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The GOPs Coming
Gay Reckoning
The Republican Party knows it has a problem, but can it x it?
Priebus
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Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Poliglot: SOTU wrap; more endorsements in Maryland
TV: Disney Channel gets gay
by Justin Snow
R
EINCE PRIEBUS KNOWS
his party has a problem. Tak-
ing the stage Friday at the
Republican National Com-
mittees winter meeting in Washington,
D.C., one didnt have to listen long to
the RNC chairmans remarks to come
to that conclusion.
Ive said many times before that
the policies and principles of our party
are sound, Priebus told the assembled
RNC faithful at a meeting thats theme
was Building to Victory. However,
as we look to grow the ranks of our
party, we must all be very conscious of
the tone and choice of words we use to
communicate those policies effectively.
We all know the GOP has to get out of
our comfort zones and go to places we
havent been for a while and engage and
welcome new voters.
Priebuss remarks mirrored sugges-
tions made in an autopsy report of the
Republican Party released in March,
which argued for increased outreach
to minority communities, including
the LGBT community. While not advo-
cating for an overhaul of the party
platform, which still opposes same-sex
marriage, the report did call for an
effort to make the party more welcom-
ing in image and tone.
Shortly after Priebus left the stage, the
Detroit Free Press reported that Priebus,
along with the chairman of the Michi-
gan GOP, Bobby Schostak, are calling
on an anti-gay member of the RNC to
resign. For the good of the party, we
believe Dave Agema should resign, Prie-
bus and Schostak said in a joint statement
to the newspaper. Agema, who previously
served in the Michigan House of Repre-
sentatives, has a history of anti-gay and
anti-Muslim remarks but has come under
re for recent comments he made on
Facebook, one of which praised Russias
anti-LGBT law as common sense.
Priebus and Schostak are the latest to
join a chorus of Republican ofcials call-
ing for Agemas resignation. Earlier this
month, Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) said
that Agemas approach has become a dis-
traction for those of us who are standing
up to the political establishment, whose
push for bigger government, more cor-
porate welfare, and less individual liberty
have hurt our party.
Defending civil liberties is at the heart
of the Republican Party and our Constitu-
tion, Amash said in a statement. As Ive
demonstrated with my words and record,
I am trying to grow a new generation of
Republicans that includes more gays and
lesbians, racial-ethnic minorities, women,
and young people.
Betsy DeVos, a former RNC mem-
ber and wife of a former GOP candi-
date for governor of Michigan, told The
Detroit News that Agema has damaged
the Republican Party.
Leaders have a responsibility to cre-
ate an inclusive, welcoming party, not to
exclude, DeVos said. Whats going on is
cause for concern about our future pros-
pects as a party and our ability to bring
people around to our point of view and
long-term agenda. We are driving people
away who might otherwise support what
we stand for.
Agema declined to attend this weeks
winter meeting at the last minute, sending
a proxy to vote in his place. He said his
liberal critics within the GOP have chosen
to elevate this discussion to the RNC
winter meeting and make it a drawn out
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views on MSNBC (where he predict-
ed the Republican Party will never win
another national election) and in numer-
ous media outlets, has been just one sign
of a national party that appears well
aware of what is ailing them but helpless
to do something about it.
It is a struggle that has played out
on the local level as well. Republicans
in Indiana desperate to push through
a constitutional amendment prohibiting
same-sex marriage, despite an already
existing ban, pulled a legislative maneu-
ver so questionable that it caused one
Republican candidate to leave the party.
With the proposed constitutional
amendment facing defeat in the origi-
nally assigned committee, Indiana House
Speaker Brian Bosma, a Republican, reas-
signed the measure from the House Judi-
ciary Committee to the more conserva-
tive House Elections and Apportionment
Committee at the last minute. Freedom
Indiana campaign manager Megan Rob-
ertson said the move was a dark day for
democracy in the state of Indiana, while
Andy Markle, a gay Republican running
for the Indiana House of Representatives,
abandoned his party over Bosmas move.
I am not leaving the Republican
Party; the Republican Party has left me,
Markle, who is associated with the Indi-
ana chapter of GOProud, wrote on Face-
book.
The committee advanced the amend-
ght between liberals and conservatives
within the party.
Agemas deance, however, signals
a broader problem for the GOP as they
seek to build a coalition that can win
a national election. While the RNCs
autopsy report released last year stated,
among other things, that to appeal to
younger voters the GOP must not be
seen as totally intolerant of alternative
points of view, that strategy has not
been embraced and in Agemas case
outright rejected by some of the partys
loudest voices.
And it is that rejection of tolerance
that led one Republican operative to
very publicly leave the party earlier this
month. Jimmy LaSalvia, who previously
worked for Log Cabin Republicans and
left to found the more conservative gay
group GOProud in 2010, announced he
was leaving the GOP to become an inde-
pendent.
I am every bit as conservative as Ive
always been, but I just cant bring myself
to carry the Republican label any longer.
You see, I just dont agree with the big-
government conservatives who run the
party now, LaSalvia posted on his web-
site. The other reason I am leaving is the
tolerance of bigotry in the GOP. The cur-
rent leadership lacks the courage to stand
up to it Im not sure they ever will.
LaSalvias very vocal abandonment
of the GOP, which has landed him inter-
ment to the House oor with a 9-3 vote
along party lines. Among those who tes-
tied against the proposed amendment
were business leaders who said it would
alienate the kind of talented young peo-
ple they are trying to attract to the state.
For national GOP operatives, the path
to victory is tied to a rm stand from
those at the top. Although there was little
discussion of Republican outreach to the
LGBT community from the podium at
the RNCs winter meeting, Log Cabin
Republicans (LCR) hosted a well-attend-
ed happy hour for committee members.
According to LCR Executive Director
Gregory T. Angelo, that event, as well as
the calls for Agemas resignation today
from the chairman of the RNC demon-
strate the only true schism in the party
right now is between those Republicans
who know how to win and those who
dont.
The way to change the party is for
GOP leadership on all levels to show
some backbone and push against big-
otry, Angelo told Metro Weekly. What
makes the Agema situation so historic is
that marks a moment where a genuine
shift in the party took place: youve had
prominent people at all levels of the GOP
Chairmen, Congressmen, nanciers,
and grassroots standing up against this
guy. The RNC knows how to win elec-
tions; now they just need to step up and
do what it takes. l
JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
McAuliffe Rejects Request for
Special Counsel
House bloc blasts new Virginia governor and attorney
general amid same-sex marriage ght
by John Riley
V
IRGINIA GOV. TERRY MCAu-
liffe (D) on Monday refused to ap-
point a special counsel to defend
the states law prohibiting recognition
of any form of same-sex relationship in
the upcoming case of Bostic v. Rainey, in
which two same-sex couples are suing to
obtain marriage licenses.
The refusal comes in response to 53
state delegates collectively signing a letter
sent to McAuliffe in the wake of Virginia
Attorney General Mark Herrings (D)
announcement last week that he would
no longer defend the states ban on rec-
ognizing same-sex relationships. That
announcement completely reverses the
policy of his Republican predecessor, Ken
Cuccinelli. In the letter, lawmakers urged
McAuliffe to act where Herring has said
he will not, though any afrmative re-
sponse was highly unlikely.
In his response to the delegates, McAu-
liffe predictably declined, arguing that the
defendants in the case, public ofcials, al-
ready have substantial representation.
I share your view that the effective
administration of our legal system re-
quires zealous advocacy on all matters be-
fore the courts, McAuliffe wrote. In the
present case, Virginias same-sex marriage
ban is being vigorously and appropriately
defended by the Clerk of the Court for the
City of Norfolk and the Clerk of the Court
for Prince William County, as well as par-
ties appearing asamicus curiae in the case.
Accordingly, I respectfully decline to ap-
point special counsel in this matter.
Thirty-two lawmakers 31 Republi-
cans led by Del. Bob Marshall (R-Manas-
sas Park, Prince William Co.) and Del.
Johnny Joannou (D-Portsmouth, Nor-
folk) had previously written a letter to
McAuliffe telling him it was his duty to
defend the 2006 voter-approved consti-
tutional amendment, aka the Marshall-
Newman Amendment, banning marriage
equality and any other recognition of
same-sex relationships. Marshall, argu-
ably the states most anti-gay legislator
and whose name is on the amendment,
followed that letter with a second bear-
ing the names of an additional 21 House
Republicans. In all, 52 of the Houses 67
Republicans and one Democrat signed on
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that Virginias ban on marriage between
same-sex couples violates the Fourteenth
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. On
two grounds; marriage is a fundamental
rights being denied to some Virginians,
and the ban unlawfully discriminates on
the basis of both sexual orientation and
gender.At his Jan. 23 press conference,
Herring, anked by Chief Deputy Attor-
ney General Cynthia Hudson and Solici-
tor General Stuart Raphael, defended his
decision that the law is unconstitutional,
saying that he believes Virginias statu-
tory and constitutional bans on same-sex
marriage are in conict with federal law.
Herring cited the U.S. Supreme Courts
June rulings in the Defense of Marriage
and Proposition 8 cases, in which Justice
Anthony Kennedy, speaking for the ma-
jority, found that the due process clause
of the U.S. Constitution was violated by
treating same-sex married couples differ-
ently from other married couples. Her-
ring also invoked Virginias history on
civil rights, including the 1967 Loving v.
Virginia case that overturned state anti-
miscegenation laws, saying there is a
long line of cases concerning the fun-
damental right to marry on which to base
his legal reasoning.
to Marshalls letter.
Signatories included House Major-
ity Leader M. Kirkland Cox (R-Colonial
Heights, Chestereld Co.), the second-
highest ranking Republican in the lower
chamber, and at least seven Northern
Virginia lawmakers: Timothy Hugo (R-
Fairfax, Prince William counties), Dave
LaRock (R-Loudoun, Clarke, Frederick
counties), Mark Berg (R-Winchester;
Frederick Co.), Tag Greason (R-Loudoun
Co.), Richard Anderson (R-Prince Wil-
liam Co.), James LeMunyon (R-Fairfax,
Loudoun counties) and Dave Albo (R-
Fairfax Co.).
In response to McAuliffes letter, Berg,
who defeated incumbent Del. Beverly
Sherwood in a Republican primary last
year, took to Twitter to post McAuliffes
letter and the message: Unbelievable re-
fusal to represent VA.
As for Herrings decision not to de-
fend the marriage ban, he said that after
reviewing the law he believes Virginias
ban on recognizing any form of same-sex
relationships is unconstitutional.I swore
an oath to both the United States Con-
stitution and the Virginia Constitution,
Herring said in a statement. After thor-
ough legal review, I have now concluded
Virginia has argued on the wrong side
of some of our nations landmark cases
in school desegregation in 1954, on inter-
racial marriage with the 1967 Loving deci-
sion, and in 1996 on state-supported sin-
gle-gender education at VMI. Its time for
the commonwealth to be on the right side
of history and the right side of the law.
There are those who will say that the
attorney general is required to defend ev-
ery state law, even one that is unconstitu-
tional, Herring said, trying to pre-empt
his critics while noting that doing so
would be a violation of his oath of ofce.
Herrings ofce is expected to le pa-
pers clarifying the states new position
in the Bostic case, and also in a second
case challenging Virginias ban, Harris v.
McDonnell, in which the American Civil
Liberties Union (ACLU), the Virginia
chapter of the ACLU, and pro-LGBT legal
organization Lambda Legal are suing on
behalf of two lesbian couples for the free-
dom to marry in the commonwealth and
the recognition of same-sex marriages
legally performed in other jurisdictions.
Herring warned, however, that his
nding that the law was unconstitutional
would not make it void. Rather, he said,
the state would simply no longer defend
the constitutionality of the same-sex-
marriage ban as the question works its
way through the courts. In both the Bos-
tic and the Harris cases, the plaintiffs
sued Virginias State Registrar of Vital
Records Janet Rainey, in her ofcial ca-
pacity, because the registrar is tasked
with enforcing Virginias constitutional
and statutory bans on same-sex mar-
riage. While the attorney generals ofce
must appear on Raineys behalf in court,
neither Raphael, arguing on behalf of the
attorney generals ofce, nor Rainey, will
seek to defend the laws constitutional-
ity, even though Rainey must continue
enforcing the ban on same-sex marriage
until it is overturned or repealed.
Virginians should no longer face
discrimination and economic hardship
based on whom they love and commit
their lives to, Herring said. Writing for
the court in 2003 in the Lawrence v. Texas
case, Justice Kennedy explained that the
Constitutions framers knew times can
blind us to certain truths and later gen-
erations can see that laws once thought
necessary and proper in fact serve only
to oppress. The registrar and local clerks
will continue to enforce the ban until the
courts can act, but the registrar and I will
not defend it, and will argue for its being
declared unconstitutional. l
JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
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services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush luncheon.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/
time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or
10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass
for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m.,
Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary
Road, Alexandria. All welcome. dignitynova.org.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE,
2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.
teamdcbasketball.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellies,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@
gmail.com.
