laren
R i c h m o n d / M a r i s s a
Kremenic (HAN) d.
Kaitlyn Markovitz/
Miranda Donovan 5-7,
6-2, 6-2; Ellie Kuzma/
Jamie Smith (TUNK)
d. Shelby Penchza/Sara
Biller 6-2, 6-2.
Wyoming Area 3,
Hazleton Area 2
SINGLES Alexa
Austin (HAZ) d. Anna
Thomas, 6-4, 6-2;
Kiresten Grillo (WA) d.
Grazia Devita 6-4, 6-2;
Hifza Saeed (HAZ) d.
Julia Gober 7-5, 6-3.
DOUBLES Julia
Banas/Lauren Petty
(WA) d. Mira Wise/
Rachel Ferguson 6-1,
6-2; Daisy Cabral/
Brooke Malore (HAZ) d.
Maddie Ambruso/Sam
Williams 2-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Wyoming Seminary
5, Hanover Area 0
SINGLES Jacqui
Meuser (SEM) d. Emily
Rinehimer 6-3, 6-0;
Megan Obeid (SEM)
d. Elise House 6-0, 6-1;
Alex Cuddy (SEM) d.
Marissa Kremenic 6-1,
6-3.
DOUBLES
Megha Sarada/
Chloe Xing (SEM) d.
Lauren Richmond/
Gabby Keating 6-3,
6-3; Charlotte Lin/Vera
Ouang (SEM) d. Mayann
Chapin/Sara Biller 6-0,
6-3.
HIGH SCHOOL
BOYS SOCCER
Wyoming Seminary 7, Berwick 2
Berwick 11 2
Wyoming Seminary 4 3 7
First half 1. SEM Andiry MMolcha-
nov (Chris Kim), 10:00; 2. SEM Jonathan
Roberge, 13:00; 3. Molchanov, 17:00; 4.
BER Joshua Maron, 20:00; 5. SEM Andrew
Drewchin (Roberge), 28:00; Second half
6. Drewchin (Roberge), 57:00; 7. Andrew
Kim (Michael Kim), 64:00; 8. BER Jose
Umana (Maron), 74:00; 9. SEM Sujay Mur-
thy (Gabriel Pascal), 78:00.
Shots BER 3; SEM 25. Saves BER 4
(Morgan Broyan); SEM 1 (Will Kozar). Cor-
ner kicks BER 1; SEM 9.
Wyoming Valley West 1, Coughlin 0
Coughlin 0 0 0
Wyoming Valley West 0 1 0
First half No Scoring. Second half
1. WVW Edddie Thomas (Nick Singer),
77:00.
Shots COU 13; WVW 9. Saves COU
2 (Steve Johnson); WVW 7 (Derek Denman,
Mitch Evan). Corner kicks COU 7; WVW 6.
Meyers 2, GAR 2, 2OT
Meyers 1 1 0 0 2
GAR 1 1 00 2
First half 1. GAR Joharky Santos,
18:00; 2. MEY Gino Setta (Mauricio Cas-
tillo), 26:00; Second half 3. GAR Jeffrey
Vergara, 15:00; 4. MEY Jarek Hernandez,
39:00; Overtime No Scoring. Double
Overtime No Scoring.
Shots MEY 16; GAR 14. Saves MEY
12 (Tino Altavilla); GAR 14 (Adam Casey).
Corner kicks MEY 5; GAR 6.
Tunkhannock 10, Nanticoke 2
Nanticoke 02 2
Tunkhannock 6 4 10
First half 1. TUNK Patrick Cronin
(Pat Casey), 5:00; 2. TUNK Adam Billings
(Daniel Shurtleff), 6:00; 3. TUNK Brian
Ly (Patrick Cronin), 10:00; 4. TUNK Sean
Andres (Shurtleff), 22:00; 5. TUNK Aidan
Cronin (Billings), 24:00; 6. Shurtleff (Matt
Dymond), 33:00; Second half 7. Dymond
(Shurtleff), 47:00; 8. Dymond, 51:00; 9.
NAN Ed Lukowski (PK), 64:00; 10. NAN
Wiston Godoy (Mike Davis), 75:00; 11.
TUNK Damon Williams (Dakota Quirk),
77:00; 12. TUNK Avery Newhart (Quirk),
79:00;
Shots NAN 8; TUNK 29. Saves NAN
15 (Carmelo Piquinto); TUNK 5 (Zac Dan-
iels, Adam Billings). Corner kicks NAN 2;
TUNK 10.
Pittston Area 3, Wyoming Area 0
Pittston Area 0 3 0
Wyoming Area 0 0 0
First half No Scoring. Second half
1. PIT Jordan Consagra (PK), 47:00; 2. Con-
sagra, 59:00; 3. Colin Tracy (Consagra),
73:00.
Shots PIT 12; WA 10. Saves PIT 5
(Taylor Roberts); WA 4 (Aaron Carter). Cor-
ner kicks PIT 3; WA 3.
HIGH SCHOOL
GIRLS SOCCER
Coughlin 5 Hanover Area 2
Coughlin 3 2 5
Hanover Area 0 2 2
First half 1. COU Emma Sukowaski
(Hailee Dumont), 2:00; 2. Sukowaski (Me-
gan Lercara), 31:00; 3. COU Mary Tona
(Sukowaski), 34:00; Second half 4.
Sukowaski, 45:00; 5. Tona, 61:00; 6. HAN
Adessa Donovan, 72:00; 7. HAN Larissa
Bannon, 78:00.
Shots COU 8; HAN 12. Saves COU
6 (Paige Davis, Julia Miller); HAN 7 (Kim
Pericci). Corner kicks COU 3; HAN 8.
Lake-Lehman 5, Hazleton Area 1
Lake-Lehman 0 5 5
Hazleton Area 0 1 1
First half No Scoring. Second half
1. LL Shoshana Mahoney, 10:00; 2. LL Kai-
tlin Sutton (Mahoney), time unavailable; 3.
Mahoney, time anavailable; 4. HAZ Madison
Polumbo (Josie Zapotosky), 60:00; 5. Ma-
honey, time anavailable; 6. Mahoney, time
unavailable.
Shots LL 24; HAZ 10. Saves LL 5
(Julia Husky); HAZ 19 (Irlanda Olivares).
Corner kicks LL 5; HAZ 2.
Pittston Area 8, Wyoming Area 1
Wyoming Area 1 0 1
Pittston Area 5 3 8
First half 1. PA Allie Barber, 10:02;
2. WA Alee Petit, 17:51; 2. PA Barber (Sara
Ruby), 20:17; 3. PA Sam Mayers (Barber),
33:46; 4. PA Mia Barbieri, 36:48; 5. PA
Ruby (Barber), 37:51; Second Half 6. PA
Katelyn Pugliese (PK), 61:20; 7. PA Barber,
73:56; 8. PA Maddy Mimnaugh, 75:19
Shots WA 12; PA 25. Saves WA
12 (Caitlin Butchko); PA 7 (Minda Li-
eback). Corner kicks WA 2; PA 7.
HIGH SCHOOL GOLF
WyomingArea 185, MMI Prep 206
at Fox Hill, par 35
MMI (206) Sam Harmon 48, Devin
McCarrie 52, Emily Morrison 52, Charlie
Karchner 54.
WA (185) Courtney Melvin 41, Maddy
Wharton 47, Gavin Kross 48, Tony Saitta 49.
Crestwood 160, Hazleton Area 183
at Sugarloaf, par 36
CRE (160) Billy Dombroski 36, Seth
Korch 39, Joe Huron 42, Joey Grandinetti
43.
HAZ (183) Geran Triano 44, Josh Pro-
vost 45, Rich Gawel 47, Brad Everett 47.
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS
VOLLEYBALL
Hazleton Area 3, Wyoming Valley West 1
Wyoming Valley West14 25 23 4
Hazleton Area 25 20 25 25
WVW: Kayley Carey 6 service points, 2
aces, 3 kills; Gavyn Giza 10 service points,
2 aces, 4 kills.
Hanover Area earns close tennis win against Tunkhannock
this sometimes. We had
some good chances but
just had trouble nishing.
We still have a num-
ber of games left. Were
right back at it Monday
against Holy Redeemer.
Thats going to be a tough
game.
Coughlin, too, had
chances that on other
days might have ended
differently. The Crusaders
were called for three fouls
on their rst ve corners.
Wood had consecutive
shots early in overtime
turned away by Gagliardi.
Kyra Castano made a
great rush into the cirlcle
just to be the victim of a
nifty poke check by Sems
Molly Turner. Colleran
was stopped on a corner
play along the end line
after working a give-and-
go with Lukashewski.
The loss was the rst
for Sem (5-1) in WVC
play, while Coughlin (5-1)
is tied with Hazleton
Area atop the Class 3A
standings.
Coughlin 1, Wyoming Seminary 0, OT
Wyoming Seminary 0 0 0 0
Coughlin 0 0 1 1
Overtime 1. COU, Savannah Robinson (Brigid
Wood), 2:36.
Shots SEM8; COU13. Saves SEM10(Mack-
enzie Gagliardi); COU 4 (MKensie Lee). Penalty
corners SEM5; COU7.
Dallas 2,
Holy Redeemer 1, OT
The Mountaineers
came back to tie the
game in the second half
after being down 1-0 foll-
wing the first time and
would go on to win the
game in overtime.
Michelle Thompson
and Vanessa Parsons
scored both goals for
Dallas.
The Royals were led
by won goal from Jenn
Ringsdorf.
Dallas 2, Holy Rdeemer 1, OT
Holy Redeemer 1 0 0 1
Dallas 0 1 0 2
First half 1. HR Jenn Ringsdorf (Melanie
Kosakavitch), 11:10; Second half 2. DAL
Michelle Thompson, 17:19; Overtime 3.
DAL Vanessa Parsons, 8:52.
Shots HR 7; DAL 9. Saves HR 5 (Baily
Janowski); DAL 6 (Lily Amadio). Penalty
corners HR 2; DAL 7.
Coughlin
From page 1B
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 7B
SOUTH BEND, Ind.
Notre Dame is still missing
graduated linebacker Manti
Teo a quarter of the way
through this season.
Without the charismatic
leader who made those
around him better, the once
dominating Fighting Irish
defense is meandering even
with eight returning start-
ers. The defense has given
up one fewer point through
three games (71) than it
did through eight games
(72) last season.
he Irish defense, which
allowed only nine offensive
touchdowns all last regular
season, already has given
up eight this year.
Our guys were like hunt-
ing dogs last year. In other
words, when it was time
to go, we knew what to
expect, coach Brian Kelly
said.
Were not there yet, but
Im getting a better feel
for our football team each
and every week. Id like to
be there right now, but the
problem is our first four
weeks dont allow us time
to grow up.
While the 22nd-ranked
Irish (2-1) opened the
season against Temple
and then split games with
Michigan and Purdue, the
Spartans (3-0) opened the
season with wins against
Western Michigan, South
Florida and Youngstown
State. Michigan State
coach Mark Dantonio said
he expects to learn more
about his team today.
You are going to find out
how they handle adversity,
how they play away, look
for matchups here, how do
they play in crunch time
in a close game, which we
really havent had that yet,
he said.
The Spartans this season
have looked more like the
Irish of last season than
Notre Dame has, depend-
ing on the nations No.
1 defense to win games.
Defensive end Shilique
Calhoun has led the charge
with three touchdowns on
a pair of fumble recoveries
and an interception return
as the defense scored four
of the Spartans first six
touchdowns.
But Irish linebacker
Prince Shembo believes the
Irish defense is still capable
of playing like it did last
season.
Its just lack of execu-
tion. Weve just got to work
at our assignments and get
better at it, he said.
The Irish defensive line,
which has not been as
productive as last season,
could be further hampered
by an ankle sprain defen-
sive end Sheldon Day sus-
tained against Purdue.
Day practiced Thursday
after missing the first two
days of practice this week,
but Kelly said he will be a
game-time decision.
Kelly admits the Irish
are still searching for
their identity, but believes
quarterback Tommy Rees
showed leadership against
Purdue in the second half
that should help with that.
With three players sharing
the two inside lineback-
er spots and a first-time
starter at safety in Austin
Collinsworth, Kelly is look-
ing for people to help fill
the leadership void left by
the departures of Teo and
Zeke Motta.
Those are two positions
were still in flux a little bit
with, Kelly said.
Weve got leaders; we
just havent got that posi-
tion nailed down yet. I
think once we do, well have
the leadership we need.
Irish set for Sparty, but still seek an identity
Notre Dames defense
has failed to live up to last
seasons stellar unit.
TOM COYNE
Associated Press
Pitt plays
frst ACC
road game
DURHAM, N.C. Duke
wants to give Pittsburgh a
warm welcome to life on the
road in the Atlantic Coast
Conference.
The Panthers make their
first road trip in the ACC
today when they visit a Blue
Devils team looking to get
past a discouraging loss to
Georgia Tech.
Duke (2-1, 0-1) squandered
much of the momentum of its
first 2-0 start since 1998 with
its 24-point loss to the Yellow
Jackets.
It wasnt any individual or
any one thing. It doesnt
catch up with you until it
catches up with you, Duke
coach David Cutcliffe said.
Were putting a premium on
how well we execute on both
sides of the ball.
Neither team can afford to
fall to 0-2 in league play and
essentially have its Coastal
Division chances evaporate
just four weeks into the sea-
son.
Pitt (1-1, 0-1) bounced back
from its lopsided opening loss
to No. 8 Florida State by beat-
ing New Mexico 49-27. Now
comes the Panthers first test
away from Heinz Field.
You just embrace it and
they have to go play some-
where different, coach Paul
Chryst said. Its going to be
a new locker room. We have
to just jump in. Five things to
know about Pitts first visit to
Duke since 1976:
PITTS KIDS: Pitt seems
to be going all-in with some of
its freshmen. Freshmen scored
37 of its 49 points last week
against New Mexico, includ-
ing two touchdowns apiece
from WR Tyler Boyd and RB
James Conner.
CONNETTE CANNOT
STRESS: Brandon Connette
is making just his second start
as a full-time quarterback and
the Blue Devils insist he cant
allow himself to shoulder too
much of the burden for the
teams performance.
GEORGIA WHO?: Duke
is happy to forget all about
Georgia Tech and its pesky
triple option. The Blue Devils
defense seems eager to get
back to dealing with an oppo-
nent that plays a more com-
mon style like Pitt, a clas-
sic power-football team with a
bulky offensive line and a pair
of gifted receivers.
PITTS WRS: Pitt boasts
one of the top receiving tan-
dems in the ACC in Boyd and
Devin Street, and that means a
test for Duke CB Ross Cockrell
and a secondary that last week
allowed four touchdown pass-
es to run-first Georgia Tech.
HISTORY LESSON: These
two schools do have a few ties.
They met in the first game at
Wallace Wade Stadium on Oct.
5, 1929, prompting Cutcliffe
to quip that they played that
game and the stock market
crashed. In between his two
stints as Pitts coach, Johnny
Majors hired Cutcliffe as an
assistant at Tennessee. And
Duke assistants Kurt and Zac
Roper are the sons of former
Pitt assistant Bob Roper.
Blue Devils ready to make
Panthers visit rough.
JOEDY McCREARY
AP Sports Writer
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. It seems like a
perfect time to catch Alabama off-guard.
The top-ranked Crimson Tide sweated
out a winina much-hypedgame withNo. 10
Texas A&M. NowheavyunderdogColorado
State (1-2) comes to town Saturday night,
with No. 21 Mississippi awaiting for another
Southeastern Conference showdown.
Its going to be a big week for us to not
havealetdownweekafter abigwin, soweve
tocome out andhandle business, Tide quar-
terback AJ McCarron said.
Rams coach Jim McElwain knows
rsthand that scenario doesnt guarantee
Alabama (2-0) will try to sleepwalk through
the follow-up game even against a 39-1/2-
point underdog. In fact, he thinks its highly
unlikely.
Oneof thethings I knowfrombeingthere
is that there is no letdown, said McElwain,
who was the Tides offensive coordinator
from 2008-11. People could point out that
they just had that huge win over a nationally-
ranked team. One of the things that they do
as well as anybody in the country does is
that it doesnt matter who youre playing, its
about playing against yourself.
Its about howyou do every single day, in
every single snap to get better.
Besides, fewwins on such a big stage pro-
vided more defensive teaching points than
that one for Alabama. The Aggies 628 yards
was the most ever against a Tide defense.
Saban said games like that 49-42 shootout
take years off your life as a coach. They
arent much kinder to Saban-coached defen-
sive backs.
He said he gave some younger DBs a shot
at earning more playing time this week. A
unit vying to become the rst to lead the
nation in scoring defense three years run-
ning has a little extra motivation, too.
I think they have a lot of pride in their
performance and certainly are trying to get
better and play better, Saban said.
Its the Tides home opener after a neutral-
site romp over Virginia Tech, an open date
and a visit to Texas A&M.
Alabama has won 20 in a row over non-
conference opponents and outscored such
teams by an average of 27 points under
Saban, while going 27-3.
Five things to watch when Colorado State
plays No. 1 Alabama on Saturday:
ALABAMAS DEFENSE: The task gets
much easier for the Tide a week after giving
up all those yards to Johnny Manziel and
Texas A&M. Colorado State ranks 85th in
total offense, averaging 367.7 yards and 29.3
points per game.
INTIMIDATION FACTOR: Colorado
State has only faced one No. 1 team, the
2004 Southern California group led by stars
Matt Leinart, Reggie Bush and LenDale
White.
TIDE BACKUPS: If the game goes as
expected, this will be a chance for Alabama
to get some youngsters in the game, maybe
including freshman tailbacks Derrick Henry
and Altee Tenpenny and a few defensive
backs.
INJURIES: Cornerback Deion Belue and
receiver Kevin Norwood are questionable
while nursing injuries.
SUNSERIS SHOT: Safety Vinnie
Sunseri has returnedinterceptions for touch-
downs in each of Alabamas rst two games
andgot lotsof attentionforputtingamoveon
the HeismanTrophywinner Manziel against
the Aggies. Antonio Langham became the
only Tide defender to score non-offensive
touchdowns in three straight games in 1992,
and nobody has done it since.
Alabama aims to avoid letdown
JOHN ZENOR
AP Sports Writer
Huskies brace for angry Wolverine squad
RALPH D. RUSSO
AP College Football Writer
Connecticut and its fans
have been looking forward
to Michigan playing on their
home turf for several years.
Now that the 15th-ranked
Wolverines trip to Rentschler
Field is here, the Huskies
dont seem to be up for the
challenge.
UConn is trying to avoid
its rst 0-3 start since 2001
when it plays Michigan (3-0)
today. The Huskies rank
103rd in the nation in total
offense and have already lost
at home to Maryland and
Towson, an FCS school.
Then again the Wolverines
are coming off a close
call against lowly Akron.
Michigan needed a last-sec-
ondgoal linestandwin28-24.
Its just another pro-
gram, UConn defensive
back Ty-Meer Brown said. I
keep telling the guys, its just
another program. They have
that, but they dont have an
S on their chest.
The sloppy performance
against Akron led to a rare
practice in pads on Sunday
for Michigan. I was mad
Saturday and Im still mad
now, MichiganAll-American
tackle Taylor Lewan said this
week, but if this team does
what its supposed to do this
could be a good thing, if we
learn from it and prepare
hard and never let this hap-
pen again.
Huskies fans have been
grumpy lately, too.
UConn has had two
straight losing seasons under
Paul Pasqualoni and two
losses to start this season
already have athletic director
Warde Manuel, who played
defensive tackle for Michigan
in the last 1980s, answering
questions about the coachs
job security.
Five things to know about
Michigan-UConn:
EXPECTING EXTRA
GUESTS: Michigan is the
most notable team to play
at Rentschler Field, built in
2003 with the help of the
state of Connecticut in East
Hartford. To accommodate
what school ofcials expected
to be extra demand for tick-
ets, 2,300 temporary seats
were added, raising capacity
to about 42,000.
UCONN CANT RUN:
The Huskies rank 122nd out
of 123 full-edged FBS teams
in rushing at 59 yards per
game.
M I C H I G A N S
RUNNING GAME IS A
PROBLEM, TOO. The
numbers look OK, 195 yards
per game, but the Wolverines
havent gotten much from
tailback Fitzgerald Toussaint,
who is averaging 3.6 yards
per carry. Might Michigan
use blue chip freshman
Derrick Green more?
GARDNER GROWING
UP: As good as Devin
Gardner was as against Notre
Dame two weeks ago, he was
that bad last week against
Akron. The junior threw
three interceptions and lost
oneof his twofumbles. Coach
Brady Hoke said staying out
of third-and-long should help
his quarterback.
NO BACKSIES. The
deal for this home-and-home
(Michigan won 30-10 in
Ann Arbor in 2010) was put
together by the previous ADs
for each school.
Michigan athletic director
David Brandon tried to con-
vince Manuel to move the
game to MetLife Stadium in
New Jersey, home of the Jets
and Giants.
wwUConn wouldnt and
couldnt budge, and Brandon
said buying out the game for
$2 million was not the right
thing to do. Rentschler Field
has the smallest capacity
for a stadium that Michigan
has played in since the
Wolverines visited Boston
College in 1991.
AP photo
Alabamas C.J. Mosley (32) warms up prior to an NCAA college football game against Texas A&M, Saturday, Sept. 14.
IN BRIEF
TODAYS TOP 25 SCHEDULE
No. 1 Alabama vs. Colorado State, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State vs. Florida A&M, Noon
No. 5 Stanford vs. No. 23 Arizona State, 7 p.m.
No. 6 LSU vs. Auburn, 7:45 p.m.
No. 7 Louisville vs. Florida International, Noon
No. 8 Florida State vs. Bethune-Cookman, 6 p.m.
No. 9 Georgia vs. North Texas, 12:21 p.m.
No. 10Texas A&Mvs. SMU, 7 p.m.
No. 13 UCLAvs. NewMexico State, 10:30 p.m.
No. 15 Michigan at UConn, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Miami vs. Savannah State, 7 p.m.
No. 17 Washington vs. Idaho State, 3 p.m.
No. 18 Northwestern vs. Maine, 3:30 p.m.
No. 19 Florida vs. Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.
No. 20 Baylor vs. Louisiana-Monroe, 4 p.m.
No. 22 Notre Dame vs. Michigan State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 24 Wisconsin vs. Purdue, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Texas State vs. Texas Tech, 7 p.m.
Buckeyes nearly
at full strength
COLUMBUS, Ohio There is
almost no one except for maybe
a deluded fan somewhere who
believes Florida A&M has a remote
chance against fourth-ranked Ohio
State on Saturday.
With a Big Ten opener a week later
against rival Wisconsin, the Buckeyes
will use the Rattlers as a full-dress
scrimmage to iron out the nal wrin-
kles before embarking on the games
that really count.
Coach Urban Meyer expected his
players to be complacent this week,
and was prepared to have his assistants
jump down their throats to get them to
focus. But that wasnt necessary. The
Buckeyes have been efcient and busi-
nesslike all week.
The big news around Ohio State isnt
who the opponent is but rather wholl
be back on the eld: tailback Carlos
Hyde and quarterback Braxton Miller.
Badgers look to
run past Purdue
MADISON, Wis. Wisconsin is
ready to take off in the Big Ten.
Sophomore Melvin Gordon leads a
stable of running backs for the 24th-
ranked Badgers (2-1) in the conference
opener against Purdue (1-2) at Camp
Randall Stadium.
Gordons 159 yards rushing per game
trails only Rutgers Paul James among
Football Bowl Subdivision schools. He
ran for an 80-yard touchdown on his
signature sweep play during last weeks
crushing 32-30 loss at Arizona State.
Boilermakers coach Darrell Hazell
says his team will try to stop the
run and make the Badgers as one-
dimensional as possible. Hes also
hoping to build on the promising play
that emerged in Purdues 31-24 loss
last week to Notre Dame. Purdue is
trying to snap a seven-game skid to
Wisconsin dating back to 2004.
Call not so clear
against Wolfpack
GREENSBORO, N.C. The
Atlantic Coast Conferences coordi-
nator of ofcials says it isnt clear
whether a North Carolina State player
stepped out of bounds during a critical
play in a loss to No. 3 Clemson.
Doug Rhoads issued a statement
Friday, one day after Clemson beat the
Wolfpack 26-14.
Momentum swung on Bryan
Underwoods long sideline run for an
apparent touchdown. An ofcial blew
the play dead, ruling he stepped out at
the Clemson 47. That prompted pro-
longed booing from the crowd.
N.C. State fumbled three plays later
and Clemson followed with a touch-
down to go up 20-7.
Rhoads says his ofce viewed all
available angles numerous times
and says some images seem to show
Underwood didnt step out while
another indicated he did. Rhoads
says it cannot be resolved beyond all
doubt.
Foster says he
took money at UT
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Houston
Texans running back Arian Foster
says in an upcoming documentary
he accepted money his senior year at
Tennessee.
Honestly, I dont know if this will
throw us into an NCAA investiga-
tion, but my senior year I was getting
money on the side, Foster says in the
EPIX documentary. I really didnt
have any money. I had to either pay
the rent or buy some food. I remember
the feeling, like, Man, be careful, but
theres nothing wrong with it. Youre
not going to convince me that there is
something wrong with it.
Sports Illustrated rst reported
Fosters comments in the documen-
tary, Schooled: The Price of College
Sports.
BERNIE WILSON
AP Sports Writer
SANFRANCISCOThe
lightest windof the Americas
Cup led to one crazy day on
foggy San Francisco Bay.
When the boats came back
to shore Friday afternoon,
Jimmy Spithill and his Oracle
Team USA teammates were
smiling and slapping each
other on the back after keep-
ing the Americas Cup in
America for at least one more
day.
Dean Barker and his mates
on Emirates Team New
Zealand could only shake
their heads at how close
theyd come to wresting the
oldest trophy in international
sports from the American
powerhouse.
Spithill and Oracle Team
USA stayed alive for the sec-
ondstraight day, pullingaway
from the Kiwis to win the re-
sail of Race 13 by 1 minute,
24 seconds.
Oracles victory came an
hour after light, shifty wind
thwarted the Kiwis chances
to wrest the Auld Mug from
software billionaire Larry
Ellison.
The rst attempt at Race
13 was abandoned because of
a time limit withthe Kiwis far
ahead.
Team New Zealand, which
reached match point on
Wednesday, leads 8-3.
Oracle has won ve races
but was penalized two points
by an international jury in the
biggest cheating scandal in
the Cups 162-year history.
Oracle Team USA, owned
by Oracle Corp. boss Ellison,
has won four of the last six
races. It needs six more wins
to complete a miracle come-
back.
Earlier Friday, organizers
had to abandon or postpone
a race for the sixth time since
Saturday. The previous ve
were because of wind over
the safety limit. That was
imposed after British sailor
AndrewBart
Simpson was killed in the
capsize of Artemis Racings
catamaran during a training
run May 9.
Team New Zealand was
slogging along on the upwind
fourth leg when the 40-min-
ute limit was reached. The
Kiwis had a lead of a mile at
one point on the fourth leg.
It was a bizarre scene as
the high-performance cata-
marans limped between the
Golden Gate Bridge and
Alcatraz Island in only 9
knots of wind.
Previously, the cats had
hit speeds of 50 mph while
skimming across the tops of
the waves on hydrofoils, with
their hulls completely out of
the water.
PAGE 8B Saturday, September 21, 2013 SMALL COLLEGE www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Theres no question that
Misericordia is improving.
Just look at the numbers
from last years inaugural
season and compare themto
this years. The differences
are what seems like a million
times better than the 2012
season.
The Cougars have played
two of the toughest teams
they will face this season and
while both were losses, they
gave Gettysburg and No.
21-ranked Delaware Valley
ts.
Today at 1 p.m. when the
Cougars (0-2, 0-1 MAC)
take a bus ride on Route
118 to Williamsport to face
Lycoming in their rst road
game of the season, they will
face another test in looking
for that elusive rst victory
in school history.
The Warriors (1-1, 1-0)
are coming off a victory
against Wilkes a week after
scoring just two points in a
loss to Brockport. They had
the third-best total defense
in the country last season
and were 14th in scoring
defense. Lycomings defense
isnt that impressive yet in
2013, but has allowed just
three points in the rst half
in each of its rst two games.
Another glaring stat by
the Warriors run defense is
that just two times in the last
three seasons has an oppos-
ing running back gone over
100 yards. And both times it
was by the same Brockport
back.
Misericordia pres-
ents another challenge to
Warriors.
Quarterback Jeff Puckett
leads the MAC in rushing
yards with460andsixtouch-
downs in just two games
as the no-huddle, option
offense has been rolling. The
Cougars have also been rack-
ing up the plays and yardage.
In two games, they have
run 185 plays for 1,076
yards, an average of 5.8
yards per play, and 57 points.
In 2012 after the rst two
weeks, Misericordia posted
just 127 plays for 397 yards
and scored just seven points.
Now, its just a matter of
putting up those numbers
against one of the top defens-
es in the country.
Misericordia (0-2, 0-1
MAC) at Lycoming (1-1,
1-0)
When: 1 p.m. today
at David Person Field,
Williamsport
Last Week: The Cougars
are coming off a 42-17 loss
to Delaware Valley, while
Lycoming defeated Wilkes
34-18.
Last meeting:The only
matchup between the
schools was a 38-0 victory
for the Warriors at the end of
last season.
Misericordia player to
watch: Quarterback Jeff
Puckett, who leads the MAC
in rushing and scoring with
460 yards on the ground and
six TDs.
Lycoming player to
watch: Middle linebacker
Kabongo Bukasa, who is the
reigning MAC Defensive
Player of the Year, missed
the Warriors rst game of
the season. He returned last
week and registered ve
tackles in a win.
Cougars team leaders:
QB Jeff Puckett 460 rush-
ing yards, 6TDs, 119 pass-
ing yards, TD; RB Frank
Santarsiero 168 yards, 1
TD; WR Juwan Petties-
Jackson 5 rec., 32 yards; DB
Ben Camacho 19 tackles, 1
int.; LB Rob Hart, DT Ben
Muschlitz 1 sack.
Warriors team leaders:
RB Craig Needhammer 216
yards, TD; QB Tyler Jenny
449 yards, 3TD, 2int.; WR
Matt Atkinson 15 rec., 170
yards, 2TD; LBTyler Denike
18 tackles; DT Braden
Zeiner 2 sacks; DB Tanner
Troutman, Mike Ciotti, C.J.
Arhontakis 1 int.
Misericordia will win if:
Lycoming quarterback Tyler
Jenny is held in check by the
Cougars defense. Last week,
Jenny went 20 of 21 for 305
yards and three touchdowns
against Wilkes.
Lycoming will win if: It
canslowdownMisericordias
rushing offense, which is
averaging 478.5 yards per
game.
What to know: Last
week, Misericordia faced
25th-ranked Delaware Valley.
This afternoon they get a
crack at an unranked teamin
the d3football.com poll, but
was picked to win the MAC
in the leagues preseason
poll.
Cougars face another tough test in Lycoming
Fred Adams | For The Times Leader
Misericordia wide receiver Juwan Petties-Jackson pulls in a pass
along the sideline as Delaware Valleys defensive back Chris Vega
makes the stop during the first quarter of last Saturdays game.
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
An early-season bye
week can be good or
bad.
It can give a team
some rest after a physi-
cal game and could
give a team more time
to work on things that
didnt go as planned in
the opener.
Kings coach Jeff
Knarr is hoping the
week off after a close
loss to William Paterson
in Week 1 is just what
his team needed to get
going as the Monarchs
face Lebanon Valley this
afternoon at 1.
Whenever (the bye)
is, you make the most
of it and go from there,
Knarr said. The posi-
tive for us is they say
you make the most
improvement from game
one to game two, so
weve had some extra
practice time to make
that come true.
If getting better after
the first game occurs for
the Monarchs, they will
be looking at their first
victory.
Against William
Paterson, Kings did a
lot of things very well.
If not for a few mis-
takes, he team wouldve
earned a win two weeks
ago.
The offense was bal-
anced with 35 rushes
and 26 passes. The pass-
ing yards outnumbered
the yards on the ground
by more than 100, but
thats not too far from
the norm.
We did leave some
things on the field,
Knarr said. We
couldve handled protec-
tion a little better. Clean
up our technique. It was
good balance, but now
we have to be consistent
and not miss opportu-
nities when theyre out
there.
Defensively, the
Monarchs will be going
against a run-heavy
Lebanon Valley offense,
which uses the run to
open up the throwing
game.
The Dutchmen have
used four runners in
the backfield at times
and quarterback Brian
Murphy is also a threat
to take off instead of
throw.
We have to match
their physicality so
were off the ball and
the guys in the second-
ary cant get caught up
in stopping run, stop-
ping run, stopping run
and then boom theyre
behind us, Knarr
added.
Kings (0-1, 0-0) at
Lebanon Valley (1-1,
0-1)
When: 1 p.m. today at
Arnold Field, Annville
Last Week: The
Monarchs are com-
ing off a bye week. In
Week 1, they lost to
William Paterson 21-19.
Lebanon Valley fell to
Widener 35-28.
Last meeting: In
2012, the Dutchmen
won 34-19. Kings hasnt
beaten Lebanon Valley
since 2006 and hasnt
won in Annville since
2005.
Kings players to
watch: The Kings
defensive front was
outstanding against
William Paterson, allow-
ing just 54 rushing
yards and picking up
five sacks.
Lebanon Valley play-
ers to watch: Receivers
Jake Ziegler and Joey
Miller were lauded as
All-MAC last season as
honorable mention and
second-team, respec-
tively. This season
theyve combined for
16 receptions for 239
yards.
Monarchs team
leaders: RB Kyle
McGrath 94 yards, TD;
QB Tyler Hartranft
213 yards, TD; WR
Dan Kempa 5 rec, 105
yards; LB Nick Kaijala
10 tackles; LB Chad
Curtice 2 sacks; DL
Pete Santorelli 1 int.
Dutchmens team
leaders: RB Evan Fink
58 yards, TD; QB Brian
Murphy 350 yards, 3TD,
1int; WR Joey Miller 6
rec, 121 yards, TD; DB
Brian Kasper 20 tack-
les; DB Ryan Melley 1
int; LB Frank Gaffney 2
sacks.
