You are on page 1of 12

Weather

Kimi Murphy
Pre-K, Annunciation
High 86 Low 63
Mostly sunny
Full forecast on
page 2A.
Five Questions
1 Who warned his wife, Pandora, not
to open her famous box?
2 Whats the only near-actual-size
item used as a token in Monopoly?
3 At what time of night does daylight
saving time begin and end?
4 What director sued in 2003 over
the new on-screen name of the former
Nashville Network?
5 Who wrote the Janis Joplin hit Me
and Bobby McGee?

Answers, 5B
inside
Classifeds 5B
Comics 4B
Obituaries 5A
Opinions 4A
LocaL FoLks
Dori Jenrette is the manager of
volunteer services and bereave-
ment coordinator at Gentiva
Hospice in Columbus.
caLendar
Wednesday, Oct. 2
Table Talk: Author and illus-
trator Laurie Parker of Starkville
discusses her frst novel, The
Matchstick Cross, at noon at the
Columbus-Lowndes Public Library,
314 Seventh St. N. The Friends of
the Library invite you to bring lunch
at 11:30 a.m. to socialize; iced tea
is provided. Or join friends for the
program from noon-1 p.m. For more
information, contact the library,
662-329-5300.
Thursday, Oct. 3
Book signings: Adele Elliott of
Columbus will read from her debut
novel Friendship Cemetery at
a book signing from 5-7 p.m. at
Hollyhocks, 204 Fifth St. S., in Co-
lumbus. She will also attend book
signings Oct. 12 from 4-6 p.m.
at the North Mississippi Holistic
Center, 140 Brickerton, and Oct.
28 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at the
Columbus-Lowndes Public Library,
314 Seventh St. N. For more
information, call 662-368-2211 or
email pr@adeleelliott.com.
Friday, Oct. 4
MSU fall plant sale: Missis-
sippi States Horticulture Club and
student chapter of the American
Institute of Floral Designers host
their fall plant and wreath sale
at the greenhouse area behind
Dorman Hall on campus from 8
a.m-5:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 662-325-2311.
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
EstablishEd 1879 | Columbus, mississippi
CdispatCh.Com
F
R
E
E
!
tuEsday | oCtobEr 1, 2013
By ANDREW TAyLOR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON Congress
plunged the nation into a partial
government shutdown today as a
long-running dispute over Presi-
dent Barack Obamas health care
law stalled a temporary funding
bill, forcing about 800,000 fed-
eral workers off the job and sus-
pending most non-essential fed-
eral programs and services.
With the Republican-con-
trolled House and Democrat-
ic-controlled Senate at a stale-
mate, it was unclear how long
the government would remain
shuttered. The No. 2 Democrat
in the Senate, Dick Durbin of Il-
linois, called the failure to pass a
budget conduct unbeftting a re-
sponsible Congress and said he
hoped it could be resolved by the
end of the day today.
Most people in the body pol-
itic are taking a look at this and
saying, A pox on both of your
houses. It should never have
reached this point, Durbin
said this morning on CNN. And
theres wisdom to that.
The shutdown, the frst since
the winter of 1995-96, closed
national parks, museums along
the Washington Mall and the
U.S. Capitol visitors center. The
Smithsonian website displayed
a red banner noting that all
Smithsonian museums and the
COngREss plungEs naTiOn inTO gOvERnmEnT shuTdOWn
spirit Week
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Joel Barron, dressed as superman, directs his choral class at Starkville High School Monday afternoon. Monday was Superhero
Day in the Starkville School District, which signals the kickoff to Spirit Week leading up to homecoming.
Buffalo Wild Wings eyeing Columbus location
By WILLIAM BROWNING
wbrowning@cdispatch.com
Columbus residents can expect two
new dining options to open on Highway
45 North, one offering old-fashioned
hamburgers and the other providing a
sports-themed grill and bar.
Jess Ousley, director of operations for
Buffalo Wild Wings franchises in Oxford
and Starkville, confrmed Monday that
the restaurant is considering a location in
Jackson Square.
If plans go as expected, the restaurant
which states on its corporate website
that all you need to know About Us is
these three things: Wings. Beer. Sports.
will locate in the space formerly occu-
pied by Goose Hollow Furniture.
Ousley said his team still has to work
out a lease agreement, but talks with an
architect and contractor are underway.
He said he is 90 percent positive the
restaurant will be coming to Columbus,
although he would not speculate on when
the restaurant would open.
We pegged Columbus because you
have a lot of things going on in that mar-
ket, Ousley said, noting Columbus Air
AP Photo/Evan Vucci
House Majority
Leader Rep. Eric
Cantor, R-Va.,
left, and House
Majority Whip
Rep. Kevin McCa-
rthy, R-Calif., rear
center, look on
as Speaker of the
House Rep. John
Boehner, R-Ohio,
pauses during a
news conference
on Capitol Hill
this morning.
First shutdown in
more than 17 years
See SHUTDOWN, 6A
CARLA K. JOHNSON
The Associated Press
CHICAGO Millions of
Americans will be able to shop
for the frst time today on the
insurance marketplaces that are
at the heart of President Barack
Obamas health care reforms,
entering a world that is sup-
posed to simplify the mysteries
of health coverage but could end
up making it even more confus-
ing, at least initially.
Whether consumers will be
pleased with the experience, the
premiums and the out-of-pock-
et costs of the plans offered to
them will fnally start to become
clear. Todays rollout comes af-
ter months of buildup in which
the marketplaces, also known
as exchanges, have been both
praised and vilifed.
Illustrating the heated po-
litical disagreements over the
law, the opening of the exchang-
es comes the same day as the
shutdown of the federal govern-
ment, led by congressional Re-
publicans who want to block the
health insurance reforms from
taking effect.
The shutdown will have no
immediate effect on the insur-
ance marketplaces that are the
backbone of the law, because
they operate with money that
isnt subject to the annual bud-
get wrangling in Washington.
The marketplaces opening in
all 50 states represent a turning
point in the nations approach to
health care, the biggest expan-
sion in coverage in nearly 50
years.
The Obama administration
Shutdown or not, health insurance markets open today
offcials expect many to wait before signing
up under the affordable care act
See OBAMACARE, 6A
See BUSINESS, 6A
Jacks hamburgers to open on highway 45 north in nov.
project Cumulus
appears to be
a done deal for
starkville
investment would
be Links frst major
oktibbeha county
success; announcement
set for thursday
By CARL SMITH
csmith@cdispatch.com
State and local
government offcials,
higher education
leaders and econom-
ic developers are ex-
pected to announce a
major breakthrough
concerning Project
Cumulus, a proposed
$20 million technolo-
gy initiative, Thursday at the Thad
Cochran Research Park.
Joey Deason, Oktibbeha Coun-
tys Link representative, was un-
available for comment Monday, but
Starkville Mayor Parker Wiseman
confrmed Thursdays announce-
ment will deal with what would be
the areas frst major economic win
while partnered with the tri-county
development agency.
Wiseman, along with Link CEO
Joe Max Higgins, Mississippi State
University President Mark Keenum
and Oktibbeha County Economic
Development Authority Executive
Director Jack Wallace, will attend
the 2:30 p.m. announcement Thurs-
day at the HPC 2 Building.
It will be a memorable day for
Starkville, Oktibbeha County and
the Golden Triangle, Wiseman
said. This is an exciting project
that brings signifcant opportunity
and investment to our community.
Offcials confrmed few details
See CUMULUS, 6A
Deason
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 2A Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013
DiD you hear?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
SUBSCRIPTIONS
The Commercial Dispatch (USPS 142-320)
Published daily except Saturday. Entered at the post offce at Columbus, Mississippi.
Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, MS
POSTMASTER, Send address changes to:
The Commercial Dispatch, P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703
Published by Commercial Dispatch Publishing Company Inc.,
516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39703
Offce hours:
n 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Fri
Main line:
n 662-328-2424
Report a missing paper?
n 662-328-2424 ext. 100
n Toll-free 877-328-2430
n Operators are on duty until
6 p.m. Mon.-Fri. and 6:30 -
9:30 a.m. Sun.
Buy an ad?
n 662-328-2424
Report a news tip?
n 662-328-2471
n news@cdispatch.com
Email a letter to the editor?
n voice@cdispatch.com
Report a sports score?
n 662-241-5000
Submit a calendar item?
n Go to www.cdispatch.com/
community
Submit a birth, wedding
or anniversary announce-
ment?
n Download forms at www.
cdispatch.com.lifestyles
HOW DO I ...
Physical address: 516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39701
Mailing address: P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703-0511
Starkville Offce: 101 S. Lafayette St. #16, Starkville, MS 39759
HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
By phone ................................ 662-328-2424 or 877-328-2430
Online ......................................... www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
RATES
Daily home delivery + unlimited online access* ..............$11/mo.
Sunday only delivery + unlimited online access* ..........$7.50/mo.
Daily home delivery only* ...........................................$10.50/mo.
Online access only* ......................................................$7.95/mo.
1 month daily home delivery .................................................. $12
1 month Sunday only home delivery ....................................... $7
Mail Subscription Rates ...................................................$20/mo.
* EZ Pay rate requires automatic processing of credit or debit card.
Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Monday
High/low ..................................... 75/62
Normal high/low ......................... 82/57
Record high ............................ 96 (1953)
Record low .............................. 39 (1967)
Monday ........................................... 0.62"
Month to date ................................. 4.77"
Normal month to date ...................... 3.65"
Year to date .................................. 50.18"
Normal year to date ....................... 41.52"
Wednesday Thursday
Atlanta 82 63 pc 83 62 pc
Boston 80 58 s 76 55 s
Chicago 79 64 s 80 67 t
Dallas 89 73 pc 90 73 s
Honolulu 87 73 c 88 73 pc
Jacksonville 84 65 pc 85 69 pc
Memphis 86 70 t 87 70 t
86
62
Wednesday
Periods of sun with
a t-storm
86
64
Thursday
Partly sunny with a
t-storm
86
65
Friday
Warm and humid
with sunshine
86
64
Saturday
A couple of
thunderstorms
Aberdeen Dam 188' 163.39' -0.02'
Stennis Dam 166' 136.64' -0.02'
Bevill Dam 136' 136.37' -0.09'
Amory 20' 11.47' +0.21'
Bigbee 14' 3.79' -0.01'
Columbus 15' 5.10' -0.09'
Fulton 20' 7.40' none
Tupelo 21' 0.60' -0.10'
Last
Oct. 26
Full
Oct. 18
First
Oct. 11
New
Oct. 4
Sunrise ..... 6:48 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:38 p.m.
Moonrise ... 3:30 a.m.
Moonset .... 4:34 p.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Major ... 10:26 a.m.
Minor ..... 4:15 a.m.
Major ... 10:49 p.m.
Minor ..... 4:37 p.m.
Major ... 11:08 a.m.
Minor ..... 4:56 a.m.
Major ... 11:31 p.m.
Minor ..... 5:19 p.m.
Wednesday Tuesday
Wednesday Thursday
Nashville 85 63 pc 87 64 t
Orlando 88 72 pc 86 74 t
Philadelphia 84 63 s 81 63 pc
Phoenix 94 70 s 93 67 s
Raleigh 84 61 s 85 61 pc
Salt Lake City 70 49 pc 60 41 sh
Seattle 56 45 r 60 43 s
Tonight
Partly cloudy; fog,
humid late
64
Its a short drive from
Starkville to Columbus
for great dental care.

300 HOSPITAL DRIVE | COLUMBUS, MS | 662-327-0995
www.DrDKCurtis.com | PediatricDentistry@drdkcurtis.com
Board Certified in Pediatric Dentistry
Dental Care for infants, children,
adolescents & teenagers


T
h
e

D
is
p
a
t
c
h
Cutting Edge
Technology
Awesome Experience
Always Exceeds
Expectations of Child
and Parents
Tuesday
Say What?
I wont lie that its been frustrating to watch the flm
afterwards knowing teams like Auburn are trying to
take me away from the game.
MSU senior running back LaDarius Perkins. Story, 1B.
Snake salesman to open
store, replacing garage
The AssociATed Press
SHIRLEY, N.Y. A
Long Island animal con-
trol offcer found with
more than 850 snakes in
his garage is moving them
to a storage facility until
he can open his own store.
An attorney for Rich-
ard Parrinello tells News-
day his client is deciding
among three properly
zoned locations.
He says moving the
reptiles is diffcult because
its the end of their breed-
ing season, when female
snakes care for their eggs.
The town of Brookhav-
en says Parrinello is coop-
erating but has four weeks
to get the snakes out of his
garage.
Authorities removed
two 6-foot Burmese py-
thons from Parrinellos
garage earlier this month.
Burmese pythons are il-
legal to own in New York
State without a permit.
Most of Parrinellos
snakes are legal, but hes
been cited for not having
proper permits.
AP Photo/Brookhaven, N.Y. Public Information Offce
Michael Ralbovsky, center, who is the general cura-
tor and herpetologist at the Rainforest Reptile Show,
displays one of two Burmese Pythons from a home in
Shirley, N.Y., Thursday, Sept. 19.
By KAreN MATTheWs
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Be-
loved authors Judy Blume
and Eric Carle helped the
New York Public Library
celebrate childrens litera-
ture Monday as the library
released a list of 100 great
books from the last 100
years.
The list includes picture
books for preschoolers
as well as books for older
readers like The Hobbit
and Harry Potter and the
Sorcerers Stone.
The Cat in the Hat,
Pippi Longstocking and
Where the Wild Things
Are all made the list, which
accompanies an exhibit on
childrens literature at the
librarys main building in
midtown Manhattan.
Blume and Carle joined
librarians for a reading and
panel discussion.
Viewed over time,
childrens books are the
collected memory of our
hopes and dreams, said
moderator Leonard Mar-
cus, a book critic and the
curator of the exhibit.
They are the message in
a bottle that each genera-
tion tosses out to the next
generation in the hope that
it may wash ashore and be
read and be taken to heart.
Blume, whose Tales of
a Fourth Grade Nothing is
on the list, said that when
she was in the fourth grade
herself she always had sto-
ries in her head.
But I never told any-
body about them because I
thought if I did they would
think I was weird, she said.
Since Blume began
publishing in the 1970s,
many of her books dealing
with subjects like racism,
divorce and sexuality have
been banned by authorities
who considered the topics
inappropriate for children.
Books that are loved
by children are often the
books that scare adults,
Blume said.
Carle made the librarys
list with The Very Hungry
Caterpillar, his 1969 pic-
ture book about a voracious
bug that becomes a butter-
fy. He said he created the
caterpillar by folding and
manipulating paper; he frst
thought of the character
as a bookworm, Willie the
Worm.
NYC library offers list of 100 great kids books
online
n nypl.org/childrens100
By rUsseLL coNTrerAs
The Associated Press
ALBUQUERQUE,
N.M. Insults
dished out by food
critic Anthony Bour-
dain on an episode
of CNNs Parts Un-
known have stirred
up outrage in New
Mexico and now
he acknowledges
that he was wrong.
The sharp-tongued chef and
writer lashed into the World Fa-
mous Frito pies sold at Santa Fes
Five & Dime General Stores snack
bar. The store is a tourist attraction
and a mainstay in the citys historic
plaza.
The dish, according to Bour-
dain, was made with canned Hor-
mel Chili and a day-glow orange
cheese-like substance.
But Bourdain spokeswoman
Karen Reynolds told The Associat-
ed Press on Monday that the writer
was incorrect in his description of
the chile used by Santa Fes Five &
Dime General Stores snack bar to
make the Frito pies.
He admits that we got it wrong
about the chile, Reynolds said in
an email. And well try to correct it
for future airings.
In his critique, Bourdain also
said that the local favorite isnt even
a New Mexico meal, but rather a
Texas creation. He said New Mexi-
cans should leave the recipe to the
Texans.
New Mexico, you have many
wonderful things, Bourdain said.
I think, let Texas have this one.
Mike Collins, store manager
of the Five & Dime, says Bour-
dain was completely wrong on
the stores Frito pie. He said their
version is homemade from chilies
grown in New Mexico and remains
popular.
I dont have any idea where he
got that from, Collins said. I mean,
if were using canned Hormel Chili
then Id like to buy stock in that be-
cause what we have is good.
Still, Collins said he and the staff
dont have any ill feelings toward
Bourdain. He said during the tap-
ing of the visit, Bourdain was nice
and a pleasure to be around.
Reynolds also said Bourdain
enjoyed the pie, something that
wasnt clear from the show.
Contrary to the impression left
by some reports of the show, I, in
fact, very much enjoyed my Frito
pie in spite of its disturbing weight
in the hand. It may have felt like
(expletive) but was shockingly
tasty, Bourdain said in a statement.
The food critic wasnt all nega-
tive toward New Mexico on the ep-
isode. Bourdain is seen driving on
Route 66 through New Mexico and
speaks of the famous highways
different cultures and cornucopia
of food. He also is shown enjoying
some level 3 green chile and hav-
ing to wait it out while the spicy
effects wear off.
Anthony Bourdain admits mistake on Frito pie
Bourdain
AP Photo/The Santa Fe New Mexican, Luis Sanchez Saturno
Connie Lanyon-Robert enjoys a World Famous Frito pie sold at Santa
Fes Five & Dime General Stores snack bar in Santa Fe, N.M.
AP Photo/The Santa Fe New Mexican, Luis Sanchez Saturno
In this Sept. 27, 2013, photo, Loraine Chavez, of Santa Fe, prepares a Frito Pie for a customer at the Five &
Dime in Santa Fe, N.M. The tourist attraction and a mainstay in the citys historic plaza was recently insulted by
food critic Anthony Bourdain on an episode of CNNs Parts Unknown.
ONLINE SUBSCRIPTIONS
For less than $1 per month, print subscribers can get unlimited
access to story comments, extra photos, newspaper archives
and much more with an online subscription. Nonsubscribers can
purchase online access for less than $8 per month.
Go to www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
MSU SPORTS BLOG
Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking
Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports
@
Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013 3A
www.saumchiropractic.com
111 Alabama Street
Columbus, MS
662-327-6586
The Dispatch
Drs. Saum, Sullivan & Pokorney
Chiropractic care works on relieving symptoms and
complications associated with scoliosis. To see if
chiropractic may be able to help you call 662-327-6586
today for a complimentary consultation.
Scoliosis is a lateral
curvature of the spine. It
affects children 8-18 and
is more common in girls.
The two most common
causes are congenital and
habitual. Congenital means
a person is born with a
lateral curvature of the
spine. Causes of habitual
scoliosis include carrying
backpacks improperly and
poor posture. Signs of
scoliosis include uneven
hips or shoulders and leg
and back pain.
SCOLIOSIS
1121 Second Ave. N.
Columbus, MS
662.327.1480
info@ncon.net
www.ncon.net
Financial
Concepts
A Planning Firm
Rhonda Ferguson CFP

