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Service terminal essentials

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Service terminal essentials

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and describes only the product defined in the introduction of this documentation. This document is intended for the use of Nokia's customers only for the purposes of the agreement under which the document is submitted, and no part of it may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or means without the prior written permission of Nokia. The document has been prepared to be used by professional and properly trained personnel, and the customer assumes full responsibility when using it. Nokia welcomes customer comments as part of the process of continuous development and improvement of the documentation. The information or statements given in this document concerning the suitability, capacity, or performance of the mentioned hardware or software products cannot be considered binding but shall be defined in the agreement made between Nokia and the customer. However, Nokia has made all reasonable efforts to ensure that the instructions contained in the document are adequate and free of material errors and omissions. Nokia will, if necessary, explain issues which may not be covered by the document. Nokia's liability for any errors in the document is limited to the documentary correction of errors. NOKIA WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE IN ANY EVENT FOR ERRORS IN THIS DOCUMENT OR FOR ANY DAMAGES, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL (INCLUDING MONETARY LOSSES), that might arise from the use of this document or the information in it. This document and the product it describes are considered protected by copyright according to the applicable laws. NOKIA logo is a registered trademark of Nokia Corporation. Other product names mentioned in this document may be trademarks of their respective companies, and they are mentioned for identification purposes only. Copyright Nokia Corporation 2005. All rights reserved.

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Contents

Contents
Contents 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Service terminal 5 Service terminal in DMX units 7 Service terminal in Chorus units 11 Service terminal programs in DMX units 13 Service terminal extensions in DMX units 17 Service terminal programs in Chorus units 23 Message monitoring in DMX units 27 Message monitoring in Chorus units 29 Monitoring messages in DMX units 33 Monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units 37 Monitoring MIPC messages in Chorus units 41 Monitoring DMX messages in Chorus units from DMX units 45 Starting service terminal session with VDU 49 Starting remote service terminal session with MML terminal 51 Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions) 53 Starting remote service terminal session using telnet connection 55 Starting minidebugger session in DMX units 57 Switching between different service terminal sessions in DMX units 59 Exiting service terminal session 61 Running service terminal extensions in Chorus units 63 Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units 65 Activating service terminal extensions from another computer unit in

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Service terminal essentials

DMX units (LEL) 67 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 Activating service terminal extensions from floppy disk in DMX units (LEL) 69 Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units 71 Examining black box in DMX units 73 Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units 75 Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units 77 Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units 79 Storing processor and process load in DMX units 81 Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units 83 Storing actor related information in Chorus units 85 Storing unit startup information in Chorus units 87 Printing system dump logs 89 Browsing computer logs in Chorus unit 91

Browsing operating system logs in Chorus unit 95 Browsing the contents of black box for the Chorus log system 97 No service terminal connection in DMX units 99 Message monitoring does not work in DMX units 101 Remote session fails in Chorus units 103 Service terminal halts in Chorus units 105 Message monitoring gets stopped by the computer in Chorus units 107 Messages do not fit into the buffer in Chorus units 109 Related Topics 111

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Service terminal

Service terminal
A service terminal is a terminal which can be connected to a system for maintenance and operating purposes. A service terminal is used in testing and monitoring of the system as well as in fault investigations. You can start a service terminal session either on a service terminal physically connected to a computer unit or via an MML terminal by establishing a remote service terminal session using the DDS command. It is also possible to open a remote service terminal session using the service terminal or by using telnet. For more information, see Starting service terminal session with VDU. There are two types of operating systems: DMX and Chorus. Depending on the operating system, service terminal commands and extensions differ from each other. For more information on operating systems, see Operating system and file system. The prompt of a service terminal session tells you whether you have opened a session in a DMX or Chorus unit.

Table 1. Prompt
XXXX:YYY>

Service terminal prompts Explanation


: indicates a service terminal session established by connecting a cable directly to a DMX computer unit. XXXX is the physical address of the DMX unit into which the service terminal session has been opened. For example, 0000 stands for OMU. YYY shows where you are in the command menu tree (MAN=main level).

XX-YYY>

- indicates a remote session in a DMX unit opened using the DDS MML command. Otherwise same as above.

XXXX-$

$ indicates a service terminal session in a Chorus unit. XXXX is the physical address of the unit.

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Service terminal in DMX units

Service terminal in DMX units


In DMX based computer units, you have a number of choices on how to establish a service terminal session. The service terminal programs running in DMX based computer units are different from the ones that are used in Chorus based computer units.

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Service terminal essentials

Equipment and software needed

SERVICE TERMINAL

CCPC2-A

OMU

Figure 1.

Connecting a service terminal to a computer unit

Maximum of two terminals per CPU plug-in unit The session connected through connector J1 can be used to monitor the startup phases of the unit. The connector J2 does not offer this facility. The display unit or printer connected to connectors J1 and J2 must satisfy the ITU Recommendation V.28 as regards to the electrical requirements. Equipment needed:

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Service terminal in DMX units

Visual display unit (1 to 2 pcs) Connector types used on service terminal cable at the CPU end Most CPUs use an 8 pin RJ45 connector Some CPUs may use a 25 pin D connector

Software needed:
.

Testing software (CLUCIF and OSITUS)

The user communicates with the system through the visual display unit. The software supports the use of the following display unit types (or compatible units):
.

VT52 VT100 (the default display and the only one supported by Chorus units)

If some other display units with V24 interface are used, all features of the software will not be apparent. The display units are connected to the system through connectors of the processor unit, for example, CP386, CP4xx, CP5xx. The maximum number of the service terminal sessions is four per functional unit (two through the external connectors, two through the MML). For more information, see No service terminal connection in DMX units.
Line parameters and terminal settings

The normal settings of the service terminal line parameters are:


.

Bit rate 9600 bit/s 7 data bits Even parity 2 stop bits

The service terminal line does not check the parity at reception, and 1 stop bit is also sufficient. For optimum results, also note the following concerning the terminal settings:

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Service terminal essentials

No automatic line feed (auto wrap: off, lf=lf) xon/xoff protocol No local echoing (local echo: off).

DMX units' service terminal commands

When using the service terminal commands of DMX based computer units note that:
.

You need not type the semicolon at the end of a service terminal command. You can, however, use the semicolon also with service terminal commands. Because the semicolon is not needed, you can accidentally execute a command that you did not intend to execute. You can obtain parameter descriptions by typing a question mark before the service terminal command character, for example, ?R. You cannot get parameter guides when typing individual parameters of a service terminal command; you need to type the whole command and execute it. You need to activate the service terminal extensions using the ZLE(L) or ZLP service terminal command. For more information, see Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units and Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units.

In remote operation, not all the service terminal commands are available, for example, a part of analyser commands.

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Service terminal in Chorus units

Service terminal in Chorus units


The Chorus service terminal allows access to a Chorus computer either via the ethernet interface (telnet), remote service terminal session from a DMX-based computer unit or directly from the console through the RS-232 interface. The purpose of the Chorus service terminal is to provide low level commands for testing and locating errors, for example:
.

commands for actor (process) management memory management message monitoring

Access to the service terminal session requires an MMI username and a privilege to execute the DDS command (remote service terminal session from MML). The Chorus service terminal consists of the command interpreter (shell) and a number of commands. The shell is a Unix-like shell with Unix-like command line syntax. Some commands are implemented inside the shell. The shell can also run service terminal extension commands, which are implemented as separate executable files and are located in the local RAM disk of the Chorus computer. For more information, see Service terminal programs in Chorus units.
Software needed

Software needed:
.

YSHELL (Chorus Shell) is the command interpreter in Chorus units. REYSKA (Remote Connection Manager for Chorus Computers) manages the remote service terminal connection in Chorus units. OSITUS (Operating System Interface and Testing Tools) is the service terminal program which manages a remote service terminal connection in DMX units. MDEBUG, remote service terminal MML-program.

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Service terminal essentials

For more information, see Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions).
Chorus units' service terminal commands

When using the service terminal commands of Chorus based computer units note that:
.

The commands resemble Unix commands. For example, the commands can take 'options' starting with - or + and 'operands'. If an operand contains spaces, use double hyphens around the operand. You can get help on both internal and external commands by typing a question mark (-?) after the command. For more information, see Useful internal and external commands. Chorus commands are case sensitive. The commands are usually entered using lower case letters but some options or operands can be written in upper case letters, too.

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Service terminal programs in DMX units

Service terminal programs in DMX units


Service terminal programs consist of the actual programs, as well as the extensions to the service terminal programs. The extensions are entities which are not usually included in the main menu. Nevertheless, they can be included as a part of the main menu or be removed from it with commands given by you. The main menu of the service terminal programs is shown below. This menu also contains the COMPUTER LOG HANDLER extension. When an extension is linked, it corresponds to a lower level menu in its function.

SERVICE TERMINAL MAIN LEVEL COMMANDS: ? ..... MENU / HELP I ..... A ..... ANALYZER L ..... B ..... DEFINE ENVIRONMENT O ..... C ..... COMMAND LANGUAGE UTILITIES R ..... D ..... MEMORY AND I/O HANDLING S ..... E ..... EXIT DEBUGGER SESSION T ..... EXTENSIONS: G ..... COMPUTER LOG HANDLER (DEF)

GENERAL INFORMATION EXTENSION HANDLING OPERATING SYSTEM COMMANDS REMOTE DEBUGGER HANDLING SYSTEM MONITORING COMMANDS TERMINAL HANDLING

INITIAL NAME: 00BE 0000 00

CURRENT NAME: 00BE 0000 00

For more information on the use of service terminal programs, see Starting service terminal session with VDU.
Analyser

The commands of this command group mainly benefit the Nokia R&D engineers in debugging.

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Service terminal essentials

Command language utilities

The commands of this command group mainly benefit the Nokia R&D engineers in debugging.
Memory and I/O handling

You can use this service terminal program to search for a certain point in the memory or file.
Exit debugger session

This logs you out of a service terminal session. For more information, see Exiting service terminal session.
Operating system commands

You can use this service terminal program to:


.

