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TWENTY-THIRD YEAR, NO. 1147 CANADAS POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT NEWSWEEKLY MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012 $4.00
Expect a fall charm
offensive to give
PM a bounce,
says Nanos
Canadas election
system mostly clean,
but corruption, fraud,
dirty tricks do happen,
say political insiders
Federal departments could be forced to dramatically
change way they report billions in spending to Parliament
Atleo urged to do
more for First Nations,
relationship with feds
at a tipping point
PM has time on
his side to reform
Senate, says
Sen. Brown
P
rime Minister Stephen Harp-
ers public approval ratings
have reached an all-time low in
2012, and Nanos Research presi-
dent Nik Nanos says the Conser-
vatives may want to begin rehabili-
tating their leaders brand this fall.
A
s the Supreme Court of Can-
ada weighs into last years
election results in the riding of
Etobicoke Centre, Ont., where an
Ontario Superior Court ruled it
null and void due to voting irregu-
larities, and as the Federal Court
F
ederal government depart-
ments could be forced to dra-
matically change the way they
report to Parliament the billions
they spend annually if the gov-
ernment acts on the unanimous-
ly-approved report released by
the House Government Opera-
tions Committee last month.
Parliament does not effective-
ly fulfill its role and standing com-
mittees are at best giving perfunc-
tory attention to the governments
spending plans,said the report.
The committee released a set
of cross-party recommendations
for improving the way
Parliamentarians review the
government spending estimates,
a system that both MPs and
Parliamentary experts have
called arcane and subject to
partisan abuse.
The Canadian system, Mem-
bers of Parliament, and that
includes government backbenchers,
were having to vote on multi-bil-
lions of expenditures with basically
no information,said NDP MP and
C
hiefs of the Assembly of First
Nations re-elected Shawn
Atleo for a second three-year term
as national chief last week, giving
Mr. Atleos approach to the fed-
eral Conservative government a
second chance, but some observ-
ers say election results would
have been different if those at the
grassroots level had been allowed
P
rime Minister Stephen Harp-
ers point-man on Senate
reform, Alberta Senator Bert
Brown, says the number of his Tory
Upper Chamber colleagues who
are against the PMs Senate reform
bill is small and to expect progress
on the bills passage in the fall.
Please see story on Page 4
Please see story on Page 16
Please see Civil Circles on Page 22 Please see story on Page 5 Please see story on Page 6
PMs approval rating is still the
best, but it has plummeted in 2012,
and pollster Nik Nanos expects the
Tories to begin directly addressing
Stephen Harpers declining
popularity come September.
Meanwhile, Canadas Chief Electoral
Officer Marc Mayrand recently
said the government may have to
regulate contact with voters during
an election campaign.
MPs and Parliamentary experts call the current process arcane and subject to partisan abuse.
More action is needed, not more
studies and discussions which
the government uses as busy
work for the AFN, says critic.
As more Senators reach mandatory
retirement and step down, the more
Prime Minister Stephen Harper
can appoint more reform-minded
Senators, says Senator Bert Brown.
PARLIAMENT: POWER
EXCLUSIVE POLITICAL COVERAGE: NEWS, FEATURES, AND ANALYSIS INSIDE
BY CHRIS PLECASH
BY JESSICA BRUNO
BY LAURA RYCKEWAERT
Donner Prize-
winning
co-author Lori
Turnbull offers
powerful advice
ITS TIME TO DEMOCRATIZE
THE CONSTITUTION, NOW
Peter Kent has a seemingly
lackadaisical approach to
climate change. Exclusive p. 3
Conservative Senator
Don Meredith on the
shootings in Toronto. p. 2
Lori Turnbull, co-author of Democratizing the
Constitution, which won the $50,000 Donner
Prize for the best public policy book in Canada,
has lots to say about Parliaments power. p. 17.
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SCIENCE
Feds mount systematic
campaign against scientific
evidence in decision-making.
Exclusive p. 13
DAVID ANGUS
Outgoing Tory Senator
David Angus on politics and
money. Exclusive p. 7
HILL
CLIMBERS
More changes in the Prime
Ministers Office. p. 19
CLIMATE
CHANGE
Just do it: Tory MP Mike Wallace.
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s
BY JESSICA BRUNO
BY JESSICA BRUNO
AND JAMES GRIGG
HEARD ON
THE HILL
2
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
C
onservative Senator and
ordained minister Don Mere-
dith condemned last weeks shoot-
ing at a neighbourhood barbecue
in Scarborough, in what police
described as the worst incident of
gun violence in the citys recent
history. Two people were killed and
more than 20 were injured by gun-
fire on Monday, July 16.
Sen. Meredith, who is execu-
tive director and co-founder of the
GTA Faith Alliance, an
interfaith group that
works to find solutions
to youth violence, said
that he was disgusted
by what happened in
the neighbourhood
that he had lived in
for several years.
Its shocking
and absolutely
deplorable.
Something
that should
never happen
in any com-
munity across
Canada,he
told The Hill Times.
The shooting happened during
an outdoor community barbecue at
around 10:30 p.m. It is suspected that
both shooters were gang members.
Toronto has seen a spike in
gun violence this summer. On
June 2, two people were killed
and seven were injured in a gang-
related shooting in the food court
of the Eaton shopping centre near
Torontos Dundas Square.
Sen. Meredith has 10 years of
experience campaigning against
youth violence as the executive
director of the GTA Faith Alliance
community organization aimed
at addressing youth violence. He
said that the root of the problem
is the attraction to gangs that
exists in marginalized neighbour-
hoods with disadvantaged youth
who see drug dealing and guns as
their best option.
Sen. Meredith said that the
use of guns is the natural exten-
sion of the drug economy which
results from the hopeless situa-
tions youth in some communities
face.
We need to provide hope to
these young people. One of the
things Ive been saying for the last
10 years is that we need to develop
more programs that engage our
young people in finding jobs,said
Sen. Meredith. One of the things
weve been doing in the GTA Faith
Alliance is training people on tech-
nology and then taking the next
step and placing them with poten-
tial employers. The key is getting
people engaged, encouraged and
empowered through various educa-
tional means in terms of them turn-
ing away from gangs.
He stressed the importance of
community empowerment and said
people need to become more vocal.
Said Sen. Meredith: They can-
not be silent. If they continue to be
silent then theyre empowering the
drug dealers and gun runners.
Sen. Meredith has developed
and advocated for a National Youth
Strategy which he says is about
engagement, encouragement and
support and having a proactive
approach to youth violence.
If we dont deal with it and
have some sort of national strategy
youre going to see [Scarborough]
repeated again and again and then
were going back to being reactive
instead of proactive,he said.
Terrific staffer seeks fitness
challenge backer
Heather Tessier, 51, who was
ranked No. 9 in this years Terrific
25 Staffer Survey, is 35 days into
a 365-day challenge to get fit for
next summers National Capital
Fitness Expo. Ms. Tessier is plan-
ning to compete in next years
body-building figure competition.
Ms. Tessier, who is a zumba
instructor and an assistant to Con-
servative MP Lois Brown (Newmar-
ket-Aurora, Ont.), said that she was
inspired to take the challenge after
attending the latest National Capital
Fit Day Expo this past June at Otta-
was Capital Exhibition Centre.
I went to that competition
last June and I got inspired, and
decided to do it. Im the type of
person whos all or nothing,Ms.
Tessier told The Hill Times. Ive
always wanted to do it, its one of
the things on my bucket list... I
figure whats holding me back?
Ms. Tessier is currently train-
ing six days a week, including
three days with a personal trainer.
Her routine includes an hour of
weight training followed by a half
hour of interval cardio training.
Shes documenting her progress
on her blog, changesin365days.
blogspot.ca, and is seeking spon-
sorship from companies that make
womens skin care products.
Im trying to target ladies
who are 50 plus, who are sitting
on their butts after supper eat-
ing ice cream and maple syrup
instead of getting out,she said.
Franke goes to
Ottawa
Artisan muck-
raker and recent
Hill Times Quizzi-
cal Twitter Sum-
mer Challenge win-
ner Franke
James was
in Ottawa
last week
to enjoy
her prize
two tickets
to the Thurs-
day, July 19
performance
of Wicked at National Arts Centre.
Readers were asked to come up
with a headline for the Prime Min-
isters most recent Cabinet shouffl
that saw Julian Fantino (Vaughan,
Ont.) replace Bev the other OJOda
at CIDA, and Bernie Valcourt add
military procurement to his growing
list of minister of state titles.
Ms. James won with the Public
Image Ltd.-inspired headline This
is NOT a Cabinet shuffle: Oda cut.
Fantino scores. Valcourt goes on
defence,which the non-partisan
Hill Times Quizzical Challenge
secretariat deemed sufficiently
cheeky.
The Toronto-based artist made
headlines last year after Canadian
officials at embassies in Europe
pressured organizers to withdraw
support for Ms. James 20-city
European tour of artworks critical
of Albertas oilsands development.
Through access to information
requests, Ms. James confirmed
that diplomats blocked Ms. James
work from being shown at Cana-
dian embassies in Europe, and
had pressured private sponsors to
withdraw support. Last November
she brought the offending art-
works to Ottawa for what became
her Banned on the Hill art show.
The self-described inconve-
nient artist and her husband Bil-
liam James are now collaborat-
ing on a project to highlight the
Harper governments silencing of
dissenting opinion.
Theres so much proof of the
government silencing people,Ms.
James told The Hill Times, who
credited last years spat with the
Canadian government for focusing
her creative energy on issues of
freedom of speech and censorship.
Ms. James recently penned an
essay on applying the consensus-
based Forest Stewardship Council
model to Canadas oil and gas
industry for the September issue
of Corporate Knights Magazine.
This has been hugely success-
ful for forest industry steward-
ship,Ms. James said. I think they
can apply the same thinking to oil
stewardship.
Ms. James art and writing can
be found at www.frankejames.com.
Senior public servants move on
to retirement, new challenges
Prime Minister Stephen
Harper announced more changes
on Friday afternoon to the senior
ranks of the public.
John Knubley, currently
deputy minister of Agriculture
and Agri-Food, will become the
deputy minister of Industry, effec-
tive Sept. 17.
Suzanne Vinet, currently presi-
dent of the Economic Develop-
ment Agency of Canada for the
Regions of Quebec, will become
deputy minister of Agriculture and
Agri-Food, also effective Sept. 17.
Daphne Meredith, currently
chief Human Resources Officer,
will become deputy minister of
Western Economic Diversifica-
tion, effective Sept. 4.
Daniel Watson, currently deputy
minister of Western Economic Diver-
sification, will become chief Human
Resources Officer, effective Sept. 4.
Paul Rochon, currently associ-
ate deputy minister of Finance,
will become associate deputy
minister of Health and concur-
rently special adviser to the min-
ister of Finance on negotiations
for a Canadian securities regula-
tor, effective Aug. 7.
The Prime Minister also
announced that Richard Dicerni,
deputy minister of Industry will
retire from the public service on
July 30.
Meanwhile, there were other
changes made to the senior ranks
of the public service a few weeks
ago too.
Mary Chaput took the helm of
Veterans Affairs last week, upon the
retirement of long-serving public
servant Suzanne Tining. Ms. Tining
was deputy minister of the depart-
ment since 2007. Prior to that, she
worked in the Privy Council Office,
at the Economic Development
Agency for Qubec, and spent more
than 20 years at Transport Canada.