, CFS | Scott Ferguson


Securities offered through Girard Securities, Inc., member FINRA, SIPC.
Investment advisory services offered through Financial Concepts a registered
investment advisor not afliated with Girard Securities, Inc.
Tune in to Dollars & Sense every
Wednesday morning on WCBI at 6:38 a.m.
Scan to go to our blog at
www.ncon.net/blog
Visit
our
new
blog!


T
h
e

D
is
p
a
t
c
h
By JEFF AMy
The Associated Press
JACKSON If Mississippi
Power Co. misses a May dead-
line to complete construction of
a $4.3 billion power plant in Kem-
per County, it will be forced to
repay $133 million in federal tax
credits.
However, the company says
that because of accounting rules,
it wouldnt write the amount off
from proft and wouldnt add it to
the $990 million in overruns its
already written off.
Company spokeswoman
Amoi Geter said that decision
could come this week.
Mississippi Power President
Ed Holland told The Associat-
ed Press recently that offcials
were reviewing the schedule and
could push it back.
We still think that May date
is achievable, Holland said. Its
a challenge, and were in the pro-
cess of evaluating how achiev-
able it is.
Geter says Mississippi Power
received tax credits in 2009 to en-
courage it to build a coal-fueled
power plant emitting less carbon
dioxide, with a fve-year deadline
to complete construction.
Rainy weather and addition-
al work have pushed back the
schedule, Holland said. More
than 6,000 workers are on the
site, a work-
force thats been
ramped up as Mis-
sissippi Power has
tried to stay on
schedule. But Hol-
land says there
are now so many
workers on site
that it can be hard
to squeeze them into the same
spaces, creating congestion that
limits productivity.
Monitors employed by the
Public Service Commission have
warned that some work remains
signifcantly behind, particular-
ly certain kinds of cabling. URS
Corp., one of the two monitors,
wrote in its August report that
internal worst-case scenarios
could call for months of delays in
completing the plant and starting
it up. The company hopes to start
the gasifer, a key part of starting
the whole plant, by December.
The startup schedule is com-
pressed, theres no doubt about
that, Holland said. But we think
its doable.
Lower labor productivity is
one of the factors that could drive
up costs even more. Southern
Co. shareholders are already ab-
sorbing $990 million in overruns,
and the company has warned
costs could go up again. But
Chief Financial Offcer Moses
Feagin said the $133 million in
tax credits, which would be re-
paid from cash or by reducing fu-
ture tax credits, would be only an
indirect drag on future proft. He
also said adding the $133 million
to the $990 million in overruns
would be adding apples and or-
anges.
Under a settlement approved
in January, Mississippi rate-
payers will have to pay for $2.4
billion of the plants price, plus
pay for up to another $1 billion
in bonds that Mississippi Power
wont make a proft on. Thats
not counting the additional hun-
dreds of millions for costs of the
mine and pipeline.
The PSC voted 2-1 to approve
a 15 percent rate increase to start
paying off the plants debt even
before it begins operations, fol-
lowed by an additional 3 percent
increase in 2014. Mississippi
Power has said its likely in 2014
to seek an additional increase of
at least 4 percent over 20 years to
pay off the bonds.
The federal government of-
fered the tax credits to Kemper
because the new plant is de-
signed to limit carbon dioxide
emissions.
Kemper delay could force repayment of $133 million
The following arrests
were reported by the
Oktibbeha County Sher-
if fs Of fice, the Lowndes
County Sherif fs Of fice
and the Columbus Police
Department:
n Gregory Quameh
Murunga, 33, of 424 23rd
St. S., was arrested at
22nd St. S. and College
St., by CPD Sept. 29 and
charged with violation of
probation, contempt of
court and driving with
a suspended drivers li-
cense. His court date is
scheduled for Oct. 9.
n Tomarcus Keion
Davis, 28, of 1514 Eighth
Ave N., was arrested at
Highway 45 N. and 18th
Ave. N., by CPD Sept. 30
and charged with viola-
tion of probation and con-
tempt of court. His court
date has been scheduled
for Oct. 23.
n Larry Mitchell Mar-
lowe, 51, of 495 shady
Lane, was arrested at 143
Carolyn Drive, by MDOC
Sept. 28 and charged with
violation of probation.
n Cornell R. Jimerson,
28, was arrested Sept. 23
by OCSO and charged
with the sale of cocaine
and failure to pay child
support. He has not been
released.
n Jahajaawon B.
Christian, 19, was arrest-
ed by OCSO Sept. 25 and
charged with armed rob-
bery. Bond has been set
at $30,000.
n Sean Porter Ross,
20, was arrested by
OCSO Sept. 27 and
charged with the sale of
more than 30 grams of
marijuana. He was re-
leased the same day on
$10,000 bond. His court
date is scheduled for Oct.
21.
n Cornell Logan, 29,
was arrested Sept. 28 by
OCSO and charged with
the sale of narcotics. He
was released the same
day on $10,000 bond. His
court date is scheduled
for Oct. 21.
n Joseph Rodney
Johnson, 28, was arrest-
ed Sept. 28 by OCSO
and charged with manu-
facturing narcotics and
the possession of narcot-
ics. He has not been re-
leased.
Jimerson
Johnson
Marlowe
Logan
Davis
Ross
Murunga
Christian
aREa aRRESTS
Deputies fnd man stealing fuel from tanker
ThE AssociATEd PrEss
PASS CHRISTIAN
A 52-year-old Long Beach
man suspected of stealing
about $7,500 in fuel from a
tanker trucking business
was caught in the act of
putting fuel in 55-gallon
drums.
Harrison County Sher-
iff Melvin Brisolara tells
The Sun Herald Devern
Sam Taylor was under in-
vestigation on an embez-
zlement complaint when
deputies and business per-
sonnel found him allegedly
stealing more fuel Sunday
night in Pass Christian.
The sheriff said inves-
tigators believe Taylors
accomplice left before du-
ties arrived.
BCP Tank Lines, of
Gulfport, had fled the
complaint and had re-
cords and log books show-
ing Taylor was responsi-
ble for the truck when the
fuel went missing.
Taylor is held at the
Harrison County jail on a
$10,000 bond set by Jus-
tice Court Judge Bruce
Strong.
It was unclear whether
he has an attorney.
Suspected of stealing $7,500 in fuel
Company says 2009 tax credits encouraged
it to build the plant with a 5-year deadline
ThE AssociATEd PrEss
JACKSON Personal income
growth in Mississippi trailed the na-
tion in the second quarter, dragged
down by a drop in farm income and
slow growth in the service sector.
The economic measure expand-
ed 0.5 percent, the federal Bureau
of Economic Analysis said Monday,
ranking 44th among states. Person-
al income in the United States as a
whole grew 1 percent from April to
June.
Farm income, which can be
among the most volatile parts of
the measure, fell more in Mississip-
pi than nationwide. A decrease in
government transfer payments also
hurt the states performance
Personal income is all of income
received from every source, includ-
ing wages, business owner profts,
interest, dividends, rent and govern-
ment transfers. Its not the same as
a measure of the overall economy,
but can be a rough proxy.
Among the states, Arizona per-
formed the strongest, with personal
income rising 1.5 percent. Nebraska
was the weakest, falling 0.7 percent.
Iowa and South Dakota, which like
Nebraska saw particularly bad farm
earnings, also had personal income
fall.
Of the three major categories
of personal income work-relat-
ed earnings, investment income
and government transfer payments
only transfer payments fell in
Mississippi. The state lagged the
national performance in all three
categories, though.
Personal income grows slowly in second quarter
Mississippi ranks 44th among other states
Holland
4A Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
Other editOrs
Our View
Some numbers command
your attention, even if youre
not certain what they mean.
Take $1 billion, for exam-
ple.
On Monday, during the
monthly meeting of the Lown-
des County Board of Super-
visors, it was revealed that
the countys total assessed
value has eclipsed the $1
billion mark for the frst time.
Lowndes County is one of six
Mississippi counties to have
surpassed that mark, joining
DeSoto, Harrison, Hinds,
Jackson, Madison and Rankin
in that rare company.
How much is $1 billion?
There are some fun ways to
think about it. One billion
one-dollar bills would carpet
an area of roughly four square
miles. If you stacked a billion
one-dollar bills, the stack
would be almost 68 miles
tall. Laid end-to-end, a billion
one-dollar bills would go
around the earth four times.
OK. Thats what it would
look like.
The bigger question for
the almost 60,000 residents
of Lowndes County is: What
does it mean?
One thing it means is that
the county has bucked a major
trend. Since 2008, when the
frst pangs of the Great Reces-
sion frst began, the assessed
value of the county has actual-
ly grown by about 25 percent,
which is pretty amazing, given
the breadth and scope of the
hard times we are still trying
to recover from nationally.
It also means that the plan-
ning that began years earlier
has proven to be successful.
While there are many factors
in that growth, there are two
that stand apart. The frst is
the 2001 sale of the county
hospital, which created a
$30 million trust fund for the
county and led to the creation
of the Columbus-Lowndes
Development Link, which has
expanded to include Clay and
Oktibbeha counties to become
the Golden Triangle Develop-
ment Link.
Under the Links guidance,
the county has seen a boom
in industrial development,
the full benefts of which the
county is only beginning to
realize. With the expiration
of fee-in-lieu agreements for
a handful of those big indus-
trial developments soon at
hand, the county should reap
an additional $3 million to $5
million annually in revenues.
While assessed value is
one indicator of a healthy
county, challenges remain
in making sure the windfalls
that seem almost certain to
come the countys way will be
used wisely, ensuring future
growth and making Lowndes
County a better place to live
and work and play.
It is interesting to note that
during this period of prosper-
ity, the county has actually
lost population, a cause for
concern. We do not think its
a good idea for the county to
become little more than one
big industrial park.
Just as we are seeing the
fruits of wise planning and
decision-making that began a
decade ago, it will be equally
important the county offcials
take a long view of the road
ahead. Old challenges remain.
New challenges are sure to
emerge.
But there is reason for
optimism.
A billion reasons, you
might say.
There shouldnt have to be laws to compel the
obvious, such as not hiring convicted government em-
bezzlers for positions of public trust again. A halfway
decent background check and common sense should
be enough.
Unfortunately, sometimes in the past, both of those
hiring safeguards have apparently been missing in
state and local governments in Mississippi. Thats
why, at the urging of State Auditor Stacey Pickering,
legislators this year passed a law that says anyone in a
government job caught and convicted of stealing from
the taxpayers can never work in state or local govern-
ment again.
Last week brought the convictions of the frst two
to be impacted by the new law. A former Union County
coroner pleaded guilty to submitting false claims for
payment totaling more than $275,000. A former state
Department of Health employee pleaded guilty to em-
bezzling more than $23,000.
Both were hit with numerous penalties jail time
or house arrest and paying restitution for what they
stole and for the states costs for catching them in
addition to the lifetime ban from government employ-
ment.
In a third case, Walthall County Deputy Chancery
Clerk Kristy Laird pleaded guilty to one count of em-
bezzlement, but she got off more lightly than the other
two.
Pickering said that Laird embezzled $15,531 from
March 2011 through April 2013. She was sentenced to
fve years, suspended, and two years probation. She
paid restitution totaling $25,052, including accrued
interest and investigative costs.
However, if Laird stays out of trouble her case will
be non-adjudicated at the end of the probationary
period, meaning her record will be wiped clean. Pick-
ering, in his speech here, indicated he wasnt too happy
with that part of the sentence.
The new law sends a message that this state takes
seriously when public employees steal from taxpayers.
It also should keep those who do the hiring from giving
the thieves another crack at getting their hands in the
public till.
The (McComb) Enterprise-Journal
Mississippi VOices
I wonder how many
others were glued to
C-Span at 1:00 on a re-
cent Sunday morning
listening to the speech-
es from the foor of the
United States House of
Representatives pre-
ceding a vote whose
outcome was a fore-
gone conclusion.
I am risking having
my sanity called into
question when I admit
that I was and that I
was far more fascinated than the
level of intrigue called for. The
speeches in the middle of the
night made on the foor which, for
the most part, alternated between
the Democrats and the Republi-
cans might just as well have been
beamed in from separate planets
rather than having been delivered
as they were from a few feet away
from each other.
The question has been oft
repeated lately by those not paid
to understand the machinations
of government: What happens
now? Others ask, When has it
been like this? Indeed, I hope
this observers next paycheck
does not depend on knowing just
how far this Congressional dead-
lock can go and what will happen
if it does indeed persist.
Two major things take place
on Oct. 1. It is the frst day that
enrollment in health care insur-
ance plans as prescribed by the
Affordable Care Act (Obamacare)
began. Secondly, it is also the frst
day of a new fscal year in which
a new budget or at least a new
continuing resolution commenced
functioning. The only problem
was that a signifcant segment of
the United States House main-
tained that if the health care
signup moves forward then the
budget will not. The bottom line
was no budget no government
funding.
Has Congress ever witnessed
such a sharp division between the
two major parties in their opinions
of the role of government? Have
they ever reached
such a bitter impasse?
A search for answers
as to what history can
tell us about Congress
and its experiences
in discovering the
indispensable art of
compromise following
a period of deadlock
is not very rewarding,
and it can be somewhat
disheartening. For
instance, the period of
greatest disagreement
and refusal to engage in a meet-
ing of the minds is undoubtedly
the years immediately prior to
the Civil War. John C. Calhoun,
perhaps the Ted Cruz of his day,
supplied the language of nullif-
cation and interposition that later
lead to the rationale for secession
of the Southern states.
The 34th Congress in 1855 be-
gan with pro-slavery and anti-slav-
ery advocates killing each other in
the Bleeding Kansas territory.
The violence made it to the Capi-
tol when Massachusetts Senator
Charles Sumner denounced Con-
gressional members who support-
ed slavery and was subsequently
caned within an inch of his life
by South Carolina Representative
Preston Brooks on the Senate
foor. Ultimately, the Southern
states made good on their threats
to secede from the union.
In more modern times there
have been major uprisings. In
March of 1956, 19 Senators and
77 House members signed and
issued The Southern Manifesto.
This document was composed as
