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Xerophilia could not have been around without the kind support of all who sent us articles, photos,

or both, for the first seven regular issues and two special issues: Agcs Gyrgy, Albert Leroy, Aldo Delladdio, Alexander Arzberger, Amante Darmanin, Ambrus Lszl, Andreas Laras, Athena Mantle, Attila Kapitany, Aymeric de Barmon, Balzs Zoltan, Barta Laszlo, Basarab Popa, Bruce Bayer, Candelaria Rodrguez, Carlos Alonso Hidalgo Villa, Claudia Lpez Martinez, Chris Davies, Ciprian Suta, Cristian Cristian, Cristian Neciu, Cristian Perez Badillo, Csaba Kadar, Daniel Schweich, David Rubo, David Rushforth, Davide Donati, Derrick J. Rowe, Eberhard Scholz, Elton Roberts, Eric Ribbens, Fabian Vinceniu Vanghele, Felipe Escudero Ganem, Frdric Adriaenssens, Gabriel Milln Garduo, George Grecu, George S. Hinton, Gottfried Winkler, Graham Charles, Grzegorz Matuszewski, Ioan Nevezi, Ionu Floca, Jn Baran, John Pilbeam , Joe Shaw, Josef Odehnal, Jzsef Szigetvri, Jovana Jaime Hernndez, Jorge Xolapa Plancarte, Judd Kirkel Welwitch, Jrgen Menzel, Laci Szanto, Lszl Ambrus, Lszl Barta, Leccinum J. Garca Morales, Leo Rodriguez, Lvai Magdolna, Levai Melchior, Malcolm A. Grant, Manuel Nevrez de los Reyes, Manuel Salazar Gonzlez, Michael Ast, Miguel Angel Gonzlez Botello, Mihai Crisbanu, Milan Zachar, Nicuor Ajder, Oldich Novk, Paul Klaassen, Pedro Njera Quezada, Petr Kupk, Philippe Corman , R. C. Hoyer, Ralph Hillmann, Ray Stephenson, Ricardo Daniel Raya Sanchez, Ricardo Garbarini Salgado, Sandi Karina Neri Cardona, Stefan Nitzschke, Stelian Popa, Steven A. Hammer, Terry Smale, Titus Simen, Tth Norbert, Trevor Wray, Vasile Plcintar, Walter Rausch, and (last but not least) Zsolt Mihail Demeter. For each and everyone, a big THANK YOU and a Happy New Year 2014 from the Xerophilia Team!

JANUARY
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The south-western portion of the state of Coahuila, Mexico, is characterized by high mountain ranges, divided by wide alluvial plains. Such plains are typically very arid, with loamy-gypseous soil, sometimes flooded by heavy rainstorm.
During the exploration of one of these valleys, North of San Pedro de las Colonias, I found a taxon belonging to the genus Corynopuntia, with exceptional characteristics Davide Donati A new, very interesting species belonging to the genus Corynopuntia Knuth: Corynopuntia guccinii Xerophilia, Vol. 1, No. 1 (1) June 2012

FEBRUARY
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Echeveria rosea is adapted to grow only in humid cloud forests of the region. Even if not an endemic species, their populations are scarce, because its one of the few species that grow as epiphytic plants together with orchids and ferns. The plants are not really showy, they grow until some 20 cm high, with a loose rosette about 10 cm wide with acuminate green leaves. The flowers are very characteristic instead, a dense inflorescence 20-30 cm long with pink to yellow flowers. It can be found looking upward big oak tree branches; occurs between 800 to 1500 m altitude. Leccinum J. Garca Morales - The Echeverioideae (Crassulaceae) of Tamaulipas, Mexico Xerophilia, Vol. 2, No. 1 (4) March 2013

MARCH
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Mancha urbana voraz - The voracious urban sprawl is a research project that speaks about nature and its ability to adapt or not to, in advance of the changes produced by man. Merging the urban dynamics with nature, which in this case is the cactus habitat, is the essence of this production. The invasion of such weaker and destruction prone environment determines us to think that in the end only one will subsist and one will be eliminated. The formal use of cacti in this series of paintings derives from my interest to explore and learn about them. I consider them as essential elements of this project and for its story, endangered because of their exposure; these plants symbolize Mexican flora, it is also interesting that such species are difficult to find due to their camouflage and adaptability in areas where you can hardly imagine that anything would grow. An interview with Cristian Perez Badillo Xerophilia, Vol. 2, No. 1 (4) March 2013

APRIL
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Intergrading is also true, of course, for var. perbellus. In south-western Oklahoma, in Kiowa county, there are mixed populations of bailey x perbellus described as being very stable. To the north, in Major county, there is a var. perbellus population having longer spines, resembling var. baileyi. Those plants were called once var. purpureus, and currently var. nova, waiting for its own proper name. Somewhat similar plants can be also found to the west, in Woodward county, where, due to the predominant influence of var. perbellus, the appearance of var. bailey is softening. The intergrading with var. caespitosus is hardly worthwhile mentioning, if we remember that some authors consider var. perbellus nothing more than a western caespitosus. Fabian Vinceniu Vanghele - Echinocereus reichenbachii the northern group Xerophilia, Vol. 2, No. 2 (5) June 2013

