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NO KAD PENGENALAN / - -

I.C. NUMBER

ANGKA GILIRAN /
INDEX NUMBER

SULIT
1119/2
B INGGERIS
Masa:
2 ¼ jam

PEPERIKSAAN PERCUBAAN SPM 2009

BAHASA INGGERIS
Kertas 2
Dua jam lima belas minit

JANGAN BUKA KERTAS SOALAN INI SEHINGGA DIBERITAHU

Arahan
1. Tulis nombor kad penganalan dan angka giliran anda pada ruang yang
disediakan.
2. Kertas soalan ini mengandungi empat bahagian: Bahagian A, Bahagian
B, Bahagian C dan Bahagian D.
3. Jawab semua bahagian dalam kertas soalan ini.
4. Soalan-soalan dalam Bahagian A mempunyai empat pilihan jawapan.
Jawab setiap soalan dengan menghitamkan ruang yang betul di halaman
19.
5. Anda dinasihati supaya mengambil masa 25 mint untuk menjawab soalan
Bahagian A, 25 minit untuk Bahagian B, 50 minit untuk Bahagian C dan
35 minit untuk Bahagian D.

Instructions
1. Write your I.C number and index number in the space provided
2. This question paper consists of four sections: Section A, Section B,
Section C and Section D.
3. Answer all sections in this question paper.
4. Questions in Section A have four options. Answer each question by
blackening the correct space on page 19
5. You are advised to spend 25 minutes on Section A, 25 minutes on
Section B, 50 minutes on Section C and 35 minutes on Section D

Kertas soalan ini mengandungi 19 halaman bercetak


@PKPSM Pahang
SULIT 1119/2

Section A
[15 marks]

Centrally Located
Pleasantly Affordable

Enjoy the convenience of Kuala Lumpur’s best value hotel


with the best facilities.

1 From the advertisement above, visitors choose to stay in the hotel for the
following reasons except

A reasonable price
B strategic location
C interesting activities

BEGGING IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED

2 The sign tells us

A to give support to the poor people


B to help the less fortunate people
C not to do business with beggars
D not to give money to beggars

IPOH: A thief in Jalan Pomelo here picked the wrong person to mess
with when he tried to steal a 47-year-old American’s motorcycle
helmet.
Dan Towery was leaving Pomelo Plaza after shopping there
yesterday afternoon when he saw a man removing the helmet that was
locked to his motorcycle.
(Adapted from The Star, 2009)
3 From the newspaper report above, what did the thief try to steal?

A a pomelo
B a helmet
C a motorcycle
D a lock

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Dear Editor,
The article “How to Lose that Belly Fat” (October
’08) was a good reminder for me to hit the treadmill
again. Yes, I’m one of the 70% of Malaysian men who
do not exercise enough. I used to go to the gym thrice a
week, but now barely even once.
(Adapted from Health Today, 2009)

4 From the letter above, what is the percentage of Malaysian men who
exercise on a regular basis?

A 8%
B 30%
C 70%

Litter bugs and vandals beware as the


Malacca Historical City Council is now keeping
an eye on things along the Malacca River and
the city’s UNESCO heritage zone through its
bicycle patrol squad. The squad will patrol
designated areas to nab litter bugs and
prevent vandalism.
(Adapted from The NST, 2009)

5 From the extract above, the Patrol Squad will be on the look out for

A those who commit vandalism and throw rubbish indiscriminately


B those who ride bicycle in the UNESCO heritage zone
C those who throw rubbish into the Malacca River

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60

50

40
%
30

20

10

0
Peer pressure Media Influence Family Problems Curiosity

Reasons Why Teenagers Smoke

6 From the graph above, we can say that most teenagers smoke because of

A media influence
B family problems
C peer pressure
D curiosity

(Adapted from The Star, 2009)

7 From the comic strip above, we know that the father disagrees with the
son’s choice of a pet because

A the father does not like pets


B the father thinks that all pets are ridiculous
C the father thinks not every boy should have a pet
D the father thinks the pet his son has chosen is too big

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LIDI WEAVING
Kampung Pengkalan Gelap is a small village
located near the river coast in the district of
Setiu. The surrounding swampy area has
abundance resources of nipah trees. This gift
of nature are valued by locals who utilized its
leave fronds as a base to the beautifully crafted
products such as fruit basket, hamper basket,
traditional bird cage and other woven
products.