a reaction by Southerners to the
U. S. Supreme Courts decision in
Brown vs. The Board of Edu-
cation in 1954 ending the legal
practice of maintaining separate
but equal facilities for black and
white citizens. The Southern
Manifesto stated in no uncertain
terms the determination of the
South not to abide by the hold-
ing of the Court in the Brown
decision. Mississippi Senator
James O. Eastland, like Calhoun
a century earlier, took up the call
for nullifcation by the states
of federal laws with which these
Southern states disagreed. Years
of bloody confict followed as the
Civil Rights movement began in
earnest.
The current situation in the
nations capital is compounded
signifcantly as Oct. 17 has been
pegged as the absolute date by
which the ceiling on the Federal
debt must be raised or the country
risks defaulting on its previously
incurred debt. In preparation for
that debate, Republicans in the U.
S. House have prepared a laundry
list of virtually every prominent
issue on their agenda which they
claim must be addressed before
the ceiling can be raised. Of
course this list includes delaying
implementation of the Afford-
able Care Act for a year. At this
juncture neither the legislation
attached to the continuing resolu-
tion nor the legislation associated
with the debt ceiling stands any
chance of passing the Democrat-
ically-held Senate. This is where
we run out of answers. Further-
more, the lines have formed just
as planned on Oct. 1 to sign up for
insurance under the Affordable
Care Act.
It was said by one commentator
that compromise is the life blood
of our representative Democracy.
Another opined that negotiation
and compromise comprised the
fuel that makes the engine of
American Democracy run. It was
quite evident from the midnight
House debate that all the lines and
all of the talking points in defense
of the two parties positions have
been used many times over. The
ultimate outcomes provided to
us by history are too dismal to
contemplate.
What remains is the answer to
the question How are we going to
get out of this wilderness and who
is going to lead us?
Wiseman is director of the Sten-
nis Institute at Mississippi State
University. His e-mail address is
marty@sig.msstate.edu.
Oct. 1, a day to remember
Stealing should
be a disqualifer
A billion dollars
Marty Wiseman
EDITOR/PUBLISHER
Birney Imes
ADVERTISING
Stacy Clark
Annette Estes
Angie Evans
Linda Massey
Beth Profftt
Ernest Rogers
Mary Jane Runnels
Jackie Taylor
Kim Vail
Diane Wyant
BUSINESS OFFICE
Terri Collums
Elbert Ellis
Debbie Foster
Peter Imes
CIRCULATION
Michael Floyd
Robbie Frantz
Melissa Garretson
Lisa Oswalt
NEWS
Carol Boone
William Browning
Sarah Fowler
Matt Garner
Micah Green
Nathan Gregory
Adam Minichino
Carl Smith
Slim Smith
Matt Stevens
Jan Swoope
Scott Walters
PRODUCTION
Ronald Gore, Sr.
Perry Griggs
Jamie Morrison
Tina Perry
THE STAFF OF THE DISPATCH
Voice of the People
We encourage you to share your opinion with readers of
The Dispatch.
Submit your letter to The Dispatch by:
E-mail: voice@cdispatch.com
Mail: P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703
In person: 516 Main St., Columbus, or 101 S. Lafayette
St., No. 16, Starkville.
All letters must be signed by the author and must include
town of residence and a telephone number for verifcation
purposes. Letters should be no more than 500 words,
and guest columns should be 500-700 words. We reserve
the right to edit submitted information.
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013 5A
Dr. Thomas Vinson
Dr. Thomas Lynn Tom-
my Vinson, age 64, died
Sunday, September 29,
2013, at North Mississippi
Medical Center in Tupelo.
Services will be held Tues-
day, October 1, 2013, at
1:00 PM at Memorial Fu-
neral Home Chapel with
Rev. Granville Wiggins and Rev. Walter But-
ler offciating. Burial will follow at Memorial
Gardens of Columbus. Visitation will be held
from 11:00 AM until service time at the funeral
home.
Dr. Vinson was born on Thursday, Septem-
ber 1, 1949, in Oxford, MS to the late James
Preston and Gertrude Fooshee Vinson. He was
a member of First Baptist Church Columbus.
He graduated from Oxford High School in May
of 1967, then graduated from the University
of Mississippi in 1971 with a degree in Liber-
al Arts Pre-Medicine, and in 1975 graduated
from the University Medical Center.
He then moved to Mobile, AL to complete
his residency and internship at Mobile General
Hospital, which he completed in 1980.
Dr. Vinson was a member of the USAFROTC
at University of Mississippi, and upon fnishing
his medical residency was commissioned to the
United States Air Force.
He completed four years of military service
at Columbus Air Force Base from 1980-1983.
During his thirty plus years of medical ser-
vice, he served at Baptist Memorial Hospital,
North Mississippi Medical Center, and many
other local facilities, while also committing
himself to his local practice.
Personally, he devoted himself to his wife
and family, friends and patients. His fervent
passions included owning and showing Tennes-
see Walking horses and supporting Ole Miss
Athletics.
He came to know the Lord in 1961 and was
baptized at Yellow Leaf Baptist Church in La-
fayette County, MS.
Survivors include his wife, Patricia Jean
Vinson, Columbus, MS; daughter, Whitney
Allen (Jeff), Oxford, MS; sons, Corey Vinson,
Oxford, MS, Paul Hawkins (Katelyn), Dallas,
TX and Tony Hawkins, Denver, CO; brother,
Jimmy Vinson (Diane), Oxford, MS; grandchil-
dren, Hardy Allen, Scout Hawkins, River Haw-
kins and Ryder Hawkins; and mother-in-law,
Ellen Davis, Hamilton, MS.
The pallbearers will be Bill Dorrah, Edgar
Abernathy, Corey Vinson, David Shepherd,
Paul Hawkins and Tony Hawkins.
In lieu of fowers, memorials may be made to
the UAB Neuro-Oncology Program, 510 20th
Street South FOT 1020, Birmingham, AL 35294.
A difference, to be a difference, must make a dif-
ference. Gertrude Stein
Expressions of Sympathy May
Be Left At
www.memorialfuneral.net
Compliments of
Lowndes Funeral Home
www.lowndesfuneralhome.net
Elnor Britt
Elnor Glen Clark Britt, 85, of Columbus, MS
passed away Monday, September 30, 2013, at
Vineyard Court Nursing Center, Columbus,
MS.
Visitation will be Tuesday, October 1, 2013,
from 6-8 PM at Lowndes Funeral Home, Colum-
bus, MS. Funeral services will be Wednesday,
October 2, 2013, at 2 PM at Lowndes Funeral
Home Chapel with Bro. Ben Yarber offciating
and Bro. Shane Cruse assisting. Interment
will be in Friendship Cemetery, Millport, AL
with Lowndes Funeral Home directing.
Ms. Britt was born August 10, 1928, in Ful-
ton, MS to the late Grover and Mimie McMa-
nus Nethery. She was a member of Canaan
Baptist Church, Columbus, MS and American
Legion Post 69 Ladies Auxiliary. Ms. Britt en-
joyed fshing and loved cats and dogs. She re-
tired in 1983 from Lowndes General Hospital
as a nurse. In addition to her parents, Ms. Britt
was preceded in death by her husbands, Allen
Gosa, Earl Clark, and Thomas Britt; brother,
Travis Nethery; and grandson, Shawn Clark.
Ms. Britt is survived by her sons, Gary
(Sam) Clark, Helena, AL, Stanley (Valerie)
Clark, Caledonia, MS and Jeffery Earl (Char-
lotte) Clark, Columbus, MS; daughters, Pa-
tricia Brown, West Point, MS and Lisa Kersh,
Caledonia, MS; stepdaughter, Gina Graham,
Columbus, MS; sister-in-law, Clarice Nethery,
Millport, AL; grandchildren, Remona (David)
Philpott, Elizabeth (Terry) Owens, Chasity
Desmidt, Melissa Chance, Candice Clark, Jef-
fery Clark, Amanda Kersh and Blakney Clark;
and 8 great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers will be Mark Ward, John Fanch-
er, Jeff Clark, Stanley Clark, Gary Clark and
Jeffery Clark.
Honorary pallbearers will be the staff of
Vineyard Court, Sonny Shelton, Rob Carson,
American Legion Post 69 Ladies Auxiliary,
Dr. Jerry Stennett, Dr. Robert Buckley, Ken-
neth Reynolds, Jack Atkins, Ted Russell, Tony
Clark, Ruth Gibson and the staff of Baptist
Hospice.
Memorials may be made to American Can-
cer Society, 1380 Livingston Lane, Jackson,
MS 39213 and Cedar Hill Animal Sanctuary,
84 Sanctuary Loop, Caledonia, MS 39740.
We Welcome
Existing Burial
and Pre-Arranged
Funeral Plans
from other
Funeral Homes
1131 Lehmberg Rd. Columbus
662-328-1808
www.lowndesfuneralhome.net
When Caring Counts...
FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATORY
AreA obituAries
COMMERCIAL DISPATCH
OBITUARY POLICY
Obituaries with basic informa-
tion including visitation and
service times, are provided
free of charge. Extended
obituaries with a photograph,
detailed biographical informa-
tion and other details families
may wish to include, are avail-
able for a fee. Obituaries must
be submitted through funeral
homes unless the deceaseds
body has been donated to
science. If the deceaseds
body was donated to science,
the family must provide offcial
proof of death. Please submit
all obituaries on the form
provided by The Commercial
Dispatch. Free notices must be
submitted to the newspaper
no later than 3 p.m. the day
prior for publication Tuesday
through Friday; no later than 4
p.m. Saturday for the Sunday
edition; and no later than 7:30
a.m. for the Monday edition.
Incomplete notices must be re-
ceived no later than 7:30 a.m.
for the Monday through Friday
editions. Paid notices must be
fnalized by 3 p.m. for inclusion
the next day Monday through
Thursday; and on Friday by 3
p.m. for Sunday and Monday
publication. For more informa-
tion, call 662-328-2471.
Mary Smith
WEST POINT
Mary Emma Price
Smith, 85, died Sept.
24, 2013, at West Point
Community Living
Center.
Services are Wednes-
day at noon at St. Mat-
thews Temple COGIC
with Roosevelt Williams
offciating. Burial will
follow in Greenwood
Cemetery. Visitation
is today from 3-6 p.m.
at Carters Mortuary
Services Chapel.
Mrs. Smith was born
Feb. 26, 1928, to the late
Louis Price and Julia
Newsom Price.
In addition to her par-
ents, she was preceded
in death by her hus-
band, George L. Smith;
brothers, Lee Andrew
Price, Willie Lee Price,
John Eddie Price, Louis
Price, Roger Price
and Sam Frank Price;
and sister, Maggie M.
Young.
Survivors include her
sons, George W. Smith
and Willie G. Smith;
daughter, Ruthie M.
ONeal; brothers, Albert
Price, Richard Price.
Gene A. Price and
Maurice Price; seven
grandchildren and six
great-grandchildren.
Miriam Wilder
COLUMBUS Mir-
iam Russell Wilder, 99,
died Sept. 30, 2013, at
Peach Tree Village in
Brandon.
Services are Thurs-
day at 2 p.m. at Me-
morial Funeral Home
Chapel. Visitation is one
hour prior to services.
Mikayla South
COLUMBUS Mi-
kayla Ruth South, 1,
died Sept. 30, 2013, at
her residence.
Services are Thurs-
day at Memorial Funer-
al Home Chapel. Burial
is Friday at 2 p.m. in
Barrancas National
Cemetery in Pensacola,
Fla.
Louise Fisher
COLUMBUS Lou-
ise Fisher, 86, died Sept.
30, 2013, at Baptist Me-
morial HospitalGolden
Triangle.
Arrangements are
incomplete and will be
announced by Carters
Funeral Services.
Odell Tate
MACON Odell
Wells Tate, 82, died
Sept. 29, 2013, in Phila-
delphia.
Services are Satur-
day at 1 p.m. at Mt. Zion
MB Church. Carters
Funeral Services of
Macon is in charge of
arrangements.
Ellen Condra
COLUMBUS El-
len Kay Condra, 54,
died Sept. 226, 2013, at
her residence.
Memorial services
are Wednesday a 11
a.m. at Memorial Funer-
al Home Chapel.
Ms. Condra was born
Aug. 29, 1959, to the late
Lawrence and Maxine
Walker Barham. She
was of a Pentecostal
faith.
Survivors include her
daughter, Latasha John-
ston of San Antonio;
sons, Justin Phillips of
Lytle, Texas and Travis
Phillips of San Antonio;
sisters, Betty God-
frey, Brenda Johnson,
Patia James and Synthia
McLaughlin; brother,
John Barham; and nine
grandchildren.
By KRISTEN GELINEAU
The Associated Press
The world is aging so
fast that most countries
are not prepared to sup-
port their swelling num-
bers of elderly people, ac-
cording to a global study
being issued Tuesday by
the United Nations and
an elder rights group.
The report ranks the
social and economic
well-being of elders in 91
countries, with Sweden
coming out on top and Af-
ghanistan at the bottom.
It refects what advocates
for the old have been
warning, with increas-
ing urgency, for years:
Nations are simply not
working quickly enough
to cope with a population
graying faster than ever
before. By the year 2050,
for the frst time in histo-
ry, seniors older than 60
will outnumber children
younger than 15.
Truong Tien Thao,
who runs a small tea shop
on the sidewalk near his
home in Hanoi, Vietnam,
is 65 and acutely aware
that he, like millions of
others, is plunging into
old age without a safety
net. He wishes he could
retire, but he and his
61-year-old wife depend
on the $50 a month they
earn from the shop. And
so every day, Thao rises
early to open the stall at
6 a.m. and works until 2
p.m., when his wife takes
over until closing.
People at my age
should have a rest, but I
still have to work to make
our ends meet, he says,
while waiting for custom-
ers at the shop, which
sells green tea, cigarettes
and chewing gum. My
wife and I have no pen-
sion, no health insurance.
Im scared of thinking of
being sick I dont know
how I can pay for the
medical care.
Thaos story refects
a key point in the report,
which was released early
to The Associated Press:
Aging is an issue across
the world.
Study: World not ready for aging population
sweden ranks highest in social and economic well-being
of elders, Afghanistan rated last
By MATTHEW PERRONE
AP Health Writer
WASHINGTON A
biotech drug from Roche
has become the frst medi-
cine approved to treat breast
cancer before surgery, of-
fering an earlier approach
against one of the deadliest
forms of the disease.
The Food and Drug Ad-
ministration approved Per-
jeta for women with a form
of early-stage breast cancer
who face a high risk of hav-
ing their cancer spread to
other parts of the body.
Surgery to remove tu-
mors is usually the frst step
in treating most forms of
cancer. Perjeta is the frst
drug to be approved as a
pre-surgical step.
Doctors hope that using
cancer drugs earlier could
help shrink tumors, mak-
ing them easier to remove.
In some cases, that could
allow women to keep their
breasts, rather than having
a full mastectomy. Doctors
also say that treating the
disease at its earliest stages
could prevent tumors from
returning later, though
studies have not yet estab-
lished that beneft.
By making effective
therapies available to high-
risk patients in the earliest
disease setting, we may
delay or prevent cancer re-
currences, said FDAs Dr.
Richard Pazdur.
FDA approves frst pre-surgical breast cancer medicine
cdispatch.com
Dr. Thomas Vinson
Visitation:
Tuesday, Oct. 1 11 AM
Memorial Funeral Home
Services:
Tuesday, Oct. 1 1 PM
Memorial Funeral Home Chapel
Burial:
Memorial Gardens
memorialfuneral.net
Mikayla Ruth South
Visitation:
Thursday, Oct. 3 5 PM
Memorial Funeral Home Chapel
Services:
Thursday, Oct. 3 6 PM
Memorial Funeral Home Chapel
Graveside Services:
Friday, Oct. 4 2 PM
Barrancas National Cemetery
Pensacola, FL
memorialfuneral.net
Ellen Condra
Memorial Services:
Wednesday, Oct. 2 11 AM
Memorial Funeral Home Chapel
memorialfuneral.net
Miriam Wilder
Visitation:
Thursday, Oct. 3 1 PM
Memorial Funeral Home Chapel
Services:
Thursday, Oct. 3 2 PM
Memorial Funeral Home Chapel
memorialfuneral.net
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 6A Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013
Browns Farm &
Garden Supply
901 Alabama St. Columbus, MS
662-329-2281
Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday 7:30 a.m.-Noon