MAY
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It is among epiphytes (plants adapted to living in trees) that we find most ant-plant species that are succulent or at least xerophytic (aridity adapted) in form and although the designation ant-plants is the one most commonly used, anthouse plants is a more accurate label for these highly adapted species. Perhaps the best examples of arboreal ant-house plants are provided by the genus Myrmecodia. Here within the plants tuberous base are many interconnecting tunnels and chambers with one or more entrances such that each is a living ant nest remarkably similar to the gallery systems built in soils. Derrick J. Rowe - Succulent Ant-house Epiphytes: A Brief Introduction Xerophilia, Vol. 1, No. 1 (1) June 2012

JUNE
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Another small population is found at the base of Sierra lvarez-San Pedro in the eastern part of SGS where it grows on a flattened terrain on a volcanic-calcareous gravelly substrate where it shares a barren isle with Ariocarpus kotschoubeyanus, Thelocactus hexaedroporus, Mammillaria formosa, Echeveria bifida, Sedum aff. ebracteatum, Milla biflora, Ibervillea sp., Allium potosiense and Zephyranthes sp. The major threats in this locality are sand and gravel quarries, road construction and plundering from collectors and local citizens. Pedro Njera Quezada - Notes on Peotillo (Pelecyphora aselliformis, Ehrenberg, 1843); A brief description of its potential distribution and intrinsic aspects about its conservation Xerophilia, Vol. 1, No. 2 (2) September 2012

JULY
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Thelocactus rinconensis ssp. rinconensis is restricted to the States of Coahuila and Nuevo Leon in northern Mexico (both States have a borderline with USA); the type is located at about 35 km to the west of Monterrey on the Highway to Saltillo, in a place named Rinconada. They grow among caliza (limestone) rocks, and all the way to the top of the mountain were the Microondas station is located. They share the habitat with Astrophytum capricorne, Acharagma roseana, Coryphanta compacta, Coryphanta salinensis, Thelocactus bicolor, Echinocereus stramineus, Mammillaria melanocentra, Mammillaria pottsi (Leona), Cylindropuntia imbricata, and Cylindropuntia leptocaulis among others. Manuel Salazar Gonzlez - A small resume of the Thelocactus rinconensis complex Xerophilia, Vol. 1, No. 3 (3) December 2012

AUGUST
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The name Lobivia is an anagram of Bolivia, which immediately indicates the South American origin of these plants. Lobivia was established in 1922, in The Cactaceae, volume III, by Britton and Rose and was defined as being Echinopsis with short flower . Britton and Rose presented 20 Lobivia species. 90 years have passed since and new related plants have been discovered by Backeberg, Fri, Stmer, Marsoner, Castellanos, Cardenas, Ritter, Knize, Rausch, Lau, and Piltz As a result, the number of species simply exploded. New names and intermediate genera were therefore established; some remained, while others have disappeared since, however, the synonymy was amplified but without being followed by a proportional surge of understanding these plants. Daniel Schweich - The Genus Lobivia Br. et R. in 2013 Xerophilia, Vol. 2, No. 1 (4) March 2013

SEPTEMBER
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These photos were taken in the Western Richtersveld region (Alexander Bay), where Crassula plegmatoides grows on gentle slopes near the summit of the hills in quartzite gravel. It are also found in loose sands associated around and in close proximity the Orange River in this Western Region. The distribution is mainly in a narrow coastal strip from near Port Nolloth to the Buchu Mountains in Namibia. I also found plants growing in the sensitive lichen fields around Alexander Bay.

Judd Kirkel Welwitch - Flowering South African Crassula


Xerophilia Vol. 2, No. 3 (6) September 2013

OCTOBER
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The term Aramberri enigma is a fancy title for two questions pertaining to an Ariocarpus population in the valley of Aramberri, described as A. confusus. First question is if this population can be regarded as a distinct taxon and if yes, does it deserve specific or sub-specific recognition? Second, what is the relationship of this taxon to the A. retusus and A. trigonus populations that flank the valley to the east and to the west, respectively?. Much confusion (and hence the specific epithet) and in a way the enigma itself were created by two deservedly respected authorities in the field, Anderson and Fitz Maurice, when in their revision of the genus in 1997 gave a single wrong answer to both questions. Dr. Andreas Laras Demystifying the Aramberri enigma Xerophilia, Vol. 2, No. 4 (7) December 2013

NOVEMBER
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To understand plants and grow that love and interest we have to have names. To be truly useful and to work for us, those names have to have meaning and properly reflect where, what, how and why those plants are in the world at all. Now there is a school of thought named ecosophy. It is coined from philosophy and is used to indicate that we need to think more deeply about ecology. I think this has become true for taxonomy (the classification and naming of plants) too. We need taxonosophy. This is because the old ideas of classification and naming do not work anymore. Bruce Bayer - What is new in Aloe names? Xerophilia Vol. 2, No. 2 (5) June 2013

DECEMBER
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The discovery of the species that would later be described as Digitostigma caput-medusae occurred while we was performing prospections for the selection of an electrical transmission line. The exact date was June 21, 2001, so that it has been nearly 12 years since then, which arouses me to write some reflections on this fact and its implications, both for the conservation of the species and equally for the life of all the people involved. Manuel Nevrez de los Reyes - Digitostigma: Some reflections Xerophilia Vol. 2, No. 2 (5) June 2013

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