(Adapted from Travel Brochure,2008)

8 Based on the information above, why is lidi weaving popular among the
locals of Kampung Pengkalan Gelap?

A the swampy area has plenty of nipah trees


B the village is located near the river coast
C the locals utilize the leave fronds

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SULIT 1119/2

Questions 9 – 15 are based on the following passage.

Jessica Cox is a superwoman of sorts. She may not be saving victims


from building, but she is ____(9)____ heroine in the hearts of many.
Born without arms, Cox used to watch with envy as other children
_____(10)_____ about on the monkey bar while she was limited to the swings.
Frustrated, she would ____(11)_____ herself flying over the playground
like Superwoman while everyone watched in disbelief. “I would imagine taking
people up one at a time to experience that my imagination had ____(12) a
reality,” said Cox at a media interview,
Cox, 26, is the first woman pilot in aviation history to fly without arms. She
was invited to Kuala Lumpur recently to speak at the Women of Independence
Conference organized ______(13)____ Intelligence Business Networks.
______(14)___, the two-day conference gathered successful women from
all over the world, who are leaders in _____(15)____ respective fields.

(Adapted from The Star,2009)

9 A the 13 A with
B an B for
C a C at
D - D by

10 A swing 14 A However
B swings B Nevertheless
C swung C Furthermore
D swinging D Consequently

11 A envision 15 A they
B perceive B their
C portray C theirs
D dream

12 A become
B became
C becoming

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SULIT 1119/2

SECTION B
[ 10 MARKS ]

Questions 16 – 25
Read the following information and answer the questions that follow.

FACTS ON NUTRIENTS

CARBOHYDRATES PROTEINS

Carbohydrates play an important role Proteins are large molecules made up


by providing energy intake. It also of amino acids. They have numerous
provides the body with phytochemicals tasks in the body. Proteins also help
and micronutrients. Carbohydrates can maintain the acid-base balance of the
be obtained from foods like rice, wheat, body and are important for overall
barley and potatoes. growth. Proteins can be obtained from
two main sources of food: animal and
plant.

FATS CALCIUM

Fats obtained from food carry out a Calcium is the most abundant mineral
number of tasks in the body. Firstly, in the body and more than 99% of it is
they provide the body with essential kept in the bones. The other 1% can be
fatty acids, crucial for hormone found in teeth, blood, nerves, muscles
synthesis. Fats can be acquired by and interstitial fluid. Among foods rich
consuming fatty fish like salmon and in calcium are milk, cheese, yoghurt,
sardines, vegetable oils, nuts and anchovies and green leafy vegetables.
seeds.

IRON ZINC

Iron plays many roles in the body, the Zinc may only be required in trace
most well-known being the amounts, but it plays a major role in the
transportation of oxygen throughout the body. It is a component of many
body in the form of iron containing enzymes and is involved in the
haem proteins. Haem iron is found synthesis of carbohydrates and
mostly in animal-based-foods. proteins. Good sources of dietary zinc
are meat, fish and poultry.

Adapted from Health Today , February 2009

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Questions 16 – 21

Based on the information given, complete the diagram below.

Nutrients Functions Sources

16. ………………………. To provide energy Rice and wheat

Fats 17……………………….. Fish, nuts and seeds

………………………..

18. …………………… 19………………………… Animal-based-foods

………………………

Calcium To provide minerals 20. ………………….

21. ………………….

[6 marks ]
Questions 22 – 25
Complete the sentences below based on the information given.