IDENTITY offers free and condential HIV testing
in Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite
411. Walk-ins 12-3 p.m. For appointments other
hours, call 301-422-2398.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2
CHRYSALIS arts & culture group views Invisible
Woman. Landmark E Street Theater, 555 11th St.
NW. All welcome. For afternoon showtime: Craig,
202-462-0535, craighowell1@verizon.net.
WEEKLY EVENTS
LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30
a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW.
202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.
DIGNITY WASHINGTON offers Roman Catholic
Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St.
Margarets Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All
welcome. Sign interpreted. dignitynova.org.
FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets for
worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker
House Living Room (next to Meeting House on
Decatur Place), 2nd oor. Special welcome to
lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from
Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance. quakersdc.org.
INSTITUTE FOR SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT,
God-centered new age church & learning center.
Sunday Services and Workshops event. 5419 Sherier
Place NW. isd-dc.org.
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA services at 11 a.m., led by
Rev. Onetta Brooks. Childrens Sunday School, 11
a.m. 10383 Democracy Lane, Fairfax. 703-691-0930,
mccnova.com.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
GLBT community, holds Friday night Shabbat
services followed by oneg social hour. 8-9:30 p.m.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, rst and third Fridays. 8:30 p.m.
The DC Center, 1318 U St. NW. 202-682-2245,
gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MENS ASSOCIATION (GAMMA)
is a peer-support group that meets in Dupont Circle
every second and fourth Friday at 7:30 p.m. gay-
married.com or GAMMAinDC1@yahoo.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health,
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. 202-745-7000, whitman-walker.org.
PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-afrming social
group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.
SMYALS REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-6 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155,
testing@smyal.org.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer organization
helps at Food & Friends and with Lost Dog & Cat
Rescue Foundation at Falls Church PetSmart. To
participate, visit burgundycrescent.org.
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes several miles
for Wilderness Battleeld tour near Fredericksburg,
Va. Bring beverages, lunch, winter-worthy boots
and about $12/fees. Carpool 9 a.m. from King Street
Metro. Craig, 202-462-0535. adventuring.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
LGBT community, holds Saturday morning Shabbat
THURSDAY, JANUARY 30
WEEKLY EVENTS
METROHEALTH CENTER offers free, rapid HIV
testing. Appointment needed. 1012 14th St. NW,
Suite 700. 202-638-0750.
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV services
(by appointment). Call 202-291-4707, or visit
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
DC LAMBDA SQUARES gay and lesbian square-
dancing group features mainstream through
advanced square dancing at the National City
Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW, 7-9:30 p.m.
Casual dress. 301-257-0517, dclambdasquares.org.
The DULLES TRIANGLES Northern Virginia social
group meets for happy hour at Sheraton in Reston,
11810 Sunrise Valley Drive, second-oor bar, 7-9
p.m. All welcome. dullestriangles.com.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-745-
7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
IDENTITY offers free and condential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
call Gaithersburg, 301-300-9978, or Takoma Park,
301-422-2398.
WOMENS LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young
LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership
development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410
7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 31
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707,
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
Metro Weeklys Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursdays publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly ofce at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
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NATIONAL CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH, inclusive
church with GLBT fellowship, offers gospel worship,
8:30 a.m., and traditional worship, 11 a.m. 5 Thomas
Circle NW. 202-232-0323, nationalcitycc.org.
ST. STEPHEN AND THE INCARNATION, an
interracial, multi-ethnic Christian Community
offers services in English, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., and
in Spanish at 5:15 p.m. 1525 Newton St. NW. 202-
232-0900, saintstephensdc.org.
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF
SILVER SPRING invites LGBTQ families and
individuals of all creeds and cultures to join the
church. Services 9:15 and 11:15 a.m. 10309 New
Hampshire Ave. uucss.org.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3
THE DC CENTER holds Volunteer Night
orientation for those interested in helping on
variety of efforts. 6:30-8:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW,
Suite 105. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE
SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000
14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
Michael Brazell teaches BEARS DO YOGA, a
program of The DC Center. 6:30 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. No cost, newcomers
welcome. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
GETEQUAL meets 6:30-8 p.m. at Quaker House,
2111 Florida Ave. NW. getequal.wdc@gmail.com.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155 or
testing@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a black gay mens evening
afnity group. 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
202-446-1100.
WASHINGTON WETSKINS Water Polo Team
practices 7-9 p.m. Takoma Aquatic Center, 300
Van Buren St. NW. Newcomers with at least basic
swimming ability always welcome. Tom, 703-299-
0504, secretary@wetskins.org, wetskins.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT
GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets
7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St.
NW, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center,
2301 MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. For an
appointment call 202-745-7000. Visit whitman-
walker.org.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4
WEEKLY EVENTS
A COMPANY OF STRANGERS, a theater chorus,
meets 7:30-9:30 p.m. A GLBTA and SATB looking
for actors, singers, crew. Open Hearth Foundation,
16 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
1502 Massachusetts Ave. SE. Charles, 240-764-
5748. ecumenicon.org.
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/
Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com,
afwashington.net.
THE GAY MENS HEALTH COLLABORATIVE
offers free HIV/STI screening every 2nd and 4th
Tuesday. 5-6:30 p.m. Rainbow Tuesday LGBT
Clinic, Alexandria Health Department, 4480 King
St. 703-321-2511, james.leslie@inova.org.
Whitman-Walker Healths GAY MENS HEALTH
AND WELLNESS/STD CLINIC opens at 6 p.m.,
1701 14th St. NW. Patients are seen on walk-in basis.
No-cost screening for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea and
chlamydia. Hepatitis and herpes testing available
for fee. whitman-walker.org.
THE HIV WORKING GROUP of THE DC CENTER
hosts Packing Party, where volunteers assemble
safe-sex kits of condoms and lube. 7 p.m., Green
Lantern, 1335 Green Court NW. thedccenter.org.
IDENTITY offers free and condential HIV testing
in Gaithersburg, 414 East Diamond Ave., and in
Takoma Park, 7676 New Hampshire Ave., Suite 411.
Walk-ins 2-6 p.m. For appointments other hours,
call Gaithersburg at 301-300-9978 or Takoma Park
at 301-422-2398.
KARING WITH INDIVIDUALITY (K.I.) SERVICES,
at 3333 Duke St., Alexandria, offers free rapid HIV
testing and counseling, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 703-823-4401.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-5 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155,
testing@smyal.org.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy
Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5
BOOKMEN DC, mens gay-literature group,
discusses Times Square Red, Times Square Blue
by Samuel R. Delany. 7:30 p.m. Tenleytown
Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. All welcome.
bookmendc.blogspot.com.
THE TOM DAVOREN BRIDGE CLUB meets for
Social Bridge. No reservations or partner needed.
Newcomers welcome. 7:30 p.m., Dignity Center, 721
8th St. SE. 301-345-1571.

WEEKLY EVENTS
AD LIB, a group for freestyle conversation, meets
about 7:45 p.m., covered-patio area of Cosi, 1647
20th St. NW. All welcome. Jamie, 703-892-8567.
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. D.C.:
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 202-745-7000,
whitman-walker.org.
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316; or Bill,
703-671-2454. l
17
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JANUARY 30, 2014
VOLUME 20 / ISSUE 39
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19
CLICHS GET A
bad rap because
they beat dead
horses until the
cows come home
with all the origi-
nality of the wall
of books Barnes
& Noble shelves
under the label
Teen Paranormal Romance. Yet for
all our railing against clichs, theyll
never leave our day-to-day lives of
speaking and writing, because clichs
are comforting. They give us metaphor-
ical shortcuts to quickly convey our
feelings without needing the skills of a
literary master. And theyre comforting
because they tell us things we believe
in language that feels cozy and familiar.
This isnt always a bad thing, even
if your boss who exhorts the staff in
every meeting to think outside the
box is working your last nerve. The
need for communication among col-
leagues, friends and family generally
trumps ne artistic expression.
But because they are comforting,
clichs can hide more than they reveal.
Right now, the biggest clich in the
gay community is more an idea than
a specic phrase, but it can be boiled
down to: Weve won. The rest of the
world is just catching up.
This is an easy one to fall into since,
like most clichs, its built around a
fundamental truth: Full legal equal-
ity for gay, lesbian and bisexual peo-
ple will arrive in the very near future
(though sadly it looks like transgender
people will end up waiting longer). The
dominoes have fallen at a faster clip
than anyone expected. In less than 10
years weve gone from a presidential
campaign built around constitutional
amendments banning same-sex mar-
riage to a majority of Americans sup-
porting marriage equality to a nation-
ally televised mass wedding of gay and
straight couples at the Grammys (which
sparked both entertaining apoplexy
from anti-gay activists and eye-rollingly
inane analysis from some gay writers).
The problem is that the comforting
clich threatens to mask an uncom-
fortable truth: A signicant portion of
the world has no desire to catch up. I
know this intellectually, but living in
my cocoon of gay-afrming career, fam-
ily and friends I can sometimes forget
until reality reminds me that I should
be very uncomfortable.
A mild reminder came this January
when I found myself without health
insurance for the rst time in more than
two decades. Id been on my husbands
health insurance; when he switched
jobs we expected that would continue.
Turns out the rst company hes work-
ing with for the next few months only
allows a spouse in a marriage legally
recognized in Virginia to join in his
health insurance.
Id gotten comfortable. I forgot there
are people who dont want or dont
bother to catch up.
A more horrifying reminder came
in the past few days when news broke
that a friend of mine, Randy Gener, was
beaten on a New York City sidewalk
just steps from his home, where he was
left with traumatic injuries requiring
brain surgery. Ive written and edited
too many stories and columns about
victims of brutal hate crimes, so I know
how to disengage myself to get the job
done. Its much harder to disengage
when you see a news photo of someone
you care about lying broken in an inten-
sive care unit.
We get comfortable. We forget how
much hatred some people still hold. We
forget that our impending yet incom-
plete victories leave too many of us
vulnerable to disdain, to discrimination,
to violence. We forget the hard work of
change in favor of frivolous arguments
over Queen Latifahs glass closet.
We are winning. We just have to
remember we havent won yet. l
Comfortably Numb
As gay-rights victories continue to pile up, we sometimes
forget that discrimination and hate are far from over
LGBTOpinion
by Sean Bugg
METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
ACTRESS GOLDIE
Hawn had no idea
what she was wad-
ing into last week
when she tweeted
from the World
Economic Forum in
Davos, Switzerland,
Met the wonderful
President of Nigeria, and posted a photo
of herself with Goodluck Jonathan. She
quickly learned that Jonathan recently
signed a harsh anti-gay law that set off
a wave of arrests. She deleted her tweet,
expressed horror, and apologized.
Hawns gaffe was useful in drawing
attention to a problem with ramica-
tions far beyond the salons of Davos. In
the city of Bauchi in northern Nigeria on
been burnt down and my family has since
denied me access to my welfare so as to
save them from further harassment, my
school has suspended me from classes
and sporting activities. My life is in dan-
ger please I need help to get out of this
country before its too late. A Ugandan
sent a similar appeal.
My local advocacy group lacks the
resources to rescue people, and I lack the
expertise to sort real cases from scams.
But the fear and suffering described are
all too real for many people. The least one
can do upon receiving these desperate
appeals is offer encouragement and links
to groups that may be of help. See iglhrc.
org for a list of asylum resources, or visit
amsher.org to contact African Men for
Sexual Health and Rights (AMSHeR), a
regional coalition.
Networks near and far are ramping
up. The LGBT Faith and Asylum Net-
work has been organized to help LGBT
asylum seekers who reach the United
States. Members of Sexual Minorities
Uganda observed the third anniversary
of the murder of their colleague David
Kato Kisule as they monitored the Anti-
Homosexuality Bill. New African voices
were raised: Former Mozambique Presi-
dent Joaquim Chissano wrote an open
letter to African leaders pleading for tol-
erance, and prominent Kenyan author
Binyavanga Wainaina revealed his own
homosexuality.
The intrusion of a distant lands per-
secution into the elite gathering at Davos
brings to mind Edgar Allen Poes story
The Masque of the Red Death, in which
the gure of Death stalks the revelers
at a masked ball who have walled them-
selves off from a plague sweeping the
land outside. Their host, mistaking Death
for a partier, is outraged at the tasteless
costume and pursues the man through
the sumptuous rooms of the castle until
he realizes too late his error.