Ms. Chaput has been at Veter-
ans Affairs since October 2010,
when she was appointed associ-
ate minister. In that time, a prior-
ity was the departments five-year
transformation plan. Prior to her
time at Veterans she was execu-
tive vice-president and chief oper-
ating officer at the Public Health
Agency of Canada. Ms. Chaput
started her career in the federal
public service in 1999 when she
became director general of the
Immigration and Refugee Board.
Replacing Ms. Chaput as associ-
ate deputy minister is Anne Marie
Smart. Ms. Smart comes from the
Privy Council Office where she
was special advisor, communica-
tions and consultations. Ms. Smart
has also worked at Environment
Canada and Human Resources.
One of Ms. Smarts colleagues at
PCO will be taking on more work
as of August 1. David Maloney,
senior advisor to PCO, will also
be responsible for the Regulatory
Cooperation Council, a Canada-U.S.
body announced by the two heads of
state in February 2011. The council is
meant to increase co-ordination and
transparency between the two coun-
tries on regulations.
Mr. Maloneys career in pub-
lic service started in 1982, in the
research department of the Bank of
Canada. He also worked for 12 years
at Finance Canada. Before joining
PCO in January of this year he was
executive vice-president of CIDA.
Bob Hamilton will soon be
moving out of his office at Trea-
sury Board Secretariat, where
he is currently senior associate
secretary, into new digs at Envi-
ronment Canada, where he will
become the departments new
deputy minister on August 1.
He has worked at Environ-
ment before. In 2009 he was asso-
ciate deputy minister. Mr. Ham-
ilton replaces Paul Boothe, who
retires from his 33-year career in
the public service on July 31. Mr.
Boothe has been at the head of
the department for two years.
Mr. Boothe has held senior
positions at Finance, Industry and
Treasury Board, and was the Sec-
retary of the Treasury Board in
Saskatchewan.
On August 27 Marie Lemay,
who has been at the head of
the National Capital Commis-
sion since 2008, will be going to
Infrastructure Canada, where she
will be associate deputy minister.
Ms. Lemay has a background in
municipal administration, and she
has worked for the city of Gatineau
and the municipality of Chelsea, as
well as helming the Canada Coun-
cil of Professional Engineers.
FEATURE
BUZZ
HEARD HILL
ON
THE
Tory Senator Meredith urges public to be more
vocal against community violence; Tessier
enters 365-day-get-physical challenge; and PM
changes senior ranks of federal public service
B Y C H R I S P L E C A S H A N D J A M E S G R I G G
CORRECTIONS: THE HILL
TIMES, JULY 16 ISSUE
Re: Canada still has no plan
to address climate change,(The
Hill Times, July 16, p. 23, by Green
Party Leader Elizabeth May).
Ms. May incorrectly wrote that
one Parliamentary secretary said
anyone opposed to pipelines and
tankers was against Canada,and
that when asked to withdraw the
remark as un-parliamentary, she
refused. Conservative MP Shelly
Glover, Parliamentary secretary
to the minister of Finance, in an
exchange in the House on Feb. 15,
2012, with NDP MP Peter Julian,
accused the NDP of being anti-
Canadafor not supporting the
governments priorities. Ms. May
attempted to raise it as a point
of order, but the House Speaker
didnt allow it. The Hill Times apol-
ogizes for publishing this mistake.

Re: Senate Energy, Environ-


ment Committee to release major
report on Canadas energy future
this week,(The Hill Times, July
16, p. 24). The story incorrectly
reported that the Senate Energy
Committee held more than 37
meetings. In fact, the committee
meet 100 times. The Hill Times
apologizes for this error.

CORRECTION: THE HILL


TIMES ONLINE, JULY 19
Re: Doctors, scientists vow
to continue protests against
Harper governments agenda,
(The Hill Times online, July 19).
The story incorrectly reported
that the Council of Canadians
was behind organizing the July
10 so-called Death of Science
rally on Parliament Hill. The
Council of Canadians helped
promote the event, along with a
number of other organizations.
Conservative
Senator and pas-
tor Don Meredith.
Lets get physical: Heather Tessier,
Ive always wanted to do it, its one
of the things on my bucket list.
Hill Times Quizzical
Summer Challenge
winner Franke James.
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3
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
T
ORONTOEnvironment Minis-
ter Peter Kents seemingly lacka-
daisical approach to climate change
stands in sharp contrast to the grow-
ing incidence of extreme weather
events scientists can now connect
to climate change. The high tem-
peratures and drought conditions
that this summer are causing many
food commodity prices to soar, with
corn now at record levels, are one
example of how climate change is
now impacting on our lives. What
climate scientists have been predict-
ing for some timevolatile weather
with droughts, floods and extreme
heat wavesis now becoming a
more regular occurrence.
This years Summer in March
saw temperatures soar, followed
by a return to frost conditions,
decimating apple and cherry crops
in Ontario and Great Lakes states.
Drought is currently plaguing
much of the U.S. Midwest corn
belt and parts of southern Ontario,
while record temperatures in cities
such as Washington have caused
deaths and destruction. Forest
fires have devastated parts of Col-
orado. Britain has been inundated
with massive rainfalls, giving the
wettest-ever April-June. Russia
has experienced flash floods while
drought conditions are threaten-
ing the grain crops of Russia,
Kazakhstan, China and India.
As The New Scientist warned
in an editorial, our weather is not
only becoming more extreme as
a result of global warming, it is
becoming even more extreme than
climate scientists predicted,so
that we need to start planning for
ever more ferocious heat waves,
storms, floods and droughts.
This is the future we are building
for todays children, because of
todays inadequate policies, with
the world moving to a planet that
is four degrees Celsius hotter by
2060 and with more than two bil-
lion additional mouths to feed.
There is now growing evidence
that human-induced climate change
is contributing to extreme weather
events we have been experiencing
in recent years. A series of articles
by climate scientists published
by the American Meteorological
Society shows how the accumula-
tive effect of rising greenhouse gas
emissions increases the probability
of extreme weather.
While the experts caution that
climate change cannot be blamed for
every instance of an extreme weath-
er event, reminding us that we have
always had bad weather, scientists
are now in a position to demonstrate
that climate change is playing a role
in some extreme weather events.
For example, the scientists are
able to show that the harsh drought
that hit Texas last year was about 20
times more likely to have occurred
due to climate change than because
of natural vagaries in climate. Like-
wise, the unusually warm weather
in Britain last year was 60 times
more likely than due to natural
variations. The scientists exam-
ined a number of other extreme
weather events from 2011, including
Thailands floods and East Afri-
can drought, as well as the Texas
drought and hot British weather.
Yet asked recently whether it was
time, since we are barely half-way
to meeting our 2020 greenhouse
gas emission reduction target, for
the federal government to look at
carbon pricing, Kent told The Hill
Times that its been off the table for
some time.Various forms of carbon
pricing, such as a carbon tax or a
cap-and-trade system, Kent claimed
would do nothing to reduce the
greenhouse gas megatonnage. We
believe sector-by-sector regulations
will reduce actual GHG emissions.
This claim that carbon pric-
ing would do nothingto reduce
greenhouse gas emissions is only
true if the price was set so low that
it would not influence business
investments or consumer choices.
But British Columbias carbon tax
appears to be having an impact and
there is considerable economics
research to demonstrate not only
that a carbon price would work but
that it is the preferred way to deal
with climate change. A carbon price
not only changes investment behav-
iour, since businesses or consum-
ers have to take the future carbon
price into account, but also provides
a strong incentive for innovative
entrepreneurs who know there will
be a growing market for low-carbon
innovations they develop.
A recent study by three econo-
mists at the International Mon-
etary Fund argued, contrary to
Kents position, that well-designed
fiscal policies (emission taxes or
their cap-and-trade equivalents,
with allowance auctions) should
form the centrepiece of efforts to
promote greener economies.
One reason, they said, is that
there is growing acceptance among
policymakers that emissions pricing
instruments are far more effective
at exploiting the entire range of
emissions reduction opportunities
than are regulatory approaches.
As a result, they recommended
levying environmental taxes
directly on potential damages
from the carbon and local pollu-
tion content of coal, natural gas
and oil products as these fuels
enter the economy, with a system
of refunds for emissions capture
at downstream facilities.
Kents reliance on heavy-handed
regulatory schemes is strange
reasoning for a conservative since
Kents regulatory approach entails
much more government interven-
tion in business decision-making
than a carbon price, which relies on
the market to respond. With carbon
pricing renewable forms of energy
would not need big public subsidies
or feed-in tariffs in order to be com-
petitive and many forms of energy
efficiency in buildings and trans-
portation would become more eco-
nomically attractive without having
to offer subsidies or tax incentives.
Kent is most unlikely to be our
environment minister in 2020 so
will not be around to explain our
more extreme weather events. But
he will likely be around to experi-
ence more instances of extreme
weather and it wont be pretty.
David Crane can be reached at
crane@interlog.com.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Kents reliance on heavy-
handed regulatory
schemes strange
With carbon pricing renewable forms of energy would not need big public
subsidies or feed-in tariffs in order to be competitive and many forms of
energy efficiency in buildings and transportation would become more
economically attractive without having to offer subsidies or tax incentives.
OPINION
CLIMATE CHANGE & POLITICS
POLICY BRIEFING
CONSUMER
SAFETY &
REGULATION
Publication Date: Aug. 20, 2012 Booking Deadline: Aug. 15, 2012
For more information or to reserve your government relations and public affairs advertising
space, contact The Hill Times display advertising department at 613-688-8825.
I
n this rst-ever Consumer Safety and Regulation Policy
Brieng, The Hill Times will take an in-depth look into
how the federal governments massive omnibus budget
bill will update Canadas food regulations and speed
up the approval process on new health claims, food
additives, and chemical contamination caps. Well also
explore Health Canadas new regulations on foods and
soft drinks boosted with high levels of certain vitamins
and minerals.
The Hill Times will examine the Competition Bureaus
concerns that Canadas credit card issuers have established
a system that obstructs the normal rules of the marketplace
and costs consumers billions of dollars annually.
Well also delve into the possibility of the CRTC
taking a more interventionist role in the $17-billion
cellular sector by developing a national code for
wireless services and well look at the CRTCs
decision to bring in new rules that will lower the
sound of loud commercials on television.
Well examine the issue of Canadian consumers
trying to take control and lower their debt burdens
amid warnings from Bank of Canada Governor
Mark Carney and other policy makers.
Top political and government players to take part.
BY David Crane
It really is the environment: Environment Minister Peter Kents seemingly lacka-
daisical approach to climate change stands in sharp contrast to the growing inci-
dence of extreme weather events scientists can now connect to climate change.
Photograph by Jake Wright, The Hill Times
4
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
This coming fall I would expect
that theres going to be some sort
of charm offensive to help slowly
get Stephen Harpers brand back to
where the Conservatives have had
it for the last number of years, Mr.
Nanos told The Hill Times follow-
ing the release of his firms latest
national trend lines last week.
Prior to his brand taking a hit,
he had a lot of coattails that the
government and the party could
ride on. Those coattails are shorter
now,Mr. Nanos said.
