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Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) - Flow Analysis (FLUENT)


DETAILS CATEGORY: ANALYSIS PUBLISHED ON THURSDAY, 16 JUNE 2011 09:00 WRITTEN BY ROCKET HITS: 4084

PEOPLE Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Academics Technician Students 2D Mesh Generation (GAMBIT) 3D Mesh Generation (GAMBIT) Flow Analysis (FLUENT) Post-Processing All Pages FACILITIES Page 4 of 5 Propellant Laboratory Equipments Bunker Design In this project, use FLUENT to analyze the flow and the main objective is to visualize the flow pattern and the choked area of the nozzle by setting up the input parameter of the actual testing such as the inlet pressure, inlet size, outlet size, total temperature and other potential input that will affect the output of the analysis. FLOW ANALYSIS

PROJECTS Propellant Grain Rocket Motor Design Rocket Body Design Analysis Computional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Finite Element Analysis (FEA) Testing 1. MODEL The type of flow modeled in FLUENT to analyze the flow inside the nozzle is the one-dimensional flow along the axis of symmetry. For nozzle flows, use the density-based implicit solver since it is the solver of choice for compressible, transonic flows without significant regions of low-speed flow.

COLLABORATION Department Civil Aviation Bernam River Airfield STRIDE For viscous model, select Standard k-e Model which is a semi-empirical model based on model transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy (k) and its dissipation rate (e ). The model transport equation for k is derived from the exact equation, while the model CONSULTATION & SERVICES Aerospace Engineering Design & Consultation Services transport equation for e was obtained using physical reasoning and bears little resemblance to its mathematically exact counterpart. In the derivation of the k-e model, it was assumed that the flow is fully turbulent, and the effects of molecular viscosity are negligible. Also, the standard wall function is used.

2. MATERIAL For material, choose ideal-gas for the air (fluid) since the velocity of the exhaust flow particle is high, and the temperature is high along the nozzle, the gas actually obeys the ideal gas law under the assumption that there is little molecular force between the gas particles.

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2/11/2014

Flow Analysis (FLUENT) - Page 4

3. OPERATING AND BOUNDARY CONDITIONS For compressible flow in nozzle, it is recommended to set the operating pressure to zero to minimize the errors due to pressure fluctuation in the calculations onwards. After setting the operation pressure to zero, boundary condition inputs for pressure should be specified in terms of absolute pressures defined in the next step. This is because boundary conditions inputs for pressure should always be relative to the value used for operating pressure. To set the boundary conditions, for inlet, set the Gauge Total Pressure as 1000psi which corresponds to the one in the actual design. For Supersonic/Initial Gauge Pressure, it is not important to set its value as FLUENT will ignore it if the inlet flow is subsonic. Then choose Intensity and Hydraulic Diameter for specification method. Set 5% to Turbulent Intensity since for high Reynolds number, its range is 1%-5%. For the nozzle, input the value for Total Pressure as 1495K which is obtained by calculations.

For the pressure outlet, approximately do the same thing. Set Gauge Pressure as 14.7psi, which is the ambient pressure that used to design the nozzle exit area in order to have the CPANEL maximum expansion ratio. The Backflow Total Pressure is set to be 300K, which is the same as the ambient pressure. The Turbulent Intensity is set to be 5% for turbulent flow.

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