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We are about to cover a lot of ground... Please hold your questions until the end.

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Our Agile Journey


Enabling Agile in a Large Organization Our Journey Down the Yellow Brick Road Agile 2007 conference.

June 2005 - Two pilot Scrum project


teams began Currently most teams use Agile practices or a combo of Agile & Waterfall.

Spring 2008 started a local Agile Users Group that meets bi-monthly.

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Agile

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The Agile Manifesto


Individuals Individuals and and interactions interactions Working Working software software Customer Customer collaboration collaboration Responding Responding to to change change
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Process Process and and tools tools Comprehensive Comprehensive documentation documentation Contract Contract negotiation negotiation Following Following a a plan plan
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Lean Principles of Agile Development


Eliminate Waste

Spend time only on what adds real customer value


Amplified Learning

When you have tough problems, increase feedback and


collaboration

Leave Options Open as Long as Possible

Maintain multiple options and decide on options as late as


practical, but no longer

Deliver as Fast as Possible

Deliver value to customers as soon as they ask for it


Empower the Team

Let the people who add value use their full potential
Build Integrity in

Dont try to tack on integrity after the fact Build it in


See the Whole

Beware of the temptation to optimize parts at the expense of the


whole
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Agile Process

The basic phases of an Agile development project are really no different from those of any other project. You still must define and initiate the project, plan for the project, execute the plan and monitor and control the results. What differs, however, is the manner in which these steps are accomplished.
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Opportunities for
Strong partnerships between Business/Sponsor and Project Team

Joint commitment to achieving business results Empowered, participating Product Owner


Requirements that adapt to business needs

Continual re-prioritization of backlog to meet changing


business needs Greater clarity and understanding of requirements through shorter development cycles

Delivering Business Value

Deliver incremental business value earlier within projects


Increase Employee Satisfaction

Empowered, self-directed teams Sustainable Pace


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Agile Methodologies / Techniques

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Scrum

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What is Scrum?
The term scrum originally derives from a strategy in the game of rugby where it denotes getting an out-of play ball back into the game with teamwork. Scrum is a project management technique based on the principles of agile Scrum consists of processes and measurements to manage the development process.

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Sequential vs. Overlapping Development


Define Analyze Code Test Deliver

Rather than doing all of one thing at a time... ...Scrum teams do a little of everything all the time

Source: The New New Product Development Game by Takeuchi and Nonaka. Harvard Business Review, January 1986.
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Scrum in 100 Words


An agile process that:

Allows us to focus in the shortest time.

on delivering the highest business value

Allows us to rapidly and repeatedly inspect actual working software. The business sets the priorities. Development teams self-manage to determine the best way to deliver the highest priority features. (They must agree on the definition of done) Every iteration (Sprint) anyone can see real working software and authorize a release of the demonstrated functionality or continue to enhance for another Sprint.
(Sprints are typically 2wks to 30 days)
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Sprints
Scrum projects make progress in a series of Sprints (iterations). Target duration is no longer than 30 days:

The team can set the exact duration based on what works the
best for them.

A constant duration leads to a better rhythm (velocity). Do not miss the end of the sprint, the deadline is sacred.
Features are designed, coded, tested and documented during the sprint. Priorities can only change between Sprints, unless the Product Owner terminates the Sprint and starts a new one. Product is potentially shippable after each sprint.

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Potentially shippable
At the end of each sprint, the team must produce a potentially shippable product increment High quality Tested Complete Done What it does it does well Potentially shippable shippable
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Scrum Roles

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Scrum roles and responsibilities


Product Owner

Defines the features of the product, decides on release date and content Is responsible for the profitability of the product (ROI) Prioritizes features according to market value Can change features and priority every sprint Accepts or rejects work products

Ensures that the team is fully functional and productive Enables close cooperation across all roles and functions and removes

Scrum Master

barriers Shields the team from external interferences Ensures that the process is followed. Participates in daily scrum, sprint review and planning meetings. Servant Leader.

Cross-functional, seven plus/minus two members Selects the sprint backlog Has the right to do everything within the boundaries of the project guidelines

Team
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to reach the iteration goal Organizes itself and its work Demos work results to the Product Owner
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Does Agile mean dont plan?


No, just the opposite, Agile puts a premium on planning
Planning Level
Product (Roadmap) Release Sprint (Iteration) Daily (Stand-Up)

How Often
1 2 Times per Year 3 4 Times per Year Every Iteration Every Day

Who
Product Owner / Executive Product Owner & Team Product Owner & Team Team

Focus
Product Evolution Over time Features Features Tasks

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w e i v r e v Sprint O

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Summary of Sprint Meetings


Sprint Planning Determine the sprint goal and which backlog items to
address and then develop the plan to accomplish the work.

Daily Stand ups 15 min mtg in which team reports to each other: what they

did yesterday, what theyre working on today, whats in the way of their progress. This is NOT a status/problem solving mtg.

Sprint Review Review the sprint goal/deliverable with the product owner
to show accomplishments.

Sprint Retrospective Team meeting held at the end of each sprint to discuss
process improvement within the scope of the project
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Birds Eye View of a Sprint


SPRINT SPRINT

Sprint Planning Meeting

Color Key

Daily Daily Scrums Scrums

Sprint Planning Meeting

Sprint Review Review Meeting Meeting Sprint Sprint Retrospective

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s t c a f i t Ar

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Summary of Artifacts
Note: Artifacts can be as simple as an excel doc through commercially available Agile software! The team chooses what they want to use. Product Backlog (All Requirements)

List of requirements / features, prioritized by business value, by the


product owner. Updated and Prioritized by the product owner.

Sprint Backlog (Requirements for a Sprint & Tasks)

List of tasks to be addressed during the active sprint. Owned and updated frequently by the scrum team
Impediments log (Daily Standup Whats in my way?)

List of impediments identified by that team that require resolution No specific format is mandated for this, teams should determine what
works for them

Retrospective (Lessons Learned)

Results from the retrospective meeting should be captured and shared in


a manner that is beneficial to all team members.

Creation of additional artifacts becomes a matter of judgment and the requirements of your companys Project Lifecycle.
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& g n i r u s M ea g n i r o t i n Mo Progress

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Burndown Charts
Primary method of tracking progress A burndown chart shows how much work remains to be done. Agile focuses on remaining effort vs. completed effort.

Note: Recognize that things such as tracking Financials & Time reporting may still be required PM does that outside of the scrum process.

Burndown charts: Two types of charts: Show net progress Sprint Burndown - report on sprint Raise questions; they
progress against schedule.

dont answer them Facilitate early Product (release) Burndown discussions report on project progress against Make it impossible to hide the truth schedule.
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Copyright (c) 2006, Mountain Goat Software, Inc. and Innolution, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

A Sprint Burndown Chart


Sum of all remaining hrs totaled and plotted each day as a result of the team updating the sprint backlog. Need to evaluate the trend lines (will they impact being done?) Team is learning Underestimated or overestimated

The value comes from the team discussing why it looks that way.
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Hours

A Product Burndown Chart


600

Estimate (Story Points) Story Points

450

300

150

2 Sprints

5
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Wrap Up

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How do I learn more? Todays handouts include:

1. Reading List 2. Websites 3. Coaching Contacts


Upstate NY Agile User Group: Bi-monthly at Key, Albany. Group home page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UNYAUG http://www.scrumalliance.org/user_groups/60
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