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Sheila Vazquez and Erin Windle ELED 3221 11/12/2013

INDIRECT INSTRUCTION LESSON PLAN FORMAT Elementary Science ______________________________________________________________________________ Big Idea: When a substance changes not all of the properties change. Grade Level: 2nd grade Rationale: When students understand the changes and can see when properties do not change in matter, such water, this helps them to understand how things, even though they change form, may not change in other properties. NC Science Essential Standards: 2.P.2.2 Compare the amount (volume and weight) of water in a container before and after freezing. Next Generation Science Standards: Heating and cooling a substance may or may not change its weight. 2-PS1-4: Construct an argument with evidence that some changes caused by heating or cooling can be reversed and some cannot. Disciplinary Core Idea: PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter: Different kinds of matter exist and many of them can be either solid or liquid, depending on temperature. Matter can be described and classified by its observable properties. (2-PS1-1)

Instructional Objective: Students will be able to observe and record the amount and weight of water in its frozen and liquid state. The students will be able to tell that the weight and amount does not change when the water is in liquid or solid form. Prerequisite knowledge and skills: Students should know that water in its solid state is called ice. Students should be able to weigh items properly and now how to record data. The teacher needs to know that water in its solid state and liquid state are the same weight. Materials/Resources: Ice, sandwich Ziploc baggies (1 per group), cooler, 1-3 scales, 1 roll of paper towels, science journals (1 each student) Place 3 ice cubes in each Ziploc baggie and place in a cooler in order to keep ice from melting until the end of the lesson
K. Popejoy

Sheila Vazquez and Erin Windle ELED 3221 11/12/2013

Science notebooks What is the source of your lesson? Web site: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/water3-melting-and-freezing/

Estimated Time: This lesson will need to be done in two sections. The first section will take about 5- 10 min and the second section will take about 20 min. Accommodation for Special Needs: Visual and motor: Have larger measuring cups with large numbers and handle. Students in wheel chairs: Have lower tables and work area. ESL: Have the students color in measuring cups with the level of the water. LI: Have the students color in measuring cups with the level of the water. TD: Let students come up with other materials that may or may not change when frozen or liquid. Have them write out how they would test this as well as their hypothesis. ______________________________________________________________________________ Content and Strategies Engage: Ask students the following questions: Has anyone ever eaten ice cream on a hot summer day? What happens to it if the ice cream is not eaten? Have you ever left a glass of ice water out on the table? What happened to the ice? Where do you think the water that is on the outside of the glass come from? Have you ever noticed what happens to frozen objects as they heat up? What happens to the amount of a substance if it is changed from a solid to a liquid? Next, show students a Ziploc baggie filled with ice. Ask students to predict what will happen to the substance (including to the amount of it) over time. This should be done in an open, large group format, and you should record a list of the students' predictions. Explore: Tell the students the rules for the activity. The bags need to stay closed, and they must stay in the classroom at all times. Break students into small table groups and give them a Ziploc baggie, ice, paper towels, and a scale or balance. Have students put the ice into the Ziploc baggie and seal it. Have them record their observations of the ice at this time, and then record the weight of the bag of ice. Have students take turns holding the bag in their hands, wiping the outside of the bag as necessary to get rid of any condensation. Ask students: What do you see?
K. Popejoy

Sheila Vazquez and Erin Windle ELED 3221 11/12/2013

What is happening to the ice? Why is this happening to the ice? What do you think is happening to the amount of melted water?? Have students weigh the bags of ice again. Ask students: What happened to the amount of ice or water? Does the ice look the same as it did in the beginning? How is it different? Allow the solid to completely change to a liquid (students can rub the bags between their palms to speed up the melting process), and have students wipe the Ziploc bag and weigh it again. Remember we have to wipe of the condensation because it is from the moisture in the air and not from inside of the container. If time allows (and there is a freezer available), put the baggies into the freezer to solidify the liquid. Then wipe the bags and weigh them a final time. Ask students: Does the amount of water change when it changes from a solid (ice) to a liquid? Does the amount of water change when it changes from a liquid to a solid? Imagine that a younger friend has just told you that the amount of ice is gone because she saw it melt. How would you explain her mistake to her? How would you explain what you observed to someone who did not perform this experiment?

Explanation: Revisit the predictions that students made in the Engage section of this lesson. Discuss how their predictions related to actual experiences with the substances. Have students share with the class the observations and recording they came up with during the activity. Write these recordings on the board for all students to see. Discuss as a class each observation and allow students to discuss why they agree with each others recordings, or why they disagree. Elaborate: Ask students: If you have two cakes that are the same size, and you took one of the cakes and cut it into pieces, would the amount of the cut cake be more, less, or the same as the amount of the other uncut cake? Draw a picture of both cakes that explains your answer. Be prepared to explain your drawing. (Have students try to solve this problem individually, then come back together as a whole class to discuss answers and illustrations) Then, ask the students: At dinner you see a bowl filled with thick slices of solid butter. As the meal continues, the
K. Popejoy

Sheila Vazquez and Erin Windle ELED 3221 11/12/2013

butter melts in the bowl, what happens to the amount of butter? Does it still weigh the same? Why or why not? Evaluate: Have each of the students respond to the following prompt individually: You leave a frozen bottle of water outside. The ice melts as the temperature increases as the day goes on. Diagram what happens to the ice as it melts. Be prepared to explain if you were to put the bottle on a scale what would happen to the weigh and amount of water in the bottle. The students responses will be collected after completion. Students will be considered to have met the lesson objective if they were able to include in their response that waters amount and weight does not change when it is changed from its solid form to its liquid form. The teacher will collect the students responses from their science notebooks as an exit ticket.

Possible example of student science journal entry


1st observation Amount Look Weight Other Observation 2nd observation 3rd Observation

K. Popejoy

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