Kings will win if:
Quarterback Tyler
Hartranft can pick apart
the Lebanon Valley sec-
ondary like Widener did
last week when it piled
up nearly 400 yards
through the air.
Lebanon Valley will
win if: The four run-
ning backs Evan
Fink, Matt Richmond,
Brendan Irving and
Austin Hartman get
through the Monarchs
front and into open
fields to break open big
runs.
What to know:
Lebanon Valley kicker
Sean Fakete is closing
in on 100 career extra
points. He currently
has 96. If he reaches the
century mark, he will be
the first in school his-
tory to do so.
Monarchs want
to maintain team
consistency
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
The worst loss in school history is
not talked about by Wilkes anymore.
That 90-0 embarrassment at the
hands of Widener was a year ago this
weekend. But all it is now for the team
is an afterthought when the teams
meet on Saturday at 1 p.m. at Schmidt
Stadium for the rst time since then.
To make sure his team isnt looking
back, Colonels coach Frank Sheptock
met with team leaders and captain
earlier in the week and told them that
if they think about that loss, its not
going to be good this time around.
Last years game has nothing to do
with this years game, Sheptock said.
Is it going to be in our kids minds?
Sure I think it is. I think itll be in
their kids minds too. I think thats
human nature. But for us, its been
very focused on these are the things
we need to get better at this week.
The Pride have revamped since
last year when they reached the
quarternals of the NCAA Division
III Tournament. Coach Isaac Collins
has taken a Division II job at Seton
Hill, while quarterback Chris Haupt
has graduated. Bobby Acosta, former
offensive coordinator at The College
of New Jersey, took over for Collins,
while freshman quarterback Seth
Klein is in Haupts old slot.
But Widener still has the speedy
receivers that ran all over the Colonels
a year ago and Acosta has implement-
ed an up-tempo offense. Anthony
Davis had 113 yards receiving last
year, while Jermaine Quattlebaum
also had two receptions. Those two
are now rst and third in the MAC
in receiving yards, while teammate
Adam Marcucci is fth.
Theres a ip side to every story.
And this time that it Wideners pass
defense, which is allowing an aver-
age of 400.5 yards per game and has
not registered an interception yet this
season.
Wilkes, which normally is a run-
heavy squad, is only averaging 127.5
passing yards per game, and just eight
of the teams receptions this season
have been to receivers.
Just looking at us statistically
wants me to get our passing game
going a lot more. We cant be one-
dimensional, Sheptock added. We
need the two phases to compliment
each other to have a chance.
Widener (1-1, 1-0 MAC) at Wilkes
(1-1, 0-1)
When: 1 p.m. Saturday at Schmidt
Stadium, Edwardsville
Last Week: In the MAC opener
for both teams, Widener defeated
Lebanon Valley 35-28, while the
Colonels dropped a 34-18 decision to
Lycoming.
Last meeting: It was a game
Wilkes does not want to remember, a
90-0 loss to the Pride last year.
Wilkes player to watch:
Quarterback Tyler Bernsten has just a
42.5 completion percentage this sea-
son with three interceptions and two
touchdowns. He will lead the offense
against a Widener defense that is
worst in the MAC in passing yards
allowed.
Widener player to watch:
Freshman quarterback Seth Klein
leads the MAC in passing with 581
yards and a completion percentage of
76.7.
Colonels team leaders: RB Pat
Inguilli 90 yards, 1TD; QB Tyler
Bernsten 101 rushing yards, 255
passing yards, 1 rushing TD; TE
Ryan Casey 101 yards, 1TD; DB D.J.
Shuttleworth, DB Omar Richardson 1
int; LB Tate Moore-Jacobs 27 tackles;
DL Rob Houseknecht 2 sacks
Prides team leaders: RB Terrant
Morrison 99 yards, 1TD; QB Seth
Klein 581 yards, 2 TD; WR Anthony
Davis 21 rec, 226 yards, 1TD; LB
Brandon Harper 21 tackles; DL
Stacey Sunnerville 2.5 sacks
Wilkes will win if: The pass-
ing game can take adavntage of a
weak Widener secondary, which has
allowed 801 yards through the air in
two games.
Widener will win if: The Wilkes
pass defense hasnt shown improve-
ment from a year ago. So far the
Colonels have been better. But playing
a potent offense will be a test.
What to know: Wilkes always plays
Widener tough at home. The Pride
havent won in Edwardsville since
2007 and even that game was decided
on a late score. In fact, in Sheptocks
tenure with the Colonels, which began
in 1996, hes lost just three times at
home to the Pride.
Colonels see Pride for frst time since debacle
ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writer
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
Miami Heat forward
Chris Andersen was the
victim of a wide-ranging
Internet hoax that result-
ed in a raid of his Denver-
area home last year, his
lawyer said Wednesday,
and prosecutors con-
rmed Andersen was
cleared of wrongdoing in
the extremely complex
case.
Lisa Pinto, spokeswom-
an for the 18th Judicial
District Attorneys Ofce,
told The Associated Press
that the ofce is review-
ing a 4,000-page report
before charging decisions
are made, but added that
based on the information
that we have been able to
obtain and analyze, we
are not pursuing charges
against Chris Andersen.
Andersens lawyer and
agent, Mark Bryant, said
his client was duped by
a woman in Canada who
sought a relationship and
gifts and who threatened
a female acquaintance of
Andersens in California
while impersonating the
tattoo-covered fan favor-
ite known as Birdman.
Bryant said neither
Andersen nor his acquain-
tance realized they
werent communicating
with each other online
or via cellphone texts but
rather were communicat-
ing with the woman in
Canada, who imperson-
ated one to the other.
The Canadian woman
initially contacted
Andersen through his
now-shuttered Facebook
prole, Bryant said.
Chris was a victim,
said Bryant, adding it was
his understanding that
the investigation uncov-
ered at least a dozen peo-
ple across several other
states who were duped
by the same woman whos
been charged in Canada.
Although she was
arrested in January, her
connection to Andersens
situation didnt become
clear until recently,
Bryant said.
Sgt. Line Karpish, a
spokeswoman with the
Royal Canadian Mounted
Police, said Douglas
County, Colo., authori-
ties requested assistance
on the case in May 2012,
and that investigation led
to the January arrest of
Shelly Lynn Chartier, 29,
of Easterville, Manitoba.
Chartier was charged
with possession and
transmission of child por-
nography, extortion and
utter threats, Karpish
said. Her next court
appearance is Oct. 22.
Birdman cleared
in Teo-like scandal
AP photo
Chris Andersen was the victim of a wide-ranging Internet hoax that
resulted in a raid of his Denver-area home last year, his lawyer said
Wednesday, and prosecutors confirmed Andersen was cleared of
wrongdoing in the extremely complex case.
AP photo
Fans cheer as Oracle Team USA approaches the finish line dur-
ing the re-sail of the 13th race of the Americas Cup sailing event
against Emirates Team New Zealand Friday, in San Francisco..
Oracle Team USA won the race.
Light wind, Oracle thwarts
Kiwis inAmericas Cup
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 9B
DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
LOUDON, N.H. Stripped of his Chase
spot, then his sponsorship, Martin Truex Jr. is
now in a hasty scramble to nd a ride.
He his little time to piece together a deal and
few options.
Theres not a whole lot out there, Truex said
Friday at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.
But if he can nd a funded ride out there,
owner Michael Waltrip is willing to let Truex
walk.
With NAPA out of the picture, Truex could
decide to bolt Michael Waltrip Racing as part
of the aftershock of the Richmond scandal
that saw him booted out of the Chase. NAPAs
multimillion-dollar sponsorship defection from
MWR at the end of the year is just the latest
fallout from the teams attempt to manipulate a
race to get Truex into NASCARs Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship.
NAPA is Truexs primary sponsor and in the
rst year of a three-year extension announced
last August. The deal ran through the 2015
season and is believed to be worth at least $15
million a year.
With only nine races left this season, Waltrip
asked Truex for more time to strike a deal for
2014 funding.
If he came to me tomorrow and said, I got
a deal to go do something, then obviously I
would not hold him back, Waltrip said. I owe
him a lot for his loyalty and his passion for our
team. I wouldnt hold him back from doing
something he wanted to do, but Id like him to
hang around so we can attract a sponsor and
keep him in our cars.
Truex, who qualied fth for Sundays race,
would like to stay at MWR.
He doesnt know if NAPA would follow him
to another team.
Id always hoped that Id be at Michael
Waltrip Racing for a long, long time, Waltrip
said. That really hasnt changed. But its a lot
more confusing at the moment.
MWR was also ned $300,000, general man-
ager Ty Norris was suspended indenitely and
all three crew chiefs for its drivers were placed
on probation for the rest of the year.
NASCAR penalties levied against teams for
working outside the rule book are as much a
part of the sport as checkered ags and 200
mph speeds.
A major sponsor defection, however, is the
type of stunning move that could scare teams
into playing it straight and eliminate late-race
shenanigans.
You see a team go through some decisions
that they went through and choices and you
want a team to get penalized for those types of
things, no matter what team it is, Chase driver
Jeff Gordon said. But you never want to see it
go to this level where they lose a sponsor.
Waltrip said at New Hampshire he was scared
about how the penalties could harm his organi-
zation and he apologized for his teams shady
actions.
We will race forward with respect and
appreciation for being able to be here, he said.
Well start to regain trust.
Waltrip tries to keepTruex after Richmond scandal
The Associated Press
ATLANTA Henrik
Stenson broke another club
Friday this time by accident.
And it didnt matter.
Playing with only 13 clubs in
the bag after his 4-wood broke
on the practice range, Stenson
made three birdies on the open-
ing four holes at East Lake to
quickly seize control and shot
4-under 66 to build a four-shot
lead over Adam Scott in the
Tour Championship.
For all his birdies, the best
move he made all week was
deciding to put the 4-wood in
his locker instead of carrying it
with him.
Stenson heard a funny sound
after hitting ve shots on
the range, showed it to Steve
Stricker and realized the face
caved in. A television viewer
who heard about the incident
called the PGA Tour to see if
the Swede had kept it in his
bag, and ofcials checked with
Stenson after his round.
If he had left it in the bag
without using it, Stenson would
have been assessed a four-shot
penalty the margin of his
lead. If he had used the club,
he would have been disquali-
ed. Stenson had no intention
of using it, though sending it to
his locker saved him.
He wasnt sure it was a viola-
tion to carry a non-conforming
club, nor did he know the penal-
ties.
You asked me how well I
knew the rules the other day. I
gave myself 7 out of 10, didnt
I? he said. I guess this was in
the other 30 percent then.
Good thing that we put it in the
locker before we teed off.
The way hes going, a bizarre
incident like that might be the
only thing that can stop him.
Stenson was at 10-under 130
going into the third round and
might be playing a course far
less rm. The forecast is for
rain most of day, and the start-
ing times have been moved
up to Saturday morning with
hopes of getting it in.
Tiger Woods is not in posi-
tion to halt the hottest player in
golf. Woods was headed toward
the best round of the day,
5-under through 13 holes, when
he made double bogey on the
14th, had a triple bogey on the
17th and wound up with a 71.
He was 14 shots behind. It
was the rst time since the 2011
PGA Championship that Woods
began a tournament with back-
to-back rounds over par.
I put everything I had into
that start and didnt have much
at the end, Woods said. Just
ran out of gas.
Scott sputtered at the start.
He was one shot behind
Stenson and quickly fell ve
shots behind with a couple of
poor tee shots. Scott played the
last 14 holes without a bogey
and wound up with a 69 that
put him at 6-under 134.
The Masters champion chose
to look at a different number
not four shots back, but only a
guy ahead of him.
Look, Henrik is playing
fantastic, so hes got this thing
under control at the moment.
But not for 36 holes, Scott
said. I think theres too many
good players here. Its not just
myself or someone at 5 under. If
it is softer tomorrow because of
rain, there could be a lot better
scores because its playing prob-
ably as tricky as it can at the
moment.
Jordan Spieth, the 20-year-
old rookie, had a 67 and was
ve shots behind. U.S. Open
champion Justin Rose, Dustin
Johnson and Billy Horschel
were another shot back.
Theres never a dull moment
with Stenson, who only last
week made news for all the
wrong reasons when he
smashed his driver on the nal
hole of the BMWChampionship
and tore up his locker at Conway
Farms.
Theyre not going to believe
me anyway after last week that
the 4-wood broke during natural
causes, he said.
His hope was to nd a new
head in a nearby pro shop,
though it was unlikely he
could test it in time with the
early start Saturday. Told that
Stenson only had 13 clubs in the
bag, Scott said, It didnt seem
to bother him.
Stenson could not recall
another time that he started
a round with fewer than the
maximum 14 clubs allowed.
Finishing a round with fewer
than 14? Thats different.
In general, I try to keep it
at 14, he said. Most rounds
I manage to nish with 14 as
well.
Stenson (No. 2) and Scott
(No. 3) are among the top ve
seeds in the FedEx Cup who
could take home the $10 mil-
lion bonus simply by winning
the Tour Championship. Woods
could still win the FedEx Cup
if both of them falter, which
is looking unlikely halfway
through the tournament.
Scott has even more at stake
a win might be enough for
him to win PGA Tour player of
the year.
Stenson really only needed
the 4-wood one time in the sec-
ond round his second shot
into the par-5 ninth.
e had to hammer a 3-iron
instead, coming up well short
of the green. He still got up-
and-down for birdie, so it didnt
matter.
e also used the 4-wood a cou-
ple of times on the back nine
Thursday, missing one of those
fairways.
Ultimately, what mattered
was his position.
They got more work to do
than I have, he said of his four-
shot lead.
It might seem like a large
lead, but four shots during two
rounds is not that much. We
know sometimes four shots
isnt enough on nine holes. So
Im pretty cool about that. Im
just going to go out and try to
do the best I can for the next
two days. And hopefully, thats
good enough.
Henrik Stenson builds 4-shot lead at East Lake
AP photo
Henrik Stenson hits from the tee on the 14th hole during the second round of play in the Tour Championship at East
Lake Golf Club in Atlanta on Friday.
GREG BEACHAM
AP Sports Writer
Jon Jones saw all the zeros
next to Floyd Mayweather
Jr.s name. He knows how
much money the worlds
best boxer made while dom-
inating his opponent last
weekend.
If Jones does some-
thing similar to Alexander
Gustafsson at UFC 165 in
Toronto this weekend, he
realizes the reward for being
arguably the worlds top
mixed martial artist is only
a fraction of Mayweathers
$40 million-plus payday.
And it doesnt bother
the UFC light heavyweight
champion at all.
Im grateful to make the
money I make, Jones said.
As a 26-year- old, I never
would have imagined being
in this position. And Im
also a person that doesnt
believe money is the key to
life or happiness.
Jones (18-1) is the UFCs
main attraction at Air
Canada Centre today when
he steps into the octagon
with Swedens Gustafsson
(15-1), the latest 205-pound-
er to take a shot at ending
Jones 2-year champion-
ship reign. If Jones wins,
hell break Tito Ortizs pro-
motion record with his sixth
successful title defense.
But MMAs probable
pound-for-pound champion
wont get anything near the
j aw- dropping reward given
to Mayweather for school-
ing Saul Alvarez. The finan-
cial disparities for the stars
of these related sports have
been topics of contention
for years.
But dont look for any
indignation from Jones, who
also has endorsement deals
with Nike and Gatorade.
The MMA champion and his
two NFL-star brothers grew
up on discounted school
lunches, and hes willing
to be patient with a young
sport he picked up just six
years ago.
Just being comfortable
makes me happy, he said.
I dont need those type of
paydays. Would it be nice?
It would be great to get paid
the way other pro athletes
get paid. I believe it will
come. Im just going to keep
doing my part. If some-
body is going to pay me over
a million dollars to fight, do
you think Im going to talk
trash about that? No way.
Im so happy. I think $40
million, thats like ridicu-
lous, in a good way.
UFC 165 also features
interim bantamweight
titlist Renan Barao, unbeat-
en in 30 straight fights
since his pro debut in 2005,
defending his belt against
former WEC champ Eddie
Wineland. Heavyweights
Brendan Schaub and Matt
Mitrione also meet.
Just like Canelo,
Gustafsson is the most logi-
cal challenger to a domi-
nant champion. He has won
six straight fights since his
only career loss in April
2010, and nobody doubts he
deserves the title shot given
to him by UFC President
Dana White.
Although Jones is a
heavy favorite to defeat
Gustafsson, the challenger
is among the few 205-pound
contenders who can match
Jones impressive frame.
At 6-foot-5, Gustafsson is
slightly taller than Jones,
although the champions
84-inch wingspan is a bit
broader.
Its not always about
reach, said Gustafsson,
who trains in Stockholm
and San Diego. Its about
footwork. Its being fast, in
and out. Stuff like that. Im
really making sure Ive real-
ly done my homework here,
and Im super motivated.
But Jones is confident he
can overcome any size simi-
larities with his combina-
tion of study and skill.
Im really excited to
prove that my size is just
a really small part of what
makes me, me, Jones said.
If my height was the rea-
son for my dominance, I
think half the NBA would
be top guys in the UFC.
Gustafsson, hes really noth-
ing like me.
What gets me motivated
is he hasnt had the life,
Jones added. He wants
to be the top dog. A lot of
the guys Ive fought before,
theyve been there and they
didnt appreciate it, and
they lost it. Alexander has
never been there, so theres
a fire that Im sure he has
that gets me fired up.
Jones accepts Gustafssons challenge at UFC 165
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON A person
familiar with the situation says
the Winter Classic is coming to
Washington in 2015.
The NHLs annual New Years
Day showcase will be played in the
nations capital for the first time.
The person Friday confirmed the
news to The Associated Press on
condition of anonymity because
Washington Capitals owner Ted
Leonsis is expected to make a for-
mal announcement Saturday.
Leonsis has lobbied to host
the game for several years. The
Capitals played in the 2011 game
as the visiting team against
Pittsburgh.
The D.C. area has several poten-
tial sites to host the game, includ-
ing Nationals Park, RFK Stadium
and FedEx Field.
Washington radio station 106.7
The Fan first reported Washington
was getting an outdoor game, and
The Washington Post reported that
it would be the Winter Classic.
AP source: Winter Classic is coming to DC in 2015
AP photo
Driver Martin Truex Jr., climbs into his car during practice for Sundays Sprint Cup race at New Hampshire Motor
Speedway on Friday in Loudon, N.H.
NEwMAN wiNS pOLE AT
NEwHAMpSHiRE
LOUDON, N.H. Ryan Newman turned a track
record lap of 136.497 mph to win the pole at
NewHampshire Motor Speedway and headline
a top 12 loaded with Chase drivers for Sundays
race.
Chase for the Sprint Cup championship drivers
flled 10 of the top 12 spots Friday. Kasey Kahne
was second, Jef Gordon third and Kurt Busch
was fourth for what will be the second Chase
race.
Joey Logano qualifed sixth, Kevin Harvick was
eighth, series points leader and last weeks
winner Matt Kenseth was ninth, and Greg Bife
starts 10th. Jimmie Johnson is 11th and Kyle
Busch 12th.
Martin Truex Jr. starts ffth the same week he
found out NAPAwas dumping sponsorship of
his Michael Waltrip Racing No. 56 car after the
race-fxing attempts at Richmond earlier this
month.
PAGE 10B Saturday, September 21, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
IN BRIEF
$3.52 $3.54 $3.92
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
LUZERNE Four months
after a Williamsport-based bank-
ing company purchased locally
owned Luzerne Bank, the com-
pany announced that long-time
Luzerne Bank President Robert
C. Snyder would be stepping
down. Hell be replaced Oct. 1
by Robert J. Glunk.
Glunk, 48, is currently the
senior vice president and chief
operatingofcerforJerseyShore
State Bank, which like Luzerne
Bank is under the umbrella of
Penns Woods Bancorp Inc. In
that capacity, Glunk supervised
the retail branch system, as
well as the computer, sales and
deposit operations for the orga-
nization.
The announcement of the
pending change was made in a
joint release sent out by Joseph
E. Kluger, chairman of the board
for Luzerne Bank, and Richard
A. Grafmyre, president and
chief executive ofcer of Penns
Woods Bancorp.
The members of the board of
directors are proud to welcome
Rob to Luzerne Bank, said
Kluger. He brings a wealth of
knowledge and years of valuable
experience in community bank-
ing to the position of president.
We are excited to have him on
board with Luzerne Bank.
Glunk is a graduate of
Lycoming College and the
ABA Stonier Graduate School
of Banking. He is the president
of the Jersey Shore Hospital
Foundation, a board mem-
ber and nance committee
member of the Jersey Shore
Hospital, treasurer of the Jersey
Shore Library and member of
the Williamsport Chamber of
Commerce Industrial Properties
Corp. While he lives in Jersey
Shore, Glunk is looking for a
home inLuzerne County, a bank
spokeswoman said.
Rob has earned his position
by demonstrating his leadership
skills, especially since being pro-
moted to senior vice president
at Jersey Shore State Bank, said
Grafmyre. Successfully man-
aging a variety of staff and line
functions in his 28-year
banking career, Rob has
always done what was in
the best interests of the
bank, its customers and
his colleagues.
Snyder, who will be
retiring from the posi-
tion of president and
chief executive ofcer
to make way for Glunk,
will become a special
advisor to the CEO
through the end of this
year. He joined Luzerne
Bank in 2004 as presi-
dent and CEO following
a career in banking in
State College. Snyder serves as
chairman of the board of The
Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber
of Commerce and as
a board member of
the United Way of
Wyoming Valley.
There are eight
Luzerne Bank branch
ofces in Luzerne and
Lackawanna counties.
The bank opened in
November 1907. In
May, the boards of the
two banking compa-
nies agreed to an acqui-
sition, which went into
effect June 1. Penns
Woods is the parent
company of Jersey
Shore State Bank,
which operates 13 branches in
Lycoming, Clinton, Centre and
Montour counties.
Newpresident named for Luzerne Bank
BREE FOWLER
APTechnology Writer
NEW YORK Sen. Al
Franken is asking Apple
for more clarity on priva-
cy and security concerns
he has with its use of fin-
gerprint recognition tech-
nology in the new iPhone
5S.
The iPhone 5S, which
went on sale Friday,
includes a fingerprint sen-
sor that lets users tap the
phones home button to
unlock their phone, rath-
er than enter a four- digit
passcode. But Franken
said that the fingerprint
system could be potential-
ly disastrous for users if
someone does eventually
hack it.
While a password can be
kept a secret and changed
if its hacked, he said, fin-
gerprints are permanent
and are left on everything
a person touches, making
them far from a secret.
Let me put it this way:
If hackers get a hold of
your thumbprint, they
could use it to identify
and impersonate you for
the rest of your life, the
Minnesota Democrat said
in a letter to Apple CEO
Tim Cook. Apple Inc. offi-
cials didnt immediately
return an email seeking
comment on Frankens
letter.But the Cupertino,
Calif., company has said
that this kind of technol-
ogy significantly boosts
security for users.
According to Apple, the
fingerprint data is stored
on the phone in a place
thats inaccessible to
other apps and to Apples
remote servers.
In addition, Apple says
its not possible to con-
vert a fingerprint from a
police file into something
the phone will recognize,
as the sensor reads a sub-
epidermal layer of the fin-
ger. Meanwhile, anyone
worried about fingerprint
scan has the option of
disabling the feature and
sticking with the pass-
code.
Senator frets over Apples fngerprint tech
AP photo
A woman stands in line outside the Apple Store in Miami Beach, Fla., on Friday, the first time Apple released two
iPhone models at once.
SARAH SKIDMORE
SELL
AP Business Writer
The stock market has
been heating up, driv-
ing demand for IPOs.
There have been 140
initial public offerings
of stock this year, up 46
percent from the same
time in 2012, according
to IPO tracking rm
Renaissance Capital.
Of the eight companies
that went public this
week, two cyberse-
curity software maker
FireEye and technology
advertising company
RocketFuel nearly
doubled in value Friday.
The pace does not
appear be slowing. Next
week, market watch-
ers expect as many as
13 companies to make
their debuts. If all of
them price, it will be
the most IPOs in the
U.S. in one week since
2007, when 14 hit the
market at once, accord-
ing to data provider
Dealogic.
With the stock mar-
ket hitting new highs,
investors want to take
chances they might not
otherwise take in a at
or down market, said
Scott Sweet, senior
managing partner at
IPO Boutique, which
researches and invests
in IPOs.
The Standard &
Poors 500 index, a
broad gauge of the stock
market, is up nearly 5
percent this month. If
that holds, it would be
the indexs best month-
ly performance since
January. Even with
Fridays decline, stocks
are near all-time highs
set earlier this week.
How many compa-
nies are going public
and how much money
theyre raising reect
investors condence
and taste for taking
risks. A rising stock
market can make inves-
tors feel more optimis-
tic about the general
business climate and
more eager to take a
chance. Companies can
grow quickly after an
IPO, adding jobs and
making investments
with the new cash that
can help buoy the econ-
omy.
The success of some
prominent IPOs in
recent years, such as
Michael Kors Holding
Ltd., has also helped
increase investors
appetite, said Josef
Schuster, an IPO ana-
lyst. Michael Kors stock
is worth almost four
times as much as its
$20 offering price in
December 2011.
And more are com-
ing. Social media com-
pany Twitter intends to
go public. Real estate
brokerage Re/Max
Holdings Inc. hopes to
raise as much as $210
million above the
$100 million projected
in August, when the
company led plans to
become public.
Appetite increases for IPOs
Poconowaterpark
tobreakground
Kalahari Resorts will break ground Oct.
1 for its waterpark, hotel and convention
center in Pocono Manor, about 45 miles
southeast of Wilkes-Barre. The rst phase
is slated to open in 2015.
The resort will include 457 guest rooms
and suites in addition to a 100,000- square-
foot indoor water park, a seasonal outdoor
water park and a 65,000-square-foot con-
vention center.
The Monroe County location will be
the companys rst on the East Coast.
Investor education
nowonFacebook
Investors of all ages and levels of experi-
ence have a newFacebook community to
help themlearn more about howto grow
and protect their money.
This Facebook community, PA
Investor Education, was developed by the
Pennsylvania Department of Banking and
Securities and can be accessed at www.
facebook.com/PAInvestorEducation.
The PAInvestor Education Facebook
page will feature information about the
departments investor education programs,
public events and publications, press
releases, links to investment news and
investor protection alerts as well as access
to online databases designed to help inves-
tors.
Leadershiptraining
oferedat Wilkes
The Family Business Forumat Wilkes
University will host The Feedback You
Truly Need: A360 Degree Look at Your
Leadership from5 to 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 23
in the Henry Student Center Ballroom.
MatthewSowcik, assistant profes-
sor in leadership studies and direc-
tor of leadership education in Wilkes
Universitys Department of Marketing,
Entrepreneurship and Leadership Studies
in the Sidhu School of Business and
Leadership, will conduct the program.
The leadership training programwill
provide participants with a leadership
assessment valued at $300. The assess-
ment will provide insight into leadership
strengths and areas for development, a
better understanding on howto give and
receive feedback, a complete understand-
ing of yourself and your repeat business
relationships, an approach to leadership
development and tools to address leader-
ship competencies and an opportunity to
develop action plans to address opportuni-
ties for leadership development.
The event is free but advance seating is
required. The deadline to register is Oct. 7.
To RSVPor for more information, please
contact Lanie Jordan at meliss.jordan@
wilkes.edu or call 570-408-4591.