T
h
e

D
is
p
a
t
c
h
Weve got everything
you need to take care
of your best friend!
Collars
Leashes
Grooming Supplies
Clippers
Kennels
Dog Houses
Sport Dog
Training Collars
Sport Dog
Bark Control
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
Dental
Health
Life
Supplemental
Vision
Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
Dental
Health
Life
Supplemental
Vision
Final expense
Eva Sue McAdams
662-640-4525
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
emcadams@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
Dental
Health
Life
Supplemental
Vision
Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
Dental
Health
Life
Supplemental
Vision
Final expense
Eva Sue McAdams
662-640-4525
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
emcadams@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
Dental
Health
Life
Supplemental
Vision
Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
GHA082LES
Your local
insurance solution
Dental
Health
Life
Supplemental
Vision
Final expense
Benjamin Baker
662-597-4177
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday
bbaker5@humana.com
www.olecountrybakery.net
Let Our Expert Staff help you choose
the perfect cake and trimmings
to make your day a success. Your
icing choices include buttercream,
chocolate and cream cheese.
Cakes Breads Doughnuts
Pies: Pecan, Sweet Potato, Cream, Berry & Fruit
Bread Pudding: Plain Cinn-Raisin & Rum
Hwy 45 South
P.O. Box 1007
Brooksville, MS 39739
662.738.5795
Mon - Fri 6:00am - 5:00pm
Sat 6:00am - 2:00pm
Baked Fresh
Daily
Sausage the way Grandpa
used to make it.
Yoders Country Market
Its time for breakfast
Hwy. 45 N. Columbus, MS
662-241-0000
Bulk & Link Sausage Bacon
The Dispatch AIRBASE HILL
Come by and
Check Us Out!
and visit us online at www.yoderbrand.com
ITALIAN
Link Sausage
NEW
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBUS Au-
thorities in Lowndes
County have arrested an
Artesia man in connection
with an assault on a school
bus driver.
Sheriffs deputies tell
WTVA that 21-year-old Ty-
quan Lucius was booked
with ag-
g r a v a t e d
assault on a
school off-
cial.
I nvest i -
gators say
the Lown-
des County
School District bus was
making its fnal stop of
the day on Friday when
Lucius got on the bus and
assaulted the driver, who
was not identifed by au-
thorities.
Investigators say an en-
counter earlier in the day
may have triggered the
incident.
artesia man booked with attack on bus driver
Shutdown
continued from Page 1a
National Zoo are closed.
Agencies like NASA
and the Environmental
Protection Agency will
be all but shuttered. Peo-
ple classifed as essential
government employees
such as air traffc control-
lers, Border Patrol agents
and most food inspectors
will continue to work.
The health care law
itself was unaffected as
enrollment opened to-
day for millions of people
shopping for medical in-
surance.
The White House was
operating with a skeletal
staff, including house-
hold workers taking care
of the frst familys res-
idence and presidential
aides working in the West
Wing. A groundskeep-
er working outside this
morning at daybreak
said he was doing the job
normally handled by four
workers.
The military will be
paid under legislation
freshly signed by Obama,
but paychecks for other
federal workers will be
withheld until the im-
passe is broken. Feder-
al workers were told to
report to their jobs for a
half-day but to perform
only shutdown tasks like
changing email greetings
and closing down agen-
cies Internet sites.
Obamacare
continued from Page 1a
hopes to sign up 7 million
people during the frst
year and has a goal of
eventually signing up at
least half of the nearly 50
million uninsured Amer-
icans through an expan-
sion of Medicaid or gov-
ernment-subsidized plans.
But if people become
frustrated with predict-
ed glitches in the com-
puter-based enrollment
process and turn away
from the program, the
prospects for Obamas
signature domestic policy
achievement could dim.
The promise of the
law is that no one will
go bankrupt because of
medical bills, said Neera
Tanden, president of the
Center for American
Progress, which helped
work for passage of the
law. It wont happen in
the frst day or the frst
year. But when the law is
fully operational, it will
provide an economic ben-
eft to roughly 30 million
Americans.
Tanden cautioned
against rushing to judge
the marketplaces success
on its frst-day perfor-
mance. Numerous observ-
ers have predicted bugs
and setbacks. Trained
outreach workers in many
states are having trouble
getting the certifcation
they need to start helping
people enroll.
Business
continued from Page 1a
Force Base and Missis-
sippi University of Women
are located in the town, as
well as the high amount of
traffc on Highway 45. It
makes sense.
Also on Monday, of-
fcials with Jacks, a Bir-
mingham, Ala.-based fast
food chain, confrmed that
they will open a location in
the building that former-
ly housed Bojangles on
Highway 45 North.
Doors are expected to
open in late November,
according to Pam Measel,
director of marketing for
Jacks Family Restaurants.
Bojangles closed in late
July. Jacks began renovat-
ing the location in early
September. The Colum-
bus location will be the
fourth in Mississippi, join-
ing locations in Iuka, Red
Bay and Corinth. There
are 122 locations in the
country all-together, ac-
cording to Measel.
The fast food restau-
rant offers biscuits, fried
chicken, hamburgers and
sandwiches, shakes and
other items.
Jacks expects to em-
ployee between 50 and 60
people once the Columbus
location is up and running,
Measel said.
Ousley said based on
employment numbers at
the Buffalo Wild Wings
his company operates in
Oxford on East Walnut
Street and Starkville on
Spring Street, the Colum-
bus location would em-
ployee a little more than
100 people.
The Starkville location
opened in August 2011.
LOWEST
highEST
SamS club
465 Goodman Rd
Southaven
2.94
local expreSS
2480 US-51
hernando
3.79
Kangaroo
725 Iowa Blvd
vicKSburg
2.95
rocKeyS lion
4103 Pemberton Square Blvd.
booneville
3.69
harryS gaS
206 Caldwell Dr
hazelhurSt
2.97
Soco
201 US-278 E
amory
3.59
SamS club
10431 Old US-49
gulfport
2.99
exxon
MS-184
bude
3.49
StarKville
(Out of 24 stations reported)
highEST
chevron
310 Russell St
3.24
LOWEST
3.04
Kroger
832 MS-12 W
state gas Prices
Source: gasbuddy.com
Lucius
Cumulus
continued from Page 1a
about the project after
public discussions began
in September. Deason
previously told the Dis-
patch that Project Cumu-
lus, the codename for the
potential investment by a
data-processing compa-
ny, could bring in fve or
six high-paying, perma-
nent jobs about $50,000-
$65,000 annually per posi-
tion and spur about 100
temporary construction
jobs. Deason previously
said he was hopeful fur-
ther investment phases
could add to the job total.
The investors identity
remained protected by
economic development of-
fcials Monday.
A Link release an-
nouncing Thursdays
press conference de-
scribes the initiative as
one that promises to
boost the regional tech-
nology infrastructure for
business and bring new
investment and expan-
sion opportunities to the
Southeast region.
The Dispatch frst re-
ported the tentative an-
nouncement date when
Deason provided an up-
date to OCEDA members
in September.
Both the Starkville
Board of Aldermen and
Oktibbeha County Board
of Supervisors approved
10-year tax abatements
last month on the pro-
posed research park site
ad valorem will be
waived, but school taxes
remain due to entice
development. At the time,
offcials estimated Oktib-
beha Countys consolidat-
ed school system could
receive about $225,000
per year based on the
frst potential phase once
the two districts merge in
2015.
City offcials are also
working to secure anoth-
er major technology win
for Starkville: the city is
vying to become C Spires
frst Fiber to the Home re-
cipient.
The project, an-
nounced last week, rep-
resents a major invest-
ment that will develop
ultra-fast, fber optic In-
ternet capabilities across
the state. It will bring
communities, includ-
ing households, 1 giga-
byte-per-second (1,000
megabytes) upload and
download speeds.
Before the system
goes statewide, C Spire
will pick one community
and develop Fiber to the
Home services there frst.
Starkville offcials com-
municated their interest
in the project shortly
after it was announced.
Offcials also traveled
Monday to a C Spire work
session for interested mu-
nicipalities in Ridgeland.
C Spire is expected to
announce its target city
this fall and provide ser-
vice by 2014. The sup-
port of local entities and
resident pre-registration
will be key factors in the
announcements timing.
C Spire will pick a launch
city based upon appli-
cants progressive, busi-
ness-minded leadership;
cost-saving agreements
with local governments;
and measured demand
shown in the pre-registra-
tion process, the company
announced last week.
BY SCOTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
Ole Miss football coach
Hugh Freeze is looking at his
teams frst loss of the year as a
bump in the road and not a sea-
son-changing moment.
Following a 25-0 loss Satur-
day at No. 1 Ala-
bama, Ole Miss
(3-1, 1-1 South-
eastern Con-
ference), which
slipped three
spots to No. 24 in
The Associated
Press rankings,
has re-focused
and started to prepare for Au-
burn (3-1, 1-1) at 6 p.m. Satur-
day (ESPNU) at Jordan-Hare
Stadium in Auburn, Ala.
Were 5-1 in the last six
BY MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE Even LaDarius
Perkins can get frustrated about his lack of pro-
duction.
The Mississippi State senior tailback ad-
mitted Monday he has dealt
with a lot of negative emotions
while trying to recover from a
right foot injury and to get the
better of defenses focusing on
him.
It has been frustrating to
watch the flm afterward know-
ing teams like Auburn are trying
to take me away from the game,
Perkins said Monday. Ive got to realize weve
proven we can move the ball without big plays
from me because of how defenses are set up.
Theyll be times for me to get yards.
Like his quarterback Tyler Russell, Perkins
hasnt been the same since a 21-3 loss to then-No.
13 Oklahoma State in the Texas Kickoff Classic
in Houston. Perkins had 16 carries for 50 yards
and three catches for 52 yards against the Cow-
boys. In the preseason, MSU (2-2, 0-1 Southeast-
ern Conference) said it would try to get Perkins
a certain number of touches per game.
Perkins is the guy probably we need to get
the ball to a little bit more, MSU coach Dan
BY AdAM MiNiCHiNO
aminichino@cdispatch.com
REFORM, Ala.
Jemarcus Brown doesnt
know when enough is
enough.
For Patrick Plott and
the Pickens County High
School football team,
Browns drive to do more
every day is wonderful
thing to have in the locker
room. Not only does the
seniors never-enough at-
titude inspire him to out-
do himself each week, but
it also motivates the Tor-
nadoes to stay hungry in
their quest to win an Ala-
bama High School Athlet-
ic Association Class 1A
State title.
Brown will have to do
some serious work if he
intends to improve
on his performance
last week.
The 5-foot-
11, 175-pounder
rushed for 116
yards, had six
touchdowns, and
intercepted three
passes Friday night in a
53-18 victory against Al-
iceville. Brown caught 24-
and 74-yard touch-
down passes from
Devonte Simon,
returned a kick 80
yards for another
score, had a 60-
yard interception
return for a touch-
down, and scored
on runs of 25 and 6 yards
in the fourth quarter to
help push the Tornadoes,
the top-ranked team in
the latest AHSAA Class
1A poll, to 5-0.
For Browns accom-
plishments, he is The Dis-
patchs Prep Player of the
Week.
I did what I could do,
Brown said. I wanted to
do more, but I got injured
when I frst started, so I
just did what I could.
Brown said he was in-
jured on a horse-collar
tackle. The injury only
kept him out of a hand-
ful of defensive plays,
but Brown returned with
a vengeance as if he had
missed two or three quar-
ters. He said he didnt
want to let his teammates
down because Aliceville
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013
InSIDE
n mORE LSu-mSu: LSU coach Les Miles and
Mississippi State coach Dan Mullen have their own
quirks on the sidelines. Page 2B
n mORE COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Times for
Southeastern Conference games Oct. 12
announced. Page 2B
College Football Major League
Baseball
HIGH SCHOOL
Jermarcus Brown
Player Week
Friendly City
Mini-Warehouses
2 Convenient Locations 662.328.2424
Football: nFL
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Mississippi State senior running back LaDarius Perkins said he isnt feeling any ill effects from an
ankle injury he frst suffered in the season opener against then-No. 13 Oklahoma State in the Texas
Kickoff Classic in Houston. He re-aggravated the injury in a 62-7 victory against Troy.
Prep Football
Brown always striving to do more than enough for Pickens Co.
See BROWN, 3B
Brown
PErkINS SEES bIggEr rOlE vS. lSU
After recovering from ankle injury, senior running back intends to make impact
Perkins
See PERKINS, 3B
Ole Miss begins preparation for Auburn
Freeze
Saban, Freeze downplay role of Siskey
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. Alabama coach Nick Saban said any
concerns about the role of staffer Tyler Siskey during the game
against Ole Miss is much ado about nothing.
Television cameras showed Siskey in the coaches box watching
through binoculars. That prompted some Rebels fans to complain
on message boards and social media that he was spying.
Siskey is the associate director for player personnel. He
worked for coach Hugh Freeze at Ole Miss last season and before
that at Arkansas State.
He didnt really assist in the game plan, and he wasnt on a
headset, Saban said. He didnt talk to anybody during the game.
I dont know if theres any rule that says he cant go into the press
box and watch the games. He wasnt in any different position than
hes been in a game.
Freeze seems to agree with Saban. He didnt accuse Alabama
of any wrongdoing and twice said he wanted to talk about his
teams game against Auburn.
games weve played, which
we think has provided a very
good foundation in where we
are headed with the program,
Freeze said Monday at his
weekly media gathering. Sit-
ting at 3-1 with the schedule
weve had is something thats
a good start to year two of our
building here.
You never like losing. You
See OlE mISS, 3B
BY BRETT MARTEL
The Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS
Drew Brees made his lat-
est claim to the moniker of
Mr. Monday Night.
He also gave the Miami
Dolphins another reason
to regret not making a
harder push to sign him
when they had the chance
seven years ago.
Brees passed for 413
yards and four touch-
downs, and the New Orle-
ans Saints turned a clash of
unbeaten teams into a lop-
sided affair, beating Miami
38-17 on Monday night.
I felt like we found our
rhythm, Brees said. Ev-
ery time we touched the
ball, it felt like we were go-
ing to go down and score
points.
Two of Brees touch-
downs went to Jimmy Gra-
ham for 27 and 43 yards as
the tight end had at least
100 yards receiving for the
third straight game.
Brees other scoring
strikes went to Benjamin
Watson and Darren Spro-
les, who also rushed for a
touchdown.
He plays out of this
world, Graham said.
This team is so dynamic,
we have so many weapons
and Drew knows exactly
where to go with the ball.
Sproles 5-yard scoring
run on the games opening
series gave the Saints a
lead they would not relin-
quish en route to their frst
4-0 start since their Super
Bowl championship sea-
son of 2009. It also further
