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Organisational Understanding- BAIF Development

Research Foundation

By

Deepak Agarwal (29045)


Shankar Mondal (29064)
Organisation Traineeship Segment (OAC)
PRM-29

Submitted to:
BAIF Development Research Foundation, Pune
Faculty Guide: Professor Debi Prasad Mishra

August 2009
INSTITUTE OF RURAL MANAGEMENT, ANAND
Contents

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1. Introduction........................................................................................................................1

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2. Objective............................................................................................................................1

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3. Methodology......................................................................................................................1

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3.1 Primary data:....................................................................................................................1

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3.2 Secondary data.................................................................................................................1

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4. Scope of the study..............................................................................................................2

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5. INTRODUCTION of BAIF...............................................................................................2

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5.1 MISSION.........................................................................................................................2

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5.2 VISION............................................................................................................................2

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5.3 Analyzing BAIF using 7S FRAMEWORK.....................................................................3

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5.3.1 Strategy.....................................................................................................................4

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5.3.2 Porter’s Competitive Strategy...................................................................................4

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5.3.3 Miles and Snow’s Strategy Typology........................................................................4

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5.3.4 Organisational control strategy.................................................................................5

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5.3.5 Cooptation.................................................................................................................5

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5.3.6 Cluster development approach..................................................................................5

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5.3.7 Future strategy...........................................................................................................5

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6. THE ORGANISATION STRUCTURE.............................................................................6

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6.1 BAIF DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH FOUNDATION ORGANISATIONAL
STRUCTURE........................................................................................................................6

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6.2 STRUCTURE OF STATE LEVEL ASSOCIATE ORGANISATIONS OF BAIF...........8

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6.3 LEVELS OF HIERARCHY............................................................................................9

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6.4 The Mintzberg Model.....................................................................................................10

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7. ORGANISATIONAL DESIGN...........................................................................................11

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7.1 Size.................................................................................................................................11

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7.2 Structure.........................................................................................................................11

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8. DAVID KORTEN’S FRAMEWORK OF ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS.............11

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8.1 Dimensions of the organisation......................................................................................12

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8.1.1 Centralisation..........................................................................................................12

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8.1.2 Formalization..........................................................................................................13

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8.1.3 Horizontal differentiation........................................................................................13

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8.1.4 Vertical differentiation.............................................................................................13

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8.1.5 Spatial differentiation..............................................................................................13

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8.1.6 Training...................................................................................................................13

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8.1.7 Communication.......................................................................................................13

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8.1.8 Staff qualification....................................................................................................13

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8.1.9 Organisational focus:...............................................................................................13

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8.2 Environment...................................................................................................................14

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8.2.1 The PESTLE Factors...............................................................................................14

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8.2.2 The PESTLE Analysis.............................................................................................17

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8.2.3 Other environmental dimensions...........................................................................18

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9. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS................................................................................................19

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9.1.........................................................................................................................................19

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9.2 Income Expenditure Account of BAIF..........................................................................20

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9.3 Sources of Income..........................................................................................................23

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9.4 Investments....................................................................................................................25

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10. SOME UNIQUE FEATURES OF BAIF......................................................................25

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11. ANNEXURES.................................................................................................................1

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l
Acknowledgement

This acknowledgement is not merely a catalogue of names but an expression of deep sense of
gratitude to all those who helped us in understanding the organisation.

We would first of all, like to thank Prof. Nivedia Kothiyal (former OTS coordinator) and
IRMA for allowing us to undertake this study. We would also like to thank Prof. Debiprasad
Mishra, faculty guide for his guidance and support while completing this study. Our thanks to
him should not be considered a mere lip service because it was due to his suggestions that we
were able to understand the nuances of this study. Had he been not our guide, we think that
we could not have completed this study to our satisfaction. Our thanks are also due to Prof. S.
R. Asokan (present OTS coordinator) for extending all help in completing this study.
We would like to thank Mr. Bharat K. Kakade, the Vice President of BAIF Development
Research Foundation, who helped us a lot during our stay and gave us important insights
regarding the nitty-gritty’s of the organisation. We would also like to thank our Reporting
Officers- Mr. J. D. Ambekar (Joint Director) and Mr. Dr. Avinash Bhide (Joint Director) for
providing us valuable insights about the organisation which helped us a lot in understanding
the organisation.
We would like to thank Ms. Lalita Kulkarni for extending all help to us during our stay in the
organisation which helped us in completing this study. We also pay our special thanks and
gratitude to the staff of BAIF Development Research Foundation and Society for Promotion
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of Eco-friendly Sustainable Development (SPESD) who were very accommodating and
hospitable and took special care to make our stay very fruitful and learning.
Deepak Agarwal (29045)
Shankar Mondal (29064)

Executive Summary
I Title : Organisational Understanding
II Organisation : BAIF Development Research Foundation
III Reporting Officer : Mr. Bharat K. Kakade
IV Faculty Guide : Prof. Debi PrasadMishra
V Student’s Name : Deepak Agarwal and Shankar Mondal

Objective of the study: The objective of the study was to study the organisation and
understand how it functions, to study the various components of the organisation, their inter-
organisational as well as intra organisational relationships. In addition to that the objective
was also to understand how an organisation interacts with the external elements and what
strategy it employs to deal with them, its work culture, activities, strengths and weaknesses.
Scope of the study: The scope of the study varies from the Pune office to the associate
organisations of BAIF. Financial analysis, studies on research and human resource, etc has
been conducted keeping Pune office in consideration while for analysing the structure,
strategy, etc the entire organisation has been considered.

Methodology and sources of data: To gather primary data structured and unstructured
interviews and informal discussions with the functional heads, Chief Programme Coordinator
of SPESD, employees at Pune office and field staff of SPESD were conducted. Unobtrusive
observations were also a part of the study to collect information and verify some facts.
Secondary data was collected from various documents- annual accounts, annual report,
BAIF’s journals, Human Resource Manual, etc. In addition to these documents, various other
publications of BAIF were also used to gather secondary data.
Findings: In our study we found that BAIF Development Research Foundation is a
professionally managed organisation. It has strength in areas like livestock and agri-horti
forestry where it has been performing exceedingly well. In addition to that the organisation
has also forayed into other areas like agri-business, agri-tourism, etc. At present it is working
in some 12 states through its state societies as well with other NGOs. Now the organisation

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wants to become a resource centre for other NGOs by providing them necessary consulting,
training and other services.

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1.

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2. Introduction
As part of our Organisational Traineeship Segment (OTS), we had the opportunity to work
with BAIF Development Research Foundation- India’s one of the largest and most reputed
NGO. For our Organisational Action Component (OAC), we were sent to Society for
Promotion of Eco-friendly Sustainable Development (SPESD) in Madhya Pradesh which is
an associate organisation of BAIF Development Research Foundation. SPESD undertakes all
developmental activities of BAIF Development Research Foundation in Madhya Pradesh. For
our Organisational Understanding study, we tried to study BAIF Development Research
Foundation.

3. Objective
The objectives of doing this study are as follows:

• To study the organisation and understand how it functions.


• To study the various components of the organisation, their inter-organisational as well
as intra organisational relationships.
• To understand how an organisation interacts with the external elements and what
strategy it employs to deal with them.
• To understand the organisation’s work culture, activities, strengths and weaknesses.

4. Methodology
The following methods were used to gather various types of information- primary as well as
secondary.

3.1 Primary data: To gather primary data structured and unstructured interviews and
informal discussions with the functional heads, Chief Programme Coordinator of SPESD,
employees at Pune office and field staff of SPESD were conducted. Unobtrusive observations
were also a part of the study to collect information and verify some facts.

3.2 Secondary data: Secondary data was collected from various documents- annual
accounts, annual report, BAIF’s journals, Human Resource Manual, etc. In addition to these
documents, various other publications of BAIF were also used to gather secondary data.

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5. Scope of the study
The scope of the study varies from the Pune office to the associate organisations of BAIF.
Financial analysis, studies on research and human resource, etc has been conducted keeping
Pune office in consideration while for analysing the structure, strategy, etc the entire
organisation has been considered.

6. INTRODUCTION of BAIF
BAIF Development Research Foundation (BAIF), formerly known as the Bharatiya Agro
Industries Foundation, is a non-profit, Public Charitable Trust, established in 1967 by Dr.
Manibhai Desai, a disciple of Mahatma Gandhi, to replicate his experiences in rural
development.
BAIF works through interventions in the fields of livestock development through various
programmes such as up gradation of low productive cattle and buffaloes for milk production,
goat husbandry, wastelands development through agri-horti-forestry, fodder production, agro
forestry, water resource management, environmental protection, tribal rehabilitation, and
empowerment of women through promotion of micro-enterprises. The development program
is based on local needs identified and implemented with a bottom to top approach. BAIF has
established independent Associate Organizations in different states. As on March 31, 2008,
the multidisciplinary program was operated by the BAIF family of state-level autonomous
institutions through 3200 staff members having sound managerial, financial and technical
competence.

5.1 MISSION
Mission of any organisation is the indicator of what the organisation wants to achieve. The
mission of BAIF is as follows:
“BAIF's Mission is to create opportunities of gainful self-employment for the rural families,
especially disadvantaged sections, ensuring sustainable livelihood, enriched environment,
improved quality of life and good human values. This is being achieved through development
research, effective use of local resources, extension of appropriate technologies and
upgradation of skills and capabilities with community participation. BAIF is a non-political,
secular and professionally managed organisation.”