22 Zinc is an important nutrient as it contains enzymes and ………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………

23 Besides maintaining the acid-base balance of the body, proteins are also

important for …………………………………………………………………………….

24 Most of the calcium in the body is kept in the ………………………………….

25 Proteins are nutrients that are made of …………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………..……….
[4 marks ]

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Section C
[25 marks]

Questions 26 – 31 are based on the following passage.

1 I was walking my dog, Phoebe, along the beach when she started
barking like crazy. Distracted, I looked up to see what was
happening. To my astonishment I saw a large creature lying at the
water’s edge about 100 metres away. I couldn’t tell what it was, but
its bulk and colour led me to guess it was a dead shark. 5

2 Phoebe was standing just a few metres away from it, barking
furiously. I laughed at her bravery: what a big, tough blue heeler she
was, telling off a dead shark from a nice safe distance. But I soon
discovered it was no shark. As I approached, I could see the
unmistakable tail of a dolphin, but couldn’t quite believe its size. 10
Inspecting it further I was surprised to see the blunt shape of its head
seemed to be missing the characteristic dolphin nose. A little whale!
It was roughly 2.5 metres long, but must have weighed between 200
and 300 kilograms.

3 I looked it over, but saw no evidence of injury. Then, noticing what 15


might have been an eye on its blunt head, I leaned in for a closer
look. Suddenly it opened, blowing wet air in my face. Not an eye, but
a vent. It was breathing!

4 Shocked and excited, my first thought was to rescue it. But how? I
didn’t think I could move it by myself, but I was alone and more than 20
three kilometres from town. There was no choice: I knew I had to
do something.

5 I decided to try to roll it. What an effort! After much straining and
grunting (mine) and a fair bit of blowing (the whale’s), I managed to
roll it a few times, timing my efforts as the waves rolled in. I was 25
making great progress until a giant wave picked the whale up and
pushed it back, despite my efforts to brace against it.

6 Dejected, I fell backwards underneath the whale and, as the


water receded, found myself in a sitting position with the baby whale
in my lap. I couldn’t move. When the next wave began to roll in, I 30
could feel the panic rising inside me as the water quickly surged up
my chin, engulfing me. I took a deep breath and went under.

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SULIT 1119/2

7 Luckily, the whale became buoyant and I was able to scramble


from under it. Regaining my composure, I quickly turned it face-first
into the oncoming waves. Thankfully, it worked and with each rising 35
waves I slowly pushed the hapless creature further and further into
deeper water until it was floating. Then I pointed it out to sea.

8 But when the next wave came in, I was horrified to see it turned
sideways again – and heading back to the shallows. Yelling my utter
frustration at the ocean, I positioned myself between the whale and 40
the shore once more, in a vain effort to stop it beaching again.

9 Not sure what more I could do to help it, I simply held the poor,
exhausted thing, talking to it over and over trying to reassure it.
Then, suddenly, the whale flicked its tail.
“So you’re ready now, are you?” I asked. “Are you sure about 45
that? You know what happened last time.”

1 Flick, flick: the tail moved again. I waited until we were between
0 waves so I could plant my feet firmly in the sand and then I gave it an
enormous shove. It went under the next wave and surfaced a few
metres away, slowly moving out to sea, its tail now helping to propel 50
it along.

“Yes!” I cried, as I watched it move into deeper water. Then,


11 slowly, it started to turn.
“No, no!” I shouted, as it started to face the shore again, no more
than 15 metres away. 55
“Don’t you dare come back here,” I yelled. And, to my amazement
and relief, it casually turned back around and moved further out to
sea.

Exhausted but exultant, I made my way up the beach and


1 watched. The whale didn’t seem to be in any immediate trouble so I 60
2 decided to run home and grab my wetsuit, intending to drive back
and make sure it didn’t beach again. Arriving home, I peeled off my
wet clothes and donned my wetsuit.
“What the heck are you doing?” my wife asked as I ran around
the house looking for my car keys. 65
“Saving a whale,” I replied.