Snyder
Glunk
IntPap 47.79 -.03 +20.0
JPMorgCh 52.80 +.05 +20.9
JacobsEng 59.06 -.67 +38.7
JohnJn 89.68 -.39 +27.9
JohnsnCtl 42.67 -.28 +39.1
Kellogg 60.57 -.51 +8.5
Keycorp 11.57 -.03 +37.4
KimbClk 96.20 -1.00 +13.9
KindME 80.03 -.25 +.3
Kroger 40.76 -.23 +56.6
Kulicke 11.52 -.12 -3.9
L Brands 59.99 -.41 +27.5
LancastrC 78.21 +.31 +13.0
LillyEli 53.93 +.07 +9.3
LincNat 42.25 +.04 +63.1
LockhdM 128.00 -2.39 +38.7
Loews 47.44 -.16 +16.4
LaPac 18.02 -.09 -6.7
MDU Res 27.48 -.29 +29.4
MarathnO 35.90 -.52 +17.1
MarIntA 43.17 -.41 +15.8
Masco 21.99 -.24 +32.6
McDrmInt 7.35 -.16 -33.3
McGrwH 65.68 +.26 +20.1
McKesson 131.27 -.74 +35.4
Merck 48.01 -.25 +17.3
MetLife 47.49 +.41 +44.2
Microsoft 32.79 -.85 +22.8
MorgStan 28.19 -.41 +47.4
NCR Corp 38.66 -.33 +51.7
NatFuGas 67.12 -.35 +32.4
NatGrid 60.38 -.37 +5.1
NY Times 11.66 +.12 +36.7
NewellRub 27.29 -.10 +22.5
NewmtM 28.07 -1.71 -39.6
NextEraEn 80.69 -2.01 +16.6
NiSource 30.38 -.17 +22.1
NikeB s 69.37 -.13 +34.4
NorflkSo 77.72 -.45 +25.7
NoestUt 41.19 -.51 +5.4
NorthropG 96.30 -1.75 +42.5
Nucor 50.37 +.17 +16.7
NustarEn 37.97 -.65 -10.6
NvMAd 12.52 ... -17.7
OGE Egy s 36.11 -.32 +28.3
OcciPet 91.56 -.55 +19.5
OfficeMax 11.28 -.08 +30.9
Olin 23.39 +.18 +8.3
ONEOK 53.12 -.81 +24.3
PG&E Cp 41.46 -.53 +3.2
PPG 166.28 -1.71 +22.9
PPL Corp 30.11 -.57 +5.2
PVR Ptrs 23.13 -.31 -11.0
PepBoy 12.05 +.20 +22.6
Pfizer 28.97 +.13 +15.5
PinWst 55.18 -.63 +8.2
PitnyBw 18.16 -.34 +70.7
Praxair 121.73 -1.05 +11.2
PSEG 33.25 -.65 +8.7
PulteGrp 17.12 -.45 -5.7
Questar 21.65 -.39 +9.6
RadioShk 4.01 -.18 +89.2
RLauren 167.33 -.98 +11.6
Raytheon 79.00 -1.69 +37.2
ReynAmer 49.96 -.13 +20.6
RockwlAut 107.40 -1.73 +27.9
Rowan 36.90 -.68 +18.0
RoyDShllB 69.10 -.77 -2.5
RoyDShllA 65.89 -.52 -4.4
Safeway 31.40 +.14 +73.6
Schlmbrg 87.44 -1.35 +26.2
Sherwin 180.11 -1.47 +17.1
SilvWhtn g 24.74 -1.67 -31.4
SiriusXM 3.94 -.03 +36.2
SonyCp 21.36 -.27 +90.7
SouthnCo 41.78 -.52 -2.4
SwstAirl 14.41 -.13 +40.7
SpectraEn 34.06 -.20 +24.4
Sysco 32.57 -.26 +3.8
TECO 16.71 -.16 -.3
Target 64.55 -.84 +9.1
TenetHlt rs 42.03 -.74 +29.4
Tenneco 49.78 -.31 +41.8
Tesoro 44.41 -1.17 +.8
Textron 28.47 -.53 +14.8
3M Co 120.01 -1.56 +29.3
TimeWarn 64.30 -.10 +34.4
Timken 62.88 -.71 +31.5
Titan Intl 15.09 -1.02 -30.5
UnilevNV 40.26 -.23 +5.1
UnionPac 159.55 -1.32 +26.9
UPS B 91.55 -.15 +24.2
USSteel 20.52 -.65 -14.0
UtdTech 109.58 -2.42 +33.6
VarianMed 76.10 +.51 +8.3
VectorGp 16.35 +.06 +15.4
ViacomB 83.14 -.06 +57.6
WestarEn 30.56 -.39 +6.8
Weyerhsr 28.81 -.46 +3.6
Whrlpl 148.05 -1.66 +45.5
WmsCos 36.63 -.21 +11.9
Wynn 155.22 +.66 +38.0
XcelEngy 27.75 -.08 +3.9
Xerox 10.14 -.10 +48.7
YumBrnds 72.09 -.64 +8.6
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 17.23 -.06 +23.2
GlblRskAllB m15.08 -.06 -1.7
American Cent
IncGroA m 33.25 -.27 +23.6
American Century
ValueInv 7.70 -.05 +22.2
American Funds
AMCAPA m 26.70 -.10 +25.8
BalA m 23.05 -.13 +14.4
BondA m 12.45 ... -2.3
CapIncBuA x 56.79 -.83 +10.5
CpWldGrIA x 42.90 -.44 +17.5
EurPacGrA m46.40 -.33 +12.6
FnInvA m 48.79 -.33 +20.6
GrthAmA m 42.31 -.20 +23.2
HiIncA m 11.31 ... +4.2
IncAmerA m 19.81 -.12 +12.5
InvCoAmA m 36.23 -.24 +21.6
MutualA m 33.36 -.29 +19.5
NewPerspA m36.93 -.22 +18.1
NwWrldA m 58.23 -.59 +6.9
SmCpWldA m48.90 -.23 +22.5
WAMutInvA x 37.50 -.52 +21.9
Baron
Asset b 61.47 -.27 +25.8
BlackRock
EqDivI 22.76 -.21 +15.3
GlobAlcA m 21.53 -.09 +9.8
GlobAlcC m 20.00 -.09 +9.2
GlobAlcI 21.64 -.09 +10.0
CGM
Focus 37.26 -.61 +27.2
Mutual 32.29 -.38 +13.6
Realty 30.83 -.45 +5.6
Columbia
AcornZ 36.79 -.18 +22.4
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 19.61 -.27 -2.5
EmMktValI 28.63 -.43 -2.7
USLgValI 28.70 -.21 +26.7
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.49 ... -5.9
HlthCareS d 35.12 -.13 +34.7
LAEqS d 30.53 -.58 -6.6
Davis
NYVentA m 39.63 -.19 +23.1
NYVentC m 37.99 -.19 +22.4
Dodge & Cox
Bal 92.07 -.24 +19.2
Income 13.55 +.01 -0.8
IntlStk 41.07 -.33 +18.6
Stock 153.35 -.61 +26.9
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 41.67 -.22 +20.8
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.58 -.01 +5.0
HiIncOppB m 4.59 ... +4.5
NatlMuniA m 9.15 +.02 -7.7
NatlMuniB m 9.15 +.02 -8.2
PAMuniA m 8.75 ... -2.2
FPA
Cres d 32.39 -.11 +15.6
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.45 -.01 +3.3
Bal 22.69 -.10 +13.3
BlChGrow 59.10 -.35 +27.5
Contra 94.15 -.34 +22.5
DivrIntl d 34.86 -.15 +16.4
ExpMulNat d 25.58 -.23 +16.9
Free2020 15.45 -.06 +8.7
Free2030 15.89 -.07 +11.9
GrowCo 120.05 -.81 +28.8
LatinAm d 40.03 -.75 -13.6
LowPriStk d 46.71 -.22 +24.2
Magellan 90.36 -.57 +23.9
Overseas d 37.97 -.11 +17.5
Puritan 21.82 -.09 +13.3
TotalBd 10.55 +.01 -1.7
Value 96.10 -.68 +25.9
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 35.23 -.35 +19.7
Fidelity Select
Gold d 21.87 -1.28 -40.9
Pharm d 18.80 -.02 +27.1
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 60.87 -.45 +21.7
500IdxInstl 60.87 -.45 +21.7
500IdxInv 60.86 -.45 +21.7
TotMktIdAg d 50.47 -.35 +22.8
First Eagle
GlbA m 53.93 -.36 +11.0
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.96 +.02 -4.7
Income C m 2.37 -.02 +9.0
IncomeA m 2.35 -.01 +9.5
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 33.80 -.15 +18.6
Euro Z 24.95 -.02 +18.2
Shares Z 26.90 -.13 +20.2
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 13.13 -.07 +0.8
GlBondAdv 13.09 -.07 +1.0
GrowthA m 23.67 -.11 +21.8
GMO
IntItVlIV 24.27 -.16 +16.8
Harbor
CapApInst 52.77 -.23 +24.1
IntlInstl 70.31 -.52 +13.2
INVESCO
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.72-.11+21.7
PacGrowB m 21.96 -.14 +8.3
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 62.32 +.16 +17.3
AT&T Inc 34.32 -.50 +1.8
AbtLab s 35.29 -.05 +12.6
AMD 3.83 -.12 +59.6
AlaskaAir 62.12 -.46 +44.2
Alcoa 8.29 -.15 -4.5
Allstate 52.00 -.62 +29.4
Altria 35.55 -.25 +13.1
AEP 43.73 -.94 +2.5
AmExp 77.32 -.25 +35.0
AmIntlGrp 49.95 +.09 +41.5
Amgen 116.85 -.33 +35.6
Anadarko 93.69 -1.11 +26.1
Annaly 11.93 -.32 -15.0
Apple Inc 467.41 -4.89 -12.2
AutoData 74.43 -.25 +30.7
AveryD 44.14 -.13 +26.4
Avnet 41.33 -.18 +35.0
Avon 21.42 -.14 +49.2
BP PLC 42.46 +.13 +2.0
BakrHu 49.84 -.39 +22.0
BallardPw 1.51 -.01+147.1
BarnesNob 13.20 -.26 -12.5
Baxter 71.58 -.62 +7.4
Beam Inc 65.74 -.65 +7.6
BerkH B 117.90 +.73 +31.4
BigLots 37.27 -.09 +31.0
BlockHR 27.11 -.76 +46.0
Boeing 116.63 -2.41 +54.8
BrMySq 46.78 -.75 +45.1
Brunswick 39.00 -.78 +34.1
Buckeye 66.10 -.82 +45.6
CBS B 56.08 -.49 +47.4
CMS Eng 26.59 -.23 +9.1
CSX 26.42 -.33 +33.9
CampSp 41.80 -.40 +19.8
Carnival 37.08 -.62 +.8
Caterpillar 84.75 -3.00 -5.4
CenterPnt 23.92 -.29 +24.3
CntryLink 32.28 -.43 -17.5
Chevron 124.92 -.52 +15.5
Cisco 24.51 -.11 +24.7
Citigroup 51.21 -.74 +29.4
Clorox 82.60 -1.48 +12.8
ColgPalm s 60.44 -.53 +15.6
ConAgra 31.00 +.20 +5.1
ConocoPhil 71.00 +.16 +22.4
ConEd 55.97 -.61 +.8
Corning 14.67 -.20 +16.2
CrownHold 43.53 -.51 +18.3
Cummins 134.57 -.68 +24.2
DTE 67.18 -.73 +11.9
Deere 83.82 -1.28 -3.0
Diebold 29.55 -.30 -3.5
Disney 65.01 -.71 +30.6
DomRescs 62.27 -.94 +20.2
Dover 90.65 -1.81 +38.0
DowChm 39.70 -.91 +22.8
DryShips 3.50 -.11+118.4
DuPont 59.42 -.91 +32.1
DukeEngy 67.36 -.57 +5.6
EMC Cp 26.43 -.51 +4.5
Eaton 70.57 -.22 +30.3
EdisonInt 46.02 -.15 +1.8
EmersonEl 64.92 -1.58 +22.6
EnbrdgEPt 29.72 -.56 +6.5
Energen 74.93 -.71 +66.2
Entergy 63.63 -1.39 -.2
EntPrPt 61.37 -.80 +22.5
Ericsson 13.81 -.32 +36.7
Exelon 30.13 -.71 +1.3
ExxonMbl 88.66 -.62 +2.4
FMC Corp 71.36 -.47 +21.9
Fastenal 50.16 -.82 +7.5
FedExCp 116.83 ... +27.4
Fifth&Pac 25.44 +.24+104.3
FirstEngy 36.66 -1.25 -12.2
Fonar 5.39 -.04 +24.5
FootLockr 32.97 -.40 +2.6
FordM 17.39 -.27 +34.3
Gannett 25.52 -.10 +41.7
Gap 41.55 -.53 +33.9
GenDynam 88.15 -1.50 +27.3
GenElec 24.01 -.45 +14.4
GenMills 48.66 -.17 +20.4
GileadSci s 63.86 -.46 +73.9
GlaxoSKln 50.53 +.26 +16.2
Hallibrtn 49.34 -.20 +42.2
HarleyD 64.27 -.23 +31.6
HarrisCorp 58.15 +.17 +18.8
HartfdFn 31.02 -.12 +38.2
HawaiiEl 24.99 -.34 -.6
HeclaM 3.29 -.21 -43.6
Heico 68.11 +.50 +52.2
Hess 78.63 -1.01 +48.5
HewlettP 21.22 -.09 +48.9
HomeDp 77.00 -1.51 +24.5
HonwllIntl 85.48 -1.31 +34.7
Hormel 43.80 -.15 +40.3
Humana 95.53 +.82 +39.2
INTL FCSt 20.10 +.13 +15.5
ITT Corp 35.94 -.05 +53.2
ITW 76.49 +.16 +25.8
IngerRd 65.50 +.09 +36.6
IBM 190.02 -3.37 -.8
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.40 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 108.57 -1.45 +29.2
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 39.88 -.73 +7.4
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 43.18 -.38 +11.5
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38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 37.24 +.18 +36.0
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 420.00 -2.79 +18.5
15.03 8.70 BkofAm BAC .04 14.44 -.17 +24.4
32.36 22.42 BkNYMel BK .60 30.85 -.23 +20.0
22.68 9.34 BonTon BONT .20 11.18 -.22 -8.1
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 58.53 -1.27 +21.1
84.68 46.50 Cigna CI .04 78.59 +.87 +47.0
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11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 9.01 +.41 +29.1
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 14.04 -.06 -2.5
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.18 -.13 -2.3
21.30 15.09 Genpact G ... 19.19 -.54 +23.8
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 8.58 +.14 +45.4
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 93.60 -.19 +29.6
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57.16 40.08 TJX TJX .58 56.60 -.12 +33.3
43.24 30.15 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 39.02 -.55 +19.3
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.12 47.78 -.73 +10.4
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 75.83 -.38 +11.1
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 49.26 -.28 +25.8
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USD per British Pound 1.6021 -.0013 -.08% 1.5118 1.6211
Canadian Dollar 1.0294 +.0031 +.30% 1.0251 .9766
USD per Euro 1.3520 -.0006 -.04% 1.2943 1.2967
Japanese Yen 99.38 +.06 +.06% 95.89 78.26
Mexican Peso 12.8630 +.1580 +1.23% 12.3733 12.8698
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CoreBondSelect11.61+.02 -2.1
John Hancock
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Oakmark
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Intl I 26.39 -.09 +26.1
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PIMCO
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Principal
SAMConGrB m16.50 -.09 +14.6
Prudential
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Schwab
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Scout
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Tweedy, Browne
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DOW
15,451.09
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NASDAQ
3,774.73
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S&P 500
1,709.91
-12.43
RUSSELL 2000
1,072.83
-2.44
6-MO T-BILLS
.05%
+.01
10-YR T-NOTE
2.74%
-.02
CRUDE OIL
$104.67
-1.72
q q p p q q q q
q q q q q q q q
NATURAL GAS
$3.69
-.03
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
at home
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SATuRDAy, SEpTEMbER 21, 2013
Ap photos
Jason Rodman installs a Collagewall display that he designed and photographed in a a bedroom in San Francisco. Previsualize your wall online, then order the paper
grid template, push pegs and photos from Collagewall.com. Family, vacation and personal-interest pictures are some of the themes you can use to create a photo-
graphic salon wall.
Salon walls tell your story
Those beautiful summer vaca-
tion photos are in a cardboard
box. Somewhere.
The souvenirs you picked up
on that overseas trip years ago
are jumbled in a drawer.
Your collection of (ll in the
blank) is in the kitchen cup-
board.
Why not showcase these per-
sonal treasures and create great
art at the same time?
One clever way to do it is to
mount shelves or frames on a
wall and ll them with whatever
pleases you. Decorators call it a
salon wall, and it has origins in
17th century Paris, when the
Royal Academy held exhibi-
tions, or salons, to showcase
student work. Their art would
be mounted in a closely knit
conguration.
A visually balanced arrange-
ment is what youre after, New
York interior designer Elaine
Grifn says.
Its the eclecticism photos
with found objects, for example
that makes it beautiful and
stylish, she says. Every ele-
ment should speak to you or tell
you a story.
To create a salon wall, plan
carefully. Lay out the arrange-
ment on the oor rst, then
transfer it from the oor to the
wall, piece by piece.
Start at the center of the
composition and work your
way outward, a little bit in each
direction, left, right, up, down,
Grifn says.
Spacing doesnt need to be
the same around all objects,
but it can look better when
its equal around an individual
KIM COOK
Associated press
Evoking old Paris, eclectic
displays can showcase a life
Housekeeping, drudgery? Not to us members of the
unofcial clean club.
You know if you belong: You enthusiastically discuss
your favorite cleaning tools, staying loyal to equip-
ment and techniques that have served you well over the
years. You understand the difference between a crevice
tool and an upholstery nozzle. Vacuuming? You see it
as an art.
But what if you dont love to clean? Well, chances
are you still need to suck it up. Here are some tips on
methods and machines to help make the chore of vacu-
uming less of a challenge:
VACUUMING HOW-TO
Kit Selzer, senior editor at Better Homes & Gardens
magazine, says you shouldnt begin cleaning by vacu-
uming.
Vacuum after youve dusted. Pick up every possible
thing from the oor, and move dining chairs and side
tables out of the way so you have as much open space
as possible, she says.
Professional house cleaners call this top-down
cleaning you start at the top of the room, so par-
ticulates settle. Tackle ceiling corners, window treat-
ments, furniture and nally the oors.
Selzer also suggests keeping the attachments crev-
ice tools and small brushes handy as you get started.
Theyre invaluable for getting dust, dirt and pet
hair while you already have the vacuum out. Use the
crevice tool in corners and along the baseboards, the
upholstery brush on anything made of fabric, and the
dusting brush on blinds, books and lampshades, she
advises.
How often should you vacuum? Frequently, especially
in high-trafc areas. It keeps dirt from getting ground
in and keeps carpet bers from getting matted. Selzer
says vacuuming once a week is good for the average
carpet.
Other tips:
Small rugs act like mini mops, gathering up a lot of
debris. Take them outdoors if possible for a good shake
before vacuuming. If you cant do that, vacuum the rug
thoroughly on both sides, roll it up and put it aside
until the oors been dealt with.
For big rugs, the Dalton, Ga.,-based Carpet and
Rug Institute recommends slow, overlapping motions
front to back. Start from the center of the rug and
move out to the edges to prevent fraying. Dont go over
the fne art
of vacuuming
Ap photo
Moneual USAs Rydis robot vacuum has several cleaning settings,
including an option to schedule a clean while you are away and a
room-indicator system to custom-design the vacuuming intensity
in different parts of the room under beds, on carpets, etc. Other
features include a detachable microfiber pad for hard surfaces
and twin brushes on the side to ensure dust is gathered efficiently
into the machine. It will return itself to the base, where it charges
rapidly.
KIM COOK
Associated press
BALTIMORE Home-
improvement shows are a
mixed blessing, says Kent
Drinker of Timberlake
Building & Renovations.
Drinker speaks from
experience. The Annapolis,
Md.-based project and cli-
ent relations manager had
his brush with television
when his company was
featured on a recent epi-
sode of HGTVs Bang for
Your Buck. Although he
hasnt seen a major effect
on his business after the
show aired in May, he says
the industry has denitely
been affected by images,
trends and projects seen on
home-improvement shows.
Its pretty common
for us to have homeown-
ers come with a big folder
lled with clippings of what
theyve seen on television
and in magazines. A lot
of the time they dont know
what they want. They just
see it, he said.
The showbiz sparkle
of these programs and
articles does not match
up with real life, accord-
ing to some home industry
experts. The time in which
projects can be completed
is misleading, they say,
and variables such as costs,
labor and materials also are
skewed.
Our take is that the
shows are great for provid-
ing ideas, Drinker said.
How practical those ideas
are is dependent on peo-
ples budget, the available
materials and time.
Drinkers company was
featured in Bang for Your
Buck, a show that pits
renovations of the same
room against each other to
see which adds the great-
est value to the home. The
company teamed with inte-
rior designer DreamHouse
Studios of Annapolis to
renovate the original great
room, kitchen, living room
and dining room of a 1929
cottage. After the reno-
vation was completed, a
group of experts deter-
mined that Timberlake
Building & Renovations
project provided the best
bang for your buck.
In real life, however, cus-
tomers wont see their proj-
ects unfold like a television
episode.
Sometimes they see
something, and they dont
know how much it costs
and how much is required
to install, Drinker said. It
makes the process of get-
ting from the concept to
the completion that much
longer. There are almost
too many choices out
there.
Since her work
appeared three years ago
on Extreme Makeover:
Home Edition creating
a house for the Boys Hope
Girls Hope organization
Joy Waida has seen a num-
ber of clients with lofty
expectations for home-
improvement projects.
What gets me is that
peoples expectations
are unrealistic, said
Waida, the owner of Joy
Home Design, Staging &
Interiors in Fallston, Md.
These shows will have a
team behind the scenes.
You go out to dinner, and
you come back and its
done. These projects dont
just happen in a day or
week. It is a collaborative
process. It doesnt happen
overnight.
Even with a large crew,
it was impossible to com-
plete the renovations asso-
ciated with the Baltimore
extreme makeover, which
at the time was the largest
project in the history of the
show, Waida said.
The home in Baltimore
was only 75 percent com-
pleted when the structure
was revealed on the show,
Waida said.
They only showed parts
of the house that were n-
ished. We had to nish the
rest of the house after they
(the show) left, she said.
Thats something the pub-
lic doesnt even know.
Home - i mprovement
shows also dont give an
accurate picture of the true
costs of projects, Waida
said.
Ive had that said do
the design on the dime
to me so many times, she
said, referring to Design
on a Dime, a series on
HGTV. Do they under-
stand that the people on
the reality show dont get
paid? Who is going to pay
the salary for those doing
the project? It costs more.
Its a misconception.
Do you believe everything you see on tV?
JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV
The baltimore Sun
Vintage plates are shown as wall art. NewYork designer David Kassels team has
sourced collections of vintage plates, exotic tortoise shells and vintage medicine
bottles that may be purchased from his ILevel studio (www.ILevel.biz) as the
basis for a salon wall.
See VACUUMING | 2C
See WALLS | 2C
READY TO GO
BUILDINGS & SITES
O
over one spot too many
times; make three or
four passes. Shaw Floors,
makers of carpet, wood,
tile and laminate ooring,
has advice on its website,
www.shawoors.com :
Use a rotating brush or
comb beater brush attach-
ment to agitate and loos-
en deep dirt. But thick
wool pile rugs, shags
and cabled weaves can
get fuzzy or tangled with
this brush, so stick to the
suction-only attachment
for them.
Change the direction
of your vacuum passes fre-
quently.
For bare oors, use
a good, soft brush to pro-
tect the oor. Brushes will
harden over time so need
to be replaced.
Replace your machine
when it no longer sucks
like it used to. But make
sure its not just suffering
from a clogged hose, lter
or intake. Resist the fun of
slurping up coins or small
objects, as they can jam
up the hose or, worse, the
motor.
Empty the canister
or vacuum bag when its a
half to three-quarters full;
dont wait until its stuffed.
By then, you havent been
sucking up anything, just
dispersing dirt by moving
the vacuum around.
Got pets? Use crev-
ice tools and upholstery
nozzles to remove hair
from tiny corners and
baseboards as well as fur-
niture. Vacuum throw pil-
lows, mattresses and cur-
tains weekly, to remove
pet dander and fur.
CHOOSE YOUR
WEAPON
There are two camps
when it comes to regular
vacuum models: uprights
and canisters.
Canister fans tout the
tote-ability of a light-
weight machine that can
be easily carried up stairs
and maneuvered from
room to room, and has
a wand that gets under
furniture. Upright lovers
prefer to push rather than
pull; these models tend to
glide easily across oors
and carpeting, and the dirt
receptacle generally has
a larger capacity than can
vacs.
Canister faves include
Eurekas Mighty Mite,
Mieles Olympus and
Delphi models, the Bissell
Zing and Panasonics
Opti Flow. Well-rated
uprights include the Shark
Navigator Elite, the Dyson
DC41 Animal, Hoover
Wind Tunnel, Miele Cat
& Dog and Bissell Clean
View.
Orecks line of uprights
and canisters are light-
weight and low-prole,
with long-lasting belts and
room-friendly bumpers
and wheels.
Electroluxs Precision
Brushroll Clean upright
has a switch that gathers
up tangled hair on the
brush and shoots it into
the dust compartment
great for families with
teenage daughters and
golden retrievers.
A lightweight, cordless
stick vac from Electrolux,
designed just for bare
oors, comes in color
accents that might appeal
to college-bound kids.
PAGE 2C Saturday, September 21, 2013 AT HOME www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
At long last, there is an
answer to why a readers
newly installed smart
meter reported normal
usage for one or two days,
then surged for the next
day or two following
no particular pattern.
Oddly enough, the
answer came to me the
week after I rst pub-
lished the readers inquiry,
but until the investigation
was completed, I didnt
know that it was correct.
We have since found
out that we had a leak
in our well, the reader
writes.
Who would have
thought that the well
pump running 24 hours a
day could almost double
our electric usage?
Because the website is
still not showing accurate
usage, the reader is wait-
ing for her next bill to see
the difference, but
Ive been told by a
Peco representa-
tive that usage has
gone from 45 to 48
kilowatt-hours per
day to under 30 per
day, and thats with
the air conditioner
running.
The correct
answer, by the way,
was submitted by
Charles Ulmann of
West Chester, Pa., who
was my sophomore-year
college roommate, and,
obviously, still as sharp as
a tack.

Q: My hardwood oor
seems to be warping on
opposite ends. I can see
it and feel it when I step
on it.
Because I was
going to have them
renished anyway,
I called for a couple
of estimates. The
rst contractor
said it was called
cupping, caused
by some type of
moisture. He said
it would come out
after renishing.
The second one
said it would go
away in a few months, and
renishing would have to
wait until then.
How can I nd out if
there is moisture under-
neath?
Answer: I think the
rst contractor is cor-
rect in his analysis of the
problem, but believe that
the source of the mois-
ture needs to be identi-
ed before you spend the
money to renish those
oors.
The second contractor
is, in a sense, also correct
if he is suggesting that the
common cause of cupping
high relative humidity
is the reason for the
problem.
Floors are cupped when
wood curls up and the
edges of the board are
higher than its center.
When I nd that lum-
ber Im using in a wood-
working project is slightly
cupped because it was not
dried completely, I run
it through my thickness
planer to see if I can solve
the problem.
Obviously, you cant
do that with a oor that
already has been installed
unless, as you renish it,
you sand the cupped por-
tions even with the rest,
which is what the rst
contractor is suggesting,
or so it seems.
Yet what caused the
cupping in the rst place?
I assume the contractor
believes that there might
have been a moisture
issue causing the cup-
ping, and that somehow
it has gone away, and all
he needs to do to correct
the problem is to sand it
evenly.
The second contrac-
tor, on the other hand,
believes the moisture
problem hasnt yet done
its worst, so he wants to
wait until it is no longer
an issue, and then sand
the oors evenly, eliminat-
ing the cupping.
It is very difcult for
someone not having seen
the situation rsthand
to reach a conclusion. If
the oors were installed
when the relative humid-
ity was low, they could
cup when it was high.
Unfortunately, they wont
uncup if the humid-
ity drops, so sanding the
oors evenly would be the
obvious x.
If the moisture causing
the cupping is, say, from
a leaking pipe or sweat-
ing ductwork in the base-
ment beneath the oor, no
amount of sanding will x
the problem permanently.
Have a plumber take a
look.
If the room gets damper
in warmer months but
is dry in colder months,
then youll have to look
into ways of getting a con-
sistent relative humidity
that wont cause warping.
Flooring manufacturers
recommend maintain-
ing indoor tempera-
tures between 55 and 75
degrees and indoor rela-
tive humidity between 35
percent and 50 percent
year round.
Youll need to gure
this out.
Questions? Email Alan J. Heavens
at aheavens@phillynews.com or
write to him at The Philadelphia
Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia,
PA 19101. Volume prohibits indi-
vidual replies.
Well pump, not smart meter, cause of higher bills
Alan J.
Heavens
Your Place
Q&A
Q: Ive had rain barrels for years and the water quality
has always been great, but for some reason, this year
both barrels are stagnant and smelly. The water is whit-
ish, cloudy and lmy. Is there anything I can or should
do about this?
A: Its hard to pinpoint the cause, but something
may have washed into the barrels from the roof or gut-
ters, said Katie Giacalone of the Clemson University
Restoration Institute and co-author of the guide
Rainwater Harvesting for Homeowners. Or water
could be backing up at the exit, she said.
Giacalone said it wouldnt hurt to put a capful or two
of chlorine bleach in the water, though she wouldnt rec-
ommend that if youre watering a vegetable garden or if
some of the water will go straight into a storm sewer.
She recommended cleaning the barrel with some
castile soap and water at the end of the season. Inspect
all the screening and pieces to make sure the barrel is
still protected from mosquitoes and the parts that are
attached with silicon will all stay in place with no leaks.
Because you told me your barrels are in the shade,
its unlikely you have a problem with algae. But its
worth mentioning an algae-prevention tip from Victoria
Mills, executive director of the Doan Brook Watershed
Partnership in Shaker Heights, Ohio. She said home-
owners whose barrels are in the sun can paint them
a dark color to block out the light and inhibit algae
growth.
On the shelf
Fiber arts take on a new level of creativity when you
dream up your own fabric designs.
Artist Cheryl Rezendes shows how in her book,
Fabric Surface Design.
Rezendes teaches a number of decorative techniques
for fabric painting, stamping, printing, marbling and
more. She offers guidance on fabric selection and on set-
ting up a work area, along with instructions and photos
of the methods she covers.
Proles of ber artists are sprinkled throughout the
book, along with photos of their work to give you inspi-
ration.
Fabric SurfaceDesign comes fromStoreyPublishing
and sells for $29.95 in paperback.
Whats new
Xtend+Climb telescoping ladders work like extension
ladders but collapse small enough to t into a car trunk.
The aluminum ladders come in home and pro series
that range in height from 8 to 15 feet. The ladders
can be adjusted to any height at 1-foot intervals.
A handle is integrated into the design to make the
collapsed ladder easy to carry, and thumb releases are
positioned to prevent pinching while the ladder is being
collapsed.
The ladders range from 16 to 36 pounds. Prices
range from $149.99 to $309.99 on http://xtendan-
dclimb.com. The ladders also are available on Amazon.
com and from many big-box retailers.
Mary Beth Breckenridge
Akron Beacon Journal
Xtend+Climb telescoping ladders work like extension ladders
but collapse small enough to fit into a car trunk.
MCT photo
IN BRIEF
element. Use a geometric
shape square, circle,
triangle or diamond
as a loose basis for your
arrangement.
Create an axis in the
center of the wall, a focal
point from which all the
elements radiate, Griffin
advises. Laying the idea
out on a template a
piece of art paper on
which you draw the
shapes will help con-
solidate the finished look.
Its nice if you have
the entire collection for
a wall ready to hang at
once, but you dont have
to you can install as
you collect, Griffin says.
David Kassel, a collage
artist in New York City,
creates salon walls for
designers such as Bunny
Williams, Jamie Drake
and Jeffrey Bilhuber.
Through his company,
ILevel, hell put up any-
thing a client gives him
but also offers his own
collections: exotic turtle
shells, vintage medicine
bottles, colorful plates,
even a framed set of
1940s Rorschach ink
blots.
For small objects you
can use shadow boxes.
Sconces are a wonderful
way to display bottles,
vases, rocks or any three-
dimensional objects. You
can choose from simple
contemporary wall wedg-
es or more traditional
options like carved, gold-
leaf sconces, Kassel
says.
If you want to turn
your wall into a photo
gallery, hanging the pic-
tures without frames cre-
ates a clean look that lets
the pictures pop, says
Jeff Southard, a spokes-
man for Collagewall.com,
which helps clients create
photo walls. Avoid hang-
ing several versions of
the same picture, he says;
instead, use a variety of
close-ups, action shots,
etc.
Given the choice
between a perfect bland
photo and a flawed, ener-
getic one, go for the lively
one, Southard says.
Dont be afraid to
exhibit your passion.
Cars, kids, architecture
even good food. When
guests come over, you
can talk about something
you love.
San Francisco photog-
rapher Jason Rodman,
for example, mounted a
series of black-and-white
images of the city on
his wall. In Seattle, Sara
Shraders pride in her
two baseball-loving sons
led her to take photos of
their various team caps
over the years. She cre-
ated a collage wall that
included pictures of the
boys in action.
A company like
Picturewall.com provides
templates for rectangular
and stairway displays,
and sends a kit that
includes wood frames
and acid-free mats. You
just drop in your photos.
From page 1C
Walls
From page 1C
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DALLAS: Grace
Community Church,
4122 Memorial Highway,
recently announced the
start of its AWANA pro-
gram for boys and girls
ages two to sixth grade.
The rst meeting will
be from 6-7:45 p.m. on
Oct. 2 and meetings will
be held until the end of
April.
The program teaches
children from an early
age about Jesus Christ
through activities such as
ag time, Bible lessons,
verses, games, prizes and
special theme nights.
To pre-register, or for
more information, call
675-3723 or visit www.
gracechurchdallas.org.
HARVEYS LAKE:
Huntsville Christian
Church is sponsoring
Lanterns of Hope, a
benet for the Hope
Center, from 4-9 p.m.
on Sept. 28 at the Beach
Club at Sandy Beach.
Lanterns will be available
for $5. There will also
be food and beverages,
a bake sale, the Hillside
Ice Cream truck, a basket
rafe and live music. For
more information call
Sherry at 362-4576.
LEHMAN TWP.:
Lehman-Idetown United
Methodist Women
will meet at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday at the church.
The speaker will be
Nancy Piteley, pastor at
Wesley Village. She will
discuss spirituality and
the elderly. All women of
the church are invited.
Hostesses are Jeanne
Barrall and Jayne Haefele.
PITTSTON: The
First Baptist Church,
Water Street, is holding
a youth revival Tuesday
to Thursday. The theme
will be What About the
Children? and will begin
each night at 6:30 p.m.
with praise and worship
followed by a nightly
message delivered by the
Rev. James H. Breese.
Although a youth revival,
everyone is invited to
attend. For more informa-
tion contact the church at
654-0283.
TRUCKSVILLE: Just
Us Girls, a free non-
denominational girls
group for rst- through
sixth-grade students, is
starting its fourth year
on Oct. 15 at Trucksville
United Methodist
Church.
Group activities
include crafts, discus-
sions, snacks, guest
speakers and more. Girls
learn about bullying, self
esteem and individual
and team building skills
that help prepare them
for middle school and
high school.
Meetings are held from
6:30-8 p.m. on the third
Tuesday of the month at
the William and Melba
Dickson Educational
Facility, 40 Knob Hill
Road.
For more information
call Carol Hadsall at 570-
690-7295.
WILKES-BARRE:
North Anthracite Council,
League of Ukrainian
Catholics, will meet on
Sept. 29 at SS. Peter and
Paul Ukrainian Greek
Catholic Church, 635 N.
River Street. Moleben
prayer service will take
place at 2:30 p.m. A busi-
ness session will be held
at 3 p.m. followed by a
reception and fellow-
ship. Main agenda items
include membership
renewal and the national
convention scheduled for
Oct. 4-6 in Cheektowaga,
Buffalo, N.Y.
All members are
reminded to renew their
annual membership. For
more information, contact
Dorothy Jamula, presi-
dent, at 822-5354.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER BIRTHDAYS/COMMUNITY NEWS Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 3C
Lily Catherine Smith, daughter of
Robert Smith and Molly Lavery-
Smith, is celebrating her ninth
birthday today, Sept. 21. Lily is a
granddaughter of Katie Lavery,
Wilkes-Barre; Helen Smith,
Trucksville; the late Owen Lavery;
and the late Clement Smith. She
has two brothers, Liam, 13, and
Ryan, 11.
Lily C. Smith
Addison Rose Davis, daughter
of Curt and Julie Davis, Hunlock
Creek, is celebrating her fourth
birthday today, Sept. 21. Addison
is a granddaughter of Richard
and Nola Davis, Hunlock Creek,
and Mark and Rita Vohar,
Shavertown.
Addison R. Davis
Savannah Lee Turoski, daughter
of Henry and Melissa Turoski,
Nanticoke, is celebrating her
second birthday today, Sept. 21.
Savannah is a granddaughter of
Sandy Beggs, Nanticoke; Robert
Beggs, Harveys Lake; Michaelene
Turoski, Nanticoke; and the late
Henry Turoski.
Savannah L. Turoski
Jackson Ryan Staples, son of
Jef and Lori Staples, Newtown,
celebrated his ffth birthday Sept
19. Jackson is a grandson of
Conrad and Sue Schintz, Plains
Township, and Patti Staples,
Blakely.
Jackson R. Staples
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
The women of St. Stephens Episcopal Church, 35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, are holding their
annual fall rummage sale from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday. Bag
day is Thursday. Lyn Conahan, president and honorary chairman, will be assisted by members of the
parish. The sale will offer mens, womens and childrens clothing, household items, small appliances,
furniture, linens, books, toys and more. A mini-boutique will have nearly new items and accessories
for women. A light lunch will be available. Rummage will be accepted until Monday. Some of the par-
ticipants, from left, first row, are Alice Killmer and Mary Pugh. Second row: Conahan; Jennie Vitale,
secretary; Jean Bohac, vice president; and Pat Jones.
Rummage sale planned
Gallagher receives
college scholarship
The Holy Family Confraternity of Christian Womens Scholarship
Committee recently selected James Gallagher to receive a mon-
etary gift for his college endeavors. He was selected for his
exceptional spiritual and community accomplishments such as,
Mass attendance, serving as an acolyte, mentoring others, serving
as youth member on the Pastoral Counsel, assisting the teachers
with the children in PSR, working at the parish annual bazaars and
dinners and for being active in many school activities. His ambition
reflects his spiritual enrichment of his faith and contribution to
Holy Family Parish and community. At the scholarship presenta-
tion, from left: Frances Romanowski, president, Confraternity of
Christian Women; Gallagher; and the Rev. Joseph Kakareka, pastor,
Holy Family Parish.
In BRIEF
See BRIEFS | 6C
The Bennett Presbyterian Church of Luzerne recently conducted its annual
Vacation Bible School. This years theme was Kingdom Rock. The children
sang songs, received Bible lessons, made crafts, watched videos, enjoyed
snacks and earned coins to spend at the church store. Visitors included the
Frog from Sweet Frog in Wilkes-Barre and Luzerne Officer Kotwasinski and
his police dog, Byron. The director of the event was Stella Falkowitz. She
was assisted by Michele Duris, Donna Bullock, Donna McLaughlin, Raeann
Hansell, Ann Marie Atherton, Jill Woodring, Candice McManus, Heather
Zaruta, Mary Ann Kingeter, Jordan McLaughlin, Ryan Zaruta, David Atherton
and Mary Iorio. With the Frog, from left, first row, are Mary Iorio, Emily Duris
and Julie Duris. Second row: Morgan Zaruta and Melissa Federici.
Bennett Presbyterian
Church holds VBS
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-generated.
Include your name and your
relationship to the child (parent,
grandparent or legal guard-
ians only, please), your childs
name, age and birthday, par-
ents, grandparents and great-
grandparents names and their
towns of residence, any siblings
and their ages. Dont forget to
include a daytime contact phone
number.
Please do not submit pre-
cious or original professional
pho tographs that require return
because such photos can
become damaged, or occasion-
ally lost, in the production
process. Email your birthday
announcement to people@
timesleader.com or send it to:
Times Leader Birthdays, 15
North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250.
