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Peter Reinhart’s
artisan breads every day

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Peter Reinhart’s

artisan breads
every day
Fast and Easy Recipes for World-Class Breads

Peter Reinhart
photography by Leo Gong

TEN SPEED PRESS


Berkeley

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Copyright © 2009 by Peter Reinhart
Photographs copyright © 2009 by Leo Gong

All rights reserved.


Published in the United States by Ten Speed Press,
an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division
of Random House, Inc., New York.
www.crownpublishing.com
www.tenspeed.com

Ten Speed Press and the Ten Speed Press colophon


are registered trademarks of Random House, Inc.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Reinhart, Peter.
Peter Reinhart’s artisan breads every day / Peter Reinhart ; photogra-
phy by Leo Gong.
p. cm.
Includes index.
Summary: “Master baker and innovator Peter Reinhart’s answer to
the artisan-bread-in-no-time revolution, with time-saving techniques
for making extraordinary loaves with speed and ease”—Provided by
publisher.
1. Bread. 2. Quick and easy cookery. I. Title. II. Title: Artisan breads
every day.
TX769.R4175 2009
641.8’15—dc22
2009021119

ISBN 978-1-58008-998-2

Printed in China
Design by Nancy Austin
Food styling by Karen Shinto
Prop styling by Harumi Shimizu

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
First Edition

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Contents

Introduction: Where We Are and How We Got Here 1

1. Baking Basics 5

2. Sourdough and Wild Yeast Fundamentals 35

3. French Breads and Sourdough Hearth Breads 45

4. Enriched Breads 81

5. Rich Breads 139

Epilogue: What’s Next for the Artisan Movement? 199

Resources 204

Baker’s Percentage Formulas 206

Index 210

Acknowledgments 214

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On Baking Day

Remove the dough from the refrigerator about 2 hours before you plan to bake. Gently
transfer it to a lightly floured work surface, taking care to degas it as little as possible. For
baguettes and bâtards, divide the cold dough into 10-ounce (283 g) pieces; for 1 pound boules,
divide the dough into 19-ounce (53 g) pieces; and for freestanding loaves, use whatever size you
prefer.
Form the dough into bâtards and/or baguettes (see pages 21 and 22) or boules (see page
20). Mist the top of the dough with spray oil, loosely cover with plastic wrap, and proof at
room temperature for about 11/2 hours, until increased to 11/2 times its original size.
About 45 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 550°F (288°C) or as high as it will go,
and prepare the oven for hearth baking (see page 30).
Remove the plastic wrap from the dough 15 minutes prior to baking; if using proofing
molds, transfer the dough onto a floured peel.
Just prior to baking, score the dough 1/2 inch deep with a serrated knife or razor. Trans-
fer the dough to the oven, pour 1 cup of hot water into the steam pan, then lower the oven
temperature to 450°F (232°C).
Bake for 12 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15 to 25 minutes, until the
crust is a rich golden brown, the loaves sound hollow when thumped, and the internal tem-
perature is about 200°F (93°C) in the center. For a crisper crust, turn off the oven and leave
the bread in for another 5 minutes before removing.
Cool the bread on a wire rack for at least 45 minutes before slicing or serving.

Variation

By simply varying the method so that the shaped loaves undergo cold fermentation, rather
than the freshly mixed bulk dough, you can create a spectacular loaf with a distinctive blis-
tered crust. After the dough is mixed and placed in a clean, oiled bowl, let it rise at room
temperature for about 90 minutes, until doubled in size. Divide and shape as described above,
mist with spray oil, then cover the shaped dough loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate it
overnight, away from anything that might fall on it or restrict it from growing.
The next day, remove the dough from the refrigerator 1 hour before baking. It should have
grown to at least 11/2 times its original size. Prepare the oven for hearth baking, as described
on page 30. While the oven is heating, remove the plastic wrap and let the dough sit uncov-
ered for 10 minutes. Score the dough while it’s still cold, then bake as described above.

French Breads and Sourdough Hearth Breads 51

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After the final stretch and fold, return the dough to the lightly oiled bowl, and immedi-
Classic French Bread
ately cover the bowl tightly and refrigerate overnight or for up to 4 days. The dough will rise
to about double, and possibly triple, its original size within 4 to 12 hours in the refrigerator. Makes 2 large loaves, 4 small loaves, or many rolls

(If you plan to bake the dough in batches over different days, you can portion the dough and
This version of French bread is the simplest formula in the book. It uses the cold fermentation
place it into two or more oiled bowls at this stage.)
technique, and the resulting dough actually holds the shape and cuts of conventional French
baguettes, bâtards, and boules better than the lean dough (page 46), which is wetter. Because
On Baking Day
the dough isn’t as wet, it’s especially important to handle it with a firm but light touch. Too
Remove the dough from the refrigerator about 2 hours before you plan to bake. Rub the much pressure will squeeze out the gas trapped during the overnight rise, resulting in small,
work surface with a few drops of olive or vegetable oil, then use a wet bowl scraper or wet hands even holes rather than the prized large, irregular holes. I’ve also included a variation that
to transfer the dough to the work surface. Divide the dough in half (about 21 oz or 595 g each) makes spectacular loaves with a distinctive blistered crust.
for two large loaves; into 4 to 6 pieces for smaller loaves; or into 18 to 24 pieces for rolls.
Line a sheet pan with parchment paper or a silicone mat, then mist it lightly with spray 51/ 3 cups (24 oz / 680 g) unbleached bread flour