My African correspondents thank me
for my help, meager though it is. I tell
them about local efforts in D.C. on behalf
of asylum seekers who nd their way
here. But the global need far outstrips
the capacity. Most of our African broth-
ers and sisters and their counterparts
elsewhere will have to face the plague
of intolerance in their own land.
We should give what we can to refu-
gee assistance efforts, and increase inter-
national pressure to end the persecution.
But we must also turn our gaze home-
ward to the deadly hatred that walks
among us. l
Jan. 22, thousands disrupted a Shariah
court by throwing stones and demanding
the quick conviction and execution of 11
men on trial for their membership in gay
organizations.
Meanwhile, anti-gay American fanatic
Christopher Doyle blamed the victims:
These countries are enacting laws as
a response to gay activists intolerance
towards traditional views on marriage
and sexuality.
This raises an issue closer to home:
combating anti-gay persecution overseas
requires that we confront the right-wing-
ers in our own country who do so much
to fuel it. In August 2013, a federal judge
in Massachusetts ruled that Scott Live-
ly, who helped inspire Ugandas Anti-
Homosexuality Bill, could be tried for
crimes against humanity.
As I was writing this, I received an
email on my activist account from a Nige-
rian man: I am a proud gay my house has
20
LGBTOpinion
Masque of the Red Death
Counterstriking the plague of intolerance that roams beyond
the borders includes action at home
by Richard J. Rosendall
JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
marketplace
21 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
22 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
I
TS THE ONE AREA OF PUBLIC POLICY THAT
still prompts giggles and bad jokes about junk-food
cravings, but the push to reform the nations laws on
marijuana is growing. Much like marriage equality,
attitudes about the drug are rapidly shifting, with
proponents of decriminalization and legalization in
ascendancy. And in light of voter-approved ballot
measures that legalized small amounts of the drug in
Colorado and Washington state, it is inevitable that Washington,
D.C. and Maryland will soon be faced with a decision regarding
how to deal with and treat marijuana-related offenses.
Under federal law, using or buying marijuana has, for all in-
tents and purposes, been illegal since 1937 when Congress passed
the Marijuana Tax Act. But even though marijuana has a long
history of medical use, the United States only began acknowledg-
ing any health benets and only to a very small, very restricted
group of people in the late 1970s. It was only after advances in
cancer and HIV/AIDS treatment that health practitioners began
noticing the positive effects for those suffering from serious ill-
ness.
California became the rst state to legalize marijuana for
medical use, via a ballot initiative in 1996, followed by Alaska,
Oregon, Washington state and Washington, D.C., two years later.
Yet even though D.C.s referendum for medical marijuana passed
in all eight wards of the city, congressional interference attempt-
ed to initially prevent those votes from being counted. After they
were with the pro-marijuana side winning 69 percent to 31 per-
cent Congressional oversight still prevented the District from
implementing the law for more than a decade.
HEMP AS HEALER
I
T WAS THE SCOURGE OF THE HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC
that rst convinced Pat Hawkins, a longtime clinical social
worker, psychologist, and former substance-abuse treat-
ment counselor, to support medical marijuana.
For some patients, it eased their dying, she says. I had pa-
tients who were literally wasting away before my eyes, and I was
sending out these 85- or 95-pound weaklings out on the street to
score some weed.
While Hawkins could not purchase the drug for her patients
or accompany them when they went to buy from local drug deal-
ers under the threat of losing her license she decided to part-
ner with other concerned citizens to draft legislation that would
allow her patients and others suffering from debilitating illnesses
to obtain the marijuana they needed, often essential to reducing
nausea and restoring appetite for cancer patients undergoing
chemotherapy, or HIV/AIDS patients who were suffering from
the toxic side effects of the earliest antiretroviral medications.
It was very risky, she says of the dangers her patients navi-
gated to get some relief. Depending on who busted you, you
could end up dying in jail.
Hawkins particularly credits former director of the Whitman-
Walker Clinic and current D.C. Councilmember Jim Graham (D-
Ward 1) with leading the way on the ght to get medical mari-
juana to the ballot. She says she and other activists knew that
Congress would likely try to block the law, but pushed on, feeling
it was in the best interests of the Districts residents who were
suffering.
I feel very strongly about medical marijuana because Ive
seen it work with people who have severe pain not just head-
aches or whatever without them having the side effects of the
major pharmaceuticals, she says.
As opponents often conate medical marijuana with outright
legalization of the drug, Hawkins says she heard similar oppo-
sition, particularly from religious groups, when D.C.s activists
were rst proposing legalizing medical marijuana.
The opposition to marijuana has been so associated with the
60s that a lot of conservatives just lumped it together with anti-
patriotism, the anti-war movement, and the sexual revolution,
she says. I also think because so many of the advocates for it
have seen it as a step in achieving a long-range goal of legaliza-
tion, the two issues have been confused. Personally, I have never
been a rabid fan of legalization. My long-range goal was to get
medical marijuana.
Hawkins adds that with the progression of HIV/AIDS, a lot
of the opposition, even from religious communities, eventually
melted away.
Since D.C.s referendum passed, 16 more states have legalized
medical marijuana, while South Dakota rejected a proposed bal-
lot initiative in 2010. The District also nally had medical mari-
juana legalized in 2010 after a Democratic-controlled Congress
declined to overrule a D.C. Council bill to establish a network of
dispensaries and cultivation centers that would closely regulate
and monitor patients who are prescribed medical marijuana for
certain conditions. Those conditions are limited to: cancer, HIV/
AIDS, glaucoma and multiple sclerosis or other muscular-related
ailments that interfere with the basic functions of life.
Under District law, patients may possess up to two ounces of
mulling over

MARIJUANA
The District and Maryland are headed for a crash course in pot politics
by John Riley // Illustration by Scott G. Brooks
23 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
24 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
the drug, in dried form, but must obtain it from a licensed dispen-
sary and must carry a card from the Department of Health, which
oversees implementation of the medical marijuana law, conrm-
ing the medical marijuana prescription just to gain access to the
dispensaries. Three dispensaries began treating patients in July
2013, though owners of the dispensaries have complained to me-
dia outlets about low demand due to the laws many restrictions.
Those restrictions are quite familiar Jeffrey Kahn, a Reform
rabbi who, along with his wife, one of his sons, and daughter-in-
law, operates the Takoma Wellness Center, one of the citys three
operating dispensaries and the only one thats owned and oper-
ated by a single family. Kahn says the Department of Health is
quite serious when they say they track the merchandise he of-
fers from seed to stem. He says that ofcials from the D.C. De-
partment of Health (DOH) the Metropolitan Police Department
(MPD) regularly check up on the store, with DOHs pharmacy
division able to access his records and keep track of the dispen-
sarys sales and deliveries.
Its an unspoken arrangement that this is going to be done
right, Kahn says of the program. And he says its going fairly
well, though hes been exasperated by the slow rollout of the
medical marijuana program because he wishes he could help
more people. But he also understands that District ofcials want
to be cautious.
Even if we do everything right, the Department of Health
needs to, too, he says.
Like Hawkins, Kahn was rst introduced to the medical mari-
juana movement through his contact working with sick people,
particularly those suffering from HIV/AIDS.
I was ordained on June 5, 1981, the day the morbidity and
mortality rate was announced for the very rst cases of AIDS, he
recalls. And I was in a position to minister to those affected by it,
and learn what was happening.
My own rst experience with medical marijuana was related
to me by someone whose brother was dying of AIDS, who told
me, Rabbi, he just seems in so much pain, so withdrawn, that I lit
up a joint and blew it in his face.
The person told Kahn that the brothers pain seemed to sub-
side quickly after that, and the brother who had not been able
to eat wanted to order a pizza. They did, he ate one slice, and
then fell asleep for two hours, the rst restful sleep he had en-
joyed in months.
Kahn says he rst broached the idea of getting licensed to
operate a dispensary after testifying before the D.C. Council in
February 2010.
I met with my family and said, I think this is something
we can do, he recalls. The whole family was excited about it.
We enjoy helping people, seeing dramatic and miraculous stuff
happen. The patients seems healthier and say they feel better
when they come in after their initial visit, and they often use less
[marijuana] as they get stronger.
Kahn says his dual roles as both a rabbi and medical-marijua-
na pioneer raise a few eyebrows, but not too many.
From a Jewish perspective, healing and bringing comfort to
the sick is the most important thing, he says. Some people are a
little taken aback, but its not as if the Jewish community would
be as shocked about a rabbi working with
medical marijuana as they would if a rabbi
were the worlds biggest bacon producer.
As he walks around the dispensary,
Kahn adjusts some of the displays offer-
ing various strains of medicinal marijuana
grown by the citys three operating cul-
tivation centers, paraphernalia or other
devices like those used for vaporization
or magical butter machines that infuse
cannabis into soluble fats, which can then
be used to cook edible treats. The atmo-
sphere of the actual store part of the
dispensary is like a mom-and-pop store
counter, where patients can obtain the
amount of product they need, while the
remainder is run like a doctors or social
workers ofce, with space allotted for
screening and tracking patients progress.
Initially and even to some extent
even today medical marijuana has been
misunderstood, with opponents of medi-
cal marijuana raising the specter of open-air drug markets and
unregulated chaos. But Kahn says D.C.s program is so closely
monitored and its standards for qualifying to take part in the pro-
gram are so strict that it deates any scaremongering or visions
of underground smoke shops that would rival Amsterdam.
For 70 years, weve been teaching people negative things
about marijuana, Kahn says. But because diseases are equal
opportunity employers, more and more people know someone
whos been touched by medical marijuana. And these are regu-
lar, average, normal people. Most of our patients are older, and
probably wouldnt feel comfortable in a counterculture-type es-
tablishment anyway.
Still, its that high degree of regulation that concerns Hawkins,
who voices concerns that the limitations placed on medical mari-
juana mean that some who could truly benet from it are not.
Id say the law is not working very well, because so few have
been able to register, Hawkins says. They have to go through
the Department of Health, which is slow and obsessed with the
bureaucratic process, which makes some patients distrustful of
the program.
In addition, she adds, many doctors are leery of prescribing
medical marijuana at all, because those patients seeking to reg-
ister under the new law have to have their primary doctors sign
a piece of paper that states that marijuana possession and use is
still illegal under the law and spells out the legal ramications of
breaking the law. A better solution, she says, would be to amend
We enjoy
helping people, seeing
dramatic and
miraculous stuff
happen. The patients
seem healthier and
say they feel better.
Jeffrey Kahn
T
O
D
D

F
R
A
N
S
O
N
25 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
the law to allow the primary doctor to refer the patient to an-
other doctor if they are uncomfortable issuing the prescription
for medical marijuana themselves, rather than intimidating doc-
tors and deterring them from recommending marijuana for those
that truly need it to treat chronic conditions.
Hawkins says she saw a similar scenario take place when D.C.
began its clean needle exchange to reduce the rate of transmis-
sion of HIV through intravenous drug use, in 1991. The program,
which was run with strict controls through the Department
of Health, only managed to register 26 people in the rst year.
However, once the program was moved to the private Whitman-
Walker Clinic (now Whitman-Walker Health), the rate of partici-
pation increased. Hawkins was later forced to set up within a
span of three days Prevention Works, a nonprot organization,
to take over the administration of the needle exchange and trans-
fer all the programs assets, after outgoing President George H.W.
Bush issued an executive order barring places engaging in needle
exchange from receiving federal funding.
In that way, Hawkins believes marijuana will follow a similar
trajectory, with dispensaries, like Takoma Wellness Center, see-
ing more customers and losing less money if a private rm takes
over the administration of the program. Hawkins also believes
that other changes are needed to expand the program beyond a
small population that experiences one of the four required medi-
cal conditions. Her hope is that the D.C. Council will pass legisla-
tion to amend the current law to instead use the restrictions as
guidelines, rather than absolutes, for the types of conditions that
can be treated with medicinal marijuana.
For example, she says, people ofcially diagnosed with severe
debilitating migraines, children suffering from pediatric epi-
lepsy, and people who suffer pain after having limbs amputated
could benet from medicinal marijuana, but are currently unable
to enroll in the Districts program.
None of the dispensaries will survive if there arent more pa-
tients, warns Hawkins.
RALLYING FOR
RECREATIONAL USE
I
T IS AGAINST THIS BACKDROP THAT THE FIGHT
over non-medicinal marijuana will take place in the Dis-
trict. While Mayor Vincent Gray (D) has indicated he is
supportive of the idea of decriminalizing marijuana pos-
session, as recently as the past summer, his ofce has reported
that the mayor thinks D.C. government should focus its efforts on
implementing the Districts medical marijuana program before
attempting more difcult goals of decriminalization or legaliza-
tion.
