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18 January 2014

PLANETLIFE

18 January 2014 PLANET LIFE IN 2013, POACHERS SLAUGHTERED MORE RHINOS THAN EVER IN RECORDED HISTORYkilled 1,004 rhinos illegally in 2013, more than 1.5 times the number butchered in 2012. As we’ve covered before, the killing spree is linked to booming d e m a n d i n Vietnam and China for rhino horns, which, in pulverized form, are prized both as a luxury club drug and a cancer cure. Rhino horns now sell for as much as $500,000 per pound ($1.1 million per kilogram) in Asia, buoyed by spending driven by surging disposable incomes. South Africa’s 18,000 or so rhinos make up 83% of the Dolphins Slaughtered in Japan Page 3 world’s total rhino population, l o c a l r h i n o p o p u l a t i o n . and around three-quarters of wild rhinos, according to Traffic, a n o n - g o v e r n m e n t a l organization. The alarming increase in poaching over the past few years puts the animals Mozambique is the major transit point for rhino horn smuggling, says Tom Milliken, a rhino expert at Traffic. Mozambique’s former president, Joaquim Chissano, blames this on track for extinction by 2032, sad state of affairs on his researchers warn. country’s penury. “ Extreme South Africa has been cracking poverty encourages poaching ,” down harder on poachers this h e s a i d i n N o v e m b e r , year. But part of the problem is announcing the launch of a Mozambique. Ironically, in foundation to give would-be 2002, Mozambique and South poachers an alternative income Africa removed most of a border v i a c o n s e r v a t i o n - f o c u s e d fence in order to promote a commercial projects. “trans-frontier park” aimed at coordinating their conservation For more on this story visit: efforts. But this also makes it http://qz.com/168186/ e a s y f o r M o z a m b i c a n poachers to descended on South Africa’s Kruger National Park, now that they’ve wiped out their Satellite to Give Earth First Health Check Page 6 in-2013-poachers-slaughtered- more-rhinos-than-ever-in- recorded-history/ Emergency Management Lets Plan Together Page 12 1 " id="pdf-obj-0-7" src="pdf-obj-0-7.jpg">
18 January 2014 PLANET LIFE IN 2013, POACHERS SLAUGHTERED MORE RHINOS THAN EVER IN RECORDED HISTORYkilled 1,004 rhinos illegally in 2013, more than 1.5 times the number butchered in 2012. As we’ve covered before, the killing spree is linked to booming d e m a n d i n Vietnam and China for rhino horns, which, in pulverized form, are prized both as a luxury club drug and a cancer cure. Rhino horns now sell for as much as $500,000 per pound ($1.1 million per kilogram) in Asia, buoyed by spending driven by surging disposable incomes. South Africa’s 18,000 or so rhinos make up 83% of the Dolphins Slaughtered in Japan Page 3 world’s total rhino population, l o c a l r h i n o p o p u l a t i o n . and around three-quarters of wild rhinos, according to Traffic, a n o n - g o v e r n m e n t a l organization. The alarming increase in poaching over the past few years puts the animals Mozambique is the major transit point for rhino horn smuggling, says Tom Milliken, a rhino expert at Traffic. Mozambique’s former president, Joaquim Chissano, blames this on track for extinction by 2032, sad state of affairs on his researchers warn. country’s penury. “ Extreme South Africa has been cracking poverty encourages poaching ,” down harder on poachers this h e s a i d i n N o v e m b e r , year. But part of the problem is announcing the launch of a Mozambique. Ironically, in foundation to give would-be 2002, Mozambique and South poachers an alternative income Africa removed most of a border v i a c o n s e r v a t i o n - f o c u s e d fence in order to promote a commercial projects. “trans-frontier park” aimed at coordinating their conservation For more on this story visit: efforts. But this also makes it http://qz.com/168186/ e a s y f o r M o z a m b i c a n poachers to descended on South Africa’s Kruger National Park, now that they’ve wiped out their Satellite to Give Earth First Health Check Page 6 in-2013-poachers-slaughtered- more-rhinos-than-ever-in- recorded-history/ Emergency Management Lets Plan Together Page 12 1 " id="pdf-obj-0-9" src="pdf-obj-0-9.jpg">

IN 2013, POACHERS SLAUGHTERED MORE

RHINOS THAN EVER IN RECORDED HISTORY

By Gwynn Guilford, The Quartz, January 17, 2014

For South Africa’s dwindling white rhinoceros population, last year was the deadliest on record.

Poachers

illegally in 2013, more than 1.5

times the number butchered in

2012.

As

the

killing

spree

is

linked

to

booming d e m a n d

i n

Vietnam

and

China for rhino

horns,

which,

in

pulverized

form, are prized both as a luxury

club

drug and

a cancer

cure.

Rhino horns now sell for as

per

in

Asia, buoyed by spending driven

by surging disposable incomes.

 

South Africa’s

18,000

or

so

rhinos make up 83% of the

Dolphins Slaughtered in Japan Page 3
Dolphins Slaughtered in
Japan
Page 3

world’s total rhino population,

and around three-quarters of wild rhinos, according to Traffic, a n o n - g o v e r n m e n t a l organization. The alarming increase in poaching over the past few years puts the animals

Mozambique is the major transit point for rhino horn smuggling, says Tom Milliken, a rhino expert at Traffic. Mozambique’s former president, Joaquim Chissano, blames this

on track for extinction by 2032,

sad state of affairs on his

researchers warn.

country’s

penury.

Extreme

South Africa has been cracking

down harder on poachers this

h e

s a i d

i n

N o v e m b e r ,

year. But part of the problem is

announcing

the

launch

of

a

Mozambique.

Ironically,

in

foundation

to

give

would-be

2002, Mozambique and South

poachers an alternative income

Africa removed most of a border

v i a

c o n s e r v a t i o n - f o c u s e d

fence

in

order

to

promote a

commercial projects.

 

“trans-frontier park”

aimed

at

coordinating their conservation

For more on this story visit:

 

efforts.

But this

also makes

it

http://qz.com/168186/

e a s y f o r M o z a m b i c a n

poachers to descended on South Africa’s Kruger National Park, now that they’ve wiped out their

Satellite to Give Earth First Health Check Page 6
Satellite to Give Earth First
Health Check
Page 6

in-2013-poachers-slaughtered-

more-rhinos-than-ever-in-

recorded-history/ Emergency Management Lets Plan Together Page 12
recorded-history/
Emergency Management
Lets Plan Together
Page 12

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

THE ENVIRONMENT WOULD PAY FOR

FOR ‘FREE TRADE’

By Tom Warne-Smith, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, January 9th, 2014

Under the secretive Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement, Australia could be forced to pay foreign corporations not to dig up or destroy its coastline or native forests, writes Tom Warne-Smith. What would you do if an international company decided to stick a toxic waste dump next to your house? Lodging an objection with your council is a good start - but what if the company could claim millions of dollars in damages if the council said no? That's exactly what happened in Mexico when the municipality of Guadalcazar refused to issue a permit to build a waste dump because of the impact on the 800 surrounding residents and $16.6 million in 'compensation' was awarded to the dump's US owners. Get ready, because the laws that let this happen are coming to Australia too. A range of experts have recently highlighted the alarming potential consequences of the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). This 'free trade' agreement between countries will more than likely contain secretive Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) clauses, allowing foreign companies to sue national governments when changes to domestic laws affect the company's investments, and so limiting governments in the regulations they can make to protect the public. A lot has already been said about the disastrous effects of these clauses on public health initiatives, like plain packaging for cigarettes. While the thought of paying Philip Morris so Australia can have a law to protect the health of Australians is bad enough,

the effects

on our environment could also be

devastating.

When Germany's Hamburg Environmental Authority issued a licence imposing water quality standards on a coal-fired power plant, energy giant Vattenfall commenced investor-state arbitration against the German government, seeking about 1.4 billion, plus arbitration costs and interest. Ultimately Germany and Vattenfall settled the dispute, with Germany agreeing to weaken environmental standards in favour of the corporation. Vattenfall has now started proceedings claiming a reported 3.7 billion in compensation as a result of the German government's decision to phase out nuclear power. Under Australian federal environmental law there are a number of provisions which allow our environment minister to vary or revoke approvals for projects like mines in certain circumstances, such as when there is new evidence about the environmental effects. An Australian licence holder has to accept the minister's decision. But under the new rules, an international investor would be able to seek compensation for any loss of profits from the project. This opens up a legal nightmare. Imagine that there's been a bushfire, and an endangered Australian species has suffered a huge loss of habitat. If any Australian government then wanted to change a permit to stop a foreign company from clearing habitat that had become vital to the survival of this species, we would have to pay the company 'compensation'. Similarly, if our government made a decision to protect a rural community from coal seam gas extraction, a foreign investor could potentially take Australia to court and be compensated for their loss of earnings.