accentuated what a turn-
around the Saints have
made since coach Sean
Payton served his boun-
ty ban last season, which
New Orleans opened with
four losses.
We like this a lot bet-
ter, Brees said of the 4-0
start. Everything that
could have gone wrong
for us went wrong. Fortu-
nately were having the
ball bounce our way this
year. Were playing good
football.
Ryan Tannehill passed
for 249 yards and a touch-
down to Charles Clay, but
his four turnovers on a
fumble and three intercep-
tions hurt Miami (3-1).
brees,
Saints
power by
Dolphins
See SAINTS, 4B
BY STEPHEN HAWKiNS
The Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Texas
The frst person David
Price looked for after pitch-
ing the Tampa Bay Rays
into the playoffs was third
baseman Evan Longoria.
Price yelled after the
two locked eyes, and they
embraced to start the cele-
bration.
He just told me he had
a dream about it, Longoria
said. It was awesome to
feel that emotion from him.
Thats what an ace does.
Thats what a leader of a
staff does.
Price, Longoria, and the
Tampa Bay Rays are going
to playoffs again, getting
there with a victory in their
fnal regular-season game
for the second time in three
years. They needed an ex-
tra game this time.
Price pitched his fourth
complete game this year,
Longoria hit a two-run ho-
mer and the Rays beat the
Texas Rangers 5-2 in the AL
wild-card tiebreaker game
Monday night, the 163rd
game for both teams.
When Price woke up
Monday, all he could think
about was throwing a com-
plete game, then getting
that last out and turning
straight to Longoria.
Youre probably sup-
posed to go to your catcher
frst, but for what hes done
for us and what hes done for
me personally, Price said.
I think about that type of
stuff before I pitch all the
time, but for it to happen
today. I didnt want to text
him when I thought about it.
I didnt want to jinx it.
Luckily for manager
Joe Maddon and the Rays,
they werent done in by an-
other blown call in Texas
though this one did cost
them at least one run.
Tampa Bay will face an-
other must-win situation
Wednesday night at Cleve-
land in the AL wild-card
game, Tampas third game
in three cities in a four-day
stretch. The winner will
face Boston in the division
series.
Price (10-8), the reigning
AL Cy Young winner, had a
10.26 ERA in four previous
starts at Rangers Ballpark.
Price
pitches
Rays into
playoffs
InSIDE
n mORE BASEBALL: The
Pittsburgh Pirates will play
host to the Cincinnati Reds
tonight to see which team
will advance to play the St.
Louis Cardinals. Page 3B
Prep Football
Fridays Games
Clinton at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Center Hill at New Hope, 7 p.m.
Washington School at Heritage Academy, 7 p.m.
Caledonia at Houston, 7 p.m.
West Lowndes at West Oktibbeha, 7 p.m.
Northwest Rankin at Starkville, 7 p.m.
Clarksdale at West Point, 7 p.m.
Kosciusko at Noxubee County, 7 p.m.
Houlka at Hamilton, 7 p.m.
Aberdeen at Nettleton, 7 p.m.
Itawamba AHS at Amory, 7 p.m.
East Webster at Okolona, 7 p.m.
Winona at Louisville, 7 p.m.
French Camp at East Oktibbeha, 7 p.m.
West Lowndes at West Oktibbeha, 7 p.m.
Madison-Ridgeland at Starkville Academy, 7 p.m.
Oak Hill Academy at Manchester Academy, 7 p.m.
Strider Academy at Hebron Christian, 7 p.m.
Park Place Christian at Immanuel Christian, 7 p.m.
Winston Academy at Leake Academy, 7 p.m.
Victory Christian at New Life, 7 p.m.
Lamar County at Aliceville, 7 p.m.
Pickens County at Parrish, 7 p.m.
South Lamar at Hubbertville, 7 p.m.
Oakman at Sulligent, 7 p.m.
Jackson Academy at Pickens Academy, 7 p.m.
Prep Softball
Todays Games
Starkville at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Amory at Hamilton, 6:30 p.m.
Smithville at Caledonia, 6:30 p.m.
New Hope at Grenada, 6:30 p.m.
Prep Volleyball
Todays Matches
Columbus at Starkville, 6 p.m.
Caledonia at New Hope, 6 p.m.
Today
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m. Playoffs, NL Wild Card game, Cincinnati
at Pittsburgh, TBS
NHL
7 p.m. Washington at Chicago, NBC Sports
Network
SOCCER
1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League, AC Milan
at Ajax Amsterdam, Fox Sports Net
1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League,
Barcelona at Glasgow Celtic, FS1
6 p.m. UEFA Champions League, Steaua vs.
Chelsea, at Bucharest, Romania (same-day
tape), FS1
Wednesday
GOLF
3 a.m. LPGA, Reignwood Classic, frst round,
at Beijing (delayed tape), TGC
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m. Playoffs, AL Wild Card game, Tampa
Bay at Cleveland, TBS
NHL
7 p.m. Buffalo at Detroit, NBC Sports Network
SOCCER
1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League, Juventus
vs. Galatasaray, at Turin, Italy, Fox Sports Net
1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League,
Manchester United at Shakhtar Donetsk, FS1
CALENDAR
oN ThE AiR
bRiEFLy
Local
Immanuel Christian girls soccer team loses fnal game
The Immanuel Christian Schoolgirls soccer team lost to Bayou
Academy 1-0 last week at Delta State University in its final game of the
season.
With its starting goalkeeper unable to make the trip, seventh-grader
Katie Wansley made 17 saves. Senior Kari Thomason, who is back
from a concussion, played the majority of the game until a hit from
behind took her out with 20 minutes to play.
Seniors Courtney Hall and Justine Bell will play in the Mississippi
Association of Independent Schools North All-Star game Oct. 9 at
Jackson Prep. Thomason was selected as an alternate.
MSU
Womens golf team has eight-stroke lead at Old Waverly
Bulldog Invitational
WEST POINT With home field advantage on its side, the Mis-
sissippi State womens golf team sprinted to an eight-stroke lead after
the first round of the Old Waverly Bulldog Invitational played Monday
afternoon at Old Waverly Golf Club.
Ginger Brown-Lemms squad posted a tournament-record 7-un-
der-par 281, while Ally McDonald also notched a tournament-best 5-un-
der-par 67. MSUs 281 also matched the second-lowest single-round
tally in program history.
Finishing only one shot off her career best, the All-American has
a two-shot lead over fellow Bulldog Jessica Peng. Pengs 3-under-par
69 tied the school record for lowest round by a freshman in recorded
history.
After rebounding from an over-par front nine with birdies on holes
13 and 15, Mary Langdon Gallagher finished tied for eighth at even par.
Ji Eun Baik and Rica Tse rounded out the MSU lineup with 1-over-par
73s. Redshirt freshman Blaise Carabello holds a share of 18th after
firing her lowest score of her young career with an opening-round 74.
Logan Chaney and Gabi Oubre posted an 80 and 81, respectively,
while Izel Pieters shot a 82 in her career debut.
nRamey finishes 11th, mens golf team takes sixth: At
Columbus, Ohio, Senior Chad Ramey posted his second-consec-
utive Top 15 finish, as Mississippi State took sixth place at the Ohio
State-hosted Jack Nicklaus Invitational on Monday.
MSU shot a 15-over-par 299, giving it a three-round score of
39-over 891 at the Scarlett Course. Ramey posted a 5-over 218 to tie
for 11th.
Sophomore Ben Wood notched his second Top 25 of the season,
firing off a 9-over 222 to tie for 24th overall. Seniors Joe Sakulpolphai-
san (12-over 225) and Barrett Edens (17-over 230) each shot a 79
Monday to finish 31st and 41st, respectively. Freshman Jackson Dick
improved his score each round at the Jack Nicklaus Invitational. The
Australian native fired a final round 4-over 75 after shooting a 9-over 80
and 6-over 77 Sunday.
No.1 ranked California won the tournament with a 10-under 842.
n Angus loses on first day of ITA All-American qualifying:
At Tulsa, Okla., In day one of the qualifying round at the 2013 ITA
All-American Championships in Tulsa, Okla., the mens tennis squad
saw its lone singles competitor fall in the first round. Jordan Angus
dropped a tough match to Ole Miss Stefan Lindmark 6-3, 7-5.
MSU will turn its attention to the doubles draw of the qualifying
round, which begins today. Robin Haden and Florian Lakat were a late
addition to the qualifying round and will face off against Armys Asika
Isoh and Harrison McCormick.
n Maroon Madness will hit The Junction Oct. 11: At Starkville,
Hoist the tailgating tents and get a first look at the mens and womens
basketball teams as Maroon Madness comes to The Junction at 6 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 11.
The event will take place on Creelman Street between Dorman Hall
and The Junction, and free pizza will be given out to all MSU fans, while
the first 500 fans will receive a free Maroon Madness T-Shirt.
The evenings festivities will feature a dunk contest and other
games and giveaways involving fans, coaches and players. Also includ-
ed will be performances by the Famous Maroon Band, cheerleaders
and the pom squad, along with Bully and Champ.
This years Maroon Madness will be part of MSUs Homecoming
festivities. Fans can enjoy the annual Homecoming parade and court,
chili cook-off and Maroon Madness before capping the night at the MSU
Soccer Field as Aaron Gordons squad hosts Florida at 7 p.m.
n In related news, the MSU womens basketball team added
another national championship-winning talent to its staff by hiring former
Texas A&M standout Skylar Collins as the programs video coordinator.
The Cedar Hill, Texas, native will be responsible for breaking down
game and practice film, as well as video exchange for second-year
coach Vic Schaefers squad.
Alabama
Single-game tickets available for football games
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. The University of Alabama announced
Monday tickets remain for the football teams game Saturday against
Georgia State and the game against Chattanooga on Nov. 23. Tickets
for both of games were made available from sections not utilized by
visiting teams.
Georgia State and Chattanooga game tickets can be purchased for
$55 each. Print at home delivery method is recommended for Georgia
State. Also available are individual seats located in the South End Zone
Field Suite area for the Arkansas (Oct. 19), Tennessee (Oct. 26), and
Chattanooga (Nov. 23) games. The Field Suite is an upscale area of the
stadium, which includes a food amenity. For more information on Field
Suite ticket availability, call 205-348-2262.
n Mens basketball team holds first practices of season: At
Tuscaloosa, Ala., the 2013-14 Alabama mens basketball season held
its first practices of the season Saturday at Coleman Coliseum and its
second practice Monday at its new practice facility.
New NCAA rules for this season moved the start of team practice
earlier in the fall from 30 days prior to the first game of the season to
42 days. The Crimson Tides first regular-season game will be on Nov. 8
in Dallas, Texas, against Oklahoma.
The Crimson Tide returns eight letterwinners and three starters
from last seasons 23-12 squad that finished tied for second in the
Southeastern Conference. Five of the top seven scorers return from last
years NIT quarterfinal team, led by First Team All-SEC and All-District
performer in senior guard Trevor Releford.
n Rijsdijk named SEC Offensive Player of the Week: At
Birmingham, Ala., Junior forward Pia Rijsdijk has been selected as the
Southeastern Conference Offensive Player of the Week, the league
office announced on Monday.
Rijsdijk had a big part in leading Alabama to a pair of home
victories over Vanderbilt and Tennessee last weekend. She scored
three goals in the two wins, including the game-winner against the
Volunteers.
n Volleyball teams Thomas named SEC Freshman of the
Week: At Birmingham, Ala., Freshman outside hitter Brittany Thomas,
of Chandler, Ariz., was named the Southeastern Conference Freshman
of the Week, as announced by the conference office Monday. In
matches against Alabama State and Kentucky, she averaged 3.14 kills
and 2.29 digs per set.
SEC
SEC honors Murray, Mosley, Morgan
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray,
Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley, and Georgia placekicker Marshall
Morgan are the Southeastern Conference players of the week.
The league named Murray offensive player of the week after he
passed for 298 yards and four touchdowns in the Bulldogs 44-41
win over LSU. Murray also ran for a touchdown. Mosley led Alabama
with nine tackles, broke up a pass and had two quarterback hurries
against Ole Miss. He made a fourth-quarter stop for a safety. Mor-
gans three field goals included a career-long 55 yarder for Georgia.
Florida defensive back Vernon Hargreaves III intercepted a Kentucky
pass in the end zone to earn freshman of the week honors. Missouri
end Michael Sam is defensive lineman of the week and South Caroli-
na guard A.J. Cann received offensive line honors.
n In related news, the Alabama coaches recognized 10 players
for their performance Saturday in a 25-0 victory against No. 21 Ole
Miss. Kevin Norwood, Anthony Steen, and T.J. Yeldon were named
players of the week on offense. HaHa Clinton-Dix and Mosley repre-
sented the defense, while Landon Collins, Cade Foster, Dillon Lee,
Cody Mandell, and DeAndrew White were on the special teams list.
Colleges
AP Source: Texas AD Dodds to retire August 2014
AUSTIN, Texas After 32 years of building Texas into the
wealthiest and one of the most powerful college programs in the
country, Longhorns athletic director DeLoss Dodds is set to retire.
A person with knowledge of Dodds decision tells The Associ-
ated Press that Dodds is to announce plans Tuesday to retire next
August and move into a paid consulting role. The source spoke on
condition of anonymity so as not to pre-empt an official statement
from Dodds and university officials.
Now 76, Dodds has overseen a program that has won 14 mens
national championships and 107 conference titles. Under Dodds,
Texas has expanded and improved athletic facilities, moved from the
old Southwest Conference to the Big 12 and signed a $300-million
agreement with ESPN to create the Longhorn Network.
From Special Reports
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 2B tuesday, october 1, 2013
Baseball
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Boston 97 65 .599
y-Tampa Bay 92 71 .564 5
Baltimore 85 77 .525 12
New York 85 77 .525 12
Toronto 74 88 .457 23
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Detroit 93 69 .574
y-Cleveland 92 70 .568 1
Kansas City 86 76 .531 7
Minnesota 66 96 .407 27
Chicago 63 99 .389 30
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oakland 96 66 .593
Texas 91 72 .558 5
Los Angeles 78 84 .481 18
Seattle 71 91 .438 25
Houston 51 111 .315 45
x-clinched division
y-clinched wild card
Mondays Game
Tampa Bay 5, Texas 2
End of Regular Season
Playoffs
WILD CARD
Both games televised by TBS
Todays Game
NL: Cincinnati (Cueto 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Liriano
16-8), 7:07 p.m.
Wednesdays Game
AL: Tampa Bay (Garza 4-5) at Cleveland (Sala-
zar 2-3), 7:07 p.m.
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-five; x-if necessary)
American League
Boston vs. Cleveland-Tampa Bay winner
Fridays Game
Cleveland-Tampa Bay winner at Boston,
2:07 p.m. (TBS)
Saturdays Game
Cleveland-Tampa Bay winner at Boston,
4:37 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 7
Boston at Cleveland-Tampa Bay winner
x-Tuesday, Oct. 8
Boston at Cleveland-Tampa Bay winner
x-Thursday, Oct. 10
Cleveland-Tampa Bay winner at Boston
Oakland vs. Detroit
Fridays Game
Detroit at Oakland, 9:37 p.m. (TBS)
Saturdays Game
Detroit at Oakland, 8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Monday, Oct. 7
Oakland at Detroit
x-Tuesday, Oct. 8
Oakland at Detroit
x-Thursday, Oct. 10
Detroit at Oakland