Still, led by councilmember and mayoral candidate Tommy
Wells (D-Ward 6), the D.C. Council is poised to vote as soon as
Feb. 4 on a bill that would decriminalize, meaning lessened pen-
alties, for those caught possessing marijuana. Under current Dis-
trict law, the penalty is a ne of $1,000 and up to six months in
jail. Under Wellss bill, that ne would be reduced to $25.
Proponents of the measure a clear majority of the 13-mem-
ber council, though with varying degrees of enthusiasm say
that the legislation is needed to combat racial disparities among
people arrested for marijuana possession. As currently written,
the bill also includes a ne of $100 for people caught smoking
marijuana who do not identify themselves at a police ofcers re-
quest, and a separate ne of $100 for smoking marijuana in pub-
lic. But even if the bill passes and receives Grays signature, it will
have to pass a 60-day congressional review period during which
Congress could choose to overturn or halt the law.
At the same time that Wellss decriminalization initiative is
receiving a vote in D.C. Council, other D.C.-based marijuana ac-
tivists are pursuing a ballot initiative that would make it legal to
possess up to two ounces of marijuana, grow up to three plants at
ones home, and transfer up to an ounce of marijuana to another
person. In order to appear
on the ballot, the referen-
dum would have to be ap-
proved by the D.C. Board
of Elections and Ethics,
weather potential chal-
lenges to its wording, and
gather petition signatures
from at least 5 percent of
D.C.s registered voters
including at least 5 per-
cent of registered voters
in ve of the citys eight
wards. Then, if enough
signatures were deter-
mined to be valid, voters
would have to approve
the measure, which,
again, would be subject to
congressional oversight.
But legalization is not
a foreign concept to the D.C. Council. Last September, Council-
member David Grosso (I-At Large) introduced a bill that would
legalize, regulate and tax marijuana at 6 percent for the sale of
medicinal marijuana, but 15 percent for all other uses but that
bill has largely been sidelined in favor of Wellss decriminaliza-
tion measure.
Additionally, if opinion polls are to be believed, the public is
highly supportive of not just decriminalization, but full legaliza-
tion. A January Washington Post poll of 1,003 adult D.C. residents
found that 63 percent support full legalization. Meanwhile, 16
percent oppose legalization, but support decriminalization. Only
17 percent saying they both oppose legalization and oppose or do
not have an opinion on decriminalization.
Even so, support for decriminalization not to mention legal-
ization is not universal. Metropolitan Police Department Chief
Cathy Lanier has said decriminalization is worthy of robust dis-
cussion, but has also alleged that arguments in favor of decrimi-
nalization are awed.
Substance abuse prevention groups, such as the Alexandria-
based international Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America
(CADCA), ercely oppose legalization, going so far as to criticize
President Barack Obama for comments he made in an interview
with The New Yorker that he believes marijuana is no more dan-
gerous than alcohol, even though he also said hed discourage his
daughters from using the drug.
CADCA is concerned that only a portion of what the Presi-
dent said during his interview has made headlines, when in fact
the President expressed some serious concerns about marijuana
legalization, Gen. Arthur T. Dean, chairman and CEO of CADCA,
said in a Jan. 23 press release. CADCA believes that substance
abuse is a public health concern and has wide-reaching negative
effects on our young people and society. So we agree with Presi-
the POT ISSUE
For some patients,
it eased
their dying.
I was sending out
these 85- or 95-pound
weaklings out on the
street to score
some weed.
Pat Hawkins
26 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
dent Obamas comment that marijuana use is a bad habit, a bad
idea and a waste of time. We also echo the Presidents sentiment
that the case for marijuana legalization is overstated and will not
solve the many social problems our society faces.
The President also noted that the marijuana legalization ex-
periments in Colorado and Washington might create a slippery
slope where people begin suggesting that we legalize harder
drugs like cocaine and methamphetamine, Dean continued.
CADCA couldnt agree more.
Regarding legalization, political observers should keep their
eyes on the gubernatorial campaign of Maryland Del. Heather
Mizeur (D-Montgomery Co.), who has proposed legalizing, tax-
ing and regulating the substance in order to generate the revenue
needed to pay for universal pre-kindergarten for all Maryland
children, while reducing what the state spends on incarcerating
some people convicted of possession of marijuana.
Under Mizeurs plan, adults 21 and older would be permit-
ted to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and up to ve grams
of concentrated marijuana. Smoking in public, or driving while
under the inuence of marijuana, would remain illegal at any
age. Mizeur also proposes a range of nes and jail times for those
caught breaking such laws or those seeking to trafc marijuana.
Minors caught possessing marijuana would be ned, and could
be required to submit to drug and alcohol counseling.
On the tax side, Mizeurs plan imposes a $50 excise tax per
ounce at the point of sale between cultivators and retailers, and a
6 percent sales tax and 2 percent excise tax on those purchasing
marijuana from retailers. According to Mizeur, if the estimated
price of a gram is $7, Maryland could expect to generate between
$122.5 million and $157.5 million.
But Mizeur also acknowledges that her state might not be ready
to automatically embrace legalization, largely because Maryland is
still playing catch-up on other fronts related to marijuana.
We do have a medical marijuana law, but its rather conser-
vative, she says. It passed last year, and it hasnt been imple-
mented in the way everyone had hoped. The sponsor of the bill is
coming back this year with revisions that will put it more in line
with what other states have done.
On whether decriminalization is necessary before tackling le-
galization of the drug, Mizeur says, I dont think it has to come
rst, but I do acknowledge that it might take an election to get a
mandate from the voters, to change old ways of thinking about
this in Annapolis. At a minimum, were going to need a Mizeur-
Coates administration to get legalization passed.
Regardless, Mizeur is has sponsored a bill aimed at decrimi-
nalizing marijuana.
At a minimum, we need to leave this session having reformed
the laws so peoples lives arent ruined and entangled in our
criminal justice system unnecessarily, she says of her priorities.
So, while legalization wont be taking effect soon, both the
District and Maryland are likely to become ensnared in the de-
bate over the effectiveness of decriminalization and whether the
policy achieves its intent.
Given whats happened in Colorado and Washington, I think
thats the path were on, Hawkins says of the Districts prog-
ress toward more liberal marijuana laws. But any changes to
our medical marijuana program, or decriminalization will have
to be able to get through Congress. Adding something like drug
and alcohol counseling or treatment for those who do get caught
with marijuana to a decriminalization bill might make it easier
to pass, because people can become psychologically, if not clini-
cally dependent. l
E
ARLIER THIS MONTH, CONGRESSMAN JARED
Polis extended a headline-grabbing invitation to
President Barack Obama and Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid. In a Jan. 23 letter addressed to two of the
most powerful men in Washington and the Democratic Party,
the Colorado Democrat said Obama and Reid should accompany
him on a tour of one of his states recently opened marijuana
dispensaries.
I would like to extend an invitation to both of you to visit
Colorado and join me to visit a legal dispensary and grow
operation to see how the law is being implemented in the state,
Polis wrote. I am condent that when you see Colorados work
to implement the law while protecting children and raising
JOINT
EFFORT
Colorado Congressman Jared Polis is leading the
charge to decriminalize marijuana on a federal level
by Justin Snow
Polis
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revenue for our schools rsthand, we can begin to make similar
efforts on a federal level.
Polis, who is the most senior out member of the House
of Representatives, has become a champion of marijuana
decriminalization since arriving on Capitol Hill in 2009. Having
declared that America is losing the war on drugs, Polis has
argued that the federal government should stay out of the
business of telling states what they can and cannot do when it
comes to decriminalizing pot.
Congress should simply allow states to regulate marijuana as
they see t and stop wasting federal tax dollars on the failed drug
war, Polis has said.
This anti-big government view, which Polis has said stems
from the failure of a national prohibition of alcohol during the
1920s and 30s, became particularly signicant when 55 percent
of Colorado voters approved a constitutional amendment in
November 2012 permitting recreational use of marijuana for
adults over the age of 21. In August, the Justice Department
announced they would not challenge Colorado or any other
state that chose to decriminalize marijuana, instead focusing
their resources on drug trafcking and protecting children. On
Jan. 1, retail marijuana went on sale to the Colorado public with
a 25 percent state tax, plus an additional 2.9 percent state sales
tax. As one of the most heavily taxed consumer products in
Colorado, marijuana sales are expected to generate $67 million
a year in tax revenue, with $27.5 million of that designated for
school construction.
Nevertheless, marijuana remains illegal in the eyes of the
federal government and Polis is seeking to change that.
By regulating marijuana like alcohol, Colorado voters hope
to reduce crime and keep marijuana away from kids, Polis said
in a Jan. 1 statement the day marijuana went on sale in Colorado.
I applaud Colorados efforts to implement the will of the
voters and will continue my work to pass H.R. 499 to regulate
marijuana like alcohol federally.
Poliss bill, the Ending Marijuana Prohibition Act, would
essentially decriminalize marijuana at the federal level.
This legislation doesnt force any state to legalize marijuana,
but Colorado and the 18 other jurisdictions that have chosen
to allow marijuana for medical or recreational use deserve the
certainty of knowing that federal agents wont raid state-legal
businesses, Polis said in a statement.
Under the proposed legislation, the attorney general would be
directed to issue a nal order removing marijuana entirely from
the Controlled Substances Act and would place the drug under
the same regulations as alcohol when it comes to such things
as interstate and foreign commerce. The Drug Enforcement
Administration currently classies marijuana as a Schedule 1
substance, dened as the most dangerous drugs of all the drug
schedules with potentially severe psychological or physical
dependence.
Congress should simply allow states to regulate marijuana
as they see t and stop wasting federal tax dollars on the failed
drug war, Polis added.
Last introduced in Feb. 2013, the bill has 16 cosponsors,
including one Republican, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher of California.
The bill still has a step climb in the Republican-controlled House
of Representatives, but the implementation of decriminalization
in Colorado appears to be shifting the conversation.
In a recent interview with The New Yorker, President Obama
said he does not consider marijuana anymore dangerous than
alcohol, but added that there is no one size ts all approach.
As has been well documented, I smoked pot as a kid, and I view
it as a bad habit and a vice, not very different from the cigarettes
that I smoked as a young person up through a big chunk of my adult
life. I dont think it is more dangerous than alcohol, Obama said.
[W]e should not be locking up kids or individual users for long
stretches of jail time when some of the folks who are writing those
laws have probably done the same thing.
Asked to clarify if Obama was setting out a new drug policy,
White House press secretary Jay Carney told reporters no.
Hes talking about the issue of the disparities in our
prosecution of our drug laws that an experiment like this may
be addressing. Hes not endorsing any specic move by a state;
hes simply making an observation, Carney said. His position
on these matters has not changed.
As of yet, President Obama has not responded to Poliss
invitation to a marijuana tour of Colorado. l
the POT ISSUE
28 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
C
OOKING AND CANNABIS HAVE A LONG HISTORY TOGETHER. IT WAS LONG USED IN CAMBODIAN
cooking, for example, with Westerners returning home with tales of Happy Pizza. Seems this didnt go
down well with the U.S., a big supplier of aid to the struggling country, and authorities have since made
cannabis illegal. Rumor has it, however, that Phnom Penh pizzas are still pretty happy.
Some who partake also come back with a warning: Eating cannabis can be an unpredictable business. Effects are
slower to take effect and likely longer to last. Its a recipe for possibly biting off more than one can chew. But for those
who choose to chew nonetheless, theres no need to travel to Cambodia or even Amsterdam, Vancouver, Colorado or
Washington state. You really need go no farther than your own kitchen, assuming your kitchen in well stocked. If so, the
site Marijuana.com is a cannabis clearinghouse of suggestions.
Cannabutter
1 ounce Cannabis
1 pound Butter
Cheesecloth
Using a coffee grinder, grind the cannabis into a ne powder. In
a double-boiler or makeshift version, using a heatproof bowl
resting in a saucepan above roughly a cup of water melt
butter over medium-low heat. Stir in the cannabis powder with
a wooden spoon. Once the mixture starts to come together,
reduce heat to very low. Leave on heat for a minimum of 30
minutes, the longer the better, but avoid letting the mixture
burn. Strain the mixture through cheesecloth into a bowl,
making sure to squeeze out all the liquid. Pour a little water
over the butter once it has hardened and it will last longer.
Marijuana Meatloaf
.25 ounce Cannabis
1 pound Lean Ground Beef
1 Egg, large
.5 package crushed Saltines
1 packet Liptons Tomato Cup-A-Soup
.5 cup Green Pepper, chopped
.5 cup Onion, chopped
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl, combine ground
beef, onion and green pepper. Mix together well with hands.
Continue with added Saltines, soup mix and cannabis. Form
into a ball and return to bowl, pressing a well into the center.
Drop egg yolk into the well and continue combining by hand
until the ingredients are mixed thoroughly. Spread into loaf pan
and bake for 30 to 45 minutes, or until cooked through.