(Adapted from READER’S DIGEST July 2007)

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26 (a) From paragraph 1, where did the writer see the large creature?

……………………………………………………………………………………(1 mark)

26 (b) From paragraph 2 and 3, give two evidence that convinced the writer that
the creature was a whale.

(i) ….…………………………………………………………………………… ( 1 mark)

(ii)…….…………………………………………………………………………. (1 mark)

27 From paragraph 4, “There was no choice. I knew I had to do something.”


[line 21]

(a) Why did the writer say that he had no choice?

……………………………………………………………………………… … (1 mark)

(b) What did the writer decide to do?

…………………………………………………………………………………. (1 mark)

28 (a) From paragraph 7, which word means “able to float”?

…………………………………………………………………………………….(1
mark)

28 (b) From paragraph 8, why did the writer position himself between the whale
and the shore?

…………………………………………………………………………………… (1
mark)

29 From paragraph 9, what did the whale do in response to the writer’s words of
assurance?

…………………………………………………………………………………....(1 mark)

30 Why do you think the writer was determined to save the whale? Give two
reasons.

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…………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………
(2 marks)

31 Based on the passage given, write a summary:

 of what the writer did to save the whale and


 the difficulties that he faced in saving it

Credit will be given for use of own words but care must be taken not to change
the original meaning.

Your summary must:

 be in continuous writing form (not in note form)


 use materials from lines 23 to 51
 not be longer than 130 words, including the 10 words given below

Begin your summary as follows:

After much straining and grunting, the writer eventually managed to ….


[15 marks]

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Section D
[25 marks]

32 Read the following stanzas of Monsoon History and answer the questions
that
follow.

Drinking milo,
Nyonya and baba sit at home.
This was forty years ago.
Sarong-wrapped they counted
Silver paper for the dead.
Portraits of grandfathers
Hung always in the parlour.

Reading Tennyson,
at six pm in pyjamas,
Listening to downpouring rain:
the air ticks
With gnats, black spiders fly,
Moths sweep out of our rooms
Where termites built
Their hills of eggs
and queens zoom in heat.
We wash our feet for bed
Watch mother uncoil
Her snake hair,
unbuckle
The silver mesh
around her waist,
Waiting for father pacing
The sand as fishers pull
From the Straits after monsoon.

The air is still, silent


Like sleepers rocked
in the pantun,
Sheltered by Malacca.
This was forty years ago,
When nyonya married baba.

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Shirley Geok-lin Lim

(a) In the stanzas above, state two things that the children did

(i)___________________________________________________[1 mark]

(ii)_________________________________________________ _[1 mark]

(b) Which word implies that the surrounding is filled with sounds made by
insects?

____________________________________________________[1 mark]

(c) Do you think it is important to maintain our culture and tradition? Give a
reason for your answer.

_________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ [2 mark]

33 Read the extract from the short story The Necklace below and answer the
questions that follow.

Madame Loisel felt moved. Should she speak to her? Yes, certainly. And now that
she had paid, she would tell her all about it. Why not?
She went up.
“Good day, Jeanne.”
The other, astonished to be familiarly addressed by this plain goodwife, did not
recognise her at all and stammered, “But – madame – I do not know – You must be
mistaken.”
“No. I am Mathilde Loisel.”
Her friend uttered a cry. “Oh my poor Mathilde! How you are changed!”
“Yes, I have had a very hard life, since I last saw you and great poverty – that
because of you!”
“Of me! How so?”

(a) “And now that she had paid, she would tell her about it.”
What would Madame Loisel tell Jeanne?

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SULIT 1119/2

____________________________________________________[1 mark]

(b) Why couldn’t Jeanne recognize Madame Loisel at first?

____________________________________________________[1 mark]

(c) Give the expression that tells us that Jeanne sympathized with Mathilde?