oil or dust it with flour, semolina, or cornmeal. (If using a banneton or proofing mold, mist 2 teaspoons (0.5 oz / 14 g) salt, or 1 tablespoon coarse kosher salt
it with spray oil, then dust it with flour.) Have a small bowl of bread flour standing by. With
21/ 4 teaspoons (0.25 oz / 7 g) instant yeast
floured hands, gently pat the dough pieces into rectangles, then stretch it into torpedos (see
2 cups (16 oz / 454 g) lukewarm water (about 95°F or 35°C)
page 21), boules (see page 20), or loaves (see page 23), or shape it into rolls (see page 25). With
floured hands, gently lift the dough and place it seam side down on the prepared pan (or seam
side up in the proofing mold). If air bubbles form, pinch the surface to pop them. Mist the Do Ahead

surface of the dough with spray oil and cover loosely with plastic wrap or a towel.
Combine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl. If using a mixer, use the paddle attach-
Let the shaped dough sit, covered, at room temperature for 60 minutes. Then, remove the
ment and mix on the lowest speed for 1 minute. If mixing by hand, use a large spoon and
covering and let the dough proof for an additional 60 minutes. The dough will spread slightly
stir for 1 minute, until well blended and smooth. If the spoon gets too doughy, dip it in a
and the skin will begin to dry out a bit.
bowl of warm water. The dough should form a coarse shaggy ball. Let it rest, uncovered, for
About 45 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 550°F (288°C) or as high as it will go,
5 minutes.
and prepare the oven for hearth baking (see page 30).
Switch to the dough hook and mix on medium-low speed for 2 minutes or knead by hand
Just before baking, score the dough with a sharp serrated knife or razor blade. The dough
for about 2 minutes, adjusting with flour or water as needed. The dough should be smooth,
will have spread somewhat but should still have its basic shape, and the shape should spring
supple, and tacky but not sticky.
back in the oven. (If using a banneton or proofing mold, remove the dough from the basket at
Whichever mixing method you use, knead the dough by hand on a lightly floured work
this stage.) Transfer the dough to the oven, pour 1 cup of hot water into the steam pan, then
surface for about 1 minute more, then transfer it to a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Cover the bowl
lower the oven temperature to 450°F (232°C), or 425°F (218°C) for a convection oven.
with plastic wrap, then immediately refrigerate overnight or for up to 4 days. If the dough
Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes,
feels too wet and sticky, do not add more flour; instead, stretch and fold it one or more times
until the crust is a rich golden brown and the internal temperature is 200°F to 205°F (93°C to
at 10-minute intervals, as shown on page 18, before putting it in the refrigerator. (If you plan
94°C). For a crisper crust, turn off the oven and leave the bread in for another 5 to 10 minutes
to bake the dough in batches over different days, you can portion the dough and place it into
before removing (rolls will take less time). Cool the bread on a wire rack for at least 1 hour
two or more oiled bowls at this stage.)
before slicing or serving.

48 peter reinhart’s artisan breads every day French Breads and Sourdough Hearth Breads 49

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On Baking Day

Remove the dough from the refrigerator about 2 hours before you plan to bake. Gently
transfer it to a lightly floured work surface, taking care to degas it as little as possible. For
baguettes and bâtards, divide the cold dough into 10-ounce (283 g) pieces; for 1 pound boules,
divide the dough into 19-ounce (53 g) pieces; and for freestanding loaves, use whatever size you
prefer.
Form the dough into bâtards and/or baguettes (see pages 21 and 22) or boules (see page
20). Mist the top of the dough with spray oil, loosely cover with plastic wrap, and proof at
room temperature for about 11/2 hours, until increased to 11/2 times its original size.
About 45 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 550°F (288°C) or as high as it will go,
and prepare the oven for hearth baking (see page 30).
Remove the plastic wrap from the dough 15 minutes prior to baking; if using proofing
molds, transfer the dough onto a floured peel.
Just prior to baking, score the dough 1/2 inch deep with a serrated knife or razor. Trans-
fer the dough to the oven, pour 1 cup of hot water into the steam pan, then lower the oven
temperature to 450°F (232°C).
Bake for 12 minutes, then rotate the pan and bake for another 15 to 25 minutes, until the
crust is a rich golden brown, the loaves sound hollow when thumped, and the internal tem-
perature is about 200°F (93°C) in the center. For a crisper crust, turn off the oven and leave
the bread in for another 5 minutes before removing.
Cool the bread on a wire rack for at least 45 minutes before slicing or serving.

Variation

By simply varying the method so that the shaped loaves undergo cold fermentation, rather
than the freshly mixed bulk dough, you can create a spectacular loaf with a distinctive blis-
tered crust. After the dough is mixed and placed in a clean, oiled bowl, let it rise at room
temperature for about 90 minutes, until doubled in size. Divide and shape as described above,
mist with spray oil, then cover the shaped dough loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate it
overnight, away from anything that might fall on it or restrict it from growing.
The next day, remove the dough from the refrigerator 1 hour before baking. It should have
grown to at least 11/2 times its original size. Prepare the oven for hearth baking, as described
on page 30. While the oven is heating, remove the plastic wrap and let the dough sit uncov-
ered for 10 minutes. Score the dough while it’s still cold, then bake as described above.

French Breads and Sourdough Hearth Breads 51

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To purchase a copy of 

Peter Reinhart’s 
Artisan Breads Every Day 
 
visit one of these online retailers: 
 
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