The Pots in the Kitchen
the POT ISSUE
29 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
Garlic Herb Mashed Potatoes
3 to 4 large Russet Potatoes, washed, peeled and
cubed
4 large Garlic Heads (Bulbs)
3 tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 tbsp Basil
1 tbsp Cracked Black Pepper
1 tbsp Kosher Salt
.25 pint Heavy Cream
4 to 6 ounces Ricotta Cheese
4 tbsp Sweet Butter
4 tbsp Cannabutter
Preheat oven to 420 degrees. Cut the top half-inch
off the garlic heads. Add olive oil to the cut heads and
sprinkle with basil. Roast for 30 to 50 minutes, until very
tender. Boil the cubed potatoes in salted water until fork
tender. Drain. Mash lightly. Add butters to potatoes and
continue to mash. Add pepper, salt, cream, and cheese
and mash until smooth. Squeeze garlic heads, forcing out
the cloves, into a small bowl. Remove any garlic skins
that may have fallen into the bowl. Add the roasted garlic
cloves to potato mix and whip until smooth.
Oatmeal Cookies
2 extra large Eggs
.75 cup Cannabutter
2 cups Raw Sugar
2 tsp Vanilla Extract
1 tbsp Nutmeg, ground
1 tbsp Cloves, ground
1 tbsp Cinnamon, ground
2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
.5 tsp Baking Soda
1 tsp Sea Salt
2 tbsp Water
1.5 cups Raisins
2 cups Rolled Oats
1 cup Pecans, chopped
Cream together the eggs, butter, sugar, and vanilla. Sift
the spices, our, baking soda, and salt into the creamed
mixture. Add the water, raisins, oats, and pecans. Mix
thoroughly. Chill cookie dough for 20 minutes. Spoon
golf-ball-sized amounts of dough, about two inches apart,
onto a buttered cookie sheet. Top with raw sugar if
desired. Bake in preheated 350-degree oven for 12 to 20
minutes, or until tops brown slightly.
Green Dragon
.25 to .5 ounce Cannabis
.5 liter Vodka
1 tbsp Lemon or Orange Zest (optional)
Grind cannabis to a ne powder. Put into bottle of
vodka and let sit for 2 to 10 weeks, shaking daily. Add 1
tablespoon of lemon or orange zest for zing.
When ready, serve chilled in a chilled glass with ice. Or try
1 shot of Green Dragon, 3 shots lemon-lime soda and a
teaspoon of honey.
These recipes were adapted from marijuana.com. l
The Pots in the Kitchen
the POT ISSUE
30 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 6, 2014
SPOTLIGHT
5TH ANNUAL WIG NIGHT OUT
What started as a ippant attempt at charity, with
a wig party among friends at Ditos Bar in the
basement of Florianas Restaurant on 17th Street
NW, has now gone high hair: After stints at Cobalt
and JR.s, the fth annual Wig Night Out moves to
Town Danceboutique. Patrons are encouraged to
don wigs at this fundraiser for the Point Foundation,
Compiled by Doug Rule
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Alvin Aileys Robert Battle advances the companys
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STARTED TAKING DANCE BECAUSE I USED TO IMI-
tate Michael Jackson, says Robert Battle, who recalls
playing piano and singing as a child growing up in Miami
before Thriller inspired him to move. But the 41-year-olds
dance career path was further solidied once he caught a local
performance of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. I
remember just being so moved by it, so excited by it.
Decades later, Battle is provoking similar reactions as head
of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, whose popular
appeal is built in large part on what Battle calls a sense of the
unexpected.
What other modern dance company, for instance, incor-
porates ballet into its repertoire? Next week at the Kennedy
Center, the company will do just that, performing two pieces
expressly written as ballets The River, written for the Ameri-
can Ballet 44 years ago by the companys late namesake and set
to music by Duke Ellington, and Chroma, a 2006 piece for the
U.K.s Royal Ballet written by Wayne McGregor and featuring a
score by rock star Jack White.
Battle has juxtaposed the ballet Chroma with Bill T. Joness
modern-dance classic D-Man in the Waters, which is really
about gesture running, jumping, skipping, sliding on your
belly on the stage. Battle added it to the Ailey repertoire in honor of Aileys afnity for Jones, plus the fact that Jones wrote the
piece in 1989 as a tribute to a dancer who died of AIDS the same year Ailey died of the disease.
Battle never got to meet Ailey, having moved to New York to attend Julliard in 1990. But every day, as he works to preserve
Aileys legacy as well as Aileys mission to advance African-American choreographers, Battle says, I feel his presence.... Im
surrounded by him in so many ways.
Battle, whom a New York Times dance critic recently raved has injected the company with new life, says this, his third
season at the helm, has been record-breaking, with people coming back again and again and again last fall in New York.
I really do want to echo that this season is like no other, he continues. If you love the company, if you think you love the
company, if youre curious this is the time to see the company. Doug Rule
The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater performs three programs next week starting Tuesday, Feb. 4, at 7 p.m., at the Kennedy
Center Opera House. Tickets are $30 to $140. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
a nonprot that grants scholarships to LGBTQ
students. Saturday, Feb. 1, from 8 to 11 p.m. Town
Danceboutique, 2009 8th NW. Suggested donation
$10. Call 202-234-TOWN or visit pointfoundation.
org/wnodc.
BILLY JOEL
Five years ago, Billy Joel paired up with the other
most popular rock piano of his era, Elton John, for
a successful, long-running tour that included a stop
at Nationals Park for the rst-ever concert at the
then-new venue. This summer Joel returns for a solo
show. Tickets on sale Saturday, Feb. 1, at 10 a.m.,
for Saturday, July 26, show. Nationals Park, 1500 S.
Capitol St. NE. Tickets are $54.50 to $129.50. Call
888-632-6287 or visit tickets.com.
BRUNO MARS
Madonna set the trend, but now Bruno Mars follows
Beyonce in working to parlay a high-prole Super
Bowl performance Mars headlines the 2014
Halftime Show this Sunday, Feb. 2 into ticket
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theaters Rachael McLaren,
Jacqueline Green, and Glenn Allen Sims
31 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
32
sales for a summer tour. In this case, its simply a
continuation of Marss Moonshine Jungle World
Tour, which launched last summer at D.C.s Verizon
Center. This time out, Mars stops locally at Virginias
Jiffy Lube Live. Aloe Blacc opens. Tickets on sale
Monday, Feb. 3, at 10 a.m., for Friday, July 11, show
at Jiffy Lube Live, 7800 Cellar Door Drive, Bristow,
Va. Tickets are $36 to $131. Call 703-754-6400 or
visit livenation.com.
JD SAMSON & MEN
Only two months after its debut, the indie electronic/
punk group JD Samson & Men returns to Comet Ping
Pong. Fronted by Samson, who came to fame as the
lesbian third of the feminist trio Le Tigre, this Brooklyn-
based queer collective, whose other core member
is guitarist Michael ONeill, is known for pointed
lyrics expressing liberal angst about our conservative,
capitalistic times but all over performed in a giddy
style and set to spunky, upbeat music steeped in the
happy sounds of 80s synth-pop. Also on the bill: Coup
Sauvage & The Snips and DJ Dean of the Black Cats
Gay/Bash monthly party. Wednesday, Feb. 5, at 9 p.m.
Comet Ping Pong, 5037 Connecticut Ave. NW. Tickets
are $15. Call 202-364-0404 or visit cometpingpong.
com or menmakemusic.com.
MESHELL NDEGEOCELLO
D.C.-raised iconoclastic musician Meshell
Ndegeocello continues her tour in tribute to fellow
iconoclast Nina Simone. The concert, presented
by the Howard Theatre in fall of 2012, features
selection of songs Simone either wrote or performed,
including Feeling Good and Dont Let Me Be
Misunderstood, but revamped in Ndegeocellos
generally brooding, lower-register contemplative
style. I wanted to carry on her [legacy], the
bisexual Ndegeocello told Metro Weekly in 2012.
What she did so well was take standards or songs
from writers and make them her own [so they]
become the denitive version. You have to put
something of yourself into it. Thursday, Jan. 30.
Doors at 7 p.m. Rams Head On Stage, 33 West St.,
Annapolis. Tickets are $49.50. Call 410-268-4545 or
visit ramsheadonstage.com.
OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORT FILMS 2014:
ANIMATED, LIVE ACTION
Once again Landmarks E Street Cinema offers
two feature-length programs of the short lms
nominated at the 86th Annual Academy Awards,
set for March 2: a program with the animated
shorts, and a program of live action shorts. Both
programs screen for two weeks. Opens Friday, Jan.
31. Landmarks E Street Cinema, 555 11th St. NW.
Call 202-452-7672 or visit landmarktheatres.com.
THE BEST MAN
Keegan Theatre kicks off its new season with a
production of Gore Vidals popular political satire
The Best Man. A play about power, ambition, secrets
and ruthlessness in the race for the presidency,
Keegan taps Christina A. Coakley and Timothy
Lynch to direct a cast including artistic director
Mark A. Rhea and his wife Susan Marie Rhea,
Kevin Adams, Sheri Herren and Michael Innocenti.
Opening Friday, Jan. 30, at 8. To Feb. 22 Andrew
Keegan Theatre (formerly Church Street Theater),
1742 Church St. NW. Tickets are $35. Call 703-892-
0202 or visit keegantheatre.com.
THE WASHINGTON BALLETS
THE JAZZ/BLUES PROJECT
Helen Hayes Award winner E. Faye Butler and
the Howard University Jazz Ensemble perform
in this program featuring Trey McIntyres Blue
Until June, set to the music of Etta James; Val
Caniparolis Charlie Bird Parker-set Birds Nest;
and Annabelle Lopez Ochoas Sueno de Marmol.
Remaining performances are Thursday, Jan. 30, and
Stone
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National Geographic honors inspiring Travelers of the Year
E
VERY YEAR NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC TRAVELER MAGAZINE
receives, according to the magazines George Stone, lots of cool let-
ters from passionate individuals telling us about their travelsalmost
like receiving a bunch of postcards.
But instead of just cluttering the sides of a refrigerator or bulletin board,
George Stone and his editorial colleagues decided to feature these adven-
tures by creating an annual best-of series. Started in 2012, the magazines
annual Travelers of the Year series recognizes about a dozen people from all
walks of life whom Stone calls inspiring passionate travelers, those who
go out and see the world and bring something back, [and] make some kind
of an impact on destinations that really touched them.
Next week, Stone will moderate a panel with a handful of those honored
in 2013, including, Shannon ODonnell, who developed a voluntourism
database featuring volunteering and sustainable tourism opportunities
worldwide; Molly Burke and Muyambi Muyambi, who created a program
to distribute bikes to low-income entrepreneurs in Uganda; and Hilda and
John Denham, a couple who established a nature preserve to protect turtle
nesting areas in Costa Rica.
Stone, the magazines editor at large who lives with his partner in South-
east Asia, says National Geographic wasnt sure what to expect when they
started the program. But the number of nominations for Travelers of the
Year doubled from 2012 to 2013, when they received 1,600 nominations.
(Nominations are now open for the 2014 round.) Similarly, last years inau-
gural event featuring the rst round of travelers at Grosvenor Auditorium
almost sold out.
Turns out people loved the idea of seeing someone maybe doing what
they aspire to do. A post-discussion wine-and-cheese reception sponsored
by United Airlines doesnt hurt, either. Doug Rule
Travelers of the Year is Thursday, Feb. 6, at 7 p.m., at the National Geo-
graphic Societys Gilbert H. Grosvenor Auditorium, 1600 M St. NW. Tickets
are $30. Call 202-857-7700 or visit nglive.org.
JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
33 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
34
Friday, Feb. 1, at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 1, at 1:30
p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Feb. 2, at 1:30 p.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Sidney Harman Hall, Harman Center
for the Arts, 610 F St. NW. Tickets are $29 to $125.
Call 202-547-1122 or visit washingtonballet.org.

FILM
SHADOW OF A DOUBT
Capitol Hills The Hill Center offers a month-long
series screening lms from the master of suspense
Alfred Hitchcock with post-show discussion from
Hitchcock expert Tom Zaniello. The focus is on
his pre-Psycho dark side repertoire, including
1943s Shadow of a Doubt, featuring what is said to
be one of Hitchcocks tightest screenplays, written
by Thornton Wilder, and focused on a young girl
who crosses over to the dark side as she discovers
the true, evil nature of her once-favorite, seemingly
charming uncle, whos also her namesake: Charlie.
Friday, Jan. 31, at 7 p.m. Hill Center, Old Navy
Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. Call 202-
549-4172 or visit HillCenterDC.org.