For more on this story visit:

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 THE ENVIRONMENT WOULD PAY FOR FOR ‘FREE TRADE’ By Tom Warne-Smith,$16.6 million in 'compensation' was awarded to the dump's US owners. Get ready, because the laws that let this happen are coming to Australia too. A range of experts have recently highlighted the alarming potential consequences of the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). This 'free trade' agreement between countries will more than likely contain secretive Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) clauses, allowing foreign companies to sue national governments when changes to domestic laws affect the company's investments, and so limiting governments in the regulations they can make to protect the public. A lot has already been said about the disastrous effects of these clauses on public health initiatives, like plain packaging for cigarettes. While the thought of paying Philip Morris so Australia can have a law to protect the health of Australians is bad enough, the effects on our environment could also be devastating. When Germany's Hamburg Environmental Authority issued a licence imposing water quality standards on a coal-fired power plant, energy giant Vattenfall commenced investor-state arbitration against the German government, seeking about € 1.4 billion, plus arbitration costs and interest. Ultimately Germany and Vattenfall settled the dispute, with Germany agreeing to weaken environmental standards in favour of the corporation. Vattenfall has now started proceedings claiming a reported € 3.7 billion in compensation as a result of the German government's decision to phase out nuclear power. Under Australian federal environmental law there are a number of provisions which allow our environment minister to vary or revoke approvals for projects like mines in certain circumstances, such as when there is new evidence about the environmental effects. An Australian licence holder has to accept the minister's decision. But under the new rules, an international investor would be able to seek compensation for any loss of profits from the project. This opens up a legal nightmare. Imagine that there's been a bushfire, and an endangered Australian species has suffered a huge loss of habitat. If any Australian government then wanted to change a permit to stop a foreign company from clearing habitat that had become vital to the survival of this species, we would have to pay the company 'compensation'. Similarly, if our government made a decision to protect a rural community from coal seam gas extraction, a foreign investor could potentially take Australia to court and be compensated for their loss of earnings. For more on this story visit: www.abc.net.au/news/ 2 " id="pdf-obj-1-35" src="pdf-obj-1-35.jpg">
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 THE ENVIRONMENT WOULD PAY FOR FOR ‘FREE TRADE’ By Tom Warne-Smith,$16.6 million in 'compensation' was awarded to the dump's US owners. Get ready, because the laws that let this happen are coming to Australia too. A range of experts have recently highlighted the alarming potential consequences of the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). This 'free trade' agreement between countries will more than likely contain secretive Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) clauses, allowing foreign companies to sue national governments when changes to domestic laws affect the company's investments, and so limiting governments in the regulations they can make to protect the public. A lot has already been said about the disastrous effects of these clauses on public health initiatives, like plain packaging for cigarettes. While the thought of paying Philip Morris so Australia can have a law to protect the health of Australians is bad enough, the effects on our environment could also be devastating. When Germany's Hamburg Environmental Authority issued a licence imposing water quality standards on a coal-fired power plant, energy giant Vattenfall commenced investor-state arbitration against the German government, seeking about € 1.4 billion, plus arbitration costs and interest. Ultimately Germany and Vattenfall settled the dispute, with Germany agreeing to weaken environmental standards in favour of the corporation. Vattenfall has now started proceedings claiming a reported € 3.7 billion in compensation as a result of the German government's decision to phase out nuclear power. Under Australian federal environmental law there are a number of provisions which allow our environment minister to vary or revoke approvals for projects like mines in certain circumstances, such as when there is new evidence about the environmental effects. An Australian licence holder has to accept the minister's decision. But under the new rules, an international investor would be able to seek compensation for any loss of profits from the project. This opens up a legal nightmare. Imagine that there's been a bushfire, and an endangered Australian species has suffered a huge loss of habitat. If any Australian government then wanted to change a permit to stop a foreign company from clearing habitat that had become vital to the survival of this species, we would have to pay the company 'compensation'. Similarly, if our government made a decision to protect a rural community from coal seam gas extraction, a foreign investor could potentially take Australia to court and be compensated for their loss of earnings. For more on this story visit: www.abc.net.au/news/ 2 " id="pdf-obj-1-37" src="pdf-obj-1-37.jpg">

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

OCEANLIFE

250 DOLPHINS ROUNDED UP IN JAPAN’S TAIJI COVE

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 OCEAN LIFE 250 DOLPHINS ROUNDED UP IN JAPAN’S TAIJI COVE ByJapan. It said it was the largest pod to be driven into the cove in several years. Pictures uploaded to Facebook show the captured dolphins swimming in circles in shallow waters. Sea Shepherd is using the hashtag #tweetfortaiji to raise awareness on social networks. The society said most of the pod faced slaughter for human consumption, with the meat likely to fetch millions of dollars. A few would be sent to captivity in marine parks, it said. Taiji shot to international prominence after the release of the 2009 Oscar-winning documentary The Cove. The town is in the middle of its traditional dolphin-hunting a dolphins will be selected for captivity," Sea Shepherd said. "Those not selected will be slaughtered for human consumption. This pod is far too valuable and worth millions of dollars. The baby albino dolphin alone is quite priceless." "It will be total of 19 hours before the " id="pdf-obj-2-11" src="pdf-obj-2-11.jpg">
By Nabeelah Shabbir, The Guardian, January 18th 2014 season, which runs between September and April.
By
Nabeelah
Shabbir,
The
Guardian,
January
18th 2014
season, which runs between September and
April.

Hundreds of bottlenose dolphins have been rounded up by Japanese fishermen and taken into captivity for slaughter in a town infamous for culling and killing the mammals, according to US conservationists.

The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society said a pod of more than 250 dolphins including babies, juveniles and a rare albino calf had been driven into a cove in Taiji, in south-east Japan.

It said it was the largest pod to be driven into the cove in several years. Pictures uploaded to Facebook show the captured dolphins swimming in circles in shallow waters. Sea Shepherd is using the hashtag #tweetfortaiji to raise awareness on social networks.

The

society

said

most

of

the

pod

faced

slaughter for human consumption, with the meat likely to fetch millions of dollars. A few would be sent to captivity in marine parks, it said.

Taiji shot to international prominence after the release of the 2009 Oscar-winning documentary The Cove. The town is in the middle of its traditional dolphin-hunting

a dolphins will be selected for captivity," Sea Shepherd said. "Those not selected will be slaughtered for human consumption. This pod is far too valuable and worth millions of dollars. The baby albino dolphin alone is quite priceless."

"It will

be

total of

19 hours before the

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 OCEAN LIFE 250 DOLPHINS ROUNDED UP IN JAPAN’S TAIJI COVE ByJapan. It said it was the largest pod to be driven into the cove in several years. Pictures uploaded to Facebook show the captured dolphins swimming in circles in shallow waters. Sea Shepherd is using the hashtag #tweetfortaiji to raise awareness on social networks. The society said most of the pod faced slaughter for human consumption, with the meat likely to fetch millions of dollars. A few would be sent to captivity in marine parks, it said. Taiji shot to international prominence after the release of the 2009 Oscar-winning documentary The Cove. The town is in the middle of its traditional dolphin-hunting a dolphins will be selected for captivity," Sea Shepherd said. "Those not selected will be slaughtered for human consumption. This pod is far too valuable and worth millions of dollars. The baby albino dolphin alone is quite priceless." "It will be total of 19 hours before the " id="pdf-obj-2-54" src="pdf-obj-2-54.jpg">
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 OCEAN LIFE 250 DOLPHINS ROUNDED UP IN JAPAN’S TAIJI COVE ByJapan. It said it was the largest pod to be driven into the cove in several years. Pictures uploaded to Facebook show the captured dolphins swimming in circles in shallow waters. Sea Shepherd is using the hashtag #tweetfortaiji to raise awareness on social networks. The society said most of the pod faced slaughter for human consumption, with the meat likely to fetch millions of dollars. A few would be sent to captivity in marine parks, it said. Taiji shot to international prominence after the release of the 2009 Oscar-winning documentary The Cove. The town is in the middle of its traditional dolphin-hunting a dolphins will be selected for captivity," Sea Shepherd said. "Those not selected will be slaughtered for human consumption. This pod is far too valuable and worth millions of dollars. The baby albino dolphin alone is quite priceless." "It will be total of 19 hours before the " id="pdf-obj-2-56" src="pdf-obj-2-56.jpg">

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

WHAT CAUSES EARTHQUAKES?