5.2 VISION
The vision of an organisation shows how it wants the future to look like. Vision of BAIF is as
follows:
1.” A self-reliant and vibrant rural economy
2. Sustainable development of Rural India, free from poverty and hunger
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3. A literate and enlightened Rural Community who care for the conservation of natural
resources and a clean environment
4. Rural Society, with a priority to
* Reduce child mortality
* Ensure safe potable water in all villages
* Promote community health, family welfare and better quality of life
* Gender equity and social equality
* High moral values free from drugs and narcotic addiction
5. Empowered Society especially of the weaker sections, capable of self governance”

5.3 Analyzing BAIF using 7S FRAMEWORK

We tried to study the organization through applying The 7 'S's


diagnostic framework, developed by management consultants McKinsey,
which provides a useful perspective with which to assess the culture and
effectiveness of an organization. This consists of following seven
Components:
i. Shared Values
ii. Structure
iii. Strategy
iv. System
v. Skill
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vi. Staff
vii. Style

5.3.1 Strategy
An organisation has to deal with many factors- both internal as well as external and hence it
has to adopt a number of strategies to deal with all these factors. So is the case with BAIF
Research Development Foundation. It has adopted the following strategies:
5.3.2 Porter’s Competitive Strategy: BAIF Research Development Foundation has adopted
Michael E. Porter’s Focussed Differentiation Strategy. This is because the organisation is
working in selected area, e.g. Livestock Development, Wadi, Agri-business, Natural Resource
Management, etc. It tries to deliver a superior service in whichever area it is working. For
example, SPESD1 has started a producer company in Khujner (KAPCL) in Madhya Pradesh
after signing a tripartite agreement with DPIP of the state. At present the company has not
achieved its breakeven point and to support the company in its nascent stage SPESD is
bearing its administrative cost. This shows the distance up to which the organisation goes to
make its project successful and this differentiates its services from other organisations
working in the same area.
5.3.3 Miles and Snow’s Strategy Typology: According to Miles and Snow’s Strategy
Typology, BAIF Research Development Foundation has adopted an Analyzer strategy. The
Analyzer tries to maintain a stable business while innovating on the periphery. Some products
are targeted towards stable environment in which an efficiency strategy designed to keep
current customers is used. Other products are targeted towards new, more dynamic
environments, where growth is possible.
BAIF Research Development Foundation is also following the same strategy. It has Livestock
Development and Wadi as the most important programmes. In these programmes it has built
tremendous capabilities. For example its Semen Freezing Unit got ISO 9001:2000
certification in 1996. At that time it was the first such Unit to get this certification in entire
Asia. Similarly its expertise in Wadi is also very good. In addition to that the organisation has
also forayed into other areas like Agri-business, Agri- tourism and Floriculture.

1
SPESD is the Madhya Pradesh state society of BAIF Development Research Foundation.

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5.3.4 Organisational control strategy: Every organisation needs system for guiding and
controlling the organisation. According to William Ouchi of the University of California at
Los Angeles, managers at the top and middle levels of an organisation can choose among
three overall control strategies. BAIF Research Development Foundation majorly uses
Market Control strategy to guide the behaviour of its employees. In this method, the BAIF
establishment (consists of BAIF Central Research Station and BAIF Research Development
Foundation) as well as every Associate organisation (all the state societies) is a cost centre in
itself. They have to recover their entire cost from their activities and they also charge for any
service rendered to any of the BAIF’s other units. This ensures fiscal prudency.
5.3.5 Cooptation: The organisation is using cooptation as one of the strategies to liaison with
various external agencies. For this, it has Mr. Arvind Mafatlal (Chairman, Arvind Mafatlal
Group) as the Chairman, and eminent persons like Dr. M. S. Swaminathan and Dr. Sudha
Murthy (Chairperson, Infosys Foundation) are Trustees of its Board. This gives the
organisation tremendous capabilities to liaison with government, non government as well as
with corporate organisations.
5.3.6 Cluster development approach: BAIF and its state societies use this strategy to
intervene when they go into any new area. In this approach, whenever they enter a new area,
they try to intervene in 5 or 6 villages in that area. The reason for using this approach is that
once it acquires the goodwill of people in one village, it becomes easy for them to intervene
in nearby villages as they get good publicity from the spread of word of mouth.
5.3.7 Future strategy: Any organisation has to constantly evaluate its environment and design
a future strategy to deal with future needs. BAIF is also doing the same. It wants to become a
resource centre for other NGOs in the coming decade. This is because BAIF’s management
thinks that they have enough capacity and experience to work as a resource centre for other
NGOs. At present they are working as a resource agency for other NGOs in the state of West
Bengal and in some other places.

7. THE ORGANISATION STRUCTURE


Any organisation has many dimensions and one has to see it from different angles to
understand all the dimensions of the organisations.

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Structure: The organogram of BAIF Development Research Foundation is as follows:

6.1 BAIF DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH FOUNDATION ORGANISATIONAL


STRUCTURE

Governin Board of Trustees


g Council ---------------------------------------------

President & Managing Trustee


Core Management
Group
Vice Presidents
Research
HR
Finance
M Committee
Team
&E

Functiona
l Teams

Core
Units/ Central Groups /
Research Thematic
Associate State – Level Associate
Organisatio Station Centers
Organizations
n

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A ) State – Level Associate Organisations

1. BIRD, Andhra Pradesh


2. BIRVA, Jharkhand
3. MITTRA, Maharashtra ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE
4. BIRD-K, Karnataka
ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE
5. RRIDMA, Rajasthan
6. GRISERV, Vadodara
7. BIRD-UP, Uttar Pradesh
8. SPESD, Bhopal
9. DHRUVA, Gujarat

B) Core Groups / Thematic Centers : Core Groups are established at suitable locations to
implement the role required of a Resource Support Organization for particular programs
/ geographical areas. Thematic Centres are Start-up Teams to initiate program
development in newer Thematic Areas.

6.2 STRUCTURE OF STATE LEVEL ASSOCIATE ORGANISATIONS OF


BAIF

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Board of Trustees/ Members
Governing
Council Chairperson : Trustee, BAIF
Executive Vice Chairperson : Vice President, BAIF

Program Director / Chief Program Coordinator

Management Committee

Finance Research / Training


Campuses

HRD M & E / Internal


Audit

Region
/ Zone Regional Coordinator and Team

Area
District Coordinators & Teams

Cluster
/ Cluster Teams

Villages

Community

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6.3 LEVELS OF
HIERARCHY
There are four main
divisions or groups
which make sure that
the organisation runs
smoothly. 6.3.1
Executive Committee-
This is the most
important unit of BAIF
after the Board of Trustees. It is the functional Executive Committee which includes the Vice
Presidents, the Director and the Chief Program Coordinators. They are responsible for the
fluent flow of the technical challenges if any arise. They are 14 in number and are usually
those employees who had been working in the organisation for a long time, who have got
expertise in their respective fields and through knowledge of the culture and functioning of
BAIF.
6.3.2 Core Management Group- As the name suggests, this group of BAIF is responsible for
running of the organisation. It constitute of the President and the Vice Presidents. They assess
the present condition and make plan for future.
6.3.3. Research Coordination Committee- The Research Coordination Committee consists of
three Vice-Presidents, Director of Research and Chief Scientist. The role of this committee is
to monitor the work related to research. BAIF has a Central Research Station (CSR) at
Urulikanchan where research related to Embryo Transfer and Reproduction Biotechnology
for livestock development, agriculture, seri culture and Wadi is conducted. The work of this
committee is the analysis of working and planning of various projects and their related
research work.
6.3.4. Thematic Core Groups- This group serves as the platform for discussion and
knowledge sharing. Here the subject matter specialist in areas of Agronomy, Agri-horti-
forestry (WADI), Livestock etc. and the related heads of the respective state societies meet to
discuss and share the knowledge. They all discuss about their related field issues in groups
and also share their experience. Each thematic group is headed by a Vice President. They are
guided by the thematic group Vice President who not only direct them on how to work
efficiently in a project but also on how the future projects should be undertaken.
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6.4 The Mintzberg Model
Following is the figure of the Mintzberg Model

The Mintzberg Model divides an organisation into different parts. They are as follows:
6.4.1 Strategic Apex: The Strategic Apex is the most important part of an organisation. It
consists of the board and the top management of an organisation and it takes strategic
decisions of the organisation. In BAIF Research Development Foundation, the Strategic Apex
consists of the Board of Trustees and the President of the organisation.
6.4.2 Middle Line: The Middle Line forms the link between the Strategic Apex and the
Operating Core. It takes tactical decisions of the organisations. In BAIF it consists of the
Executive Vice President and five Vice Presidents.
6.4.3 Techno Staff: These are the technically fluent employees who also perform the
functions of supervising subordinates, implementation of the projects and the strategic
decisions taken by the apex level. In BAIF they are the Chief Programme Coordinators of
state societies, Scientists and Advisors (technical people).
6.4.4 Operating Core: The operating core is directly involved in implementation of the
programmes of the organisation. It consists of all the field level employees of the
organisation.
6.4.5 Support Staff: They are the employees who are indirectly involved in the working of the
organisation. They perform support functions like accounts keeping, security staff, clerks,
drivers, etc.

7. ORGANISATIONAL DESIGN:

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7.1 Size: The size of BAIF Development Research Foundation is large when compared to
other NGO’s. In fact it is the largest NGO of India in terms of its geographical reach. It is
working in 12 states in India and has more than 3100 employees.

7.2 Structure: BAIF Development Research Foundation’s organisations can be divided into
two categories which are as follows:
BAIF Establishment: It consists of BAIF Development Research Foundation and BAIF
Central Research Station at Urlikanchan.
Associate Organisations: These are the various state societies working in different states of
India.
The organisation BAIF Development Research Foundation has a divisionalised structure
because all the organisations of BAIF work independent of each other and they are controlled
by the BAIF Development Research Foundation. This is like a big company having many
units in different parts of the country and each unit working independent of all other units and
controlled by the Head Office.

8. DAVID KORTEN’S FRAMEWORK OF ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS


David Korten’s framework helps in analysing how any developmental agency should work.
First of all the developmental agency has to talk to the local people and understand their
needs. For this the stakeholders (beneficiaries) have to express their demand. Then the
organisation has to understand their demands and decide on a suitable programme. The
programme will have specific requirements and the organisation must have the requisite
capacity to fulfil these requirements. The output of the programme should satisfy the needs of
the beneficiaries.
BAIF Development Research Foundation and its associate organisations are exactly doing the
same thing. In their participatory approach, they go in a village, approach the local people
and discuss with them to know their requirements and then suitably design a programme.
While designing the programme they keep in mind that they have the requisite skills and
resources to deliver the programme and then implement the programme. The outcomes of the
programme should fulfil the needs of the local people for the programme to become
successful.