You also may use the form
under the People tab on www.
timesleader.com.
Childrens
birthdays
published free
of charge
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PAGE 4C Saturday, September 21, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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PREMIUM 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30
HBO (5:45) <+++ The Day After Tomorrow (TV14) <Hitchcock (12, Dra) (TVPG) (:45) Newsroom (TVMA) :45 Boardwa.
HBO2 (:15) <+++ Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (11, Act) (TVPG) Vice Eastbound Eastbound <Snow White & the Hu...
MAX (5:35) <The Sitter (TVMA) <++ Mr. and Mrs. Smith (05, Act) Brad Pitt. (TVPG) (:10) Strike Back (TV14) <Pitch Perfect (TVPG)
MMAX (5:30) <Hide and Seek (:15) <Taken 2 (12, Act) Liam Neeson. (TV14) <+++ Entrapment (99, Cri) Sean Connery. (TV14)
SHOW (5:30) Dexter Ray Donovan (TVMA) LT: The Life & Times Boxing Showtime Championship (TVMA)
STARZ (:10) <+ Wreck-It Ralph (12, Ani) (TVPG) The White Queen (TVMA) White Queen (N) (TVMA) The White Queen (TVMA)
On paper, The Crazy
Ones looked less than
promising. David E.
Kelley, the shows creator,
has had an erratic record
and in recent years has
not appealed to my view-
ing taste. Robin Williams,
one of the stars, does not
seem the comedic titan
he once was. And another
star, Sarah Michelle Gellar,
is long removed from the
career high point of Buffy
the Vampire Slayer; her
most recent series, Ringer,
lasted just one season.
But The Crazy Ones
made me laugh, espe-
cially when Williams was
unleashed, improvising
madly in scenes. He is
especially good in tandem
with James Wolk; while
Wolk was impressive as the
mysterious Bob Benson on
Mad Men, that gave no
hint of the unfettered looni-
ness in some of his scenes
with Williams. Theres an
outtake from The Crazy
Ones premiere in which
the two nally force guest
star Kelly Clarkson to break
her stony expression, worn
down by their relentless
assault on her funny bone.
In the series, premiering
at 9:01 p.m. EDT Thursday
on CBS (with the premiere
ending at 9:31). Williams
is Simon Roberts, the bril-
liant head of an advertis-
ing agency but also
something of a head case.
Gellar is Simons daughter
Sydney, very buttoned up
and determined to keep
the agency aoat even as
Simon threatens to run it
aground. Wolk is part of the
agencys staff.
Based on the premiere,
the show will drop real
names in its pursuit of cli-
ents, for example wooing
McDonalds and trying to
get Clarkson to sing a jingle
in an ad. The glowing trib-
utes to the hamburger chain
will feel excessive, especial-
ly to someone who doesnt
consider the Big Mac a
culinary paragon. But we
are in a product-placement
age; I am mightily weary
of TV shows where char-
acters spend extra time in
a car just so we can admire
its dashboard features. It
would be nice to see the
crazy ones think a poten-
tial, real-life client has a bad
product.
Still, Williams is in ne
form, as is Wolk. Gellar has
never struck me as espe-
cially funny, and the Crazy
Ones premiere does not
change my mind; that said,
she does manage to carry
off her big scene in the
premiere. And Clarkson is
delightful. Well just have to
see if The Crazy Ones can
live up to its premiere.
Robin Williams returns to TV
in a Crazy but likable sitcom
RICH HELDENFELS
Akron Beacon Journal
AP photo
Remember him? Robin Williams is in rare modern form in the new
comedy The Crazy Ones.
NEW YORK Asked about the
upcoming season of The Walking
Dead, Danai Gurira goes silent.
When prompted again, she
breaks into laughter: Im thinking.
How Im going to answer without
saying anything?
The actress, who will mark her
second full season as the machete-
wielding fan favorite Michonne
when the AMC show returns Oct.
13, is still guring out how to
dodge questions about what will
happen so she doesnt reveal plot-
lines.
Gurira doesnt let on much about
the new season, although she says
many fans are asking whether
romance will bloom for Michonne
and Sheriff Rick Grimes (Andrew
Lincoln).
We know from the comic books
even that these two characters do
develop a connection. How exactly
that plays out I dont know
well have to all see, she says.
Gurira is also starring in Mother
of George. The lm is the story
of a woman from Nigerias Yoruba
tribe who moves to Brooklyn, N.Y.,
to marry her intended and the
hurdles she faces as part of the
traditional Yoruba New York com-
munity when she doesnt become
pregnant.
Gurira, who was born in Iowa to
Zimbabwean parents and grew up
in Zimbabwe, says she appreciates
being able to tell a story from the
African perspective.
I loved being able to explore such
a story, she says. That woman you
see on the streets of Brooklyn, on
the streets of Manhattan and walk-
ing in the same subway and wear-
ing her outts with pride and with
an ease and knowing she doesnt
look like anybody else in the car-
riage and not minding at all.
Danai Gurira reveals little
about theWalking Dead
LAURIE NEFF
The Associated Press
AP Photo
Danai Gurira as Michonne in a scene from the series The Walking Dead, returning for a fourth season on Oct. 13.
610 Nanticoke Street, Hanover Twp.
Phone 570-825-9720 Fax 570-825-1939
www.lucasfarms.org
LUCAS FARMS
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Phone 570-825-9720
Fax 570-825-1939
www.lucasfarms.org
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SCREEN 2
Monsters University G
Percy Jackson:
Sea of Monsters PG
80025476
SCREEN 1
Insidious: Chapter 2 PG-13
Youre Next R
MOVIES ONFRI., SAT., ANDSUN.
FLEAMARKET SUNDAYS 6AM-3PM
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* MOVIE STARTS AT 7:30PM*
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LAST MOVIE WEEKEND
OF THE SEASON
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Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Note**: Showtimes marked with a \\ indicate reserved seating.
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Battle of the Year (3D) (PG-13)
new movie 2:45PM 7:55PM
Battle of the Year (DiGital)
(PG-13) new movie 12:10PM
520PM 10:30 PM
Blue Jasmine (DiGital) (PG-13)
1:35PM 4:45PM 7:15PM 9:40PM
ConJurinG, the (DiGital) (r)
10:10
familY, the (DiGital) (r) 11:55AM
1:20PM 2:45PM 4:10PM 5:35PM
7:00PM 8:25PM 9:50PM
GetawaY, the (DiGital) (PG-13)
8:00PM 10:15PM
GranDmaster, the (DiGital)
(PG-13) 10:25PM
insiDious ChaPter 2 (DiGital)
(PG-13) 1:00PM 2:20PM 3:40PM
5:00PM 6:20PM 7:40PM 9:00PM
10:20PM
lee Daniels Butler, the
(DiGital) (PG-13) 12:30PM 3:30PM
7:05PM 10:05PM
mortal instruments (DiGital)
(PG-13) 12:25PM 3:45PM
6:45PM** 9:45PM***
one DireCtion: this is us -
eXtenDeD fan Cut (3D) (PG)
3:50PM 9:20PM
one DireCtion: this is us -
eXtenDeD fan Cut (DiGital) (PG)
1:15PM 6:50PM
Planes (3D) (PG) 2:30PM 7:10PM
Planes (DiGital) (PG) 12:10PM
4:50PM
Prisoners (DiGital) (r) new
movie
1:40PM 5:00PM 8:20PM
Prisoners (XD) (r) new movie
12:00PM 3:20PM 6:40PM 10:00PM
riDDiCk (DiGital) (r) 12:20PM
1:30PM 3:10PM 4:25PM 6:05PM
7:25PM 8:50PM 10:15PM
smurfs 2 (DiGital) (PG) 12:05PM
2:50PM 5:25PM
sPeCtaCular now, the
(DiGital) (r) 12:15PM 2:40PM
5:05PM 7:30PM 9:55PM
unfinisheD sonG (DiGital) (PG-
13) new movie 1:55PM 4:30PM
7:20PM
were the millers (DiGital) (r)
2:05PM 4:55PM 7:35PM 10:35PM
worlDs enD, the (DiGital) (r)
12:00PM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:45PM
10:35PM
Youre neXt (DiGital) (r)
12:40PM*, 3:50PM *
5:30PM*** 7:50PM***
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Wednesday 9/25
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Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
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**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
- 150 min - (12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
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World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Friday Sept. 20th through
Thursday Sept. 26th
Battle of the Year 2D PG-13,
1hr 49min - (1:40), (4:10), 7:10,
9:40
***Battle of the Year 3D PG-13,
1hr 49min - (2:20), (4:50), 7:40,
10:05
Prisoners R, 2hr 33min - (2:00),
(3:00), (5:15), 7:00, 9:00, 10:10
The Family R, 1hr 51min -
(2:15), (4:45), 7:15, 9:45
Insidious: Chapter 2 PG-13,
1hr 45min - (1:45), (2:30), (4:15),
(5:00), 7:00, 7:30, 9:35, 10:00
Riddick R, 1hr 59min -
(1:50), (4:25), 7:20, 10:05
uRiddick DBOX R, 1hr 59min -
(1:50), (4:25), 7:20, 10:05
***One Direction: This is Us 3D
Extended Cut PG, 1hr 55min -
(2:30), (4:40), 7:20, 9:40
Youre Next R, 1hr 34min - 7:20,
9:40
Lee Daniels The Butler PG-13,
2hr 12min - (1:55), (4:30), 7:10,
9:50
Planes PG, 1hr 32min - (2:15),
(4:25)
Were the Millers R, 1hr 50min
- (1:40), (4:15), 7:15, 9:45
Grown Ups 2 PG-13, 1hr 40min
- 7:40, 10:10
Despicable Me 2 PG, 1hr 38min
- (2:00), (4:15)
This is the End R, 1hr 47min -
(2:20), (4:40), 7:25, 9:45
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 5C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I am
fortunate to be a
stay-at-home mom.
My days are spent
doing chores and
taking care of the
kids. I also volunteer
extensively at their
schools, but I do find time for other
pursuits, such as reading and writing.
My problem is my husband. Bob
is the kind of guy who cant sit still.
When hes home on weekends or tak-
ing a day off, he constantly needs to
be doing something. This involves
projects around the house. Other than
spending time online, his hobbies are
active ones. Because hes always on
the go, he insists I should be equally
productive. He constantly wants to
know what Im doing, and if its not
something he thinks is useful, he be-
comes passive-aggressive.
Bob initiates big projects and then
complains that he gets no help and
has no time for himself. He says my
volunteerism takes away from time
I should be doing things around the
house. In addition, Bob is incredibly
neat and often insists that our immac-
ulate house needs to be cleaned.
I dread the days hes home because
I have to constantly justify my activi-
ties or feel guilty if Im not busy the
entire time. Dont misunderstand
Bob is a great guy, a good dad and my
best friend. But Im afraid I will soon
resent him to the point of dislike if
I must live my life according to his
unrealistic expectations. Any advice
other than to seek counseling?
Not a Loafer in Chicago
Dear Not A Loafer: Nope. It appears
that your great guy, good dad and
best friend is so controlling he makes
you miserable when hes home. I
agree that if this continues, it will
have a negative effect on your mar-
riage. The person who should explain
it to him is a mental health profes-
sional who can provide the counsel-
ing and/or medication he may need,
because I suspect he may have OCD.
Dear Abby: I reconnected with my
dad two years ago. I hadnt spoken
with him for almost 10 years, follow-
ing my parents divorce. Im thankful
hes back in my life again.
The problem is his wife, Kathy.
Ever since we reunited, I have felt she
resented me. Its like she doesnt like
sharing Dad with me. She had him
all to herself for 10 years, so I guess I
kind of understand.
Kathy recently found a job across
the country, so she and Dad sold
their house and moved away a few
weeks ago. Her family lives here and
she had job offers closer to home,
but she chose the one farthest away.
I cant help but feel she did it to put
distance between Dad and me, and it
hurts me deeply. How do I talk to my
dad about it without damaging the
relationship?
Loving Daughter in Wisconsin
Dear Loving Daughter: What do you
think talking about it to your father
will accomplish? You dont know for
certain that she accepted the job to
separate you and your dad. Remem-
ber, he AGREED to the move.
The problem with family estrange-
ments is that you can never get back
the time you lost. Keep in touch with
your father via cards and letters, texts
and emails, video chats or other so-
cial media whatever you and your
father are most comfortable with.
But I do NOT advise saying anything
negative about Kathy.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Husbands constant need for activity is wearing on womans patience
To receive a collection of Abbys most memo-
rable and most frequently requested po-
ems and essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check or money
order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear
Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). The
moon gives you an energetic
boost thats better than anything
you could buy in a bottle. Youre
physically stronger than yester-
day, and the odds are with you
for winning at sports.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). The
philosopher Cosino DeGregrio
said, Beware the flatterer: He
feeds you with an empty spoon.
Of course, if youre very hungry,
youll accept the placebo effect
and eat it right up.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). If theres
one thing you do not lack, its
complexity. Youre multidimen-
sional and will interest others on
many different levels. No one,
not even you, knows all of you.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Being
overly concerned with whats
appropriate only makes every-
one feel uptight. If youre too
agreeable, youll shortchange all
the zippy fun that happens when
youre edgy.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). As if saying
the right thing at the right time
werent tricky enough, saying
nothing at the moment that
tempts you to state the obvious
truth of the matter takes super-
human good taste.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). People
think highly of you and will seem
to have overblown opinions of
your abilities. Dont modestly dis-
qualify what they think and say,
because they could be right.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Youre in
a competitive mood, but if you
compete with a partner, youll
either lose for winning or lose
for losing. It will be better to play
games with acquaintances or
strangers.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Youre
sensitive to different environ-
ments and will match your
conversation accordingly. Some
people arent as good at this as
you are.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Your fire-sign tendencies will be
amplified at the start of the day
when emotions will run hot. But
the evening hours cool things
down with a breezy sense of
detachment and a playful mood.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
Youll be encouraged to air some
of your strong opinions. Loved
ones dont expect or want you to
agree on every point, but they
will be hurt if you dont at least
listen to their views.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
Someone is thinking about the
future while youre still trying to
figure out the moment. To get
back into a relationship groove,
either you need to speed up or
the other person needs to slow
down.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You
want to connect with successful
people, but their success doesnt
matter nearly as much to you
as how they interact with you.
When it comes to relationships,
its your personal evaluation, not
the worlds, that matters.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Sept. 21).
Romance isnt just a feeling you
have about another person; its a
way of life. This year is a celebra-
tion of beauty and affection. An
encouraging group of friends will
help you make a career shift in
October. Stash your November
bonus; youll need it for a major
purchase in August. Your lucky
numbers are: 3, 1, 22, 38 and 18.
PAGE 6C Saturday, September 21, 2013 CHURCH www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
From page 3C
Briefs
WI LKES - BARRE:
Unity of NEPA: A
Spiritual Center
announced the following
activities:
The Rev. Diane
Sicker, senior minister,
will speak on a transcen-
dent treatment at the 10
a.m. Sunday service. She
will also conduct a Unity
class on the Life of
Prayer at 11:45 a.m.
The Unity for The
Hip Sip Coffee House
Series will continue on
Sept. 28 with an 80s
karaoke night at 6:30
p.m. in Harmony Hall.
WILKES-BARRE: St.
George Chapel, Loomis
Street, will begin its nine-
day novena of devotion to
St. Therese Little Flower
of Jesus on Monday.
Prayers will be offered
at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.,
except on Oct. 1, the last
day of the novena.
On Oct. 1, Mass and
novena prayers will be
offered at 6 p.m. and will
conclude with individual
veneration and blessing
with the miraculous relic
of St. Therese.
Everyone is welcome to
attend.
For more information
call the rectory at 570-
824-3599.
WI LKES - BARRE:
The Christian Women of
Our Lady of Hope Parish,
40 Park Ave., will meet at
6:30 p.m. on Wednesday
at the Marymount Parish
Center, 154 S. Hancock
Street. Hostesses are
Martha Lock and June
Swida.
Plans will be nalized
for the annual turkey
bingo to be held on Oct.
13.
The Oct. 23 meeting,
which will include the
crowning of the Blessed
Mother and a covered-
dish supper, will also be
discussed.
All women of the parish
are invited.
Religious Service Calendar
To AdvertiseYour Church, Call Caitlin, 970-7374
Apostolic Baptist Bible Episcopal Lutheran Orthodox
Apostolic Faith
Tabernacle
536 Village Rd, Orange
Pastor Frank Chorba
333-5172
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Sunday Evening
Worship 7 p.m.
Bible Study
Wednesday 7:30 p.m.
Messages-To-Go Ministry
apostolicfaith.net
MEADE ST.
BAPTIST
50 S. Meade St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Chester F. Dudick, Pastor
(570) 820-8355
SUNDAY SCHOOL
9:30 a.m.
WORSHIP SERVICE
10:30 a.m.
PRAYER, BIBLE STUDY
& PIONEER CLUB
Wed 6:30 p.m.
WOMENS FELLOWSHIP
2nd Tuesday of the month
6:30 p.m.
AFTERNOON
FELLOWSHIP
12 noon last Sunday of the
Month
EXPOSITORY PREACHING:
EXPLAINING GODS TRUTH,
ONE VERSE AT A TIME.
Christ
Fellowship
Church Of
Plymouth
246 E. Main St.,
Plymouth, PA
(570) 779-4210
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday night bible study
and prayer 7 p.m.
Sunday School and
Nursery provided
We are a Christian bible church
teaching the plain truth of Gods
word as we prepare
for our eternal future.
River Of Life
Fellowship
Church
22 Outlet Road
Lehman, PA
675-8109
www.rolfministries.org
Sunday School 9:15am
Service 10:30am
Nursery provided
Thursday Night
6:30pm Bible study
& Youth Groups
Coffee house
Fridays 6 to 9 pm
with live music.
St. Martin
In-The-Fields
3085 Church Rd.,
Mountaintop
Rev. Dan FitzSimmons
CHORAL EUCHARIST
10AM
HEALING SERVICE
Last Sunday
each month
Serving through Faith,
Praise & Good Works
ST. CLEMENT &
ST. PETERS
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
165 Hanover St., W-B
822-8043
The Rev. John C.
Major Priest-In-Charge
Holy Eucharist 9am
Sunday School 9:00am
WELCOME ALL TO
GROW IN GODS LOVE
www.stclementstpeter.org
Episcopal
Holy Trinity
Lutheran Church
813 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston
Saturday
Contemporary Holy Communion 5:30
Sunday
Traditional Holy Communion 10:00
Rev. Paul Metzloff
Handicapped Accessible
Messiah
Lutheran Church
453 S. Main Street, W-B
Rev. Mary E. Laufer
Sunday Holy Communion
8:00 and 10:45 a.m.
St. Johns
Lutheran Church
410 S. River St.
Wilkes-Barre
Worship
9:30 AM
Ofce Phone 823-7139
St. Marks
Lutheran Church
56 S. Hancock St., W-B
Pastor - Rev. Mary Lauffer
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
Sunday School 10:15 a.m.
St. Matthew
Lutheran Church
667 N. Main St., W-B
822-8233
Worship Schedule:
Sun 7:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School 10:45 a.m.
Adult Bible Class 11:00 a.m.
Rev. Gary Scharrer
Chairlift Available
Missouri Synod
St. Peters
Lutheran Church
1000 S. Main St., W-B
823-7332
Reverend
David Szeto
Sun. Worship 9 AM
Sunday School &
Adult Bible Study 10:30 AM
Missouri Synod
Mennonite
Nanticoke
Christian
Fellowship
112 Prospect St.
Sunday Celebration 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School - Sept. - May
9:00 a.m.
Pastor D. Pegarella
735-1700
Nazarene
Mountain View
Church Of The
Nazarene
WE HAVE MOVED!!
52 E. 8th Street, Wyoming
Pastor Bryan Rosenberg
Sunday Worship
9 am
Childrens Church &
Child Care Provided.
570-821-2800
Everyone is Welcome!
Saint Mary
Antiochian
Orthodox Church
905 South Main Street
Wilkes-Barre
Very Rev, David Hester
Deacon John Karam
Saturday - Great Vespers 6 p.m.
Sunday - Divine Liturgy 10 a.m.
Parish Ofce 824-5016
All Are Welcome
Website:
www.antiochian.org
Presbyterian
First United
Presbyterian
Church
115 Exeter Ave.,
West Pittston
654-8121
Worship 11:00 AM
at St. Cecilias Roman
Catholic Church, Wyo-
ming Avenue, Exeter
Rev. James E.
Thyren, Pastor
Primitive
Methodist
New Life
Community
Church
570 South Main Rd.,
Mountaintop, PA
868-5155
Pastor Dave Elick
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service
8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.
Bible Services
Wed. 7 p.m.
All Are Welcome
United Methodist
Central United
Methodist
65 Academy Street, W-B
Rev. Dr. Paul C. Amara
SUN. WORSHIP SERVICE
11:15 am
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Child Care Provided
For Infants
& Toddlers
822-7246
Askam United
Methodist
Church
2811 S. Main St., Hanover Twp.
Pastor:
George Price
570-823-6467
Sunday Services
at 9 A.M.
Kids Korner
available during worship.
Dallas United
Methodist
4 Parsonage Street, Dallas
Pastor:
Rev. Robert G. Wood
675-0122
Summer Church Service
9:15 & 10:30 A.M.
675-5701
Handicapped Accessible
Luzerne United
Methodist Church
446 Bennet St., Luzerne
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Church School
during Worship
Carol E. Coleman
Pastor 287-6231
Shavertown United
Methodist Church
shavertownumc.com
163 N. Pioneer Ave.
Shavertown
Phone-A-Prayer 675-4666
Pastor: Rev. Judy Walker
Organ/Choir Director:
Deborah Kelleher
Saturday Service-5:30 pm
Chapel Service
Sunday Service-10:00 am
Worship Service
Prayer & Praise
Service - 2nd Monday
of the month at 7 pm.
Nursery Care
Available during Sunday
Service
For more information call
the office at
570-675-3616
Trucksville United
Methodist
Marian E. Hartman, Pastor
Dr. Stephen L. Broskoske,
Director of Music
Making Disciples for
Jesus Christ
Sunday Worship Schedule
8:30 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.
17 West Church RD off Route
309, Trucksville at Carverton RD
Nursery available for children
birth through kindergarten.
Vacation Bible School
August 18-22 5:30-8:30pm
Grief Support 7PM
3rd Wednesday Every Month
Phone: 570- 696-3897
Fax: 570-696-3898
Email:
ofce@trucksvilleumc.com
Unity
Unity: A Center for
Spiritual Living
140 S. Grant St., W-B
Rev. Dianne Sickler
Sunday Service &
Childrens Church
10 a.m.
Church 824-7722
Prayer Line 829-3133
www.unitynepa.com
Forty Fort
Presbyterian
Church
1224 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
Pastor William Lukesh
287-7097
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
6 p.m. Praise Band
Handicap Accessible
Nursery Provided
Air Conditioned
Visitors Welcome
Loyalville United
Methodist Church
Loyalville Rd.
Lake Township
Sunday Worship
9:30 am
570-477-3521
St. Johns
Lutheran
Nanticoke
231 State St.
Ofce 735-8531
www.NanticokeLutheran.org
Rev. Debby North
Holy Communion
Sunday 8 am & 9:30 am
Christian Education
10:30 am
Christian Coffee House
Every 4th Fri 7-9PM
Catholic
PARISH OF ST.
ANDRE BESSETTE
Vigil (Saturday)
4:00 p.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
(570)823-4988
5:30 p.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
Sunday
8:30 a.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
10:30 a.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
Weekday Mass
7:00 a.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
8:00 a.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
Confessions
3:00 p.m. at Holy Saviour
Worship Site,
56 Hillard St, East End
4:30 p.m. at St. Stanislaus
Worship Site,
668 N. Main St., North End
Catholic
Holy Cross Episcopal Church
373 N. Main Street, W-B
Father Timothy Alleman, Rector
SUNG SUNDAY EUCHARIST - 9:00 AM
SUNDAY SCHOOL - 9:00 AM
SATURDAY HOLY EUCHARIST - 4:30 PM
HEALING SERVICE & HOLY EUCHARIST
PARKING
St. John The
Baptist Church
126 Nesbitt St.
Larksville, PA 18651
570-779-9620
A WELCOMING, GROWING,
FAITH COMMUNITY
Saturday 4 p.m.
Sunday
7 a.m., 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.
Ample, Easy Parking
Handicapped Accessible
Confessions:
Saturday 3 p.m.
Firwood United
Methodist Church
Cor. Old River Rd. &
Dagobert St.
Rev. Barbara Pease
Safe Sanctuary Policy
Sunday School
9:45
Morning Service
11:00 a.m.
Handicap
Elevator
Available
You are invited to
attend.
823-7721
Holy Trinity
Russian
Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church In America
401 East Main St., W-B
Phone: 825-6540
Rev. David Shewczyk
Sunday Divine Liturgy 9:00 a.m.
Feast Days 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Vespers:
Summer 6:00 p.m. - Winter 4:00 p.m.
First
Presbyterian
Church
S. Franklin &
Northhampton Sts., W-B
10:00 a.m. Worship
Rev. Dr. Robert M.
Zanicky, Minister
Air Conditioned Sanctuary
Nursery provided
Handicapped Access
John Vaida -
Minister of Music
Pamela Kerns -
Christian Education
Director
A Friendly Inclusive,
& Welcoming Church
Audio Sermons
available on the web
www.fpcwb.com
Wyoming
Presbyterian
Church
Wyoming Ave.
at Institute St.,
570-693-0594
Laura Lewis, Pastor
Worship Service: 11 a.m.
Sunday School: 10 a.m.
Forty Fort United
Methodist Church
Church Ofce 287-3840
Wyoming & Yeager Ave
Rev. Dr. PhilipT. Wanck
Handicapped Accessible
Sat. 5pm
Praise and Worship
Service Sun. 8:30 a.m.
Early Summer Worship
(June 9-Sep 1)
10 amTraditional
Worship
Prayer Line
283-8133
Friends &
Quakers
Friends & Quakers
Stella Prebyterian
Church
1700 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
570-824-5130
11 am
Worship
http://northbranch.
quaker.org
Wyoming United
Methodist
376 Wyoming Ave
Rev. Marcelle Dotson
Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
570-693-2821
Ample Parking
United Church
Of Christ
St. Lukes UCC
471 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre 822-7961
Rev. Justin Victor
Sunday Worship
10:00 A.M.
Sunday School
10:15 A.M.
Communion Service
the 1st Sunday of
every month.
TRANSPORTATION: CALL
Catholic
Independent
Second Welsh
Congregational
Church
475 Hazel St., Wilkes-Barre
829-3790
Sunday Services 9:30 a.m.,
10:45 a.m. Sunday School
6 p.m. Sunday Eve
Wednesday 7 p.m. Bible Study
Prayer and Youth Groups
Limited Van Service
Available, Please Call.
Independent...
Fundamental...
Friendly
Wyoming Ave.
Christian
881 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston
570-288-4855
Pastor Dennis Gray
Come Hear The
Word Of God,
Let It Change
Your Life!
Sunday School
9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship
11 a.m. Communion
Every Sunday
Sunday Evening
Worship At 7 p.m.
Wednesday Bible
Study 7:00 p.m.
ELEVATOR
ACCESSIBLE
Baptist
Tabernacle
63 Division St., W-B
Interim Pastor:
Richard McIntyre
Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
570-823-3083
Slocum Chapel
1024 Exeter Avenue
Exeter, PA 18643
Pastor Guy Giordano
(570) 388-5213
SUNDAY SERVICES
Intercessory Prayer
9:30am
Worship Service
10:00am
Sunday School/
Nursery Provided
WEDNESDAY SERVICES
Bible Study & Prayer 7pm
Visitors Welcome!
Encounter Christ in a
historical church in a
new & relevant way.
Assembly of God
340 Carverton Rd. Trucksville
Pastor Dan Miller
570-696-1128
www.bmha.org
SUNDAY
Morning Worship
(Main Sanctuary)
8:00AM, 9:45AM, 11:00AM
(Harvest Cafe Bldg)
9:45AM, 11:00AM
Kids Church
8:00AM & 11:00AM
Sunday School: 9:45AM
SUNDAY EVENING
WORSHIP
(Main Sanctuary) 6:30PM
WEDNESDAY EVENING
(Harvest Cafe Bldg)
FUEL Youth Ministry 6:30PM
We have various Ministries
available for Men, Women,
Youth and Children.
SUNDAY SERVICES
Celebration Service
10:15AM
Sunday School 9AM
Christian Education 9AM
Kidz Church
10:15AM
Intercessory Prayer 8:15AM
Sunday Evening 6:30PM
TUESDAY
Womens Bible
Study 10AM
WEDNESDAY
Family Night
Ministries 7PM
THURSDAY
Evidence Youth
Group 6:30PM
570-829-0989
www.wilkesbarreag.com
First Assembly
Of God
424 Stanton Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Dallas Baptist
Harveys Lake
Highway, Dallas
639-5099
Pastor Jerry Branch
Sun. Worship 9:15 & 10:30 am
www.dallasbaptist
church.org
Nebo Baptist
Church of
Nanticoke
75 Prospect St.
Nanticoke 735-3932
Pastor Tim Hall
www.nebobaptist.org
Worship Service
Sun. 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.
Sun School 9:45 a.m.
Nursery Junior Church
Youth Groups
Great Bible Seminars
Everyone is Welcome
Christian
Grace
Community
Church
A Bible Teaching Ministry
Memorial Hwy. Dallas
Sunday Services:
11 a.m., 6 p.m.
(570) 675-3723
www.gracechurchdallas.org
Parker Hill
Community
Church
667 N. River St.
Plains
Sundays
10:30 a.m.
570-822-1111
parkerhill.org
CHRIST UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
175 S. Main Road
Mountain Top
Pastor Rev.
Stephen Sours
Sunday Worship
8:30 & 10:45 am
Sun School 9:30 am
Nursery Available
570-474-6060
Trinity
Presbyterian
105 Irem Rd, Dallas
Worship Service:
10:00 a.m.
Pastor
Kathleen
Jamhoury
Nursery Provided
570- 675-3131
Holy
Resurrection
Cathedral
Orthodox Church In America
591 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Very Rev. Joseph
Martin, Pastor
570-822-7725
Saturday Vespers 6:00 p.m.
Sunday Divine Liturgy 8:30 a.m.
Feast Day
Vespers 6 p.m.
Feast Day
Divine Liturgy 9:00 a.m.
ALL ARE WELCOME
web site: www.oca.org
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
190 S. Main Street, W-B
Pastor Peter D. Kuritz
Pastor Janel D. Wigen
Saturday Service
5:00 p.m.
Sunday Service
9:30 a.m.
Worship
570-824-2991
Lutheran
NEW LIFE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
301 Delaney St.
Hanover Township
LOOK/LEARN/LOVE/LEAD
Sunday School
9:30 am
Worship Service
10:30 am
Nursery/Childrens
Church
570-NEW-LIFE
(639-5433)
Pastor:
Gideon Gaitano
newlifefamily.org
Presbyterian United Methodist
Bible
Christ
Community
Church
100 West Dorrance St.
Kingston, PA 18704
Sunday School/ABF
9:30 a.m.
Sun Worship 10:30 a.m.
Radio Ministry
Searching the Scriptures
Sunday 7:30-8:30 AM
WRKC 88.5 FM
website: www.ccchurchtoday.org
Pastor: John Butch
Phone: 283-2202
Cross Creek
Community Church
Sunday Services 9am &
10:45am
With Jr. Church & Nursery
Available.
Wed 6:30 Family Night
with Awana for ages 18
months - 6th grade.
College & Career,
CrossRoads for Teens,
Deaf Ministry, Small
Groups, Mens & Womens
Ministry, Groups.
Celebrate Recovery for
Hurts, Habits, Hang-Ups -
Tuesdays 6:30pm
Discover the difference!
370 Carverton Road,
Trucksville 696-0399
www.crosscreekcc.org
High Point Baptist
Church
For the Glory of God and the
Proclamation of His Word
1919 Mountain Road, Larksville
570-371-4404
www.highpoint church.info
SUNDAY
9:30AM Bible
Studies for All Ages
10:30AM Worship
and Rootz
Childrens Ministry
WEEKLY
Small Group Bible
Studies Adult/Teen
Ministries Cub Scouts/
American Heritage
Girls
www.highpointchurch.info
Living Hope
Bible Church
35 S. Main St.
Plains, PA
Pastor Mark DeSilva
Sunday Service
10:00 a.m.
Sunday School for
all ages 9:00 a.m.
Mid Week Bible
Study every Wed
at 6:30pm
Youth Group Mens
& Womens
Bible Studies
For information call
570-406-4295
www.lhbcpa.org
WHERE HOPE COMES
TO LIFE AND THE
SON ALWAYS SHINES
First Baptist
Church
Water Street Pittston
654-0283
Rev. James H. Breese, Pastor
Sunday Worship
9:30 a.m.
Childrens Sun School
9:45 a.m.
Adult/Teen Sun School
10:45 a.m.
Bible Study/Prayer
Meeting Wed at 7:15 p.m.
Chairlift Available
www.fbcpittston.org
Welsh Bethel
Baptist
Parish & Loomis St. W-B
Sunday Worship 10 a.m.
Sunday School 11:15 a.m.
Bible Study Wed 6:30 p.m.
Pastor Don Hartsthorne
822-3372
Mt. Zion
Baptist Church
105 HILL ST...WILKES-BARRE
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Service 11 a.m.
We offer Childrens Church
Prayer Service Wednesday 7p.m.
Bible Study Wednesday 8 p.m.
Rev. Michael E. Brewster, Pastor
Baptist
ST. ELIZABETH ANN
SETON PARISH
116 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville
Masses:
Saturday
4:00 & 5:30 pm
Sunday
8:30, 10:00, 11:30 am
Daily: 8:00 am
Confessions:
Saturday 3:15 pm
www.setonpa.com
287-6624
CHRIST FELLOWSHIP
CHURCH
OF PLYMOUTH
246 E. Main St.
Plymouth, PA
(570) 779-4210
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Wednesday night
bible study and
prayer 7 p.m.