FAULTS EXPLAINED

By Dan Vergano, National Geographic, January 15th, 2014

We all have our faults, and that includes planet Earth. Earthquakes rattle the globe every day, big and small, most recently making news this week with temblors in Puerto Rico and southern California. They all spring from faults deep underground, but what kind? The impact and severity of each quake depends on the answer to that question. (See video:

"Earthquakes 101.") The Earth's crust is made of a jigsaw puzzle of continental and oceanic plates that are constantly ramming each other, sliding past each other, or pulling apart. Along the Ring of Fire girding the Pacific Ocean, for example, the seafloor plunges beneath Asia and the Americas, building mountains, feeding volcanoes, and triggering earthquakes. Most earthquakes arise along such fault zones. The ground first bends and

then snaps—an earthquake—to release energy along faults. Here are a list of the various ways Earth can shake.

Strike-Slip

When portions of the Earth's crust moves sideways, the result is a horizontal motion along a "strike-slip" fault. The most famous example is California's San Andreas Fault, which stretches some 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) from southern California to north of San Francisco. The sideways motion of the fault's branches is caused by the Pacific Ocean's crustal plate moving to

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 WHAT CAUSES EARTHQUAKES? FAULTS EXPLAINED By Dan Vergano, National Geographic, JanuaryEarthquakes rattle the globe every day, big and small, most recently making news this week with temblors in Puerto Rico and southern California . They all spring from faults deep underground, but what kind? The impact and severity of each quake depends on the answer to that question. (See video: "Earthquakes 101. ") The Earth's crust is made of a jigsaw puzzle of continental and oceanic plates that are constantly ramming each other, sliding past each other, or pulling apart. Along the Ring of Fire girding the Pacific Ocean, for example, the seafloor plunges beneath Asia and the Americas, building mountains, feeding volcanoes, and triggering earthquakes. Most earthquakes arise along such fault zones. The ground first bends and then snaps—an earthquake—to release energy along faults. Here are a list of the various ways Earth can shake. Strike-Slip When portions of the Earth's crust moves sideways, the result is a horizontal motion along a "strike-slip" fault. The most famous example is California's San Andreas Fault , which stretches some 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) from southern California to north of San Francisco. The sideways motion of the fault's branches is caused by the Pacific Ocean's crustal plate moving to the northwest under North America's continental crust. Dip-Slip U p - a n d - d o w n m o t i o n s i n earthquakes occur over so-called " dip-slip " faults, where the ground above the fault zone either drops (a normal fault) or is pushed up (a reverse fault). A normal fault occurs where the deeper part of the crust is pulling away from an overlying part. A reverse is, well, just the reverse. An example of a normal fault is the 240-mile (150-kilometer) long Wasatch Fault underlying parts of Utah and Idaho, again caused by the Pacific plate driving under western North America. One magnitude 7.0 quake along the fault perhaps 550 years ago dropped the ground on one side of the fault by three feet (a meter). The U.S. Geological Survey sees the fault as posing a risk of more magnitude 7.0 earthquakes. Oblique Faults that combine sideways with up-and-down motions are called oblique by seismologists. The Santa Clara Valley south of San Francisco holds a fault prone to oblique motions , for example, seen in a 1999 quake. Human-Induced It really takes the movement of crustal plates to uncork a massive earthquake, such as the magnitude 9.0 quake off the coast of Japan in 2011, which was caused by the Pacific plate moving under Asia. But humanity has figured out ways to trigger small quakes as well. Temblors can be triggered by pumping wastewater onto faults in deep disposal wells, as seen in quakes that occurred in Oklahoma, Texas, and Ohio in recent years. And football fans in Seattle have gained their own notoriety with the NFL playoffs upon us, triggering " Beast Quakes " detected by seismologists across the Pacific Northwest. The height of their seismic activity in last week's game came during a touchdown run. For more on this story visit: news.nationalgeographic.com EARTHQUAKES AROUND THE GLOBE THIS WEEK By Global Disaster Watch 5.8 ANDREANOF ISLANDS, 5.0 SOUTH OF KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.1 TAJIKISTAN 5.5 TONGA 5.2 TURKMENISTAN 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT ALEUTIAN IS. 6.4 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.0 MOLUCCA SEA 6.5 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.3 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES 5.3 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES HONSHU 5.1 RYUKYU ISLANDS, JAPAN 5.1 MOLUCCA SEA 5.5 GUATEMALA 5.2 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 VANUATU 5.1 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.3 KURIL ISLANDS HONSHU, JAPAN 5.7 KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.4 SAN JUAN, ARGENTINA " id="pdf-obj-3-37" src="pdf-obj-3-37.jpg">
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 WHAT CAUSES EARTHQUAKES? FAULTS EXPLAINED By Dan Vergano, National Geographic, JanuaryEarthquakes rattle the globe every day, big and small, most recently making news this week with temblors in Puerto Rico and southern California . They all spring from faults deep underground, but what kind? The impact and severity of each quake depends on the answer to that question. (See video: "Earthquakes 101. ") The Earth's crust is made of a jigsaw puzzle of continental and oceanic plates that are constantly ramming each other, sliding past each other, or pulling apart. Along the Ring of Fire girding the Pacific Ocean, for example, the seafloor plunges beneath Asia and the Americas, building mountains, feeding volcanoes, and triggering earthquakes. Most earthquakes arise along such fault zones. The ground first bends and then snaps—an earthquake—to release energy along faults. Here are a list of the various ways Earth can shake. Strike-Slip When portions of the Earth's crust moves sideways, the result is a horizontal motion along a "strike-slip" fault. The most famous example is California's San Andreas Fault , which stretches some 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) from southern California to north of San Francisco. The sideways motion of the fault's branches is caused by the Pacific Ocean's crustal plate moving to the northwest under North America's continental crust. Dip-Slip U p - a n d - d o w n m o t i o n s i n earthquakes occur over so-called " dip-slip " faults, where the ground above the fault zone either drops (a normal fault) or is pushed up (a reverse fault). A normal fault occurs where the deeper part of the crust is pulling away from an overlying part. A reverse is, well, just the reverse. An example of a normal fault is the 240-mile (150-kilometer) long Wasatch Fault underlying parts of Utah and Idaho, again caused by the Pacific plate driving under western North America. One magnitude 7.0 quake along the fault perhaps 550 years ago dropped the ground on one side of the fault by three feet (a meter). The U.S. Geological Survey sees the fault as posing a risk of more magnitude 7.0 earthquakes. Oblique Faults that combine sideways with up-and-down motions are called oblique by seismologists. The Santa Clara Valley south of San Francisco holds a fault prone to oblique motions , for example, seen in a 1999 quake. Human-Induced It really takes the movement of crustal plates to uncork a massive earthquake, such as the magnitude 9.0 quake off the coast of Japan in 2011, which was caused by the Pacific plate moving under Asia. But humanity has figured out ways to trigger small quakes as well. Temblors can be triggered by pumping wastewater onto faults in deep disposal wells, as seen in quakes that occurred in Oklahoma, Texas, and Ohio in recent years. And football fans in Seattle have gained their own notoriety with the NFL playoffs upon us, triggering " Beast Quakes " detected by seismologists across the Pacific Northwest. The height of their seismic activity in last week's game came during a touchdown run. For more on this story visit: news.nationalgeographic.com EARTHQUAKES AROUND THE GLOBE THIS WEEK By Global Disaster Watch 5.8 ANDREANOF ISLANDS, 5.0 SOUTH OF KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.1 TAJIKISTAN 5.5 TONGA 5.2 TURKMENISTAN 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT ALEUTIAN IS. 6.4 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.0 MOLUCCA SEA 6.5 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.3 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES 5.3 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES HONSHU 5.1 RYUKYU ISLANDS, JAPAN 5.1 MOLUCCA SEA 5.5 GUATEMALA 5.2 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 VANUATU 5.1 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.3 KURIL ISLANDS HONSHU, JAPAN 5.7 KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.4 SAN JUAN, ARGENTINA " id="pdf-obj-3-39" src="pdf-obj-3-39.jpg">

the northwest under North America's continental crust.

Dip-Slip

U p - a n d - d o w n m o t i o n s i n

earthquakes occur over so-called "dip-slip" faults, where the ground above the fault zone either drops (a normal fault) or is pushed up (a reverse fault). A normal fault occurs where the deeper part of the crust is pulling away from an overlying part. A reverse is, well, just the reverse. An example of a normal fault is the 240-mile (150-kilometer) long Wasatch Fault underlying parts of Utah and Idaho, again caused by the Pacific plate driving under western North America. One magnitude 7.0 quake along the fault perhaps 550 years ago dropped the ground on one side of the fault by three feet (a meter). The U.S. Geological Survey

sees the fault as posing a risk of more magnitude 7.0 earthquakes.

Oblique

Faults that combine sideways with up-and-down motions are called oblique by seismologists. The Santa Clara Valley

south of San Francisco holds a fault prone to oblique motions, for example, seen in a 1999 quake.