STAGE
VIOLET
Fords Theatre offers Jeanine Tesori/Brian Crawleys
musical, based on the short story The Ugliest Pilgrim
by Doris Betts, touching on televangelists and the
military, plus quick, supercial cosmetic correctives
and the deeper and more lasting power of inner
strength. First staged off-Broadway in 1997, Violet
features an American roots score that veers from
bluegrass to gospel to rock by Tesori (Thoroughly
Modern Millie) and lyrics and book by Brian Crawley
(The Little Princess). Jeff Calhoun, best known for
writing the music for the Broadway hit Newsies,
returns to Fords to direct the production after
his previous hits, 2005s Big River and 2006s
Shenandoah. Casting for this production is dominated
by staple performers at Signature Theatre: Erin
Driscoll as the title character, plus Nova Y. Peyton,
James Gardiner, Bobby Smith, Chris Sizemore and
Stephen Gregory Smith. To Feb. 23. Fords Theatre,
511 10th St. NW. Tickets are $20 to $52. Call 800-
982-2787 or visit fordstheatre.org.
YELLOW FACE
Theater J presents the regional premiere of Yellow
Face, in which playwright David Henry Hwang leads
a community protest against the casting of a famous
white actor as the Eurasian pimp in the original
Broadway production of Miss Saigon and then
faces his own headache when he mistakenly casts a
white actor in his own new play. Natsu Onoda Power
directs the Theater J production of this Pulitzer Prize
nalist featuring a cast including Tony Beckman,
Mark Hairston, Stan Kang, Al Twanmo and Jacob
Yeh. Pay-What-You-Can Preview Thursday, Jan. 30,
at 8 p.m. To Feb. 23. The Aaron & Cecile Goldman
Theater, Washington, D.C.s Jewish Community
Center, 1529 16th St. NW. Tickets are $30 to $55.
Call 202-518-9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org.l
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SYNAGOGUE
D.C.s Adas Israel pushes the envelope with gay rights
A
YEAR AGO GIL STEINLAUF, LEADER OF THE OLDEST AND
largest Conservative synagogue in Washington, took a stand for
gay rights. Writing in the Jewish Journal, Adas Israels 44-year-
old senior rabbi advanced a Jewish legal argument, or halahkic, not only
in support of same-sex marriage, but also asserting that the original
Jewish Bible is not anti-homosexual in its rulings.
The place of LGBT Jews in our community is something that is
very important to me as a rabbi, and very important to this commu-
nity at Adas Israel, Steinlauf says. There are many congregations
that arent willing to push the envelope on that and arent willing to
talk about this still.
But Steinlauf is making sure Adas Israel isnt one of them. Next
week this Cleveland Park-based congregation, dedicated more than 150
years ago by President Ulysses S. Grant and considered a agship in the
American Jewish community, will hold a public discussion on the topic.
I think we have to have real conversations, Steinlauf says, about
what are the roadblocks that have developed over thousands of years in
the Jewish tradition preventing all people, no matter who they are,
how they live their lives, to participate as members of the community.
At this discussion the featured guest is Jay Michaelson, whose 2011
book God vs. Gay? The Religious Case for Equality made the argument
that queer people enrich religious communities. Michaelson, a gay
Conservative Jew and best-selling author on the topic of religion and
sexuality, has made it his mission to speak out against religious intoler-
ance and hostility.
We live in a time when the imperative of what is right and what is
good and what is just demands that our halahkic system evolve, Stein-
lauf says. Jay is somebody who has been on the forefront of these dis-
cussions. Hes been a true groundbreaking teacher, writer and speaker
for a long time now.
Michaelson will speak as part of the program LGBTQ Jewish Life
in America, which Steinlauf intends to be a frank and uncensored
conversation as a Jewish community around the issues of justice and
the LGBT community. Doug Rule
Tuesday, Feb. 4, at 7:30 p.m., Adas Israel Congregation, 2850 Quebec St.
NW. Call 202-362-4433 or visit adasisrael.org.
JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
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OUT ON THE TOWN LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
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Steinlauf (R)
35 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
36
A
LATE-VICTORIAN
romp lled with Oscar
Wildes relentless wit
and merciless jabs at
high society, the Shakespeare
Theater Companys The Impor-
tance of Being Earnest may be
just the ticket for a bitterly cold
winters evening. With wordplay
that tickles the brain, creampuff
costumes, an all-around insup-
pressible cheerfulness, and the
kind of elocution that borders on
the hypnotic, its easy to forget
about things like snow, ice and
unscheduled leave as long as
one doesnt also fall into a long
winters nap.
Which is to say that despite
its confectionary-like pleasures
(including some ne sets) and its
exuberant good-naturedness, this
isnt the most riveting of produc-
tions. Though its hard to put a
nger on it, sufce to say its some-
thing to do with a slight lag in
rhythm, a slight lack of chemistry
and a slight imbalance between
the smug and the sardonic tones
that must drive the play. Even with
the built-in advantages of Wil-
des fragrantly evergreen wit and
supremely clever silliness, a play
like this will only truly y if its as
tightly bound as a ladys corset.
And what isnt tight enough,
despite plenty of energy, is the
dynamic between the two eligible
bachelors at the center of the pro-
ceedings the joyful, if feckless,
Algernon, and the older, more cal-
culating Jack. Just as the chem-
istry of romantic pairings matter,
so does the friendship and fris-
son of Jack and Algernon. They
must generate the devil-may-care
silliness of over-privileged young
men, but they must also set the
witty and sardonic tone of the play
and this is where a certain neces-
sary magic never quite occurs.
Gregory Wooddells Jack
delivers leading-man charisma,
but his self-assurance and know-
ingness isnt enough to overcome
an expressiveness that is a whis-
per off beat, a whisper overplayed.
It might only be measurable in
nanoseconds, but it is just enough
to leave the signicantly more on-
the-boil Anthony Roach too little
for his Algernon to play against.
Flip it around, and Roachs
improvy physical humor slightly
clashes with Wooddells more
measured style. Bottom line: each
player has much to offer - Wood-
dell with his impressive presence
and Roach with his excellent
facility with Wildes speed and
tone just not with each other.
There is a bit more potential
in the coupling of Algernon and
Cecily, the semi-secret ward Jack
has been harboring at his country
estate, but this is largely due to
Roachs puppy-like exuberance.
Katie Fabel gives her ever-so-
slightly rebellious young Cecily
a nicely piquant expressiveness
and good comic timing, even if its
somewhat hard to see her attrac-
tion to Algernon.
Still, these quibbles on the fris-
son front are somewhat mitigat-
ed by the general hubbub of the
plot, even if they do cause mind-
wandering lags in the momen-
tum. After all, this is a comedy of
manners and the bromances and
romances are mainly an excuse
for bigger entertainments. Indeed,
almost as soon as the action
begins, Wilde throws Jack into
the mix, showing us that he lives
a less than transparent existence
and that his engagement to the
unassailable Gwendolen may not
get past the formidable resistance
of Lady Bracknell, her mother.
With the mischievous Algernon
causing as much trouble as pos-
sible, all manner of scathing social
commentary occurs and near-
social disaster threatens before an
alls-well-that-ends-well nale.
And frankly, it is with the arriv-
al of Lady Bracknell, that the pro-
duction is pulled fully on track.
Offering the perfect blend of men-
ace, color and comic timing, Sian
Despite its confectionary-like pleasures and exuberant good-natured-
ness, this isnt the most riveting of Earnests
Gregory Wooddell (L) and Anthony Roach
THE
IMPORTANCE
OF BEING
EARNEST
HHHHH
To March 9
Lansburgh Theatre
450 7th St. NW
$20-$115
202-547-1122
shakespearetheatre.
org
Wilde at Heart
KATE WINGFIELD STAGE
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JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
F
REDA PAYNE HAS
absolutely no trouble
channeling the big voice
of Ella Fitzgerald, and
its actually quite remarkable.
Payne, who had a pop hit in 1970
with Band of Gold, hits all the
right notes singing, scatting, even
occasionally ad libbing in Metro-
Stages latest bio-musical, Ella
Fitzgerald: First Lady of Song. Her
achievement will no doubt delight
and surprise anyone who has ever
listened in awe to Fitzgerald, one
of the greatest singers America
has ever produced.
That is, when Payne is sing-
ing. Turns out, she isnt much
of an actor. Or, at the very least,
Payne lacks condence in lling
Fitzgeralds shoes, walking and
talking like the mid-20th century
jazz legend.
MetroStages relatively bare-
bones production doesnt give
Payne much wiggle room either.
Two seasons ago Maurice Hines
pulled out all the stops at this
Alexandria theater with an excel-
lent, extravagant world-premiere
production of Josephine Tonight
that made you forget where you
were, even giving you visions
of Broadway. This time around
director Hines is giving us what
feels like an also-ran a sec-
ond production of Ella Fitzgerald:
First Lady of Song a full decade
after the rst in New Jersey,
with seemingly no larger ambi-
tions than that. Pianist William
Knowles does just ne in the role
of music director, assembling a
rollicking ve-piece band that lls
in adequately as the storys larger
orchestras supporting Fitzger-
ald. Unfortunately, the musicians
are also asked to sub for some of
the shows other incidental roles,
including drummer and Fitzger-
ald mentor Chick Webb and Ray
Brown, the bassist who became
Fitzgeralds second husband.
No offense to Greg Holloway or
Yusef Chisholm, respectively, but
the show would benet from real
actors taking on these roles.
But then there isnt that
much to the main roles here. We
dont gain that much insight into
Fitzgerald, the notoriously private
woman. Instead, it simply asks
Payne to sing and swing nearly
two dozen songs from Fitzger-
alds repertoire, including her sig-
nature renditions of A Tisket A
Tasket, How High The Moon
and Mack The Knife. And pre-
cisely because of Paynes mas-
tery at performing as Fitzgerald,
youre sure to leave the show on
a good note, singing a good tune.
YOURE SURE TO LEAVE
Source laugning after taking in
Constellation Theatre Companys
latest twist on a classic. Certain-
ly Constellations production of
Scapin, a farce originally from
French playwright Moliere that
Bill Irwin and Mark ODonnell
adapted two decades ago, ranks as
one of the companys most glee-
fully delightful. The outlandish
story revolves around two ser-
vants in a coastal Italian town
conspiring against their masters
in pursuit of love and money.
Kathryn Chase Bryer of Imagina-
tion Stage applies her expertise in
putting on shows for children to
make this far-fetched story crazi-
er and yet more entertaining as it
goes. From A.J. Gubans cartoon-
like set to Kendra Rais whimsy,
fantastical costumes to the way
choreographers Kelly King and
Matthew R. Wilson have the
actors move or ght in exagger-
ated, comical fashion, the playful,
physical comedy is as escapist
and as active as live theater gets.
Its all further embellished by the
laughter provoked by the music
Travis Charles Ploeger plays live
from the piano, little well-timed
riffs drawn from some of Holly-
MetroStages Ella Fitzgerald is best when its simply singing, while
Constellations Scapin is simply delightful
Bradley Foster Smith (L) and Michael Glenn
ELLA
FITZGERALD
HHHHH
To March 16
MetroStage
metrostage.org
SCAPIN
HHHHH
To Feb. 16
Source
constellationtheatre.
org
37
Jazzed
DOUG RULE STAGE
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METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
38
I
ts not much of a secret these days. To get to the size and strength level of many
professional athletes, PEDs are necessary. An acronym that encompasses a large
selection of pharmaceuticals, PED stands for Performance Enhancing Drugs. The
most popular PED is the anabolic steroid, testosterone. The government labeled
testosterone and other anabolic steroids as controlled substances in 1990, resulting in the
ban of over-the-counter sales. Now, the only way to legally obtain them is through a pre-
scription from your doctor. While thats a conversation for your doctor, the conversation
many people dont want to have is one about perpetuated scare tactics and myths.
ROID RAGE - Testosterone (the most commonly used anabolic steroid) is the central
culprit for the roid rage myth. During competitive moments in ones life, excessively
high levels of testosterone can possibly make a person more aggressive. Expressions of
so-called roid rage, however, seem to be the clear exception.
TESTOSTERONE SHRINKS TESTICLES - This has some truth to it. The more testosterone you
inject the less your body produces. As a result, the testicles, the main source of product,
will shrink.
IT WILL CAUSE YOU TO DEVELOP BREASTS - Again, there is some truth behind this state-
ment if you arent using the proper dosages and accessory medicine. When you begin
injecting higher amounts of testosterone than your body is used to, you will also being
producing extra estrogen to compensate. Some will begin to develop gynecomastia or
large, breast-like fat deposits in the chest.
For all of the negatives that surround testosterone supplementation, there are ways to
combat and monitor all of the effects. For instance, the testicle shrinking can be xed by a
proper PCT, or Post Cycle Therapy. The PCT effectively restores testosterone production
in most people, returning everything to its normal size. Gynecomastia is easily combat-
BRANDON HARRISON
ed by taking an estrogen inhibi-
tor, blocking the bodys estrogen
receptors. That, however, is not to
say there arent other drawbacks
to supplementing the testosterone
in your body.