Nanos Research routinely
charts public approval of feder-
al leaders through its leadership
index, which is the total of the
percentages of respondents who
believe a given leader to be most
competent, trustworthy, and have
the best vision for the country.
According to Nanos Researchs
recent polling, 23 per cent of sur-
vey respondents said that they
trust Stephen Harper (Carlgary
Southwest, Alta.) the most among
federal leaders. Some 27.1 per cent
responded that the Prime Minister
was the most competent federal
leader, and 22.6 per cent said the
Prime Minister had the best vision
for the country. The sum of the per-
centages gives Stephen Harper a
leadership index score of 72.7.
The Prime Minister continues to
enjoy a strong advantage over the
other federal leaders in terms of pub-
lic approval of his leadership. NDP
leader Tom Mulcair (Outremont,
Que.) was a distant second with a
leadership score of 46.8, 15.8 per cent
of respondents said Mr. Mulcair was
the most trustworthy federal leader,
12.8 per cent said he was the most
competent, and 18.2 per cent said he
had the best vision for Canada.
Interim Liberal leader Bob
Raes (Toronto Centre, Ont.) lead-
ership index score improved
slightly in the month following his
announcement that he would not
seek the permanent leadership of
his party. Mr. Rae rivalled Mr. Mul-
cair with a leadership score of 41.5,
14 per cent of respondents said Mr.
Rae was the most trustworthy, 14.5
per cent said he was the most com-
petent, and 13 per cent said that he
had the best vision for the country.
But while the Prime Minister
continues to enjoy a strong lead
over his rivals, the long-term trend
line for the Prime Ministers public
approval has been in falling since
last fall, when Mr. Harpers score
was at an all-time high of 114.2. In
September, 36.5 per cent of respon-
dents said he was most trustwor-
thy, 40.9 per cent said he was most
competent, and 36.8 per cent said
he had the best vision for Canada.
Mr. Harpers overall leadership
score fell to 97.2 in October and
stabilized in that range in the final
months of 2011.
Public confidence in the Prime
Minister dropped even more dra-
matically beginning in Febru-
ary, 2012, when details began to
emerge of an Elections Canada
investigation into allegations
of vote suppression during the
2011 federal election campaign.
Between February and May, Mr.
Harpers leadership index plum-
meted more than 36 points from
102.4 to 65.8, and has improved
only slightly in the months since.
Mr. Nanos observed that Prime
Minister Harpers reputation as a
federal leader has declined more
significantly than the reputation
of his own party.
Theres been a more dramatic
drop in Stephen Harpers person-
al brand, compared to that of the
Conservatives, noted Mr. Nanos,
who said that public disappoint-
ment with the handling of the F-35
procurement and costing have
been particularly damaging to the
Prime Minister, the government,
and the Conservatives.
The Conservatives brand has
been built around economic stew-
ardship and competency,Mr. Nanos
said. For a lot of Canadians, wheth-
er they vote for the Conservatives
or another party, theyre wondering
how the Conservatives could have
made mistakes in terms of estimat-
ing the costs related to the F-35.
The Nanos survey is the latest
in a series of summer polls that
reflect a decline in public confi-
dence in the government.
A July 13 poll by EKOS Research
showed support for the Tories down
9.4 percentage points over last
Mays election results, to 30.2 per
cent. The poll put the New Demo-
crats two percentage points ahead
of the Tories, with 32.3 per cent sup-
port, while the Liberals were just
below 20 per cent, and Green Party
support was at 10 per cent.
EKOS President Frank Graves
told The Hill Times that not since
1989 has a government seen such
a significant drop in support with-
in one year of securing a majority
mandate at the polls. That year
marked the beginning of the end
for Brian Mulroneys Progressive
Conservative government. Mr.
Mulroney entered his second term
with 169 seats, but stepped aside
as party leader in 1993. His party
was reduced to two seats in the
House of Commons following the
1993 federal election.
Mr. Graves said that it was too
far from the next federal elec-
tion, slated for the fall of 2015, to
tell how current numbers would
impact the Conservative govern-
ment in the long run, but agreed
that issues such as the F-35 pro-
curement, vote suppression alle-
gations, and the governments
omnibus budget bill have dragged
down public approval for the gov-
ernment and the Prime Minister.
Its not that the public are
reacting to any individual pratfall.
It seems to be more of a critical
mass of frustration with the gov-
ernments management style the
way theyre conducting themselves
in office,Mr. Graves observed.
A June poll by Forum Research
and The National Post put sup-
port for the Conservatives at 30
per cent, while 37 per cent of
respondents said that they would
vote for the NDP, and 22 per cent
said that they would vote Liberal.
June polling by Angus Reid
showed the government and offi-
cial opposition neck and neck,
with the Conservatives polling at
34 per cent, the NDP at 35 per cent,
and the Liberals at 19 per cent.
Nanos Researchs July poll put
the Conservatives ahead of the NDP
by 3.3 percentage points, with the
parties receiving 33.6 and 30.3 per
cent support, respectively. The Liber-
als trailed with 26.5 per cent support.
A si gni fi cant number of
respondents did not approve of
any of the federal leaders in the
latest Nano polling14.8 per cent
said none of the leaders were
trustworthy, 12.5 per cent said
none of the leaders were compe-
tent, and 12.3 per cent said that
none of the leaders had the best
vision for Canada, giving None of
them a leadership score of 39.6.
cplecash@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
NEWS
PRIME MINISTER & CONSERVATIVES
PMs approval rating is still the best, but it has plummeted in 2012, and pollster Nik Nanos expects the
Conservatives will begin directly addressing Stephen Harpers declining popularity come September.
Continued from Page 1
Expect a fall charm offensive to
give PM a bounce, says Nanos
Leadership score: Prime Minister Stephen Harper, pictured July 6, at the Calgary Stampede. The sum of the percentages gives Mr. Harper a leadership index score of 72.7. But while the Prime Minister
continues to enjoy a strong lead over his rivals, the long-term trend line for the Prime Ministers public approval has been in falling since last fall, when Mr. Harpers score was at an all-time high of 114.2.
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THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
to vote, as mounting, widespread
frustration with the governments
failure to act on First Nations
issues has brought the AFN to a
tipping point.
The chiefs who are sitting here
[voting], theyre the conservative
ones. The feeling out in the com-
munities and out on the streets
is more radical. If they were to
have had the election open to the
general Indian public, we would
have found much more different
leadership, said Doug Cuthand,
a member of the Cree Little Pine
First Nation in Saskatchewan and
a columnist for The Star Phoenix.
Some 540 chiefs voted in last
weeks election. Mr. Atleo was re-
elected on the third ballot of the
day, receiving 67 per cent of the
vote in the end.
Under the AFNs charter, a
national chief must receive at least
60 per cent support. Only chiefs of
the AFN can vote to elect a nation-
al chief, and whether a reserve has
a population of 200 or 2,000, its a
one-chief-one-vote system.
Mr. Atleo, who had been criti-
cized as being close to the Conser-
vative government and not vocal
enough, told the First Nations that
he will fight to stop any mining,
logging, and pipeline projects pro-
ceeding without the consent of
First Nations.
We will stand in front of efforts
to sweep away our titles and rights,
Mr. Atleo said on July 19 after win-
ning the leadership, adding that
First Nations must be made part-
ners in the development of the
major resources on their land.
Mr. Atleo was challenged by
seven candidates, including four
female candidates. Interestingly,
the gender equilibrium remained
in place throughout all three bal-
lots, with one man and one woman
being knocked off or withdrawing
after each round of voting.
Pamela Palmater, a Mikmaq
lawyer whose family comes from
the Eel River Bar First Nation in
New Brunswick, placed second to
Mr. Atleo, and won 27.5 per cent
support on the third ballot. Ms.
Palmater, an associate professor
in politics and public administra-
tion at Ryerson University, and an
off-reserve, urban aboriginal voice,
told APTN that the unprecedent-
ed number of candidates who ran
indicates their growing concerns.
We [had] seven candidates
challenging Atleo, said Ms. Pal-
mater. I think thats almost his-
tory. So for me, and what Im hear-
ing, that is pretty strong evidence
that were not happy with whats
happening.
But Herb George, a Wetsuweten
hereditary chief of the Frog Clan
and current president of the Nation-
al Centre for First Nations Gover-
nance, told The Hill Times that the
AFN chiefs sent a clear message
that they need continuity in the
relationship between First Nations
and the Crown.
I think thats what the chiefs in
the assembly were looking for was
the continued advocacy of national
chief Atleo. The way he conducts
himself, his diplomatic style, is
what they need, said Mr. George.
But the other side of it is that talk
at the assembly was the fact that
weve got to get organized in our
communications and within our
nations to deal with those issues
regarding land and resources.
In the lead-up to the election,
there were rumours of an anyone
but Atleo movement as a result of
widespread criticism that Mr. Atleo
was under the thumb of Prime
Minister Stephen Harper (Calgary
Southwest, Alta.) and the Conserva-
tive government, but Mr. Cuthand
said with all the candidates, votes
never coalesced around one Atleo-
alternative. Mr. Atleo started strong
on the first ballot with 284 votes, or
53 per cent support, and came just
three votes short of 60 per cent on
the second ballot.
Meanwhile, the AFN is at a
tipping point in its approach to
relations with the federal govern-
ment, Mr. Cuthand told The Hill
Times, adding that theres a point
where you just cannot work with
them anymore.
There s no negotiation
it started with the Kelowna
Accord. The first week that the
Harper government came in with
a minority, they scrapped an
accord that had been worked out
in detail with the provinces and
First Nations and it would have
gone a long ways because there
was a funding disparity, and there
still is a large funding disparity
between First Nations needs and
what theyre getting, said Mr.
Cuthand. Theres a strong feel-
ing that were being bullied, and
that the First Nations are in quite
a bit of trouble and the message
is not getting out there. So theres
a strong sense of private frustra-
tion and anger growing.
Mr. Atleo is a hereditary chief
from the Ahousaht First Nation
on Vancouver Island in B.C., and
as AFN national chief, will be the
top liaison between First Nation
chiefs and various levels of the
federal government.
On April 23, at a Canadian
Club of Toronto luncheon, Mr.
Atleo said in order to achieve true
reconciliation there must be an
economic partnership between
aboriginal communities and the
rest of Canada.
Almost every resource devel-
opment activity currently operat-
ing or planned is occurring within
200 kilometers of a First Nations
community and right in the mid-
dle of our traditional territories,
said Mr. Atleo.
In his first term as chief, Mr.
Atleos established a national panel
on First Nations on-reserve edu-
cation in 2010 and organized the
Crown-First Nations meeting held
in December 2011, which was seen
as an important step forward in dia-
logue with the federal government.
But since that meeting, the
chiefs have said they felt muzzled
by Prime Minister Harpers gov-
ernment.
Marilyn Poitras, a Mtis and
an assistant professor in the Uni-
versity of Saskatchewans law fac-
ulty, told The Hill Times that more
action is needed, and not more
studies and discussions, which
she said the government uses as
busy workfor the AFN.
On Mr. Atleos road to re-election
he was told that he needs to take a
harder line with the government.
Ms. Poitras said national chiefs
have the potential for powerful
leadership, but are restricted by
the fact that the federal govern-
ment controls their funding.
If you can t disempower
somebody with a stroke of a pen
and a chequebook I think that
of course you have more power,
said Ms. Poitras. Shawn Atleo, I
think, is trying to go about this in
a way that he is taking measured,
contemplative steps about what
he says and where he says it. ... I
think he has a potential for lead-
ership that could turn the corner.
The Department of Aboriginal
Affairs underwent a 2.7 per cent cut
this yeara reduction of $26.9-mil-
lion this year, $60.1-million next
year and $165.6-million in 2014-
15one of the smallest depart-
mental trims as part of the govern-
ments cost-cutting measures. The
government has also committed
$175-million over three years to
fund on-reserve education.
But NDP MP and aborigi-
nal affairs critic Jean Crowder
(Nanaimo-Cowichan, B.C.) told
The Hill Times that many First
Nations communities are already
so behind financially that any
kind of reduction in funding
makes a bigger difference.
On July 16, the Canadian Coun-
cil of Chief Executives released
a report prepared for provincial
leaders which urged governments
to work with aboriginal communi-
ties as full partners in developing
energy and mining projects, and
to help train their workforce so
First Nations can participate and
share the wealth of business ini-
tiatives in their territories.
I think thats a huge develop-
ment as an external or third party
coming inand saying, wait a min-
ute here. And frankly, I think its
one of the few things thats going
to put any kind of brakes on the
Harper machine, said Ms. Poitras
in an interview with The Hill Times.
A share of resource wealth
would provide First Nations com-
munities with an economic founda-
tion, making them less reliant on
funding from the Department of
Aboriginal Affairs, and would open
up employment opportunities. First
Nations communities argue that
just as they have a right to the land,
they have a right to the resources it
produces and a right to weigh in on
environmental assessments.
Theres some everyday issues
that face First Nations people that
are pretty universal, that unfortu-
nately unite a lot of colonialized
communities. Theyre the issues that
are some pretty basic ones: health
issues, poverty, education, justice
issues, maintaining language, eco-
nomic developments within commu-
nities, employment issues. Theres
really foundational issues that face a
lot of communities, Can I drink the
water thats coming out of my tap
today?said Ms. Poitras.
In October 2011, as temperatures
in Canada dropped, the First Nation
community of Attawapiskat in
Northern Ontario declared a state of
emergency due to a severe housing
shortage. Many residents were liv-
ing in tents or other temporary shel-
ters, and many homes lacked water,
electricity or proper sewage dispos-
alall factors that directly impact
health and quality of life. The drastic
conditions in Attawapiskat sparked
a flurry of national attention, but
they were far from new or unique,
and Attawapiskat became the case
in point for renewed national discus-
sion around the range of issues that
continue to face First Nations com-
munities, from housing to education
to economic opportunities, which
are all interconnected.
Education and child welfare
are huge i ssues f or Fi rst
Nations communities who are
still suffering the impact of the
residential school system.
A federal two per cent cap on
funding for First Nations schools,
introduced in 1996, has left the First
Nations education system under-
funded. Less than half of First
Nation youth graduate high school
and only eight per cent of First
Nations, Mtis and Inuit have a uni-
versity degree, compared to 23 per
cent of Canadas non-indigenous
population, and many First Nation
communities are without a school,
and many more have schools in
portable trailers or schools that
require extensive renovations. Mr.
Atleo has previously estimated that
$500-million would be needed to
bring First Nations schools up to
speed with the rest of Canada.
Though it varies by commu-
nity, First Nations communities
in Canada are dealing with high
suicide rates. Health Canada
reports that suicide rates, which
have an impact upon the entire
community, are five to seven times
higher for First Nations youth,
compared with non-Aboriginal
youth. As recently as last May, the
Cowichan Tribes on central Van-
couver Island in B.C. declared a
state of emergency following four
suicides in two months, and even
more suicide attempts.
The issue of violence against
aboriginal women has garnered
international attention. In 2004,
Amnesty International reported
that aboriginal women between
the ages of 25 to 44 were five
times more likely than other
Canadian women of the same age
range to die of violence. And in
2008, the United Nations called
on the Canadian government to
investigate the deaths and disap-
pearances of hundreds of aborigi-
nal women in 2008. Since 1980,
more than 600 aboriginal women
have gone missing or have been
murdered. There have been recent
mounting calls for a national
inquiry into missing and mur-
dered aboriginal women.
Unemployment among aborig-
inal Canadians, both on and off
reserve, is significantly higher
than the national rate of 6.6 per
cent, according to the 2006 census.
That year, 23.1 per cent of First
Nations people living on reserve
were unemployed, while 12.3 per
cent of First Nations people living
off reserve were unemployed.
Ms. Crowder said First Nations
people havent seen the kinds of
gains that they had hoped for after
the residential school apology
delivered by Mr. Harper in 2008,
and people are losing patience.
lrykewaert@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Atleo urged to do more for
First Nations, relationship
with feds at a tipping point
More action is needed,
not more studies and
discussions which the
government uses as busy
workfor the AFN,says critic.
NEWS
FIRST NATIONS & GOVERNMENT
Continued from Page 1
First Ballot:
Shawn Atleo: 284
Pamela Palmater: 95
Diane Kelly: 39
Terrance Nelson: 35
Ellen Gabriel: 33
Bill Erasmus: 29
Joan Jack: 20
George Stanley: 5
Second Ballot:
Shawn Atleo: 318
Pamela Palmater: 107
Bill Erasmus: 34
Diane Kelly: 34
Terrance Nelson: 25
Ellen Gabriel: 17
Third Ballot:
Shawn Atleo: 341
Pamela Palmater: 141
Bill Erasmus: 30
Diane Kelly: 0
AFN National Chief
Election Results:
Shawn Atleo.
6
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
I can definitely say to you
without qualification that they are
a minority,Sen. Brown said of the
dissenters, though he declined to
name names or specify how many
of the Conservatives 57 Senators
disagreed with legislation to intro-
duce term limits and provincial
Senate elections.
But some Senators who dis-
agree with the proposed changes,
which are outlined in bill C-7, cur-
rently at second reading before
the House, have gone public.
Quebec Conservative Sen.
David Angus, who retired on July
21 after 19 years in the Red Cham-
ber, told The Hill Times that the
Senate cannot be elected without
amending the Constitution.
I am personally against an
elected Senate but Im not against
reform, Sen. Angus told The Hill
Times last week, adding that he is
a very loyal Conservative.
Sen. Angus said in his view the
Senate needs to be modernized
and made accountable, but that the
current bill, which gives the prov-
inces the option to hold elections
to select nominees, who would
then be appointed by the Prime
Minister, is not the way to go.
Its very hard to amend the
Constitution. I think if we want to
amend the Constitution we should
face up to it. I dont think you can
make an elected Senate without a
constitutional amendment, thats
my legal view,Sen. Angus said.
I dont believe in tinkering with
the Constitution, but Im a very
loyal Conservative. And Mr. Harp-
er has consistently said since he
went into public life that he would
like to help reform the Senate and
therefore I think he feels commit-
ted to that. There are many ways
to reform the Senate, Sen. Angus
said, a lawyer by profession.
Do I have the answer? No.
But let the premiers, the prov-
inces and the federal government
meet in a constitutional confer-
ence and decide how they want to
do it,he said.
The proposed bill also limits
Senators appointed after October
2008 to either serving a nine-year
term or retiring at the established
age of 75, whichever comes first.
A Senators term would officially
begin whenever the reform legis-
lation is passed. If passed in the
fall, the term would expire in 2021.
With Sen. Anguss departure
last week, there are 57 Conser-
vative Senators, 40 Liberals, one
Progressive Conservative and two
independents. There are now five
vacancies: two in Ontario, one in
Nova Scotia, one in New Bruns-
wick and one in Quebec. More
Senators are expected to retire this
fall. There are 105 seats in total.
Another Quebec Senator,
Pierre Claude Nolin, has also spo-
ken out against the reforms, but
declined to be interviewed by The
Hill Times as the bill is not yet
before the Senate.
Sen. Brown said that time is
on the Prime Ministers side when
it comes to getting the reforms
passed, as more Senators would
be reaching the mandatory retire-
ment age and stepping down. He
deflected the idea that this sug-
gests it is Conservatives appoint-
ed by prime minister Brian Mul-
roney in the early 1990s who are
opposed to the reforms.
I dont know about the Mul-
roney era, but Im just saying that
the more time goes by, the more
people reach 75 years of age and
they automatically leave the Sen-
ate,he said.
As the older members leave,
Mr. Harper (Calgary Southwest,
Alta.) has the opportunity to
appoint reform-minded replace-
ments. Since being elected in
2006, he has appointed 46 Sena-
tors, and 42 are still sitting.
Mr. Mulroney appointed both
Sen. Nolin and Sen. Angus in 1993,
but the problem is not just with
older Senators. Some Senators
who were appointed by Mr. Harper
on the promise of working towards
Senate reform are also proving
problematic, said Mr. Brown.
Some of them are going back
on their wordthats a personal
decision on their own, said Mr.
Brown.
The caucus issues affected Mr.
Harpers decision to introduce his
reform bill in the House of Com-
mons rather than the Senate when
it was tabled in June 2011, said
Sen. Brown.
I think some of the reaction of
the Senators led the Prime Minister
to think it was just a lot easier to go
forward in the Commons,he said.
This is the eighth time that
Mr. Harper has attempted to pass
reform legislation since being
elected prime minister in 2006.
The previous seven bills have died
on the order paper due to proroga-
tion or elections calls, and none
made it past second reading.
Sen. Brown said there would
very definitely be progress on
the legislation in the fall. How-
ever, the bill faces significant criti-
cism from the Liberals and the
New Democrats.
You need to consult with the
provinces. You simply cant do it by
an act of Parliament, said Liberal
Nova Scotia Senator James Cowan,
the opposition leader in the Senate.
Sen. Cowan said that while he
is not personally opposed to term
limits or elections, the bill leaves a
lot of questions about how Parlia-
ment would work with an elected
Senate unanswered. He also said
that the Liberals dont think that
Senate reform without Constitu-
tional amendment is lawful.
Sen. Brown said that ultimate-
ly, full reform of the Senate would
require constitutional amend-
ments, which can only be done
with the agreement of seven prov-
inces holding at least 50 per cent
of Canadas population.
He said that is why his work liais-
ing with provincial governments
and persuading them to introduce
Senate reform legislation in their
own legislatures is important.
Thats why I work, why Ive
gone across the country four times
in my history talking to various
premiers and their governments,
he said.
Sen. Brown, Canadas second
Senator to be appointed after
being selected by a provincial
elections contest, will retire next
year when he turns 75. He leaves
Alberta Conservative Senator
Betty Unger, Canadas only other
current elected Senator, behind.
Sen. Unger was appointed in Jan.
2012. The very first Senator to be
appointed after getting elected
was Albertas Stan Waters in 1990.
So far, Alberta is the only prov-
ince to have held elections for
Senate nominees. Saskatchewan
has the legal framework to do it
too, but has yet to hold an election
as it would like the federal gov-
ernment to pay for it.
British Columbia is currently
considering a private members
bill on holding elections, some-
thing Premier Christy Clark has
said the government would sup-
port. New Brunswick is consider-
ing government-introduced legis-
lation and Prince Edward Island is
looking into the matter.
Sen. Angus said that the fear sur-
rounding opening up the Constitu-
tion for amending the Senate is that
it would lead to the provinces trying
to strong-arm concessions out of the
federal government.
There is a fear today that
because we have this issue with
Quebec, we have issues with immi-
gration, with natural resources with
the environment, that are really hot
topics, and if you get around the big
table, purportedly to deal with sen-
ate reform, this premier is going to
say, Yeah you want me to vote on
your position for Senate, then I want
more Senators for my province, or I
want the new securities regulator to
be placed in Hull,he said.
He also said that the appetite
for a Triple-E senate, meaning
elected, equal and effective, has
passed out of vogue.
The outcry for that is no lon-
ger there,he said.
An elected Senate would be
dysfunctional and lead to disputes
with the House, said Sen. Angus.
If they were to have an elected
Senate it would just turn into anoth-
er House of Commons,he said.
Sen. Brown said that in his
20-year quest to reform the Senate,
he has consulted with Constitutional
scholars, and that there is a way to
have an elected and effective Senate
while retaining the supremacy of the
House of Commons.
He said if there is a bill that isnt
supported by the majority of Cana-
dians, the Senate would be able to
veto the bill with the support of a
majority of Senators representing
seven provinces and 50 per cent
of the Canadian population, but
the veto would not be considered
a matter of non-confidence in the
government.
Concerns surrounding the
effect of an elected Senate on Can-
adas democratic system are over-
blown by people unfamiliar with
the legislation, said Sen. Angus.
Theres all kinds of constitu-
tional people that because they
havent studied this document
they come up with some pretty
funny worries about the future
Senate,he said.
The Prime Minister is very
committed to Senate reform, said
both Sen. Angus and Sen. Brown.
Sen. Brown said that Senate
reform is a long term challenge that
is for the benefit of the country.
Were putting this together for
the next 100 years, not just for the
Prime Minister of the day, and I
know thats what he wants,he said.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
NEWS
SENATE REFORMS
PM has time
on his side to
reform Senate,
says Sen. Brown
As more Senators reach mandatory retirement and step down, the more Prime Minister
Stephen Harper can appoint more reform-minded Senators, says Senator Bert Brown.
Continued from Page 1
Senate reforms stuck: Conservative Sen. Bert Brown, pictured in this file photo at a national summer caucus on
Parliament Hill, says time is on the Prime Ministers side when it comes to getting the reforms passed, as more Senators
would be reaching the mandatory retirement age and stepping down and more reform-minded would come in.
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THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
Q
uebec Conservative Senator
David Angus, who retired on
July 21 from the Senate at the age
of 75, has been one of the most suc-
cessful fundraisers, or bagmen,
for the Conservative Party and the
former Progressive Conservative
Party of Canada, and figures he
helped raise more than $100-mil-
lion when headed the fund.
Appointed by former Progres-
sive Conservative prime minister
Brian Mulroney in 1993, Sen.
Angus was the chief of the PC
Canada Fund, now called the
Conservative Fund Canada, dur-
ing the Mulroney years.
The former longtime chair of
the Senate Committee on Energy,
the Environment and Natural
Resources which released a major
report on July 19 in Ottawa, was
recently paid an extraordinary
tribute in the Senate by his col-
leagues, which he said was one of
his proudest moment in politics.
The Hill Times spoke with
Sen. Angus before he was to have
heart surgery on July 23 for a
leaky valve.The interview has
been edited for style and length.
Before you were a Senator, what
has your role been with the Con-
servative Party?
I joined up with the Progressive
Conservatives when I was a student
still and Ive been a loyal Tory ever
since. Ive had all the positions. I
was the president of my riding, and
president of the Young Conserva-
tives, chief fundraiser, I ran a num-
ber of campaigns both as campaign
manager and as a fundraiser. [I
ran the campaign] for president of
the party in 1977, Joe Clark was
the campaign manager, I was the
fundraiser, and I was the chief fund-
raiser for Brian Mulroneys leader-
ship campaign when he ran for the
leadership in 1976 and I was raising
funds for the national party starting
back in the 60s.
When Mr. Mulroney became
prime minister, I was chairman of
the PC Canada Fund which was
the main fundraising arm of the
party. I was in that position for 10
or 11 years. Then I became a Sena-
tor in 1993. Ive been involved still
in party financing ever since and
Im very involved again now and
with my friend Senator [Irving]
Gerstein, Im an officer and direc-
tor of the Conservative Fund and
chairman of the audit committee
and chairman emeritus.
Ive been a loyal supporter of
the party, both the old Progressive
Conservatives, and the merged
party. Im on the fund of the party,
I raise money all of the time.
Reading through the records of your
last speech in the Senate and the
tributes given to you, Senator Mar-
jory LeBreton made the comment
that you were the best fundraiser
who ever laced on a pair of shoes.
Whats your reaction to that?
I think its the normal hyperbole
one does in a tribute, but it was very
kind of her, I think she was acknowl-
edging that I certainly was an effec-
tive fundraiser for the party over
the years. I think she said some very
nice things and I appreciate them.
What made you such a good fun-
draiser?
I was invited to be a candidate
many times in the 70s, 80s, 90s, but
I always preferred the backrooms,
if I can put it that way. I raised a lot
of money for charity too. Im not
afraid to ask. I think a lot of people
are shy to ask for money and Ive
always felt that the worst thing that
can happen is they say no. And Ive
always been an outgoing, gregari-
ous kind of person. Ive had success
at doing it and success breeds more
success. Ive always enjoyed it. I
went to Princeton University in the
U.S. and whilst there I did a major
study on money in politics. So even
the theory of money in politics is
something that interests me and Ive
studied.
On that topic, whats your opin-
ion on the new election laws lim-
iting personal contributions and
banning corporate contributions
to parties funds?
Political parties are a funda-
mental element of the democratic
system. I think our system was
designed to only have two par-
ties. It gets complicated when you
have a number of parties if you
want to treat them equally.
We have a hybrid system with
both government and personal
contributions involved. But you
know the old saying: money is the
mothers milk of politics.The par-
ties have got to be financed or you
wont have a proper system. Should
there be an element of competi-
tion? I suppose if youre no good at
raising money youll be no good at
running the country, I suppose one
could make that argument.
To me, the system we have
today is as good as it gets. I think
its probably one of the best sys-
tems in the world. I think the idea
of keeping the idea of the govern-
ment support is very important.
As Conservatives, were very suc-
cessful at our small donations. We do
a lot of telephone solicitations, a lot
of direct mail in small amounts.
Weve got people who give
five, six, seven, eight times a year.
Whether its 25 bucks here, or what-
ever, its amazing. The records are
all public and show that the Con-
servatives are very well-financed
and I think that the methodology
we use is very evolved.
How much money do you think
youve raised over the years?
I wouldnt want to venture, but
someone told me that I raised over
$90-million in the old days. It isnt
me, personally, necessarily, I chaired
the [PC Canada] Fund, but wed
raise $25 million in an election year
and $10-[million] or $12-[million] in
a non-election year, so you add up
the years the fund probably raised
well over $100-million while I was
chair, but I dont know for sure and I
dont keep score.
How did you meet Mr. Mulroney?
I met Mulroney in the Young
Conservatives. He was studying
law at Laval and I was at McGill
and I guess we were both interest-
ed in the party. [John] Diefenbaker
had won a minority government in
1957 and in 68 a landslide victory.
Then I met Brian and we got
involved in provincial politics.
There werent that many Conser-
vatives around Quebec but we had
a gang of us and we were interest-
ed in public life and making Cana-
da better. Diefenbaker was a great
inspiration, and when he went into
a decline, we were involved with
Dalton Camp, [Robert] Stanfield
came along, Duff Roblin, then Mr.
Mulroney came along.
Was that your first taste of politi-
cal fundraising?
Id been raising money at the
local level, but the 1976 leadership
campaign was a big thing. We raised
a lot of money, in fact probably too
much. Because he became known
as the well-financed candidate,
too glitzy. I think it was unfair to
portray him that way but thats how
it worked out. We worked hard, we
had a deficit too at the end and had
to raise money to cover that.
Youve been quoted and have
become known as an opponent to
Senate reform. Whats your opin-
ion on Senate reform?
I think any institution needs to
be continually upgraded and kept
up with the times, unfortunately,
our Parliamentary system is sub-
ject its a fundamental part of
our Constitution and its very hard
to amend the Constitution. I think
if we want to amend the Constitu-
tion we should face up to it. I dont
think you can make an elected
Senate without a constitutional
amendment, thats my legal view.
I dont believe in tinkering
with the Constitution, but Im a
very loyal Conservative. And Mr.
Harper has consistently said since
he went into public life that he
would like to help reform the Sen-
ate and therefore I think he feels
committed to that. There are many
ways to reform the Senate, but if
you want to really reform it, I am
personally against an elected Sen-
ate but Im not against reform.
If they were to have an elected
Senate it would just turn into
another House of Commons and
itd be better to abolish the Senate,
in my view. Im not for abolition, I
think the Senate is a terrific institu-
tion, it could do much more, but its
not well-explained all the good
about the Senate is a well-kept
secret it seems to me.
Ive been impressed with the
people. Its the best thing about the
Senate; you meet these people and
theyre all so committed to mak-
ing Canada better and theyre here
for the right reasons. Theyre not
here to sit on the dole, which is the
way were portrayed. Anyone who
knows me knows Im not a guy who
wants a free lunch. Ive carried on
four or five jobs at the same time. I
want to do public service, commu-
nity service, I want to give back.
People should take a look
at the Senate; sure it needs to be
streamlined and modernized. Much
like the House of Commons does,
and the Supreme Court does. All of
these institutions are mired back
in the 1800s and today its today
2012 its just a whole new world.
By and large, I find that these
are all honest people. Its not as if
were paid a gazillion dollars. A
lot of people [make sacrifices to be
here]. Theyre really doing pub-
lic service. They really care about
Canada and thats good. As I said
in my remarks, my father used to
say, Public service is like godliness.
I dont regret being here all
these years; on the contrary, I feel
a great privilege. And yeah Ill
miss it a lot. So Ill probably run
for the Senate. Show you how to
get elected in Quebec.
So youre against Triple-E senate
reform, but you would like the
Senate to be modernized?
Yes, of course, the Senate
should be reformed, so should the
House of Commons or any institu-
tion of this age that hasnt been
updated to the times. I dont like
the word reformed because theres
something bad about it. I can give
you some things that are very obvi-
ous. First of all, the Senate was
created before Canada grew from
coast to coast. So British Columbia
only has four Senators so thats not
right, its not proportionate.
So the proportionality and
representation of the differ-
ent regions is out of whack and
hasnt kept pace. But you cant
change that without amending
the Constitution. So why dont we
amend it? If you want to change
it, change it properly.
Do I have the answer? No.
Political parties are a fundamental
element of the democratic system
Retiring Tory Sen. David
Angus talks about
money and politics and
modernizing the Senate.
THE Q&A
DAVID ANGUS
By JAMES GRIGG
Continued on Page 18
Backroom boy: Quebec Conservative Sen. David Angus, who retired on July 21, has been a successful bagman for the party
and continues to be. I was invited to be a candidate many times in the 70s, 80s, 90s, but I always preferred the backrooms.
P
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s
LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
8
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
A divergence on riding boundaries
Tories underestimate unions
Canadas elections systems weak
Senate question goes unanswered
Spike in drownings in Canada
M
idway through the boundary commis-
sionsproposals, with five in British
Columbia, Alberta, New Brunswick, Nova Sco-
tia, and Newfoundland and Labrador, there is a
great divergence of approach to the permissible
variance from the quotientfor each riding.
Last Nov. 17, Michael Pal told the Standing
Committee on Procedure and House Affairs,
At the Mowat Centre, we suggest that this
bill should be amended to allow only a five
per cent to 10 per cent variance, with some
exemptions for ridings such as Labrador.
Nelson Wiseman testified like Michael,
I would prefer that it be narrowed, perhaps
to 10 per cent or possibly 15 per cent.
But no action was taken. The permitted
variance is still 25 per cent.
Although most commissions will not
need to go beyond 10 per cent for almost
all ridings, there is no uniform standard. It
would have been helpful.
Instead, at one extreme we have Albertas
commission proposing all 36 ridings within
five per cent of the provincial average or
quotient. At the other extreme, we have New
Brunswick, which has Miramichi at 28.7 per
cent, and four more at 22.6 per cent, 16.8 per
cent, 14.3 per cent, and 12.7 per cent, so that
half the 10 ridings exceed 10 per cent variance.
In between, we have British Columbia:
13 of the 42 have a more than five per cent
variance, but only the exceptional northern
Skeena-Bulkley Valley is more than 10 per
cent, and even it is only 14.1 per cent over.
Almost as bad as New Brunswick is
Nova Scotia with both Cape Breton ridings
more than 10 per cent under quotient, while
Halifax, with 4.66 per cent quotients, gets
four over-sized ridings while parts of Halifax
are sliced off into three abutting ridings.
Wilfred Day
Port Hope, Ont.
D
espicable. At all levels of government
the right wing in this country is mount-
ing a concerted effort to demoralize working
people and their unions simply to please
their friends on Bay Street. Its not enough
that they sit idly by and watch what is left
of the middle class erode before their eyes.
They are vehement in their ideology to put
unfettered control of the workplace back
in the hands of the countrys employers.
Stephen Harper, Tim Hudak, Rob Ford and
others are badly underestimating working
Canadians. Its true, as it relates to most
things political, we are a passive society,
however, try stripping away a workers hard
earned wages, pension and benefits and
all hell will break loose. Canadian workers
wont stand idly by and let that happen.
Roland Kiehne
President
CAW Local 112
Toronto, Ont.
I
n the Supreme Court of Canada case
about voting in a Toronto area riding dur-
ing last Mays federal election, Elections
Canada and some provincial elections agen-
cies seem to be arguing that problems are
inevitable instead of acknowledging that
their current systems have significant weak-
nesses in ensuring that voters are voting
properly at the correct polling station.
The robocall election fraud situation
has revealed other weaknesses in fair elec-
tion enforcement.
And these two situations are likely the tip
of the iceberg, as there are more than 3,000
complaints that Elections Canada alone has
received since 1997. Unfortunately, Elections
Canada continues to refuse to disclose its
rulings in those complaints, so the public
has no idea whether enforcement of the
rules has been proper and effective in the
past six federal elections.
Democracy Watch will soon release
details about a recent Elections Canada
ruling that raises serious questions about
its enforcement standards.
Rather than defending systems with
loopholes, and hiding enforcement records,
Elections Canada and the provincial agen-
cies should be disclosing details to prove their
enforcement is effective, and pushing for stron-
ger laws and more resources and training to
ensure our future elections are fraud-free.
Tyler Sommers
Coordinator
Democracy Watch
Ottawa, Ont.
R
ecently, on a Monday afternoon, I went
on a Parliamentary tour and when the
tour guide reached the Senate Chamber, I
asked, Bridgette DePape was taken out of
here, yes?, and the guide answered, I dont
know.So I repeated, But this is the place
where Bridgette DePape was removed?,
and received the same reply. In the Nation-
al Film Boards Manufacturing Consent:
Noam Chomsky and the Media, he says
dissidents are sidelined because govern-
ment controls public discussion of them.
Andrew Romain
Ottawa, Ont.
T
wo two-year children drowned within
hours of each other in separate back yard
pools in the Greater Montreal area on July 12.
The spike in drownings in Canada, and
not only Quebec, in recent years among
children under the age of five, as reported by
The Lifesaving Society is of much concern.
These terrible and sad tragedies illus-
trate the common, but poorly recognized or
understood phenomenon of how drowning is
a silent death for children. According to Dr.
Joseph Torg of the Temple University School
of Medicine in Philadelphia, young children
and toddlers jump into water and sink like a
lead weight straight to the bottom. No cries
for help, no flailing of arms, no nothing. Dr.
Torg says that contrary to movie depictions
of a drowning person who flails about and
calls for help, children just sink and drown.
It happens quickly, within seconds, silently
and without notice. Once submerged, chil-
dren become disoriented and oblivious to the
change in environment from air to liquid.
As the drowning mechanism in toddlers
is quite different from that of adults, what
makes prevention possible in these circum-
stances is a full understanding and aware-
ness of what and can actually happen.
That said, in and around backyard pools,
lakes, and rivers, parents and caregivers
must be constantly and consistently remind-
ed to supervise their children. There is abso-
lutely no substitute for this. That said, super-
vising young children at the best of times is
a very challenging and daunting task.
Emile Therien
Past president, Canada Safety Council
Ottawa, Ont.
Editor
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EDITORIAL
ETOBICOKE CENTRE
MPs want to better scrutinize
government spending, let them
T
he House Government Operations Com-
mittee released a report last month,
which, if passed, could dramatically change
the way the federal government departments
report the billions they spend annually. The
government should adopt the report because
as it stands, Parliament does not effectively
fulfill its role and standing committees are
at best giving perfunctory attention to the
governments plans,or, as NDP MP Linda
Duncan put it, were having to vote on multi-
billions of expenditures with basically no
information.Its time to turn this around.
Federal legislators are supposed to prop-
erly scrutinize bills and government spend-
ing annually. But MPs say theyve been left
in the dark on government spending.
The government tables spending estimates
four times a year, by portfolio in large catch-all
categories such as capital expenses or grants
and contributions. Parliamentarians are then
expected to vote on approving these funds.
The committee has recommended
switching from the existing categories to a
program basis, meaning an entire govern-
ment initiative, and all the costs it entails,
could be shown in the estimates books and
even in the related appropriations bill that
Parliamentarians vote on.
The committee has also asked the TBS to
study the accounting basis for the estimates
which are based on a cash system of account-
ing, meaning that when money is spent or
received, it is put on the books. The other
potential system is accrual accounting, an
industry standard that both the budget and the
public accounts are based on.
The committee also recommended that
the budget be tabled earlier in the year, no
later than Feb. 1, so that more of its initiatives
could be included in the estimates for scrutiny.
The committee report also recommended
regular training for MPs on how to read the
estimates, and providing questions to depart-
mental officials in advance of their appear-
ance, so that the right witnesses are called.
The report recommends that the com-
mittee study the role of the PBO and
whether or not the position remains in
the Library of Parliament or becomes an
independent agent reporting directly to
Parliamentarians. Both the NDP and the
Liberals, who are a minority on the com-
mittee, say that the PBO needs to be made
independent now. This study is the third
in 15 years into improving the estimates.
Combined with this committees sugges-
tions, MPs have made almost 150 recom-
mendations on the subject, with little suc-
cess.
Treasury Board President Tony Clement,
whose office said the minister was glad to
read the committees recommendations,
had encouraged its members to look into
these issues. Mr. Clement said he wants to
improve transparency and accountability
of the budget and estimates process. The
government has until October to respond
to the report. Heres Mr. Clements chance
to improve the system.
9
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
O
AKVILLE, ONT.Green
Party Leader Elizabeth May
should consider changing the
name of her party.
A more accurate name might
be, We Will do Everything We
Can to Help the Liberal Party
Even if it Means Undermining
our own Environmental Cause
Party.
Okay, that moniker might be a
bit difficult to fit on a ballot, but
you get the point.
Ever since she became leader
of her party, Mays chief political
goal seems less about promoting
Green ideology and more about
helping Liberals get elected.
Recall, for example, that in the
2008 federal election she decided
not to run a Green candidate against
then Liberal leader Stphane Dion.
And in doing so, she effectively
endorsed Dion for Prime Minister.
This was an odd decision for a
couple of reasons.
First, if May really thought Dion
would make a great Prime Minis-
ter, why was she even running?
And dont tell me May endorsed
Dion because she believed he was
some kind of green activist.
That theory doesnt hold water
because Dions Liberals didnt
exactly have a sparkling green
record when they were in power.
In fact, the Liberal government
had done precious little to reduce
Canadas greenhouse gas emissions
or to implement the Kyoto Accord.
Thats why Jamey Heath, an
environmental activist and one-
time NDP adviser, called Mays
Dion endorsement incredibly
self-defeating.
He was right.
Also seemingly self-defeating
was Mays bizarre call for strategic
voting during that 2008 election.
She actually urged Canadians
not to vote for a Green candidate
if another candidate (i.e. a Liber-
al) had a better chance at defeat-
ing a Conservative.
With friends like May, Green
Party candidates didnt need
enemies.
Nor, it seems has May given up
advocating for the Liberal Party,
despite its third-party status.
Just recently, May told the
media she is urging her party
not to run a Green candidate in
the Etobicoke Centre riding if a
Supreme Court ruling makes a
byelection there a necessity.
The story of Etobicoke Centre,
of course, is now well-known.
The Liberal candidate, Borys
Wrzesnewskyj, who narrowly lost
the riding to Conservative MP Ted
Opitz in the 2011 federal election,
argues a byelection is needed
because of what he claims were
voting irregularities.
A lower court agreed with him
and now its up to the Supreme
Court to decide as to whether or
not there will be a vote.
At any rate, May believes if
Wrzesnewskyj was unfairly denied
a seat any byelection in Etobicoke
Centre should be a clean vote
between Borys and Ted.
Now thats a nice gesture and
all, but its hardly the attitude of
someone who believes passion-
ately in a cause.
After all, small one-issue
parties like the Green Party usu-
ally rely on elections as the best
chance they have to get their
message out to voters.
And certainly running a Green
candidate in an Etobicoke Centre
byelection, which is guaranteed
to receive tons of media coverage,
would give the Green Party an amaz-
ing chance to promote its cause.
Yet incredibly, May is willing
to forgo this chance just so the
Liberals will have a better proba-
bility of electing a backbench MP.
If Green Party supporters arent
angry about this, they arent paying
attention.
And forget about Green politics.
What about the concept of democ-
racy? Why does May think its a
good idea to give voters less choice?
You know, now that I think about
it, maybe changing the name of the
Green Party isnt the best answer.
Maybe it would be more logical
and easier if May simply changed
parties.
I hear the Liberals are in the
market for a new leader.
Gerry Nicholls is a communi-
cations consultant.
www.gerrynicholls.com
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
O
TTAWALet the Games
begin, pullease! Otherwise,
we will continue to be subjected to
the crescendo of criticism that pre-
cedes every single Olympic extrav-
aganza. Remember Vancouver. The
British press took a giant dump
on just about every aspect of the
Winter Olympic Games. And now
the Brits are determined to do the
same thing in their own country.
Like clockwork, each new
Olympic moment is ushered in
with a combination of athlete adu-
lation and organizational trashing.
As minister, I had the privilege
of representing our country at
four Olympics, including Atlanta,
Nagano, Sydney, and Salt Lake
City. A barrage of negative news
preceded every one of them.
In the 100
th
anniversary celebra-
tion of the modern Olympics in Ath-
ens, Greece, there were demands to
cancel the event in response to criti-
cism about accommodation, trans-
portation, etc. In the end, the Greek
Olympics were feted as fabulous.
The conclusion of the London
Olympics will likely shine simi-
lar glory on the host country. In
the meantime, we are in for a
bumpy ride.
First, the usual suspected orga-
nizational problems. According to
a British parliamentary committee,
security is in shambles. Rumblings
about possible transportation prob-
lems mar the lead up to the Games.
Anyone actually heading across
the pond to participate is faced
with the possibility of not getting
there, courtesy of looming work
stoppages at airports, on trains,
and more. Even if they arrive safe-
ly, according to the doomsayers,
they likely wont remain so.
I have more faith in the Brits.
In colonial times, no-nonsense
English overlords installed practi-
cal governing systems in many
parts of the world, which flourish
to this day. There is a reason that
fair playis synonymous with the
United Kingdom.
And anyone who has spent
time in London can witness just
how the largest urban centre in
Europe moves people and lorries
with astonishing efficiency. The
city famous for its roundabouts
can literally manage thousands of
cars (albeit on the wrong side of
the road) without the nuisance of
a single red light.
The Brits also invented over-
sized hackney cabs that can carry
people and bags in tandem com-
fort. And their buses do double
duty as double deckers.
By the time the closing ceremo-
ny concludes, the London Games
will undoubtedly be lauded as the
best yet.
These same
ominous rumblings
preceded the Van-
couver Olympics.
With transportation
improvements in the
Sea to Sky highway
and the installation
of a light rail service
linking downtown
Vancouver with the
airport, the pace of
construction lead-
ing up to the Games
was frenetic. There
was no shortage
of grumbling from
those who felt the
shuttling between
Vancouver and
downhill ski site
Whistler would be
disastrous.
Notwithstanding
the doomsayers, the
Games were delivered without a
hitch to glowing reviews.
The greatest challenge for any
Games is that no news is good
news. And vice versa. In the lead
up to the Games, we will witness a
number of wonderful success sto-
ries, from potential medalists who
have overcome huge obstacles on
their journey to Olympic greatness.
Once the Games begin, the same
challenges exist for journalists look-
ing to pursue a new Olympic angle.
Oftentimes, the most coveted story
is the one that will not actually hap-
pen on the playing field.
When Canadian Ross Reba-
gliati became the first snowboard-
er ever to win a gold medal, it was
a good story. But the news went
viral when Rebagliati was stripped
of his medal for testing positive
for marijuana. That decision was
ultimately reversed on appeal.
Who can forget the ruckus at
the Nagano Olympics when Bloc
Qubcois Member of Parliament
Suzanne Tremblay complained she
was upset that there were too many
Canadian flags. The flag story out-
stripped just about any other cover-
age of those Games; with the possi-
ble exception of the moment when
Wayne Gretzky actually shed tears
after his team lost their chance at
gold during a shootout against the
Czech Republic.
When the London Games get
underway, we will commence the
traditional medal deathwatch. How
many do we have? How do we com-
pare with other countries? Why are
we trailing?
As Canada usually scores big
in the second week, the story of
grief will soon be supplanted by
one of exuberance. The country
will hold its breath as our medal
count jumps daily.
For a brief moment, we will be
transfixed together, in a positive
energy that will engulf the whole
country.
For a brief moment, stories of
courage, determination, and strength
will overtake the daily drubbing of
negativity that colours our world.
It will be a welcome respite.
Sheila Copps is a former Jean
Chrtien-era Cabinet minister and
a former deputy prime minister.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Green Party needs a new name
Let the Summer Olympic Games begin, please
Green Party Leader Elizabeth May should consider changing the name of her party, or joining the Liberals.
Otherwise, we will continue to be subjected to the crescendo of criticism that precedes every single Olympic extravaganza.Remember Vancouver.
POST-PARTISAN PUNDIT
COPPS CORNER
GREEN PARTY
SUMMER OLYMPICS IN LONDON
BY Gerry Nicholls
BY sheila copps
Getting ready for the Summer Olympics 2012: Top British rider Mark Cavendish, pictured on
Aug. 14, 2011, topped off a successful summer by winning the London-Surrey Cycle Classic,
the biggest test event staged by the London 2012 Organizing Committee.
Photograph courtesy of London 2012
10
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
F
or many of us, it started with
the census. In a controversial
move, our government switched
from a mandatory to a voluntary
census in the summer of 2010. The
former Statistics Canada chief, the
media, and the research communi-
ty reacted with shock and largely
opposed the change to no avail.
StatsCan quietly continued this
trend recently when it published
a media advisory listing programs
identified for elimination or reduc-
tion to meet savings targets that were
announced in the Economic Action
Plan 2012 ($33.9-million by 2014-15).
These reductions have been
masked under the compelling veil
of efficiency.In reality, the cuts
promise considerable future costs
because they compromise the
tools used to understand the state.
This, in turn, has a high probabil-
ity of leading to decisions that are
no longer based on evidence, and
therefore are likely to be ineffec-
tive uses of public money.
Reductions to Statistics Canada
activity are not new. Preceding the
census cuts, the agency moved three
of four key longitudinal surveys that
were initiated in the 1990s to the
inactive list: the National Popula-
tion Health Survey; the National
Longitudinal Survey of Children
and Youth, and the Workplace and
Employment Survey. These infor-
mation-rich surveys involve repeat-
ed observations of the same people
over long periods of time and began
tracking Canadians in the early
1990s. We are no longer measuring
outcomes for these individuals.
The recent cuts, which affect 34
surveys, brought an end to the fourth
of the longitudinal surveys started in
the 1990s: The Survey of Labour and
Income Dynamics (SLID), which
provides an understanding of the
economic well-being of Canadians.
We have now halted the collec-
tion and analysis of our most infor-
mative longitudinal information on
our labour force, on the workplace,
on health and health care, and on
child well-being. Add to this our
universal census of the population.
How might Canada expect to meet
the policy challenges of the future
when we no longer have the ability
to understand where we are today?
Statistics Canada is the primary
source of Canadian data, a federal
government agency formed in 1971
to produce statistics that help us
better understand Canada, its pop-
ulation, resources, economy, soci-
ety and culture. For many decades,
it was considered among the top
statistical agencies in the world.
The surveys started in the 1990s
were the envy of U.S. researchers
looking to better understand how
our jobs, workplaces, health, and
children were changing over time.
As our government incremen-
tally eliminates popular data sets,
to whose hands might we toss this
statistical torch? There is certainly
a shifting onus as the state slowly
shrugs off primary responsibility
for the collection and maintenance
of widely available and shareable
descriptive information. Will we
be able to compensate as a society
before its too late?
In some cases, it is appropri-
ate for the public sector to turn
over responsibilities that can be
adequately performed in the pri-
vate sector. The government need
not run airlines or gas stations or
even mail companies.
Is statistical information on the
country an appropriate addition to
this list? Or does a combination of
privacy concerns, the necessity for
information on the entire country,
the benefits of having a single entity
that houses the expertise to collect,
store, and protect these data, and
the necessity of accessible informa-
tion for government researchers,
and private corporations alike lead
to data collection and dissemination
being a public good? Does the social
benefit of these data far exceed the
private benefit that a private sector
company might realize?
We would argue that there is
a strong case to be made for a
publicly-funded and administered
statistical agency that collects
the kind of robust information
required for government, busi-
ness, and individuals to make the
best decisions they can.
For without being able to accu-
rately describe the characteristics
and trends of what that problem
is, society will simply have to
make policy in the dark. Evidence-
based policy-making requires just
thatevidencestandard, reliable
metrics whose quantification and
legitimacy is widely-agreed upon.
In their absence, policy-making at
all levels and in every sector will be
as expensive as it is hopeful, while
policy actors are forced to gingerly
guess and checkover time.
In the absence of good data,
our ability to fully comprehend
complex policy issues will grow
anecdotal and inconsistent. As
admirable as the quest for effi-
ciency in the public sector is, it
cant be worth the confusion that
it will promise in the future. Truly
realizing the kind of savings that
Statistics Canada claims to strive
for in this budgetary cycle means
continuing to invest in the founda-
tional information that has wisely
informed our nation for decades.
Vass Bednar is an Action
Canada Fellow and graduate of the
School of Public Policy and Gover-
nance. Mark Stabile is the director
of the School of Public Policy and
Governance and a professor at the
Rotman School of Management,
University of Toronto, and an expert
adviser with EvidenceNetwork.ca
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Cuts to Statistics Canada a costly error
Policy-making without evidence is a guessing game.
OPINION
STATISTICS CANADA
By VASS BEDNAR
and MARK STABILE
POLICY BRIEFING
Publication Date:
Aug. 6, 2012
Booking Deadline:
Aug. 1, 2012
Communicate with
those most responsible
for Canadas public
policy decisions.
For more information or to reserve your government relations
and public affairs advertising space, contact The Hill Times
display advertising department at 613-688-8825.
Cuts to stat: Canadas Chief
Statistician Wayne Smith, pictured
in Ottawa in this file photo. The
agency moved three of four key
longitudinal surveys that were
initiated in the 1990s to the
inactive list: the National
Population Health Survey; the
National Longitudinal Survey
of Children and Youth, and the
Workplace and Employment
Survey. These information-rich
surveys involve repeated observa-
tions of the same people over long
periods of time and began tracking
Canadians in the early 1990s. We
are no longer measuring outcomes
for these individuals, say Vass
Bednar and Mark Stabile.
Photograph by Jake Wright, The Hill Times
11
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
G
ATINEAU, QUE.Interim
Liberal leader Bob Rae has
provided welcome clarity on his
partys stand on the controversial
Northern Gateway pipeline and the
rush to export Albertas oil wealth.
Hes in favour of development,
but it must be done sustainably.
This is violently different from
Stephen Harpers position: hes
in favour of development, but it
must be done responsibly.
We know where NDP Leader
Thomas Mulcair stands: pull the plug
on Enbridges Northern Gateway,
slow oilsands growth to give environ-
mental protection a chance to catch
up, and, meanwhile, focus on com-
mercializing alternatives to oil.
Mulcair wins. His position is
clearclearer, certainly, than the
blancmange Rae offered a few
days ago. In interviews, the Liberal
leader came out unequivocally in
favour of consultation and engage-
ment. Off the fencefinally!
We can reap the benefits of
oilsands development and miti-
gate the environmental impact,
but only if we engage and consult
with parties on all sides of this
issue,Rae said.
Why didnt someone think of
this before? Buckets of money for
federal and provincial treasuries,
tons of jobs and emissions no more
harmful than steam from a tea ket-
tle. It will just take a few meetings.