Human-Induced

It

really

takes

the

movement

of

crustal plates to uncork a massive earthquake, such as the magnitude 9.0 quake off the coast of Japan in 2011, which was caused by the Pacific plate

moving under Asia. But humanity has figured out ways to trigger small quakes as well.

Temblors can be triggered by pumping wastewater onto faults in deep disposal wells, as seen in quakes that occurred in Oklahoma, Texas, and Ohio in recent years. And football fans in Seattle have gained their own notoriety with the NFL playoffs upon us, triggering " Beast Quakes" detected by seismologists across the Pacific Northwest. The height of their seismic activity in last week's game came during a touchdown run. For more on this story visit:

news.nationalgeographic.com

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 WHAT CAUSES EARTHQUAKES? FAULTS EXPLAINED By Dan Vergano, National Geographic, JanuaryEarthquakes rattle the globe every day, big and small, most recently making news this week with temblors in Puerto Rico and southern California . They all spring from faults deep underground, but what kind? The impact and severity of each quake depends on the answer to that question. (See video: "Earthquakes 101. ") The Earth's crust is made of a jigsaw puzzle of continental and oceanic plates that are constantly ramming each other, sliding past each other, or pulling apart. Along the Ring of Fire girding the Pacific Ocean, for example, the seafloor plunges beneath Asia and the Americas, building mountains, feeding volcanoes, and triggering earthquakes. Most earthquakes arise along such fault zones. The ground first bends and then snaps—an earthquake—to release energy along faults. Here are a list of the various ways Earth can shake. Strike-Slip When portions of the Earth's crust moves sideways, the result is a horizontal motion along a "strike-slip" fault. The most famous example is California's San Andreas Fault , which stretches some 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) from southern California to north of San Francisco. The sideways motion of the fault's branches is caused by the Pacific Ocean's crustal plate moving to the northwest under North America's continental crust. Dip-Slip U p - a n d - d o w n m o t i o n s i n earthquakes occur over so-called " dip-slip " faults, where the ground above the fault zone either drops (a normal fault) or is pushed up (a reverse fault). A normal fault occurs where the deeper part of the crust is pulling away from an overlying part. A reverse is, well, just the reverse. An example of a normal fault is the 240-mile (150-kilometer) long Wasatch Fault underlying parts of Utah and Idaho, again caused by the Pacific plate driving under western North America. One magnitude 7.0 quake along the fault perhaps 550 years ago dropped the ground on one side of the fault by three feet (a meter). The U.S. Geological Survey sees the fault as posing a risk of more magnitude 7.0 earthquakes. Oblique Faults that combine sideways with up-and-down motions are called oblique by seismologists. The Santa Clara Valley south of San Francisco holds a fault prone to oblique motions , for example, seen in a 1999 quake. Human-Induced It really takes the movement of crustal plates to uncork a massive earthquake, such as the magnitude 9.0 quake off the coast of Japan in 2011, which was caused by the Pacific plate moving under Asia. But humanity has figured out ways to trigger small quakes as well. Temblors can be triggered by pumping wastewater onto faults in deep disposal wells, as seen in quakes that occurred in Oklahoma, Texas, and Ohio in recent years. And football fans in Seattle have gained their own notoriety with the NFL playoffs upon us, triggering " Beast Quakes " detected by seismologists across the Pacific Northwest. The height of their seismic activity in last week's game came during a touchdown run. For more on this story visit: news.nationalgeographic.com EARTHQUAKES AROUND THE GLOBE THIS WEEK By Global Disaster Watch 5.8 ANDREANOF ISLANDS, 5.0 SOUTH OF KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.1 TAJIKISTAN 5.5 TONGA 5.2 TURKMENISTAN 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT ALEUTIAN IS. 6.4 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.0 MOLUCCA SEA 6.5 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.3 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES 5.3 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES HONSHU 5.1 RYUKYU ISLANDS, JAPAN 5.1 MOLUCCA SEA 5.5 GUATEMALA 5.2 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 VANUATU 5.1 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.3 KURIL ISLANDS HONSHU, JAPAN 5.7 KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.4 SAN JUAN, ARGENTINA " id="pdf-obj-3-97" src="pdf-obj-3-97.jpg">
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 WHAT CAUSES EARTHQUAKES? FAULTS EXPLAINED By Dan Vergano, National Geographic, JanuaryEarthquakes rattle the globe every day, big and small, most recently making news this week with temblors in Puerto Rico and southern California . They all spring from faults deep underground, but what kind? The impact and severity of each quake depends on the answer to that question. (See video: "Earthquakes 101. ") The Earth's crust is made of a jigsaw puzzle of continental and oceanic plates that are constantly ramming each other, sliding past each other, or pulling apart. Along the Ring of Fire girding the Pacific Ocean, for example, the seafloor plunges beneath Asia and the Americas, building mountains, feeding volcanoes, and triggering earthquakes. Most earthquakes arise along such fault zones. The ground first bends and then snaps—an earthquake—to release energy along faults. Here are a list of the various ways Earth can shake. Strike-Slip When portions of the Earth's crust moves sideways, the result is a horizontal motion along a "strike-slip" fault. The most famous example is California's San Andreas Fault , which stretches some 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) from southern California to north of San Francisco. The sideways motion of the fault's branches is caused by the Pacific Ocean's crustal plate moving to the northwest under North America's continental crust. Dip-Slip U p - a n d - d o w n m o t i o n s i n earthquakes occur over so-called " dip-slip " faults, where the ground above the fault zone either drops (a normal fault) or is pushed up (a reverse fault). A normal fault occurs where the deeper part of the crust is pulling away from an overlying part. A reverse is, well, just the reverse. An example of a normal fault is the 240-mile (150-kilometer) long Wasatch Fault underlying parts of Utah and Idaho, again caused by the Pacific plate driving under western North America. One magnitude 7.0 quake along the fault perhaps 550 years ago dropped the ground on one side of the fault by three feet (a meter). The U.S. Geological Survey sees the fault as posing a risk of more magnitude 7.0 earthquakes. Oblique Faults that combine sideways with up-and-down motions are called oblique by seismologists. The Santa Clara Valley south of San Francisco holds a fault prone to oblique motions , for example, seen in a 1999 quake. Human-Induced It really takes the movement of crustal plates to uncork a massive earthquake, such as the magnitude 9.0 quake off the coast of Japan in 2011, which was caused by the Pacific plate moving under Asia. But humanity has figured out ways to trigger small quakes as well. Temblors can be triggered by pumping wastewater onto faults in deep disposal wells, as seen in quakes that occurred in Oklahoma, Texas, and Ohio in recent years. And football fans in Seattle have gained their own notoriety with the NFL playoffs upon us, triggering " Beast Quakes " detected by seismologists across the Pacific Northwest. The height of their seismic activity in last week's game came during a touchdown run. For more on this story visit: news.nationalgeographic.com EARTHQUAKES AROUND THE GLOBE THIS WEEK By Global Disaster Watch 5.8 ANDREANOF ISLANDS, 5.0 SOUTH OF KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.1 TAJIKISTAN 5.5 TONGA 5.2 TURKMENISTAN 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT ALEUTIAN IS. 6.4 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.0 MOLUCCA SEA 6.5 PUERTO RICO REGION 5.3 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES 5.3 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES HONSHU 5.1 RYUKYU ISLANDS, JAPAN 5.1 MOLUCCA SEA 5.5 GUATEMALA 5.2 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS 5.0 VANUATU 5.1 NEAR EAST COAST OF 5.3 KURIL ISLANDS HONSHU, JAPAN 5.7 KERMADEC ISLANDS 5.4 SAN JUAN, ARGENTINA " id="pdf-obj-3-99" src="pdf-obj-3-99.jpg">

EARTHQUAKES

AROUND THE GLOBE THIS WEEK

By Global Disaster Watch

  • 5.8 ANDREANOF ISLANDS,

  • 5.0 SOUTH OF KERMADEC

ISLANDS

  • 5.1 TAJIKISTAN

  • 5.5 TONGA

  • 5.2 TURKMENISTAN

  • 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT

  • 5.0 TAIWAN STRAIT

ALEUTIAN IS.