National League
St. Louis vs. Cincinnati-Pittsburgh winner
Thursdays Game
Cincinnati-Pittsburgh winner at St. Louis,
4:07 p.m. (TBS)
Fridays Game
Cincinnati-Pittsburgh winner at St. Louis,
12:07 p.m. (MLB)
Sundays Game
St. Louis at Cincinnati-Pittsburgh winner
x-Monday, Oct. 7
St. Louis at Cincinnati-Pittsburgh winner
x-Wednesday Oct. 9
Cincinnati-Pittsburgh winner at St. Louis
Atlanta vs. Los Angeles
Thursdays Game
Los Angeles at Atlanta, 7:37 p.m. (TBS)
Fridays Game
Los Angeles at Atlanta, 5:07 p.m. (TBS)
Sundays Game
Atlanta at Los Angeles
x-Monday, Oct. 7
Atlanta at Los Angeles
x-Wednesday Oct. 9
Los Angeles at Atlanta
Basketball
WNBA Playoffs
FINALS
(Best-of-five)
Sundays Game
Atlanta at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 8
Atlanta at Minnesota, TBA
Thursday, Oct. 10
Minnesota at Atlanta, TBA
Football
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 0 0 1.000 89 57
Miami 3 1 0 .750 91 91
N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 68 88
Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 88 93
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 3 1 0 .750 105 51
Tennessee 3 1 0 .750 98 69
Houston 2 2 0 .500 90 105
Jacksonville 0 4 0 .000 31 129
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 2 2 0 .500 91 87
Cleveland 2 2 0 .500 64 70
Cincinnati 2 2 0 .500 81 81
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 4 0 0 1.000 179 91
Kansas City 4 0 0 1.000 102 41
San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 102
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 91
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 2 2 0 .500 104 85
Philadelphia 1 3 0 .250 99 138
Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112
N.Y. Giants 0 4 0 .000 61 146
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 4 0 0 1.000 108 55
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36
Atlanta 1 3 0 .250 94 104
Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 3 1 0 .750 122 101
Chicago 3 1 0 .750 127 114
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 123
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 0 0 1.000 109 47
San Francisco 2 2 0 .500 79 95
Arizona 2 2 0 .500 69 89
St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 69 121
Thursday, Sept. 26
San Francisco 35, St. Louis 11
Sunday, Sept. 29
Kansas City 31, N.Y. Giants 7
Seattle 23, Houston 20, OT
Buffalo 23, Baltimore 20
Arizona 13, Tampa Bay 10
Indianapolis 37, Jacksonville 3
Cleveland 17, Cincinnati 6
Detroit 40, Chicago 32
Minnesota 34, Pittsburgh 27
Tennessee 38, N.Y. Jets 13
Washington 24, Oakland 14
San Diego 30, Dallas 21
Denver 52, Philadelphia 20
New England 30, Atlanta 23
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Mondays Game
New Orleans 38, Miami 17
Thursdays Game
Buffalo at Cleveland, 7:25 p.m.
Sundays Games
Detroit at Green Bay, Noon
New Orleans at Chicago, Noon
Kansas City at Tennessee, Noon
Jacksonville at St. Louis, Noon
New England at Cincinnati, Noon
Seattle at Indianapolis, Noon
Baltimore at Miami, Noon
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, Noon
Carolina at Arizona, 3:05 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 3:25 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 7:30 p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 10:35 p.m.
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay,
Washington
Monday, Oct. 7
N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 7:40 p.m.
Saints 38, Dolphins 17
Miami 3 7 0 717
New Orleans 7 14 14 338
First Quarter
NOSproles 5 run (Hartley kick), 11:52.
MiaFG Sturgis 34, 7:16.
Second Quarter
NOGraham 27 pass from Brees (Hartley
kick), 8:01.
MiaMiller 5 run (Sturgis kick), 3:35.
NOSproles 13 pass from Brees (Hartley
kick), :55.
Third Quarter
NOWatson 4 pass from Brees (Hartley kick),
9:44.
NOGraham 43 pass from Brees (Hartley
kick), 8:12.
Fourth Quarter
MiaClay 3 pass from Tannehill (Sturgis kick),
13:48.
NOFG Hartley 29, 7:15.
A73,118.
Mia NO
First downs 19 23
Total Net Yards 331 465
Rushes-yards 19-115 24-68
Passing 216 397
Punt Returns 1-5 3-44
Kickoff Returns 3-68 2-36
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-28
Comp-Att-Int 22-35-3 30-39-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 4-33 2-16
Punts 4-52.0 3-47.3
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1
Penalties-Yards 5-25 6-45
Time of Possession 26:11 33:49
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHINGMiami, Miller 11-62, Tannehill 4-48,
Dan.Thomas 4-5. New Orleans, K.Robinson
12-37, Sproles 4-28, Brees 4-2, Thomas 4-1.
PASSINGMiami, Tannehill 22-35-3-249.
New Orleans, Brees 30-39-0-413.
RECEIVINGMiami, Gibson 6-71, Clay 6-42,
Hartline 3-34, Wallace 3-24, Thigpen 1-50,
Matthews 1-21, Miller 1-6, Dan.Thomas 1-1.
New Orleans, Sproles 7-114, Colston 7-96,
Thomas 5-37, Graham 4-100, Stills 4-38, Toon
1-18, Collins 1-6, Watson 1-4.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNew Orleans,
Hartley 43 (WL).
CFL
Fridays Games
Hamilton at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Saskatchewan at B.C., 9 p.m.
Saturdays Games
Montreal at Edmonton, 2:30 p.m.
Winnipeg at Calgary, 5:30 p.m.
The Associated Press
Top 25 Schedule
Thursdays Game
No. 12 UCLA at Utah, 9 p.m.
Saturdays Game
No. 1 Alabama vs. Georgia State, 11:21 a.m.
No. 2 Oregon at Colorado, 5 p.m.
No. 3 Clemson at Syracuse, 2:30 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State at No. 16 Northwestern, 7 p.m.
No. 5 Stanford vs. No. 15 Washington, 9:30 p.m.
No. 6 Georgia at Tennessee, 2:30 p.m.
No. 7 Louisville at Temple, 11 a.m.
No. 8 Florida State vs. No. 25 Maryland, 11 a.m.
No. 10 LSU at Mississippi State, 6 p.m.
No. 11 Oklahoma vs. TCU, 6 p.m.
No. 13 South Carolina vs. Kentucky, 6:30 p.m.
No. 14 Miami vs. Georgia Tech, 2:30 p.m.
No. 17 Baylor vs. West Virginia, 7 p.m.
No. 18 Florida vs. Arkansas, 6 p.m.
No. 19 Michigan vs. Minnesota, 2:30 p.m.
No. 20 Texas Tech at Kansas, 11 a.m.
No. 21 Oklahoma State vs. Kansas State, 2:30 p.m.
No. 22 Arizona State vs. Notre Dame at
Arlington, Texas, 6:30 p.m.
No. 23 Fresno State at Idaho, 4 p.m.
No. 24 Mississippi at Auburn, 6 p.m.
This Weeks
College Schedule
Thursdays Games
SOUTH
W. Kentucky at Louisiana-Monroe, 6:30 p.m.
MIDWEST
Texas at Iowa St., 6:30 p.m.
FAR WEST
UCLA at Utah, 9 p.m.
Fridays Games
FAR WEST
BYU at Utah St., 7 p.m.
Nevada at San Diego St., 8 p.m.
Saturdays Games
EAST
Air Force at Navy, 10:30 a.m.
E. Michigan at Buffalo, 11 a.m.
Lehigh at Fordham, 11 a.m.
Valparaiso at Marist, 11 a.m.
Louisville at Temple, 11 a.m.
New Hampshire at Towson, 11 a.m.
West Liberty at Duquesne, 11:10 a.m.
Colgate at Cornell, 11:30 a.m.
Army at Boston College, Noon
St. Francis (Pa.) at CCSU, Noon
Harvard at Holy Cross, Noon
Robert Morris at Monmouth (NJ), Noon
Dartmouth at Penn, Noon
Columbia at Princeton, Noon
Wagner at Sacred Heart, Noon
William & Mary at Villanova, Noon
Bucknell at Lafayette, 2:30 p.m.
Delaware at Maine, 2:30 p.m.
Clemson at Syracuse, 2:30 p.m.
Rhode Island at Brown, 5 p.m.
Bryant at Stony Brook, 5 p.m.
SOUTH
North Greenville at Charleston Southern, 10 a.m.
Maryland at Florida St., 11 a.m.
Ball St. at Virginia, 11 a.m.
Gardner-Webb at Charlotte, 11 a.m.
Georgia St. at Alabama, 11:21 a.m.
North Carolina at Virginia Tech, 11:30 a.m.
Morehead St. at Campbell, Noon
NC Central at Howard, Noon
Florida A&M at Morgan St., Noon
Savannah St. at Norfolk St., Noon
South Alabama at Troy, Noon
Elon at Furman, 12:30 p.m.
Albany (NY) at James Madison, 12:30 p.m.
Presbyterian at Wofford, 12:30 p.m.
MVSU at Alabama A&M, 1 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman at Delaware St., 1 p.m.
UTSA at Marshall, 1 p.m.
Appalachian St. at The Citadel, 1 p.m.
Warner at Alcorn St., 2 p.m.
Georgia Southern at Samford, 2 p.m.
FAU at UAB, 2 p.m.
Jacksonville St. at UT-Martin, 2 p.m.
Georgia Tech at Miami, 2:30 p.m.
East Carolina at Middle Tennessee, 2:30 p.m.
NC A&T vs. SC State at Atlanta, 2:30 p.m.
Georgia at Tennessee, 2:30 p.m.
North Texas at Tulane, 2:30 p.m.
NC State at Wake Forest, 2:30 p.m.
Tennessee Tech at Murray St., 3 p.m.
FIU at Southern Miss., 3 p.m.
UCF at Memphis, 3:30 p.m.
W. Carolina at Chattanooga, 5 p.m.
Austin Peay at E. Kentucky, 5 p.m.
Liberty at Old Dominion, 5 p.m.
Mississippi at Auburn, 6 p.m.
Arkansas at Florida, 6 p.m.
Ark.-Pine Bluff at Jackson St., 6 p.m.
Texas St. at Louisiana-Lafayette, 6 p.m.
LSU at Mississippi St., 6 p.m.
Cincinnati at South Florida, 6 p.m.
SE Missouri at Tennessee St., 6 p.m.
Kentucky at South Carolina, 6:30 p.m.
Missouri at Vanderbilt, 6:30 p.m.
Incarnate Word at SE Louisiana, 7 p.m.
MIDWEST
Penn St. at Indiana, 11 a.m.
Michigan St. at Iowa, 11 a.m.
Texas Tech at Kansas, 11 a.m.
Illinois at Nebraska, 11 a.m.
Stetson at Butler, Noon
Davidson at Dayton, Noon
Cent. Michigan at Miami (Ohio), Noon
Ohio at Akron, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Drake, 1 p.m.
W. Illinois at Illinois St., 2 p.m.
S. Illinois at S. Dakota St., 2 p.m.
Missouri St. at South Dakota, 2 p.m.
W. Michigan at Toledo, 2 p.m.
Youngstown St. at Indiana St., 2:05 p.m.
UMass at Bowling Green, 2:30 p.m.
N. Illinois at Kent St., 2:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Michigan, 2:30 p.m.
N. Iowa at N. Dakota St., 2:30 p.m.
Ohio St. at Northwestern, 7 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Rutgers at SMU, 11 a.m.
Kansas St. at Oklahoma St., 2:30 p.m.
Rice at Tulsa, 2:30 p.m.
McNeese St. at Cent. Arkansas, 3 p.m.
TCU at Oklahoma, 6 p.m.
Prairie View vs. Grambling St. at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Alabama St. at Texas Southern, 6 p.m.
Louisiana Tech at UTEP, 6:30 p.m.
Notre Dame vs. Arizona St. at Arlington, Texas,
6:30 p.m.
West Virginia at Baylor, 7 p.m.
FAR WEST
UC Davis at S. Utah, 2:05 p.m.
Portland St. at Montana, 2:30 p.m.
Washington St. at California, 3 p.m.
Mercer at San Diego, 3 p.m.
North Dakota at Idaho St., 3:05 p.m.
N. Arizona at Montana St., 3:05 p.m.
Fresno St. at Idaho, 4 p.m.
Yale at Cal Poly, 4:05 p.m.
Oregon at Colorado, 5 p.m.
New Mexico St. at New Mexico, 6 p.m.
Weber St. at E. Washington, 6:05 p.m.
N. Colorado at Sacramento St., 8:05 p.m.
Washington at Stanford, 9:30 p.m.
San Jose St. at Hawaii, 10:59 p.m.
Southeastern Conference
East
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Florida 2 0 55 24 3 1 95 51
Georgia 2 0 85 71 3 1 165 130
S. Carolina 1 1 65 66 3 1 120 101
Missouri 0 0 0 0 4 0 182 84
Tennessee 0 1 17 31 3 2 159 134
Kentucky 0 1 7 24 1 3 87 93
Vanderbilt 0 2 60 74 3 2 174 108
West
Conference All Games
W L PF PA W L PF PA
Alabama 2 0 74 42 4 0 140 58
LSU 1 1 76 65 4 1 214 122
Texas A&M 1 1 87 82 4 1 246 154
Auburn 1 1 45 55 3 1 114 88
Mississippi 1 1 39 60 3 1 114 96
Arkansas 0 1 33 45 3 2 146 111
Miss. St 0 1 20 24 2 2 136 59
Saturdays Games
Georgia St. at Alabama, 11:21 a.m. (WCBI)
Georgia at Tennessee, 2:30 p.m. (WCBI)
LSU at Mississippi St., 6 p.m. (ESPN)
Arkansas at Florida, 6 p.m. (ESPN2)
Mississippi at Auburn, 6 p.m. (ESPNU)
Missouri at Vanderbilt, 6:30 p.m. (CSS)
Kentucky at South Carolina, 6:30 p.m.
(Fox Sports Net)
Oct. 12
Missouri at Georgia, 11 a.m. (ESPN)
South Carolina at Arkansas, 11:21 a.m. (WCBI)
Western Carolina at Auburn, 1 p.m.
Florida at LSU, 2:30 p.m. (WCBI)
Alabama at Kentucky, 6 p.m. (ESPN2)
Bowling Green at Mississippi State, 6:30 p.m.
(Fox Sports Net)
Texas A&M at Ole Miss, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Coaches Football
Championship
Subdivision Top 25
SPARTANBURG, S.C. The weekly poll,
with first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Sept. 29 and previous ranking:
Rec. Pts Pvs
1. No. Dakota St. (26) 4-0 650 1
2. Towson 5-0 623 2
3. Sam Houston State 4-1 599 4
4. Northern Iowa 4-0 567 5
5. Eastern Illinois 4-1 485 12
6. Coastal Carolina 5-0 477 11
7. Montana State 3-2 465 10
8. Eastern Washington 2-2 450 3
9. South Dakota St. 3-2 432 6
10. Lehigh 4-0 345 17
11. Central Arkansas 2-2 336 13
12. Montana 3-1 330 7
13. Fordham 5-0 328 16
14. McNeese State 4-1 320 9
15. Wofford 2-2 298 15
16. Bethune-Cookman 3-1 256 18
17. Northern Arizona 3-1 242 22
18. New Hampshire 1-2 222 7
19. Cal Poly 2-2 198 19
20. Villanova 2-2 168 21
21. James Madison 3-1 122 14
22. Youngstown State 4-1 117 25
23. Maine 4-1 103
24. Gardner-Webb 4-1 49
25. Delaware 3-1 47
The Sports Network
Football Championship
Subdivision Top 25
PHILADELPHIA The weekly poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records through
Sept. 29, points and previous ranking:
Rec. Pts Pvs
1. North Dakota St. (157) 4-0 3949 1
2. Sam Houston St. (1) 4-1 3673 4
3. Towson 5-0 3645 3
4. Northern Iowa 4-0 3492 5
5. Eastern Illinois 4-1 3156 8
6. Eastern Washington 2-2 3050 2
7. South Dakota State 3-2 2581 6
8. Montana State 3-2 2561 11
9. Coastal Carolina 5-0 2478 12
10. Montana 3-1 1964 7
11. McNeese State 4-1 1836 9
12. Fordham 5-0 1832 16
13. Lehigh 4-0 1764 21
14. Central Arkansas 2-2 1763 13
15. Northern Arizona 3-1 1711 24
16. Georgia Southern 3-1 1635 15
17. Wofford 2-2 1203 17
18. Cal Poly 2-2 1195 18
19. New Hampshire 1-2 1162 10
20. Villanova 2-2 1002 19
21. Bethune-Cookman 3-1 947 20
22. Tennessee-Martin 3-1 724 23
23. Maine 4-1 702
24. Delaware 4-1 671
25. Gardner-Webb 4-1 570 25
AFCA Division II Coaches
Top 25
Rec. Pts Pvs
1. Valdosta St. (Ga.) (30) 3-0 793 1
2. Minn. St.-Mankato (2) 4-0 765 2
3. NW Missouri St. 4-0 727 3
4. West Texas A&M 4-0 700 4
5. Colo. St.-Pueblo 4-0 670 5
6. Missouri Western St. 4-0 648 6
7. Indiana (Pa.) 4-0 595 7
8. Henderson St. (Ark.) 4-0 573 8
9. Bloomsburg (Pa.) 4-0 529 11
10. Pittsburg St. (Kan.) 4-0 514 12
11. Minnesota-Duluth 3-1 438 13
12. Shepherd (W.Va.) 4-0 413 14
13. UNC-Pembroke 4-0 391 16
14. West Alabama 3-1 359 15
15. Washburn (Kan.) 4-0 309 18
16. W-Salem St. (N.C.) 3-1 290 17
17. West Chester (Pa.) 4-0 266 19
18. St. Cloud St. (Minn.) 4-0 240 20
19. Chadron St. (Neb.) 3-1 169 21
20. C-Newman (Tenn.) 3-1 163 10
21. Indianapolis (Ind.) 3-1 138 22
22. Tarleton St. (Texas) 3-0 129 25
23. Ohio Dominican 4-0 124
24. Emporia State (Kan.) 4-0 114 24
25. G. Valley St. (Mich.) 3-1 113 9
AFCA Division III Coaches
Top 25
Rec. Pts Pvs
1. Mt. Union (Ohio) (38) 3-0 1046 1
2. M.H.-Baylor (Texas) (4) 4-0 1004 2
3. Linfield (Ore.) 3-0 970 3
4. North Central (Ill.) 3-0 912 4
5. Hobart (N.Y.) 3-0 794 5
6. Wisc.-Platteville 3-0 793 6
7. Wisconsin-Whitewater 3-0 780 7
8. Bethel (Minn.) 3-0 762 8
9. Wisc.-Oshkosh 3-0 710 9
10. Heidelberg (Ohio) 3-0 620 10
11. Wheaton (Ill.) 3-0 584 11
12. Wesley (Del.) 3-1 543 14
13. St. Thomas (Minn.) 2-1 541 12
14. J. Hopkins (Md.) 4-0 516 13
15. P. Lutheran (Wash.) 3-0 491 15
16. Del. Valley (Pa.) 4-0 377 16
17. Wabash (Ind.) 3-0 340 18
18. Coe (Iowa) 3-0 327 17
19. St. John Fisher (N.Y.) 3-0 307 19
20. Franklin (Ind.) 2-2 193 20
21. Wittenberg (Ohio) 2-1 182 22
22. Huntingdon (Ala.) 3-0 164 23
23. Conc.-Mrhead (Minn.) 4-0 163
24. Thomas More (Ky.) 3-0 117 25
25. Chr. Newport (Va.) 3-0 112 24
NAIA Top 25
Rec Pts Pvs
1. Morningside (Iowa) (14) 3-0 314 1
2. Cumberlands (Ky.) 4-0 299 4
3. Saint Xavier (Ill.) 3-1 283 5
4. Grand View (Iowa) 4-0 276 7
5. Georgetown (Ky.) 2-1 275 6
6. Saint Francis (Ind.) 2-1 239 2
7. Benedictine (Kan.) 4-0 236 10
8. Missouri Valley 2-1 234 9
9. Carroll (Mont.) 4-1 214 3
10. Ottawa (Kan.) 3-1 209 12
11. St. Ambrose (Iowa) 2-1 205 11
12. Baker (Kan.) 3-1 183 13
13. Doane (Neb.) 3-1 172 14
14. Lindsey Wilson (Ky.) 5-0 153 16
15. Tabor (Kan.) 3-1 142 8
16. Rocky Mntn (Mont.) 4-1 136 18
17. Concordia (Neb.) 4-0 121 20
18. Valley City St. (N.D.) 3-1 103 19
19. Montana St.-Northern 4-1 93
20. Friends (Kan.) 3-1 75
21. Montana Western 3-1 65 15
22. William Penn (Iowa) 2-2 63 25
23. Robert Morris (Ill.) 4-1 40
24. Peru State (Neb.) 3-1 33 23