NATURAL TESTOSTERONE LEVELS
MAY NEVER LEVEL OUT - By supple-
menting testosterone via injec-
tion or orally, you shut down your
bodys natural production of the
hormone. Your body recognizes
that there is plenty of testosterone
in the body already and reacts
accordingly. Taking steroids can
permanently damage this part of
the bodys regulatory system, and
you could end up being on TRT
(testosterone replacement thera-
py) for the rest of your life.
ACNE - If vanity is your primary
reason for being in the gym, tes-
tosterone could put a damper on
your ability to walk around shirtless.
Acne on your face, chest and back
are very common occurrences in
steroid users.
INCREASED RISK OF PROSTATE
CANCER - The biggest issue with
injecting testosterone is the pos-
sibility of prostate cancer. There
are now more studies on the sub-
ject some of which cast doubt
on such a link of testosterone
replacement therapy being the
main cause of prostate cancer. It
does increase the production of a
prostate-specic antigen, which is
a red ag for health care provid-
ers to further examine a patients
prostate health, but the actual link
is still being questioned.
There are always drawbacks to
changing the way your body natu-
rally works, and through a lack
of understanding and knowledge
on the subject, anabolic steroid
purchasing was quickly banned
in the United States. Not unlike
many substances in the country,
through the proper education and
guidance, anabolic steroids, and
especially testosterone, can be
used to increase your lean mus-
cle tissue at a signicantly higher
rate, and with a reasonable degree
of safety.
Brandon Harrison covers health and
tness for Metro Weekly. Read more
at metroweekly.com/health. l
HEALTH & FITNESS
Anabolic steroid use testosterone, in particular carries both scare
tactics and sound warnings
T Time
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I
T WAS A WEEK OF MILESTONES AND PETTY IN-FIGHTING IN THE AUTO-
motive world this past week. As one of the potential future directions of the automotive
world reached a technological milestone, a much-vaunted car hire company found itself
red-faced in a bizarre and underhanded stunt aimed at hurting a competitor.
Tesla announced that their pioneering Supercharger network has reached a new land-
mark, with owners of Tesla electric vehicles now able to travel from coast-to-coast across
the United States without leaving the range of a Supercharger charging station. The sta-
tions, available exclusively for Tesla owners, are free to use, can provide 170 miles of range
in just 30 minutes and derive part of their power from solar energy. They are part of a
nationwide network of charging stations that Tesla is rolling out across the country, with
Tesla aiming for nationwide coverage in all 50 states and parts of Canada by 2015.
As it currently stands, a Tesla owner living in Seattle can travel along the Supercharger
network south to Los Angeles, before driving up through Colorado, South Dakota, Wiscon-
sin, Ohio and other states in a rather circuitous route to New York City. From there, they
can travel south to Miami all without ever paying to charge up their Tesla. Thats pretty
incredible, and a testament to how far electric technology has come, though its aided in no
small part by the highest-powered Model Ss 265-mile range.
A father and daughter team have already claimed the rst cross-country trip from New
York to LA, taking a week to travel from Kentucky to New York City, and then over to Los
Angeles, racking up 3,600 miles
in the process. Their trip bolsters
Teslas claims that 80 percent of
the US population now lives with-
in driving range of a Supercharger
station, while CEO Elon Musk has
planned a family trip across the
country this spring using his com-
panys charging network.
Uber, meanwhile, is one of the
most ubiquitous car hire rms at
the moment, with the company
continuing to spread its operations
throughout the U.S. However, its
rapid expansion hasnt been with-
out teething troubles certainly
not aided by some incredibly shady
business practices. The latest rev-
elation comes from New York City,
where Uber has been accused by
rival hire rm Gett of deliberately
disrupting their drivers.
Gett claim that Uber employ-
ees called and canceled more than
100 cars over the course of several
days, with Ubers general man-
ager, several community manag-
ers and operations managers and
the companys social media strat-
egist allegedly all involved in the
scheme. Gett also accuse Uber em-
ployees of allegedly attempting to
recruit their drivers after repeat-
edly canceling orders. Gett sends
the phone number of a driver to
the person that books a car, which
Uber apparently used to text the
drivers, offering incentives to per-
suade them to switch rms.
For its part, Uber hasnt denied
the actions, instead stating, Our
local teams can be pretty deter-
mined when spreading the word
about Uber and how our platform
opens up new economic opportu-
nities for drivers. In this instance,
the New York City team was a bit
too ambitious and well make sure
they tone down their sales tactics.
Gett hasnt commented on wheth-
er it will seek legal action against
Uber, but the bad press will hope-
fully be a deterrent against future
underhanded methods. Whatever
happens, its clear that rms are
willing to do whatever it takes to
emerge on top in the growing pri-
vate hire segment.
Rhuaridh Marr covers the
automotive industry. Read
more on the Gears blog at
metroweekly.com/auto. l
Tesla achieves a new goal with its Supercharger network, while Gett
accuses Uber of some underhanded recruitment tricks
Tesla Model S
39
Milestones
and In-Fighting
T
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METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
RHUARIDH MARR GEARS
40
G
IVEN MY NATION OF BIRTH, BRITAIN, IT COULD BE EXPECTED THAT
my personal politics would be heavily inuenced by the ethical socialism that
proved popular in the 20th century. I do, however, draw several of my inuences
from American idealism, and the notion of the American Dream. Using capital-
ism and the benets of a free market economy to better ones self, regardless of status, is
an empowering ideal. However, while sharing a common language, our two nations vary
greatly which made the fact that Id just chosen to be President of the United States all
the more daunting. How would my British political upbringing inuence my control of the
most powerful nation on earth?
As I took ofce, the situation was somewhat dire. GDP was in the toilet, the overall stan-
dard of health was poor, unemployment was moderately high and there were pervasive lev-
els of crime. The national spending decit was $203 billion, while national debt sat at $3.3
trillion. My 316 million citizens lived with numerous threats to their health and well-being:
there were vigilante mobs taking the judicial system into their own hands, anti-social be-
havior was rife, internet crime was ruining the digital sphere and alcohol abuse and drug ad-
diction were reaching epidemic levels. This all combined with an uncompetitive economy, a
strong skills shortage, high levels of homelessness and years of unrestricted environmental
policies producing record levels of pollution which had created an asthma epidemic. All-
in-all, the land of the free and the home of the brave was in a rather mixed state.
My rst year was tough and my policies were strict. I raised the police force budget,
granting the intelligence services enough money to construct a satellite network to heavily
monitor every facet of criminal activity. I introduced stronger prisoner tagging to closely
watch possible reoffenders. I subsidized youth clubs, to keep teens off the street, drafted
child labor laws to keep students in school and doubled education spending, giving every
student a laptop to enable better learning. Strong restrictions were placed on alcohol to re-
duce its consumption and sale, and the effects that alcohol abuse had on crime and health.
(I later regretted this when it became near impossible to enjoy a gin and tonic.) A telecom-
muting initiative was enacted to reduce the pressure on the road network and to cut down
on pollution as a result, Los Angeles residents spent less time on notoriously clogged free-
ways, down to a mere nine hours per day. A debt protection law helped those affected by
dodgy loan deals, but it didnt help my popularity. After the rst six months, polls suggested
only 38 percent would re-elect me.
The rest of the year, I placed focus on health, tripling the budget of all federal and state
RHUARIDH MARR
health programs into a nation-
wide, fully-funded health service
my British upbringing an obvi-
ous factor here. I received staunch
opposition from capitalists and
conservative members of society,
but I proceeded unabashed. Un-
fortunately, the costs associated
led to our national credit rating
dropping from B to CCC the
wealthy were up in arms. As ap-
peasement, I cut $100 billion from
the military budget, balancing
that by appointing a UN ambassa-
dor with a strong focus on foreign
relations. Now patriots hated me.
Being President is tough.
My rst 365 days, however,
ended on a positive note. Debt
had risen to $4.2 trillion, but GDP
and national health were rising,
and my militant policing had led
to an end of vigilante mobs and
anti-social behavior, and crime
as a whole was down. As a result,
62 percent would re-elect me. I
savored a near-impossible-to-ac-
quire martini.
I started my second year with
a goal to improving the nations
nances. I closely studied my ex-
penditure and income reports,
and made my decisions. Income
tax was cut by 7 percent, and in
its place came a carbon tax, which
proportionally taxed individu-
als and businesses based on their
emissions. The reason was two-
fold: it would reduce pollution,
which would help the asthma
epidemic, in turn leading to less
coughing interrupting me during
cabinet meetings. It would also
raise signicantly more money
than income tax the rst three
months alone saw a surplus of
$404 billion on the balance sheet.
This enabled a hybrid car initia-
tive and the introduction of ma-
jor nes for heavy polluters. The
uncompetitive economy ended as
productivity increased, which in
turned raised GDP and bumped
the credit rating back up to B.
Sure, there was a stress epidemic
due to healthier citizens working
longer hours, but Id just cut in-
come tax so they could suck it up
and keep working.
For the latter half of the year,
I was pretty much coasting.
America entered a state of crime-
free utopia, with citizens able to
freely walk the street at night. Of
course, the human rights society
was taking to radio to complain
that my extensive policing hurt
GAMEFACE
Can a British citizen take over the American presidency and x all the ills
in the land while remaining vastly popular?
West Winging It
JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
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u
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continued from page 36
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41 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
personal liberties, but a freedom of infor-
mation act that guaranteed individuals
wouldnt be spied on soon smoothed over
that crack. I then noticed that creationism
was still being taught in schools, which I
swiftly cracked down on. Religious lead-
ers branded me the devil, but, as the year
drew to a close, evolution was the only
acceptable teaching method for the na-
tions youth. I nished my second year as
President feeling pretty smug. That ended
when I was told my support had dropped
to 57 percent.
My third year was focused entirely on
health and education. A constant surplus
led to free school meals for every student,
strict regulations on childrens food to com-
bat obesity and increased funding for uni-
versity students, with all fees paid and gen-
erous grants available for those who wished
to enter higher education. Science funding
was boosted, and I told leading scientists to
construct a particle accelerator in Ameri-
ca Ill be damned if CERN was going to
have all of the atom-smashing fun. That
was followed by improved fuel efciency
standards to reduce dependency on fossil
fuels and aid the continued fall in pollution
levels nationwide smog became plain ol
fog again. As the year drew to a close, things
were looking good for next years election.
National debt had fallen to $3.4 trillion,
wed entered a period of high productiv-
ity, which was boosting business and trade,
internet crime had been stomped out by
intelligence services and 77 percent of the
healthy, evolution-loving populace were
willing to re-elect me. Now I just needed to
avoid screwing everything up.
The last twelve months of my term
were spent tweaking the work Id car-
ried out. I initiated cost-saving measures
to boost credit ratings and reduced taxes
to further improve my standing with the
public. Yes, I was going for popular poli-
cies but I had an election to win. Inheri-
tance tax was abolished and property tax
reduced to under 1 percent, boosting the
middle classes. I cut school expenditures
to free up extra cash as the world entered
recession, but was still able to have our
rating upgraded to BBB. Winning!
With 6 months to the election, sup-
port had fallen to 72 percent, so I went
on a spending spree of efcient, headline-
worthy policies. Free eye tests were intro-
duced alongside subsidies for healthier
foods I refused to punish those who
enjoyed fatty foods, but made it easier for
them to choose a low-cost, healthy op-
tion instead. Arts programs were given
heavy subsidies, which boosted culture
and tourism nationwide with a raft of new
entertainment and exhibits. I prepared
for a future without fossil fuels with clean
energy subsidies and made sure to qui-
etly ignore the angry calls ooding in from
oil CEOs. Community policing was intro-
duced to further improve relations in ur-
ban areas, and homelessness decreased to
negligible levels as businesses continued
to thrive. Our surplus stood at $150 billion
and national debt was $3 trillion. I en-
tered the election race with 86 percent of
the public saying they would vote for me,
staying laissez-faire in debates and ap-
pearances merely pointing to the good
work Id enacted over the past four years.
Overall health was up 42 percent,
Id improved education by a fth, crime
was reduced 80 percent and poverty was
down by a third. Nationwide productivity
was up by a fth and unemployment had
fallen the same amount. We were a third
more energy efcient as a nation and pro-
duced two thirds less carbon dioxide. The
poorest in society earned 40 percent more
than they had when I took ofce and na-
tional GDP was up 20 percent. I was, as
President, crushing it.