____________________________________________________[1 mark]

(d) Would you like to have a friend like Mathilde? Give a reason for your
answer.
_____________________________________________________

___________________________________________________[2 marks]

34 The following are the novels studied in the literature component in English
Language.

Jungle of Hope - Keris Mas


The Pearl - John Steinbeck
The Return - K.S. Maniam

Choose any one of the novels above and answer the question below.

“Life is full of challenges and hardships.” From the novel that you have learnt,
describe how a character overcomes the challenges and hardships in his /
her life. Support your answer with close reference to the text.

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FOR SECTION A

Blacken only one space for each question. If you wish to change your answer,
erase the blackened mark that you have made. Then blacken the space for the
new answer.

For examiner’s use


Examiner’s Code:
Section Marks
A 15
B 10
C 25
D 25
Total 75

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE 1119


MARK SCHEME FOR PAPER 1
SPM TRIAL EXAMINATION 2009

QUESTION 1 : DIRECTED WRITING [35 MARKS]

a. FORMAT: - 3 MARKS
i. Title 1 mark
ii. Name of writer 1 mark
iii. Appropriate ending 1 mark

b. CONTENT: - 12 MARKS

C1- duration 3 – 7 March 1 mark


C2- raise awareness 1 mark
C3- beautify school compound 1 mark
C4- paint mural 1 mark
C5- plant trees 1 mark
C6- recycle old newspapers 1 mark
C7- poster drawing competition 1 mark
C8- speech by invited guest 1 mark
C9- create conducive environment 1 mark
C10- instill love for nature 1 mark
C11- foster closer relationship 1 mark
C12- develop cooperation 1 mark

c. LANGUAGE – 20 MARKS

MARKING METHOD:
1. Read the script and indicate all the errors of language by
underlining word, phrase or punctuation where the mistake
appears.

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2. Place a tick (√ ) for good appropriate vocabulary, structure and


tone.
3. Award marks by referring to the criteria for marking language.

MARKING SCHEME FOR DIRECTED WRITING


MARK RANGE DESCRIPTION OF CRITERIA
● The language is accurate apart from occasional draft slips.
A ● Sentence structure is varied and shows that the candidate is
able to use sentence length and type to achieve an intended
19 - 20 effect.
● Vocabulary shows some sophistication and is used with
precision.
● Punctuation is correct.
● Spelling is correct across the whole range of vocabulary used.
● Paragraphs have unity.
● The tone is appropriate – formal, courteous and suitable for
a formal letter.

● The language is almost accurate but there may be more minor


B or first draft slips.
● Errors may also arise from more ambitious structures which are
16 – 18 imperfectly understood.
● Sentence show some variations in length and type, including
the confident use of complex sentences.
● Vocabulary is wide enough to show intended meaning.
● Spelling is nearly always accurate.
● The tone is formal and appropriate to intended person. The
reader is satisfied that a genuine attempt has been made.

● The language is largely accurate to communicate meaning


C clearly to the reader.
● Simple structures are used without error; mistakes may occur
13 - 15 when more sophisticated structures are attempted.
● Vocabulary is adequate to convey intended meaning although it
may not be sufficiently developed achieve precision.
● Sentences shows some variety of length and structure although
there is a tendency to repeat some sentence types, giving it a
monotonous effect.
● Punctuation is generally accurate although errors may occur in
more complex uses.

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● The letter is written in paragraphs which show some unity,


although links may be absent or inappropriate.
● The tone of the letter is fairly formal but lapses into formality
may occur. Slang or formal language is used from to time.

● The language is sufficiently accurate.


D ● There will be patches of clarity particularly when simple
structures are used.
10 - 12 ● Mistakes will occur when more complex sentences are used.
● There may be some variety of sentence length and type but this
may not be successful in enhancing meaning or arousing interest.
● Vocabulary is adequate but lacks precision.
● Simple words spelt correctly, but errors may occur when
unfamiliar words are used.
● Punctuation is generally correct but does not enhance or clarify
meaning.
● Sentence separation errors may occur.
● The letter is written in paragraphs which may show some unity
in topic. The style may fail to achieve the informality required for
this task. Lapse in slang or formal language may occur
consistently.