Sunday School and
Nursery provided
We are a Christian
bible church
teaching the plain
truth of Gods word
as we prepare for
our eternal future.
Christian
First Baptist
52 E. 8th Street Wyoming
Sunday School All Ages 9:30
Worship Service 10:45 a.m.
Tues. 7 p.m. prayer meeting
693-1754
Visitors Welcome
St. Pauls
Lutheran Church
474 Yalick Road
(Route 118)
Dallas, PA
Rev. Charles Grube
Sat. Worship
5:30 PM
Sunday Worship
9:30 AM
570-675-3859
SAINT MARYS CHURCH OF THE
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
Our Lady of Fatima Parish
134 S. Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre
(570) 823-4168
Saturday 4:00 PM
Sunday 8 AM, 10 AM, 12:10 PM & 7PM
Monsignor Thomas V. Banick, Pastor
PRAISE
JESUS
Tree of Life
Christian
Fellowship
167 East State Street
Nanticoke, PA
A Church
Unashamedly in
love with The LORD
JESUS
CHRIST
Sunday 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m.
570-735-4737
www.treeoifefellowship.net
Firwood United Methodist
Church
Cor. Old River Rd. &
Dagobert St.
Rev. Anthony Brima
Safe Sanctuary Policy
Morning Service 10:00 a.m.
Handicap Elevator Available.
You are invited to attend.
570-823-7721
Shavertown United Methodist Church
shavertownumc.com
163 N. Pioneer Ave. Shavertown
Phone-A-Prayer 675-4666
Pastor: Rev. Judy Walker
Organ/Choir Director: Deborah Kelleher
Saturday Service-5:30 pm Chapel Service
Sunday Service-10:00 am
Worship Service
Prayer & Praise
Service - 2nd Monday
of the month at 7 pm.
Nursery Care
Available during Sunday Service
For more information call the ofce at
570-675-3616
Handicapped Accessible
CHRIST UNITED
METHODIST
CHURCH
175 S. Main Road
Mountain Top
Pastor JP Bohanan
Sunday Worship
8:30 & 10:45 am
Sun School 9:30 am
ChurCh onthe Square
Pastors Vincent OBoyle and Louis Smyth
52 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
570-446-4740
A Full Gospel Church
Sunday 10:30 AM
Tuesday Prayer 6:30 PM
Friday Bible Study 6:30 PM
Churchonthesquareinc.org
Follow Us On FaceBook!
Loyalville United
Methodist Church
Loyalville Rd.
Lake Township
Sunday Worship
9:30 am
570-477-3521
Luzerne United
Methodist Church
446 Bennet St., Luzerne
Sunday Worship
10:30 a.m.
Church School
during Worship
Carol E. Coleman
Pastor 287-6231
Calvary United
Methodist Church
39 East Poplar St
West Nanticoke
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Childrens Church School
Everyone Welcome
George Price
Pastor
570-735-1514
Air Conditioned
Wyoming Seminary
Lower School
1560 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
570-824-5130
10 AM Adult Discussion
11 AMWorship
www.northbranch.
quaker.org
Grace
Community
Church
A Bible Teaching Ministry
4122 Memorial Highway, Dallas
Sunday Services:
10 am, 6pm (August only)
570-675-3723
www.gracechurchdallas.org
Firwood United
Methodist Church
Cor. Old River Rd. &
Dagobert St.
Rev. Anthony Brima
Safe Sanctuary Policy
Sunday School, 9:45-10:45
Worship Service 11-Noon.
Handicap Elevator Available.
You are invited to attend.
570-823-7721
HOLY RESURRECTION
CATHEDRAL
ORTHODOX
CHURCH IN AMERICA
591 N. Main St, Wilkes-Barre
Very Rev. Joseph Martin, Pastor
570-822-7725
Sat. Vespers 5 pm
Sun. Divine Liturgy 9 am
Feast Day
Vespers 6 pm
Feast Day
Divine Liturgy 9 am
ALL ARE WELCOME
web site: www.oca.org
Dallas United Methodist
4 Parsonage Street, Dallas
Pastor Rev. Robert G. Wood
570-675-0122
Sunday School, Sat. 6PM
Church Service Sat. 7PM
Adult Sunday School Sun. 9AM
Church Service Sun. 10:30AM
570-871-0863
Handicap Accessible
St. Johns
Lutheran Church
410 S. River St.
Wilkes-Barre
Worship 11 A.M
Oce: 570-823-7139
Trucksville United
Methodist
Marian E. Hartman, Pastor
Dr. Stephen L. Broskoske, Director of Music
Making Disciples for Jesus Christ
Sunday Worship Schedule
8:30am& 11:00am
Nursery Available - Infant through
Kindergarten
Sunday School 9:45 to 10:45 am - Nursery
through Adult
17 West Church Road oRoute 309,
Trucksville at Carverton Road.
Grief Support, 7pm, 3rd Wednesday of
Every Month
570-696-3897
Fax: 570-696-3898
Email:offce@trucksvilleumc.com
ST. PAULS
LUTHERAN CHURCH
474Yalick Road(Rt. 118) Dallas, PA
Rev. Charles Grube
Sat. Worship 5:30 pm
Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11:00 am
Sunday School 9:45 am
570-675-3859
Handicap Accessible
First Presbyterian
Church
S. Franklin and Northampton
Sts. W-B
10:00 A.M. Worship
Rev. Dr. Robert M. Zanicky,
Minister
11:00 A.M. Sunday School
Nursery Provided
Handicapped Access
John Vaida - Minister of Music
Pamela Kerns - Christian
Education Director
A friendly, inclusive,
and welcoming church
Audio Sermons avail-
able on the web
To Advertise Your Church, Call Caitlin, 970-7374, cakins@civitasmedia.com
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
190 S. Main Street, W-B
Pastor Pete D. Kurtiz
Pastor Janel D. Wigen
570-824-2991
Saturday Service 5:00pm
Sunday Worship 8:30 am and 11 am
SCS 9:45 am
376 Wyoming Av
Rev. Harriet Santos
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
570-693-2821
Everyone Welcome!
Handicap Accessible
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
Trucksville
Shavertown
Lehman/Harveys Lake
Lee Park
Hilldale
Wyoming
Glen Lyon
South Wilkes-Barre
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
THE OFFICE CENTERS
5 Kingston Locations
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovation Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information call 570-287-1161
MARKETPLACE
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 1D
Special Notices
GUARDIAN ANGEL
Hard times upon you?
Down on your luck?
Need help & dont know
where to turn? We care and
are willing to help.
Serious problems only.
Write to:
PO Box 3238,
W. Pittston, PA 18643
ADOPT:
A teacher hopes to adopt a
baby! I promise to provide a
lifetime of unconditional
love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
For that Hallmark
Moment..Start planning
your Oyster Wedding today
and make your special day
Nothing But The Best!
bridezella.net
Adopt-Loving couple will
cherish your baby, offering
security, endless love
and opportunities.
Expenses Paid.
Lori & Jeff
1-888-642-9650
ADOPT
A loving couple dreams of
be- coming a family. A life
filled with love & opportunity
awaits your newborn. Ex-
penses paid. Nadine & Jeff
1-866-936-7580
The World is your Oyster! Mr.
& Mrs. McGeehan!
Oyster Wedding!
oysterrestaurant.com
570-820-0990
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF
CHARLES F. BAUM, JR.
Late of Hazleton, Pennsylvania
(Died August 28, 2013)
Letters of Administration hav-
ing been granted to Allison L.
Sei ger. Al l persons havi ng
claims against the Estate of in-
debted to the Estate shal l
make payment or present
claims to Douglas P. Thomas,
Esquire, Attorney for the Es-
tate, 415 Wyoming Avenue,
Scranton, Pa 18503.
NOTICE OF SALE
by Borough of Wyoming, one
1992 Chevrolet 4 x 4 pickup
t r uck wi t h appr oxi mat el y
66, 890 mi l es. Tr uck i s
equipped with an 8 foot West-
ern Pro Plow. Bids will be re-
ceived at the Wyoming Bor-
ough Building, 277 Wyoming
Avenue, Wyoming, from 9a to
2p daily and opened at the
Council Meeting, held at the
above listed location on Octo-
ber 8, 2013 at 7:30p.
BY: MARCELLA STARR
BOROUGH SECRETARY
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
COMMONWEALTH OF
PENNSYLVANIA
DEPARTMENT OF
CONSERVATION AND
NATURAL
RESOURCES BUREAU OF
STATE PARKS
Sealed bids will be received
on the seventh floor, Rachel
Carson State Office Building,
400 Market Street, Harrisburg,
Pennsylvania 17101-2301,
until 2:00 p.m. prevailing time,
October 16, 2013, and then
publicly opened and read for
the operation of the
FOOD AND REFRESHMENT
CONCESSION
at
FRANCES SLOCUM STATE
PARK
LUZERNE COUNTY,
PENNSYLVANIA
Bid documents containing all
pertinent information must be
obtained from the office of:
Rex Bradish, Park Manager
Frances Slocum State Park
565 Mount Olivet Road
Wyoming, PA 18644-9333,
Telephone number
(570) 696-3525.
The Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania reserves the
right to reject any and all bids,
and to waive any informalities,
defects, or irregularities
in the bids.
The Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania is an equal
opportunity employer and
requires conformance with
Title 16 Pennsylvania Code,
Chapter 49, Contract
Compliance Regulations.
David L. Kemmerer, Director
Bureau of State Parks
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that name change papers for
Maximize Life, a not-for-profit
Pennsyl vani a Corporat i on,
were filed and approved by the
Department of State of the
C o m m o n w e a l t h o f
Pennsylvania, on April 8, 2013,
pursuant to the provisions of
the Business Corporation Law
of Pennsylvania. The name of
the Corporation was changed
to Good News for Life.
Dennis Madeira, President
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
Notice of Zoning Hearing
Notice is hereby given that
the Zoning Hearing Board of
the City of Pittston will con-
duct a publ i c heari ng on
Monday October 14, 2013 at
5:00pm, at Pittston City Hall,
35 Broad Street, First Floor
Conference Room, Pittston,
PA 18640 to consider the fol-
lowing matter:
Request of Vito Forlenza for
r el i ef f r om Sect i on 405
Schedule II District Regula-
tions of the City of Pittston
Zoning Ordinance regarding
lot width, side yard & rear
yard setbacks and minimum
square footage requirements
for a lots at 49 Anderson
Street and 224 Wi l l i am
Street.
A copy of the application for a
zoning permit and hearing are
on file and available for pub-
lic inspection during normal
business hours in the Office
of the City Administrator, City
Hall, 35 Broad Street, Pitt-
ston. Anyone requiring spe-
cial accommodations to at-
tend the hearing should tele-
phone the administrative of-
fices at 570.654.0513 by 4pm
on Friday October 11th. The
City of Pittston does not dis-
criminate on the basis of race,
color, national origin, sex,
sexual orientation, religion,
age, disability or family status
on employment or the provi-
sion of services.
FOR THE CITY OF
PITTSTON
ZONING HEARING BOARD:
Harry Smith, Zoning Officer
City of Pittston
ADVERTISEMENTS
FOR BIDS
The Borough of Freeland
Municipal Authority
711 Birkbeck Street
Borough of Freeland,
Luzerne County, PA 18224
Sealed Bids for the
construction of the Wyoming
Street Pump Station Force
Main Replacement Project,
generally consisting of site and
mechanical work for the
installation of two (2) sewage
force mains and a gravity
interceptor.
Electronic sealed Bids are to
be submitted online via the
Penn Bis Program until 6:00
PM (local time), October 16,
2013 and then publicly opened
and read aloud at the Borough
of Freeland Municipal Author-
ity. All Bid Documents and soli-
citation details are available
online at no cost at PennBid-
www.PennBid.net.
This contract is expected to be
funded in whole or in part us-
ing funds from the American
Recovery and Reinvestment
Act (ARRA). Section 1605 of
the ARRA prohibits the use of
these funds unless all iron,
steel and manufactured goods
are produced in the United
States, except for the metallur-
gical process involving refine-
ment of steel additives. There
is no requirement for the origin
of components and sub com-
ponent s of manuf act ur ed
goods. Products listed at 48
CFR 25.104(a) have been de-
termined to be unavailable in
the United States and if re-
quired for the project may be
pur chased f r om f or ei gn
sources. No unauthorized use
of foreign iron, steel, and/or
manufactured good will be al-
lowed on this project.
The contractor must comply
with the minimum rates for
wages for laborers and mech-
anics as determined by the
Secretary of Labor in accord-
ance with the provisions of the
Davis-Bacon and Related Acts.
A pre-bid conference will be
held on September 25, 2013 at
10:00 AM (local time) at the of-
fice of the Borough of Free-
land Municipal Authority, 711
Birkbeck Street, Freeland, PA.
Borough of Freeland
Municipal Authority
September 19, 2013
Lost & Found
FOUND brown & cream tabby
cat, front paws declawed, 8th
St., W. Wyoming. 855-0961
FOUND. Beagle, female with
black collar, no ID, on Hunts-
ville Road., in Chase.
570-287-0380
Notices
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Highest Prices Paid Free Pickup
CA$H PAID 570-288-8995
Attorney
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult-Payment Plan!
Atty Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
BANKRUPTCY
DUI-ARD
Social Security-Disability
Free Consultation
Attorney
Joseph M. Blazosek
570-655-4410 or 570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
DIVORCE No Fault
$295. divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Travel Entertainment
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
KINKY BOOTS
WED. NOV. 6TH
$165. (MID MEZZ SEATS)
MOWTOWN
ON BROADWAY
WED., NOV 6TH
$149 (MID MESS SEATS)
JERSEY BOYS
WED., OCT 16TH
$129 (FRONT MEZZ
SEATS)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
MON DEC. 2ND
$99 (Orchestra Seats)
A CHRISTMAS STORY
SAT., DEC. 14TH
$165 (FRONT MESS SEATS)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
LAST CALL:
OCT. 5 & 6 Sat./Sun.
FALLING WATER
CLAYTON &
SHANKSVILLE 9/11
SITE
NOV. 3rd SUNDAY
* CASTLES
* CHOCOLATE
* CASINO -
(Ask About Bonus)
NOV. 14th
THURSDAY
Vermeer &
Dutch Masters
Exhibit At The Frick
Dinner at Four Seasons
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
FUN GETAWAYS!
Giants/Eagles 10/6
Yankees vs
SF Giants 9/22
Broadway:
"Newsies" 9/14
Matilda 9/14
Salem & Boston
Halloween, Oct. 18-21
1-800-432-8069
Travel Entertainment
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Building / Construction / Skilled
CARPENTERS
3+ years experience.
Must have valid drivers
license. Must have own hand
tools. Local, year round work
available. Apply at
197 Courtdale Ave., Courtdale
or call 570-287-5313
Child/Elderly Care
FAMILIES
URGENTLY NEEDED
More children than ever
before can no longer live in
their own homes. You can
help by becoming a foster
parent. Call FCCY at
1-800-747-3807. EOE
CHILD CARE AIDE
Full & Part time positions avail-
able. Please call 570-735-9290
Drivers & Delivery
DRIVER
Experienced
Limousines/Sedans.
Part-time. Days/
Nights/Weekends.
Knowledge of major
airports and NYC
recommended.
570-288-5466
DRIVER
Part time local Driver.
Tuesday and Thursday after-
noons. Clean license required.
Please call 570-288-5466
DRIVERS
Hiring Event!
Class A- CDL Drivers
Saturday, September 28th
9am-3pm
Hilton Hotel
100 Adams Ave
Scranton, PA
Attendees will learn about:
New Dedicated Run
Great Pay
Daily home time
Sign on Bonus
This event is exclusively for
Class A CDL truck drivers or
someone interested in a truck
driving career.
Cant make the event, call
xxx-xxx-xxxx for more details!
ROLLBACK
DRIVERS
Second & Third Shifts. Must
have good driving record. We
offer top wages and benefits
package. Apply in person to
Paul or Mike:
Falzone Towing Service, Inc.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
823-2100
Education
EXCITING TEACHING
OPPORTUNITY
Immediate opening for
Part Time Evening
CDL Instructor
A current CDL and 3+plus
years truck driving work
experience required.
Teaching experience a plus,
but not required.
Fax resume to:
570-287-7936
Or mail to:
Director of Education
166 Slocum Street
Forty Fort PA 18704
TEACHERS/
ASSISTANTS
for acrylic painting classes
with Spirited Art Scranton.
Strong communication skills &
humor required. Art degree
not required. Part time.
Send resume and portfolio
(if available) to:
SpiritedArtScranton@
gmail.com
Electrical / Plumbing
ELECTRICIANS
Experienced electricians
wanted. Minimum 5 years
commercial construction
experience.
Fax/email resume to
570- 639-5383
jthomas813@excite.com
Help Wanted General
INSPECTOR
A well-established local
manufacturer is looking for a
full time employee for
inspector. Hours are
2:00 PM 10:00 PM.
Must be able to lift 80 lbs.
A comprehensive benefit
package, which includes
401K.
Applications can
be obtained at:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
SPCA
Part Time, $8/hr to start.
Experience with animals.
Customer services & com-
puter skills a plus. Must be
willing to work, days,
evenings, & weekends.
Apply at:
SPCA
524 East Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
VETERINARY
ASSISTANT
Send resume to:
Nanticoke Animal Hospital
226 South Market Street
Nanticoke, PA 18634
No Phone Calls
Logistics/Transportation
CLASS A CDL
DRIVER
Small trucking company
looking for qualified drivers to
run Regional and OTR. Must
be at least 24 yrs of age & a
minimum of 2 yrs experience,
with clean driving record.
Average over $1,000 a week.
Interested drivers can call
Howard at 570-417-4722
Maintenance / Supervisory
ENVIRONMENTAL
SERVICES WORKERS
(HOUSEKEEPING &
FLOOR CARE)
Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Wilkes
Barre, currently has full time
night shift positions available
for general housekeeping and
floor care technicians. Experi-
ence is preferred. Geisinger
offers a competitive salary and
comprehensive benefits pack-
age on the first day of hire.
Candidates may apply at
www.geisinger.org/careers
Geisinger is a drug screening
employer; EOE/M/F/D/V
Mechanics
Outdoor Power
Equipment
(OPE)
Technician /
Mechanic
Minimum 4 years experience
troubleshooting & repairing
motors, engi nes, transmi s-
sions, electrical, hydraulics,
pneumatics, etc. on outdoor
power equi pment , saws,
plows, tractors, mowers, etc.
Must provide your own tools.
Call Brian at Harvis HR Ser-
vice 542-5330 or send re-
sume to: hilbertsequipment.
jobs@gmail.com
Medical/Health
SATELLITE OPERATIONS
MANAGER
Manage, supervise and
coordinate the overall opera-
tions of physician office sites
and departments as
assigned. Minimum three
years management experi-
ence in physician office site
environment. Bachelor
degree in Health Care
Administration or Business
Administration preferred.
Email resumes to:
hr@ihgltd.com
or fax to (570) 552-8876
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
FULL TIME
Lackawanna Valley Dermato-
logy has a full-time opening in
our future Kingston office. After
a few months of initial training
in our downtown Scranton of-
fice, your employment will be
primarily in our Kingston loca-
tion. Duties include: assisting
providers in surgery & exams,
recording patient medical in-
formation in computer while
assisting, escorting patients,
sterilization, clerical, etc. We
prefer a friendly, team player
with medical experience to join
our team. Applicant must have
computer experience since our
practice is totally computer-
ized with Medent EMR. ICD9
and CPT coding knowledge a
plus. LVDA is a drug free com-
pany. Whi l e t rai ni ng your
schedule is Monday through
Friday from 7:30 am to 4:00
pm and your Kingston hours
will be similar. Competitive be-
nefit package included. Fax
cover letter & resume to Prac-
tice Manager at 570-207-5579
GET ALL THE
ADVERTISING INSERTS
WITH THE LATEST SALES.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
PAGE 2D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLANCE
REPAR
We service all brands.
All repairs guaranteed
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
18T. OUALTY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES
SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME 8HOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan 8un
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
By E-mailing Office Manager:
officemanager@bianepa.com
Or Call:
570-287-3331
For All of Your Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Roofing,
Siding, Decks, Windows, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates. (570) 332-7023
Building & Remodeling
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHMNEY REPAR8
SpringhiII Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Locationl
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PAT'8
CLEANNG 8ERVCE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-235-1840
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
ResidentiaI & CommerciaI
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, nsured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
Concrete & Masonry
Chimneys / Repairs
Chopyak Masonry
Sidewalks, Steps, Concrete
Free Estimates. Fully Insured
570-674-7588
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA MASONRY, INC.
Masonry, Concrete,
Stucco, Chimneys
Fall Special
Chimney Inspection $45.
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service, installation
and repair. FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008 CALL JOE
570-735-8551 Cell 606-7489
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE E8TMATE8l
570-793-1391
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran. Panel upgrades.
New & old work. 25 Yrs. Exp.
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Excavating
All Types Of Excavating,
Demolition & Concrete Work.
Lot clearing, pool closing
& retaining walls, etc.
Large & Small Jobs. FREE EST.
(570) 760-1497
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
nsured. 570-288-6794
GUTTER
RESTORATION &
ROOF REPAIRS
Clean, Seal, Refinish
10 Year Warranty
570-417-1538
PJs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Handyman
DO IT ALL
HANDYMAN SERVICE
Licensed & Insured
570-704-8759
DAVE'8 HANDY MAN
8ERVCE8
30 years experience
Full-Time-Affordable quality repairs,
Remodeling and Painting.
570-299-1127
Hauling & Trucking
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning attics,
cellar, garage, one piece or whole
Estate, also available 10 & 20
yard dumpsters.
655-0695, 592-1813 or 287-8302
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'8 HAULNG
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458. 570-926-8090
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Highest Prices Paid Free Pickup
CA$H PAID 570-288-8995
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from
Houses, Garages, Yards, Etc.
826-1883 704-8846
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
BRIZZY'S ARBOR CARE &
LANDSCAPING
Hedge & Tree trimming, prun-
ing & removal. Stump grind-
ing, Cabling. Retaining walls &
repair. Free Est. Fully Ins.
570-542-7265
Foltz Landscaping
Small Excavating New landscapes,
retaining walls/patios. Call:
570-760-4814
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Fall Cleanups, Leaf Removal,
Landscaping, Snow Plowing
Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
Landscaping
Tough Brush
Tree pruning. Fall cleanup.
Fully Ins. Free Est.
570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Movers
BestDarnMovers
...your Moving Helpers!
www.BestDarnMovers.com
Free Quotes.
We Make Moving Easy.
Check us out on AngiesList
and Yelp. 570-852-9243
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
FALL SPECIAL
Get Ready for the Holidays.
$120, average size room +
materials. 18 years experience
Interior Painting
570-820-7832
JOHN'8 PANTNG
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'8 ALL
COUNTY PAVNG
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed & Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Plumbing
D.M. PLUMBING & HEATING
Specializing in boilers,
furnaces & water heaters.
10% Sr. discount. Licensed,
insured & 24 hour service
570-793-1930
Roong & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & nsured
PA026102
CaII Dan: 570-881-1131
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
JO Home Improvement
Roof, siding, painting, gutters.
Fully Ins. Free Est. PA100512.
570-829-3261 or 57-817-2548
8PRNG ROOFNG
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000 satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
Medical/Health
Full Time, Part Time
and Per Diem
RN's, LPNs,
DIETARY & ACTIVITY
ASSISTANTS
Apply in person at:
Summit
50 N. Pennsylvania Ave
Wilkes-Barre
EOE M/F/D/V
Village at Greenbriar
Assisted Living
Personal Care Aides
All shifts
Cook
Part Time
Dietary Aide
3:30pm-8:30pm
Housekeeping
Part-time
Good Starting Wages!
Will Train!!
APPLY WITHIN:
4244 Memorial Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
Other
BODY SHOP
HELP NEEDED
Call
570-574-9877
Production/Operations
MACHINIST
Local firm has immediate
opening for CNC Lathe
Operator. Experience pre-
ferred, but will train the right
applicant. 2nd shift - 4 day
work week.
Excellent benefits.
R&H Mfg., Inc.,
Woodward Hill,
Edwardsville, PA,
570-288-6648
STRUCTURAL STEEL
FABRICATOR
Looking for experienced welders,
overhead crane operators, blue-
print reading, machine operators &
steel stud wall framers. Steady
work. Excellent opportunity. Health
insurance, vacation, holidays and
401K. Wages based on skill level.
Apply at: Luzerne Iron Works
300 Sly Street
Luzerne, PA 18709
Restaurants
BEST WESTERN PLUS
EAST MOUNTAIN INN
HAS THE FOLLOWING
PART TIME POSITIONS:
*Experienced Housekeepers
*Experienced Housekeeping
Inspector
*Houseperson/Van Drive
valid PA drivers license req'd.
*Dishwasher
*Banquet Prep/Line Cook
Uniforms & meals provided
Weekends & Holidays A Must!
APPLY IN PERSON
NO PHONE CALLS
OFF OF ROUTE 115
WILKES-BARRE, PA
Immediate
Positions Available at
Franks Pizzeria
Experienced Hand Tossed
Pizza Man and
Short Order/Line Cook
Apply in Person
198 S. Main St. Wilkes Barre.
Restaurants
GROTTO PIZZA
outside The Wyoming Valley
Mall, NOW HIRING ALL
POSITIONS. Part time, Full
Time, Nights & Weekends.
Servers, cooks, bakers,
buss persons and more!
Apply in person.
No phone calls!
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
INCOME PROPERTY
DUPLEX HOME LOCATED 55
- 57 East Frothingham St., Pitt-
ston. Side 1: 6 rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, bath, newly carpted &
painted, basement with wash
tub, garage, oil heat, big back
yard. Side 2: 5 rooms, 2 bed-
rooms, bath, garage, new oil
furnace, back yard. Currently
rented. Asking $110,000.
570-654-0956
Commercial
HUNLOCK CREEK
Turn Key and come to this
beautiful quiet area with a
stream that runs between the
properties. Great yard for sit-
ting on the deck & watching
nature all for a great price.
This place has been remodel
and updated. A great place to
live. Do not let this house
pass you by. This is by ap-
pointment only. 24 Hour no-
tice.
MLS# 13 2668
$79,500
Please call Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
Commercial
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
MOUNTAINTOP
Mountain Blvd.
Multi-Use Complex 8,000+
sq.ft. building consists of res-
taurant, offices and apart-
ment. 359 ft. front with 3+
acres.
Priced to sell!
$395,000
Call Dave Hourigan
570-715-7750
570-474-6307
Commercial
PITTSTON TWP.
38 Tedrick St.
(Off Pittston By-Pass)
$119,900
Upscale double block with
separate utilities. One side
has large remodeled kitchen
with 3 bedrooms, other side
has 2 bedrooms with garage
and 2 car carport. Stucco Ex-
terior, most appliances in-
cluded. See add'l photos and
search for this listing at
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS #13-3214.
Call Charlie 829-6200
PITTSTON
A Family Owned
West Pittston Deli
20 Years Operating
Good Re-Occurring Business
Serious Inquires Only
Attorney Joseph A. Dessoye
570-299-5166
Commercial
PITTSTON TWP.
LEASE
Medical/professional space
available. Almost 3,000 sq. ft.
includes all utilities, alarm
system and ample free park-
ing $3,625 per month.
Can be subdivided.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 23,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
For Sale By Owner
PLAINS TWP.
29 Jay Drive
2 story, 4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, on half acre. Fenced
yard with heated in ground
pool. Price Reduced to
$235,500. 570-235-1624
timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
SA VE $7000O FF M SR P !
2012N IS S A N
M URA N O S A W D
V-6, CVT , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
Allo ys , AM / F M / CD
& F lo o rM a ts !
*$279 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r;
Res id u a l= $17,593.20; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h
d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery=
$2202.50. $1500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $500 S ep tBo n u s Ca s h In clu d ed .
STK# N22119
M O DEL# 23212
V IN# 227913
M SRP $32,580
5 A T TH IS 5 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
26,58 0
*
+ T/T
OR
$
279
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
SA VE $6500O R M O R E O N A LL
2012 P A TH FINDER S IN STO C K!! SA VE $2000O FF M SR P !
THE NUM BER 1DEAL ER IN N.E.AND
C ENTRAL PENNS YL VANIA**
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils .
**As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f Au gu s t2 0 12 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 9 /3 0 /12 .

LOWFINANCING!
TOP DOLLAR FOR
YOUR TRADE!
OV E R
300
N E W N IS S A N S
A V A IL A BL E
HUGE
SAVINGS
ON ALL
NEW2012
NISSANS
2012N IS S A N
S E N TRA 2.0S S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !
*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $10,292.60;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22430
M O DEL# 12112
V IN# 756446
M SRP $19,420
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
SA VE $3000O FF M SR P !
B U Y FOR
$
16,420
*
+ T/T
OR
$
18 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
2012N IS S A N
ROGUE S FW D
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, S p la s h Gu a rd s ,
F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
*$199 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,908;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK# N21596
M O DEL# 22112
V IN# 274973
M SRP $23,050
7 A T TH IS 7 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
SA VE $4000O R M O R E
O N A LL 2012 R O G U ES!!
B U Y FOR
$
18 ,995
*
+ T/T
OR
$
199
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
O NLY 50
2012 R O G U ES
R EM A IN
H U R R Y !
2013N IS S A N
A L TIM A 2.5S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C,
PW , PDL , T ilt,
Zero Gra vity
S ea ts , F lo o rM a ts
& M u ch M o re!
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $11,837.80; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22468
M O DEL# 13013
V IN# 125432
M SRP $22,410
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,410
*
+ T/T
OR
$
259
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
2012N IS S A N
P A THFIN DE R S 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
AM / F M / CD, Allo ys ,
F lo o rM a ts
& M u ch M o re!
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles
p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,834.35; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru
NM AC @ T ier1; $2500 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2702.50. $1750
Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $1000 S ep tBo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed .
STK# N22166
M O DEL# 25012
V IN# 625154
M SRP $32,315
6 A T TH IS 6 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
25,8 15
*
+ T/T
OR
$
259
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $250 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 S EP T B ON U S CAS H
SA VE $6000O R M O R E O N A LL
2012 M U R A NO S IN STO C K!!
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H & $50 0 S EP T B ON U S CAS H
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S L IM ITE D E DITION
V-6, CVT , A/ C, S u n ro o f,
Bla ck W heels , F lo o r
M a ts , AM / F M / CD,
M u ch, M u ch M o re!
*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19,627.95;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK# N22368
M O DEL# 16112
V IN# 861635
M SRP $34,435
5 A T TH IS 5 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
27,435
*
+ T/T
OR
$
28 9
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $350 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
H U R R Y ! H U R R Y !
WERE
SCHOOLING
THE
COMPETITION
2012N IS S A N A L TIM A
2.5S COUP E
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, L ea ther, Prem iu m Pa cka ge, F o g L ights ,
M o o n ro o f, Bo s e S o u n d , Cn v. Pkg, & M u ch M o re!
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$16,710.90; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o r
tra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22155
M O DEL# 15112
V IN# 260196
M SRP $31,530
2 A T TH IS 2 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
26,530
*
+ T/T
OR
$
299
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $5000O FF M SR P !
2012N IS S A N XTE RRA
S 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, Va lu e Pkg, AM / F M / CD, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , & M u ch M o re!
*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l=
$15,873; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2500 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e
eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2702.50.
STK# N21979
M O DEL# 24212
V IN# 513857
M SRP $30,525
6 A T TH IS 6 A T TH IS
P R IC E! P R IC E!
B U Y FOR
$
26,525
*
+ T/T
OR
$
299
*
L EAS E FOR
P ER
M O.
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
SA VE $4000O R M O R E O N A LL
2012 XTER R A S IN STO C K!!
SA VE $$$
O N TH E NEW
A LTIM A !!!
*Tax and Tag additional. Prior Sales Excluded. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors. All rebates &incentives applied. ** 0%APR in lieu of rebates. Ask for details.
**As per NISSAN Montly Sales Volume Report as of August 2013. All Prices based on immediate delivery iin stock vehicles only. All ofers expire 9/30/13.
WERE
SCHOOLING
THE
COMPETITION
2014 NISSAN
VERSANOTE SVHATCHBACK
STK# N23864
MOD# 11614
VIN# 356442
MSRP $17,115
4 Cyl., CVT, A/C, PW, PDL, Cruise,
Tilt, Floor Mats and Splash
Guards and much more!
2 AT THIS
PRICE! ONLY 24 MONTH LEASE @$189 PLUS TAX
BUY FOR
$
16,995
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
189
*
PER
MO.
*189 per month plus tax, 24 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$12,151.65; Must be approved thru NMAC @Tier 1;
$800.50 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$1000.00. $425 NISSAN Lease Rebate included.
2013 NISSAN
SENTRAS SDN
STK# N24035
MOD# 12013
VIN# 753002
MSRP $18,960
4 Cyl., CVT, Alloys, Bluetooth,
PW, PDL, Floor Mats, Splash
Guards and much more!!
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN SENTRAS IN STOCK ONLY!!
BUY FOR
$
17,495
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
219
*
PER
MO.
*219 per month plus tax, 36 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$10,996.80; Must be approved thru NMAC @
Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$0. $900 NISSAN Lease Rebate included.
3 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH
2013 NISSAN
ALTIMA2.5S SDN
STK# N23628
MOD# 13113
VIN# 547941
MSRP $24,645
4 Cyl., CVT, A/C, PW, PDL,
Tilt, Zero Gravity, Seats, Floor
Mats and much more!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
BUY FOR
$
19,999
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
249
*
PER
MO.
*249 per month plus tax, 36 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$14,540.55; Must be
approved thru NMAC @Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @
delivery=$0. $375 NISSAN Lease Rebate and $600 Equipment Allowance Applied.
W/ $1000 NISSAN REBATE. $500 NMAC CAPTIVE
CASH & $600 NISSAN EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN ALTIMAS IN STOCK ONLY!!
2013 NISSAN
ROGUE SVAWD
STK# N24025
MOD# 22413
VIN# 652557
MSRP $25,220
4 Cyl., CVT, A/C, Alloys, Bluetooth,
Roof Rails, Rear Tinted Glass, Power
Seat and much more!!