Change the process priority (for example, for the service terminal processes) Restart a process family (you should consult Nokia first as restarting a critical process family may cause the unit to restart) Monitor messages Send messages

Remote debugger handling

Using this service terminal command you can establish remote service terminal sessions from one unit to another using the unit's individual address. For more information, see Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including chorus unit sessions).
System monitoring

You can use this service terminal program to:


.

Investigate the buffers and timers (per unit, per process or per buffer size) Display the operating system error logs Display the processor load rate

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VAX communication

The commands of this command group mainly benefit the Nokia R&D engineers in debugging.

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Service terminal extensions in DMX units

Service terminal extensions in DMX units


The extensions are loaded from the hard disk (or diskette). Some extensions are loaded onto the unit during the startup phase. These default extensions may be different in different units. When the minidebugger is used, only a few extensions are available and MAS (Mass Memory Handling) is loaded automatically in every unit, although the unit does not have any disk or tape unit. This is because the minidebugger is loaded from the EPROMs which are identical in every unit. If the minidebugger is loaded in a unit which is not the system maintenance unit and the message connection is working, after some time the recovery system restarts the unit automatically (warm restart). For more information, see Starting minidebugger session in DMX units For more information, see Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units.
Mass memory handling program block (MASHAN)

This extension enables you to use the mass memory devices connected to the network element in situations where the MML commands are not available. These operations include listing directory contents as well as creating, copying and deleting files and directories. For example, you may need to restore the software package from a safecopy in a situation where both disks of the OMU have become faulty. This extension is available only in units which have got I/O devices, for example, OMU. For more information, see Restoring software from FDU if both OMU hard disks are faulty . Unlike with MML commands, there is no protection when you use the MASHAN service terminal extension. For example, you could accidentally initialise a WOBU winchester disk. For this reason you must be very careful when using the MASHAN commands. You can also patch WDUs using MASHAN, which you cannot do using MML commands.

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Recovery system user interface service terminal extension (RCJUUS)

When MMLs are not available (for example, the OMU is not able to provide the telnet service), you can use this extension to:
.

Change the working state and the status of unit Interrogate the unit state and the state information Start/restart units Start/restart the whole system

System state and black box analyser (BOXANA)

This extension enables you to investigate the contents of the black box, to define the desired data structure for the data which will be collected at the next restart, and to form a black box for the current state of the functioning unit. For more information, see Examining black box in DMX units.
Computer log handler (LOGUTI)

This extension enables you to handle computer log files. For example, you can:
.

examine the records written into the log file monitor log writing prevent log writing reset the log file and display the log's state

By means of LOGUTI, it is also possible to increase the size of the log temporarily. You find the computer log menu from the service terminal by using the command ZG. The disk log files created and maintained by the centralised log manager are handled with the MML commands of the command group DV. You find the disk log handling commands from the MML terminal by using the command DV. These commands enable you to display the log entries on the disk log files and the settings for the disk log files. It is also possible to allow or restrict sending of certain log entries from the computer logs to the disk log file. For more information, see Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units

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Service terminal extensions in DMX units

Startup service utilities (SQQEXT)

This extension enables you to display the unit start up information after the start up. You can also stop and start the supervision of a process family using this extension.
Mixed commands handling (MRSTRE)

Using this service terminal extension you can:


.

Remove the MML program from the memory (needed in loading some MML change notes). Interpret DX general error messages.

Filetest handling (FCHECK)

This extension program is only available in the Marker. Using the X and T commands you can check some of the routing files for faults. Using the WS and C commands you can display the CGR connections.
Database monitor (DAEMON)

Using this extension you can modify and copy equipment database contents, which you can not do using the MMLs. This can be handy in the live switches where you can not delete the hardware that is in use.
Family utilities (FAMUTI)

Using this extension you can display the reserved process hands and collect data on the processes. Some alarm instructions may ask you to collect data using the FAM extension. The extension can be loaded with the service terminal's ZLP command.
OSI stack monitor (O23MTS)

The OSI monitor for Ethernet and X.25 connections is used in troubleshooting.
File System Utilities (FUTILI)

Using this extension you can:


.

Check whether the contents of DXPFIL are up to date (D command). Display the file catalogue of a unit's memory file system, for example, file addresses, GDT slots (command FFHI). Display file openers (command O).

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Display statistical data on the memory file system's components, for example, SF: <filenumber> shows the last usage of a file (command S). Display the contents of memory file; record by record for array files (command T). Display the memory file system file locking table contents and the location of FISLIB's central directory structures in G54 (command X).

Also the following data can prove useful: header of a file, bit map of a file and the contents of a file's directory entry. You can find out the location of a file's header and bit map in G1 using the FFHI command. Use the SF command to find out the location of a file's directory entry in G54. You can use the file openers when studying load failures and the X command can prove useful when dealing with locking problems.
Service terminal extension for POSIX subsystem (POMOXI)

This extension is not needed in the normal operation of a network element. However, you may need the POMOXI commands when the backups cannot be restored using any conventional method. For more information, see Restoring software from FDU if both OMU hard disks are faulty .
Logical file inquiry utility (LF4EVR)

Using this extension you can display all destination objects of a logical file. The difference between the output of LF4 command and IID MML command is that LF4 shows the whole connection tree. LF4EVR is meant to be used as an auxiliary interface in addition to II command group MML commands. It may come in handy when investigating logical file configurations or possible faultsituations.
BURNER  updating the boot package in flash memory

The computer units contain a boot package when delivered to the customer. Sometimes it may later become necessary to update the boot package with a new release. The Nokia Customer Service tells the operators when the updating should be done and how the new boot package is delivered. You can update the BOPROM boot package in the FLASH memory using the BURNER service terminal extension. You will also need the service terminal extensions STYMIE and RCBUGG to be able to carry out the update procedure.

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Service terminal extensions in DMX units

Warm-up services (WUTILI)

This service terminal extension provides commands which you can use to compare the state of a warmable application or the process between a WO (working) and an SP (signalling) unit. WUTILI also allows you to warm up a single process family manually at any time.
JIHEXT

With the help of JIHEXT extension you can print contents of the JIGGER program block's workfiles JIIFIL, JICFIL, and JILFIL. JIIFIL contains information about each functional unit in a network element. JICFIL contains information about internal connections between functional units of the network element. JILFIL is a log file, that is responsible for configuring internal interfaces that are either dedicated for internal communication or shared with internal communication and user traffic.
MM3STE

MM3STE is a service terminal extension in DMX units, which provides you centralised message monitoring control to remote Chorus units. It allows you to start, stop, configure and show DMX message monitoring in all Chorus units of a certain type from one DMX unit. MM3STE can run on any DMX unit. For more information, see Monitoring DMX messages in Chorus units from DMX units.

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Service terminal programs in Chorus units

Service terminal programs in Chorus units


The service terminal programs in Chorus units are used for similar tasks as the DMX service terminal programs. However, not all of the functions available for DMX units are available for Chorus units. For more information, see Service terminal in Chorus units. The Chorus units' service terminal has two types of commands: internal and external commands. The internal commands have been implemented in the shell program whereas the external commands are implemented in the loadable extension programs. You can use the internal commands to carry out basic operating functions, such as 'cd' to change directory and 'help' to list all internal commands. The extension programs are located on the local RAM disk in the '/bin' directory. Note that not all the files in the /bin directory are executable service terminal programs, so be careful when giving extension commands in Chorus service terminal. In Chorus units the computer log can be examined with a CLOG service terminal extension. Using the CLOG extension, writing to the computer log can also be prevented and restricted to certain processes. For more information, see Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units.
Useful internal and external commands

Here is a short list of useful internal and external commands:

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Command
cd

Function
Change working directory. The cd command changes the working directory of the current service terminal session. The directory parameter defines the new working directory. The directory can be an absolute path starting from the root directory (for example, '/bin') or a relative path starting from the current working directory (for example, '..' or 'bin'). If the directory is not specified, the root directory ('/') is used as the new working directory.

pwd

Display working directory name. The command outputs the absolute path name of the current working directory.

help

List internal commands. The command outputs a list of available internal (shell) commands. The list does not contain service terminal extension commands. Service terminal extension commands are stored in the / bin directory. The contents of the directory can be listed using the command ls.

ls cat alist tlist sysenv

List the contents of a directory. Output data in a file. List actors. List threads. Display the physical address and state of the own unit. Lists also system variables.

Computer log

Each computer unit of the system contains a computer log. A computer log is conceptually a file in which the application programs can write information about the error situations they detect. A log is specific to the computer unit , and therefore, the computer log system provides centralised reporting of errors detected in various programs.

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Service terminal programs in Chorus units

After the restriction rules verification the computer log entries are forwarded to OMU where the entries are saved to the disk log file.
Operating system log

Each computer unit of the system contains an operating system log. The operating system log contains data of certain system events, as well as data of the errors that occur during operation. These events are: exception of actor, creating and destroying actor, change of calendar time in unit, buffer allocation failure, DMX message for unknown receiver. The logs are used in testing and error diagnostics.
Log system black box

Each computer unit of the system contains a black box log. The black box log is a predefined memory area which contains a computer log and an operating system log of previous restarts. The computer log and the operating system log are saved to the black box log immediately after the unit has been restarted. Black box logs can be used to help in problem solving when the computer unit has got spontaneous resets.
System dump log

Chorus system dump is for post mortem fault analyzing. The system dump data contains the following information: a list of running actors and threads, exceptions and panic notifications, logs made by actors, last 16 context switches, console printouts, failed system calls and snapshot information. The system dump information can be used to help in problem solving when the computer unit has got a spontaneous reset. For more information on the use of service terminal programs, see Starting service terminal session with VDU. Also, see Service terminal in Chrous units.