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8.1 Dimensions of the organisation
8.1.1 Centralisation: At present, all the major decisions in BAIF are taken by the Pune Head
Office. This includes matters related to major programmes, permanent recruitment at BAIF,
etc. In addition to that, all the major decisions are taken by either by the Executive
Committee or the Core Management Group. But there is a gradual shift towards
decentralization. The state societies are gaining independence in matters of how to implement
the programmes, etc. In some places the state societies have taken some initiatives of their
own also, e.g. the construction of the Sapth Sagar Dam at Rajgarh in Madhya Pradesh. In
addition to that, the employees of BAIF also have some say in operational or tactical
decisions. Thus it can be said that the organisation is partially decentralized.
8.1.2 Formalization: There are standard working protocols for many of the work in the
organisation. But even then the junior level employees are allowed to digress from the
standard protocols if it makes the work more efficient in terms of delivery or in terms of cost
benefit ratio. Thus the organisation can be said to be partially formalized.
8.1.3 Horizontal differentiation: The organisation is working in 12 states in the country. Thus
it has a high horizontal differentiation.
8.1.4 Vertical differentiation: Given the number of levels between the President and a junior
level employee, there is a high level of vertical differentiation in the organisation.
8.1.5 Spatial differentiation: The organisation is working in 12 states in the country and
therefore it has a high level of spatial differentiation.
8.1.6 Training: Regular in-house training is given to employees who require any training.
When some employees require training which cannot be provided in house then the
organisation make arrangement for the same and bear the expenses also.
8.1.7 Communication: Both written and verbal communications are used to communicate. It
may be mutual or top down depending upon the people involved.
8.1.8 Staff qualification: Staff qualification can be functional as well as social. In functional
qualification, the job a person is broken down into repetitive tasks and each task can be
undertaken by other people also. In social qualification, a person has degrees like MBA or
CA and his/her task cannot be easily performed by other person.
8.1.9 Organisational focus: At present, the organisational focus is internal. This is because
BAIF is a 42 years old organisation and the management thinks that they have diversified
into a lot of areas and fields. Therefore they do not want to diversify anymore and at present
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are focussing within the organisation on how to achieve more efficiency, what should be their
future strategy, etc. The organisation is also contemplating changing its mission statement
because its mission statement states that the organisation will work for the betterment of rural
poor. But the demographic change that has taken place in these 42 years has forced BAIF to
rethink its mission statement. The rate at which urbanization is taking place in India, within a
couple of decades more than half of our population will be living in urban areas. Therefore
there may be more urban poor than rural poor and hence the organisation may not cater to
their needs if it does not diversify into urban areas. Hence the organisation is thinking of
changing its mission statement.

8.2 Environment
Any organisation that exists in today’s world is an open system. It cannot afford to be a
closed system (or a closed organisation) because a closed organisation cannot survive in the
long run. Being an open system, BAIF Development Research Foundation has to deal with
many factors- e.g. political, economic, social, technological, legal, environmental, etc.
8.2.1 The PESTLE Factors
Political factors: These are those factors which are takes place due to local or state politics. It
includes decisions taken by the government of the land. Some of the political factors with
BAIF and its associate organisations has to deal with are as follows:

• Government Policy: It is very important for BAIF Development Research Foundation


and its state societies as it can affect the organisation’s projects as well as its funds.
This is because almost 60 % to 70 % of the organisation’s funds come from
government projects. Therefore if for any reason the government has to curb its
spending on development sector or decides to do it through different government
agencies, then BAIF and its state societies will have problem in getting funds.
• Political parties: Since any political party which comes to power in India has a focus
on development so coming of any political party to power may not affect the flow of
funds to BAIF.
• Privatisation: Privatisation may be a threat to BAIF because the organisation procures
fertilisers, seeds and other agricultural inputs from different government agencies at a
subsidised rate. Therefore if any of these government agencies is privatised then the
organisation may have to procure agricultural inputs at a higher cost.

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• Trade Union: There is a demand for recognition of a Trade Union of BAIF’s
employees and if that takes place then the organisation may face some problems.
There is some unrest among the lower cadre employees due to less salary.
• International relations: Around 30 to 40 % of BAIF’s funds come from international
donors like kfW, European Union, etc. Therefore if international relations of the
organisation or the country gets deteriorated due to any unforeseen event than that
may seriously effect the organisation’s fund flow.
• Tax policy: Taxation policy of the government is important for the
organisationbecause according to present tax policy if any corporate donates/spends
some money for some developmental activity than it gets a tax rebate. At present
BAIF is working with many corporates like Indian Tobacco Company, Coca Cola,
Indian Oil Limited, etc. If this tax policy is changed or removed than the flow of
funds may also reduce.
Economic factors: Some of the economic factors which affect the working of the
organisation are as follows:
• Change in GDP: BAIF is dependent upon government projects hugely (more than 60
% of its funds come from the government projects) which indirectly depends upon the
tax collection. In case the GDP growth is high than the tax collection of government
will also increase and this in turn will give the government more scope to spend on
developmental projects. Similarly if there is a recession or some event due to which
growth in GDP is reduced than the government tax collection will also reduce and it
may affect the flow of funds to the organisation.
• Disposable income of the people: Government’s tax collection indirectly depends
upon the disposable income of people also to some extent. As explained above the
organisation’s flow of funds may get affected due to a change in disposable income of
people.
• Income distribution: The difference in distribution of income between people of
different income segments also determine the types of programmes that the
organisation undertakes. If there is a highly skewed income distribution in a country
with population and GDP equal to that of India, then that will imply that too many
people are living below poverty line and hence more of livelihood generation
activities have to be undertaken. But if in the same country the income distribution is

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even then the focus may shift towards other welfare activities like community health,
women empowerment, etc. But income distribution is not the only factor which
determines the programme intervention as it also depends upon many other factors.
• Social factors: Social factors can mean a lot in determining the success of an
intervention. For example in an area where women are not allowed to venture out of
home so much will pose great challenges in making a female literacy programme
successful.
• Image: Image of the organisation in an area matters a lot in determining its
acceptability in the community which in turn can decide the success of the
programme. Image is determined by the past work, time from which it is active in the
area, quality of work, benefits people have derived from the work, etc.
• Local customs: Local customs and culture can be a vital factor for any programme. As
explained above it can be a major factor in determining the success of any
programme. For example, an area where majority people do not sell milk of their
cattle in the market will not show a high level of artificial insemination of cattle. This
is because as the people do not sell the milk in open market and their family
consumption is limited, so do not have much incentive to for higher milk yielding
cattle.
Technological factors: Technological factors become very important in determining the type
of intervention in a place. Some of the technological factors are as follows:

• Technological limitations: If a particular technology which is very good cannot be


applied in an area with ease due to some technical reasons, then those technical
reasons become the technological limiting factor of the area. For example, tractors
cannot be easily used for cultivation in hilly terrain.
• Cost of the technology: If a technology is very costly, then it may become fruitless to
introduce it in an area where the users are majorly poor.
Legal factors: Every organisation that is working in an area has to abide by the rules and
regulations applicable in that area. BAIF and its associate organisations have to abide by the
following rules and regulations:

• Bombay Public Trust Act, 1950: This act provides machinery of charity
commissioners to regulate the administration of public religious and charitable trusts.

lxix
• Income Tax Act, 1961: Organisations that meet the requirements of Internal Revenue
Code section 501(c) (3) are exempt from federal income tax as charitable
organisations.
• Service Tax Act, 1994
• Maharashtra Labour Welfare Act, 1953: This act provide for the constitution of a fund
for the financing of activities to promote welfare of labour in the state of Maharashtra.
• Provident Fund Act: This act provides for compulsory contributory fund for the future
of an employee after his retirement or for his dependents in case of his early death.
• Employees Pension Scheme Act, 1995: As per this act, the employer shall pay the
contribution payable to the Employees' Pension Fund employed by him directly or by
or through a contractor.
• Profession Tax Act, 2004: In India, the State Governments are authorized to levy and
collect professional tax on any income earned by an individual. A deduction of sum
paid by the taxpayer on account of professional tax is allowed as a deduction from the
income of the individual. However, the deduction is allowed in the year in which the
tax is actually paid by the individual.
• Minimum Wages Act, 1948: As per the law every individual working in any
organisation is entitled to get minimum wages.
• Industrial Disputes Act, 1947: This law is applicable in cases of disputes arising
between employer and employee and employee-employee.
BAIF comes under section 35 (1) (ii) which characterizes it as a charitable organisation. This
act characterizes it as a unique organisation which can accept donations and is approved by
8.2.2 The PESTLE Analysis
PESTLE Analysis is a framework which helps in analysing the most important factor out of
political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental factors affecting an
organisation like BAIF.
PESTLE Factors Most pressing in each The most pressing of all
category the factors
Political Government policy of giving Government policy of
developmental projects to giving developmental
NGOs projects to NGOs
Economic Change in GDP (Economic
growth)
Social Community perception of the
lxx
organisation
Technological Innovations in related fields
Legal Legislations related to NGOs
Environment Global warming

At present the government has the policy of implementing many of its developmental
projects through NGOs like BAIF. This is very important for BAIF and its state societies
because almost 60 % of their funds come from government projects. Economic growth is also
important for BAIF because for a developing country like India the investment required in
development projects is huge and a growing economy gives the government of the country
the freedom from financial constraints and encourages it to spend more on developmental
projects. In all the areas where BAIF has been working for quite some time it has gained the
faith of people. This faith is very important to start any new project or else once the faith is
lost the community may not allow the organisation’s workers to come in contact with. Till
now there is no such legislation on the way to deliver developmental projects which has
given the autonomy to the organisation to proceed as it wants. If any such legislation comes
in future then the organisation may face problem. Climate change may prove to be a big
threat in future because if that happens then the organisation does not have any inbuilt
mechanism to protect from. Out of all these factors the policy of government to implement
developmental projects through NGOs like BAIF is the most important factor for the latter as
more than 60 % of its funds come from government projects.
8.2.3 Other environmental dimensions
Complexity: The environment in which BAIF and its associate organisations are operating is
complex in nature. This is because there are too many factors to deal with. Some of the
factors are political, social, legal, environmental, technical and economic. It has to deal with
all these factors while intervening in any village. Besides every village in which BAIF or its
associate organisation intervenes has its complexities and the organisation has to mould its
programme to suit the local needs. Thus given the number of factors with which it has to deal
with, its environment is complex.
Stableness: The above mentioned factors with which BAIF has to deal with do not change so
often. It does not means that the environment is static in nature but their pace of change is
very slow and hence it can be concluded that the organisation deals in a stable environment.
lxxi
Boundary Spanning: Any organisation in today’s world cannot afford to be a closed system;
they have to be an open system. Being an open system an organisation has to analyse the
events of outside world and decide its future strategy accordingly. For this boundary spanning
becomes an important function. A boundary spanner has to receive inputs about outside
world, analyse the work of competitors and help the organisation in taking an informed
decision. In case of BAIF its field staff, managers in the state offices and senior managers
(core activities) at the Pune Head Office perform the function of boundary spanners. This is
because they are in field for a considerable period (even senior managers have to travel a lot)
and hence they come across a lot of people and get to see a lot of things that are happening on
the field. Besides this, the senior managers have to interact a lot with various agencies which
again prove to be a valuable source of information.

9. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
9.1 Balance Sheet of BAIF:
Following is the Balance Sheet of BAIF of the last five years
(Amount in Rs.)

Particulars 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04


Funds and Liabilities
Trust Funds 5000 5000 5000 5000 5000
Reserve and Surplus 585708864 534135686 500148134 462139230 45841365
5
Designated Funds 41224664 32011521 24628547 27842448 52482735
Loans 18957835 18521674 23380162 21766785 4062797
Current liabilities and 70691998 23465099 33165799 21999009 21605114
provisions
TOTAL 716588361 608138980 581327642 533752472 53656930
1

Properties and Assets


Fixed Assets 205119680 202266106 187005685 188700417 19558461
7
Investements 266184505 184374824 159123392 145145096 113077081
Current assets, Loans 232561561 212405141 226991379 169188577 21975926
and Advances 0

lxxii
Amount due from 12722615 9092909 8207186 30718382 8148343
sponsoring agencies
towards the Projects
Total 716588361 608138980 581327642 533752472 53656930
1

If we see the reserves and surplus, then it is increasing every year since 2003-04. Every year
a part of income is deposited in the Manibhai Desai Memorial Fund and in other funds
created for special purpose (like the Employee Welfare Fund). The funds are deposited in
RBI and other Public Sector Bank bonds which give a low yield but offer maximum security.
Fixed assets of the organisation have also increased. This is because the organisation believes
in creating assets which will be of use in long term. The amount of loans is high because the
organisation has to take loans from banks as at times funds do not come on time from
donating agencies. This in turn shows the financial strength of the organisation because it has
the capability to keep the projects running on its own even if funds are delayed by a couple of
months. Amounts due from sponsoring agencies towards the projects is high but is not a
major concern because most of the sponsors are either government agencies (both state and
central) or other organisations which have a long term relationship with the organisation.

9.2 Income Expenditure Account of BAIF


Particulars 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04
Expenditure
To Expenditure on the objects of
the Trust
Payment to and for Employees 2452688 2250970 2016012 2339127 1553986
8 0 8 9 2
Material and Input cost 3564677 3956346 2589192 1911774 1866849
5 2 7 5 0
Repairs and Maintenance 7920300 6471740 7818488 3008944 2737946

Rent, rates, Taxes and Insurance 1955926 1849014 1893692 1172546 1125512

Electricity, Power and Fuel 2890831 2839820 3693482 3353350 3056276


Travelling and Vehicle 2178106 2596040 3301359 2506704 1984071

lxxiii
Maintenance
General Expenses 4015531 4869822 7875195 1082147 9806719
5
Audit Fees 44944 44944 44080 44080 40000
Legal, Professional and consultancy 2379845 1524173 1059432 202685 224216
fees
Professional Fees paid to Trustees 1317690 1453620 818234 1082234 1051250
Depreciation 8268670 7277838 7807219 7018032 6848485
Expenditure on Research and 0 0 5752629 5695420 5626125
Development
Financial Charges 1544877 1860992 712954 0 0
Debit Balances written off 10202 38238 839920 0 0
Provison For livestock inventory 244707 61134 0 0 0
losses
Defecit on sale of assets 0 0 0 0 27659
Provison for Doubtful Debts 0 0 165372 0 0
Total (A) 9294529 9296053 8783411 7741449 6673661
2 7 1 4 1
To contribution to
Staff contingency fund 1100000 925000 838000 826000 832000
Program Contingency Fund 0 925000 838000 826000 832000
Rural Development reserve 1100000 0 0 0 0
Scientific research fund 2500000 4300000 0 0 0
Social Science and gender Fund 0 0 1300000 1680000 0
Vijaya Deshmukh Memorial Fund 0 500000 0 0 0
KKM Rural Development Fund 0 0 0 110000 0
Dr. Manibhai Desai Memorial Fund 4000000 6000000 5000000 4500000 0
To Excess of Income over 941229 904283 714723 548172 1210465
expenditure carried to Balance
Sheet
Total (B) 9641229 1355428 8690723 8490172 2874465
3
Grand Total (A+B) 1025865 1065148 9652483 8590466 6961107
21 20 4 6 6

Particulars 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04


Income

lxxiv
Rent 8602202 8564924 7603819 7434137 3260086

Donations 0 10000 0 6502 41332


Interest on Deposits 3654437 4115543 2756901 1794754 2385043
Receipts for Rural 88879632 92235319 7894154 6473931 56946645
Development and other 0 6
program and other receipts
Receipts for research and 0 0 5613170 9533667 4480702
development
Increase in value of livestock 0 0 30443 732848 70442
Sundry credit balances 21204 97837 27293 39443 3779
written up
Increase in value of finished 1416759 640738 0 0 324412
stock
Transfer from scientific 0 0 591111 1223899 2098635
research fund
Profit an sale of assets 12287 85910 14308 400100 0
Excess provison written back 0 764549 946249 0 0

Grand Total 10258652 10651482 9652483 8590466 69611076


1 0 4 6

BAIF is not completely depended upon external agencies for funds. Over the years it has built
assets (liquid as well as fixed) which has proved to be a source of income. In the year 2007-
08, BAIF had earned almost 12 % of its income from rent from these fixed assets or interest
from the money deposited in banks. At the same time, the organisation also deposits a good
amount of money in different funds which helps it in meeting future exigencies. For example,
in 2007-08 it has deposited 8.4 % of its expenses in such funds. In other words, the
organisation spent 8.4 % of its expenses in last year to create funds which will help it in
future problems. This shows the sound financial planning of the organisation.

lxxv
9.3 Sources of Income

Here FCRA stands for earnings from foreign donors. Donation consists of donation from
various sources like corporate houses whereas the others category consists of earnings from
government programmes as well as from own sources (interest on fixed deposits, etc). From
the above bar chart it can be easily made out that the earnings from other sources consists of a
major part of BAIF’s income. In fact most of BAIF’s projects are government projects.
The pie charts below shows income break up of BAIF from various sources. It can be seen
that income from FCRA has increased from 13 % of income in 2005-06 to 24 % in 2007-08
whereas income from government projects has decreased from 66 % in 2005-06 to 59 % in
2007-08. Thus it can be concluded that BAIF is getting more projects from foreign donors
and the income from government projects is steadily decreasing.

9.4 Investments
Year 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04
ManiBhai Desai 153816637 136971247 120953557 98823351 90317132
Memorial Fund
Other Investments 112367868 47403577 38169835 46321745 22759949
Total Investment 266184505 184374824 159123392 14514509 113077081
6

lxxvi
The above table shows the breakup of total investments made by that year. Most of these
investments are either RBI bonds or in Public Sector Banks bonds which give a low yield but
offer maximum security.

lxxvii
10.SOME UNIQUE FEATURES OF BAIF
• Most of the NGOs execute a project only after receiving grants for it. Until and unless
there is some income from a project they do not undertake it. But this is not the case
with BAIF. It is executing some projects without any external help. Example is the
Khujner Agriculture Producers Company Limited (KAPCL). BAIF has been bearing a
part of the its administrative cost every year as well as providing it the management
required to run the company. BAIF is doing this just to enable this people’s
organisation to cover its gestation period and enable it to reach its breakeven period
sooner.
• Reaching the kitchen of a household is an indicator that a developmental worker of
BAIF has established a very good rapport with the household. This is because Late
Manibhai Desai believed that a poor person considers his kitchen as the most
important part of his household and hence does not allow any outsider to go there.
Therefore only when a BAIF worker has reached the kitchen of any household then
only it can be said that he has won the hearts of the members of that household

lxxviii
11.ANNEXURES
BAIF Trustees

1. Mr. Arvind N. Mafatlal, Chairman


Chairman, Arvind Mafatlal Group, Mumbai
2. Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, Vice Chairman
Chairman, M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai
3. Mr. Jagmohan L. Bajaj
Former Chairman, UP Electricity Regulatory Commission, Lucknow
4. Smt. Rajashree A. Birla
Chairperson, Aditya Birla Group, Mumbai
5. Mr. Bhalchandra G. Deshmukh
Former Cabinet Secretary, Government of India
6. Mr. Hrishikesh A. Mafatlal
Vice Chairman and Managing Director, Mafatlal Industries Ltd., Mumbai
7. Mr. Deepak C. Mehta
Managing Director, Deepak Nitrite Limited, Pune
8. Dr. Sudha N. Murty
Chairperson, Infosys Foundation, Bangalore
9. Prof. Indira Parikh
President, Foundation for Liberal and Management Education, Pune
10. Mr. Pratap G. Pawar
Managing Director, Sakal Papers Ltd.
11. Mr. Hasmukh S. Shah
Chairman, Gujarat Ecology Society, Vadodara
12. Mr. Ramesh Rawal
Vice President and Joint Managing Trustee, BAIF
13. Mr. Girish G. Sohani
President and Managing Trustee, BAIF
14. Dr. Narayan G. Hegde
Principal Advisor and Trustee, BAIF

lxxix
List of Associate Organisations:

1. Dr. Manibhai Desai Management Training Centre (MDMTC), Pune

2. Maharashtra Institute of Technology Transfer for Rural Areas (MITTRA), Nasik

3. BAIF Institute for Rural Development Karnataka (BIRD-K), Tiptur

4. Rajasthan Rural Institute of Development Management (RRIDMA), Udaipur

5. Gujarat Rural Institute of Socio-Economic Reconstruction , Vadodara (GRISERV)

6. BAIF Institute for Rural Development Uttar Pradesh (BIRD-UP), Allahabaad

7. Society for Promotion of Eco-friendly Sustainable Development (SPESD), Bhopal

8. DHRUVA, Kaprada

9. BAIF Institute for Rural Development Andhra Pradesh (BIRD-AP), Jadcherla

10. BAIF Institute for Rural Development Bihar (BIRD-Bihar), Patna

11. BAIF Institute for Rural Development-Uttaranchal

12. BAIF Institute for Rural Development-Jharkhand ( BIRD-Jharkhand)

lxxx
BAIF’s Multidisciplinary Program Coverage
Women
Agriculture
Empowerment
Dairy Watershed Wadi
State-Districts Husbandry
Devt. Finance
Development Agri-
Community
Business
Health
Maharashtra – Ahmednagar, Chandrapur,
Dhule, Gadhricholi, Hingoli, ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔
Nandurbar, Nashik, Pune, Yavatmal
Amravati, Jalgaon ✔ ✔ ✔
Beed, Gondia, Nagpur, Nanded, Raigad,
✔ ✔ ✔
Thane, Usmanabad, Washim
Buldhana ✔ ✔
Wardha, Bhandara, Kolhapur, Satara ✔
Gujarat- Bharuch, Dahod, Surat ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔
Bhavnagar, Dangs, Navsari, Valsad,
✔ ✔ ✔
Vadodara
Ahmedabad, Junagarh, Rajkot ✔ ✔
Kutchh ✔ ✔
Amreli, Banaskantha, Jamnagar, Mehsana,

Narmada, Patan, Porbandar
Karnataka – Belgaum, Davanagere,
✔ ✔ ✔ ✔
Dharwad, Gadag, Hassan, Tumkur
Bellary, Chamarajnagar, Chitradurga,
Gulbarga, Haveri, Kodagu, Mysore,
✔ ✔ ✔
Raichur, Uttar Kannada, Bagalkot, Bidar,
Bijapur, Chickmanglur, Koppal, Mandya
Rajasthan – Ajmer, Baran ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔
Banswara, Udaipur ✔ ✔
Alwar, Bharatpur, Bhilwara, Bundi,
Chittorgarh, Dausa, Dungarpur, Jaipur,

Jhalawar, Karauli, Nagaur, Rajasmand,
Sawai Madhopur, Sirohi, Tonk
Uttar Pradesh – Chitrakoot, Hamirpur ✔ ✔
Rae Bareli, Sultanpur ✔ ✔
Bahraich, Balrampur ✔ ✔
Allahabad, Ambedkar Nagar, Auriya, ✔
Azamgarh, Badaun, Bagpat, Balia,
Barelly, Barabanki, Basti, Bhadoi,
chandauli, Deoria, Etah, Etawah,
Faizabad, Farrukhabad, Fatehpur,

lxxxi
Firozabad, Ghaziabad, Gonda, Gorakhpur,
Hardoi, Hathras, Jalaun, Jaunpur, Kanpur,
Kanpur Dehat, Kannauj, Kushinagar,
Lalitpur, Lucknow, Maharajgunj,
Mainpuri, Mau, Meerut, Mirzapur,
Muzaffarnagar, Pilibhit, Pratapgarh,
Rampur, Saharanpur, Sant Kabir Nagar,
Shravasti, Siddhart Nagar, Sitapur, Unnao
Uttarakhand – Almora, Bageshwar,
Chamoli, nainital, Champavat, Dehradun,

Uddham Singh Nagar, Haridwar, Pauri,
Garhwal, Rudraprayag
Bihar – Banka, Munger ✔ ✔
Arra, Begusarai, Buxar, Chhapra,
Gopalgunj, Muzaffarpur, Lakhisarai, ✔
Patna, Samastipur, Siwan, Vaishali
Jharkhand – Bokaro, Chatra, Dhanbad,
Dumka, Garhwa, Giridih, Godda, Gumla,
Hazaribagh, Jamtara, Khunti, Koderma,
Latehar, Lohardaga, Pakur, Palamau, ✔
Ramgarh, Ranchi, Sahebganj, Saraikela-
Kharsawan, Simdega, Singhbhum – East,
Singhbhum - West
Madhya Pradesh – Dhar, Guna, Jhabua,
✔ ✔ ✔
Rajgarh
Barwani, Betul ✔ ✔ ✔
Balaghat, Bhopal, Dewas, Hosangabad,

Indore, Sehore, Sheopur, Vidisha
Shivpuri ✔
Andhra Pradesh – Guntur,
✔ ✔ ✔
Mahabubnagar, Prakasham
Khammam, Karimnagar, Nalgonda, ranga

Reddy, Warangal
West Bengal – Burdwan, Bankura ✔
Orissa - Sundergarh ✔ ✔ ✔

Awards conferred on BAIF and its Programmes

1. The India NGO Award 2008 was conferred on BAIF by Resource Alliance, United
Kingdom, and the Nand and Jeet Khemka Foundation, a Public Charitable Trust, on
March 30, 2009 in New Delhi for sustainable practices demonstrated in mobilisation

lxxxii
of resources for the upliftment of the community, good governance, accountability,
transparency and efficiency in management.
2. The Indian Innovation Award 2005 was awarded to BAIF by EMPI Business School,
New Delhi in collaboration with NDTV for its innovative approaches for poverty
alleviation.
3. The Vasantrao Naik Jala Samvardhan Award 2005 was awarded to BAIF’s Associate
OrganisationMITTRA by the Vasantrao Naik Krishi Sanshodhan and Gramin Vikas
Prathishthan, Mumbai for its innovative approach in watershed development.
4. BAIF and its Associate Organisations, RRIDMA and SPESD were awarded the
Doreen Mashler Award for 2004 by the International Crops Research Institute for the
Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) for outstanding contribution to integrated watershed
management in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh.
5. Dhruva was awarded the 12thRed and White Social Bravery Award for the year 2003
for successfully fighting various social evils such as consumption of liquor, gambling
and for rescuing the tribals in Vansda tehsil in Navsari district from the vicious cycle
of poverty and migration, by Godphrey Philips Co., New Delhi in February 2004.
6. Dhruva was also awarded FGI Award for Excellence–2003 for Rural Development by
the Federation of Gujarat Industries, Vadodara.
7. The Adivasi Development Program at Dharampur in Valsad district of Gujarat was
registered as an EXPO 2000 Project (1999) by the EXPO 2000 GmbH in Hannover,
Germany.
8. Our Associate Organisation, Gujarat Rural Institute for Socio Economic
Reconstruction, Vadodara (GRISERV) was awarded Award for Excellence in Rural
Development, 1999 by the Federation of Gujarat Industries, Vadodara.
9. The Adivasi Development Programme at Dharampur in Valsad district of Gujarat was
also the only Project to be selected by the German Ministry for Economic
Cooperation and Development, for presentation at the UNDP Forum of Ministers on
Poverty and Environment held in New York in September 1999, as a replicable model
for poverty alleviation.
10. Adivasi Seva Sanstha Award by the State Government of Maharashtra in 1997 for the
tribal development programme undertaken in Ahmednagar, Thane and Raigad
districts.

lxxxiii
11. Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Puraskar, 1996 was conferred on our Associate
Organisation, Gujarat Rural Institute for Socio Economic Reconstruction, Vadodara
(GRISERV), Gujarat by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of
India.
12.Seth Baldeodas Shah Award for improved silkworm mountages (1991-92).
13.Indira Priyadarshini Vrikshamitra Award (1986) for afforestation and wastelands
development.
14. FICCI Award for Rural Development (1978).

D. Awards conferred on Audio-Visual Training and Communication Material


produced by BAIF
1. In recognition of its excellence, the Wadi programme was captured in a
documentary film “Wadi: Planting Hopes” by Skoch Consultancy Services Pvt. Ltd.,
New Delhi and premiered during the plenary session of the “Centre @ Work
Conference of the International Conference on India @ Work Summit” on October
20, 2005.
2. Rajat Kamal Award for the film “Building from Below” (1994).
3. Green Film Award, Berlin Festival for the film “Golden Earth” (1991).
4. Rajat Kamal Award for the film “Golden Earth” (1991).
5. NCERT - Best Children’s Literature Award for “Mother Nature” (1991).

E. The founder of BAIF Late Dr. Manibhai Desai received the following honours
1. Padmashree for rural upliftment and community development (1968);
2. Ramon Magsaysay Award for public service (1982);
3. G.J. Watumull Memorial Award for dedicated devotion to Gandhian principles in
rural development (1982);
4. Jamnalal Bajaj Award for application of science and technology (1983);
5. Vasantrao Naik Award for Rural Development (1988);
6. Vishwa Gurjari National Award for rural upliftment (1989);
7. National Citizen Award for rural development (1991),
8. Pune’s Pride - Life Time Achievement (posthumously) by Residency Club, Pune
(1995).

lxxxiv
Questionnaire for Management
We the students of IRMA assure you that the information being sought from you will be used
for academic purposes only and it will be kept completely confidential.
•What is your name? Designation? Job responsibilities?

• Total years of experience and no. of years in BAIF?


• How have you reached this position? Please describe the process? Educational background?
• What motivated you to join the development sector?
•What are the new areas in which BAIF has forayed into (like earlier BAIF was only into
livestock, but now it is into so many other sectors like WADI, watershed, etc)? What
capacities it has developed for these sectors?