BUY FOR
$
21,520
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
259
*
PER
MO.
*259 per month plus tax, 39 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$13,871.00; Must
be approved thru NMAC @Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total
@ delivery=$0. $2,250 NISSAN Lease Rebate included.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN ROGUES IN STOCK ONLY!!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $1000 NISSAN REBATE &$500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH
2013 NISSAN
MURANOSVAWD
STK# N22962
MOD# 23413
VIN# 302925
MSRP $37,905
V-6, CVT, A/C, Bluetooth, Navi,
Bose Sound, PWR, Liftgate and
much, much more!!
BUY FOR
$
29,905
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
379
*
PER
MO.
*379 per month plus tax, 39 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$19,710.60; Must be approved thru
NMAC @Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$0. $1500 NISSAN
LEASE REBATE INCLUDED & $1000 CUSTOMER BONUS + $2450 EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE APPLIED.
W/ $500 NISSAN REBATE, $500 NMAC CASH, $1000
CUSTOMER BONUS CASH &$2450 EQUIPMENT ALLOWANCE.
5 AT THIS
PRICE!
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN MURANOS IN STOCK ONLY!!
SAVE
$8000
OFF MSRP!
V-6, CVT, Leather, Rear DVD, PW,
PDL, Cruise, Tilt, Alloys and much,
much more!
BUY FOR
$
37,999
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
489
*
PER
MO.
*489 per month plus tax, 36 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$22,960.20; Must be approved thru
NMAC @Tier 1; $1800 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$2000. NISSAN
LEASE REBATE INCLUDED.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN PATHFINDERS IN STOCK ONLY!!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $1000 NISSAN REBATE &$500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH
SAVE
$7000
OFF MSRP!
2013 NISSAN
PATHFINDER
PLATINUM
4x4
STK# N23225
MOD# 25613
VIN# 637981
MSRP $45,020
2013 NISSAN
FRONTIER SVC.C. 4X4 6 speed
STK# N23428
MOD# 32463
VIN# 722605
MSRP $28,835
V-6, 6 Speed, A/C, PW, PDL,
Cruise, Tilt and much, much
more!
3 AT THIS
PRICE!
BUY FOR
$
25,835
*
+T/T
OR
LEASE FOR
$
299
*
PER
MO.
*299 per month plus tax, 39 month lease; 12,000 miles per year; Residual=$16,724.30; Must be approved thru NMAC
@Tier 1; $0 cash down or trade equity. (+) plus registration fees; total @ delivery=$0. $500 NISSAN CUSTOMER
BONUS CASH INCLUDED.
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISSAN FRONTIERS IN STOCK ONLY!!
W/ $500 NISSAN REBATE, $500 NMAC CAPTIVE CASH &
$500 CUSTOMER BONUS CASH.
2013 NISSAN
TITANSVC.C. 4X4
V-8, AUTO, Value Truck Package, Alloys,
Rear Camera, Tow Hitch, Blue Tooth,
Satellite Radio and much, much more!
BUY FOR
$
30,905
*
+T/T
SIMILAR SAVINGS ON ALL NEW 2013
NISAN TITANS IN STOCK ONLY!!
2 AT THIS
PRICE!
W/ $2500 NISSAN REBATE, $500 NMAC CAPTIVE
CASH & $2350 CUSTOMER BONUS CASH
SAVE
$9000
OFF MSRP!
STK# N23331
MOD# 36413
VIN# 300071
MSRP $39,905
OVER
360
NEWNISSANS
AVAILABLE
HUGE
SAVINGS
ON ALL
NEW 2013
NISSANS

TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 3D


PAGE 4D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 9D
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Call 570-970-7307 to Get Started!
Mention This Ad and Get
25% OYour App Development!
Your customers are using iPhones, iPads, laptops and
mobile devices. We can help your business launch
mobile solutions which can help you connect with
existing customers and attract new customers.
More Local Businesses are TApping Into It. Get Your App Today!
*
plus one-time setup fee of $1,000.
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Houses For Sale
JENKINS TWP.
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English Tudor in a
desirable neighborhood. Mod-
ern kitchen with cherry cabin-
ets, stai nl ess steel appl i -
ances, island with Jenn air &
tile floor. Separate glass sur-
rounded breakf ast room.
Family room with gas fire-
pl ace & hardwood fl oors.
Formal dining room with bay
wi ndow. Fr ench door s
throughout. Master bedroom
suite with master bath, walk-
in closet & separate sitting
room. Lower level rec-room
and office. Two car garage.
Pittston Area School District.
MLS#13-1076
Price Reduced
$285,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
KINGSTON
Roomy, bright & cheery de-
scribes this 3 story home with
traditional charm. 5 BR, 2.5
BA, 2 stairways , wood fire-
place, solid wood doors, 3rd
fl. would make a great in-law
suite. One Year Home War-
ranty Included!
MLS 13-3669
$229,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
283 REYNOLDS ST.
Spacious four bedroom home
with plenty of charm. Hard-
wood floors, leaded windows,
accent fireplace and built-in
bookshelves. First floor laun-
dry/power room, three-sea-
son porch and a 16x32 in-
ground pool. Move-in condi-
tion with newer roof, siding
and windows, ductless air, all
appliances and alarm system.
#13-3406
$189,900
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
Green Acres
213 Joseph Drive
Meticulously maintained 3
bedroom rancher with 2
modern baths. Modern kit-
chen. Sunken living room.
Formal dining room. First floor
family room. Central air condi-
tioning. Oversized carport.
Patio. Loaded with upgrades
and extras. Quiet street.
MLS #12-4661. $225,000.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
822-5126
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$268,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
$239,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in Oakwood
Park, Laflin. 13 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 baths. 2 car garage
and large corner lot. Lots of space
for the large or growing family.
www. atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
floors, NEW furnace, 1 car gar-
age, large yard and covered
patio in very convenient loca-
tion. Great curb appeal and
plenty of off street parking. Rt.
315 to light @ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd. Home is
on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL ROAD
Spacious Modern Tri-Level,
4 bedroom with 3.5 bath,
Large Kitchen, family room
with fireplace, dining room
and living room. Attached 3
car garage, gas heat, cent-
ral air, central vac-system.
Closet and Storage Space.
Second lot included. Minutes
from I-81 and Pennsylvania
Turn pike. $374,900.
570-237-0101
LARKSVILLE
PENDING
$54,900
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
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PAGE 10D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Houses For Sale
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
570-760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
MOUNTAIN TOP
A 1.17 acre serene setting &
a l arge pi cni c grove wi th
stream makes this move in
ready 3 BR bi level a must
see property! Theres an eat
in kitchen with breakfast bar,
a formal DR with sliders to a
private deck, ample LR with
picture window, Master BR
suite, 25 LL Rec Room with
bath, oversized 2 car gar-
age with large paved drive.
MLS 13 3516
$259,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
570-287-1196
MOUNTAIN TOP
Immaculate 3/4 bedroom bi-
level on half acre lot offers
privacy & outdoor beauty.
Convenient U shaped kit-
chen opens to dining area.
Hardwood floors in much of
house. Family room in lower
level has tile floor & brick
mantle ready for wood burn-
er. Office can be 4th bed-
room. Perennials comprise
extensive outdoor landscap-
ing, along with a 10x17 deck,
15x 16 pat i o & 20x 12
Studi o/offi ce. Home War-
ranty.
MLS#13 2914
$189,000
Call Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
MOUNTAINTOP
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Sept 22nd , 1-3 PM.
Beautifully maintained 4 BR,
2 BA stream front home on
cul-de-sac end of Oak Drive,
oak ki tchen cabi nets, ti l e
counter-tops. Four zone heat-
ing & central AC, large formal
sunken living room with step
up to dining room, oak hard-
wood floors, tile in baths, sun-
room overl ooki ng stream.
Enormous backyard framed
by babbling brook. Suspen-
sion bridge overlooks stream
wi t h access t o nat ural l y
wooded pl ayground.
42oakdrive.2seeit.com
570-510-5452
MOUNTAIN TOP
Well cared for 2 story on quiet
street. Eat in kitchen, dining
room, living room along with
sun room comprise the first
floor. 2 generous bedrooms w/
closets and full bath on 2nd
floor. Walk up attic provides
easy storage. Hardwood floors
and beautiful wood. 2 addition-
al buildings on lot offer many
possibilities and Storage! 1
year Home Warranty to buyer.
MLS 13 2817
$116,900
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
Houses For Sale
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
Rear 395 E.
Washington St.
Double Block Home,
Each Side:
Large Living Rm., Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Vinyl Sid-
ing, Brand New Roof New:
Berber Carpets, Paint, Floor-
ing, With Backyard Deck
length of House Have In-
come Tomorrow or Live for
Free! Appraised at $65,000
listing at $47,950 or
BEST OFFER!!!
570-916-2043
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
Don't like yard work? Then
consider this home. Large liv-
ing room area w/ductless wall
a/c unit. Gas heat.
MLS #13-3775
$34,900
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
Penn Lake
Lakefront Cottage
(pennlake.org).
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
large living room, large en-
closed heated porch, eat-in
kitchen, laundry room, at-
tached shed, wood burning
stove, electric baseboard
heat, 1300 sq. feet, public
sewer. Beautiful views and
wonderful lake community.
Some furniture negotiable.
No realtors please.
Call 856-217-9531
or 610-357-3338
or email preedys@aol.com
PITTSTON
47 Vine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
$84.900
57 Dewitt St.
Cute Cape Cod with 3 bedrooms,
vinyl replacement windows, Pergo
flooring and walk up attic. Put this
one on your list.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-1038
CALL CHARLIE
PITTSTON
80 Rear Parsonage Street
Move right into this 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
Pergo floors. New plumbing,
new wiring & new replace-
ment wi ndows. di recti ons:
Main St, Pittston to parson-
age St; left on Miller St; right
on Rear Parsonage St.; home
is on the right.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3689
$47,900
Keri Best
570-885-5082
PITTSTON
76 Rear Parsonage Street
Nice 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom
home with large yard. Direc-
tions: Main St, Pittston to Par-
sonage St.; left on Miller St;
r i ght on Rear par sonage
St reet ; home i s on ri ght .
MLS 13-3690
$37,900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Keri Best
570-885-5082
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
HALF-DOUBLE
Bank Owned, great invest-
ment or first home buyer
property. Price reduced to
sell. $32,900. MLS#12-4494
Call John Piszak
570-313-8586
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
PITTSTON
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
MLS #13-3293
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570-592-3966
PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto
Girard Ave; home is on the left.
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
Classic 3 story brick home of-
fers spacious living on 3 floors.
Many areas nicely detailed
w/HW floors. Professional use
possible as separate entrance
leads to FR which could be an
office. New roof & soffets done
in 2011. 4 ductless heat/air
uni ts i mprove effi ci ency of
house. 2nd floor bedroom con-
verted to large laundry - easily
converted back. Large WI attic.
MLS 13 893
$125,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor.
MLS #13-2814
New Price $45,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHAVERTOWN
2103 Hillside Road
Recently renovated two story
on large lot features modern
kitchen with granite counters,
Living room and Dining room
with hardwood floors, large
treated deck overlooking level
yard. 3 Bedrooms, one on
first floor. Master Bedroom
upstairs with full master bath.
Oversized Detached 2 car
garage. Gas heat. Well water
and public sewers.
Great opportunity.
MLS#13-27
$157,500
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
696-1195
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
433 FAIRVIEW ST
PRICE REDUCED!
Seller says make me a good
offer and youll be moving in
before the holidays! Motiv-
ated seller-relocating. This is
a great home in a nice neigh-
borhood, well out of the flood
zone. Watch the fall colors
unfold as you look over the
valley from the front porch.
Modern kitchen with vaulted
ceiling, modern bath, LR, DR
and 2 generous BRs. Many
updates including new roof,
windows, front door, lighting,
w-to-w carpeting, interior/ex-
terior painting, security sys-
tem, etc. OSP and large level
yard with mature trees and
flowering bushes. For more
details and to view the pho-
t o s o n l i n e , g o t o :
www.prudenti al real estate.
com and enter PRU5B4G9 in
the Homes Search.
MLS #13-2080
$77,000
Mary Ellen and Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazing, well maintained.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049.
$59,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742
570-474-6307
Be Inspired!
Look for it every
Saturday in
Read The Times Leader's "AT HOME"
section every Saturday for ideas.
Subscribe today. 829-5000.
Indulge your senses with
stories dedicated to the home
and garden at their very best:
At Home With, home and
homeowners histories
Do-it-yourself projects
Home Renovations, before &
after stories with photos
Sandra Snyders column
Alan J. Heavens, Q&A
GET IT
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 11D
PAGE 12D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Houses For Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
221 Kossack St.
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x
188 lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $43,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
Houses For Sale
WAPWALLOPEN
895 Hobbie Road
Wonderful Country Living de-
scribes the location of this
Well-Maintained 2-Story
Home. Features Remodeled
Kicthen, LR/DR Combo,
Den/Office, 3 Bdrms., 1.75
Baths, Enclosed Sunroom +
4-Car Detached Garage.
MLS# 13-2816.
$149,900.
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
WEST PITTSTON
40 Exeter Avenue
A grand stone wraparound
porch with swing surrounds
this century house loaded with
charm and character. Marble
entry foyer, 1st floor office with
tile floor, grand staircse, form-
al living room,& sitting & din-
i ng rooms wi t h hardwood
floors. eat in kitchen, master
bedroom with walk in closet &
screened porch. walk up attic,
o f f s t r e e t p a r k i n g i n
rear........this outstanding home
is in move in condition and is
priced right @ $149,900.
Call Pat today @
Smith Hourigan Group
570-287-1196
Houses For Sale
WEST WYOMING
$69,900
384 Tripp St.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story with
large kitchen, dining room and liv-
ing room. Private rear yard, nice
neighborhood gas heat.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2179
Call Charlie
WHITE HAVEN
178 West Woodhaven Drive
Relax on deck watching sun
rise over Woodheaven Lake -
- Home has 4 bedroom, 2 1/2
baths, living room with fire-
place, dining room with split
system wall A/C. And spiral
stair to 4th bedroom or office
& walk-in huge attic, family
room great stone fireplace
leads to patio, pool
room/game room features
split system in wall AC, Over-
size garage, with workshop,
matching shed, double lot 1/2
acre, Two paved driveways
one on each side of home.
Basketball court (26x40)
paved with Lights and ad-
justable basket, shared Dock,
and small helicopter pad
presently covered by double
swing facing lake. Appoint-
ment only.
MLS#13-3189
$314,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
WILKES-BARRE
35 Hillard St
$71,900
Well cared for 3 bedroom
home with walk up attic, nice
fenced in yard, rear deck,
front porch, hardwood floors,
eat in kitchen, first floor laun-
dry, move right in. Oil heat but
gas is available in house.
MLS #13-2823.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415.
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
This is a great investment op-
p o r t u n i t y . . . s e p a r a t e
utilities...very motivated seller.
MLS #13-1473
$75,000
Call Maria Huggler
570-586-3575
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
570-586-9636
WILKES-BARRE
$174,900
105 Plymouth Ave.
This lovely Bi-level home fea-
tures 3 bedrooms, 1 and 1/2
bathrooms, in ground pool with
pool bar and deck, central air.
Hardwood floors, gas fireplace,
finished lower level, fenced in
yard and 2 year garage with
ONE YEAR HOME WAR-
RANTY. (directions: Old RIver
Road to Dagobert, at 2nd stop
sign turn R onto Plymouth Ave.
Home is on left in 2nd block)
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2144
Keri Best 570-885-5082
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
276 High Street
Very Affordable property lov-
ingly cared for and ready for
you to move in! Heat-a-lator
fireplace provides cozy win-
ters and you can enjoy the
patio in the summer. Newer
kitchen, replacement win-
dows, new 200 amp electric
and low taxes. MLS#13-3212
$38,500
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
WILKES-BARRE
$69,900
319 N. Washington Street.
Large 3 story home with 3 bed-
rooms of each of the 2nd and 3rd
floors. Hardwood floors in living
room and dining room, gas heat,
first floor laundry. 1 3/4 baths,
large eat in kitchen, central vac,
alarm system, low taxes.
MLS#13-2348
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
$52,900
247 Lehigh Street
Cozy two story, move right in. Gas
Heat, central air, 3 bedroom, 1
bath.
MLS # 13-1510
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377 timesleader.com
Get news
when it
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 15D
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Houses For Sale
YATESVILLE
7 Paiges Dr.
$169,900
Custom 3 bedroom town-
home with all the bells and
whistles. LR, Dr, kitchen with
all appliances, 2 1/2 baths,
OSP, garage and driveway.
MLS #13-3646.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Phil Semenza
570-313-1229
YATESVILLE
$129,900
617 Willowcrest Dr.
End unit. 2 bedroom townhome
with master bath on 2nd floor.
Needs a little TLC.
MLS 13-569
Call Tom
570-262-7716
YATESVILLE
$119,000
15 Pittston Ave.
Two bedroom bi-level with
very private rear yard, new
vinyl windows, split system
a/c unit. Enjoy the serenity of
this home while being
conveniently located in a
desirable neighborhood.
Search for this listing with
additional photos on
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS #13-3771.
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
NO CLOSING COSTS
NO TIME FRAME TO BUILD
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT
10% DOWN FINANCING
LOTS OF ELBOW ROOM
FOR PRIVACY
2 ACRES with view $29,900
7 ACRES with view $79,900
Call 570-245-6288
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
road front on 2 roads. Al l
wooded. $385,000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DORRANCE TWP.
Well located 58.84 acre parcel
with 36.62 acres zoned com-
mercial. Great views. Ideal for
recreational type business. Ad-
ditional land available.
$339,000
Call Dave Hourigan
570-715-7750
570-474-6307
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
EXETER TOWNSHIP
VACANT LAND
Build your dream home on
this lot of almost 1 acre in a
small quiet development on
Bodle Road. $29,900.
MLS#13-3803
Call John Piszak
570-313-8586
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9 Pinewood Dr
Build your new home in a great
neighborhood. Convenient loc-
ation near highways, airport,
casino and shopping
156 x 110 x 150 x 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin
Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner
of Pinewood Dr. and Hickory-
wood Dr. MLS 13-23
atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
PAGE 18D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Land (Acreage)
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
WHITE HAVEN
Middleburg Road
Fabulous 5 acre flat wooded
lot. Public sewer. Old rock
wall along south property line.
Zoned rural agriculture.
MLS#12-3503. $57,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new home here. 2
new developments, prices
range from $35,000 to
$39,900. Public water sewer
& gas available. NOT in flood
zone. Lot sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105. www.at-
lasrealtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
Lots
BACK MOUNTAIN
1/2 ACRE LOTS
In an upscale development,
with public sewer, gas and
underground utilities.
Privacy and great views.
10 minutes to Kingston on
Hillside Road. Starting at
$47,900. 570-283-0547
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
NUANGOLA
Raeder Ave.
Private 90 x 200 wooded lot.
Recent l y sur veyed. Di r :
Naungola Rd., right on Lake
Ave., left on Raeder Ave. Lot
is 50 ft past last house on left
& at end of paved road. You'll
see sign 50 ft in woods on left
.Call to walk land or for addi-
tional info.
MLS 13-3194
$29,500
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
NUANGOLA
Gay Ave.
Wooded building lot 150' road
frontage, 200' deep, near I-81,
Nuangola Exit. Public sewers.
Lot will require well. Turn right
at Rice Elem., left at stop sign,
quick right on Gay Ave., prop-
erty on left (lots 8, 9 & 10).
Recently surveyed.
MLS# 13-3195
$30,500
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
570-474-6307
Lots
PRINGLE
LOT FOR SALE
92'X120' Valley View Drive
Last Available lot on
Developed Street
High and Dry, Sewer hook-up.
$45,000. 570-287-1322
YATESVILLE
$49,900
Prime lots read for the right
builder. Apx 100x150 priced
to sell.
www.atlasrealyinc.com
Call Phil Semenza
570-313-1229.
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
2 bedroom. Water included.
$550 + utilities,
security & lease. No pets.
570-472-9494
ASHLEY
1st floor, 2 bedroom apart-
ment, freshly painted, wall to
wall carpeting, appliances,
washer/dryer hook-up, large
yard, front and side porches,
off-street parking. Sewer and
garbage included. Utilities by
tenant. No Pets. $450.
Security and 1st months rent.
570-474-5505
AVOCA
3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting,
a p p l i a n c e s , c o i n - o p
washer/dryer, off street park-
ing, $420+ security. No pets.
570-655-1606
BACK MOUNTAIN
Two 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartments with all appli-
ances, $650 & $795/month +
security & utilities. Credit
check. 570- 696-5417
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment Homes
FALL SPECIAL
$500 Off
1st MONTHS RENT
FEATURING
- Washer & Dryer
- Central Air
- Fitness Center
- Pet Friendly
- Easy Access to I-81
Newly Renovated
Sundeck Pool
Mon Fri. 9 5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
(Off Route 309)
Call for a special app't
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
DALLAS
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Includes
heat, water & garbage. Off street
parki ng. No pets/no smoki ng.
$600/month + 1 month security.
570-690-1591
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DALLAS
Newberry Estates
Furnished or Unfurnished
Carriage House, 1 bedroom
washer, dryer. Country club
amenities included. No pets,
no smokers. $925/month.
210-542-0635
DALLAS
MULTI-LEVEL LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
IN NEWBERRY ESTATES
3 bedroom, 3.5 baths in a quiet
country setting. Includes cent-
ral air & vacuum, 2 car garage,
refrigerator, range, dishwash-
er, water & trash & all exterior
maintenance. Amenities in-
clude golfing, swimming & ten-
nis. $1,475 month. + utilities.
Call Bernie 655-4815
ROTHSTEIN
REALTORS
888-244-2714
DALLAS
2nd floor Municipal Road
$550. Mo. Electric heat, NO
Pets. 1 bedroom plus 1 smal-
ler bedroom, laundry, kitchen,
living and dining room.
570-332-3562
EDWARDSVILLE
2 Bedroom, recently
remodeled, hardwood floors
throughout, microwave, dish-
washer, washer, dryer, stove,
refrigerator. Water included.
No Pets. $550/month.
570-709-5178. Bit Keller LLC
EDWARDSVILLE
2 bedroom double with re-
cently updated kitchen & bath.
Fenced in yard and off street
parking. $675/month.
Call Crystal Banfield
570-715-7741
570-474-6307
FORTY FORT
1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor +
attic, new stove & refrigerator,
wash/dryer hook-up, off-street
parking. Water & heat in-
cluded. No pets. No Smoking.
1 year lease, $485/mo + secur-
ity, credit & background check.
570-947-8097
Apartments /Townhouses
FORTY FORT
Newly renovated. Great neigh-
borhood. Non-smoking. Oak
composite floors, new wall to
wall carpeting in bedrooms,
new windows. 3 paddle fans,
bath with shower. Stove, refri-
gerator, dishwasher. OSP.
Coin-op laundry. $600/mo. +
gas, electric & water. Refer-
ences required. No pets.
Available Oct. 1st!
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
FORTY FORT
All utilities included. Clean, 4
room, 2nd floor. Appliances.
Covered parking. Non
smoking, cat considered,
starting at $700/month.
570-714-2017
FORTY FORT
Newly renovated 2 bedroom,
large living room with hard-
wood floors, off street parking,
washer / dryer hookup. Sun
porch. No pets. $700/month +
security & references.
570-760-2362
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2nd floor apt in good
neighborhood. 1 bedroom, liv-
ing room, kitchen & tile bath.
Hi gh cei l i ngs & hardwood
fl oors. 1 year l ease. $750
month + security & references.
Tenant pays electric & gas. No
smoking. No Pets.
570-313-9955
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TWP
NEWLY REMODELED. 1st
floor efficiency. 1 bedroom,
living room, kitchen, bath &
l aundry. New carpet & ti l e
f l oors. St ove, ref ri gerat or,
washer & dryer included. Non
smoki ng. No pet s. 1 year
lease. $550 month + security &
references. Tenant pays elec-
tric & gas. 570-313-9955
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
WEST END ROAD
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER
TWP.
3029 S. Main st.
2nd floor very large
3 bedrooms, wall to wall
carpeting central air, eat in
kitchen with appliances. Off
street parking. Washer &
dryer hookup. Heat & cook-
ing gas included. Tenant
pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom, Lake Front
Apartments. Lake rights, off-
street parking. No Pets. Lease,
Security and References.
570-639-5920
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
1st fl oor. Located i n qui et
neighborhood. Kitchen, living
room, dining room, sun room,
bath, 3 bedrooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of closets, built-in
linen closet & hutch. Hard-
wood & carpeted floors. Fire-
place. Storage room. Yard.
Washer/dryer, stove/fri dge.
Heat & hot water included. 1
year lease + security. $950.
570-283-4370
KINGSTON
Pierce Street
3rd floor, 1-2 bedroom, 1 bath.
Newly remodeled building, off
street parking, all appliances,
including washer/dryer. $575 +
utilities. No pets, no smoking.
570-814-3281
KINGSTON
Spacious 2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. 1 bath. Newly re-
modeled building, Living room,
Dining room, eat-in Kitchen,
private front balcony, off street
parking, all appliances, includ-
ing washer/dryer. Available
now. $675+ utilities. No pets,
no smoking. 570-814-3281
KINGSTON
2 BR, range, refrigerator, wall-
to-wall washer/dryer hook up,
walk up attic. Concrete cellar,
2 porches. Very clean. Must
see. No pets. $450 + utilities &
security. 570-574-1276 or
570-288-4860
KINGSTON
2nd floor, 1 bedroom, 1 bath,
kitchen,living room,washer &
dryer. Next to post office, off
street parking. $500 + utilities,
water & sewer included, 1 year
lease, security & references,
no pets, no smoking.
Call 570-822-9821
KINGSTON
3 r d f l o o r . 1 b e d r o o m.
$600/month, everythi ng i n-
cl uded. NO smoki ng. Very
unique! 570-814-3859
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, 1.5
baths & office. All appliances,
washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstons Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed,
Central Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
KINGSTON
West Union St.
In 2 family house, 1 unit - 4
bedroom for rent.
570-223-2937
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. Ar-
chitecturally designed. Cent-
ral air. Off street parking.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LUZERNE
1st floor studio $415/month.
No Pets, Electric heat, Kitchen
& bath. Laundry room in base-
ment. 570-332-3562
LUZERNE
276 Bennett Street
1st floor, 1 bedroom, tiled bath,
kitchen with refrigerator and
stove, off-street parking, water
& sewer paid. $470 + utilities &
security. No pets/smoking.
References. 570-288-7309.
Leave message.
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
MINERS MILLS
1 & 1/2 bedrooms, completely
redone, washer/dryer hook up,
heat & water included. Quiet
neighborhood with yard and
screened in back porch. No
pets. $575/month + security. 1
year lease. 570-430-0175
MINERSMILLS
2 bedroom, 1st floor, $550/
month plus $550 security. Pay
your own utilities. Gas heat.
Fridge & stove. background &
credit check. NO PETS.
570-825-2306
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 bedroom apartments with
media rooms, recently ren-
ovated, New carpeting & ap-
pliances From $550 & up.
570-854-8785
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644
NANTICOKE
Large 1 bedroom. Hardwood
floors, full kitchen, large dining
room. No pets, no smoking.
$465. Water, sewer & trash in-
cluded. 570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, washer/dryer hook
up 1 year lease. $385 + utilit-
ies. 570-237-0968.
Apartments /Townhouses
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1 bedroom
apartment. Newly renovated,
off street parking, washer/
dryer hook up. $700 heat, wa-
ter and sewer included.
570-443-0770
PITTSTON
Large 2 BR, 2nd floor apart-
ment. Newly painted with new
window blinds, eat in kitchen,
built in hutch. Includeds refri-
gerator, range, washer/dryer
hook up & sewage. $500 + se-
curity.
Call Bernie Madrack
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
PITTSTON
3 bdrm., 2nd floor, Eat in kit-
chen. Washer/dryer hook up.
Storage area. Small yard &
rear deck. $850/month + se-
curity. Heat & sewer included.
Call 570-650-7265
PITTSTON
3RD FLOOR
Available Now! 3 bedroom.
$600 + security. Sewer &
garbage included. 574-4380
PITTSTON
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 bath
apartment on 2nd floor. Over-
size bay windows, hardwood
floors, granite counters, stain-
less appliances. All tile &
stone showers. Central air,
gas heat. Washer & dryer.
Water & garbage included. No
dogs. $1,250/month.
570-760-7326
PITTSTON
Immaculate 1 bedroom, large
kitchen, enclosed patio, wash-
er/dryer hookup. Brand new
carpeting. Off street parking.
Yar d. $500/ mo wat er &
garbage included. 1 block to
park. 570-362-0581
PLAINS
Clean ground level 1 bedroom.
Stove, fridge, sewer & water
included. Freshly painted, new
rugs, security & references. No
smoking. No pets. $465/mo.
570-693-1468
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Newly remodeled, 2 bedroom.
Water included. $600.
570-239-3950
PLYMOUTH
$500.00
Excellent apt. One bed-
room, 1 bath. Included sew-
er, water, off street parking,
kitchen appliances. Close
to WVW H.S. We are look-
ing for clean tenants to rent
clean living space.
570-855-3329.
PLYMOUTH
Cozy 3 bedroom on 2 floors.
$650/mo. 570-760-0511
PLYMOUTH
Nice, clean 2 bedroom apart-
ment . Cl ean ki t chen, r e-
modeled bath. Quiet neighbor-
hood. 105 Davenport St. $495
per month plus security and
utilities. Vacant now. Please
call night or day at 674-3120.
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WARRIOR RUN
Close to Hanover Ind. Park.
Remodeled 1 bedroom, fridge,
stove, eat in kitchen. Sewer,
water & garbage paid, electric
by tenant. $425/mo + lease &
security. 570-301-8200
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
MAINTENANCE
FREE!
One block to
elementary School
(WY Area).
2 Bedrooms. Off-Street
Parking No Smoking.
$565. + utilities,
security, last month.
570-885-4206
WEST PITTSTON
1 or 2 bedrooms, washer/dry-
er hookup. Air conditioning.
Heat, water & sani tary i n-
cl uded.
570-430-3095
WEST PITTSTON
$595 a month. Heat, Water
and Sewer included. 1 bed-
room, living room, dining
room, wall to wall carpeting,
washer/dryer, refrigerator and
stove. Modern kitchen and
bath. 2nd floor. 1 month se-
curity with 1 year lease. Ref-
erences required, No Pets.
570-446-7682
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, kitchen
appliances, washer/dryer
hook-up. $550/month + utilit-
ies and security. One month
security. No Pets.
570-647-5053
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 2 bath,
washer/dryer hook-up, central
air and heat. Built in garage.
$700/month+utilities. A month
and half security. No Pets.
570-647-5053
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIV
CAMPUS
1, 2, 3, or 4 bedrooms. Wood
floors, no pets, starting $450.
all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
142 s. franklin St
2nd floor, 1 large bedroom
w/office, fireplace, off street
parking, 14' ceilings, hard-
wood & tile floors. Stove, D/W,
microwave, garbage disposal,
washer/dryer, 24 hour main-
tenance & security cameras.
$900/month + security, utilities
& 1 year lease. Call Janice at
570-706-6010
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, off street parking,
washer & dryer hook up.
freshly painted No pets. $575
+ utilities & security.
570-822-7657
Wilkes-Barre
3 bedrooms, 2nd
floor, modern, new flooring, re-
frigerator stove, washer/dryer
hookup, water included.
$650 + electric. Section
8 Accepted. 570-301-8200
WILKES-BARRE
307-309 South Street East
2 bedroom apartment on 1st
floor. New floors & carpets,
bi g ki tchen, 6 x 8 covered
porch , large yard. Landlord
p a y s w a t e r & h e a t .
$650/month, $1,000 security
No hook ups. NO PETS.
Call Manny 917-295-6254
718-946-8738
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
72. W. River St.
Newly refurbished, large &
very charmi ng 3 bedroom
dwelling in Historic Mansion in
a beaut i f ul nei ghborhood.
Central Air & Heat. Off-street
parking, Hardwood floors, new
kitchen & appliances. Hot wa-
ter included. $1,240 + security.
570-991-1619
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
Duplex, 2nd floor apartment. 1
bedroom. Heat & hot water in-
cluded. No smoking. No pets.
$500 + security.
Call 570-823-6829
WILKES-BARRE
Hazle Street
Large 1 bedroom, 2nd floor.
Appl i ances, no pets, OSP.
$650 includes all utilities. Se-
curity. 570-822-3991
WILKES-BARRE/Heights
Townhouse type apartments. 2
bedrooms, stove, fridge, wash-
er/ dryer hookup. Off-street
parking. Utilities by tenant. No
pets or smoking. $500/month.
570-825-8355, 6 t o 8 pm
ONLY
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
Near Kings, 2 BR heat & wa-
ter included. $650/month. No
pets. 570-693-0285
WILKES-BARRE
Near Wilkes University
1 & 3 bedroom apartments.
$400 & $600/month +
utilities & 1 month security.
Section 8 OK. No pets.
570-606-9432
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
STUDIO-Short Term Available
Excellent Wilkes University
neighborhood, wood floors, park-
ing. $425, all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
Studio on 3rd floor of historical
building at 281 S. Frankllin St.
Includes kitchenette, bath, &
off street parking. Heat, water,
& garbage removal included
$425/month rent. Call 570-333-
5471 with references.
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled single home. 3
bedroom, hardwood floors.
No pets. 215-932-5690
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, sun porch, wall to
wall carpeting, gas heat, off
street parking. $500/mo + utilit-
ies. Application & background
check required. lease, security
& references. No Pets.
570-430-8527
WYOMING
BLANDINA APARTMENTS
Deluxe 2 bedroom. Wall to wall
carpet. Some utilities by ten-
ant. No pets. Non-smoking.
El derl y Communi ty. Qui et ,
safe. Off street parki ng.
570-693-2850
Commercial
EDWARDSVILLE
612-616 Main St.
REDUCED!