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Message monitoring in DMX units

Message monitoring in DMX units


The inter-process communication IPC is accomplished by operating system messages. These messages are used by different software entities when they communicate with each other. On the basis of the operating system messages the R&D engineers can obtain vital information on how the exchange works. You can use the operating system commands of the service terminal to monitor messages sent and received by a DMX computer unit or process family. For more information, see Monitoring messages in DMX units.
Phases of message progression

When you activate message monitoring, the messages are copied to a buffer at certain phases, see the figure below. When a message arrives at the message queue of the receiving process, this is called 'Arrive'. 'Receive' refers to the phase when the receiving process fetches the message from the message queue. For more information, see Monitoring messages in DMX units.

P1

P2

P1 P2 S R

is the sending process is the receiving process is the 'Send' phase is the 'Receive' phase

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A Q
Figure 2.

is the 'Arrive' phase is the message queue


The different phases of message progression

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Message monitoring in Chorus units

Message monitoring in Chorus units


The Chorus operating system provides two native mechanisms for messaging: Chorus Interprocess Communication, IPC and Message Queues Interprocess Communication, MIPC.
IPC message monitoring

IPC messaging is an easy way of communication provided by the Chorus operating system. In IPC messaging, the messages are transmitted between ports. These ports are identified as message queues. A port belongs to an actor. The threads belonging to an actor are able to receive messages from a port which is attached to another actor. An actor may have multiple ports. Actors can create and delete ports dynamically.

Message

Message

Port

Thread

Actor

Figure 3.

IPC messaging

The target of the IPC monitoring can be a port, a set of ports or an actor. If an actor is monitored, monitoring is attached to all the ports of the actor (also to dynamically created ports or to destroyed ones). Message monitoring can have three different IPC results:

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send arrive receive

The picture below shows two messages being sent between ports one and two. The corresponding results are listed in the table.
arrive (1) receive (1) msg-1 port1 Actor A msg-2 arrive (2) receive (2) send (2) port2 Actor B

send (1)

Figure 4.

Two messages between ports

Table 2. Event
Sent Arrived Received Sent Arrived Received

The results of messages sent between two ports Who


From A From A To B From B From B To A

What
Msg-1 Msg-1 Msg-1 Msg-2 Msg-2 Msg-2

An IPC message consists of a fixed size annex (120 bytes) and a variable size body. Both the annex and the body are optional and unstructured. A Nokia convention is to include the message domain (Chorus internal, DMX, or TNSDL) and the message number in the annex.

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Message monitoring in Chorus units

annex Message

body

Figure 5.

IPC message

For more information, see Monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units.


MIPC message monitoring

Message Queues Interprocess Communication MIPC provides an efficient communication mechanism in the Chorus operating system. Using MIPC, copying message data is avoided. In MIPC, an actor first creates a communication environment called 'message space'. This message space consists of: A set of message pools Each pool contains the space for the messages of fixed size A set of message queues The messages allocated by pools are transmitted by means of message queues Once the message space is created by an actor, the other actors using the space may open it. Opening the message space enables the actor to allocate messages from the message pools and transmit them via queues. The figure shows a message space of two message pools and three message queues, opened by actors.

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example_space

Msg pool 1 Actor which created the space 2nd actor has opened the space

Msg pool 2

Q1 Msg queues

Q2 Q3

Figure 6.

Message space

The basic results of MIPC monitoring are: arrive receive occurs when the sender puts the message into receiver's queue the receiver starts processing the message

Additionally, other MIPC messaging events can be monitored:


.

message allocate message free message remove

There are no conventions in putting header-kind information in the MIPC message, as in IPC messaging. For more information, see Monitoring MIPC messages in Chorus units.

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Monitoring messages in DMX units

Monitoring messages in DMX units


Purpose

You can monitor messages in DMX units using MML commands.


Steps

1.

Reserve the monitoring buffer (ZOEBR) ZOEBR;

2.

Define the monitoring criteria (ZOEC) ZOEC::A:OFAM=XXXX;

3.

Activate message monitoring (ZOEM) ZOEM;

4.

Stop message monitoring (ZOES) ZOES;

5.

Display the monitoring results (ZOEG) ZOEG;

Further information

Note
Note that message monitoring causes a load on the exchange. Stop monitoring if the alarm does not appear again soon after you have started monitoring.

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**

OMU <HIST> SWBT1 1G159-00 TSSPRO ALARM SSU-0-0 (0013) 2620 CONNECTION FAILURE 4d 0d 0064 10

SWITCH

1996-09-08

16:29:45.27

Figure 7.

An example of an alarm printout

For more information on the alarm printouts, refer to the 'Alarm structure'. In this printout, the computer unit is OMU and the issuer is the TSSPRO program block. Under normal processor load conditions, the time indicated in the alarm is the same as the time when the messages relating to the alarm are sent. 1. Reserve the message monitoring buffer. a. b. Connect the service terminal to the computer that issued the alarm, in this example, OMU. Check the amount of free memory, using the SBS command. The field 'biggest free buffer current' shows the amount of free memory. Reserve a buffer which takes a maximum of half of the free memory. If there is little memory left, you must carefully consider whether to start the monitoring at all, since this may slow down the processes and/or result in service breaks. Reserve the message monitoring buffer. The hexadecimal parameter 100000 defines the size of the monitoring buffer to one megabyte. The type of the buffer is ring buffer (parameter 0). ZOEBR::100000,0;

c.

2.

Define the monitoring criteria. a. First, find out the ID of the process family. ZSXP:TSS;

ID 0069

NAME

LDT (G0819)

TSSPRO 1998

ATTR 0000

BP 01

MP 24

SI 0014

HGC 0000

MQ FFFF

EH 01

IS 00

LP 24

HP 24

Figure 8.

The ID of the process family in the output

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b.

In this printout, the ID of the process family is 0069. Define the monitoring criteria. Only the messages that have arrived to the message queue of 0069 process family are monitored. ZOEC::A:OFAM=0069;

3.

Activate message monitoring a. Type the following command into the service terminal, but execute the command (= press <enter>) only after you have cancelled the alarm. ZOEM; Cancel the alarm in the MML terminal. Execute the command.

b. c. 4.

Stop message monitoring a. Check the alarm printer. Stop the monitoring, using the following command. Use the time indicated on this alarm to find out the counterprocess that has sent messages to TSSPRO at that time. ZOES;

**

OMU <HIST> SWBT1 1G159-00 TSSPRO ALARM SSU-0-0 (0013) 2620 CONNECTION FAILURE 4d 0d 0064 10

SWITCH

1996-09-08

16:29:45.27

Figure 9.

An example of an alarm printout to help identify the counterprocess

5.

Display or store the monitoring results.

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a.

Display the messages on screen using the following command. Search for the message that has arrived to the message queue of TSSPRO at the time indicated in the alarm, in this example, 16:34:59.94. Stop scrolling by typing <Ctrl-S> and continue by <Ctrl-Q>.

MONITORED MESSAGE: 0031 C000 0064 0000 00 01 0000 1601 0000 00 11 00 FF 01 16 62 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 21 00 0F 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 MONITORING TIME: 1996-09-08 16:34:59.94 ARRIVED TO: 0069 0000 00 MONITORED MESSAGE: 0031 C000 0064 0000 00 01 0000 1601 0000 00 11 00 FF 01 16 62 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 21 00 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 MONITORING TIME: 1996-09-08 16:34:59.97 ARRIVED TO: 0069 0000 00 MONITORED MESSAGE: 0031 C000 0064 0000 00 01 0000 1603 0000 00 11 00 00 00 00 62 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

Figure 10.

Another example of an alarm printout to help identify the counterprocess

b. c.

The third field in the header MONITORED MESSAGE indicates the program block that has sent the message (0064). The last field in the header indicates the computer unit where the message comes from (0000). Cancel the alarm in the MML terminal. ZACA:2620:OMU; Store the results of the monitoring on a DX floppy disk. ZOEGD::F0-message.txt;

Example 1. Monitor the messages after alarm received An alarm is used as a starting point in this example. You can use message monitoring to get deeper information on alarm situations that can be repeated. In this example, message monitoring is set for the family that issues the alarms. When an alarm occurs, the monitoring is stopped and the resulting message monitoring can be attached to the failure report. For instructions on alarms, always refer to the 'Alarm instructions' and use the suggested measures given there.

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Monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units

10

Monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units


Purpose

Use ipcmon commands to manage monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units.


Before you start

To get help with IPC commands, use ipcmon - ? -.


Steps

1.

Reserve the off-line memory buffer ipcmon -br

2.

Define the monitoring conditions ipcmon -c <conditions...>

3.

Activate monitoring ipcmon -start -off

4.

Stop monitoring ipcmon -stop

5.

Print the results ipcmon -get


Further information

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Note
If you want to save a monitoring session as a text file, for example, to use the file for failure analysis, use the following command: ipcmon -get -f <file>

Example 2. Monitoring IPC messages a. b. c. d. e. f. Reserve the off-line memory buffer. ipcmon -br Set the monitoring conditions to actor 50. ipcmon -c -a 50 Add actor 56 to the monitoring conditions. ipcmon -c -a 56 Start off-line monitoring. ipcmon -start -off Stop monitoring. ipcmon -stop Get the results. ipcmon -get

Expected outcome
MONITORING TIME: 2001-08-09 RECEIVED BY: NAME: monsen ACAP: [2000003B,0,38,1] THREAD: 139 ANNEX: MESSAGE ID: DDD6 MESSAGE DOMAIN: CHORUS BODY: 14:44:50.79

MONITORING TIME: 2001-08-09 14:44:50.81 SENT BY: NAME: monsen ACAP: [2000003B,0,38,1] THREAD: 139 ANNEX: BODY: 00 00 00 01 A0 57 2D 5C 00 00 00 00 FA 37 AE 1D 6D 6D 30 74 65 73 5F 72 65 63 65 69 76 65 72 5F 61 73 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 MONITORING TIME: 2001-08-09 RECEIVED BY: 14:44:50.81

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NAME: monrec ACAP: [2000003B,0,32,0] THREAD: 12 ANNEX: BODY: 00 00 00 01 A0 57 2D 5C 00 00 00 00 FA 37 AE 1D 6D 6D 30 74 65 73 5F 72 65 63 65 69 76 65 72 5F 61 73 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

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Monitoring MIPC messages in Chorus units

11

Monitoring MIPC messages in Chorus units


Before you start

To get help with MIPC commands, use mipcmon - ? -.