• How do you define BAIF’s organisation structure with respect to Associated Organisations
in terms of:
− Autonomy
− Decision making
− Formalization
− Decentralization

• How do you define BAIF’s organisation structure with respect to its employees in terms of:

− Autonomy
− Decision making
− Formalization
− Decentralization

• How do you do performance appraisal?

lxxxv
• Is the work repetitive in nature or it requires creativity every time?

• When a major decision is being taken are the people consulted?

• Any difficulty in recruiting new people?

• Who are your main competitors? What is your strategy to defeat them?

• How do you resolve conflicts? If any?

•Conflicts with funding agencies?


• Any legal complexities in the past?
• When do you do goal setting exercise? Who are the people involved in this?
• Is it influenced by mission, vision or nation’s need?
• Relationship with government and how it influences BAIF’s functioning?
• Do you define objectives for employees?
• Is there a match between goals of employees and BAIF?
• Please explain different linkages
− Government
− Corporate
− Other NGOs
− International
• Which are your major funding agencies?
• How do you mobilize the funds?
• Your relationship with funding agencies (project based, long term)?
• How do monetary and fiscal policies of nation affect BAIF (inflation, taxation, interest
rates)?
• Why should one join BAIF?
• How do you motivate employees? Internally and externally?
•What do you do to celebrate an employee’s achievements (like some small party or some
other recognition)?

• Is there high Turn Over of employees? If so how do you curb them and what are the reasons
for these?
• What do you feel about the culture of BAIF?
lxxxvi
• What are the strengths and weaknesses of BAIF?

• Was there any leadership crisis in the past?

• Was there any other major crisis in the past?

• Any annual employee gathering event? How are people motivated in it to continue the good
work?
• How moral of people is maintained?
• Please explain the supervisor and subordinate relationship?
• Biggest problem at hand? Any solutions defined? And how are you achieving it?
• Are you planning to foray into any new development sector? What hindrances do you
foresee? What measures have been adopted to achieve them?
• How are you trying to adopt to new technologies ( MIS, 360. feedback)
• How does BAIF maintain its identity despite growing no of NGOs? Do you see them as a
competitor or as a partner?
• Any alteration in mission, vision and objectives? When and why?

Questionnaire for Finance Department


We the students of IRMA assure you that the information being sought from you will be used
for academic purposes only and it will be kept completely confidential.
• Is regular and periodic financial planning undertaken to support performance?
• Is there an adequate budgetary planning?
• Are cash requirements analysed through cash flow statements?
• Are budget plans timely? (Any incidence of not done on time?)
• Are budget plans updated as financial information comes in?
• Are members of the governing body/ funding agency involved in the financial planning and
monitoring? How much is their control/ involvement?
• Are human resources adequate to ensure effective financial planning? (Educational
qualification and competency of employees?)
• Are comparisons of both actual and planned budgets monitored and analyzed for decision
making? If yes, which bodies are involved in decision making?

lxxxvii
• Besides project funding is there any other sources of funding?
• Are there appropriate capital and equipment forecast?
• Are reports provided to senior managers, the board, and the funders on a regular basis?
• Is financial information provided in a timely fashion to those who needed? (Is it open to
all?)
• Role of Central Finance in budgeting of Associated Organisations
• Do members of BAIF follow clearly stated financial procedures? (Are they clearly stated,
does emergency lead them to shortcuts?)
• Are the auditors satisfied with BAIF’s control on cash and assets? (Auditor’s Review
Frequency)
• How many internal and external audits in a year?
• When the Financial Year does starts? Are any objectives defined for this period? If yes, who
does so?
• Does the BoD review financial policies and procedures regularly? If yes, what they do and
how often they do?
• Is there an adequate book keeping system that can generate monitoring information?

Confidential Staff Questionnaire


We the students of IRMA assure you that the information provided by you will only be used
for academic purposes and will be kept completely confidential.
• Which Department do you work for?
• What is your age and gender?
• How long you have been working with BAIF?
• Total Work Experience?
• Educational Qualification?
• What are your reasons for working with BAIF? (Please rank in order of your preferences, 1
being highest & 5 being lowest preference)
− Development/ Help Others
− By Chance
− Own Experiences of Issues
lxxxviii
− Organisation’s Proximity to Home
− Others – Please Specify -
• What according to you are the BAIF’s basic principles/ values?
• When is BAIF’s Foundation Day?
• 27th April
• 27th August
• 28th April
• 24th October

• Please rank the following as per your experiences at BAIF:


(1 – Very Bad, 2 – Poor, 3 – OK/ Acceptable, 4 – Good, 5 – Excellent)
12345
− Work Place/ Office Physical Environment (eg: Sitting Area, Ventilation etc.)
− Furniture/ Equipment
− Work Load Stress
− Support / Relationship in your work from other employees (eg: Team Work etc.)
− Support in work from supervisor/ reporting head
− Support from other departments
− Training
− Growth Opportunities
• In your opinion what is the most important training area for the staff at BAIF?
• Please rank your opinion:
(1 – Very Bad, 2 – Poor, 3 – OK/ Acceptable, 4 – Good, 5 – Excellent)
12345
− Remunerative Package (eg: Salary etc.)
− Compensation, Perks & Allowances
− Information Flow
− Individual’s Decision Making Power
− Knowledge of Latest Technology used in the Organisation
lxxxix
− Motivation provided for work (How?)
− Performance Appraisal (Annual Objectives?)
• Please rank your opinion of BAIF’s development over the years:
(1 – Very Bad, 2 – Poor, 3 – OK/ Acceptable, 4 – Good, 5 – Excellent)
12345
− Administrative System (eg: Paper Work etc.)
− Financial System (eg: Budgeting etc.)
− Learning and Planning System (eg: Reporting Capabilities, Computer Knowledge etc.)
− Information Sharing (eg: Internal Communication etc.)
− Decision Making System (eg: Autonomy to employees etc.)
− People Friendly Organisational Policies (eg: Rewards, Loans etc.)
• Improvement Area for BAIF according to your view point.
• Do you face any difficulties in balancing personal and professional lives? If yes, how do
you deal with it?

HRD Manual
1. Introduction
xc
This manual on HRD is an outline of existing practices and instructions covering the
employees of BAIF.
The objective of the manual is to:
1. Provide up-to-date information on HRD practises/procedures in the organisation.
2. Ensure better understanding and uniform implementation.
3. Avoid alteration in practises that may have repercussions elsewhere and/or later.
4. Eliminate needless references to and from different establishments on day to day
aspects of administration of personnel.
It must be clearly understood that the manual is not a substitute for statutory acts/rules and it
is the responsibility of the management staff concerned to ensure upto date knowledge of the
compliances with relevant statutory provisions.
1.1 Induction of new employees
1.2 Joining formalities:
Purpose:
1. To enumerate joining formalities.
2. To familiarise the new employees with the philosophy, policies and practises of the
organisation.
2. Induction :
Purpose:
To make the newly appointed employees acquainted of the rules and regulations of the
organisation.
3. Allowances Payable
3.1 Allowances (Payable Monthly)
1. Personal Allowance
2. House Rent allowance or Rent Free Accommodation
3. Transport allowance2
4. Medical Allowance
5. Educational Allowance

2
Employee on transfer shall be eligible for Transport Allowance (Conveyance) as applicable to his/her place of
transfer.

xci
The aforesaid allowances, that is HRA, TA,Medical allowance and educational allowance
shall not be considered as salary for any purpose whatsoever and shall not attract Provident
Fund deductions, Gratuity, ex-Gratia or any other allowance or other incidental payments,
benefits/remuneration etc.
3.2 Cash Benefits
3.2.1 Leave Travel Allowance (LTA): LTA is an assistance paid to an employee to travel with
his/her family anywhere in India once in a year when s/he proceeds on leave sanctioned for
the purpose of availing LTA.
The amount eligible for LTA is equivalent to 15% of the starting payscale of the grade once in
a calendar year.
3.2.2 Festival Allowance: Employees who are on the roll of the organisation as on the first
day of the month of October every year are paid an amount equivalent to one month’s salary ,
that is basic + personal allowance as festival allowance before the Diwali festival.
3.3 Indirect benefits:
3.3.1 Group Mediclaim insurance:
BAIF has provided this scheme through The Oriental Insurance Company Limited, for the
eligible employees to enable them to meet the medical expenses in case of hospitalisation,
because of disease or injury sustained. Every family is covered upto Rs. 50,000 every year.
3.3.2 Personal Accident:
An employee who is covered under Mediclaim policy with the Oriental Insurance Company,
is eligible for this benefit. This is a social security benefit to the employee in case of his/her
permanent disablement or to his/her nominee in the event of the insured’s death due to
accident.
The nominee of the diseased employee will be eligible for an amount of Rupees one Lac as
benefit.
The Premium in respect of the employee is borne by the organisation.
3.4 Deferred Benefits:
3.4.1 The PF act, 1952: The employees’ provident fund and miscellaneous
provisions act, 1952 is inacted to provide a kind of social security, mainly after
retirement for oldage benefits to the employees or to their dependents in the
event of death of the employee while in service.

xcii
BAIF shall pay it’s contribution towards Provident Fund @ 12% of the Basic and Personal
allowance to all her employees. The employee under the scheme, shall also pay equal
contribution towards Provident Fund.
from and out of the contribution payable by BAIF in each month, a part of the contribution
representing 8.33% of the Basic + Personal Allowance (Not exceeding Rs. 6,500 per month)
of each employee, shall be remitted by BAIF to the Employees’ Pension Fund, to which the
central Government also contributes @ 1.16% of the pay of the members of the Employees’
Pension Fund.
3.4.2 The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972: Employees under type ‘A(a)’ who have
put In a continous service of 5 yrs, however completion of continuous service
of five years shall not be necessary where the termination of the employment
of any employee is due to death or disablement.
The scheme is implemented through a LIC policy. The employer contributes @ 6.6 % of
Basic + Personal Allowance against every confirmed employee.
3.4.3 Superannuation: All the confirmed employees who put in a continuous service
of five years are eligible for super annuation.
It is admissible only after retirement, resignation and death. This scheme is governed by LIC.
The LIC pays an interest on the deposited amount every year which is fluctuating.
The employer contributes @ 5% of Basic pay against every confirmed employee.
3.5 Transfer:
One way Railway/Bus Fare to the place of destination by shortest route will be reimbursed to
the transferee and his/her family as per the provisions relating to payment of travelling
expenses. When the transfer is made on the employee’s request, all expenses on freight,
cartage and conveyance will be borne by the employee himself/herself.
The employee on transfer will be entitled to receive a transfer grant to cover incidental
expenses arising out of the transfer.
3.6 Bihar Allowance:
The employees transferred to Bihar from other state societies or areas shall be paid Bihar
Allowance.
The Bihar allowance shall be paid @20% of the basic of their starting of the Grade. The
native of Bihar shall not be entitled for this allowance.

xciii
3.7 Travelling and Daily Allowance:
Employee on tour for official purpose shall be eligible to claim travelling and daily
allowance.
4.Schemes
4.1 Encouragement for higher studies: Employees under Management Executive,
Managers and Program Grades are only eligible for this scheme. Employees Who
have put in continuous service of five years and have got work performance
assessment rating of minimum 2 Gs and above during the previous three years are
eligible.
This is to encourage and assist managerial staff desirous of pursuing higher studies in the
stipulated areas of BAIF’s interest.
In view of the extension of facilities of Study leave with full pay and allowances, as also the
expenditure as stated herein above, to be incurred for higher studies, the concerned employee
will be required to complete the formalities of signing a bond to serve the organisation. The
period of bond depends on the duration of the study leave availed.
4.2 Bond formalities for training within the country as well as overseas:
Deserving employees fulfilling the requisite terms and conditions prescribed by
the sponsors/international rural development agencies, institutes are deputed to
short/long duration program, workshop, conventions, seminars etc.
A bond depending on the duration of the training and the terms relating to the sponsorship is
obtained from the employee deputed so that the organisation deputing him/her for training is
benefitted by the experience gained and the skills acquired
4.3 Vehicle Loan
a) Vehicle loan for M-1 and above: This loan is provided to eligible employees
for purchase of a new vehicle of an Indian manufacturer which will subject to
availability of funds.
Maximum amount for this loan is Rs. 1 lakh. However the quantam of loan will be limited to
such an amount to ensure that the take home pay of the employee after all deductions is not
less than 50 % of his/her gross salary. The loan will be subject to 8 % per annum interest on
the monthly diminishing balance. The loan amount along with interest will be recovered in 60
monthly instalments starting from the following month in which the loan is advanced.

xciv
b) Vehicle loan (two wheelers): This loan is provided to employees in type ‘A’
who have completed 5 years in service. A maximum of Rs. 60,000 is available
as a loan. However the quantam of loan will be limited to such an amount to
ensure that the take home pay of the employee after all deductions is not less
than 50 % of his/her gross salary. The loan will be subject to 8 % per annum
interest on the monthly diminishing balance. The loan amount along with
interest will be recovered in 60 monthly instalments starting from the
following month in which the loan is advanced.
4.4 Consumer/ personal loan: Employees in type ‘A’ who have put in a continuous
service of 5 years are eligible to a maximum of Rs. 40,000 as consumer/personal
loan. However the quantam of loan will be limited to such an amount to ensure
that the take home pay of the employee after all deductions is not less than 50 %
of his/her gross salary. The loan will be subject to 8 % per annum interest on the
monthly diminishing balance. The loan amount along with interest will be
recovered in 60 monthly instalments starting from the following month in which
the loan is advanced.
This loan is provided to extend financial assistance to eligible employees who are interested
in purchasing consumer durables or to enable them to meet the expenses towards family
commitments/obligations.
4.5 Financial assistance: This assistance is provided in case of personal emergencies
or large value expenditures. Employee under type ‘A’, who has put in a
continuous service of 5 years in the organisation are only eligible to receive it. The
maximum amount under this loan is Rs. 60,000.
The amount of financial assistance if repaid in full within 3 months from the date of receipt,
shall not be charged any interest thereon. Failing this the interest rate per annum on
diminishing balance, right from the day of the amount of financial assistance was received.
The loan along with the interest will be recovered in 60 monthly instalments. The first
instalment recovery will commence from the fourth month following the month in which the
loan is advanced.
4.6 Facility at Asharam: The employees in type ‘A’ and their family members
(family comprising of spouse and dependent children only) can avail the facility
of staying with their families at concessional rate at Nisargopchar ashram at

xcv
Urlikanchan for a maximum of one month at a stretch from the date of admission
in the ashram.
4.7 Consultancy: Employees with minimum three years of service under confirmed,
contract and coterminous basis are encouraged to augement their income and to
broaden their learning horizon by working with other organisations in line with
BAIF’s mission.
The employees can undertake the assignment outside BAIF for a period of 15 days in a
financial year. They can accumulate their unutilised leave without pay for a period of five
years. The Special LWP will lapse at the end of five years on rotation basis.
5. Attendance
5.1 Work rules:
a) Hours of work: The flexible timings in force for the staff at BAIF, warje
office are as under:

• 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. This period includes a lunch


break for forty five minutes.

• The timing in force for the staff at Urlikanchan is from 9 a.m. to 5


p.m. with forty five minutes break for lunch.

• Office assistance/ technicians/ drivers will observe staggered


timings as fixed for them by their admin. department from time to
time. The office remains closed on every Sunday.
b) Notice boards: Notice boards are maintained at all work locations for
prominently displaying organisations announcements, circulars, notices and
news bulletins for the information of all employees.
c) Paid holidays: The total number of paid holidays will be ten of which four
will be compulsory holidays as notified under the Bombay Shops and
establishments Act, 3 holidays will be decided by the management and the
remaining three holidays will be optional holidays as notified.
5.2 Compensatory off: Employees under type ‘A’ who are in the grade P-4/ G-6 and
below are eligible for compensatory off for their work in normal weekly holidays.
An employee shall be allowed to avail his/her compensatory off in advance,

xcvi
immediately within preceding three days or within three succeeding days from
the day of his/her normal weekly holiday.
5.3 Types of leaves
5.3.1 Earned leave: For annual recuperation/rest and fulfilment of personal, social or
religious obligations of the employee. There will be 30 EL per calendar year. New employees
who have worked for a part of a year will be allowed credit for pro rata leave at the rate of 2.5
days per calendar month (less than 15 days in a month will be ignored and 15 days or more
will be treated as one full month). Employees on probabtion will not be eligible for EL. EL
can be accumulated upto a maximum of 240 days in a year. Any accumulation beyond this
limit will automatically lapse.
An employee can encash EL provided a minimum of 30 days EL balance is maintained to
his/her credit.
5.3.2 Casual leave: Short periods of leave to meet emergent/ special or
unforeseen circumstances. CL cannot be availed for more than 3
consecutive days at a time but can be combined with holidays or weekly
offs. Unavailed CLs as on 31st December of the year will be merged
alongwith EL. CL cannot be availed during training period.
5.3.3 Maternity leave (As per the provisions of Maternity Act, 1961): Any
female employee who has worked in the organisation for not less than 80
days during the preceding 12 months shall be granted ML with full pay.
The maximum period for availing ML is 12 weeks amounting to a
maximum of 24 weeks during the entire period of service.
In case of abortion/miscarriage, ML may be granted upto 6 weeks immediately following the
day of abortion/miscarriage based on medical certificate.
5.3.4 Paternity leave: A male employee who has put in minimum one year of
service in the organisation shall be entitled to PL with full pay, on
production of proof, for two weeks which may be availed anytime from
one month before the expected date of delivery to months after the
delivery either at a stretch or in two instalments.
This facility will be allowed only on one occasion during the entire period of service in the
organisation.

xcvii
5.3.5 Adoption leave: Male and female employee intending to adopt a child
should have completed minimum 2 years of service in the organisation,
can apply for this leave. Such employees one month in advance for AL.
Female employees will be granted a maximum of 60 days and the male employees 14 days as
AL. Adoption leave will not be admissible to the employee already having two children and
can be availed only once during the entire period of service.
5.3.6 Sabbatical leave: Sabbatical leave with pay and allowances for three months,
extendable in circumstances, will be granted at the discretion of the management to an
employee with minimum 5 years continuous service and who is desirous of pursuing
advanced studies in disciplines/ areas of BAIF’s interest.
5.4 Absence authorised and unauthorised: Any absence without proper authorisation shall
be treated as unauthorised absence which shall be actionable as per the rules of the
organisation. An unauthorised absence for more than 30 days in a year will be treated as poor
performance.
In cases where the employee has exhausted all the leaves to his/her credit can apply
for leave without pay which can be approved on case to case basis.
6. Conduct discipline and Appeal
6.1 Discipline: When an employee commits any misconduct, organisation may
decide to impose suitable penalty depending on the seriousness of the
misconduct. However, before taking any such disciplinary action, all
opportunities will be given to the employee to explain his/her action. Whenever
the misconduct appears to be of serious nature, the Appointing or Disciplinary
Authority may personally or through his/her nominated employee conduct an
inquiry to find out the truth of any imputation of misconduct against any
employee. If an employee admits his/her guilt, no such inquiry will be conducted.
At the end of the inquiry, if it is proven beyond doubt that the employee has
committed a misconduct, suitable Disciplinary action will be taken against
him/her, which may be a minor or a major penalty depending upon the
misconduct. Minor penalties will range from censure or warning to recovering
from employee’s salary any loss sustained by the organisation. Major penalties
may range from reduction to a lower grade to termination of employment to

xcviii
dismissal. Before taking any such action, all the legal aspects will be looked after
by the HR Department at every stage.
6.2 List of misconduct: There are several actions/activities, which are listed in the
list of misconduct and any of the following acts and omissions on the part of an
employee shall amount to misconduct.
6.3 Gender Policy: A gender policy is in place in order to prevent/stop/redress
Sexual harassment at work place, which hinders organisational development. The
gender policy provides for resolution, settlement or prosecution of such acts and
to ensure safe, equal and gender friendly work place.