25. Siena Heights (Mich.) 3-1 22
Hockey
NHL
Todays Games
Toronto at Montreal, 6 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Toronto at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Colorado, 8:30 p.m.
Soccer
Major League Soccer
Todays Game
U.S. Open Cup
D.C. United at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m.
Fridays Games
Chicago at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Houston, 7:30 p.m.
Saturdays Games
New England at New York, 6 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m.
Seattle FC at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Sundays Games
Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Portland at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Tennis
China Open
Monday
At The Beijing Tennis Centre
Beijing
Purse: Men, $3.57 million (WT500); Women,
$5.19 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
First Round
Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Zhang Ze, China,
7-6 (4), 6-4.
Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Tommy Robredo,
Spain, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3.
Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Albert
Montanes, Spain, 7-5, 1-6, 7-6 (4).
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Tommy Haas (7),
Germany, 7-6 (6), 6-3.
Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain, def. Grigor
Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-2.
Women
First Round
Ana Ivanovic (14), Serbia, def. Flavia Pennetta,
Italy, 7-6 (9), 6-1.
Jelena Jankovic (8), Serbia, def. Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 1-6, 6-4, 6-0.
Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Sorana
Cirstea, Romania, 6-3, 6-2.
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, def. Magdalena
Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-1.
Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Sharon
Fichman, Canada, 6-4, 6-3.
Zhang Shuai, China, def. Peng Shuai, China,
6-3, 6-3.
Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Hsieh
Su-wei, Taiwan, 6-1, 6-1.
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Victoria
Azarenka (2), Belarus, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4.
Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Monica Puig,
Puerto Rico, 6-1, 6-4.
Second Round
Sara Errani (5), Italy, def. Misaki Doi, Japan,
6-3, 6-2.
Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Kaia
Kanepi, Estonia, 6-3, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan, and Jean-Ju-
lien Rojer (3), Netherlands, def. Yen-hsun Lu,
Taiwan, and Wu Di, China, 6-4, 6-3.
Women
First Round
Vera Dushevina, Russia, and Arantxa
Parra Santonja, Spain, def. Janette Husarova,
Slovakia, and Oksana Kalashnikova, Georgia,
6-2, 6-2.
Chan Hao-ching, Taiwan, and Liezel Huber,
United States, def. Serena and Venus Williams,
United States, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 11-9.
Silvia Soler-Espinosa and Carla Suarez
Navarro, Spain, def. Sun Ziyue and Zhang
Yuxuan, China, 7-6 (4), 6-0.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and Lisa
Raymond, United States, def. Alla Kudryavts
eva, Russia, and Anastasia Rodionova,
Australia, 7-5, 6-3.
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, and Anabel Medina
Garrigues, Spain, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld,
Germany, and Kveta Peschke (5), Czech
Republic, 6-4, 1-6, 10-3.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Sania Mirza (8),
India, def. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, and
Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-3, 6-3.
Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, and Zheng Jie, China,
def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, and
Zhang Shuai, China, 6-3, 3-6, 10-5.
By MATTHEW STEVENS
mstevens@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE Whether its eating grass or the hat he wears on the
sideline, Mississippi State coach Dan Mullen stopped short of saying Les
Miles mannerisms were a act.
However, the Bulldogs fifth-year coach said he doesnt let that com-
ic book character image of Miles distract him from the LSU football teams
disciplined nature.
I think hes a very good coach, Mullen said. I think hes got a lot of
personality. I think sometimes that can come off in a different way.
Mullen, who is 31-24 as a head coach, suggested Monday in his weekly
media conference that his mannerisms might be a bigger deal in a bigger
media spotlight.
We all have our quirks, Mullen said. I chew my game plan (the lami-
nated play sheet) sometimes. I wear a visor, so I guess I have my quirks. You
look at the success hes had. To be in this league as long as hes been, it
shows the type of coach that he is.
MSU (2-2, 0-1 Southeastern Conference) will play host to No. 10 LSU
(4-1, 1-1) at 6 p.m. Saturday (ESPN) at Davis Wade Stadium. LSU, which
lost to Georgia 44-41 in Athens, Ga., on Saturday, comes to Starkville with a
20-1 record under Miles in games following a loss. Only once in nine years
under Miles have the Tigers dropped back-to-back games (2008 Ole Miss,
Arkansas).
Miles is 54-4 against unranked teams at LSU and Mullen is 0-8 all-time
against top-10 opponents. LSU has won 13 straight and 20 of last 21 against
MSU. The last time MSU beat LSU was a 17-16 victory in 1999 in Starkville.
Theres not a chance well be looking ahead, Miles said Monday.
(MSU) is a program, like most college programs, when they get to the end
of the week, they really need to have victory. The work they put in is so sig-
nificant, this will not be a difficult week for us to get our eyes open to how
quality the opponent is.
Mullen remembers coaching LSU QB Zach Mettenberger in a high
school football camp when he was an assistant coach at Florida. Metten-
berger, with a new offensive coordinator in Cam Cameron, has 13 touch-
downs, which is one more than he threw in 13 games a year ago. His total
of 13 touchdown passes ranks second in the SEC, and seventh nationally.
He was 23 of 37 for a career-best 372 yards and three touchdowns against
Georgia.
It was clear then that he was a guy that would have major recruiting tal-
ent with a big arm coming from a high school program that was sophisticated
in throwing the football, Mullen said. He has proved all those experts correct
now that hes comfortable with what hes doing in LSUs offense.
They still are a power running team. They have two NFL wide receiv-
ers with a NFL quarterback with a big arm that can get them the ball. Its a
dilemma of how do you stop the power run and then make sure theyre not
getting out to the perimeter. When you leave them one-on-one, theyre very
dangerous in the pass game.
n In other news, Organizers for the College Football Playoff say they
have received four bids to host the 2016 national championship game and
six to host the 2017 game. Groups from Jacksonville, Fla., and Tampa, Fla.,
have submitted bids for both games. Tampa was a finalist to host the first
championship game, which will be played Jan. 12, 2015, at AT&T Stadium in
Arlington, Texas. The other groups bidding for the Jan. 11, 2016, game are:
Arizona (University of Phoenix Stadium) and New Orleans (Superdome). The
other groups bidding for the Jan. 9, 2017, game are: Northern California Bay
Area (Levis Stadium, the 49ers planned new home); Minneapolis (Vikings
Stadium); San Antonio (Alamodome); and South Florida (Sun Life Stadium).
n Connecticut athletic director Warde Manuel says hes looking for
football coach who can bring more excitement, passion, and above all wins
to UConn. Manuel fired coach Paul Pasqualoni on Monday, with his team
0-4 and coming off a 41-12 loss at Buffalo. Pasqualoni, in his third season at
UConn, finishes with a 10-18 record. Associate head coach George DeLe-
one, who coached the offensive line, also was let go. The school said it will
pay Pasqualoni $750,000 to buy out his contract.
Offensive coordinator T.J. Weist, who played at Alabama will take over
as interim head coach for the remainder of the season.
The Associated Press reports were included in this report.
Follow Matt Stevens on Twitter @matthewcstevens.
College Football
Miles, Mullen have
their own quirks
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013 3B
Sudoku
YESTERDAYS ANSWER
Sudoku is a number-
placing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The object
is to place the numbers
1 to 9 in the empty spaces
so that each row, each
column and each 3x3 box
contains the same number
only once. The difculty
level increases from
Monday to Sunday.
On the warpath
WHATZIT ANSWER
ACROSS
1 Behind bars
7 Rum-soaked cake
11 Houdini feat
12 Wildly excited
13 Stephen King
book
15 Singer Lotte
16 Golf pegs
18 Reclined
21 Fish features
22 Cautioned
24 Say more
25 Martini base
26 Game cube
27 Corned beef
sandwich
29 Portent
30 Rotisserie part
31 Nevada neighbor
32 Boulder
34 Stephen King
book
40 Sneaker problem
41 Merchant
42 Verne captain
43 How some drugs
are taken
DOWN
1 Pilots place
2 Fire remnant
3 Rink material
4 Soup servers
5 Fencing swords
6 College head
7 Marketplace
8 In the past
9 appetit!
10 Wisdom bringer
14 Blowin in the
Wind singer
16 Oceans motions
17 Finish
19 Nepal neighbor
20 Horse sound
21 Way off
22 Finish frst
23 Lions home
25 Infuence
28 Cafs cousin
29 Streetcar cry
31 Big name in auto
racing
33 Words of
approximation
34 Oxford bigwig
35 Exalted poem
36 Web address
piece
37 Angled pipe
38 Twisty fsh
39 Use a crowbar
Ole Miss
Continued from Page 1B
never like looking at the what-ifs or
wishing you had done something
different. Its part of the game. Six-
ty teams do that every Saturday.
What kind of team you become is
defned after diffcult moments.
Ole Miss won its frst three
games for the frst time since 1989.
The Rebels knew they would have
to take their game to different lev-
el against the defending national
champion Crimson Tide. Instead,
the Alabama defense rose to the
challenge on the national television
stage and posted a shutout.
They are the No. 1 team in the
nation for a reason, Freeze said.
We had a chance defensively to put
us in the game, but we didnt make
enough plays to keep us in it late in
the game.
Ole Miss had 205 yards of total
offense. Quarterback Bo Wallace
was 17 of 30 for 159 yards. The Reb-
els were held to a season-low total
offense output and shut out for the
frst time since 1998.
Still, Alabama led only 9-0 at
halftime.
We just didnt make plays, Wal-
lace said. When you look at the
tape of the game, you get sick be-
cause you see all of the plays that
were there to be made. The defense
played its tail off. All we had to do
was put something together and
were unable to do that.
Auburn had a bye week to pre-
pare for Ole Miss. The Tigers won
their frst three games under new
coach Gus Malzahn before drop-
ping a 35-21 decision at LSU.
(Auburn) reminds me a lot of
us last year, Freeze said. Theyre
a very, very hungry team that plays
with great emotion, energy and
passion. It doesnt surprise me at
all with Gus (Malzahn) leadership.
I know theyre off to a great start.
They have been very, very good
at home. Its another road trip in
a hostile environment on a Satur-
day night. Its a big game for both
schools, sitting at 3-1. He will have
them ready.
Theyre extremely athletic at
quarterback, running back, receiv-
ers, and DBs. Their O-line and
D-line are physical, like an SEC
team should be. Hes got them play-
ing extremely hard. When you face
an offense thats very balanced in
rushing and passing, they give you
a lot of looks, a lot of motions, a lot
of smoke and mirrors. Theyre very
effcient in what they do. Defen-
sively, (defensive coordinator) Ellis
(Johnson) is one of the best in the
business. Its very, very multiple.
You have to prepare for almost any-
thing.
Ole Miss entered the game
against Alabama averaging 38
points and 490 yards per game.
Leading rusher Jeff Scott was held
to 28 yards on eight rushes. Still,
players and coaches said this is no
time to panic of change things.
You just have to look at as a bad
game, Scott said. We have a lot of
confdence in what we are doing.
We have won games before so what
we are doing is successful. We still
have some really high goals as a
team. We are excited to play again,
so that we can prove people that we
are still a good football team.
Said Freeze, We can look just
alike offensively, if we wanted to.
Well be able to simulate their looks
very effciently for our defense. Hav-
ing said that, both of us can change
a lot during the course of the week.
(Malzahns) got two weeks to do
whatever hes going to do. I know
hell dress things up and have some
wrinkles we havent seen.
We are very, very similar in the
things we do offensively. We can
help prepare, but you never know
exactly what to prepare for. Well
show them everything our defense
wants to see. There will be some-
thing we dont cover that well see
Saturday night.
The game is critical if the Reb-
els want to stay in the Southeastern
Conference Western Division race.
The good news is it will mark the
end of road play for a while. After
winning at Vanderbilt and Texas,
the game ends a stretch of four of
fve games on the road to start the
season.
Ole Miss will play six of its fnal
seven games at home. It needs three
more wins to clinch bowl eligibility
for a second-straight season.
No game is easy in this league,
and we are looking forward to an-
other challenge, Wallace said. We
dealt through adversity regularly
last season. Now its time to prove
what this team is made of.
Follow Scott Walters on Twitter
@dispatchscott.
Perkins
Continued from Page 1B
Mullen said Sept. 16. He
didnt practice a whole lot
(before the Auburn game)
coming back from that in-
jury. On the injury report
hes full-go, so youre go-
ing to feel a lot more com-
fortable having him part
of the game plan.
Against Oklahoma
State, Perkins injured his
right ankle and missed
MSUs home opener
against Alcorn State. He
saw his touches decrease
against Auburn and Troy
because of the injury.
Since the opener, Perkins
has 13 carries and needed
the bye week to heal phys-
ically.
Im able to plant and
cut with confdence on
my foot this week, so I
dont think my injuries
here and there (will) be a
factor, Perkins said. Im
looking forward to being
involved in the offense
more against a opponent
where my teammates will
need me.
Perkins returned from
a ankle injury at Auburn
and had 50 all-purpose
yards, including 36 rush-
ing yards. He had fve car-
ries for 23 yards against
Troy before re-aggravat-
ing his ankle injury in the
frst quarter. He didnt
play the rest of the game
and was unable to partic-
ipate in the offensive ex-
plosion that resulted in a
62-7 victory.
It was real tough self-
ishly to watch my team-
mates have a lot of suc-
cess while I was unable to
play, but my job that night
was to cheer on my guys,
Perkins said. I have to
believe my number will be
called in a big spot again
soon.
Even without Perkins
normal production (he
rushed for 1,024 yards,
had eight touchdowns,
and averaged 5 yards per
carry last season), MSU
is averaging 206 rushing
yards per game. Sopho-
more quarterback Dak
Prescott, who has start-
ed the last three games
in place of Russell, leads
the team in rushing with
215 yards and fve touch-
downs.
If theyre going to let
Dak run, well let Dak
run, Mullen said. He
had another good game
running (against Troy).
I think he only had fve
carries (for 53 yards), so
it wasnt like he had a lot
of carries. If people are
going to let our quarter-
backs just go run for big
yards, well take that.
Until Sunday, Mullen
has sounded confdent