Steps

1.

Reserve the off-line memory buffer mipcmon -br

2.

Define the monitoring conditions mipcmon -c <space> [conditions...]

3.

Activate monitoring mipcmon -start -off

4.

Stop monitoring mipcmon -stop

5.

Print the results mipcmon -get


Further information

If you want to save a monitoring session as a text file, for example, to use the file for failure analysis, use the following command: mipcmon -get -f <file>

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Expected outcome
MONITORING TIME: 1989-02-13 ARRIVED FROM: NAME: cxmana ACAP: [20000011,0,11,1] THREAD: 200 MESSAGE SPACE: 8 MESSAGE QUEUE: 7 PRIORITY: 0 SIZE: 404 MESSAGE DATA: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FE 1F 00 02 70 BE 03 00 00 00 00 00 08 41 00 00 00 00 00 00 0F 00 05 00 00 00 72 00 00 00 91 11 73 67 53 70 61 63 65 4F 70 65 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 33 36 37 63 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 MONITORING TIME: 1989-02-13 RECEIVED BY: NAME: goffic ACAP: [20000016,0,16,17] THREAD: 62 MESSAGE SPACE: 8 MESSAGE QUEUE: 7 SIZE: 404 MESSAGE DATA: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FE 1F 00 02 70 BE 03 00 00 00 00 00 08 41 00 00 00 00 00 00 0F 00 05 00 00 00 72 00 00 00 91 11 73 67 53 70 61 63 65 4F 70 65 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 33 36 37 63 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 03:26:11.91

42 00 00 26 6E 00 00 00 00 00

72 C8 00 03 20 00 00 00 00 00

BD FC 00 13 66 00 00 00 00 00

03 FE 00 02 61 00 00 00 00 00

00 1F 00 89 69 65 00 00 00 00

00 E9 00 19 6C 72 00 00 00 00

00 04 00 49 65 72 00 00 00 00

80 00 00 56 64 6F 00 00 00 00

00 00 00 42 00 72 00 00 00 00

00 00 00 4D 00 20 00 00 00 00

90 00 00 49 00 63 00 00 00 00

0A 00 00 50 00 6F 00 00 00 00

0A 00 05 3A 00 64 00 00 00 00

00 00 54 20 00 65 00 00 00 00

82 00 54 6D 00 20 00 00 00 00

03:26:11.91

42 00 00 26 6E 00 00 00 00 00

72 C8 00 03 20 00 00 00 00 00

BD FC 00 13 66 00 00 00 00 00

03 FE 00 02 61 00 00 00 00 00

00 1F 00 89 69 65 00 00 00 00

00 E9 00 19 6C 72 00 00 00 00

00 04 00 49 65 72 00 00 00 00

80 00 00 56 64 6F 00 00 00 00

00 00 00 42 00 72 00 00 00 00

00 00 00 4D 00 20 00 00 00 00

90 00 00 49 00 63 00 00 00 00

0A 00 00 50 00 6F 00 00 00 00

0A 00 05 3A 00 64 00 00 00 00

00 00 54 20 00 65 00 00 00 00

82 00 54 6D 00 20 00 00 00 00

MONITORING TIME: 1989-02-13 03:26:12.28 ARRIVED FROM: NAME: cxmana ACAP: [20000011,0,11,1] THREAD: 80 MESSAGE SPACE: 8 MESSAGE QUEUE: 43 PRIORITY: 0 SIZE: 104 MESSAGE DATA: 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 1F FE C0 00 04 3B 00 00 00 00 00 00 0A 91 00 0A 00

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10 BA 00 49 9A 00 98 00 01 00

C0 98 00 4C D2 00 00 01 00 00

00 04 00 45 6C 00 01 00 00 00

04 FE 00 00 94 01 00 00 00 01

3B DC 00 00 89 00 00 00 01 00

00 BA FE 00 44 00 00 01 00 00

00 98 DC FF 9A 00 01 00 00

00 00 BA FF 4B 01 00 00 00

00 00 98 FF B1 00 00 00 01

00 0A 00 FF 52 00 00 01 00

00 00 00 FF 00 00 01 00 00

00 00 00 FF 00 01 00 00 00

01 00 00 FF 00 00 00 00 01

00 00 00 FF 00 00 00 01 00

0A 00 00 FF FE FE 01 00 00

FE 00 00 FF DC DC 00 00 00

DC 00 00 00 BA BA 00 00 01

BA 00 00 00 98 98 00 01 00

98 FE 00 00 98 00 01 00 00

00 DC 00 00 FF 01 00 00 00

00 BA 00 D4 10 00 00 00 01

00 98 FE 3B 00 00 00 01 00

09 00 DC 3D 00 FE 01 00 00

FE 00 BA A2 00 DC 00 00 00

DC 00 98 15 01 BA 00 00 01

Example 3. Monitoring MIPC messages 1. Reserve the off-line memory buffer. mipcmon -br 2. Set monitoring to message space eight. mipcmon -c 8 3. Start off-line monitoring. mipcmon -start -off 4. Stop monitoring. mipcmon -stop 5. Get the results. mipcmon -get

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Monitoring DMX messages in Chorus units from DMX units

12

Monitoring DMX messages in Chorus units from DMX units


Purpose

You can monitor DMX messages in Chorus units from a remote DMX unit through the MM3STE service terminal extension.
Summary

The following shows the MM3STE main level menu:


? B C G I M R S T Z ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... HELP BUFFER HANDLING SET MONITORING CONDITION GET MONITORING RESULT INTERROGATE MONITORING INFORMATION START MONITORING RESET MONITORING STOP MONITORING SET STOP TRIGGER EXIT

Steps

1.

Load MM3STE service terminal extension (ZLE)

ZLE:X,MM3STEGX.IMG
2. Reserve the monitoring buffer (ZXBR)

ZXBR:<unit_type>,<index>:<buffer_size>,<type>;
Example 4. Reserve a ring buffer for all NIP1 units with the size of 40 (KBytes)

ZXBR:NIP1,1:;
3. Define the monitoring criteria (ZXC)

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ZXC :<unit_type>,<index>:<S/R/SR>:<monitoring_criteria>;
Monitoring points: S = Send, R = Receive Compare operators = , <>, =,<>,>,>=,<,<= Data field access: ABS<type><index> or DAT<type><index> ABS from message start, DAT from data start;<type>:B(yte)/W(ord)/D (word)<index>:msg offset (hex, starting from 0) Message header fields: LEN COM CCOM FAM CFAM OFAM PRO CPRO OPRO FOC CFOC OFOC ATT GRO NUM PHY Length Computer (in message) Co-computer Family (in message) Co-family Object family Process ID in message Co-process Object process Focus (in message) Co-focus Object focus Attributes Group Number Physical address

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Numeric values must start with a number, for example 1234, 0A, 0C000. Example 5.

ZXC:NIP1,1:SR:FAM=OBF;
4. Activate message monitoring (ZXM)

ZXM:<unit_type>,<index>:<data_length>:<num>;
data_length: 0 = store only message header n = store maximum n bytes of data Default is storing all data. num: 0 = monitoring stopped immediately when triggers are met (default) n = store n message events after triggers are met Example 6.

ZXM:NIP1,1::; ZXM:NIP1:1:0;
5. Display the monitoring result (ZXG) Display the monitoring result one unit at a time. You do not need to stop monitoring before displaying the result.

ZXG:<unit_type>,<index>:<subheader>;
subheader: 0 = subheader not displayed (default) 1 = message subheader displayed Example 7.

ZXG:NIP1,3:;

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6.

Store monitoring result to OMU disk (ZXGF)

ZXGF:<unit_type>,<index>:<file_full_name>;
Example 8.

ZXGF:NIP1,1:W0-RUNNING/BLCODE/mon_result_of_nip1_5.txt;
7. Display monitoring result from OMU disk (ZXGFD)

ZXGFD:<disk_full_name>:<subheader>;
Subheader: 0 = message subheader not displayed (default) 1 = message subheader displayed Example 9.

ZXGFD:W0-running/blcode/mon_result_of_nip1_5.txt:1;

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Starting service terminal session with VDU

13

Starting service terminal session with VDU


Purpose

Connect a VDU physically to a computer unit using a service terminal connector. All units may not have service terminal connectors.
Steps

1.

Connect the VDU to the computer unit with service terminal connector, for example, OMU Activate the service terminal line by pressing the RETURN key
Further information

2.

The service terminal prompts you for a username and password. 3. Enter your username and password If you try to use the MMI username and password when the MMI system is not functional, the following error message appears:
/*** NO RESPONSE FROM USER AUTHENTICATION SERVICE

Further information

Use the fixed username and its password instead. The fixed username is SYSTEM and the default setting for the password is SYSTEM. Change your password when the network element is in use.

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Starting remote service terminal session with MML terminal

14

Starting remote service terminal session with MML terminal


Purpose

You can open a remote service terminal session using an MML terminal in DMX units and connect to Chorus units. Start a remote service terminal session using the DDS MML command.
Steps

1.

Start a remote service terminal session using MML terminal (DDS) ZDDS:<unit type>;

2.