● Meaning is never in doubt, but single errors are sufficiently


E frequent and serious to hamper precision and speed of reading.
● Some simple structures will be accurate but accuracy is not
7- 9 sustained for long.
● Vocabulary is limited and either too simple to convey precise
meaning or are imperfectly understood.
● Simple words will usually be spelt accurately but mistakes will
occur when more difficult words are used.
● The letter will have paragraphs but these lack unity and links
are incorrectly used or the speech may not be paragraphed at all.
There may be errors of sentences separation and punctuation.
● The tone may be appropriate for a formal letter.

● Meaning is fairly clear.


U (i) ● The reader feels that the correction of ‘single word’ errors may
produce a piece of fairly accurate English, but the incidence of
4–6 error is high and will definitely impede the reading.
● A very few simple structures are used accurately.
● Vocabulary may not extend beyond a simple range of words
that are inadequate to express intended shades of meaning.
● Paragraphs will sometimes be used correctly but sentence
separation errors may occur.
● Paragraphs may not be used, or if used, show a lack of
planning.

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● There may be frequent spelling errors.


● The style may not be appropriate to that of a letter.

● Sense will usually be decipherable, but some of the errors will


U (ii) be multiple, requiring the reader to re – read and re – organize
before meaning becomes clear.
2- 3 ● Whole sections of the speech may make little or no sense.
● Unlikely to be more than one or two accurate sentences.

● Scripts in this category are entirely impossible to recognize as


U (iii) pieces of English.
● Whole sections of the speech may make no sense at all or are
0-1 copied from the task.
● Award ‘1’ mark if some sense can be obtained.
● The mark ‘0’ should only be awarded if the speech makes no
sense at all from the beginning to the end.

MARKING SCHEME FOR CONTINUOUS WRITING

MARKING METHOD

1. Each composition should be read slowly and carefully.


2. Underline all errors and place ticks ( √ ) to indicate good use of language
or subject matter.
3. Assign the script to one of the levels of performance described. If the
script meets all or nearly all the criteria given in the description. It should
be placed at the tip of the mark range for that level. On the other hand, a
script that fits the description but is less complete in its coverage of the
criteria should be placed at the bottom end of the mark range for that
particular level.

CRITERIA FOR MARKING LANGUAGE ( CONTINUOUS WRITING)

Mark Description of Criteria


Range

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• The language is entirely accurate apart from very occasional first draft slips.
• Sentence structure is varied and shows that the candidate is able to use various
types of sentences to achieve a particular effect.
A • Vocabulary is wide and is used with precision.
• Punctuation is accurate and helpful to the reader.
44 - 50
• Spelling is accurate across the full range of vocabulary used.
• Paragraphs are well-planned, have unity and are linked.
• The topic is addressed with consistent relevance.
• The interest of the reader is aroused and sustained throughout the writing.

• The language is accurate; occasional errors are either minor of first draft slips.
• Vocabulary is wide enough to convey intended shades of meaning with some
precision.
B • Sentences show some variation of length and type, including some complex
sentences.
38 - 43
• Punctuation is almost always accurate and generally helpful.
• Spelling is nearly always accurate.
• Paragraphs show some evidence of planning, have unity and are usually
appropriately linked.
• The piece of writing is relevant to the topic and the interest of the reader is
aroused and sustained through most of the composition.

• The language is largely accurate.


• Simple structures are used without error; mistakes may occur when more
C sophisticated structures are attempted.
• Vocabulary is wide enough to convey intended meaning but may lack precision.
32 - 37
• Sentences may show some variety of structure and length but there is a tendency
to use one type of structure, giving it a monotonous effect.
• Punctuation of simple structures is accurate on the whole but errors may occur in
more complex uses.
• Simple words may be spelt correctly but errors may occur when more
sophisticated words are used.
• The composition is written in paragraphs which may show some unity, although
links may be absent or inappropriate. The writing is relevant but may lack
originality and planning. Some interest is aroused but not sustained.