OWNER FINANCING
AVAILABLE!!
LEASE PURCHASE OPTION.
Unlimited potential in this once
Iconic location. Space can be
used as restaurant, (coolers &
equipment on site) bar & grill,
including office & living space
the possibilities are endless!
Call agent to make an appoint-
ment & a deal!
MLS 13-2445 $75,500
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
EXETER
OFFICE SPACE
Newly remodeled, 120 sq. ft.
all utilities included, except
phone. Pav ed par k i ng.
$200/month. 1 month free. Call
570-602-1550 for details
KINGSTON
BUSINESS PARK
Large equipmen/storage yard
available. $850/month. Utilit-
ies available. 570-947-3292
AS
LOWAS
$277
12 CHRYSLER 200 LX SEDAN
Only 23,386 Miles, Security Alarm, Automatic, Traction
Control, Steering Wheel Mounted
Audio Controls................................................ NOW$15,500
11 FORD CROWN VICTORIA LX
V8, Leather Seating, Alloy Wheels, Heated
Mirrors, Keyless Entry................................................... $13,900
12 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4
1-Owner, Power Sunroof, Power 8 Way Driver
Seat, Keyless Enter-N-Go, Only 29,426 Miles........... $28,900
12 NISSAN SENTRA 2.0 SEDAN
1-Owner, Only 20,437 Miles, Automatic, Rear
Decklid spoiler, Steering Wheel mounted controls $15,400
11 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 70TH EDITION 4X4
Leather Seating, Navigation, Power Sunroof, Rear Backup Camera, Heated
Front Seats, Aluminum Polished Wheels, Trailer Tow Group,
Blue Tooth Streaming Audio, Only 23,600 Miles .......................... $31,800
06 RAM 1500 THUNDER ROAD QUAD CAB 4X4
Hemi, V-8, Local Trade, Automatic,
Trailer Tow Group, 6 Way Power Drivers Seat ......................... $14,500
12 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4
One Owner, Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle, Freedom hard Top
and the Sunrider Soft Top, Leather Seating w/
Heated Front Seats, Alpine Premium Sound System.. $27,900
12 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING CONVERTIBLE
Automatic, Power Retractable Top, Rear Window Defroster,
Keyless Entry, Power Heated Mirrors, 6-Way
Power Drivers Seat....................................................... $17,700
13 CHEVROLET CRUZE LS
1-Owner, Only 2,000 Miles, Great Fuel Economy, Onstar with Turn by Turn
Directions, XM Sirius Satellite Radio, Side Airbags,
Keyless Remote, Power Windows and Locks...................... $17,500
11 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE 4X4
Heated Front Seats, Fog Lamps, Power Windows,
Power Locks, Automatic, Remote Start,
Available Sirius Satellite Radio......................... $16,900
11 JEEP COMPASS LIMITED EDITION 4X4
Former Chrysler Company Employee Lease Vehicle, Leather Seating,
Heated Front Seats, Power 6 Way Driver Seat,
Premium Sound Group, Automatic, Only 29,477 Miles... $19,900
13 JEEP COMPASS SPORT 4X4
Never Titled, Former Chrysler Company Vehicle, 6 Disc
CD Player, Power Windows, Power Locks,
Heated Mirrors, Only 4,608 Miles...................... $19,900
11 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED 4X4
One Owner, Leather Seating, Power Sunroof, Blue Tooth Streaming
Audio, Heated Front Seats, Rear Park Assist, 18
Aluminum Chrome Wheels, Only 18,671 Miles............... $24,900
11 FORD FUSION SE
1-Owner, Only 19,624 Miles, Power Moonroof, SYNC
Voice Activated System, Power Drivers
Seat, Steering Mounted Audio Controls,
Rear Decklid Spoiler...................................... $16,500
11 LINCOLN MKZ AWD
All Wheel Drive, 1-Owner, Only 20,474 Miles, Power Moonroof,
Leather Seating, Reverse Sensing System,
Available Sirius Satellite Radio, V6,
Heated & Cooled Front Seats...................................... $22,900
13 DODGE CHARGER RALLYE
Black/Red Leather Seating, 18 Aluminum Chrome Clad
Wheels, Rear Spoiler, Heated 1st & 2nd Row Seats, Blue
Tooth Streaming Audio, 8.4 Touch Screen Display,
Sirius Satellite Radio, Only 9,917 Miles .....................$26,900
04 FORD EXPEDITION XLT 4X4
V-8, Rear Air, Towing Package, Running Board............. $8,900
12 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED JET SKYSLIDER 4X4
Former Chrysler Executive Vehicle, Low Miles,
Retractable Panoramic Roof, Leather Seating,
Navigation........................................................... $23,900
10 FORD EDGE LIMITED AWD
All Wheel Drive, Leather Seating, Panoramic Vista Roof, Reverse
Sensing System, Power Lift gate, Sync Voice Activated
System, 20 Chrome Clad Wheels, 6 Disc CD...................$23,400
13 DODGE DART LIMITED
Former Chrysler Company Car, Only 4,900 Miles, Never Titled,
Navigation, Leather Seating, Heated Front Seats, BlindSpot and
Crosspath Detection, Heated Steering Wheel,
Power Sunroof, Rear Backup Camera ....................... $21,900
13 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SLT 4X4
V8, Automatic, Power Windows and Locks, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry........................................................ $27,800
13 RAM 1500 TRADESMAN QUAD CAB 4X4
Former Chrysler Group Company Vehicle, Never Titled,
Spray in Bedliner, Class IV Trailer Hitch,
Only 9,018 Miles.............................................................. $27,900
12 RAM 1500 CREW CAB SLT OUTDOORSMEN 4X4
One Owner, Garmin Navigation, Rear Back Up Camera, Rear Park
Assist, UCONNECT w/ Bluetooth Streaming Audio,
Remote Start, HEMI V8, Only 22,600 Miles................... $32,400
12 DODGE JOURNEY HERO AWD
One Owner, Local Trade, All Wheel Drive, 3rd Row Seating,
Rear Air and Heat, UCONNECT Voice Command w/
Bluetooth Streaming Audio. ......................................... $20,400
12 DODGE JOURNEY R/T AWD
Former Chrysler Company Vehicle, Leather Heated
Seats, Third Row Seating, All Wheel Drive,
Power Sunroof............................................................... $26,900
13 DODGE JOURNEY HERO
V6, 3rd Row Seating, Rear Air & Heat, Power 6 Way
Driver Seat, Alloy Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio ........ $20,900
WE HAND PICK THE BEST NEW CAR TRADE-INS & LEASE TURN-INS &
SELL THEM RIGHT HERE IN TUNKHANNOCK AT A FRACTION OF THEIR
ORIGINAL PRICE. THEY DRIVE LIKE NEW BUT COST THOUSANDS LESS.
www.TunkAutoMart.com
13 KIA SORRENTO LX V6 4X4
Only 10,832 Miles, All Wheel Drive, Third Row
Seating, Bluetooth, Alloy Wheels,
Steering Mounted Audio Controls............. $23,900
12 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER AWD
All Wheel Drive, Navigation, Rear Backup Camera,
Power Sunroof, One Owner,
Only 18,242 Miles............................................ $22,900
13 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT
Rear DVD, Power Sliding Doors, Power Lift Gate,
Rear Back Up Camera, 8 Way Power Driver Seat. $23,400
13 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING
Only 16,397 Miles, Leather Seating, Rear DVD, Power Sliding Doors,
Power Lift Gate, Parkview Rear Back Up Camera,
UCONNECT Voice Command w/Bluetooth Audio........ $26,300
13 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING
Only 14,430 Miles, Leather Seating, Rear DVD, Power
Sliding Doors, Power Lift Gate, Parkview Rear Back
Up Camera, UCONNECT Voice Command
w/Bluetooth Audio......................................... $26,300
13 CHRYLSER 300
Featured in Phantom Black, Former Chrysler Company
Vehicle, Has Never Been Titled, Leather Seating,
Heated Front Seats, Traction Control, Blue Tooth
Streaming Audio, 8 Speed Automatic
Transmission, Only 12,017 Miles.................. $23,900
12 CHRYLSER 300 S V8 AWD
One Owner, Local Trade, Only 12,594 Miles, Dual Pane
Panoramic Sunroof, Forward Collision Warning System,
Cross Path Detection, Navigation, Sirius XM Satellite Radio,
Trafc & Travel Link, V8, All Wheel Drive,
Featured In Bright White ........................................ $32,900
12 CHRYSLER 300S V8 AWD
Former Chrysler Company Vehicle, All Wheel Drive,
Unique Custom Leather Red Seating that is usually
found on SRT models, Blindspot/Crosspath Detection,
5.7 HEMI V8 with Fuel Saving MDS,
Only 8,337 Miles.............................................. $29,900
13 CHRYSLER 300S AWD GLACIER
A Rare Limited Glacier Edition, Never Been Titled,
Save From Thousands Compared To A Brand New
One, Garmin Navigation, Dual Pane
Panoramic Sunroof, Beats Audio by
Dr. Dre Only 12 Miles..................................... $32,900
12 CHRYSLER 300C AWD
This All Wheel Drive Gloss Black 300C is a Former
Chrysler Company Car Equipped With Just About Every
Available Option and Harman Kardon Audio Ground
Breaking Featuring 18 Premium Speakers, Garmin
Navigation, Panoramic Sunroof. See Our
Website For More Details. ............................. $30,900
Clearance Priced
For Quick Sale!
DONT RISK PAYINGTOO MUCH SOMEWHERE ELSE!
Tunkhannock Auto Mart
www.tunkautomart.com
888-323-6924
OPEN FRIDAYS
TIL 8:00 PM!
Jeep

2012 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE


OVERLAND SUMMIT AWD
STK#CC206013
2013 KIA SORENTO
LX V6 4X4
STK#DG403070
NOW
$23,900
2013 CHRYSLER
300
STK#DH643819
NOW
$23,900
NOW
$25,900
2013 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT
More Values...
Hand Picked Just for You!
REAR
DVD
2012 RAM 1500 EXPRESS
CREW CAB 4X4
STK#CS234320
NOW
$31,200
ONLY
7,000
MILES
STK#BZ365051
2011 GMC SIERRA 1500
SLE-1 EXT. CAB 4X4
2011 LINCOLN
MKZ AWD
NOW
$17,500
2013 CHEVROLET
CRUZE LS
STK#D7106049
REAR DVD
ONLY
12,017
MILES
NOW
$21,900
STK#DD194357
2013 DODGE
DART LIMITED
ONLY
4,952
MILES
NOW
$27,700
STK#BW164000
2011 NISSAN
MURANO SL AWD
ONLY
15,182
MILES
NOW
$23,900
2012 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE
LAREDO 4X4
STK#CC265942
V6
2012 CHRYSLER
300 C V8 AWD
NOW
$30,900
STK#CH163842
STK#DU016561
2013 MITSUBISHI
OUTLANDER AWD
NOW
$23,900
SUNROOF
NOW
$23,900
STK#CC463962
2012 NISSAN
FRONTIER SV KING
CAB 4X4
ONLY
7,946
MILES
NOW
$29,600
STK#BC541992
HEMI
V8
2011 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE 4X4
2012 JEEP LIBERTY SKY
SLIDER LIMITED JET
EDITION 4X4
STK#CW112610
ONLY
19,000
MILES
2009 FORD FOCUS
STK#9W181125
NOW
$9,400
NOW
$13,900
2011 FORD CROWN
VICTORIA LX
STK#BX141725
LEATHER
SEATING
NOW
$18,800
2012 CHRYSLER
300S V8 AWD
NOW
$29,900
STK#CH100347
STK#DT527490 STK#DR637061
2013 DODGE
JOURNEY HERO
AWD
NOW
$22,700
ALL
WHEEL
DRIVE
2012 RAM 1500 QUAD
CAB 4X4 OUTDOORSMAN
NOW
$29,900
STK#CS118394
ONLY
6,295
MILES
NOW
$22,900
NOW
$26,300
STK#BR763309
2011 JEEP
COMPASS
LATITUDE 4X4
ONLY
16,202
MILES
ONLY
10,800
MILES
AS
LOWAS
$117
NOW
$22,500
NOW
$38,500
STK#BD191526
NOW
$16,900
AS
LOWAS
$245
Prices are Plus Tax, Registration Fees and Documentation Fees. All payments are for 72 months to qualied buyers with excellent credit @ 6.99 APR. Your rate may
Vary depending on credit rating status. $2499 down payment or trade equity. In addition to tax and registration, doc fees. Must take delivery by 9-27-13
ALL
WHEEL
DRIVE
ONLY
2,400
MILES
ALL
WHEEL
DRIVER
ONLY
8,300
MILES
SOLD
2012 KIA
SORENTO LX 4X4
STK#CG190200
PAGE 20D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Commercial
KINGSTON
COMMERCIAL GARAGE
1250 sq. ft., 12' ceilings,
10' garage door. $550/month
+ utilities.
570-947-3292
KINGSTON
STORAGE/WORKSHOP
665 sq. ft., bathroom, office.
$350/month
570-947-3292
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. 1,800 sq. ft. of beauti-
fully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
SEEKING PROFESSION-
AL LONG TERM TENANT
Two 2,000 sq. ft. units avail-
abl e. Owner occupi ed. off
street parking. Alarm. Renov-
ated. Wilkes-Barre near high
traffic area. 570-829-1518
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1 Month Free Rent
(Qualified Applicant)
FORTY FORT RETAIL
(GLASS FRONT) STORE.
WYOMING AVE. $850. month.
2 YEARS SAME RENT.
A MONTH FREE RENT
(QUALIFIED) APPLICATION
REQUIRED. DETAILS CALL
570-288-1422
WYOMING
322 Wyoming Avenue
300 sq. ft. ideal for barbershop,
small convenience store, appli-
ance repair, locksmith, eBay
outlet, accounting office, travel
agency, designer, broker, con-
sultant, general office space.
Air, heat, garbage, sewer, hot
water & all maintenance in-
cluded. Street parking. Down-
t own Wyomi ng l ocat i on,
30,000 passing cars a day.
$350/month. Call
570-693-3492 for appointment.
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
great deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 570-760-5095
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-899-8432
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
1st MONTHS RENT FREE
(Qualified Applicants)
EXCELLENT REMODELED
PROPERTIES
CALL 570-288-1422
HOME Gorgeous 1.5 baths,
fireplace, mantle, 2 enclosed
porches, all appliances, kit-
chen Colonial - center island,
$900/mo + utilities.
APT: Victorian finished, re-
modeled 1st floor, oak kitchen,
appliances, tiled fireplace as-
t het i c, 1 bedr oom, mor e.
$600/mo + utilities. Details!
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
EXTRAORDINARY
GEORGIAN PILLARED
COLONIAL
(Qualified / Inquiries)
FORTY FORT - Wyoming Ave.
Over 3,200+ approximate sq.
ft. of excellent quality splendor!
3/4 bedroom, tiled 1 & 3/4
baths, cherry cabinet, break-
fast room, kitchen appliances
& (W/D). 2nd floor enclosed
porch, dining room, gas fire-
place, hardwood, appliances
(W/D) 1 stall garage. $3,000 +
utilities. No pets, sincere ap-
plicants, credit, employment,
occupancy date to be determ-
ined. Professional office suite
may be future rental.
Houses For Rent
HARVEYS LAKE
NOXEN AREA
Country raised ranch with 2-3
bedrooms, full basement, huge
wrap around deck. 1 bay gar-
age. Lake Lehman School Dis-
trict. $900 month + 1st & last
month's rent. 570-298-2523
LARKSVILLE
Pace Street
5 room single family home with
2 + b e d r o o ms , 1 b a t h,
washer/dryer, deck & yard.
$660/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
696-1195
LUZERNE
6 room single family home. All
gas. $650/month + security.
Call 570-650-4628
MOUNTAIN TOP
Mobile home
2 bedroom, 2 full baths, eat in
kitchen, living room, walk in
cl oset, deck, washer/dryer,
di shwasher & ref ri gerat or,
cent r al ai r on 2 acr es.
$600/month. + 1 & 1/2 month
security & 1st month rent.
570-592-5764/ 973-271-0261
EXETER TWP.
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
MOUNTAIN TOP
Walden Park
4 bedroom, 3 bath home with
appliances included. 1 year
lease & security deposit re-
quired. No pets. $1,400/month.
Call Rick Gaetano
570-715-7735
570-474-6307
NATICOKE
HANOVER SECTION
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
HOUSE. 570-864-2275
PITTSTON
Available Oct. 1st. very nice
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath. Move in
condition. Gas range, fridge,
dishwasher, washer &dryer
included. Large yard. Beauti-
ful front porch. Corner lot with
2 car driveway parking. Nice
neighborhood. No pets. No
Smoking. $800/mo plus utilit-
ies, security & references.
570-655-4950
PITTSTON
AVAILABLE NOW
80 River Street
Newly remodeled two story,
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove & dryer,
washer included, two car
driveway, fenced yard, no
pets. $775/month + utilities
plus security.
Call 570-417-9781
To view house go to
www.wilkesbarredjs.com/
789PhotoAlbum
PLAINS
SINGLE HOME
Nice Yard, off-street parking,
plus garage. 3 bedrooms plus
small office, 1.5 bath,
washer/dryer hookup, gas
heat, air conditioning. Newly
renovated. No Pets. $975. +
utilities. 570-655-4915
PLYMOUTH
Newly Remodeled 2 bedroom
house, quiet secluded area,
Nice View. $650 + Security.
570-239-3950
Roommate (male) wanted to
share expenses on whol e
house in Plymouth area with
l arge yard. Approxi matel y
$450/month. 570-332-7023
THORNHURST
MUST SEE!!!
Large 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths house
for rent. Perfect for multi-genera-
tion. $900 month + utilities. 2
months security + references.
718-916-9872
WILKES-BARRE
Miners Mills house for rent:
Scott St, 2 bedroom, 2 story
home with porch, patio & side
yard. Appliances & washer/dry-
er included. Ample off street
parking. $650/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
570-696-1195
WEST WYOMING
Beautiful 2 very large bed-
room home, 3 bat hs wi t h
wood, slate & marble floors,
stai nl ess steel appl i ances,
laundry room on 2nd floor.
Pool table room, finished base-
ment, fenced yard, garage.
$1,200/month + utilities, lease,
& security deposit.
570-233-7235.
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
Land (Acreage)
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills/Charles Place
Only 2 one acre+ lots left!
570-498-9244
Land (Acreage)
SWEET VALLEY
GRASSY POND ROAD
6.69 wooded acres. Great
building site and/or ideal hunt-
ing property. No utilities.
REDUCED $65,000.
Call Pat Doty
570-394-6901 696-2468
Half Doubles
GLEN LYON
15 minutes from Power Plant
or W-B. 2 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/dryer hook up,
electric heat, new paint & car-
pet, non smoker. $625/month
+ security, references & 1 year
lease. Pet on approval.
570-218-2320 570-379-2029
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
HANOVER
LYNDWOOD AREA
1/2 double, very spacious, 3
bedrooms, 1.5 baths with all
neutral decor, large eat-in kit-
chen with oak cabinets, new
countertop & all appliances,
ample closets, full walk out
basement f or st orage, of f
street parking, spacious back
yard deck. $750/mo + utilities,
security & lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
HANOVER TWP.
1/2 double. 3 bedrooms. Vinyl
siding. Steel insulated entry
doors with deadbolts. Gas
heat. Located on small, quiet
lane. Close to bus stop &
shopping. Available 10/1/13.
Now showing. Lease, refer-
ences checked. $525 monthly
+ utilities. 570-650-3803
HARVEY'S LAKE
Waterview, 2 bedroom, deck,
porch, storage, Family room,
eat-in kitchen. $650/month.
703-583-5067
KINGSTON
SPRAGUE AVE. 2 bedroom, 1
bath, 1st floor duplex. New car-
peting & hardwood floors. Con-
veni ent t o Wyomi ng Ave.
B a s e m e n t s t o r a g e .
Washer/dryer hookup. $525
month + uti l i ti es, securi ty,
l ease. NO PETS.
EAST BENNETT ST. Charm-
i ng 3 bedroom, hardwood
floors, new carpeting in bed-
rooms, laundry room off spa-
cious kitchen, stained glass
windows, off street parking,
convenient to Cross Valley.
$650. + ut i l i t i es, securi t y,
l ease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
LARKSVILLE
2 BR, refrigerator, stove &
dishwasher, washer/dryer hook
up. Private driveway. No pets,
$650 + utilities & security.
570-954-5903
LARKSVILLE
Very clean, fenced in yard,
washer/dryer & stove. Utilities
by tenant. Has gas heat & wa-
ter. Off street parking, nice
nei ghborhood. 2 l arge & 1
small bedroom. $700/month +
security. No pets.
570-287-1421
NANTICOKE
185 W. Church St,
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, oil heat,
washer/dryer hookup. Small
yard. $550 + utilities & secur-
ity. No pets. Available 10/1/13.
570-270-3139
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
PITTSTON CITY
HALF-DOUBLE
Half-Double for rent. Well
kept 3 Bedroom, 1 bath loc-
ated at 172 William Street.
$650/Mo requires: 1 month
security deposit ; credit/back-
ground check. No Pets, No
Smoking, Not Section 8. For
more info contact Norm at:
normandy225@comcast.net
or 570-606-7018.
PITTSTON
ELIZABETH STREET
1 bedroom with neutral decor,
t i l e bat h, ampl e cl oset s,
screened in porch and private
yard. $350 month + utilities,
security, lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PLAINS 1/2 DOUBLE
3 bedrooms, gas heat. 1.5
baths. Spacious living room &
di ni ng room, gas fi repl ace,
Kichen new with cabinets &
appliances. Off street parking.
$825/mo + utils. 570-655-4915
PLAINS
Spacious, high ceilings, 4 bed-
room, wall to wall carpeting.
1.5 bath, hardwood fl oors
downstairs, large living room
with fireplace, large kitchen
with stove, microwave, refriger-
ator, dishwasher, washer &
dryer. Full attic, off-street park-
ing, yard. Absolutely NO pets
or smoking. Utilities paid by
tenants. $800+security and last
months rent. Section 8 accep-
ted. Call 570-823-4116 or 570-
417-7745
Resort Property For Rent
TN. - WEST GATE
Smokey Mt. Resort
Oct. 12-19 $650. Golf, Casino,
Dollywood, Fishing & more.
570-954-3365
Pets
CAT LOVERS ATTENTION
desperately need good homes
for 1-2 year old cats, neutered
& spayed. Call 570-237-5749
Huskies, Poms,
Yorkies, Chihuahuas,
German Shephards & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
PIT BULL PUPPIES
3 female, parents on premises.
Adoption agreement reques-
ted. 570-371-8086.
Ask for Missy.
YORKIE PUPPY
Female, AKC. champion
bloodlines. Dew claws done,
wormed, 1st shots.
REDUCED $800.
570-332-4739
Autos Under $5000
DODGE '03
GRAND
CARAVAN
AWD, $1,500. 570-262-1996
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,295
Call for details 570-696-4377
MERCURY SABLE 2002'
150K. $700
215-932-5690
Autos For Sale
ACME
AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 NISSAN AKTIMA SL
grey, grey leather, sunroof
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 AUDI A6 3.2
AVANT/STATION WAGON
black, tan leather
navigation, AWD
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 LIBERTY SPORT
Silver, V6 4x4
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 HYUNDAI SANTE FE GLS
Black, V6, 4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLT
silver V6
3rd seat, 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS
Silver, V6, 3rd seat 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 CHEVY TRACKER LT
white V6 4x4 54k miles
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
98 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB
V8, 4x4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER
Route 309 Hazleton 570-454-2414 962 Wyoming Ave Exeter 570-602-0226
Mon-Thurs 8:30-8, Fri 8:30-5, Sat 9-4:30 Mon-Thurs 9-8, Fri 9-6, Sat 9-4
Route 309 Hazleton
570-454-2414
962 Wyoming Ave.
Exeter 570-602-0226
Mon-Thurs 8:30-8: Fri 8:30-5, Sat 9-4:30 Mon-Thurs 9-8, Fri 9-6, Sat 9-4
Sale Ends September 30, 2013. (T) All vehicles plus tax, tags, doc and registration fees. Trades accepted at cash value.
MSRP
$
28,195
Ford Rebate 1,500
Barber Discount 1,195
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, 1.6L EcoBoost, Sync Voice
Activated #7657
$
189/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
2011
$
19,980
T
NOW!
Auto,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Cruise
#7522A
NOW!
PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER
Barber Ford Auto Loan Center
602-0226
Call Mickey
C
re
d
it
C
o
n
c
e
rn
s
?
at
the
All applicatons will
be processed.
See dealer for details.
602-0226
Barber Ford Auto Loan Center
Factory-backed warranty Free vehicle history report
172-point inspection by factory-trained technicians
(2) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, Comfort Package
#3746
2014 FORD FIESTA SE
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
139/mo
2
$
23,544
T
NOW! NOW!
2014 FORD FOCUS SE
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
2013 FORD FUSION SE
Auto, A/C, Sync Voice
Activated, Advancetrac #3694
$
19,880
3
$
169/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
2013 FORD FUSION SE
MSRP
$
25,200
Ford Rebate 1,320
Barber Discount 1,500
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
Financing for
60 months with
approved credit
6
2012 NISSAN VERSA
NOW!
FWD,
Auto,
A/C,
PW, PL
#P3354A
NOW!
2012 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS HATCHBACK
$
14,280
T
Auto,
A/C,
PW, PL,
Tilt
#P3366A
NOW! NOW!
$
13,900
T
$
5,320
in
Savings!
Bring in your vehicle to Barber Ford today!
See dealer for details.
w
e
w
i
l
l
top
dollar car car w
e
o
f
f
e
r
f
o
r
y
o
u
r
Whether or not you buy fromus
www.barberautogroup.com
0
%
Financing
60 Months
for
on select models with approved credit
6
Financing
60 Months
0
%
for
make
an offer
w
e
o
f
f
e
r
f
o
r
y
o
u
r
top
dollar
make
an offer
vehicle
o
n
y
o
u
r
w
e
w
i
l
l
o
n
y
o
u
r
vehicle
2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL
MSRP
$
32,370
Ford Rebate 1,000
Barber Discount 1,570
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
302a Package, Power Liftgate, Rear
View Camera, Moonroof, Navigation,
Sync Voice Activation #7594T
$
4,070 in
Savings!
Now
at
Barber
Ford
BUY BUY BUY BUY BUY AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN AMERICAN
Sale ends 09/30/13. (1) (2) (3) (4) All vehicles plus tax, tags, license and dealer doc fees with approved credit. College Student Rebate applies to a full-time college student, recent college or current graduate school student. Military Rebate applies to active military personnel. (2) (4) $2,500 Down (cash or trade). (3) (4) To qualify for Ford Lease
Renewal, customer must be returning a Ford Lease. Ford Credit Retail Bonus Cash requires financing with Ford Credit. (6) Must finance through Ford Credit. 0% Financing for 60 months with approved credit in lieu of rebates. (3) (4) (8) (9) Ford Competitive Lease Rebate customer is required to trade-in or terminate their lease of a 95 or
newer non-Ford vehicle for added lease and retail incentives when purchasing a new Ford vehicle.
2013 FORDMUSTANGCOUPE
$
18,800
T
NOW!
3.7L V6,
PW, PL,
Cruise, Tilt,
A/C
#P3327A
NOW!
2014 Ford Explorers and
2014 Ford Escapes are
here and in stock!
2014 Ford Explorers and
2014 Ford Escapes are
here and in stock!
(4) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
MSRP
$
31,990
Ford Rebate 2,750
Barber Discount 1,190
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
College/Military
Rebate 500
$
189/mo
4
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
26,050
3
2013 FORD EDGE SE AWD
Sync Voice Activated,
Advancetrac #7654
0
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
1750
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
$
13,900
T
3 C-MAX at
Similar Savings!
2010 ACURA RDX
3.6L V6,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Leather
#7606A
2009 CADILLAC SRX
$
14,280
T
2012 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SPORT
$
18,680
T
NOW!
Auto,
PW, PL,
Tilt, A/C,
Cruise
#P3338B
NOW!
$
19,980
T
2012 FORDFOCUS SEL
$
15,680
T
Auto, A/C,
Cruise,
Tilt,
PW, PL
#P3380A
NOW! NOW!
2010 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
$
16,280
T
NOW!
3.7L V6,
PW, PL,
Tilt,
A/C
#P3337B
NOW!
2011 KIA SORENTOLX
$
17,680
T
NOW!
3.5L V6,
PW, PL,
Cruise, Tilt,
A/C, 4WD
#P3307B
NOW!
2014 FORD FOCUS SE
0
%
MSRP
$
17,630
Ford Rebate 325
Barber Discount 500
College/Military
Rebate 500
2014 FORD FIESTA SE
(2) Plus tax, tags, license & dealer doc fees w/ approved credit. 10,500
miles/yr. $2500Down (cash or trade). Add $645 Acquisition Fee; first
payment due at signing; no security deposit.
Auto, Comfort Package
#3759
$
17,000
1
for 24 months
Lease
It For
$
149/mo
2
$
3,405
in
Savings!
0
%
Financing for
60 months with
approved credit
6
MSRP
$
20,405
Ford Rebate 2,000
Barber Discount 905
College/Military
Rebate 500
2013 FORD EDGE SE AWD
MSRP
$
35,880
Ford Rebate 3,750
Barber Discount 1,980
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 750
College/Military
Rebate 500
PW, PL, Sync Voice Activated,
Heated Leather, Power Moonroof,
Rear View Camera #3733
A/C, PW, PL, Sync Voice Activated,
Advancetrac, Heated Leather,
Moonroof #3744
3 Taurus at
Similar Savings!
2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID SEL
$
139
$
17,000
$
149
$
189
$
19,880
$
169
$
26,050
$
189
$
15,680
T $
18,800
T
$
17,680
T
$
16,280
T
$
23,544
T
$
18,680
T
$
5,940
in
Savings!
$
28,300
3
$
28,300
$
16,305
1
$
1,325
in
Savings!
0
.9
%
$
16,305
2014 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD
$
23,500
3
$
4,695
in
Savings!
Financing for 60
months +
$
1000
Ford Bonus Cash with
approved credit
6
2014 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD
0
.9
%
Financing for 60
months +
$
500
Ford Bonus Cash
with approved credit
6
$
23,500
$
27,900
3
$
27,900
2014 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
$
7,980
in
Savings!
2014 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
Financing for 60 months
+
$
750 Ford Bonus Cash
with approved credit
6
0
.9
%
MSRP
$
35,085
Ford Rebate 1,000
Barber Discount 1,930
Ford Competitive
Lease Rebate 1,000
Ford Credit Retail
Bonus Cash 500
College/Military
Rebate 500
$
30,155
3
10 Fusions at
Similar Savings!
$
30,155
2014 FORD FUSION TITANIUM AWD
$
4,930
in
Savings!
2014 FORD FUSION TITANIUM AWD
Financing for 60 months
+
$
500 Ford Bonus Cash
with approved credit
6
0
.9
%
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 21D
PAGE 22D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
ASHLEY MULTI-FAMILY
Indoor/Outdoor, Rain or Shine
26 Ashley Street
Sat. 9-3 & Sun. 9-12
Toys, bikes, clothes,
collectibles and More!
ASHLEY
18 ROSS STREET
SAT., 9/21 10AM-2PM
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Household items, girl's toddler
clothing, outdoor items, sea-
sonal items, bedroom set &
much more!
BUTTONWOOD Indoor Sale
79 Simon Block Ave.
Across from 96
Sat., Sept. 21, 9-3
Contents of House For Sale.
DALLAS
COMBINED 5 FAMILIES
EVERYONE IS DOWNSIZING!
10 North Gate, North Woods
off 42nd St, or take Lake St to
42nd St. Sat., Sept 21st, 8-1
Furniture, electronics, appli-
ances, rugs, bikes, every room
household items, clothing, beer
making kits, life jackets, snow
boards, bed frames, VCR cab-
inet, entertainment center, TV
stand, rugs, bicycles, baskets,
toys, dolls, stuffed animals,
floor & chair back massagers,
air conditioners, microwaves,
toaster oven, 2 new sets of Co-
relle dishes, pictures, adult de-
si gner cl ot hes, desi gner
purses, shoes, holiday decora-
tions, surround sound, com-
puter chair, cassette/radios,
wi cker rocker, sewi ng ma-
chine, boating & fishing items.
Too Much to List! Look for
signs on Rte. 415.
DALLAS
ESTATE SALE
823 HOMESTEAD DRIVE
(YALLICK FARMS)
Sat., Sept. 21, 2013
8:00-4:00
DIRECTIONS: Rt. 415 (Me-
morial Hwy.) To Old Farm-
lane to Homestead
ENTIRE CONTENTS OF
HOME INCLUDING
Designer furniture, leather
sofa, Ethan Allen dining room
set, Broyhill king size bed-
room set, Ethan Allen Power
Hide-A-Way Entertainment
unit, large office lamps, kitch-
enware, Oriental rug, paint-
ings and prints, adult and
child's bicycles and much
more!
CREDIT CARDS
ACCEPTED!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
EDWARDSVILLE
420 Northampton Street
Sat., Sept. 21, 9-2
HUGE BABY SALE!
Clothes sizes newborn to 18M,
Boys and twin girls.
EXETER
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
306 Lincoln Street
Sat., Sept. 21st., 8-1
Girl's clothes to size 6, house-
hold items, toys & lots more!
DUNMORE
ESTATE SALE
136 W. SWINICK DRIVE
Sat., Sept. 21, 2013
9:00-4:30
DIRECTIONS: 81 N. t o
Dri nker St . exi t . R on
Prospect to L on Shirley to R
on West Swinnick.
Enti re Contents of
House Including: Ni ce
sofa and loveseat, bedroom
sets, ni ce pati o furni ture,
washer and dryer, costume
jewelry, glassware, holiday,
records, lots of nice ladies de-
signer clothes and purses,
treadmill and exercise equip-
ments, sentry safe, Crafts-
man snow blower, Black and
Decker electric lawnmowers
and Much More!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
EXETER
YARD SALE
156 Lincoln St.
Sat., 9/21 9am-2pm
Ki d' s toys & games, sport
equi pment & bi kes, shoes;
some girl's clothes; LOTS of
boys clothes - newborn to 7
yrs; DVDs, furniture, many oth-
er various items.