Start a remote service terminal session using MML terminal (DDS) ZDDS:<unit type>,<unit index>;
Expected outcome

The service terminal session is active when a service terminal prompt is displayed on the screen. For more information, see the table Service terminal prompts on how to read these prompts. The DMX and Chorus unit prompts are: 00MAN> 0051$ Remote DMX prompt Chorus prompt

Further information

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Note
Using the DDS command, you can also use CTRL-B in service terminal sessions to recall service terminal commands you have entered. If you enter the service terminal commands as parameters of the command, you can execute service terminal commands using the DDE command. You can also recall commands using CTRL-B. You can also make use of command files and command calendar to execute service terminal commands automatically. You could use the command calendar to trace additional information on problems that occur randomly by using alarms as triggers that start the execution of a calendar task. For example, you can create a command calendar task to execute the DDE command which displays the processor load after the high load rate disturbance and stores the results in a text file on the WDU.

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Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions)

15

Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions)
Purpose

You can start up a remote service terminal session connecting one computer to another, using the ZRS service terminal command. You can use this command to, for example, start a service terminal session in computer units that have DMX and ChorusOS. Remote service terminal sessions are useful when you only have a limited number of service terminals available, or if you need to establish several service terminal sessions to one computer unit.

Note
You can start a remote service terminal session connecting from a DMX unit or from an MML terminal to either a DMX unit or a Chorus unit. You cannot, however, start a remote service terminal connecting from a Chorus unit to any other unit. For more information, see Remote debugger handling.

Steps

1.

Find out the number of the computer unit (USI) ZUSI;


Further information

You can also use this command to verify the state of the unit you want to connect to and whether a remote connection can be established or not. 2. Start a service terminal session

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Start a service terminal session in the unit you want to establish the remote service terminal session in. If you want to start a service terminal session in a unit that has Chorus operating system, you can use the MML command DDS. 3. Start a remote service terminal session (ZRS service terminal command) Use the computer unit number found out in step 1. ZRS:<computer unit number>;
Expected outcome

The service terminal session is active when a service terminal prompt is displayed on the screen. For more information, see the table Service terminal prompts on how to read these prompts. The first two are DMX unit service terminal prompts and the third one is a Chorus unit service terminal prompt. 04:MAN> 04-MAN> 0051-$ DMX direct connection prompt Remote DMX prompt Chorus prompt

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Starting remote service terminal session using telnet connection

16

Starting remote service terminal session using telnet connection


Purpose

You can open remote service terminal session using telnet connection.
Steps

1.

Start a remote service terminal session using telnet port 8007 for service terminal connections (telnet) telnet<ip address or host name>:<port>;

2.

Enter your username and password

Expected outcome

The service terminal session is active when a service terminal prompt is displayed on the screen. For more information, see the table Service terminal prompts. 00:MAN> Remote DMX prompt

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Starting minidebugger session in DMX units

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Starting minidebugger session in DMX units


Purpose

A minidebugger can be taken into use in fault situations, for example, when the startup of a unit fails. For more information, see Service terminal extensions in DMX units.
Steps

1. 2. 3.

Connect the VDU to a computer unit, for example, OMU Restart the unit Press shift + M when the screen starts to display unit startup information
Expected outcome

When the minidebugger starts, information similar to the following is displayed:


MINIDEBUGGER, NO LOADING READY - PHASE 99

Example 10.
DMX SYSTEM START-UP TESTS SUCCESSFULLY INITIALIZED MEMORY ROW 2 SUCCESSFULLY INITIALIZED MEMORY ROW 3 NORTH BRIDGE INITIALIZED ZERO RAM OK SELF TEST RESULT = 00000000 PROCESSOR ID & REV = 00000652 CPU IDENT = 53D0 CPIO FEATURES = D335 CPU RESET STATUS = 7EDE VALUE OF VAR 'NORTH BRIDGE INITIALIZED' = 01 BOPROMGX.PAC 7.4-16 00/08/02 BOLEROGX.PAC 7.3-3 99/09/13 PLAENVC2.PAC 7.4-0

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RESET TYPE = COLD, FF RESET CAUSE = UNKNOWN, FF DRAM SIZE = 08000000H BYTES TESTING SYSTEM RAM... SYSTEM RAM OK NTC PCI Software version 0.2-0 created 24.10.1997 Copyright (c) 1993 1995 Nokia Telecommunications Oy Finland

ENUMERATING PCI BUSES... 1 PCI BUSES ENUMERATED. REGISTERING DEVICE IN BUS 0 AS DEVICE 0 FUNCTION 0 REGISTERING DEVICE IN BUS 0 AS DEVICE 7 FUNCTION 0 CONFIGURING PCI/DMC BRIDGE... PCI/DMC BRIDGE FOUND IN BUS 0 AS DEVICE 3 FUNCTION 0 PCI/DMC BRIDGE SUCCESSFULLY CONFIGURED CONFIGURING SCSIS... SCSI FOUND IN BUS 0 AS DEVICE 4 FUNCTION 0 SCSI SUCCESSFULLY CONFIGURED SCSI FOUND IN BUS 0 AS DEVICE 4 FUNCTION 1 SCSI SUCCESSFULLY CONFIGURED SCSI CONFIGURATION COMPLETED. CONFIGURING OTHER TARGET DEVICES... FOUND UNINITIALISED TARGET FROM BUS 0 AS DEVICE 2 FUNCTION FUNCTION 0 SUCCESFULLY CONFIGURED OTHER TARGETS SUCCESFULLY CONFIGURED TESTING RAM... RAM OK, 08000000H BYTES TESTED BLACKBOX FORMING SKIPPED SIZING L2 CACHE ... L2 ON LOADING MODULES FROM PROM AIHLIB AIMPRB APPARA BBOLIB BIBLIO BLNAME BLSLIB BOSLIB CLUCIF DEBUTI DMXRTE DXPARA ENALIB EPISOD FISLIB FIZSLM INVOKE ISRLIB JUPINA LIBGEN LOGUTI MBDRIV NASEVA OSITUS PODISK POFFIC POHEXT POMOXI POXLIB POZMAN PRSLIB PULINA SHIFTY SQPAPL SQPCPL SQPDPL SQQEXT STQPRO TOELIB TOHEXT MODULES LOADED FROM PROM DEBUGGER READY STARTING FAMILIES

BOXANA HMILIB PAGLIB RAUDAT TOMPRB

BURNER HMRESE PBMLIB RUBBER

BIB HMR POZ NAS AIM TOM POF PUL EPI

WAITING CONNECTION PERMISSION TO LOAD MANAGER...

4. 5.

Press the enter key to start the minidebugger service terminal session Enter the fixed username and password The fixed username and the fixed password are both SYSTEM. You cannot change the username or password of a minidebugger session.

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Switching between different service terminal sessions in DMX units


Purpose

You can switch between service terminal sessions. You do not have to exit a service terminal remote session, but you can return to it later on. However, switching between sessions can best be done when you have connected a VDU directly to your computer unit and established a service terminal session this way. You need to key in the Ctrl-@ = ASCII-NULL (0x0).
Before you start

You need to have established at least one service terminal session and started one service terminal remote session in this session. Switching between different service terminal sessions does not work with Chorus units, but ends the Chorus service terminal session.
Steps

1.

Return to the original service terminal session (Ctrl-@) You can also return to the original service terminal session without exiting the service terminal remote session by entering Ctrl-@. When you are in the original service terminal session, you can use the ZRD command to exit a service terminal remote session, if you wish. ZRD;

2.

Display the active sessions (ZRA service terminal command) ZRA;

3.

Return to a session (ZRR service terminal command) ZRR:<session number>;

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Exiting service terminal session

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Exiting service terminal session


Purpose

You are recommended to exit the service terminal session after you have finished working with the service terminal to avoid unauthorised use of the service terminal. There is a time-out for the sessions opened using the DDS MML command. When you connect a VDU to the service terminal connectors of a computer unit, there is no time-out. For more information, see Exit debugger session.
Steps

1.

Exit Chorus unit service terminal session (logout) logout


Further information

You can also use 'exit' or 'quit' to exit the session. 2. Exit service terminal session ZE;
Further information

If you were in a service terminal remote session, you get back to the original service terminal session when you have entered the ZE command. Enter the command again to end the service terminal session.

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Running service terminal extensions in Chorus units

20

Running service terminal extensions in Chorus units


Steps

1.

List the extensions (ls) The most important extensions are located in the '/bin' directory. ls /bin/
Further information

Note
The command shows not only service terminal extensions, but also actors located in the BIN directory. Only start the service terminal extensions. If you start an actor by mistake, you can kill the actor using the instructions in Service terminal halts in Chorus units.

2.

Running an extension You can run an extension by entering the extension name. Note that Chorus service terminal extensions are like commands. <extension name>
Further information

If the extension has got obligatory parameters, these need to be entered too before the extension can be run. Use the help function by typing in a question mark (-?) after the extension name to see the syntax of the extension.

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Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units

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Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units


Steps

1.

List the extensions (ZLS service terminal command) Enter: ZLS;


Further information

If you cannot find the extension that you need, you can list all the available extensions using the command of the MASHAN extension in OMU. First you must activate the MASHAN extension.

Note
Activating the MASHAN extension is done using the LP command.

Enter: ZLE:M,MASHAN1X; ZMXE:W0-BLCODE/; 2. Activate an extension (ZLE service terminal command) You can use the LE command to activate a service terminal extension that is either in a load chain (shown by LS command), in the memory or on the OMU disk. You need to know the full name of the extension program, for example, LOGUTIGX.

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Using the command character for the extension, below G, you can use any other character than those already used for service terminal programs or extensions installed earlier (to view the command menu enter a question mark, ?). You can also use numbers as command characters for the service terminal extensions to keep them apart from the service terminal programs. Enter: ZLE:G,LOGUTIGX;
Expected outcome

You can check that the LOGUTI extension was activated with the command ?. Enter: ?

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Activating service terminal extensions from another computer unit in DMX units (LEL)
Steps

1.