Which, naturally, led to a landslide
election victory. 182 million people chose
me as their leader, with an embarrassing-
ly low 21 million for my opposition. The
smug factor was increased by the 113 mil-
lion who hadnt voted, meaning Id been
elected by a true majority of the popula-
tion. Despite my many controversial poli-
cies national health service, new taxes,
reduced military spending, contempt to-
wards religion in schools Id somehow
managed to win over most of the popu-
lace, taking a British upbringing and a
love of American idealism and combining
them into an incredibly successful rst
term. I checked my political spectrum and
was told I was a liberal capitalist. Perfect.
And with that, I left the excellent menu
structure of Democracy 3, with its intui-
tive, text- and icon-based navigation, its
humorous slant on political simulation,
its numerous charts and graphs and its
myriad of options and policies, and went
to bask in the glory of the greatest one-
term Presidency in history. I may return to
complete my second term, or take on the
challenge of running Germany, or Canada,
or my home country, or even try managing
America from an extreme conservative
standpoint, but for now Im just happy to
have been such a benevolent, measured
President. A humble one, at that.
One question, though: where was Con-
gress in all of this?
Democracy 3 is available on Steam for
$24.99. l
Phillips delivers Wildes wit in a way that
makes one savor every word. She is a joy to
watch and she lifts, shakes out and carries
every scene shes in. Another lynchpin is
Patricia Conolly as Miss Prism, tutor and
chaperone to the recalcitrant Cecily. Play-
ing Prism in full spinster glory, like Phil-
lips, Conolly brings Wildes wit to full and
giggle-worthy life. Both play it large, but
they do so with so much texture, subtlety
and tongue-in-cheek wit, it proves exactly
right. Exuding irony like his own per-
sonal sunshine, Floyd King brings devious
humor to Chasuble, the priest with a soft
spot for Miss Prism, injecting a small role
with a convincing humanity.
Although director Keith Baxter does not
pull from his ensemble quite the consis-
tency and rhythm the play needs, there are
plenty of highlights and a nale that arrives
with energy and joy. The bottom line is that
if you know the play, you will nd pleasure
in the production, even if a blast of icy air
might do some of it a bit of good. l
woods biggest blockbusters, from Titanic
to Chariots of Fire.
But ultimately what keeps you most
delighted is the strong acting ensemble
Constellation has assembled, led by Con-
stellation regular Michael Glenn as the
crafty Scapin and Keegan Theatres Brad-
ley Foster Smith in a strong Constellation
debut as Scapins dim-witted sidekick Syl-
vestre. l
NIGHT
LIFE
t
THURS., 01.30.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, games,
football on Sundays
Expanded craft beer
selection No cover
ANNIES/ANNIES
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.s drafts, 8pm to
close Top Pop Night
NELLIES SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm)
Buckets of Beer $15
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm No
Cover
ZIEGFELDS/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
Shirtless Thursday DJ
Tim E in Secrets 9pm
Cover 21+
LISTINGS
44 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
$5 Coronas, $8 Vodka
Red Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIES SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer Videos,
Dancing Beat The
Clock Happy Hour $2
(5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4
(7-8pm) Buckets of
Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo Dancing
$5 cover
FRI., 01.31.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm Friday
Night Videos with
resident DJ Shea Van
Horn VJ Expanded
craft beer selection
No cover
ANNIES
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
$4 Small Plates, $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
Upstairs open 5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm $3
Rail, $3 Draft, $3 Bud
Bottles Free Pizza, 7pm
Hosted by Charger
Stone No cover before
9:30pm 21+
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
For the Ladies DJ
Rosie Doors at 9pm
21+
PWS SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington
Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge
Half-price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Ariana & The Rose
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and BaNaka
Doors open at 10pm
For those 21 and over, $5
from 10-11pm and $10
after 11pm For those
18-20, $10 all night
18+
ZIEGFELDS/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm
Cover 21+
SAT., 02.01.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm $5
Absolut & Titos, $3
Miller Lite after 9pm
Expanded craft beer
selection No cover
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
JR.S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIES
Guest DJs Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer, House Rail Drinks
and Mimosas, $4,
11am-5pm Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
DILF at 9:30pm Host
Michael Hodges, Music
by DJ Dean $3 Miller
Lite, $5 Titos, Absolut,
Bulleit Open 5pm
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm No
Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
For the Ladies DJ
Rosie Doors at 9pm
21+

PWS SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington
Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
Wig Night Out! in
support of The Point
Foundation Suggested
Donation $10 Doors
at 8pm Funkytown
Upstairs, Music and
Video by DJ Ed Bailey
DJ Wess Drag
Show starts at 10:30pm
Hosted by Lena Lett
and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux
and BaNaka For those
21 and over, $8 from
10-11pm and $12 after
11pm 21+
45
t
METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
Ryan Rose appearance at Town
Saturday, January 25
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
ZIEGFELDS/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets
DJ Spyke in Ziegfelds
Doors 8pm Cover
21+
SUN., 02.02.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, games,
football on Sundays
Expanded craft beer
selection No cover
FIREPLACE
Skyy Vodka, $3
$5 cover with $1 off
coupons
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm
Drag Show hosted
by Destiny B. Childs
featuring performances
by a rotating cast, 9pm
No cover Karaoke
follows show
JR.S
Sunday Funday Liquid
Brunch Doors open at
1pm $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
NELLIES
Drag Brunch, hosted
by Shi-Queeta-Lee,
11am-3pm $20
Brunch Buffet House
Rail Drinks, Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm No
Cover
ZIEGFELDS/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
Decades of Dance DJ
Tim-e in Secrets Doors
8pm Cover 21+
MON., 02.03.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football
on Sundays Expanded
craft beer selection
No cover
ANNIES
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
$4 Small Plates, $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
46 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
FREDDIES
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1,
4-9pm Showtunes
Songs & Singalongs,
9pm-close DJ Jamez
$3 Drafts
NELLIES SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm)
Buckets of Beer $15
Poker Texas Holdem,
8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm No Cover
PWS SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington
Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition 75 cents
off bottles and drafts
TUES., 02.04.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football
on Sundays Expanded
craft beer selection
No cover
ANNIES
Happy Hour, 4-7pm $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
DJ Wes Della Volla
2-for-1, all day and night
NELLIES SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm)
Buckets of Beer $15
Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm No Cover
PWS SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington
Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts Movie Night
WED., 02.05.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, games, football
on Sundays Expanded
craft beer selection
No cover
ANNIES
Happy Hour, 4-7pm $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Drag Bingo, 8pm
Karaoke, 10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
JR.S
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm The Queen,
10-11pm $2 JRs
Drafts & $4 Vodka ($2
with College I.D./JRs
Team Shirt)
NELLIES SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm)
Half-Price Burger Night
Buckets of Beer $15
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm No Cover
PWS SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington
Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELDS/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
New Meat Wednesday
DJ Don T 9pm Cover
21+
THURS., 02.06.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1
on any drink, 5-9pm
Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, games,
football on Sundays
Expanded craft beer
selection No cover
ANNIES/ANNIES
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
47 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
48 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
JR.S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.s drafts, 8pm to
close Top Pop Night
NELLIES SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm)
Buckets of Beer $15
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on
any drink, 5-9pm No
Cover
ZIEGFELDS/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
Shirtless Thursday DJ
Tim E in Secrets 9pm
Cover 21+
FRI., 02.07.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm Friday
Night Videos with
resident DJ Shea Van
Horn VJ Expanded
craft beer selection
No cover
ANNIES
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm
$4 Small Plates, $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
Upstairs open 5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm $3
Rail, $3 Draft, $3 Bud
Bottles Free Pizza, 7pm
Hosted by Charger
Stone No cover before
9:30pm 21+
FREDDIES BEACH
BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
$5 Coronas, $8 Vodka
Red Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIES SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer Videos,
Dancing Beat The
Clock Happy Hour $2
(5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm), $4
(7-8pm) Buckets of
Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo Dancing
$5 cover
PHASE 1 OF DUPONT
1415 22nd St. NW
For the Ladies DJ
Rosie Doors at 9pm
21+
PWS SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington
Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge
Half-price burgers and
fries
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and BaNaka
Doors open at 10pm
For those 21 and over, $5
from 10-11pm and $10
after 11pm For those
18-20, $10 all night
18+
ZIEGFELDS/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm
Cover 21+ l
49 METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
50 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
51 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
Blowoff
Saturday, January 18
9:30 Club
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
52 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
M
Y AUDIENCE IS
predominantly
straight these days,
DJ Victor Calderone says, but
especially in New York and in
Miami the boys still come out
for me. Which is great to see.
Thats the way I remember it
being in the early 90s in New
York City everyone just
shared and partied together.
I enjoy when theres a good
diverse crowd out there.
A decade ago, the tables
were turned. Calderone was
one of the leading DJs on
the predominantly gay club
circuit. He was known back
then for playing marathon sets
of hard-hitting tribal house in
the biggest warehouse-style
clubs, including regular stops
at D.C.s Velvet Nation. But
after the birth of his now
11-year-old son, the straight
Brooklyn native slowly altered
course. These days Calderone
often plays smaller clubs, at
least when not in Europe.
And mostly for straight
crowds.
Ive lost a lot of the
boys, Calderone concedes.
I think because Ive gone
more in the direction of
underground techno and
tech-house and cut out
the diva vocal stuff. The
switch isnt quite as drastic
as that may sound. Youll
still hear some underlying
sounds from the past, he
says, adding that his sound
has evolved in ways not too
dissimilar from his former
regular cohorts in Chus
& Ceballos, the Spanish
DJ duo that is still a major
draw on the gay club circuit.
Their recent sets have
some avors of techno as
well. Its important for us,
especially the guys that
have been doing this 30-plus
years like myself, to just
stay connected to whats
happening and to evolve.
Calderone is inspired
by dance musics
increasing mainstream
acceptance, including Daft
Punks success at this
years Grammy Awards.
My sound is still very
underground, but weve all
been benetting from whats
happening. These kids that
are going out and listening
to the more commercial/
mainstream stuff, theyre
also nding their way into
the world of underground
music.... Its all trickling
down.
After years of allowing
international touring to take
precedence, Calderone is
back in the studio working.
I want to try to put out more
music. In particular hes
planning to release some
collaborations with other
producers in time for Miamis
Winter Music Conference in
mid-March.
Next Friday, Feb. 7,
Calderone returns to D.C.
for the rst time in years,
making his debut at U Street
Music Hall. The celebrated
subterranean club has one
of the best sound systems
in D.C. today but its also
several times smaller than
Nation. I enjoy the smaller
rooms, Calderone says.
When you have that intimacy,
and youre close to your
audience, its quicker to build a
vibe. It can really turn out to be
a special night.
DJ Victor Calderone spins
Friday, Feb. 7, at 10 p.m.
U Street Music Hall, 1115A
U St. NW. Tickets are $12.
Call 202-588-1880 or visit
ustreetmusichall.com. l
B
Y

D
O
U
G

R
U
L
E
Victors Return
C
L
U
B
L
I
F
E
S
53
Nation alum Victor Calderone returns to D.C. for a more intimate DJ night at U Street Music Hall
METROWEEKLY.COM JANUARY 30, 2014
We are gathered here to celebrate love and harmony,
in every key and every color.

QUEEN LATIFAH, making history as she ofciated over a mass wedding of 34 couples at the Grammy Awards, which included both
same- and opposite-sex couples. The wedding took place during a performance of Same Love by Macklemore &
Ryan Lewis featuring Mary Lambert, with a guest appearance by Madonna.
(CBS)
We dont have them in our town.
ANATOLY PAKHOMOV, the mayor of Sochi, in an interview with the BBCs Panorama, stating that he doesnt believe
there are any gay people in the Russian host city of this years Olympic games.
(BBC)

As far as I know,
there are several gay clubs in Sochi.
How have they survived? Why are they not bankrupt?
Liberal Russian opposition leader BORIS NEMTSOV, in an interview with the BBCs Panorama. The politician, visibly amused,
asked the rhetorical questions in response to Mayor Pakhomovs assertion that there are no gay people in Sochi.
(BBC)
Im terribly disappointed in his decision and beliefs,
but hes not going to change them now if he hasnt after all these years of knowing I am gay.

CHRIS SMITH, openly gay son of Indiana state Rep. Milo Smith, in a post on the Facebook page of Indiana Equality. Milo Smith is
spearheading a push for a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in the state. The measure is
currently in the House awaiting a second reading.
(Facebook)

We welcome todays vote and can nally call


Europe a continent completely free from laws criminalising
homosexuality.
PAULO CORTE-REAL, from the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association, responding to Turkish
Cypriot-controlled Northern Cyprus voting to decriminalize sex between consenting male adults. Northern Cyprus was
the last remaining territory in Europe that placed a criminal sentence on homosexuality.
(Reuters)
54 JANUARY 30, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM