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Running head: CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS

Running head: CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS

Midterm Case: Case of the Troubled Truckers

Brigham Young University Communications 336 Brynne Turville Hillary Brown Laura Harrison Madilyn Grimm

CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS

Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................. 4 C.R. England ................................................................................................. 4 The Profession .............................................................................................. 4 Industry Concerns ......................................................................................... 5 Accident Prevalence ..................................................................................... 6 Industry Regulations .................................................................................... 6 Industry Stereotypes ..................................................................................... 7 Potential Key Publics ................................................................................... 7 Potential Intervening Publics ....................................................................... 7 SWOT Analysis ........................................................................................... 8 Situation Analysis .................................................................................................... 8 Core Problem/ Opportunity ...................................................................................... 8 Goal and Objectives ................................................................................................. 9 The Big Idea ............................................................................................................. 9 Key Publics and Message Design ............................................................................ 9 Strategies and Tactics ............................................................................................. 13 Calendar and Budget .............................................................................................. 16 Communications Confirmation Table .................................................................... 17 Evaluation Criteria and Tools ................................................................................. 18 Bibliography ........................................................................................................... 19 Appendix ................................................................................................................ 21 Executive Handout ..................................................................................... 21

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Facebook Page 1 ......................................................................................... 22 Facebook Page 2 ......................................................................................... 23 Calendar Year 1 .......................................................................................... 24 Calendar Year 2 .......................................................................................... 26 Calendar Year 3 .......................................................................................... 27 Calendar Year 4 .......................................................................................... 28 Calendar Year 5 .......................................................................................... 29 Budget Year 1 ............................................................................................. 30 Budget Year 2 ............................................................................................. 32 Budget Year 3 ............................................................................................. 33 Budget Year 4 ............................................................................................. 34 Budget Year 5 ............................................................................................. 35

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Background C.R. England The motor-freight industry is an undervalued industry with a declining reputation. C.R. England operates throughout the United States with 2,900 trucks, 7,300 trailers and 4,833 professional drivers, and are the largest temperature-controlled delivery in the world. C.R. England delivers nationally, regionally, and their efforts extend to Mexico when needed (C.R. England, n.d.). Dedication and attention to detail are among the top priorities of this company. C.R. England emphasizes their professional drivers, their commitment to safety and seeks to provide timely and safe deliveries to their customers. Truck drivers contribute greatly to societal needs by providing shipment of goods for consumption all across the nation and even internationally, often at their own expense and sacrifice. Heavy truck drivers spend days and sometimes weeks away from their homes and families transporting everything from food to cars. Light truck drivers deliver locally or close enough that they can return home each evening (Tech Directions, 2005). C.R. England focuses heavily on customer service. The company goal in this regard is to deliver the freight entrusted to us on-time and safely (C.R. England, n.d.). C.R. England is criticized as not paying their lease operators properly. Their own drivers have stated that they rip off their customers. People have heard bad things about C.R. England for years (Truckers Report, n.d.). C.R. England has shown support of environmental efforts by awarding their drivers for strong environmental values. On October 28, 2013, C.R. England awarded one of their top company drivers a 2013 Harley-Davidson Sportster Seventy-Two for improvement in miles per gallon average and average idle percentage for the third quarter 2013. The company has awarded nine Harley-Davidsons total since 2011, when C.R. England began sponsoring a fuel efficiency promotion (Fox 19, 2013). This shows that C.R. England cares about their social responsibility and has a strong corporate social responsibility presence internally that reflects outwardly. The Profession: Truck Driving Trucker drivers are specialized workers. They experience intense training and schooling because they perform many tasks while they are on the job. Truck drivers must pass a physical exam that includes a minimum of 20/40 vision in each eye, with or without glasses, good hearing without a hearing aide, normal use of arms and legs, normal blood pressure, must not be color blind, must pass random drug and alcohol tests and persons with epilepsy or insulincontrolled diabetes cannot drive heavy trucks. Truckers must be at least 21 and have a high school diploma or a GED in addition to an excellent driving record (Tech Directions, 2005). Truckers must know how to drive safely as well as operate and inspect all of the equipment on the truck. Truckers are given high expectations including several pressures such as: safe driving, fuel conservation and a swift and on time delivery of their cargo. These men and women are expected to be technologically savvy in using cell phones, navigation systems, satellite equipment and other inventory-tracking devices. This profession is extremely demanding on time and effort for truck drivers. Many find that despite this, truck driving is a

CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS way of life that allows them to have independence and see the country while achieving a productive lifestyle (Tech Directions, 2005). Working conditions for truckers vary based on vehicle, cargo and employer types. Local drivers average 50 hours of driving per week while long-distance drivers are not allowed to work more than 60 hours during a week. Within that time 10 hours of rest are required for every 11 hours of driving. This helps combat the concern with drowsy driving in truckers. Long-distance drivers typically work all of the hours allotted to them because they are paid by the mile or number of hours driven. Working in teams and sharing driving responsibilities is common among truckers. Road and weather conditions among other vehicle noises are elements that can cause stress in this vocation (Tech Directions, 2005). Truckers driving vehicles carrying more than 26,000 pounds must have a commercial drivers license (CDL). They must also pass a written and driving test. Other personal characteristics that help in this vocation are being mechanically inclined, good manual dexterity, ability to follow instructions, self-motivated, neat appearance, good self-confidence, ability to work with little supervision and comfortable being alone for long periods of time (Tech Directions, 2005). Many people do not give credit to the work truckers actually do. Trucking involves planning, money management, time management, paperwork keeping, diplomacy, loading and unloading, patience, the ability to adapt, awareness of personal safety and mental strength. Truckers must be flexible and still be able to get their job done (Tech Directions, 2005). Wages differ based on carriers and cargo. First year truck driver earnings sit around $27,000-34,000 per year. After one year, wages go up to about $40,000 per year. Those who are specialized truck drivers can earn in excess of $60,000 per year. Local truck drivers are often hourly employees who can earn bonuses after 40 hours of work per week. Miles driven, hours worked and seniority are also taken into consideration for long-haul truckers. Benefits are available to truckers, though they vary widely based on the carrier. Some benefits include: medical and dental coverage, paid vacation and sick days and a 401K plan (Tech Directions, 2005). Industry Concerns Safety. Safety is a major concern across the board when it comes to those joining the truckers on the road and the truckers themselves. Many people view truckers as reckless and careless, discounting the great work they do for them personally. Associations like the American Trucking Associations (ATA, 2013) give high priority to safety concerns. Because its largest workplace is the national highway system ATA places emphasis on making laws and regulations practical while fulfilling their essential need. They seek to benefit the public, motor carriers and their employees while imposing a minimal burden on commerce. These laws and regulations do provide uniform expectations statewide as well as federally interstate and intrastate (ATA, 2013). Trucker complaints. While consumers complain about those who carry their goods, truckers also have complaints about their profession. One of those complaints is car drivers. Many people do not

CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS realize that it takes semi-trucks much longer to stop than a car due to the weight of the cargo. Drivers also recklessly cut off or tailgate truck drivers. Everyone on the road wants to remain safe, but not everyone takes the precautions to do so. Another issue that truck drivers wrestle with is anti-idling laws. These laws were enacted as a means to protect the environment from engine emissions. One thing this legislation did not consider, however, is the safety and comfort of truck drivers. When drivers stop to rest they often sleep in freezing conditions or conditions that are far too hot because they cannot use the air or heat in the cab. If truck drivers leave their truck on idle they can be ticketed and fined heavily. This means the truck driver often does not get good rest and results in fatigued driving. Other complaints include time away from home and low pay (Taylor, n.d.). Drowsy driving. One study showed that sleepiness in drivers is present in about 16-23 percent of all car accidents (Johansson, 2012). This is an issue that could be worked on creating preventative measures among truck drivers. Accident Prevalence The Department of Transportation (DOT) and many other agencies compiled a document of truck accident statistics that are valuable in assessing and predicting trends. Around 500,000 trucking accidents occur annually in the United States, with 5,000 of those resulting in fatalities. One in every eight traffic collisions involves a trucking collision. In the past year, trucking proved to be an extremely profitable force with revenues totaling more than $600 billion. Cars and other SUVs share the road with these trucks, which have potential to be very dangerous. In 2008, preliminary national crash facts were reported as: 123,918 large trucks involved in non-fatal crashes, 49, 084 large trucks and involved in injury crashes, 73,047 injuries in crashes involving large trucks, 74,834 large trucks involved in tow-away crashes and 2,609 large trucks involved in hazmat (HM) placard crashes.

Sixty-eight percent of these crashes happened in rural areas and 66 percent of all fatal truck accidents occurred during the day, not the night. Even though the number of truckers on the road has increased significantly over the past decade, the number of deaths due to accidents remains fairly consistent. No fatality is an acceptable one, however, so the Department of Transportation works to ensure safety on the road (LegalInfo.com, n.d.). Industry Regulations The DOT also provides strict regulations on safety for motor carriers. The DOT breaks down safety into seven BASICs to avoid that can improve safety on the roads. They include: unsafe driving, hours-of-service compliance, driver fitness, controlled substances/alcohol (nonuse), vehicle maintenance, hazardous materials compliance and crash indicator (Department of Transportation, n.d.).

CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS

Industry Stereotypes Sexual promiscuity. One secondary piece of research that can cripple long-haul truck drivers reputation is the sexual promiscuity that takes place and the risk that gives to truck drivers developing HIV or other STIs. Though this type of behavior takes place in countries outside of the United States, it provides risks to truckers in the U.S. because of the prevalence of the occupation. Research in the United States does not currently support the stereotyped sexual and drug behavior of truck drivers (Lichtenstein et al., 2008). Serial killing. Another bit of evidence that dampers truckers reputations is the stigma they carry that there are truck driver serial killers. The FBI released a report that linked long-haul truckers and serial killings. A bureau database includes more than 500 female victims, most of whom were killed and their bodies dumped at truck stops, motels and other spots along popular trucking routes crisscrossing the U.S. (Los Angeles Times, 2009). We need to know what the drivers can personally do to change their reputation. We also need to know if other trucking companies have launched similar campaigns. In addition, we need to specifically research C.R. Englands efforts toward this issue. We should also know why out of all the public transportation employees, truck drivers have the worst reputation. Potential Key Publics Police officers (regulations), community where C.R. England is located, local commuters, local travelers, national commuters, national travelers, new drivers, taxi services, other professional driving services, drivers (non-employees), truckers, employees, businesses and truck stop workers Potential Intervening Publics Politicians, drivers education teachers, non-profit organizations (national and local), law enforcement, DOT, ATA, businesses and teacher

CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS SWOT Analysis Strengths: -Leading position in the market -Diversified revenue stream -Steady financial performance - Professional driving training provided for truckers -Heavy community involvement Opportunities: -Gain trust in truckers and the trucking industry -Prevent future negative opinions from forming -Maintain current government regulations (prevent them from increasing) -Brand recognitionstand out among other trucking companies in the industry -Become the leader/opinion leader of the industry Weaknesses: -Negative reputation of the industry nationwide -Low public awareness of social contributions -Misperceptions, misinformation and negative stereotypes of truckers and the trucking industry

Threats: -Environmentalists (pollution) -Legal Proceedings (truck drivers causing accidents) -Trailer leasing (potentially untrained drivers representing C.R. England) -Losing key investors -Tightened government regulations = difficulty gaining profit and growing - Truckers feeling undervalued -C.R. England potentially losing profits

Situation Analysis The freight carrier company C.R. England is known in the local business community as a solid corporate citizen, however many people (locally and nationwide) are unaware of its social contributions. Because of this lack of information the public has formed a negative opinion of the company, based on misperception, misinformation, and negative stereotypes. This has been a huge damage to C.R. Englands reputation, thus increasing regulations. Unless a long-term plan is implemented to fix the companys reputation and convince people that truckers are skilled and trained workers of society, C.R. England is at risk of tightened regulations that could lead to failure of profitable operation. A continued decrease in reputation will be a continued increase in regulation. Because the company operates nationwide, they face the problem of reaching a broad audience.

Core Problem/Opportunity Reputations of truckers and the trucking industry in general are extremely negative, causing regulations to increase and C.R. Englands opportunities to gain profit to decrease. The main opportunity lies in teaching publics about the importance of truck drivers in delivering goods and food as well as educating our drivers qualifications.

CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Goals and Objectives Goal Increase and maintain the reputation of C.R. England and their drivers as skilled workers who contribute to the delivery of necessary food and goods.

Objectives 1. Increase positive attitudes of C.R. England by 30 percent within the next 12 months and 5 percent for each remaining year of the 5-year campaign, resulting in a 50 percent increase. 2. Increase positive attitudes of truckers by 35 percent within the next 12 months and 7 percent for each remaining year of the 5-year campaign, resulting in a 63 percent increase. 3. Have 6 percent of our drivers featured in media and social media within the next 18 months. The Big Idea For our campaign, we decided to use the slogan Im a trucker for C.R. England. We decided on this slogan because we think that it will be easily remembered and recognizable. By using this slogan, we are not only improving the reputation of the drivers, but of C.R. England as well. We want to showcase the drivers as educated and highly qualified individuals who fulfill the duties of C.R. England. We want others to understand who C.R. England is as a company and their mission to quality service. Key Publics Truckers and Employees Demographics and psychographics. A study during the last driver shortage by Global Insight, commissioned by the American Trucking Associations, shed some light on the industrys aging driver population. One in six truck drivers was over the age of 55, and 43 percent of all truck drivers were at least 45 years old. While the study was based on analysis of 2000 Census data, meaning that core group is now out of the industry or on the verge of retirement, the findings remain valid today. More than one in three company drivers are 55 or older, according to a 2010 study by CCJs sister publication Truckers News, and only 6 percent are under 35 (Crissey, 2011). Self interests. Truckers care about how they are perceived. They want to be safe on the road and want others to be safe as well. They would want to prevent things such as being cut off, being given

CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS obscene gestures, or being treated violently on the road. Truckers care about keeping their jobs and about accomplishing the mission of C.R. England. Current relationship. For the most part, truckers respect C.R. England. C.R. England employs them, gives them health benefits, etc. Any internal issues between truckers and C.R. England will require additional attention outside of this campaign. Opinion leaders. Spouses, other trucking friends, supervisors and government regulators Objectives. 2 and 3 Primary message. Get the respect and recognition you deserve for the hard, necessary work you do using social media and reaching out to others. Secondary messages.

Always drive safely and according to regulations to create and maintain a good, strong reputation. Truckers who drive safely have more respect among travelers/commuters. Keep yourself updated on new regulations and do what is necessary to maintain your CDL. You are important in the delivery of necessary goods that contribute to society.

Local Commuters Demographics and psychographics. Because C.R. England is located in Salt Lake City, the local community is largely family oriented. Demographics are a wide range, but those who are actually affected by the truck drivers are drivers themselves. These are members of the community who are over the age of 16. Those who drive on freeways on a daily basis are generally workers, ages 21-55. Commuters are usually educated, college-graduates. Self interests. They care about their safety within the community. Not only do they care about the safety on the roads, but also the safety of local community gas stations, truck stops etc. They would prefer less traffic around their area, and they probably blame trucks for a lot of that traffic.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Current relationship. They probably dont have a great relationship with C.R. England because of the bad reputation that truckers have. A lot of traffic problems are blamed on truckers. Opinion leaders. Local government leaders, church leaders, spouses, family, fellow employees at the workplace Objectives. All Primary message. Your local truckers provide goods to families around the nation through their tireless training and work. Secondary messages.

Respect the truckers on the road. Dont drive in no sight zones. C.R. England employs your fellow community members. The trucking industry is necessary for delivery of produce and other goods.

Nationwide Travelers Demographics and psychographics. A large age range, either college aged, middle aged and families, or retired individuals, have extra money to travel, spend lots of time with family, want to relax and not be bothered, generally those traveling on the same roads as truckers are looking to reach a destination, while driving people become anxious and irritated by slower, large trucks and assign this frustration with drivers themselves instead of the conditions. Self interests. Reach their destination as quickly as possible, stay safe, and avoid slow traffic. Current relationship. Do not particularly care for truckers or C.R. England as long as their materials are delivered on time.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Objectives. 1 and 2 Opinion leaders. Other families, media Primary message. C.R. England truck drivers work hard to deliver fresh goods to your families and communities, respect them on the road and be open to understanding their qualities. Secondary messages.

While on the road, be considerate of truck drivers situations and try to help others understand their importance. C.R. England hires skilled drivers who train extensively for their positions.

New Drivers Demographics and psychographics. Usually around the age of sixteen, young, inexperienced on the road, most information about driving comes from friends/family/drivers education classes, have little interest in truckers. Self interests. Want to be seen as cool drivers, want to fit in by agreeing with stereotypes, want to be safe on the road, eager to learn and begin driving. Current relationship. There is hardly a relationship between truckers and new drivers, they have little interaction with one another. The new drivers are likely uninformed about C.R. England with some misconceptions. Their opinion of truckers may or may not be wholly formed. Opinion leaders. Parents, drivers education teachers, friends Objectives: 2

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Primary message. With your help, we can help correct the misconceptions of some of our most valuable drivers on the road, truckers make a difference and work hard to help and serve us. Secondary messages.

Help your friends understand the importance truckers are in our society. Learning about how trucks operate will protect your safety on the road. Trucking is a respectable industry, that is undervalued for its contributions to society. Truck driving is a job that requires extensive training and schooling.

Intervening Publics -Teachers -Media -Department of Transportation -Government Officials Strategies and Tactics Truckers and Employees Strategy 1. Reinforce long-term C.R. England professional trucking expectations and value of C.R. England truckers by training current drivers during year one and maintaining training programs in concurring years. Tactics.

Host two dinner conferences within the first year of the campaign (half of the truckers come during their time off; the other half drive; visa versa) that reinforce all expectations and regulations so that truckers understand expectations. During conferences reinforce appreciation through trucker bags with hats, stickers with regulation reminders, snacks that say Im a Trucker for C.R. England. Introduce the campaign with media training speaker and workshops. Send out monthly newsletters via email to truckers with the characteristic/regulation of the month as part of Im a Trucker for C.R. England campaign. Set up award system with a grand prize for each year (i.e. Harley Davidson) for top driver of the month winner for each newsletter characteristic. Strategy 2.

Use social media to create interaction between truckers and commuters to encourage mutually beneficial relationships.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Tactics.

Live Twitter chats to be held between 100 truckers and local commuters each month. Conversations encouraged by a handle on the drivers truck. Only to be held at truck stop rests. Chat rooms held on C.R. England website in response to videos between truckers and followers.

Local Commuters Strategy 1. Use mass media to portray a positive reflection of truckers and their value to society using the Im a Trucker for C.R. England slogan. Tactics.

Put up four northbound and four southbound billboards along I-15 between St. George and Ogden. Create a website with testimonials from truckers explaining their stories and what they give to society Create commercials including trucker testimonials, to be shown on local stations. At least 150 video testimonials and 150 written testimonials. The more truckers we include the wider range of diversity we can provide, and we can appeal to a larger demographic. Strategy 2.

Create positive relationships between C.R. England truckers and local children by bringing the truckers to the elementary schools, in order to persuade parents to have positive opinions of C.R. England truckers. Tactics.

Set up an interview with principals of local elementary schools to organize the event Print fliers to send home with children Set up student-to-trucker pen pal interactions to last throughout the year Plan presentations for truckers to give, explaining to kids what they do and why they like their job. Give branded pen and mini notebooks to elementary school children. Strategy 3.

Use social media to portray a positive reflection of truckers and their value to society locally, using the Im a Trucker for C.R. England slogan.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Tactics.


Create a Facebook page for the campaign posting positive facts and statistics about truckers and the trucking industry as well as posting about events. Create a Twitter account posting positive facts and statistics about truckers and the trucking industry as well as posting about events. Create an Instagram account, collecting pictures from truckers and their travels across the nation, posting pictures that are interesting and relevant as well as promotional. #imatruckerforcrengland Create a YouTube channel to post the trucker testimonials and other promotional ads.

National Travelers Strategy 1. Use mass media to portray a positive reflection of truckers and their value to society nation-wide, using the Im a Trucker for C.R. England slogan. Tactics.

Put up at least one billboard along major travel routes in the United States including (I70, I-80, I-40, I-5, etc.) Put signs in subway stations in New York and Los Angeles. Create a website with testimonials from truckers explaining their stories and what they give to society. Create VNR for media with trucker testimonials. Share trucker testimonials on YouTube channel and other social media pages. Strategy 2.

Use social media to portray a positive reflection of truckers and their value to society nationally, using the Im a Trucker for C.R. England slogan.

Tactics.

Create a Facebook page for the campaign posting positive facts and statistics about truckers and the trucking industry as well as posting about events. Create a Twitter account posting positive facts and statistics about truckers and the trucking industry as well as posting about events. Create an Instagram account, collecting pictures from truckers and their travels across the nation, posting pictures that are interesting and relevant as well as promotional. #imatruckerforcrengland Create a YouTube channel to post the trucker testimonials and other promotional ads.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS

At least 150 video testimonial and 150 written testimonials. The more truckers we include the wider range of diversity we can provide, and we can appeal to a larger demographic.

New Drivers Strategy 1. Through education programs, help the next generation of drivers on the road understand the nature of C.R. England as a company and their employee requirements. Tactics.

Create a unit to be taught in drivers education courses on the vehicles, the drivers, and the nature of the work to make drivers more relatable to students. We will add the C.R. England trucking unit to 50 classes across the United States (one for each state excluding Hawaii and adding Washington DC, with a class size of 30 students in each class). Bumper stickers will be given to students who complete the unit with the Im a trucker for C.R. England logo. Create Im a trucker video to be shown in drivers education courses to make truckers seem more relatable to new drivers. Have truckers make stops at high schools and conduct assemblies which include truck tours, video presentations and question and answer forums. Assemblies will be conducted at the same high schools where drivers education courses are offered. Before assemblies, do a pre-test to measure what students know, after the forum conduct a short post-test. Hang fliers around schools when assemblies are coming up. Strategy 2.

Correct misconceptions and inform the next generation of truckers importance to society, through mass media. Tactics.

Use social media to share personal truckers stories on Facebook and Twitter Share the Facebook stories and promote them on drivers education websites Use e-mails to inform skills and requirements of truckers to new drivers and their drivers education teacher Calendar and Budget See Appendix

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Communication Confirmation Table

Key Publics Truckers and Employees

Objectives Objectives 2 and 3

Local Commuters

All objectives

Strategies 1. Industry-wide training to reinforce C.R. Englands mission 2. Use social media to promote truckers 1. Use mass media to reflect positive light on truckers 2. Positive interactions with local children 3. Use social media to connect truckers

Nationwide Travelers

Objectives 1 and 2

1. Mass media outlets 2. Social media outlets

New Drivers

Objective 2

1. Education programs to teach new curriculum 2. Use mass media to correct misconceptions

Tactics 1. -dinner conferences -monthly newsletters -award systems 2. -live twitter chats -chat rooms 1. -billboards -testimonials -commercials 2. -interviews -fliers -pen-pals -presentations 3. -Facebook -Twitter -Instagram -YouTube 1. -billboards -websites -testimonials -high concentrated areas with ads. 2. -Facebook -Instagram -Twitter -YouTube 1. -create a unit to teach -use media -truckers assemblies -fliers in schools 2. -social media promotions and testimonials -email messaging

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Evaluation

Objective #1 Criteria. Increase positive attitudes of C.R. England by 30 percent within the next 12 months and 5 percent for each remaining year of the 5 year campaign, resulting in a 50 percent increase. Tool. After year one, execute a survey through Qualtrics measuring perceptions of C.R. England. Deliver the survey to local commuters and national travelers. Compare future evaluations based on the first years results.

Objective #2 Criteria. Increase positive attitudes of truckers by 35 percent within the next 12 months and 7 percent for each remaining year of the 5 year campaign, resulting in a 63 percent increase. Tool. After year one, execute a survey through Qualtrics measuring perceptions of C.R. England truckers. Deliver the survey to new drivers, local commuters and national travelers. Compare future evaluations based on the first years results. Objective #3 Criteria. Have six percent of our drivers featured in media and social media within the next 18 months (~300 drivers). Tool. Have our team track and count all coverage of campaign efforts through social media analytics and data analysis in SPSS.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Bibliography C.R. England. (2013, October 28). C.R. England Awards Harley-Davidson in Fuel Efficiency Promotion. Fox 19. Retrieved from http://www.fox19.com/story/23803977/cr-englandawards-harley-davidson-in-fuel-efficiency-promotion. C.R. England: About Us. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.crengland.com/our-company/companyinformation/about-us. Company Warnings. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.thetruckersreport.com/company-warnings/. Crissey, J. (2011). Whos in the drivers seat? Commercial Carrier Journal. Glover, Scott. (2009, April 5). FBI makes connection between long-haul truckers, serial killings. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved from http://articles.latimes.com/2009/apr/05/local/meserialkillers5. HEAVY TRUCK DRIVER. (2005). Tech Directions. 64(9), 38-39. Johansson, J. (2012). Why does a sleepy driver continue to drive?: -A qualitative study of the factors contributing to sleepiness in truck drivers' work environment.. (Student paper). Linkpings universitetLinkpings universitet. Lichtenstein, B., Hook III, E. W., Grimley, D. M., ST. Lawrence, J.S., & Bachmann, L. H. (2008). HIV risk among long-haul truckers in the USA. Culture. Health & Sexuality, 10(1), 43-56. doi:10.1080/13691050701582936. Truck Accident Statistics. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.legalinfo.com/content/truckaccidents/truck-accident-statistics.html. Truck Driver Complaints. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/list_7567930_truck-drivercomplaints.html. Trucking Issues. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.trucking.org/Trucking_Issues_Safety.aspx.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS What is Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS)? (n.d.). Retrieved from http://ai.fmcsa.dot.gov/SMS/InfoCenter/default.aspx#question1464.

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS

Truckers and Employees


Why they matter: The way they act affects their reputation Their confidence in themselves will reflect on those around them How we reach them: One year of Industry-wide training Use them for face-to-face interaction with publics

Appendix A

Local Commuters
Why they matter: They have negative opinions of truck drivers If they are not happy, regulations go up They have misinformation and misconceptions How we reach them: 4 northbound, 4 southbound billboards between St. George and Ogden Im a Trucker for C.R. England website and commercials with trucker testimonials Bring truckers into elementary schools- Trucker Pals Social Media

Nationwide Travelers
Why they matter: Their opinions are still being formed They will become local commuters and national travelers How we reach them: Create a unit to be taught on semi-trucks in Drivers Ed courses Provide bumper stickers to students enrolled in the course Show Im a Trucker for C.R... England video presentation in the course Face-to-face trucker interaction, truck tours, trucker presentations

New Drivers

Why they matter: They have negative opinions of truck drivers If they are not happy, regulations go up They have misinformation and misconceptions How we reach them: Billboards along major travel routes in the US including (I-70, I-80, I-40, I-5, etc.) Signs in subways stations in NY and Los Angeles Im a Trucker for C.R. England website with trucker video testimonials- use for VNR Social Media

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS

Appendix B

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CASE OF THE TROUBLED TRUCKERS Appendix C

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