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• The language is sufficiently accurate to communicate meaning clearly to the


D reader.
• There will be patches of clear, accurate language, particularly when simple
26 - 31 vocabulary and structures are used.
• There is some variety of sentence type and length but the purpose is not clearly
seen.
• Punctuation is generally correct but does not clarify meaning.
• Vocabulary is usually adequate to show intended meaning but this is not
developed to show precision.
• Simple words will be spelt correctly but more spelling errors will occur.
• Paragraphs are used but show lack of planning or unity.
• The topic is addressed with some relevance but the reader may find composition
at this level lacking in liveliness and interest value.

• Meaning is never in doubt, but errors are sufficiently frequent and serious to
hamper reading.
E • Some simple structures may be accurate, but a script at this level is unlikely to
sustain accuracy for long.
20 - 25 • Vocabulary is limited—either too simple to convey precise meaning or more
ambitious but imperfectly understood.
• Simple words may be spelt correctly but frequent mistakes in spelling and
punctuation make reading the script difficult.
• Paragraphs lack unity or are haphazardly arranged.
• The subject matter will show some relevance to the topic but only a partial
treatment is given.
• The high incidence of linguistic errors is likely to distract the reader from any
merits of content that the composition may have.

• Meaning is fairly clear but the high incidence of errors throughout the writing
will definitely impede the reading.
U (i) • There will be many serious errors of various kinds throughout the script
without rewriting the whole sentence.
14 - 19 • A script at this level will have very few accurate sentences.
• Although communication is established, the frequent errors may cause
blurring
• Sentences will be simple and very often repetitive.
• Punctuation will sometimes be used correctly but sentence separation

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SULIT 1119/2

errors may occur.


• Paragraphs lack unity or there may not be any paragraphs at all.

• The reader is able to get some sense out of the script but errors are multiple
in nature, requiring the reader to read and re-read before being able to
U (ii) understand.
• At this level, there may be only a few accurate but simple sentences.
8 - 13 • The content may be comprehensible, but the incidence of linguistic error is
so high as to make meaning blur.
• This type of script may also be far short of the required number of words.

• Scripts in this category are almost entirely impossible to read.


• Whole sections may make little or no sense at all.
U(iii) • Where occasional patches of clarity occur, marks should be awarded.
• The mark ‘0’ should only be given if the script makes no sense at all, from
0-7
the beginning to the end.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 1119


MARK SCHEME FOR PAPER 2

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SULIT 1119/2

TRIAL EXAM 2009

Section A

1. C 9. C
2. D 10. C
3. B 11. A
4. B 12. A
5. A 13. D
6. C 14. C
7. D 15. B
8. A

Section B

16. Carbohydrates
17. to provide the body with essential fatty acids
18. iron
19. to transport the oxygen throughout the body
20 - 21 Milk/cheese/yoghurt/anchovies/ green leafy vegetables [any two]
22. is involved in the synthesis of carbohydrates and proteins
23. (overall) growth
24. bones
25. (large molecules of) amino acids

Section C

26 (a) at the water’s edge (about 100 metres away)


(b) i) the blunt shape of its head seemed to be missing the
characteristic dolphin nose
ii) it blew wet air in the writer’s face
27 (a) he was alone and more than 3 km from town
(b) saved / moved the whale
28 (a) buoyant

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SULIT 1119/2

(b) to stop it beaching again


29 flick its tail
30 Any acceptable answers.

31
Marks for Style and Presentation are awarded based on the average sum total
(to the nearest rounded fraction/decimal) of Paraphrase and Use of English.
Annotate as follows :

Paraphrase = 5
Use of English = 4
-------
9 ÷ 2 = 4.5 = 5 marks

STYLE AND PRESENTATION DESCRIPTORS SUMMARY

MARKS PARAPHRASE MARKS USE OF ENGLISH

- a sustained attempt to - language is accurate


rephrase the text - occasional errors
- expression is secure - sentence structure varied
5 - difficult phrases from 5 - marked ability to use
Excellent text may be substituted Excellent original complex syntax
- punctuation accurate
- spelling correct
Throughout

- noticeable attempt to - language is almost always


rephrase the text always accurate
- free from stretches of - serious errors will be
4 lifting 4 isolated
Good - expression is generally Good - some variation of
secure sentences
- punctuation accurate
- spelling largely accurate

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SULIT 1119/2

- intelligent and selective language largely accurate


lifting but limited - simple structures
attempts to rephrase dominate
3 - expression may not 3 - serious errors not
Fair always be secure Fair frequent
but noticeable
- spelling nearly always
accurate

- total lifting of text but not - meaning is not in doubt


a complete transcript - serious errors more
- attempts to substitute but frequent
2 only for single words 2 - simple structures
Unsatisfactory - irrelevant sections more Unsatisfactory accurate but not
frequent maintained
- spelling accurate
- some irrelevant parts

- more or less a transcript - heavy frequency of errors


of the text - hampers reading
0-1 0-1
- no originality - fractured syntax /
Poor Poor
- irrelevant sections fragmented
copied

Summary Content
Each point scores 1 mark. Maximum : 10 marks
1. (managed to) roll it a few times
2. (a giant wave) picked the whale up and pushed it back
3. he tried to brace against the wave
4. he fell backwards underneath the whale
5. he couldn’t move
6. the water quickly surged up (his chin)
7. engulfing him
8. he (quickly) turned it face-first (into the oncoming waves)
9. he pushed the whale further into deeper water
10. the (next) wave came in

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SULIT 1119/2

11. the whale turned sideways (again)


12. he positioned himself between the whale and the shore
13. he talked to it
14. he gave it (an enormous) shove

Section D

32.
(a) - reading Tennyson
- listening to (downpouring) rain
- washing (their) feet for bed
- watching mother uncoiled her (snake) hair
- watching mother unbuckle her silver mesh
(accept any two)

(b) ticks
(c) accept any sensible answer

33.
(a) the necklace was paste/ was an imitation
(the idea of losing the necklace and replacing it)

(b) she looked old / she had changed / she looked like a poor woman
(any idea of her looking impoverished)
(c) “Oh, my poor Mathilde”
(d) accept any sensible answer

29
SULIT 1119/2

34.

1. Read the script carefully before deciding which band it best fits and the
content mark it deserves. If the response meets all or nearly all the
descriptors given in the bands, the response should be placed at the top level
of the mark range for that particular band.

2. Then assess the quality of writing under the provision for LANGUAGE.

3. The final mark will be expressed as CONTENT plus LANGUAGE and the total
is shown in the right hand margin of the script.

4. No response will fit perfectly into any band but examiners must judge which
level best fits the descriptors described in the bands.

Content and Language Descriptors

MARK CONTENT MARK LANGUAGE


RANGE RANGE
9-10 ~ A consistently relevant and 5 ~ The language is accurate
convincing response to the ~ Very well-organised
task specified
~ Always provides detailed
and well-developed textual
evidence

7-8 ~ Response is relevant to the 4 ~ The language is largely


task specified accurate
~ Usually provides textual ~ Well-organised
evidence with some
development

5-6 ~ Response is intermittently 3 ~ Frequent errors but


relevant to the task specified meaning is never in doubt
~ Provides some textual ~ Fairly well-organised
evidence with little
development

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SULIT 1119/2

3-4 ~ Response of little relevance 2 ~ Very frequent errors with


to the task specified blurring in meaning
~ Little textual evidence ~ Poorly organised

1-2 ~ Response has no 1 ~ Makes little or no sense at


relevance to the task all
specified ~ Lacks organisation
~ Has no understanding of
the requirements of the task

Note : The mark of 0 should only be awarded if


• the response is in a language other than English
• the response is not related to any of the novels

31

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