Connect a VDU to the CPU connector of a computer unit (for example, STU) Activate a service terminal extension (ZLEL) ZLEL;
Further information

2.

Using the command character for the extension, below G, you can use any other character than those already used for service terminal programs or extensions installed earlier (to view the command menu enter a question mark, ?). You can also use numbers as command characters for the service terminal extensions to keep them apart from the service terminal programs. ZLEL:G:0,LOGUTIGX.IMG;
Expected outcome

You can check that the LOGUTI extension was activated with the service terminal command ?. ?

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Activating service terminal extensions from floppy disk in DMX units (LEL)

23

Activating service terminal extensions from floppy disk in DMX units (LEL)
Steps

1. 2.

Insert the floppy disk in the floppy disk drive Activate the extension (ZLEL) As a command character for the extension (below G) you can use any other character than those already used for service terminal programs or extensions installed earlier (to view the command menu enter ?). You can also use numbers as command characters for the service terminal extensions to keep them apart from the service terminal programs. ZLEL:G:0,F0-LOGUTIGX.IMG;

Expected outcome

You can check that the LOGUTI extension was activated with the service terminal command ?. ?

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Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units

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Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units


Purpose

You are recommended to use the LE command instead of the LP command because LP only activates extensions that are included in the load chain. For more information, see DMX units' service terminal commands.
Steps

1.

List the extensions (ZLS service terminal command) ZLS;


Further information

If you cannot find the extension that you need, you can list all the available extensions using the following MASHAN command in OMU (the command code given for MASHAN is M in the command below). ZMXE:W0-BLCODE/; If the extension that you need to use is not shown by the LS command but you can find it using the MASHAN command, use LE command to activate the extension. 2. Activate an extension (ZLP service terminal command) Use this command to install the Computer Log Handler, for example. Using the command character for the extension, below G, you can use any other character than those already used for service terminal programs or extensions installed earlier (to view the command menu enter a question mark, ?). You can also use numbers as command characters for the service terminal extensions to keep them apart from the service terminal programs.

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Enter the first three letters of the extension program name you got by using the LS command. After you have installed the extension, it is displayed in the main menu of the service terminal commands under the heading 'extensions'. ZLP:G,LOG;
Further information

After a successful restart of a unit, the Computer Log Handler extension is linked to the service terminal process in every unit automatically.

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Examining black box in DMX units

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Examining black box in DMX units


Purpose

If there is a fault in the software or hardware of the exchange, you can speed up the debugging of the fault by supplying appropriate information together with the failure report. The black box contains data on unit states prior to unit restart. You can use this data to find out the cause of the restart. The system also maintains disk copies of black boxes. A maximum of 12 black box files are stored per computer unit. The black box disk copies are stored in directory /var/crash/. The files are named in the following way: <computer unit physical address>_<cyclic index>.bbox. For example, file 0001_02.bbox is from OMU-1. If there are multiple black box copies from a certain computer unit, you can use the creation/modification time of the file to find out when the black box copy was made and which of the files is the most recent one. You can either use a PC as a terminal and copy the black box from the screen as an ASCII file, or you can use FTP to copy the black box as a binary file. You are recommended to copy the black box as an ASCII file if possible. For more information, see System state and black box analyser (BOXANA).
Steps

1.

Start a remote service terminal session connecting to the computer unit that restarted, using a PC Activate the black box analyser extension if not in the main menu, to analyse the black box in the memory (ZLP service terminal command) ZLP:1,BOX;

2.

3.

Display the contents of the black box on screen (Z1U service terminal command) Z1U;

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4.

Copy the results to a file The results are shown on the screen. Copy them to a file.

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Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units

26

Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units


Purpose

If there is a fault in the software or hardware of the exchange, you can speed up the debugging of the fault by supplying appropriate information together with the failure report. The black box contains data on unit states prior to unit restart. You can use this data to find out the cause of the restart. The system also maintains disk copies of black boxes. A maximum of 12 black box files are stored per computer unit. The black box disk copies are stored in directory /var/crash/. The files are named in the following way: <computer unit physical address>_<cyclic index>.bbox. For example, file 0001_01.bbox is from OMU-1. If there are multiple black box copies from a certain computer unit, you can use the creation/modification time of the file to find out when the black box copy was made and which of the files is the most recent one. You can either use a PC as a terminal and copy the black box from the screen as an ASCII file, or you can use FTP to copy the black box as a binary file. You are recommended to copy the black box as an ASCII file if possible. For more information, see System state and black box analyser (BOXANA).
Steps

1. 2. 3. 4.

Establish FTP connection to the network element Set the transfer method to BINARY Change the directory to /var/crash Check the time stamp of the *.bbox files to find the correct black box copy Download the desired black box copy

5.

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Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units

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Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units


Purpose

Each microcomputer of the system contains a computer log. A computer log (or a 'log' for short) is conceptually a file in which the application programs can write information about the error situations they detect. A log is specific to the computer unit, and therefore, the log system provides centralised reporting of errors detected in various programs. Computer logs are used in testing and error diagnostics. The operating system log contains data on certain events of normal operation, as well as data on the errors that take place during operation. Operating system log is used in error diagnostics. You can either use MML commands to store the computer logs or the LOGUTI service terminal extension to store both the computer logs and operating system logs. The benefit of using MML commands is that you can store several units' computer logs to one file. For more information, see Computer log handler (LOGUTI).
Steps

1.

Check the filtering settings of the network element (DVI) ZDVI;


Further information

Only the logs created by a critical error are stored by default. You are also recommended to monitor the logs caused by an error situation. 2. Redefine the monitoring settings (DVM) ZDVM:CRI&ERR:::;

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3.

Check if there are any logs in the log file (DVP) ZDVP;
Further information

The number of logs is shown in the 'total number of logs' field. You can display more detailed information about the logs using the DVG and DVL commands; For example, the header of the logs and the computer unit which has produced the log. You can also create a sublog file to monitor some types of error logs. For example, to monitor only the logs caused by an error in all the computer units: ZDVC:ERRLOG:30000:ERR::; 4. Copy both of the log files to a floppy disk (IWY, IBC) The log files are stored in the ASWDIR directory. The main log files are called LGFILE00.IMG and LGFILE01.IMG. The sublog files have unique names given by you. You can check the name of the sublog file using the DVP command. ZIWY:S:UNIT=OMU,PATH=ASWDIR,DRIVE=WDU-S,; ZIWY:D:UNIT=OMU,DRIVE=FDU-N0,; ZIBC:,,LGFILE00,IMG;

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Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units

28

Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units


Steps

1.

Start a remote service terminal session in the correct computer unit (DDS) DDS;

2.

Activate the computer log handler extension if not in the main menu (ZLP service terminal command) ZLP:G,LOG;

3.

Display the contents of the computer log on screen (ZGSC) ZGSC;


Further information

Using the G?P, you can get different options on how to prevent log printouts. 4. 5. Copy the results shown on screen to a file Display the contents of the operating system log (ZGL service terminal command) ZGL; 6. Copy the results shown on screen to a file

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Storing processor and process load in DMX units

29

Storing processor and process load in DMX units


Steps

1. 2.

Connect the service terminal to a computer unit Display the processor load (ZSPC) ZSPC;
Further information

You can display the processor load of several computers using the unit individual address of the computer in the command. 3. 4. 5. 6. Stop the display after 10 to 30 seconds (Press Ctrl-C) Copy the results shown on screen to file Connect the service terminal to a computer unit Display the process load (ZSRCT) ZSRCT::0069;
Further information

You can display the process load of several processes using the process family identifier in the command. This command only displays the load of the 0069 process family's master process (0). 7. 8. Stop the display after 10 to 30 seconds (Press Ctrl-C) Copy the results shown on screen to file

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Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units

30

Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units
Purpose

Each microcomputer of the system contains a computer log. The logs are used in testing and error diagnostics. A computer log (or a 'log' in short) is conceptually a file in which the application programs can write information about the error situations they detect. A log is specific to the computer unit, and therefore, the log system provides centralised reporting of errors detected in various programs. The operating system log contains data on certain events of normal operation, as well as data on the errors that take place during operation. Operating system log is used in error diagnostics. You can either use MML commands to store the computer logs or the CLOG and OLOG service terminal extensions to store both the computer logs and operating system logs. The benefit of using MML commands is that you can store several units' computer logs to one file. For more information, see Service terminal programs in Chorus units.
Steps

1.

Start a service terminal session in OMU or any other DMX unit (DDS) DDS;
Further information

You can now start a service terminal remote session in the Chorus unit. 2. Display the computer log (clog) Display the operating system log using the clog extension. clog -s -a

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3. 4.

Copy the results shown on screen to file Display the operating system log (olog) Display the computer log using the olog extension. olog -s

5.

Copy the results shown on screen to file

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Storing actor related information in Chorus units

31

Storing actor related information in Chorus units


Steps

1.

Start a service terminal session in OMU or any other DMX unit (DDS) DDS;
Further information

You can now start a service terminal remote session in the Chorus unit. 2. List the actors and threads (alist, tlist) alist tlist 3. 4. Copy the results shown on screen to file List the actors registered in the post service (pnaste) pnaste -l 5. 6. Copy the results shown on screen to file List the actor supervision information (supervise) supervise -l -a -all 7. Copy the results shown on screen to file

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Storing unit startup information in Chorus units

32

Storing unit startup information in Chorus units


Steps

1.

Start a service terminal session in OMU or any other DMX unit (DDS) DDS;
Further information

You can now start a service terminal remote session in the Chorus unit. 2. Show unit startup information (cat) cat var/daqtor/phaseoutput.txt 3. Copy the results shown on screen to a file

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Printing system dump logs

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Printing system dump logs


Purpose

You can display the ChorusOS system dump information using the command sysdump. The system dump information can be used to examine events before a reset. The system dump data contains: a list of running actors and threads, exceptions and panic notifications, logs made by actors, last 16 context switches, console printouts, failed system calls and snapshot information.
Summary

The following list shows the ChorusOS system dump commands information:
-A -l -s -a -t -p -c -b -i -W -H -F ..... Display whole system dump of one reset. ..... Display logs. ..... Display failed system calls. ..... Display running actors. ..... Display running threads. ..... Display console printouts. ..... Display last context switches. ..... Sets log printing start from the beginning of the log. ..... Display system dump internal information. ..... Display whole system dump. id .. Display application area data. address .. Find given virtual address from all running actors.

Note
-r nb defines what stored dump information is displayed.
.

Number 1 is the running operating system. Number 2 means events from before last reset. Number 3 means events from 2 resets ago and so on. The default value is 2.

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The number of stored system dumps depends on the current configuration. The configuration information can be retrieved with -i option.

Steps

1.

Display the whole system dump data

sysdump -W
Note that the command prints out an error message if it encounters any errors. Example 11. Printing system dump logs a. b. Display the last context switches from the previous resets

0020-$ sysdump -c -r2 Display the logs from the previous reset 0020-$ sysdump -l -r2

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Browsing computer logs in Chorus unit

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Browsing computer logs in Chorus unit


Purpose

With the command clog you can


.

display the statistic information of the computer log clear and monitor the contents of the computer log set and remove the current prevention rules

Before you start

Log writings of selected families can be prevented. Family is identified by family id.
Steps

1.

Monitoring the computer log

clog -m
Stop monitoring of the computer log by pressing ctrl + c 2. Browsing the computer log Note that if the computer log local buffer is reserved for another user, clog prints the error message TIMEOUT ERROR. Try your operation again.
.

Display the contents of the computer log

clog -s [number]
.

Display the contents of the computer log by given family id

clog -f dmx_id
Expected outcome

The correct content is displayed.

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Unexpected outcome

If the computer log local buffer is not found, clog prints the error message MEMORY ERROR. Use the command alist checking if lofter is running in the target machine, restart the unit if it is not. 3. Clearing the computer log

clog -c
4. Setting the computer log preventing information

clog -p dmx_id
5. Removing the computer log preventing information

clog -r dmx_id
Example 12. Browsing computer logs in Chorus unit 1. Display the contents of computer log:

0000-$ clog -s
001: CALLER: 457 002: CALLER: 457 003: CALLER: 457 004: CALLER: 457 005: CALLER: 457 006: CALLER: 457 007: CALLER: 457 008: CALLER: 457 009: CALLER: 457 010: CALLER: 457 011: CALLER: 457 012: CALLER: 457 013: CALLER: 457 014: CALLER: 457 015: CALLER: 457 016: CALLER: 457 017: CALLER: 457 018: CALLER: 457 019: CALLER: 457 020: CALLER: 457 021: CALLER: 457 022: CALLER: 457 023: CALLER: 457 s <number> print TIME: 10:25.11.68 TIME: 10:25.11.69 TIME: 10:25.11.70 TIME: 10:25.11.71 TIME: 10:25.12.72 TIME: 10:25.12.73 TIME: 10:25.12.74 TIME: 10:25.12.75 TIME: 10:25.12.76 TIME: 10:26.59.68 TIME: 10:26.59.69 TIME: 10:26.59.70 TIME: 10:26.59.71 TIME: 10:26.59.72 TIME: 10:26.59.73 TIME: 10:26.59.74 TIME: 10:26.59.75 TIME: 10:26.59.76 TIME: 10:27.40.23 TIME: 10:27.40.24 TIME: 10:27.40.25 TIME: 10:27.40.26 TIME: 10:27.40.27 details of entry; USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB USER TEXT: NSULIB n next page, any other key exit:

2.

Display the prevention rules

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Browsing computer logs in Chorus unit

0000-$ clog -o
PREVENTED FAMILIES: 000 000 000 000 000 ENTRY COUNTER: 62 ERROR COUNTER: 00

3.

Set the prevention rule for family 0x50 and see the rule

0000-$ clog -p 50 0000-$ clog -o


PREVENTED FAMILIES: 050 000 000 000 000 ENTRY COUNTER: 62 ERROR COUNTER: 00

4.

Remove the prevention rule for family 0x50 and see new rules 0000-$ clog -r 50 0000-$ clog -o
PREVENTED FAMILIES: 000 000 000 000 000 ENTRY COUNTER: 62 ERROR COUNTER: 00

Note
A maximum of five dmx_ids can be prevented.

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Browsing operating system logs in Chorus unit

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Browsing operating system logs in Chorus unit


Purpose

With the command olog you can


.

display the statistic information of the operating system log clear and display the contents of the operating system log

Steps

1.

Browsing the operating system log


.

Display the contents of the operating system log

olog -s Display the contents of the operating system log by family id olog -f dmx_id Display the contents of the operating system log by entry type olog -t type

Expected outcome

The correct content is displayed.


Unexpected outcome

If the operating system log memory is not found, olog prints the error message MEMORY ERROR. Use the command alist checking if lofter is running in the target machine, restart the unit if it is not. 2. Clearing the operating system log

olog -c
3. Checking the operating system statistic information

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Service terminal essentials

olog -i
Example 13. Browsing operating system logs in Chorus unit 1. Display the contents of the operating system log

0000-$ olog -s
NUMBER: 01 TYPE: 01 DATE:02.00.89 TIME: 16:55:39 OLD DATE AND TIME: 00.00.00 01:02:03 NEW DATE AND TIME: 00.00.00 06:05:04 REASON CODE: 99 NUMBER: 02 TYPE: 02 DATE:02.00.89 TIME: 16:55:40 FAMILY: testiohjelma1 BUILD. DMX ID IS: 100 NUMBER: 03 TYPE: 03 DATE:02.00.89 TIME: 16:55:41 FAMILY: testiohjelma2 DESTROYED DMX ID IS: 101

2.

Display the operating system log entries by dmx_id

0000-$ olog -s f 100


NUMBER: 01 TYPE: 02 DATE:02.00.89 TIME: 16:59:44 FAMILY: testiohjelma1 BUILD. DMX ID IS: 100

3.

Display the operating system log entries by type 0000-$ olog -s t 2


NUMBER: 01 TYPE: 02 DATE:03.00.89 TIME: 11:00:46 FAMILY: testiohjelma1 BUILD. DMX ID IS: 100

4.

Clear the operating system log

0000-$ olog -c clear log


5. Display the statistics of the operating system log

0000-$ olog -i
entry counter: 3 error counter: 0 offset of first item: 32 offset of current item: 488

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Browsing the contents of black box for the Chorus log system

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Browsing the contents of black box for the Chorus log system
Purpose

Chorus unit black box files contain computer logs and operating system logs of previous unit restarts. The amount of black box files in the unit depends on the system configuration. Each black box file contains the computer logs and operating system logs of one previous unit restart. You can view computer logs and operating system logs of previous unit restart using the command bblog.
Before you start

Use the command bblog -h to get help information. Note that if the specified black box file does not exist, BLACK BOX FILE NOT EXISTED announcement is printed on the service terminal screen. If the specified black box file does not contain valid data, NO VALID DATA IN BLACK BOX FILE announcement is printed on the service terminal screen. Note that only one argument is allowed in time. <file id> default is 2 which is from the previous restart, 3 is the restart preceding the previous restart and so on.
Steps

1.

Browsing the computer log in a specified black box file


.

Show the given number computer log Note that when number=0 it shows log headers.

bblog -c <number> <file id> Show the details of the computer log bblog -c -a <file id>

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Show bblog Show bblog

the headers of the computer log -c -l <file id> the computer log by family id -c -f <dmx_id> <file id>

2.

Browsing the operating system log black box


.

Show the operating system log

bblog Show bblog Show bblog

-o <file id> the operating system log by family id -o -f <dmx_id><file id> the operating system log by entry type -o -t <type><file id>

Example 14. Browsing the contents of black box for the Chorus log system 1. Show the computer logs of the previous restart

0005-$ bblog -c -l 2
001: 002: 003: 004: 005: 006: 007: CALLER: CALLER: CALLER: CALLER: CALLER: CALLER: CALLER: 3CB 3D1 3D1 3D1 3D1 3D1 3D1 TIME: TIME: TIME: TIME: TIME: TIME: TIME: 00:00.33.06 06:11.46.53 06:11.48.99 06:12.04.98 06:12.16.05 06:12.16.46 06:14.06.71 USER USER USER USER USER USER USER TEXT: TEXT: TEXT: TEXT: TEXT: TEXT: TEXT: UXCPRB: GOFFIC: GOFFIC: GOFFIC: GOFFIC: GOFFIC: GOFFIC: NOTICE -- UX1 SYNC FOUND i gofmangx.c, line 2941 gofmangx.c, line 2941 gofmangx.c, line 2941 gofmangx.c, line 2941 gofmangx.c, line 2941 gofmangx.c, line 2941

2.

Show the previous operating system logs of the previous restart

0005-$ bblog -o 2
NUMBER: 01 TYPE: 02 DATE:01.01.1970 TIME: 00:00:47 FAMILY: qalarm BUILD. DMX ID IS: 143 NUMBER: 02 TYPE: 02 DATE:01.01.1970 TIME: 00:00:47 FAMILY: fellow BUILD. DMX ID IS: 54C NUMBER: 03 TYPE: 02 DATE:01.01.1970 TIME: 00:00:47 FAMILY: dakota BUILD. DMX ID IS: 654 NUMBER: 04 TYPE: 02 DATE:01.01.1970 TIME: 00:00:47 FAMILY: puzage BUILD. DMX ID IS: 4F3 NUMBER: 05 TYPE: 02 DATE:01.01.1970 TIME: 00:00:47 FAMILY: ch1sup BUILD. DMX ID IS: 518

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No service terminal connection in DMX units

37
Description

No service terminal connection in DMX units


Normally the service terminal's process priority (C0, C1, BE and BF) is quite low compared to the priorities of other processes. C0 and C1 are the processes for the terminal connectors in the CPUs and BE and BF are the processes for the DDS MML.