  • 6.4 PUERTO RICO REGION

  • 5.0 MOLUCCA SEA

  • 6.5 PUERTO RICO REGION

  • 5.3 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS

  • 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES

  • 5.3 NEAR EAST COAST OF

  • 5.0 MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES

HONSHU

  • 5.1 RYUKYU ISLANDS, JAPAN

  • 5.1 MOLUCCA SEA

  • 5.5 GUATEMALA

  • 5.2 SANTA CRUZ ISLANDS

  • 5.0 VANUATU

  • 5.1 NEAR EAST COAST OF

  • 5.3 KURIL ISLANDS

HONSHU, JAPAN

  • 5.7 KERMADEC ISLANDS

  • 5.4 SAN JUAN, ARGENTINA

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

 
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 DANGEROUS POLLUTION HITS THE CHINESE CAPITAL AS INDEX HITS TOP OF
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 DANGEROUS POLLUTION HITS THE CHINESE CAPITAL AS INDEX HITS TOP OF
 

DANGEROUS POLLUTION HITS THE CHINESE CAPITAL

AS INDEX HITS TOP OF SCALE

By Australia Network New, January 17th, 2014

China's capital has been shrouded in dangerous smog, cutting visibility down to a few hundred metres. A count of small particulate pollution reached more than 25 times recommended levels. A grey haze filled the sky, leaving an industrial, burning smell hanging in the air. The official air quality index reached the top of the scale at

500.

China's cities are often hit by heavy pollution, blamed on coal-burning by power stations and industry, as well as vehicle use.

It's become a major source of discontent with the ruling Communist Party. "I can't believe how bad it is," said US tourist Richard Deutsch in Tiananmen Square in central Beijing, which was shrouded in heavy smog. "I have never experienced air this bad. "It's worse than LA. "I feel kind of bad for the people, it's taking years off their

life."

Authorities have become more open about pollution levels, in part as a response to public pressure. But officials have implied that it will take years before the situation improves. The pollution has been linked to hundreds of thousands of premature deaths, and has tarnished the image of Chinese cities including Beijing, which saw a 10 percent drop in tourist visits during most of 2013. "There are less and less tourists coming to Beijing," said tourist guide Xiao Yan. "It's normal as people keep on talking about the bad air quality on the internet." China's State Council said last year that "concentrations of fine particles" in the capital's air would fall by approximately 25 percent from 2012 levels by 2017. Other major Chinese cities on China's affluent east coast, including Shanghai and Guangzhou, will see reductions of between 10 and 20 percent from 2012 levels over the same period, it said. China is the world's biggest coal consumer and is forecast to account for more than half of global demand this year.

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014
PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

Unless "explicit efforts" are made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the experts warned that increased conservation and efficiency will not be sufficient to counter their rise.

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014 Unless "explicit efforts" are made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the experts

ANOTHER UN WARNING ON OUR CLIMATE

When will non action be seen as negligence?

http://www.news.com.au

DELAYING action on global warming will only increase the costs and reduce the options for dealing with the worst effects of climate change, according to a draft report by UN experts.

The final draft of the report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, obtained on Thursday by The Associated Press, says that global warming will continue to increase unless countries shift quickly to clean energy and cut emissions. It said that despite national policies and international efforts aimed at mitigating climate change, emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that are warming the planet grew 2.2 per cent per year on average between 2000 and 2010, compared with 1.3 per cent per year from 1970 to 2000. The two main drivers for the increasing emissions are economic growth, which has risen sharply, and population growth, which has remained roughly steady, the report said. The largest contributor to global emissions results from the burning of oil and coal - and the draft report said its contribution is expected to rise.

Unless "explicit efforts" are made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the experts warned that increased conservation and efficiency will not be sufficient to counter their rise. With increasing demand for energy and the growing use of coal to generate electricity, the experts said emissions from the sector are projected to double or triple by 2050 from the level in 2010 unless improvements in clean energy are "significantly accelerated". International climate negotiators agreed at the 2009 UN climate change conference in Copenhagen that global warming this century must increase by less than 2C to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Scientists say that target requires atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas, to stay below 530 parts per million. The level recently surpassed 400 parts per million. The report said the majority of scenarios to stay below 530 parts per million throughout the 21st century would require a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions between 40 per cent and 70 per cent of 2010 levels by 2050. The experts said this will require new patterns of investment and a transformation into a low-carbon economy. The global total annual investment in the energy system is presently about $US1.2 trillion ($A1.36 trillion), it said.

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

SATELLITE TO GIVE EARTH

FIRST HEALTH CHECK

By Jonathan Amos, BBC, January 17th, 2014

The date has been set for the roll-out of the European Union's multi-billion-euro Earth observation project. Copernicus will fly a constellation of satellites known as the Sentinels to take a continuous "health check" on the planet and to acquire data that can help inform and enforce EU policies. It has been announced that the first spacecraft in the series will go into orbit, most likely, in early April. Sentinel 1a will use radar to map the surface of the Earth. Its information will find myriad uses, from monitoring European coastal waters for oil spills to investigating subsidence in cities. A key role also will be to provide rapid damage maps to enable emergency services and aid agencies to respond to natural disasters such as earthquakes and severe flooding events. Sentinel 1a is undergoing final testing at prime contractor Thales Alenia Space, at its facility in Cannes, France. Shortly, it will be transferred to Turin, Italy, where it will take an Antonov transport plane to the Guianese spaceport in South America. There it will be fuelled and attached to its Soyuz rocket, ready for an ascent no earlier than 28 March. "We're making every effort to meet this date, but it's tight," said European Space Agency (Esa) director general, Jean-Jacques Dordain. "The industrial teams are working double shifts, pretty much seven days a week," he told BBC News. 1 April is his anticipated launch date.

Copernicus is one of

two flagship EU space

projects, the other being the Galileo satellite- navigation system. European states have so far committed some 7.5bn euros (£6.2bn; $10.2bn) to the end of the decade to build and operate Copernicus. As such, it represents the biggest civilian Earth- observation project ever conceived, says Josef Aschbacher, the head of Esa's Copernicus office. "Typically in Europe, we're always looking across the Atlantic and if we see something we like, we build a smaller version of it here. But something like Copernicus doesn't exist anywhere else in the world, and that's why our American and other international partners are extremely interested in collaborating." Satellites are at their most powerful when their data is continuous and unbroken in time. To that end, the vision for Copernicus is that becomes an open-ended mission of overlapping satellites. A Sentinel 1b is already in production, with early discussions already taking place on the procurement of the 1c and 1d models. Likewise, the first satellites in the Sentinel 2 and 3 series are well advanced. These will carry instruments focused on changes that occur over time in land cover and ocean behaviour, and will launch next year. Atmospheric sensors known as Sentinel 4 and 5 will go up later this decade. Sentinel 6 will continue the work of a current satellite that measures the height and shape of ocean surfaces.

For more on this story visit: www.bbc.co.uk

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 SATELLITE TO GIVE EARTH FIRST HEALTH CHECK By Jonathan Amos, BBC,

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

TWENTY-SIX TIPS TO BEAT THE HEAT

WITHOUT AIR-CONDITIONING

By Australian Broadcasting Corporation, January 15th 2014

The heat is on, literally. It's sticky, uncomfortable and downright dangerous. Heatwaves are nothing new in Australia, but they're becoming longer, hotter and more common. This is serious. 173 Australians lost their lives during the Black Saturday bushfires, but an estimated 400-plus people were killed by the heatwave that led up to it. Infants, the elderly and people with certain heart conditions can be vulnerable to heat-related illness. If available, such people should certainly use air-conditioning. But not all of us have access to air-con. And when you turn on an air-conditioner, it can be expensive and it releases climate-changing greenhouse gases. Here's out list of 26 ways to beat the heat without an air- conditioner.

House

1.

Prevention is better than cure. Keep curtains and

blinds

closed during the day

to block

the heat and direct

sunlight.

2.

Close windows once the outside air is warmer than

indoors.

3.

At night, once the mercury drops, purge the

accumulated hot air by opening windows and doors.

4.

Halogen lights, dishwashers, cooking appliances and

dryers all produce heat. Avoid using them during the hottest

part of the day. Halogen lights are worth replacing to save energy, anyway.

5.

Improvise an evaporative cooler by drying a load of

washing in front of a fan. Sun exposure, especially when it's

intense, gradually fades coloured fabric, so this is a great way to dry coloured loads.

6.

Heat rises. If you have a two-storey house, stay

downstairs. Sleep there, too.

 
 

People

7.

Keep the family

cool and

hydrated. Keep a jug of

drinking water in the fridge.

8.

Stay cool from the inside out. For cooling snacks,

make yoghurt, juice or pureed fruit icy-poles. Or put an icy

pole stick into a fresh, ripe banana and freeze it.

9.

Sitting for a while? Soak your feet in cold water. Add

some grated ginger and bicarb soda just for fun.

  • 10. Cool your caffeine. Try

instead of hot tea or coffee.

iced tea or an affogato,

  • 11. Electric fans create cooling air movement using

minimal electricity. For extra cooling, keep a spray bottle

handy and regularly mist yourself with water.

  • 12. But remember that a fan only works when it is

blowing on you. If you're not in the room, switch it off.

  • 13. Barley, rice or wheat-filled bags (used in winter as

'heat packs') can be put in the freezer and used as personal ice packs.