6.4 Conduct discipline and appeals: This clause is in place to guide the
management employees to understand and adhere to certain values and beliefs
considered as sacrosanct by the Organisation. Adherence to these rules not on;ly
help the employee in self development but also in projecting a favourable image
about the organisation.
Rules under this clause include:

• Every employee of the organisation shall at times maintain


absolute dignity and devotion to duty. S/He should do nothing that
is unbecoming of a responsible representative of the organisation.

• Every employee of the organisation holding a management post,


shall take all steps to ensure the integrity and devotion to duty of
all employees under his/her control.

• No employee of the organisation shall except with the prior


sanction of the competent authority, engage directly or indirectly
xcix
in any trade or business or undertake any other employment or
office of profit.

• Every employee shall maintain utmost security regarding


organisation affairs and shall not communicate any sensitive
information to unauthorised person.

• No employee shall participate in any demonstration against the


management etc.
6.5 Conduct, discipline and appeals (Non-management employees): In absence of
any certified Standing Orders relating to conditions of employment including
rules and procedure to be followed in respect to conduct, discipline and appeals,
every employee will be governed by the “Industrial Employment(Standing Order)
Act 1946” and the rules framed there under by the central and the state
governments and as modified from time to time.
6.6 Grievance Handling: grievance procedure is necessary to ensure that employees
have a recognised channel through which they can bring their grievances to the
attention of the management. The objective of the grievance procedure is thus to
facilitate that grievances are heard, investigated and if proved, justified, remedied
properly.
Grievance procedure is only for handling individual grievances and not group grievances.
6.7 Appeals: when disciplinary action is taken against an employee other than by the
highest authority in the organisation, s/he may appeal to the highest authority if
s/he so desires. However, such an appeal should be forwarded through the
authority who had imposed the penalty. The decision of the highest authority will
be final.
6.8 Domestic Enquiry: When an employee commits any misconduct, disciplinary
action will be taken against him/her. However, before taking any such step the
employee will be given a fair chance to explain the circumstances and give
reasons for his/her action. In case the reasons cited are unsatisfactory or the
action unjustified, the HOD will endeavour to counsel the employee. In case, s/he
fails and feels further disciplinary steps are necessary, s/he will report the matter
to the HR department with his/her recommendations.
7. Awards/Rewards
c
To motivate the employees to take up greater challenges in Rural development and to
recognize the significant work undertaken by them in operational areas.
7.1 Dr. Manibhai Desai Fellowship: To encourage senior staff to take up special
assignments in specific and development work related to BAIF’s missin and
programmes. The staff of BAIF and its associate societies in M1 and above grade
are eligible for this fellowship once in five years. In special circumstances,
sabbatical leave may be granted for three months and extended further, if
necessary. The receipent should submit a copy of the report/assignment after its
completion. The receipent of this award will be given a medal, citation and a
contingency amount of rs 25,000.
7.2 Awards for Case Studies: To encourage the documentation process in various
areas, BAIF promotes writing of case studies and rewards the best of them in
various fields.

Cash Prizes for the Case Studies

1st Prize – Rs. 1000/- 2nd Prize – Rs. 800/-


3rd Prize – Rs. 600/- 4th Prize – Rs. 400/-

Consolation Prizes Rs. 200/- each (5).

7.3 Best scientific paper of the year: To encourage the research work done by BAIF
scientists in various aspects of Rural Development. Cash prize of Rs. 5000/- is
awarded.
7.4 Best publication of the year: To encourage the employees to publish their
articles
cash prize of Rs. 2500/- is awarded.
The entries should not fulfil the criteria as under 7.2 and 7.3.
7.5 Award for employee’s children: To encourage and motivate the children of the
employees to study hard and come out with flying colors in their SSC and HSC
examination. The children of the employees of BAIF who obtain:

• 80% or more aggregate marks in SSC and

• 75% or more aggregate marks in HSC


ci
Will be awarded a sum of Rs. 1000/-.
8. Performance Appraisal
The purpose of the performance appraisal is to rate an employee according to his/her output,
strengths and weakness, the work allotted and make the necessary arrangements to develop
his/her skills.
A) Appraisal for probationers: A formal appraisal process is followed every three
months for the new entrant, while in probation. The HoD/Appraiser will review
and discuss performance with the new entrant, on completion of three months.
The confirmation of the employee will depend upon his/her performance.
If the performance is not found upto the mark, his/her probation period will be extended or
terminated, if deemed fit.
B) Appraisal for management: To assess the employee every year in the month of
Jan-Feb before the release of annual increments in April every year. The following
codes are used to measure an employee’s performance in different areas:

Marks Grade Explanation of the grades


Obtained
80 and Excellent Outstanding or exceptional performance
above (E)
60-79 Good (G) Better than normally expected producing results which
exceed the requirements of the position.
40-59 Normal Performance which meets the usual requirement
(N) expected from the position.
Below 40 Poor (P) Performance does not meet the requirement and is not
acceptable.

A performance appraisal form is there where the employee is evaluated on various parameters
like Job knowledge, quality of work, quantity of work, leadership, interpersonal relations,
innovativeness, cost consciousness, responsibility, communication and Judgment and
common sense.
The salient aspects of the form are as follows:
• Who does the appraisal – It is the responsibility of the Employee’s immediate
cii
supervisor to prepare the appraisal report. In this process s/he may like to associate his/her
HoD or some other senior employee who has had the opportunity to interact with the
employee so as to make the appraisal as objective and realistic as possible.
• The Supervisor assessing an employee’s performance should have had the chance to
observe the employees performance at least six months. In case the employee’s supervisor
has changed during the year, a joint appraisal by both supervisors is carried out.
C) Appraisal for non Management Cadre: It is to be completed for all employees
in non management cadre by January, every year, reviewing n employee’s
performance during the previous twelve months. The performance appraisal is to
be completed by the employee’s immediate supervisor and reviewed by the next
higher level of supervisor.
BAIF Historical Mile Stones
Concept of BAIF was established on August 24,1967 with basic activities as
Agro based- wastelands development, agro forestry, horticulture and livestock
development
Seminar on February 15-16, 1969 at Pune for attracting people to accept and
join it. Dr. M.R. Marathe and Dr. D.V. Rangnekar joins BAIF
In 1970, Denmark gives initial support to Central Research Station (CRS)
Semen lab Bull station worth 3.2 million Danish Kroner (DK)
In 1971, Mani bhai Desai thought of Cattle health. Mr. Wagholi, Dr.C. M.
Singh (Director of IVRI), Dr. Gorkhe joined BAIF. Wagholi project was born and
lab produced many vaccines like- Foot and mouth disease, H.S., B.Q., Rinderpest
and other 50 products.
In 1972, there was no recruitment of Veterinarians by the Government of
Maharashtra so entire batch of Vets from Bombay and Nagpur joined BAIF
Door step services idea standardised
Goshalas and Sugar factories brought into programme
Programme model established on the field
BAIF started first CSR activity with Rourkela Steel Plant for providing
Irrigation facilities to farmers in Gujarat
In 1974, Dr. N.G. Hegde (present President) joined BAIF
In 1975, BAIF’s programme was accepted under Integrated Rural Development
Programme (IRDP) by Ministry of Agriculture.
ciii
BAIF Institute for Rural Development Uttar Pradesh (BIRD-UP) was registered
as a Public Charitable Trust under Uttar Pradesh Amendment Act in 1975, with its
Head Office in Allahabad.
In 1976, a centre was started in South Gujarat for milk procurement, processing
and marketing as Kalyan bhai Mehta, Arvind bhai Mafatlal and Naval Tata came
together.
Semen Laboratory started in 1976
From 1976-1979 BAIF suffered huge financial crisis due to change in government policy
whereby all corporate withdrew financial assistance. BAIF had to close down man of its
Cattle Breeding Centres.
In 1978, 50 cattle breeding Centres started
In 1980, three day brain storming session was called by Mani bhai Desai where he consulted
all his employees about venturing in other development sectors apart from Livestock.
In 1980 SHG programme started for empowering the women
In 1980 G. G. Sohani (presently Executive Vice President) joined BAIF after graduating
from IIM A
In 1982 Wadi Model came into existence and first Wadi model turned a huge success in
South Gujarat
In 1985, GRISERV (Gujarat Rural Institute for Socio-economic Reconstruction Vadodara)
was established in Vadodara.
In 1986, BAIF, under Mani bhai Desai’s devoted leadership, received the Indira
Priyadarshini Vrikshmitra Award for Afforestation and wastelands development
BAIF’s name was changed to BAIF Development Research Foundation in 1989 to get
Income tax exemption
In 1992 Watershed activities started in Ahmednagar
Wagholi Laboratories closed in 1993 due to profit making enterprise.
Mani bhai Desai Management Training Centre (MDMTC) was set up in 1993 to provide
training to BAIF staff and to the staff of other development agencies, in sustainable
management of rural development programmes.
Mani bhai Desai died in November, 1993 due to prolonged illness. Dr. N.G. Hegde succeeded
him as the new President

civ
Maharashtra Institute of Technology Transfer for Rural Areas (MITTRA) was established as a
Public Charitable Trust in 1993 with its headquarters at Nashik to coordinate the
multidisciplinary programme being implemented in Maharashtra.
Rajasthan Rural Institute of Development Management (RRIDMA) was established in 1993
under the Societies Registration Act, 1950. The head office is located at Bhilwara.
DHRUVA was established in 1995 with its head office at Kaprada in Dharampur in Valsad
district of Gujarat
Society for Promotion of Eco-Friendly Sustainable Development (SPESD) was established in
1996 as a Public Charitable Trust with its head office in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh.
BAIF shifted to new office named BAIF Bhavan in Pune on 19 June 1996.
In 1997 BAIF got the largest Project in terms of geographical spread and duration. The
project aimed at bringing 35,000 families in 217 villages across 5 states in 8 years above
poverty line, supported by European Union. The success rate of this project was 85%.
1997 BAIF ventured in Sericulture for small farmers
Vasundhara Cooperative was set up in 2000 in Valsad district of Gujarat for marketing of
Mangoes.
In 2001 BAIF conducted its first Management Development Programme(MDP)

cv
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