Russell would start at 6
p.m. Saturday (ESPN)
when MSU plays host to
No. 10 LSU (4-1, 1-1). If
Russell gets the opportu-
nity, his teammates said
the same philosophy will
drive the running game
with him or with Prescott.
Its hard to convince
people, but the offense
isnt fundamentally differ-
ent whether Tyler or Dak
are in the football game,
MSU junior center Dillon
Day said. We know one
thing, when we play LSU,
well have to be physical
and run the ball.
Follow Matt
Stevens on Twitter
@matthewcstevens.
BY WiLL GRAVES
The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH
Where most saw misery
and chaos, Clint Hurdle
saw something else en-
tirely.
The day Hurdle took
over as the Pittsburgh Pi-
rates manager in Decem-
ber, 2010, he spoke about
electrifying the city. He
preached optimism then
went out and practiced it
every day while talking
about a vision that went
far beyond returning a
moribund franchise to re-
spectability.
Its why Hurdle isnt
satisfed after leading
Pittsburgh to a 94-68 re-
cord and its frst playoff
berth in 21 years. Its why
he doesnt view tonights
wild-card game against
Cincinnati as the culmi-
nation of three years of
patience, progress and
pragmatism.
Press Hurdle on how
detailed he allowed his
vision to get and he leans
forward for emphasis.
To win a sixth World
Series, he said.
First things frst.
The team that spent all
summer defying expecta-
tions now must fnd a way to
do it again when it hosts the
frst playoff game in Pitts-
burgh in 7,660 days. Com-
ing off a weekend sweep
in Cincinnati that gave the
Pirates home-feld advan-
tage for the one-and-done
wild card, Pittsburgh has to
press reset while trying not
to get caught up in the kind
of hype not seen in the city
since Barry Bonds bolted
for San Francisco 21 years
ago.
What happened over
the weekend, Hurdle
said, doesnt matter.
Neither does the six
months that came before
it, though Hurdle believes
his team has all the hall-
marks required to make
sure this postseason ap-
pearance will extend be-
yond a cameo.
I like the grit factor,
he said, and the lessons
weve learned.
Lessons hard won on
a roster that is baseballs
version of Ellis Island, a
mixture of veterans look-
ing to revive their careers
and an exciting young
core that includes MVP
candidate Andrew Mc-
Cutchen and ace-in-train-
ing Gerrit Cole.
Perhaps its ftting that
left-hander Francisco
Liriano (16-8, 3.02 ERA)
will start the teams most
important game in a gen-
eration. Allowed to walk
in free agency after an
underwhelming stint with
the Chicago White Sox in
2012, the Pirates signed
Liriano to a two-year deal
last winter that turned out
to be one of the best bar-
gains in baseball.
Fueled by a slightly
overhauled delivery and
a devastating slider, Liria-
no rediscovered the form
that made him an All-Star
in 2006. Even more, hes
found a home in a club-
house that wasnt always
the most welcoming in the
majors.
Major League Baseball
Pirates hoping for more
than cameo in playoffs
Brown
Continued from Page 1B
is a big rivalry game and he
wanted to do his part.
Mission accomplished.
I just know when the ball
is in my hands I have to make
a big play, Brown said. I just
know the season I had last
year was great. When I came
in this year, I thought I could
be better than I was last year.
Brown said he has
watched highlights of Pick-
ens County games to re-
member what he and his
teammates achieved. He said
every day he thinks about
what he is going to do in prac-
tice and how he is going to
use that to improve on Friday
nights. If coaches tell him
the team needs a frst down,
he thinks he is going to get
a touchdown. When he gets
tired, he thinks back to the
offseason and all of the run-
ning he did to prepare him-
self and the fatigue vanishes.
Growing up in the leagues
in Reform, he played quarter-
back, wide receiver, running
back, linebacker, and defen-
sive end, which makes it easi-
er to understand why Brown
is always into something.
This season is the most time
Brown has spent on defense.
I know I am going to have
to see a lot more playing time
on defense because this is my
last year and we are trying to
make it to State, Brown said.
Brown played his fresh-
man football season at Gordo
High. When Plott returned
to Pickens County High,
Brown transferred and has
spent the past three seasons
assaulting scoreboards and
defenses. Last season, he
rushed for more than 2,800
yards and helped Pickens
County fnish 11-3. But a 42-
41 loss to Marion County
in the state semifnals left
Brown and the Tornadoes
wanting more, so he spent
the offseason pushing him-
self to make sure he was in
the best possible shape.
Plott hopes Browns role
will get bigger on defense.
He considers his secondary
to be one of the strengths of
the team and feels Brown
seeing more time at that posi-
tion group can strengthen an
already talented area. Plott
said Browns athleticism and
ability to attack the football
make him a solid defensive
player. He said Brown has
that same mentality when he
is on offense.
Once he gets the ball
in hand, he will make you
miss or he will run you over,
Plott said. He is not very big,
but he runs so hard that you
watch him and wonder, Dang,
where is that coming from?
Browns work has paid off.
Plott said his senior standout
has offers from South Ala-
bama, Jacksonville State, and
West Alabama. He knows
Brown can play at the next
level. He also believes Brown
can play at another level if he
takes care of his work off the
feld. Plott agrees Brown has
loftier visions for himself and
that he wont stop working
until he realizes those goals.
Brown said he wants to
play at Tennessee and that
his favorite school is Oregon.
He realizes major-Division I
schools in Tennessee and Or-
egon might not know about
him in West Alabama, but
that isnt going to stop him
from doing things on the foot-
ball feld to attract attention.
I am trying to push my-
self to get to the next goal,
Brown said. I am trying to
put my team on my back to
get them to the next goal.
If they see me doing great,
I know they will want to do
great.
Follow Dispatch sports
editor Adam Minichino on
Twitter @ctsportseditor.
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
DOONESBURY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY:
I am writing
in response
to Anonymous in
Wisconsin (Aug.
11), the cancer
survivor whose
husband has lost
interest in her
after her double
mastectomy. I am
OUTRAGED by his
insensitivity and
lack of love. She
says she doesnt
want to leave him.
My question to
her is, why not?
She deserves
better.
I am a cancer survivor who
was diagnosed with breast
cancer seven months after
I was married. Prior to my
decision to have a radical
mastectomy, I offered my
husband the chance to leave.
(After all, one doesnt expect
worse to come so soon after
the wedding.) The prospect
of children, which we had dis-
cussed and was important to
us, was uncertain because of
my subsequent chemotherapy.
My husband didnt hesitate. He
said, You would not leave me.
We will adopt.
On our frst wedding
anniversary I was bald, and
he treated me to a beautiful,
romantic getaway. Although
I did have reconstruction, it
was a long process. He was
supportive from day one.
Fifteen years later, I was
diagnosed with breast cancer
again. I had another radical
mastectomy followed by chemo
and reconstruction. Abby, my
husband again made me feel
beautiful even
when I didnt.
There are men
out there who de-
fne a woman not
by the size of her
breasts, but by
the beauty of her
heart. SURVI-
VOR IN NATICK,
MASS.
DEAR SUR-
VIVOR: I want to
thank you and
the many breast
cancer survivors
who wrote me
and their sup-
portive spouses
for telling me your personal
stories. Readers, I am printing
this to remind you that October
is National Breast Cancer
Awareness Month. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: I had to write
to Anonymous. I kept hoping
my husband of 20 years would
change his mind and accept my
new body. However, because
he could not, I chose to divorce
him and it liberated me.
At frst, I felt that if the one
person who was supposed
to care couldnt look at me,
then no other man would
either. I was wrong. After fve
years of dating, I never once
encountered a man who was
as insensitive as my husband
had been. I have now found the
man of my dreams.
In some respects, my med-
ical adventures, as I refer to
them, were the best thing that
ever happened. They enabled
me to see my ex for who he
really was, and fnd a man who
truly IS a man. GOT A NEW
SET AND A NEW LIFE
DEAR ABBY: Breast cancer
doesnt ruin your life unless
you let it.
I am 66 years old. When I
was in high school, my mom
had a breast removed. My
parents and I just took it in
stride. It didnt defne us. Dad
adored her.
Mom would come in
dressed up for whatever
reason and ask, Am I even?
because the falsies then
were made of foam and were
lightweight. She kept the
vacation money pinned to it.
She made a few new friends
faint when she used it as a pin
cushion. Dad died at 90, and
Mom died the following year.
Mom could have helped
Anonymous. She would have
cut her a slice of homemade
pie, poured a cup of coffee,
sat down at the table and just
talked to her. Women need
other women. Anonymous
should fnd a friend who has
gone through the same thing
and talk and pray. She needs
both. EARLENE IN TEXAS
DEAR ABBY: My wife went
through a lumpectomy, chemo-
therapy, then radiation. During
that time she went to work
every day, except when she
had a treatment.
Of course, I have a visual
reminder of what she went
through when we share an
intimate moment, but she has
had to deal with it every day
of her life since then. When I
see her scar, I think about how
strong she was going through
that diffcult period of time.
Rather than drive us apart, it
has brought us closer together
than I ever thought possible.
HUSBAND OF A BREAST
CANCER SURVIVOR
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 4B Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Oct.
1). Your birthday brings conf-
dence and clarity. A dry spell
will end this month, and youll
feel a fresh fow of excitement
visit your realm of personal
relationships. November pleas-
antly changes the direction of
your work. Sell something of
high value and reinvest in Jan-
uary. Youll give an acceptance
speech in March. Taurus and
Gemini people adore you. Your
lucky numbers are: 10, 48, 17,
41 and 39.
ARIES (March 21-April
19). A person who doesnt
know what good is cannot be
happy. Your conscience may
keep you from following a
hedonistic path, but ultimately
joy is better than pleasure.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). Call the expert, Google
the question on your mind, ask
your mom. Do your research
frst, before you decide on a
plan of action. Research will
tell you what is not even worth
pursuing.
GEMINI (May 21-June
21). Stress may be a feeting
reaction to the moment, but
it also has long-term health
ramifcations. Learning more
effective coping skills could
actually help you live longer
and will certainly help you live
better.
CANCER (June 22-July
22). Youre in a different place
in your life than some of the
people who are around you
today, which is precisely why
you have a lot to offer one
another. The gift of a different
perspective cannot be under-
estimated now.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You
like that people younger than
you have things that werent
available to you growing up.
But sometimes younger people
teaching the older ones can
bring an unsettling dynamic.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
There are things that are richer
than power and privilege, but
sadly some people lack the
ability to experience them
or even believe they exist.
Thats why your compassion
is a much-needed force in the
world.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
You could worry about things
not under your control, or you
could channel that energy into
the things you can do some-
thing about. More than likely,
youll do a little of both.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). A person doesnt have
to be lying to be totally wrong.
There is a lot of misinfor-
mation in the world. Try not
to read too much into the
exchange of bad information.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21). The work you did
last week is only now starting
to be recognized by those
whose opinions matter to your
future. More than compli-
ments, you want advancement
and thats just what youll
get.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). People present the side
of themselves that they want
you to see and believe. Youre
too keen to take that as the
whole truth. Youll see through
the cracks of the facade and
address the reality.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Youll be concerned with
the larger implications of your
activities. If a practice makes
you skillful, blameless and
happy, its something worth
pursuing. If it brings a lot of
garbage and politics into play,
its not worth pursuing.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). Seize the moment of
silent reverence offered you.
No more words. In the name
of this place we drink in with
our breathing, stay quiet like
a fower, so the nightbirds will
start singing. Rumi
Horoscopes
Saints
Continued from Page 1B
The Saints have won their
last nine Monday night games,
all with Brees at quarterback
and often putting on some of his
most memorable performances.
There was his 307-yard, four-
TD performance against Atlanta
late in the 2011 season, the same
game in which he broke Dan
Marinos 27-year-old record for
yards passing in a season.
Earlier that same season,
Brees threw for 363 yards and
four scores in a 49-24 Monday
night win over the New York
Giants.
The Saints Super Bowl cam-
paign was highlighted by Brees
371 yards and fve touchdowns
in New Orleans stunning 38-17
rout of Tom Brady and the New
England Patriots.
Now his 10th career 400-yard
outing has delivered a sobering
blow to a Miami team that came
in riding a surprising start.
When Brees was a free agent
in 2006, he drew the most in-
terest from New Orleans and
Miami, but the Dolphins, fear-
ful of the effects of reconstruc-
tive surgery on Brees throwing
shoulder, did not pursue the
quarterback as enthusiastical-
ly as then-Saints rookie coach
Sean Payton. Since then, Brees
has become one of the most
prolifc quarterbacks in NFL
history.
During New Orleans open-
ing drive, Brees became only
the seventh quarterback to pass
for more than 47,000 yards. He
ended the drive with 47,030, sur-
passing Fran Tarkentons 47,003
for sixth most yards passing all-
time.
Later, Brees eighth comple-
tion gave him 4,124 in his ca-
reer, one more than John Elway
for fourth all-time in that cate-
gory.
Brees was 30 of 39 without
an interception. Sproles caught
seven passes for 114 yards.
Marques Colston had seven
catches for 96 yards.
Miamis Lamar Miller had
62 yards rushing on 11 carries,
including a 5-yard scoring run
late in the second quarter that
made it 14-10, but the Saints be-
gan to run away with the game
after that, and as they did, they
turned up their pass rush. Tan-
nehill was sacked four times in
the second half, once each by
Junior Galette, Martez Wilson,
Cameron Jordan and Tyrunn
Walker.
The DispaTch www.cdispatch.com 6B Tuesday, OcTOber 1, 2013
CBS 4
WANTS YOU TO
PAY 3x MORE
FOR THE
SAME SHOWS
DISH defends your right
to a fair deal.

t

K

i
n

h
e
r
e

t

K

i
n

h
e
r
e

t
K
in
h
e
r
e

t
K
in
h
e
r
e
To voice your concerns, call the
Station Manager, Bobby Berry, at
662-327-4444
ADS3856 2013 DISH Network L.L.C. All rights reserved.