  • 14. It's the best excuse you'll get to skip your lunchtime

jog. Avoid excessive activity or switch to exercising very early in the day or very late in the evening, when it is cooler.

  • 15. If you've got children, submerge some plastic toys in

an ice-cream container filled with water. Freeze it. Then tell

the kids they're on an ice fortress rescue mission!

Animals

  • 16. Make sure pets have adequate shade, ventilation and

water. You might have to bring them indoors for the day.

  • 17. Find a shady spot in the garden and use a kids'

clamshell as a paddling pool for your dog. Keep it topped up

with clean water.

  • 18. Leave out bowls of water in shady areas for wildlife.

Also see Wildlife Victoria's factsheet for advice regarding heat

stressed wildlife.

  • 19. If

Out and About

you have to venture outdoors, protect yourself

from the sun's harmful UV rays by covering up with light,

loose clothing, a hat and sunscreen, à la the original Slip Slop Slap SunSmart campaign.

  • 20. Use reflective sunshades in the car. Open windows to

purge the hot air when you first get in, before turning on cooling.

  • 21. Escape the heat at air-conditioned cinemas, art

galleries, libraries and other public buildings.

Serious stuff

  • 22. As we mentioned earlier, some members of society

are more vulnerable to heat stress. Follow these tips for

keeping babies and children safe in hot weather. See the Heart Foundation's information on heatwaves. Also keep tabs on elderly family members and neighbours during heatwaves.

  • 23. Don't leave anything that has a heartbeat (animals,

children) in a locked car, even with the windows down. Temperatures inside cars can be as much as 20 to 30 degrees hotter than the outside temperature.

Long-Term Ideas

  • 24. Put up exterior shade sails or grow deciduous vines

over a pergola, particularly on the western side of your house.

  • 25. Insulate your home.

  • 26. The most energy efficient way to stay cool is to live in

a well-designed home. If you're building or renovating, aim for a house that keeps cool without air-conditioning. Remember that there are often power outages on days of

extreme heat, when the electricity grid struggles to cope. Efficient eco houses, like Josh's house in Perth, are the ones

sitting cool and pretty when the power is out.

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 TWENTY-SIX TIPS TO BEAT THE HEAT WITHOUT AIR-CONDITIONING By Australian Broadcastinglonger, hotter and more common . This is serious. 173 Australians lost their lives during the Black Saturday bushfires, but an estimated 400-plus people were killed by the heatwave that led up to it. Infants, the elderly and people with certain heart conditions can be vulnerable to heat-related illness. If available, such people should certainly use air-conditioning. But not all of us have access to air-con. And when you turn on an air-conditioner, it can be expensive and it releases climate-changing greenhouse gases. Here's out list of 26 ways to beat the heat without an air- conditioner. House 1. Prevention is better than cure. Keep curtains and blinds closed during the day to block the heat and direct sunlight. 2. Close windows once the outside air is warmer than indoors. 3. At night, once the mercury drops, purge the accumulated hot air by opening windows and doors. 4. Halogen lights, dishwashers, cooking appliances and dryers all produce heat. Avoid using them during the hottest part of the day. Halogen lights are worth replacing to save energy, anyway. 5. Improvise an evaporative cooler by drying a load of washing in front of a fan. Sun exposure, especially when it's intense, gradually fades coloured fabric, so this is a great way to dry coloured loads. 6. Heat rises. If you have a two-storey house, stay downstairs. Sleep there, too. People 7. Keep the family cool and hydrated. Keep a jug of drinking water in the fridge. 8. Stay cool from the inside out. For cooling snacks, make yoghurt, juice or pureed fruit icy-poles. Or put an icy pole stick into a fresh, ripe banana and freeze it. 9. Sitting for a while? Soak your feet in cold water. Add some grated ginger and bicarb soda just for fun. 10. Cool your caffeine. Try instead of hot tea or coffee. iced tea or an affogato, 11. Electric fans create cooling air movement using minimal electricity. For extra cooling, keep a spray bottle handy and regularly mist yourself with water. 12. But remember that a fan only works when it is blowing on you. If you're not in the room, switch it off. 13. Barley, rice or wheat-filled bags (used in winter as 'heat packs') can be put in the freezer and used as personal ice packs. 14. It's the best excuse you'll get to skip your lunchtime jog. Avoid excessive activity or switch to exercising very early in the day or very late in the evening, when it is cooler. 15. If you've got children, submerge some plastic toys in an ice-cream container filled with water. Freeze it. Then tell the kids they're on an ice fortress rescue mission! Animals 16. Make sure pets have adequate shade, ventilation and water. You might have to bring them indoors for the day. 17. Find a shady spot in the garden and use a kids' clamshell as a paddling pool for your dog. Keep it topped up with clean water. 18. Leave out bowls of water in shady areas for wildlife. Also see Wildlife Victoria's factsheet f or advice regarding heat stressed wildlife. 19. If Out and About you have to venture outdoors, protect yourself from the sun's harmful UV rays by covering up with light, loose clothing, a hat and sunscreen, à la the original Slip Slop Slap S unSmart campaign. 20. Use reflective sunshades in the car. Open windows to purge the hot air when you first get in, before turning on cooling. 21. Escape the heat at air-conditioned cinemas, art galleries, libraries and other public buildings. Serious stuff 22. As we mentioned earlier, some members of society are more vulnerable to heat stress. Follow these tips for keeping babies and children safe in hot weather. See the Heart Foundation's information o n heatwaves. Also keep tabs on elderly family members and neighbours during heatwaves. 23. Don't leave anything that has a heartbeat (animals, children) in a locked car, even with the windows down. Temperatures inside cars can be as much as 20 to 30 degrees hotter than the outside temperature. Long-Term Ideas 24. Put up exterior shade sails or grow deciduous vines over a pergola, particularly on the western side of your house. 25. Insulate your home. 26. The most energy efficient way to stay cool is to live in a well-designed home. If you're building or renovating, aim for a house that keeps cool without air-conditioning. Remember that there are often power outages on days of extreme heat, when the electricity grid struggles to cope. Efficient eco houses, like Josh's house i n Perth, are the ones sitting cool and pretty when the power is out. " id="pdf-obj-7-234" src="pdf-obj-7-234.jpg">

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

ANIMALLIFE

WEST

AFRICAN

LIONS

CLOSE

TO

EXTINCTION WITH ONLY 400 LEFT

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 ANIMAL LIFE WEST AFRICAN LIONS CLOSE TO EXTINCTION WITH ONLY 400published in scientific journal PLOS ONE, says the lions are now only present in 1.1 per cent of their original habitat. It recommends they be classified as "critically endangered". Conservation efforts in a region known for its poverty and political instability, have been weak compared to other parts of Africa, and the population density is about 15 times lower compared with lions in east Africa, the study says. Parks in the region typically have four staff or fewer per 100 square kilometres, it adds. One of the main reasons for the decline is the conversion of habitat into farm land. Others included sharp falls in the numbers of antelope, buffalo, and other prey, and villagers killing lions in revenge for the loss of livestock. "It's become very complicated for this carnivore at the top of the food chain to find enough space and food to survive," Dr Hunter said. " id="pdf-obj-8-21" src="pdf-obj-8-21.jpg">

By Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 15th, 2014

January

The

West

A frican

lion,

which

once

numbered in the tens of thousands, could be

extinct within 10 years, a conservation group says.

Panthera, the global organisation dedicated to protecting wild cats, carried out research in 17 West African countries and found there were only around 400 of the species left. Fewer than 250 of them are of breeding age, the study says. And even then, their ability to produce cubs is limited by the fact they are spread across wide areas in groups that often do not have enough lionesses to sustain a population. Panthera president Dr Luke Hunter says humans are the biggest threat to the West African lion, a relatively slender animal with a thin mane that is genetically distinct from the rest of the African species. "Very poor human populations are converting natural, pristine savannas into

agriculture and areas for their livestock to maintain their own populations and what that means is that it really leaves no habitat and nothing to eat for lions," he said. "These lions are standing on a cliff looking at the chasm of extinction. "It would be very easy for small, isolated populations to be wiped out over the next five to 10 years." Call for 'critically endangered' tag The study, published in scientific journal PLOS ONE, says the lions are now only present in 1.1 per cent of their original habitat. It recommends they be classified as "critically endangered". Conservation efforts in a region known for its poverty and political instability, have been weak compared to other parts of Africa, and the population density is about 15 times lower compared with lions in east Africa, the study says.

Parks in the region typically have four staff or fewer per 100 square kilometres, it adds. One of the main reasons for the decline is the conversion of habitat into farm land. Others included sharp falls in the numbers of antelope, buffalo, and other prey, and villagers killing lions in revenge for the loss of livestock. "It's become very complicated for this carnivore at the top of the food chain to find enough space and food to survive," Dr Hunter said.