Symptoms

A unit's load rate gets so high that there is no time for the service terminal due to the low priority. You can increase the priority of the service terminal prior to logging on.
Recovery procedures

Note
You must always change the priority back to normal using the OGR command after you have finished the task. This command restores the service terminal priority to the normal priority: ZOGR:FAM,PROC;

Change the priority value Steps

1.

Connect a VDU to the CPU connector and type in the priority (for example, F5) If you type shift F and 5, the priority is set to F5 (hexadecimal value).

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Shift+F 5
Expected outcome

This value should be high enough to enable you to open a service terminal session when the problem lies in a unit's load rate. 2. Hold down the control button and type OBELIX
Expected outcome

You should now be able to log in.

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Message monitoring does not work in DMX units

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Description

Message monitoring does not work in DMX units


When you are monitoring messages, you can increase the size of the free memory area G40 temporarily so that it can contain a larger amount of data, if needed. You must be careful when increasing the size of the free memory area so as not to use up all the resources of a unit.

Symptoms

Message monitoring does not work.


Recovery procedures Increasing the free memory area G40 temporarily Steps

1.

Start a service terminal session in the computer unit that you wish to monitor Activate the STYMIE service terminal extension (ZLEL) ZLEL:1:0,STYMIEGX.IMG;

2.

3.

Find out the maximum continuous free space of memory area (ZSB) ZSB;
Further information

Look for the largest available fragment information. It will be 'safe' to use about half of this maximum free area. 4. Use the system utilities to expand the G40 memory segment (Z1SE)

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Z1SE:G40,<size>;

Parameter
<size>

Explanation
half of the largest fragment in hex

5.

Define a monitoring buffer using the same size as above (ZOQS) ZOQS:G40.0,<size>;

6.

Start the message monitoring (ZOQB) ZOQB:<process>;

7.

Display the messages normally (ZOQM) ZOQM;

8.

Disable the monitoring buffer (ZOQS) Disable the monitoring buffer after you have captured all the messages. ZOQS;

9.

Bring the G40 back to normal size (Z1SR) Z1SR:G40;


Further information

Wait for the response: 'segment has been restored to the state before the enlargement'.

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Remote session fails in Chorus units

39
Description Symptoms

Remote session fails in Chorus units


You cannot open more than two remote sessions in one unit. The starting of the remote session fails also if the loading of the program code has failed or has been interrupted in that unit. If that is the case, you need to find out why loading fails or gets interrupted.

You cannot start a remote service terminal.


Recovery procedures Checking the state of the unit Steps

1.

Exit the remote session

Note
If there are two active remote sessions in the same unit, use one of the active sessions or exit at least one of the remote sessions before trying to start a new remote session.

2.

Check the state of the unit (USI) USI;


Further information

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If you cannot start a service terminal because there is more than one active remote session functioning, you need to check the state of the unit you tried to start the service terminal session in. If the state of the unit is normal and the unit functions, consider if you need to start the service terminal session in this unit. Restarting the unit can help, but should only be used as a last resort and during a low traffic period.

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Service terminal halts in Chorus units

40
Description Symptoms

Service terminal halts in Chorus units


The service terminal session may halt if you accidentally start an actor instead of a service terminal extension. For more information, see Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions).

The service terminal session halts.


Recovery procedures Killing the halted yshell actor Steps

1. 2.

Start a new service terminal connection Find out the yshell actor identifier (self) self
Further information

The 'lid' field shows the actor identifier of the current session. 3. Find out all yshell actor identifiers (alist) alist -n yshell
Further information

The 'lid' field shows the actor identifiers. 4. Kill the halted yshell actor (akill)

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Service terminal essentials

akill <actor identifier>

Note
Do not kill the actor shown by the self command.

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Message monitoring gets stopped by the computer in Chorus units

41
Description Symptoms

Message monitoring gets stopped by the computer in Chorus units


If messages are long or if traffic is heavy, the internal buffer can become full before the filtering application has a chance to process the messages. In this case, it helps to increase the size of the temporary buffer.

Message monitoring gets stopped.


Recovery procedures Increasing the size of the temporary buffer Steps

1.

Increasing the size of the temporary buffer in IPC messaging ipcmon -start -t [NEW_SIZE]
Further information

The default buffer size is 8kB. The maximum recommended buffer size is half of the free memory space. You can check the free memory space by giving the following command: memstat 2. Increasing the size of the temporary buffer in MIPC messaging mipcmon -start -t [NEW_SIZE]
Further information

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Service terminal essentials

The default buffer size is 8kB. The maximum recommended buffer size is half of the free memory space. You can check the free memory space by giving the following command: memstat

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Messages do not fit into the buffer in Chorus units

42
Description Symptoms

Messages do not fit into the buffer in Chorus units


Sometimes the messages do not fit into the off-line buffer. The size of the buffers can be increased for recovery.

Messages do not fit into the buffer.


Recovery procedures Increasing the size of the off-line buffer Steps

1.

Increasing the size of the off-line buffer in IPC messaging ipcmon -br [NEW_SIZE]
Further information

The default buffer size is 32kB. The maximum recommended buffer size is half of the free memory space. You can check the free memory space by giving the following command: memstat 2. Increasing the size of the off-line buffer in MIPC messaging mipcmon -br [NEW_SIZE]
Further information

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Service terminal essentials

The default buffer size is 32kB. The maximum recommended buffer size is half of the free memory space. You can check the free memory space by giving the following command: memstat
Further information

If you want to store more messages than the default monitoring buffer allows, you can increase the size of the off-line buffer. For more information, see Monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units and Monitoring MIPC messages in Chorus units.

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Related Topics

Related Topics
Service terminal
Instructions
Starting service terminal session with VDU

Descriptions
Service terminal in DMX units Service terminal in Chorus units

Service terminal in DMX units


Instructions
Starting service terminal session with VDU

Service terminal extensions in DMX units


Descriptions
Service terminal in Chorus units

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Service terminal essentials

Monitoring messages in DMX units


Descriptions
Message monitoring does not work in DMX units Phases of message progression Message monitoring in DMX units

Monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units


Instructions
Message monitoring gets stopped by the computer in Chorus units Messages do not fit into the buffer in Chorus units

Descriptions
IPC message monitoring

Monitoring MIPC messages in Chorus units


Instructions
Message monitoring gets stopped by the computer in Chorus units Messages do not fit into the buffer in Chorus units

Descriptions
MIPC message monitoring

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Related Topics

Starting service terminal session with VDU


Desciptions
Service terminal in DMX units Service terminal in Chorus units

Starting remote service terminal session with MML terminal


Instructions
Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions) Starting remote service terminal session using telnet connection

Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions)
Instructions
Starting remote service terminal session with MML terminal Starting remote service terminal session using telnet connection Remote session fails in Chorus units Service terminal halts in Chorus units

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Service terminal essentials

Starting remote service terminal session using telnet connection


Instructions
Starting remote service terminal sessions with MML terminal Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions)

Switching between different service terminal sessions in DMX units


Descriptions
Service terminal in DMX units

Exiting service terminal session


Descriptions
Service terminal in DMX units

Running service terminal extensions in Chorus units


Descriptions
Service terminal in Chorus units

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Related Topics

Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units


Descriptions
DMX units' service terminal commands

Activating service terminal extensions from another computer unit in DMX units (LEL)
Instructions
Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units Activating service terminal extensions from floppy disk in DMX units (LEL)

Descriptions
Service terminal in DMX units

Activating service terminal extensions from floppy disk in DMX units (LEL)
Instructions
Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units Activating service terminal extensions from another computer unit in DMX units (LEL) Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units

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Service terminal essentials

Descriptions
Service terminal in DMX units

Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units


Instructions
Activating service terminal extensions using the LE command in DMX units Activating service terminal extensions using the LP command in DMX units Activating service terminal extensions from floppy disk in DMX units (LEL)

Descriptions
Service terminal in DMX units

Examining black box in DMX units


Instructions
Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units Storing actor related information in Chorus units Storing unit startup information in Chorus units

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Related Topics

Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units


Instructions
Examining black box in DMX units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units Storing actor related information in Chorus units Storing unit startup information in Chorus units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units

Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units


Instructions
Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units Storing actor related information in Chorus units Storing unit startup information in Chorus units

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Service terminal essentials

Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units


Instructions
Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units Storing actor related information in Chorus units Storing unit startup information in Chorus units

Storing processor and process load in DMX units


Instructions
Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units Storing actor related information in Chorus units Storing unit startup information in Chorus units

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Related Topics

Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units
Instructions
Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units Storing actor related information in Chorus units Storing unit startup information in Chorus units

Storing actor related information in Chorus units


Instructions
Examining black box in DMX units Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units Storing unit startup information in Chorus units

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Service terminal essentials

Storing unit startup information in Chorus units


Instructions
Downloading a black box binary file with FTP in DMX units Storing computer logs using MML commands in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units Storing logs using clog and olog service terminal commands in Chorus units Storing logs using LOGUTI service terminal commands in DMX units Storing actor related information in Chorus units

No service terminal connection in DMX units


Instructions
Storing processor and process load in DMX units

Descriptions
Service terminal in DMX units

Message monitoring does not work in DMX units


Instructions
Monitoring messages in DMX units Storing processor and process load in DMX units

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Related Topics

Descriptions
Message monitoring in DMX units

Remote session fails in Chorus units


Instructions
Starting remote service terminal session using service terminal (including Chorus unit sessions)

Service terminal halts in Chorus units


Descriptions
Service terminal in Chorus units

Message monitoring gets stopped by the computer in Chorus units


Instructions
Monitoring IPC messages in Chorus units Monitoring MIPC messages in Chorus units

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