FORTY FORT YARD SALE
ENGLEWOOD-MURRAY
Toys & Children's clothing.
Englewood Terrace 1700/1800
Blocks of Murray St.
Sat., Sept. 21, 9-3
FORTY FORT
PATIO SALE
72 Bedford Street
Fri., Sept. 20th, 9-3 &
Sat., Sept. 21st, 9-2
Bikes, brick-brack & bargains.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
ESTATE SALE
1205 S. MAIN STREET
In the greenhouses at
KETLER FLORIST
Fri & Sat., Sept, 20 & 21, 9-3
Furniture, tools, men's clothing,
holiday decorations, house-
hold items, sporting goods &
100's of old time country favor-
ite CD' s, some collectibles,
jewelry & much more!
HANOVER TWP
53 spring street
(Off Hazle St)
Sat., & Sun., 9/21 & 22
9am-4pm
NEIGHBORHOOD
SALE
HH from A to Z. Billiard equip-
ment, lights, holiday cards,
Xmas tags & ribbons, costume
jewelry, kid items & more!!!
HANOVER TWP.
Holy Cross Church
420 Main Road
FLEA
MARKET/CRAFTS
Chicken BBQ
Sunday 9/15 , noon - 4pm
Flea Market Only
9/20, 8am-2pm
9/21, 8am-Noon & 6-7pm
9/22, 10am-Noon
HARVEYS LAKE
HOUSE/GARAGE/YARD
SALE
222 Carpenter Road
Sat & Sun, 21 & 22, 9-3
Antiques, fancy high back Vic-
torian bed, cherry DR set, Ped-
estal maple set, fiesta, Depres-
sion glass, china, painting,
prints, Hanson's Amusement
Park, Gay's, lake scenes &
coal breakers, quilts, linens &
light fixtures & more!
570-639-1205
HARVEYS LAKE
ESTATE SALE
Pole 38 Lakefront
Sept 21st & 22nd, 9-5
Fabulous treasures from
the early 1900's, 70's,
Retro, Bohemian, glass-
ware, Fenton glass, vin-
tage jewelry, sterling sil-
ver, kitchenware. You
Won't Believe this Sale!
Stored away for many
years. Signs at entrance
to lake.
KINGSTON GARAGE SALE
588 Tioga Ave.
Fri., Sat., & Sun.
Sept., 20, 21 & 22, 9-5
Rain or Shine!
New and practically new
clothes in Large & XL, slacks
10 & 12 Petite New. House-
hold, records & small furniture!
KINGSTON
Multi-Family Sales
571 Meadowland Ave.
Sat., Sept. 21, 8-3
Kinbal organ, clothes boys
infant to teen, women's and
men's clothes and shoes, Xbox
games, toys and lots of
household items!
Heavy Rain Date, Sept. 28.
Kingston
Green Acres Apts.
Building 38 Apt. 151
( Enter complex, drive all to
the end and go left.)
Sat. Sept. 21, 8:00-3:00
TAG
SALE
Contents of lovely
filled apartment.
PA House dining room suite
with open hutch,
Wing back chairs, lamps,
mirrors, settee, Desk with
chair, book shelves, carved
ducks , water fowl art, Col-
lections of Royal Doulton
character mugs, lenox, brass
dcor, Silverplate, fine
crystal, Waterford,
Large set of Franciscan Ivy,
Fiesta, Stangl, Many kitchen
items, Needlepoint and wall
art, Dresser, night stands,
linens, womans clothing
Too much to list,
all priced to sell!
LARKSVILLE
Lark Mont Manor
101 Robin Drive
Sat., Sept. 21, 8:30-2:30
Glassware, purses, jewelry,
microwave and many house-
hold items and Much More!
LARKSVILLE
BASEMENT &
GARAGE SALE
1 Clearview Drive,
across from Wyoming
Valley Motors,
Rt. 11, Narrows.
Fri., Sat. & Sun.
Wheel chair, furniture, clothing.
1,000's of Items!
Special: Fill a Tall Kitchen
Garbage bag for $2.00
in the garage.
Early Birds Welcome
on Thursday!
LARKSVILLE
STORAGE AUCTION
Rear 213 E. Luzerne Ave.,
Saturday, Starting at 10 a.m.
AUCTIONEER; M. MYSLAK
AU3247L
FOR INFO: 822-8249
AUCTIONZIP I.D. 3473
DALLAS
LEHMAN TWP.
111 HEMLOCK DRIVE.
SAT., 9/21, 8AM-4PM
Kitchen & lawn equipment,
craft, glass & holiday items,
suitcases, rug shampooer &
more!
MOUNTAIN TOP
160 FAIRWAY DRIVE
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
Fri., & Sat. 9/21 & 9/22
8AM-4PM
HUGE HOLIDAY
GARAGE SALE
Accents for Halloween, Christ-
mas, Easter, special occa-
sions, etc., many electronic
items, 2 Build-A-Bears,
clothes, toys, jewelry, books,
tapes, religious, household,
fabric, collectibles of thimbles,
angels, shells, corks & Asian
decorative fans. Don't Miss!
MOUNTAIN TOP
68 Heslop Road
Moving Sale / Yard Sale
Sat., Sept. 21st, 8:00 to 3:00
Furniture, Bikes, Piano, kids
clothes, games,
Small appliances, etc.
Mountain Top Moving Sale
90 Karin Drive. Sat., 8-2
Furniture, yard & camping
equipment, tools, sewing ma-
chine, snow thrower & more!
Bring a truck or van!
MOUNTAIN TOP
MOVING SALE
13 Sycamore Road
Sat. & Sun., Sept. 21 & 22, 9-3
Furniture, kitchen, house-
wares, small tools, mowers.
Everything Must Go!
NANTICOKE
ESTATE SALE
1480 South Hanover Street
Sat., Sept. 21, 9-1
Small or Large Everything Must Go!
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
14 Rock Street
Sat., Sept. 21, 9-2
Kitchenware, dishware, elec-
tronics, furniture, books, and
baby items and much more!
PITTSTON/INKERMEN
HOUSE SALE
275 Love Lane, Heather
Highlands Sat., Sept. 21, 9-2
Tools, housewares, living room
set. Priced to sell!
PLAINS
BASEMENT SALE
442 Mill Street
Fri & Sat, Sept 20 & 21, 9-2
Hal l oween & Thanksgi vi ng
decorations, household items,
plus sized women's clothing &
much more!
PLAINS
Garage/Yard Sale
11 & 15 Blanchard Street
Fri. & Sat, Sept 20 & 21, 9-4
Tools, bicycles, clothes, home
decor & much more!
SHAVERTOWN
621 SPARROW DRIVE
TOP OF THE HILL
ECHO VALLEY ESTATES
SAT., & SUN,. 9/21 & 9/22
9AM TO 5 PM
YARD & MOVING SALE
Collectibles, knick-knacks,
sporting goods, tools, house-
hold. ALL MUST GO!
SHAVERTOWN
BACKYARD SALE
106 Village Dr., Sat. 9/21, 9-4
Bowling balls, wheel barrow,
propane tanks, file cabinet,
household items,
craft supplies.
SHAVERTOWN, PA
Plymouth Twp.
499 Weavertown Road
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 20 & 21, 8-?
Furniture, Lighting, Glassware,
Tools and Much More!
SWOYERSVILLE
132 Simpson Street
Sat., Sept. 21, 9-1
Household, clothes, lots of odds
and ends, too much to mention!
SWOYERSVILLE
MILBRE STREET
MULTI FAMILY
YARD SALE
Sat., 10/21, 9am-1pm
SOMETHING FOR ALL!
SWOYERSVILLE
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
233 Slocum Street,
Fri & Sat. Sept. 20 & 21, 8-1
Kid's art desk L.T., air hockey
table, Fisher Price kitchen with
food & much more. Something
for Everyone!
SWOYERSVILLE
NEIGHBORHOOD
YARD SALE
698, 700, 704, 713 & 717 Main
Sat., Sept 21st, 8:30-2:30
Children's costumes, clothing,
shoes, purses, jewelry, De-
pressi on gl assware, toys,
bikes, compound archery bow,
records, CD's, books & more!
SWOYERSVILLE
ST. NICHOLAS
BYZANTINE
CATHOLIC
CHURCH
271 TRIPP ST
RUMMAGE &
BAKE SALE
SAT., SEPT., 21,
9 TO 1
BAG DAY
WEST WYOMING
455 WEST 6TH STREET
SAT., 9/21 8AM-3PM
SUN., 9/22 8AM-1PM
Ski & bike rack, weight lifting
bench, lamps, blender, bread
machine, holiday decorations
& ornaments, many kit. items
too numerous to mention!
SWOYERSVILLE
50+ YEARS OF
COLLECTING REVEALS
ONE FULL ESTATE SALE.
219 Slocum Street
Sat. Sept. 21, 9-4
Sun. Sept 22, 9-2.
They lived in this storybook
Swoyersville home and
collected everything.
Antique & Vintage Porcelain;
Jewelry; Train Accessories;
Sports Caps & Collectibles,
Retro Kitchenware, Crystal,
Vintage Furniture; Designer
Boots; Unopened
Appliances; Antique Curios;
Handbags, Riding and Rotary
Lawn Mowers; Tools &
TONS more.Turn at Pizza
Bellas on Wyoming Ave. near
Welles St, Forty Fort. Plenty
of St. parking. No early birds.
Not to be missed!
Lots to discover.
nepaestatesales.com
WEST
WYOMING
6th Street
Open year round
SPACE AVAILABLE
INSIDE & OUT
Acres of parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
$10
Saturday 10am-2pm
Sunday 8am-4pm
WILKES-BARRE
PARSONS SECTION
3 WILCOX DR.
Fri & Sat 9/20 & 9/21
8 am to 3 pm
Nurses scrub uniforms, Kim-
ball piano, train table with
Thomas accessories, child's
table & chairs, car seat, toys,
carriage, race car youth bed,
crib & dresser, assorted tables,
& household items.
SOUTH WILKES-BARRE
29 AMHERST AVE.
(off Old River Rd)
Sat., 9/21, 8am-2pm
Furniture, etc.
WILKES-BARRE/
MINERS MILLS
GARAGE SALE
174 E. Thomas Street
Sat., Sept 21, 8-12
WIDE VARIETY OF ITEMS!
WILKES-BARRE
Unity of NEPA 140
140 S. Grant Street
(Parking off of Bethel)
Amazing Bag Sale
Sept. 20-21
Fri., 9-6, Sat., 9-3
Clothing, shoes, books, kit-
chen and more. Some items
individually priced. The rest get
bagged. Bags provided. Fri-
day AM bags start at $5 by
Sat PM bags are $1.
WILKES-BARRE
SALVATION
ARMY
INDOOR FLEA
MARKET
17 S. Penna. Ave
SAT. OCT 12TH
8AM TO 2PM
Over 40 Vendor Tables
Concessions &
Silent Auction.
570-824-8741
WILKES-BARRE
31 Gilligan St
Saturday, September 21
9am-4pm
Directions: Follow
Blackman St to Brown St,
Turn onto Brown St at
Stoplight. Follow Brown St to
End then turn Left onto
Gilligan St. Home is on Right.
Entire Contents of Beau-
tiful Home & Basement:
Antique Oak Library Table,
Thomasville Dining Room
Suite, Bedroom Suite,
Kitchen Table w/Chairs,
Brass & Glass Table, Miller
Slag Art Deco Lamp, Chairs,
Antiques, Tables, Primitives,
Vintage Christmas & Holiday
Decor, Yearbooks, Tools,
Glass, Collectibles, Kitchen-
ware, Large Antique Safe,
Cabinets, Books, Cookbooks,
Desk, Linens, Wall Art, Flor-
als, Jars, Women's Clothing &
So Much More!!!
Something for Everyone!!!
All Items Priced to Sell.
Sale by Wm. Lewis
www.wvestates.coM
WYOMING Multi-Family Sale!
43 2nd Street. Sat., 7-12
Boys clothing to 3T, house-
hold a wide variety of low
priced items! No Early Birds!
Flea Market
WILKES-BARRE
TOWNSHIP
GARAGE SALE
133 OLD ASHLEY ROAD
THURS-FRI-SAT , 9-5
Last huge sale of the season.
Multiple families in one loca-
tion. Treasures to be found.
Something for every
member of the family. Bring
a little money and go home
with a big bag full of stuff.
Come and take
a look for yourself.
Sponsored by
GARAGE & YARD
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE SALE
AD
CALL 829-7130
TODAY
Autos For Sale
ACURA 12' TL-SH AWD
9,800 miles, Black on Black, all
available options, lease
buy-out, $33,000 including
taxes. 570-574-5020
$ BUYING $
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Highest Prices Paid Free Pickup
CA$H PAID 570-288-8995
CADILLAC '07 DTS
Pearl white/tan leather,
heated & cooled seats.
43k miles. Warranty.
$17,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CADILLAC '00
SEVILLE
Grey/beige leather, heated
seats. 70k miles.
Two owners, local trade.
Excellent Condition
Extended Warranty
$5,495.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CHEVY '03 IMPALA
Power windows, locks, seats,
moonroof. GORGEOUS
BLACK! $4,925.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
Autos For Sale
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 10 IMPALA LT
V6, Auto, all power, cruise,
CD. Very clean. Balance of
GMs Warranty.
SPECIAL $11,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
KIA '11 RIO LX
27,000 miles, automatic, air,
power steering & brakes,
CD/Sirius radio
Balance of Factory Warranty
Like New. Special $9.995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
CHRYSLER '05
PT CRUISER
Excellent condition!
Warranty $4,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CHRYSLER '06
300 TOURING
Gold with beige leather,
heated power seats, alloys,
68k. Local Trade, Like New!
$11,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
FORD TAURUS SE 05'
Low Miles, 35K. Runs great,
New Tires. $5,000
570-779-9976
Autos For Sale
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
DODGE '10 JOURNEY
Light grey, 4 cylinder, all
power, cruise, tilt, alloys,
Sirius radio, 56k. Balance of
factory warranty. Very
clean..very economical.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD '11 ESCAPE XLT
4 cyl., all power,
AM/FM/CDE, Siriusn radio,
alloys, cruise, tilt. EXTRA
CLEAN. SPECIAL $13,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
FORD '05 TAURUS SEL
Power windows, locks, seat,
air. 59k. EXCELLENT $6,850.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEEDe.
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD 12
FUSION SE
Auto, all power, cruise, tilt,
alloys. Black. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
HONDA '07
ACCORD EXL
6 cylinder, leather, 24,500
miles. Garage kept. Newer
tires. $16,599. 570-655-4736
Autos For Sale
HONDA '10 CIVIC EX
4 door sedan, blue/grey
cloth, alloy wheels,
sunroof, 20k miles.
Factory Warranty
$14,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '06 CIVIC LX
Power windows, locks, air.
SHARP! $7,950
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX - ONE OWNER
HYUNDAI '04 TIBURON
6 speed, Power windows,
locks, air. Moonroof.
SPORTY! $5,500.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
LEXUS '06 ES 330
Silver/grey leather, moon
roof, heated seats. Excel-
lent condition. 82k miles.
Extended Warranty
$13,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Autos For Sale
MERCURY '07 MILAN
Power windows, locks, seat,
air. 75k.
MUST SEE & DRIVE! $8,575.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
MITSUBISHI '02
GALANT GTZ
Power windows, locks, air,
moonroof. MUST SEE!
$3,975.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
OLDSMOBILE '00 ALERO
Power windows, locks, air.
ECONOMICAL!
$3,450.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
SATURN '07 ION
4 cylinder. 5 speed. REAL
SHARP CAR! $3,995.
570-696-4377
Autos For Sale
SCION XD 11'
Good condition, new brakes.
Navy Blue. 40,000K. Interior
is in good shape.
$10,800. Call Kristen
570-704-6022
TOYOTA '07 HIGHLANDER
V6 3.3 l i tre, 4WD 100,000
MILES. Auto. Black. Inspected
u n t i l 6 / 1 4 . l e a t h e r ,
EVERYTHING POWER, Sun-
roof . Cl ean i nsi de & out .
$14,500 OBO. 570-417-9974
TOYOTA '08
CAMRY LE
Red. Very good condi ti on.
Never in an accident. Well
mai nt ai ned, prof essi onal l y
cleaned & buffed. Used as
church car for pastor. 97,000
miles. $8,795. Contact
William Smalt @ 570-881-2165
TOYOTA '06
COROLLA LE
Power windows, locks, seat,
air. 65k.
SHARP! 8,950.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED.
VOLVO ' 06 S80
TURBO
AWD, silver/silver, sunroof,
GPS, runs & looks great,
128,000 miles. $7,400.
Contact John
570-479-3955
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
Autos For Sale
VW '03 JETTA GLS
Red with black cloth,
heated seats, alloys, 108k.
Extended Warranty $6,200.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
VW '03 PASSAT WAGON
Power windows, locks, air.
ECONOMICAL!
$4,995.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
VW '04 PASSAT GL
Power windows, locks, air.
81k. SHARP! $7,400.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Fi nanci ng avai l abl e. CAR
FAX GUARANTEED
VW '10 BEETLE GLS
Red/black leather, heated
seats, moon roof. 19k
miles. Factory Warranty.
PRICE REDUCED $15,395.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
2013 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of all traffic laws at all times.
Electricity can be measured in amps.
Or in this case, heartbeats.
Introducing the car that no one thought possible. The new Porsche Panamera. Pure Porsche performance that just also happens to
feature executive-class accommodations. And now you get to see it for yourself. Please join us September 21, 2013 as we unveil the
worlds most thrilling contradiction. Where youll get to witness best in class performance and handling and spacious, handcrafted interi-
ors. Hors doeuvres, drinks and impossibility will be served.
See it for yourself at Wyoming Valley Porsche
on September 21, 2013.
Date: September 21, 2013
Time: 11am - 2pm
Place: Wyoming Valley Porsche
RSVP: charliem@wyomingvalleymotors.com
Wyoming Valley Motors Porsche
126 Narrows Road, Route 11
Larksville, PA 18651
(570) 288-7411
wyoming-valley.porschedealer.com
Porsche recommends
PAGE 24D Saturday, September 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Saturday, September 21, 2013 PAGE 25D
Get all the
advertising
inserts withthe
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
Motorcycles
STRATUS 17'
Pleasure/
Fishing Boat
150HP Johnson motor, new
canopy Trolling motor, also.
Moving , Must Sell! 570-
498-9599
RVs / Campers
Mini Winnebago 86'
18', new inspection. Sleeps 4.
Sink, stove, refrigerator and
bathroom with shower. All in
working condition. $2,900.
570-779-3639
Mini Winnebago 86'
18', new inspection. Sleeps 4.
Sink, stove, refrigerator and
bathroom with shower. All in
working condition. $2,900.
570-779-3639
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
CHEVY '92 4X4
NOTICE OF SALE by Bor-
ough of Wyoming, one 1992
Chevrolet 4 x 4 pickup truck
wi th approxi matel y 66,890
miles. Truck is equipped with
an 8 foot Western Pro Plow.
Bids will be received at the
Wyoming Borough Building,
277 Wyoming Avenue, Wyom-
ing, from 9a to 2p daily and
opened at the Council Meeting,
held at the above listed loca-
tion on October 8, 2013 at
7:30p.
BY: MARCELLA STARR
BOROUGH SECRETARY
CHEVY '94 S10 PICK UP
4X4, automatic, extras too nu-
merous to mention. $2,000.
570-288-3053
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02 BLAZER
4X4. V6. BARGAIN PRICE
$3,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02
SILVERADO XCAB
4X4 Sharp, Sharp truck!
$6,995
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '06
TRAILBLAZER
4X4. V6. EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995.
570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,250
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '97 BLAZER
4 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
very good condition.
$1,750
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '07 CARAVAN
V6, 1 owner. CLEAN VAN!
$4,995
570-696-4377
FORD '00 EXCURSION
LIMITED 4 X 4
Well maintained, runs great,
many extras & new parts.
$5,000. 570-574-3881
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD 00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,495.
570-696-4377
Ford Ranger
Pickup 94'
4 Cyl., 5-Speed, good
condition. $2,200.
570-825-4261
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '05 ESCAPE
4X4. Leather. Sunroof.
CLEAN SUV! $5,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
GMC '96 JIMMY
2 door, 6 cylinder, auto, 4x4.
Very Good Condition
$1,750
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
HONDA '08 PILOT SE
AWD, V6, burgundy/grey
cloth, power seat, sunroof,
63k miles. Warranty
$17,895.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
JEEP '12 LIBERTY LIMITED
4x4, V6. white/tan leather,
heated seats, 33k miles.
Factory Warranty
$20,500.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
LEXUS '04 RX330
AWD, V6, light blue/black
leather, heated seat, sunroof,
92k miles. sharp, like new.
$14,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
TOYOTA '06 HIGHLANDER
AWD, V6, silver/grey cloth,
sunroof, 3rd row seat,
90k miles.
Extended Warranty.
$12,995.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Antiques & Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES $
$ BUYING $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BARBERS CHAIR vi ntage
Koken St. Louis Mo. orig. black
leather, very good condition,
hydraulics work B-3688 orig.
head rest, l eather strap &
clothes brush $750. 570-779-
4228 or 570-262-1032
BASEBALL CARDS 91 Up-
per Deck 800 cards $5. '93
Topps 800 cards $5. '04 Topps
800 cards $5. 570-313-5214 or
570-313-3859
Appliances
DISHWASHER portable, Ken-
more black with butcher block
top $175. Back Mountain.
570-239-5254
REFRIGERATOR Frigidaire
side by side, bisque, ice & wa-
ter on door, 26 cu. ft. $300.
570-696-5204
REFRIGERATOR white 18.2
cu. ft. $100. GE electric stove
white, glass top burners $75.
GE electric dryer white $100.
Mini refrigerator $20. 902-
9363
REFRI GERATOR whi t e, 7
year old Roper, side by side,
ice/water dispenser & humidity
control crispers $295. Dish-
washer white, full size, Fri-
gidaire Galley Series, 5 cycles,
3 options $245. 570-287-0362
Appliances
WASHER & DRYER Kenmore
less than 2 years old, perfect
condition, will sacrifice $500.
Brand new bike seats Schwinn
& Roadmaster $15. ea. Brand
new Harmony electric guitar
$50. All priced firm.
570-947-0032
Building Materials
DECONSTRUCTED bar n-
wood planks 2" thick range
7.5" to 12"w % 5'6" tp 6"-0 ap-
prox 55 pieces. Misc. shorter
pieces 2" planks. many full
2"x4" boards. $510. 570-779-
1256 or 570-855-2506
Clothing
COAT ladies black leather 3/4
length sz 14. Skirt & jacket
suits navy size 6; caramel sz
8. $7. ea. Boys winter boots
(2) Spiderman & Cars design
$4. & $3. Girls boots sz 13
navy/red trim & high silver boot
$3. ea. 570-288-0060
JACKET bl ack motorcycl e
type, size 40, good condition
$125. 570-287-5640
SNEAKERS boys size 4 Youth
Under Armour; bl ack wi t h
green, worn once $20.
570-603-1195
Computer Equip. & Software
COMPUTER Windows 7, ex-
cellent condition, works good
on internet $50. 570-824-7354
Exercise Equipment
TREADMILL $40.
GAZELLE EXERCISER $60.
SMALL REFRIGERATOR $25.
570-287-6427
TREADMILL Expanse 600,
Space saver design. Excellent
condition $75. 570-654-5141
TREADMI LL, PRO- FORM
Crosswalk, safety key, fan,
multi programs, hardly used,
excellent condition. Paid $500,
will sell for $275.
570-696-2169, leave message.
WEIGHT BENCH & cast iron
weights over 300 lbs. Dumb-
bells & barbells $300.
570-855-3113
Firewood
Firewood-All Hardwood
Cut, Split, Delivered &
Stacked. 570-443-8986
Furnances & Heaters
HEAT YOUR ENTIRE
HOME water, and more
wi t h a n OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C Out-
door Wood Furnace, LLC.
570-477-5692
STOVE Dickson coal burning
stove, older model, suitable for
heating & cooking, gray with
large oven & 6 lids plus top
warming oven. Very good con-
dition $300. 570-288-0204
Furniture & Accessories
BED FRAME ki ng/ queen
heavy duty, new in bix $50.
OBO. 570-788-32388
BED frame with brass head-
board, full $75. French Provin-
cial sofa, soft gold & white,
$100. Matching chair & otto-
man $75. 2 White end tables-2
shelves, $35. ea. Oval coffee
table, glass/brass $75.
70.655.6290
BED queen size tubular steel,
no mattress $175. Anti que
brown wood desk, 7 drawers
$300. Bookcase, 2 gl ass
doors, 3 shelves $300. Ban-
quet folding tables 3 for $150.
570-654-4440
BED/twin with built in 4 draw-
ers under & shelves, light in
headboar d. pai d $800 6
months old, asking $250. Kit-
chen table with leaf, 4 chairs
solid wood, used Asking $75.
570-690-3760
BEDROOM FURNITURE 8 pc
mahogany, chest, dresser with
mirror, vanity with mirror, van-
ity bench, small mahogany
chair, extra mirror for chest.
$400. Lazyboy red all leather
sofa approx. 88" l, 3 cushion
attached back $525. 331-0533
BEDROOM SUITE 7 pc. oak,
full/queen footboard & head-
board, dresser wi th mi rror,
desk with hutch top, chest with
hutch top, solid wood, all good
condition $400. 570-235-1315
COMPUTER CHAI R ad-
justable height & back, brown
good condition. $25. 570-819-
2793
COUCH Olive color, very good
condition. $200. Call Nancy
570-479-0021
COUCH, loveseat, oversized
chai r, Contemporary styl e,
beige in color $400. Kitchen ta-
bl e 54", 6 padded chai rs,
brown $300. Coffee & end
tabl es Mi ssi on oak $200.
570-693-1454
DINING ROOM SET, l arge
chi na cabi net wi th l i ghted
shelves, 3 drawers & 2 cabin-
ets, table with 3 12" leafs serv-
er & 6 uphol stered chai rs
$1200. Tiffany lamp, large size
for over table, neutral color
$100. Brass chandelier $50.
Dog crate medium size $50.
570-823-9467 after 6pm
DRY SINK Very nice wood
&accents. Has a shelf inside.
Use as a dry sink or make a
bathroom vanity out of it with a
modern bowl si nk ? $150.
Cash or Paypal in Hanover
Twp. 735-2661
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Sauder, oak, 2 shelves for
component s, st or age f or
DVDs, CDs or VHS will fit 27"
or most 32" flat screen, very
good condition $30. 570-675-
5622
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER,
excellent condition, glass side
storage for stereo, bottom cab-
inets, asking $75. 239-6011
BEDROOM SET twin, maple
complete with night stand &
mirrored dresser $300.
570-696-5204
Furniture & Accessories
KITCHEN SET beautiful, wood
with cushions for chairs $100.
ELECTRIC FIREPLACE new,
never used with receipt 4200.
STAI NLESS STEEL wat er
cooler $45. Old porch ROCK-
ING CHAIR, wood $40.
570-824-3507
KITCHEN TABLE & chairs.
FREE Call Monday - Thursday
after 6pm 570-288-6214
LIVING ROOM SET rattan, 2
sofas, 1 end table, 1 coffee ta-
ble with glass top $450. Rock-
er/recliner, dark green $50. Ex-
cellent condition.
570-654-4112
PATIO CHAIRS metal frame,
brown, 2, like new $35. ea.
Outdoor lounge chairs brown,
metal frame, 2, like new $35.
ea. 570-735-7619
RECLI NER / ROCKER by
Lane made in USA slate blue,
very good condition, can help
with delivery. 570-905-7427
SOFA Lazyboy brown leather,
2 reclining seats paid $2300.
sell for $999. 570-474-9122
Landscaping & Gardening
STRAWBERRY PLANTS by
the bucket, fill yur 5 gallon
bucket wi th ever bl oomi ng
plants for $20. Very hardy. A
wide variety of flowers & trees
FREE. Bring your own contain-
ers. 570-823-3030 for app't
TILLER Yard Machine 3.5HP,
new condition $90. Craftsman
lawnmower 5HP self propelled
with bag runs good $90. Shen-
nodaha coal stove, barrel type,
good condition $200.
570-655-3197
Miscellaneous
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
BOOK Egyptian book 1800's
$10. Harry Potter Scene It
game DVD $10. 2 Gem Trees
Paudshell Amethyst & Agate
$5. ea. Unique picture of ship
made of wood & string $10. 2
beautiful framed pastel pic-
tures $20. ea. 209-1909
BOOKS chi l dr en' s books
Thomas the Tank 13 books $5.
570-603-1195
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
Miscellaneous
CANDLES / YANKEE (53)
new 22 oz fall & Christmas
scents $10. ea. 14.5 oz new
fall scents 2 jars $6. ea. 25
Woodwick candles 21 oz new
assorted scents $10. ea.
570-693-2329
CANES & WALKING STICKS.
25 available. Made from slip-
pery maple trees. Many differ-
ent shapes & sizes. $5 to $6
dollars ea. 570-735-2081
CARBOYS 5 gallon glass $15.
ea. ideal for wine or beer brew-
ing. Corkers floor model Portu-
giese $75. Airlocks $1 ea. Jet
bottle washer brass $7.
570-678-7634
CHANDELIER 3 tier, all glass
$25. MICROWAVE oven cart
$20. PURSES $5. & up. KIDS
BOOKS $1. & up.
570-855-8764
CHANDELIER Victorian brass,
5 lights. Cost 4300. asking
$50. 570-779-3653
CHANDELI ERS gol d wi t h
white globes $25. each. Stone-
ware service for 8 $50. Kit-
chen cabinet hardware gold -
29 handl es, 11 knobs $2.
each. 2 king size comforters
$15 each. 570-825-2888
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
DUMMY MTH unit ENG $315.
Oak wall phone 1907 $290. 2
gallon brown jug Pittston,PA
$25. Marx tin doll house with
furniture $50. Hess '02 in box
$20. Gulf truck in box $15.
Maple glider chair, new $75.
570-735-1589
DVD Gong Show movie $10. 5
storm windows $10. ea. Goo-
d y e a r W r a n g l e r t i r e
P205/75R15 $25. 1 205/75R14
$20. 8' 4" PVC pipe $10. '88
caprice taillights $20. Chevy
V8 350 bearing set $15. 18"
tires $80. 570-740-1246
BOOKCASE, white, 2 shelves
$15. Bedroom chest white, 5
drawers, $20. Bedroom dress-
er white, 9 drawers $40. DR
$60. DR cabinet $50. Shed
Rubbermaid 8'x10' $25. 2 deck
boxes $25 ea. 570-902-9363
GARAGE DOOR OPENER
Raynor 1/3 HP with remote
$50. 570-824-1020
GUITAR electric Pro Custom
by Cart wi th amp & stand
$250. Pro Tech 10" miter saw
on Skil contractors stand $125.
Everlast Power Core station
stand with heavy bag & speed
bag $150. Braun shaver 360
$75. 7.5' pre lighted Christ-
mas tree $50. Sit up bench
$10. 570-406-2507
HANDBAGS 3 Etienne Aigner
burgundy shoulder strap also 1
Stone Mountain black shoulder
strap $10. each. 570-693-4483
Miscellaneous
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7 days. All items must be
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address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
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use code 48643XMD - or
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CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
REEL HOSE & hose $15. 3
fluorscent lights single 30 watt
lights included $18. Chinon
3000 GL movi e proj ect or
8m/super 8 $40. Craftsman
snowblower 4.5 elec. start $40.
Deneis Austin primerider $35.
Hedge trimmer $70. 825-5564
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
Miscellaneous
TIRES" Run Flat Bridgestone
235/55R 18 Removed from 13
Toyota Sienna Van XLe. Sell 2
for $325. or all 4 for $575.
Less than 250 mi l es wear.
New cost $213 each. Call 570-
868-6357 and leave message.
Musical Instruments
CLARINET Leblanc Vito B flat,
ol der model , good worki ng
condition, excellent for begin-
ner $150. 570-814-2773
Personal Electronics
LAPTOP Toshiba full screen
satellite C655, touch pad with
multi touch control, DVD super
multi drive, Windows 7 & En-
ergy star $300. 570-417-1502
Pools & Spas
POOL 21'x52" high, includes
Hayward sand filter & pump,
ladder, solar cover. Will help
dismantle $900. 570-902-9363
Sporting Goods
BOW CASE SKB like new.
New was $259. sell for $100.
570-824-5588
COMPOUND BOW Alpine Colt
seri al #31490, draw 16-20
wei ght 25, Tune 16. Great
starter bow. Used i n great
shape $50. Red/silver sparkle
browning MicroMidas 5-3728
c o mp o u n d b o w, s o me
scratches $100. 570-499-8068
FISHING GEAR LOT 2 large &
2 small tackle boxes - lures,
hooks, etc, 6 poles, 4 reels all
for $50. 570-735-6638
GOLF CLUBS Hogan Edge 3
thru Sandwedge. Like new.
$125. 570-262-7318
TREE STANDS 16" ladder for
hunters $300. OBO. 570-347-
0593 after 7 pm
Toys & Games
TOYS Step2 Lifestyle Party
Time kitchen, 30 pc access.
set $80. Doll 10 pc care center
$30. Radio flyer steer/stroll
trike $30. F.P. living family
dream dollhouse, furnished
$60. Vtech MobiGo pink touch
learning sytem $25. 333-0470
Want To Buy
Old Items Wanted.
Pay in Cash. For old cup-
boards, mining items, books,
magazines, advertising, radios,
fountain pens, old clocks,
glassware, furniture, toys,
cameras, guns and swords,
Rail Road items, coins, silver
bars, jewelry. 570-881-5202
or 570-925-5466
WANTED TO BUY
Old car books, brochures,
catalogs & paint chip binders.
$$Cash Paid! 570-516-9953
F U N N I E S SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
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TUNDRA

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