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 ANIMAL LIFE WEST AFRICAN LIONS CLOSE TO EXTINCTION WITH ONLY 400published in scientific journal PLOS ONE, says the lions are now only present in 1.1 per cent of their original habitat. It recommends they be classified as "critically endangered". Conservation efforts in a region known for its poverty and political instability, have been weak compared to other parts of Africa, and the population density is about 15 times lower compared with lions in east Africa, the study says. Parks in the region typically have four staff or fewer per 100 square kilometres, it adds. One of the main reasons for the decline is the conversion of habitat into farm land. Others included sharp falls in the numbers of antelope, buffalo, and other prey, and villagers killing lions in revenge for the loss of livestock. "It's become very complicated for this carnivore at the top of the food chain to find enough space and food to survive," Dr Hunter said. " id="pdf-obj-8-54" src="pdf-obj-8-54.jpg">
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 ANIMAL LIFE WEST AFRICAN LIONS CLOSE TO EXTINCTION WITH ONLY 400published in scientific journal PLOS ONE, says the lions are now only present in 1.1 per cent of their original habitat. It recommends they be classified as "critically endangered". Conservation efforts in a region known for its poverty and political instability, have been weak compared to other parts of Africa, and the population density is about 15 times lower compared with lions in east Africa, the study says. Parks in the region typically have four staff or fewer per 100 square kilometres, it adds. One of the main reasons for the decline is the conversion of habitat into farm land. Others included sharp falls in the numbers of antelope, buffalo, and other prey, and villagers killing lions in revenge for the loss of livestock. "It's become very complicated for this carnivore at the top of the food chain to find enough space and food to survive," Dr Hunter said. " id="pdf-obj-8-56" src="pdf-obj-8-56.jpg">

PLANETLIFE 18 JANUARY 2014

SPACELIFE

CONTINENTS ON ALIEN WORLDS COULD HINT AT EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE

PLANET LIFE 18 JANUARY 2014 SPACE LIFE CONTINENTS ON ALIEN WORLDS COULD HINT AT EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFEextraterrestrial life , scientists added. Earth is currently the only known planet in the universe that has liquid water on its surface. There is life virtually wherever there is liquid water on Earth, so one main focus of the search for extraterrestrial life as we know it is the region around a star where it is neither too hot nor too cold for liquid water to exist on a planet, an area known as the star's habitable zone. Although water covers most of Earth's surface, nearly 30 percent of the planet is covered by land, sustaining a dazzling variety of life. Scientists might one day be capable of telling if distant planets are similarly covered by land, oceans and clouds by looking for reddish, bluish or grayish tints in the color of those worlds. Researchers have already developed maps of clouds on a giant planet orbiting a distant star. Now researchers suggest Earth would have been a water world with very few continents, if any at all, without the presence of life. A great deal of research has shown that life has had a major impact on the evolution of Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Plants and other photosynthetic life generate oxygen, giving Earth the only known atmosphere in the universe with significant levels of oxygen. Life also greatly influences how much carbon is in the atmosphere and oceans in the form of carbon dioxide and methane. These greenhouse gases trap heat and can dramatically affect Earth's climate, which in turn has an effect on how much of Earth's water is frozen as ice. Oxygen can also indirectly cool Earth's climate by removing methane from the atmosphere — in fact, the dramatic rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere about 2.4 billion years ago, known as the Great Oxidation Event, may have cooled the planet enough to for it become a frozen " Snowball Earth ." "However, much less is known about whether life has had any effects on the deeper interior of Earth," said study author Tilman Spohn, a planetary scientist at the German Aerospace Center's Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin. For more on this story visit: www.space.com EDWARD SNOWDEN HAS TOP SECRET DOCUMENTS ABOUT US WORKING WITH ALIENS IN GOVERNMENT AREAS By ufosightings.com, January 18th, 2014 Iran may have some inside information from its informatives in China and Russia, because they currently believe that Edward Snowden had top secret information about the US and Alien alliance making the US a world power. Iran states: "incontrovertible proof that an alien/ extraterrestrial intelligence agenda is driving US domestic and international policy." I have to admit, I didn't know Iran was so advanced in their thinking. Yes, the US has been working with aliens all the way back to the 1950s when Val Valient Thor visited President Eisenhower in the pentagon . Yes they even have photos and eyewitnesses to ... that event. Looks like countries around the world are wising up about how the US has become so powerful. If those countries also begin attempting communication with aliens using experimental methods, America might not be a world power for long. " id="pdf-obj-9-11" src="pdf-obj-9-11.jpg">

By Charles Q. Choi, Astrobiology Magazine, January 13th, 2014

If not for life, Earth may not have possessed the continents it does now, instead becoming a planet covered nearly entirely in ocean, researchers say. These new findings suggest that any continents astronomers may one day see on alien worlds may potentially be signs of extraterrestrial life, scientists added. Earth is currently the only known planet in the universe that has liquid water on its surface. There is life virtually wherever there is liquid water on Earth, so one main focus of the search for extraterrestrial life as we know it is the region

around a star where it is neither too hot nor too cold for liquid water to exist on a planet, an area known as the star's habitable zone. Although water covers most of Earth's surface, nearly 30 percent of the planet is covered by land, sustaining a dazzling variety of life. Scientists might one day be capable of telling if distant planets are similarly covered by land,

oceans and clouds by looking for reddish, bluish or grayish tints in the color of those worlds. Researchers have already developed maps of clouds on a giant planet orbiting a distant star. Now researchers suggest Earth would have been a water world with very few continents, if any at all, without the presence of life. A great deal of research has shown that life has had a major impact on the evolution of Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Plants and other photosynthetic life generate oxygen, giving Earth the only known atmosphere in the universe with significant levels of oxygen. Life also greatly influences how much carbon is in the atmosphere and oceans in the form of carbon dioxide and methane. These greenhouse gases trap heat and can dramatically affect Earth's climate, which in turn has an effect on how much of Earth's water is frozen as ice. Oxygen can also indirectly cool Earth's climate by removing methane from the atmosphere — in fact, the dramatic rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere about 2.4 billion years ago, known as the Great Oxidation Event, may have cooled the planet enough to for it become a frozen "Snowball Earth." "However, much less is known about whether life has had any effects on the deeper interior of Earth," said study author Tilman Spohn, a planetary scientist at the German Aerospace Center's Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin.

For more on this story visit:

www.space.com

PLANET LIFE 18 JANUARY 2014 SPACE LIFE CONTINENTS ON ALIEN WORLDS COULD HINT AT EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFEextraterrestrial life , scientists added. Earth is currently the only known planet in the universe that has liquid water on its surface. There is life virtually wherever there is liquid water on Earth, so one main focus of the search for extraterrestrial life as we know it is the region around a star where it is neither too hot nor too cold for liquid water to exist on a planet, an area known as the star's habitable zone. Although water covers most of Earth's surface, nearly 30 percent of the planet is covered by land, sustaining a dazzling variety of life. Scientists might one day be capable of telling if distant planets are similarly covered by land, oceans and clouds by looking for reddish, bluish or grayish tints in the color of those worlds. Researchers have already developed maps of clouds on a giant planet orbiting a distant star. Now researchers suggest Earth would have been a water world with very few continents, if any at all, without the presence of life. A great deal of research has shown that life has had a major impact on the evolution of Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Plants and other photosynthetic life generate oxygen, giving Earth the only known atmosphere in the universe with significant levels of oxygen. Life also greatly influences how much carbon is in the atmosphere and oceans in the form of carbon dioxide and methane. These greenhouse gases trap heat and can dramatically affect Earth's climate, which in turn has an effect on how much of Earth's water is frozen as ice. Oxygen can also indirectly cool Earth's climate by removing methane from the atmosphere — in fact, the dramatic rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere about 2.4 billion years ago, known as the Great Oxidation Event, may have cooled the planet enough to for it become a frozen " Snowball Earth ." "However, much less is known about whether life has had any effects on the deeper interior of Earth," said study author Tilman Spohn, a planetary scientist at the German Aerospace Center's Institute of Planetary Research in Berlin. For more on this story visit: www.space.com EDWARD SNOWDEN HAS TOP SECRET DOCUMENTS ABOUT US WORKING WITH ALIENS IN GOVERNMENT AREAS By ufosightings.com, January 18th, 2014 Iran may have some inside information from its informatives in China and Russia, because they currently believe that Edward Snowden had top secret information about the US and Alien alliance making the US a world power. Iran states: "incontrovertible proof that an alien/ extraterrestrial intelligence agenda is driving US domestic and international policy." I have to admit, I didn't know Iran was so advanced in their thinking. Yes, the US has been working with aliens all the way back to the 1950s when Val Valient Thor visited President Eisenhower in the pentagon . Yes they even have photos and eyewitnesses to ... that event. Looks like countries around the world are wising up about how the US has become so powerful. If those countries also begin attempting communication with aliens using experimental methods, America might not be a world power for long. " id="pdf-obj-9-36" src="pdf-obj-9-36.jpg">

EDWARD SNOWDEN HAS TOP SECRET DOCUMENTS ABOUT US WORKING WITH ALIENS IN GOVERNMENT AREAS

By ufosightings.com, January 18th, 2014

Iran may have some inside information from its informatives in China and Russia, because they currently believe that Edward Snowden had top secret information about the US and Alien alliance making the US a world power. Iran states: "incontrovertible proof that an alien/ extraterrestrial intelligence agenda is driving US domestic and international policy." I have to admit, I didn't know Iran was so advanced in their thinking. Yes, the US has been working with aliens all the way back to the 1950s when Val Valient Thor visited President Eisenhower in the

pentagon. Yes

they

even have photos and eyewitnesses to

... that event. Looks like countries around the world are wising up about how the US has become so powerful. If those countries also begin attempting communication with aliens using experimental methods, America might not be a world power for long.

PLANETLIFE 18 January 2014

HEALTHYLIFE

THIRTEEN USES FOR

C U C U M B E R S

T H AT

WILL AMAZE YOU!

Cucumbers are very easy to grow and

make for a delicious treat. But did you know they can prevent hangovers, or clean the kitchen sink? Below is a list of tips and tricks you can do with cucumbers that you do not want to miss!

  • 1. Cucumbers contain most of the

vitamins you need every day, just one cucumber contains Vitamin B1, Vitamin B2, Vitamin B3, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B6, Folic Acid, Vitamin C, Calcium, Iron,

Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium and Zinc.

  • 2. Feeling tired in the afternoon? Put

down the caffeinated soda and pick up a

cucumber. Cucumbers are a good source

of B Vitamins and Carbohydrates that can provide that quick pick-me-up that can last for hours.

  • 3. Tired of your bathroom mirror

fogging up after a shower? Try rubbing a

cucumber slice along the mirror, it will eliminate the fog and provide a soothing, spa-like fragrance.

  • 4. Are grubs and slugs ruining your

planting beds? Place a few slices in a small pie tin and your garden will be free of pests all season long. The chemicals in the cucumber react with the aluminum to give off a scent undetectable to humans but

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 HEALTHY LIFE THIRTEEN USES FOR C U C U M Bcof fee creamer when emulsified into coffee (The only way I’ll drink coffee) 3. On the skin as a basic lotion 4. In homemade lotion bars for soft, smooth skin 5. In homemade deodorant or deodorant bars 6. As an eye-makeup remover 7. As a cloth diaper safe diaper cream (just rub on baby’s bottom) 8. I n m a k i n g y o u r o w n Remineralizing Toothpaste 9. To lighten age spots when rubbed directly on the skin 10. To prevent stretch marks during pregnancy 11. To support healthy thyroid function 12. In homemade Mayo without the high PUFA vegetable oils 13. To help increase sun tolerance and avoid burning 14. As a naturally SPF 4 sunscreen 15. In homemade lotion recipes 16. To get rid of cradle cap on baby- just massage in to head, leave on for a few minutes and gently rinse with a warm wash cloth 17. Topically to kill yeast or yeast infections 18. As a delicious tropical massage oil 19. It’s high Lauric acid and MCFA content helps boost metaboism 20. A tiny dab rubbed on your hands and then through hair will help get rid of friz " id="pdf-obj-10-45" src="pdf-obj-10-45.jpg">

drive garden pests crazy and make them flee the area. 5. Looking for a fast and easy way to remove cellulite before going out or to the pool? Try rubbing a slice or two of cucumbers along your problem area for a

few minutes, the phytochemical in the cucumber cause the collagen in your skin to tighten, firming up the outer layer and reducing the visibility of cellulite. Works great on wrinkles too!!!

6. Want to avoid a hangover or terrible headache? Eat a few cucumber slices before going to bed and wake up re f re s h e d a n d h e a d a ch e f re e. Cucumbers contain enough sugar, B vitamins and electrolytes to replenish essential nutrients the body lost,

keeping everything in equilibrium, avoiding both a hangover and headache! 7. 7. Looking to fight off that afternoon or evening snacking binge? Cucumbers have been used for centuries and often used by European trappers, traders and explores for quick meals to thwart off starvation. 8. Have an important meeting or job interview and you realize that you don’t have enough time to polish your shoes? Rub a freshly cut cucumber over the shoe, its chemicals will provide a quick

and durable shine that not only looks great but also repels water. For more on this story visit:

realfarmacy.com

PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 HEALTHY LIFE THIRTEEN USES FOR C U C U M Bcof fee creamer when emulsified into coffee (The only way I’ll drink coffee) 3. On the skin as a basic lotion 4. In homemade lotion bars for soft, smooth skin 5. In homemade deodorant or deodorant bars 6. As an eye-makeup remover 7. As a cloth diaper safe diaper cream (just rub on baby’s bottom) 8. I n m a k i n g y o u r o w n Remineralizing Toothpaste 9. To lighten age spots when rubbed directly on the skin 10. To prevent stretch marks during pregnancy 11. To support healthy thyroid function 12. In homemade Mayo without the high PUFA vegetable oils 13. To help increase sun tolerance and avoid burning 14. As a naturally SPF 4 sunscreen 15. In homemade lotion recipes 16. To get rid of cradle cap on baby- just massage in to head, leave on for a few minutes and gently rinse with a warm wash cloth 17. Topically to kill yeast or yeast infections 18. As a delicious tropical massage oil 19. It’s high Lauric acid and MCFA content helps boost metaboism 20. A tiny dab rubbed on your hands and then through hair will help get rid of friz " id="pdf-obj-10-61" src="pdf-obj-10-61.jpg">
PLANET LIFE 18 January 2014 HEALTHY LIFE THIRTEEN USES FOR C U C U M Bcof fee creamer when emulsified into coffee (The only way I’ll drink coffee) 3. On the skin as a basic lotion 4. In homemade lotion bars for soft, smooth skin 5. In homemade deodorant or deodorant bars 6. As an eye-makeup remover 7. As a cloth diaper safe diaper cream (just rub on baby’s bottom) 8. I n m a k i n g y o u r o w n Remineralizing Toothpaste 9. To lighten age spots when rubbed directly on the skin 10. To prevent stretch marks during pregnancy 11. To support healthy thyroid function 12. In homemade Mayo without the high PUFA vegetable oils 13. To help increase sun tolerance and avoid burning 14. As a naturally SPF 4 sunscreen 15. In homemade lotion recipes 16. To get rid of cradle cap on baby- just massage in to head, leave on for a few minutes and gently rinse with a warm wash cloth 17. Topically to kill yeast or yeast infections 18. As a delicious tropical massage oil 19. It’s high Lauric acid and MCFA content helps boost metaboism 20. A tiny dab rubbed on your hands and then through hair will help get rid of friz " id="pdf-obj-10-63" src="pdf-obj-10-63.jpg">

T H E

M I R A C L E

O F

COCONUT OIL

S O M E

A M A Z I N G

FACTS!

By Wellness Mama

y o u r

o w n

just massage in

to

head, leave on

for a few minutes and gently rinse with a warm wash cloth

  • 17. Topically to kill yeast or yeast infections

  • 18. As a delicious tropical massage oil

  • 19. It’s high Lauric acid and MCFA content helps boost metaboism

  • 20. A tiny dab rubbed on your hands and then through hair will help get rid of friz

18 January 2014

WISEFOOD

18 January 2014 WISE FOOD GLOBAL RESCUE 0412 933 352 56-Serve Bucket $175.00 (GST Free )

GLOBAL RESCUE 0412 933 352

18 January 2014 WISE FOOD GLOBAL RESCUE 0412 933 352 56-Serve Bucket $175.00 (GST Free )
56-Serve Bucket $175.00 (GST Free )
56-Serve
Bucket
$175.00
(GST Free )

1 ADULT FOOD SUPPLY

You can't prevent certain events in life, but you can prepare for them.

18 January 2014 WISE FOOD GLOBAL RESCUE 0412 933 352 56-Serve Bucket $175.00 (GST Free )

The 56-serve Grab and Go Bucket is an ideal way to get to know the Wise range of emergency food. This breakfast and mains bucket will allow you and your family to experience the great

taste of our food range. Remember, these meals are packed in individual 4- serve packs within the bucket so there's no waste. The 56-serve buckets are compact and light weight so minimal storage space

is needed and you can grab a bucket easily if you're forced to move from your house for any reason. These buckets are also great for camping trips and family holidays.