Even so, Rae has serious reser-
vationsabout the Northern Gate-
way project, intended to transport
all that liquid gold across vulnera-
ble British Columbia wilderness to
oil tankers that would ply the rocky
and dangerous west coast.
He isnt ruling out any, or all
pipelines across B.C., mind you.
He muses about increasing capac-
ity in the existing Kinder Morgan
line which ends in Vancouver and
would greatly increase oil tanker
traffic off English Bay.
The key word in all this is bal-
ance,says Rae. Or, perhaps, evasion.
Rae is pretending to be the adult,
the voice of reason, in a squabble
between two supposed extremes,
the Tea Party and Occupy.But it
is hard to believe, given his partys
history, that Liberals would do any-
thing differently from the Conser-
vatives when the National Energy
Board approves the pipeline pro-
posal, as it inevitably will.
They might talk a little tougher,
they might invent new and different
incentivesto cajole industry into
doing the right thing, they might even
impose stricter fines on scofflaws.
We know how effective that
approach has been: climbing
emissions, exploding growth in
tar sands development, continu-
ing leaks from existing pipelines,
international censure.
Of course, Rae is only leader until
the 2013 leadership convention. For
the first time, it is fair to ask if he is
speaking for all Liberals.
What does Justin Trudeau think
of the Northern Gateway and the
supposedly urgent need to sell our
oil to China? In his popular stump
speech, Trudeau comes across as
a passionate environmentalist
(although vague on details.) He
is from Quebec, where climate
change is taken seriously. At 40,
he is of a generation more open to
ending our addiction to oil.
And what of other leader-
ship contenders like Liberal MP
Marc Garneau, also from Quebec,
or David McGuinty (brother of
Dalton), and former head of the
National Round Table on the Envi-
ronment and the Economy? Are
they going to skate on this issue
all the way to the finish line?
Within the federal Liberal cau-
cus, too, others have reason to be
nervous. Vancouver-Quadra Liberal
Joyce Murrays website routinely
features hard-nosed media critiques
of the Northern Gateway, and the
Kinder Morgan alternative.
On the other side, Rae has drawn
fire from Alberta Liberal leader Raj
Sherman, who suspects the federal
leader opposes the Northern Gate-
wayin Shermans view, the key the
Albertas prosperity.
Thats what happens when you
take both sides.
You need compromise in poli-
tics, of course, and the conciliatory
approach advocated by Rae is
better than bone-headed confron-
tation. But compromise already
exists: neither Mulcair, or even
Green Party leader Elizabeth May,
are calling for an immediate shut
down of the tar sands. They just
want to hit the pause button.
Increasingly, there is no middle
ground on the Northern Gateway,
nor should there be. This is turning
into an Iraq war moment, a same-
sex marriage moment, a gun con-
trol momentonly more serious.
There are only two sides, polit-
ically and morally: for, or against.
And Rae is on the wrong one.
Susan Riley is a veteran politi-
cal columnist.
sriley.work@gmail.com
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
O
TTAWAWhen I was the
commander of Joint Task
Force North, I recommended that
some search and rescue (SAR)
air assets be located in the Arctic
which I define as north of the 60
th

parallel. The High Arctic is north
of the Arctic Circle. Specifically,
I suggested positioning a CC-130
Hercules aircraft in Yellowknife.
The aircraft would only be sta-
tioned there on standby. Its main
base would still be in the south
for maintenance, training, etc. The
logic was simple: the Canadian
Forces have assets (440 Squadron,
hangers) in Yellowknife, the JTF(N)
HQ is in Yellowknife, the location
is fairly central to the Arctic, and
the aircraft could reach some of the
western provinces faster than from
Winnipeg or Trenton. The reaction
time to Arctic locations, where time
is more critical than in the south,
would be shortened significantly.
With a shorter transition flight the
aircraft can also be over the search
area longer before it needs refuel-
ling. We all know that the first few
hours are critical in any search.
Another option would be to posi-
tion the aircraft in Iqaluit. Tens of
thousands of international flights
go over Baffin Island every year.
They could also service the north-
ern part of Quebec and Newfound-
land and Labrador. Better still, they
could position one in each.
The greatest argument I heard
against my original proposal was
that the SAR assets were deployed
to cover the areas where the most
accidents have taken place and
that historically less than one per
cent of the accidents were in the
Arctic. In preparation for a presen-
tation on SAR in the Arctic, I came
across Transport Safety Board web-
site statistics that shocked me. In
2001, no less than 15 per cent of the
aircraft accidents in which there
was a fatality were in the Arctic.
In 2001, no less than 21 per cent
of the fatalities related to aircraft
accidents were in the Arctic. More
recently, in 2010, seven per cent of
the aircraft accidents were in the
Arctic and 11 per cent of the fatal
aircraft accidents were in the Arc-
tic. On average, between 2001 and
2010, more than five per cent of the
aircraft accidents were in the Arc-
tic. Yet there are still no dedicated
SAR air assets in the Arctic.
Those assets would also have
some degree of importance relat-
ed to marine SAR in the Arctic.
In 1996, the cruise ship Hanseatic
ran aground near Gjoa Haven: all
passengers were evacuated and
there were no casualties. In 2010,
the Clipper Adventure cruise ship
ran aground near Kugluktuk.
Again all passengers were evacu-
ated, no casualties. On May 26,
2012, a Russian trawler sank after
hitting an iceberg in the Bering
Sea. All 91 passengers were res-
cued by a passing vessel. Should
Canada not insist on the sister
shippolicy that applies in Ant-
arctica? It is that policy that saved
the passengers of the Canadian
cruise ship MS Explorer which
sank in Antarctica in 2007.
Let us hope that the new SAR
aircraft will have the legs and on-
station capabilities required to deal
with the increased incidence of air-
craft accidents in the Arctic. There
are new polar air routes that go
over the Canadian Arctic. In 2003,
there were 884 such polar flights. In
2010, there were 9,683. The Arctic
is opening up at an unprecedented
speed in the air and on the sea. As
Ron Kroeker once said to me It
is not wise to deploy your assets
based on historical trends. It should
be based on present and projected
traffic and a risk assessment.
Canada has recently signed
an international Agreement on
Cooperation in Aeronautical and
Maritime Search and Rescue in
the Arctic. It thus behooves us to
improve our SAR capabilities in
the Arctic. As I have said before,
we cannot cover the whole of
the Arctic adequately but we can
certainly do better than what we
have at present.
Retired colonel Pierre Leblanc
is a former commander of the
Joint Task Force North.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Raes first mis-step spells
trouble for federal Liberals
There are still no dedicated search
and rescue air assets in the Arctic
There is no middle ground on the Northern Gateway. There are only two sides,
politically and morally: for, or against. And Bob Rae is on the wrong one.
Those assets would also have some degree of importance related to marine SAR in the Arctic.
IMPOLITIC
OPINION
NORTHERN GATEWAY PIPELINE
ARCTIC
BY Pierre Leblanc
BY Susan Riley
Stuck in the middle: Bob Rae is pretend-
ing to be the adult, the voice of reason,
in a squabble between two supposed
extremes, the Tea Party and Occupy.
Photograph by Jake Wright, The Hill Times
P
ARLIAMENT HILLEric Lid-
dell, Olympian, is dead but not
forgotten. Born In China, raised
in Scotland, he is immortalized
by media as the most intriguing
track and fielder of all time with
a little-known Canadian connec-
tion. Liddell personified the age
of amateurism,as The Times of
London put itthe triumph of
discipline and sportsmanship
stripped of brain injuries, cyni-
cism and steroid-laced endorse-
ments. Even athletes rate him
an inspiration. Canadian long
jumper Brian Thomas, asked once
why he started every day with a
half-hour of meditation at 5:30
a.m., replied: Eric Liddell.
Liddell was the true-life 1924
Olympic medalist depicted in the
Academy Award-winning Chari-
ots of Fire. He held a record in the
100 metres but would not run on a
Sunday. Liddell competed instead
in the 400 metresthe race fell
on a Fridayand won gold in 47.6
seconds, then the shortest time
ever clocked. The second-place
finisher ran five metres behind
him. I found out that the 400 was
really my distance for a race,Lid-
dell told The Toronto Daily Star
in 1932. So, Ive always been glad
I didnt race on the Sabbath.
Acclaimed a Commonwealth
hero, Liddell declined all commercial
endorsements and became a mis-
sionary in rural China. He died in a
Japanese internment camp in 1945.
You can find YouTube news-
reels of Liddell in his heyday.
Sportswriters rated his track
style as simply strangehis
neck craned with head thrown
back as though he was watch-
ing clouds. In 1981, biographer
Sally Magnusson interviewed Ian
Charleson, the Scottish actor who
played Liddell in Chariots of Fire.
I had to learn to run properly
and then to learn Liddells way,he
said. The hardest thing was that Eric
ran with his head back, when I did
it I couldnt see where I was going.
I kept running off the track and
bumping into other runners. Then
one day, on the fifth or sixth day of
filming, I suddenly cottoned on to
what he must have been doing when
he ran. At drama school we used to
do what are called trust exercises,
where you run as hard as you can
towards a wall and trust someone
will stop youLiddell must have run
like that. He must have run with his
head up and literally trusted to get
there. He ran with faith. He didnt
even look where he was going,(see
The Flying Scotsman, by Sally Mag-
nusson, 2007 Stadia).
The Liddell story strikes a
chord; It is the idea that there is
something about sport that tran-
scends financial considerations,
noted a recent commentary in
The Ottawa Citizen.
There were other remarkable
stories in those 1924 Summer
Games in Paris. That year the
Edmonton Grads defeated France to
win the girls basketball champion-
ship, but claimed no medal. Basket-
ball was then an exhibition sport.
And Doug Lewis, a black boxer
with Torontos Shamrock Ath-
letic Club, defeated a Swede to win
bronze for Canada in the welter-
weight categorythen simply van-
ished. Even the Canadian Olympic
Committee says it has no record of
what became of Lewis or his medal.
And Liddell?
His wife Florence was a nurse
trained at Toronto General Hospi-
tal. In WWII years when Liddell
was trapped behind enemy lines,
she raised their children at 21
Gloucester St. in Toronto. The house
is still there, seven blocks from the
legislature. It has been turned into
a steakhouse called Bumpkins;
it serves duck a lOrange at $27 a
plate and displays autographed
photos of celebrity guests like
Canada AM co-host Beverly Thom-
son. The restaurants owner, Min
Ma, has run the place for 13 years
and told me he had no idea of the
Liddell connection. Oh, wow, thats
exciting,said Mathen acknowl-
edged hed never heard of either
Liddell or Chariots of Fire.
Liddells widow died in obscu-
rity in Binbrook, Ont., in 1984. She
kept his Olympic medal for years,
till it was loaned to a grandchild
who took it to school and had it
stolen. The United Church called
Florence one of the unknown links
with physical and spiritual magnif-
icence, living on an ordinary street.
Christians and Lords Day
advocates never tired of Liddell.
Montreal Gazette contributor Peter
Menzies in a 1999 essay invoked
Liddells example in lamenting the
exhibition of Sunday sports that
left Christians bewildered by their
sudden status as cultural aliens,he
wrote. The Kingston Whig Standard
once cited Liddell in promoting a
common pause day where every-
thing ought to stop.Liddell is the
subject of dozens of church tracts
though friends and family grew to
bristle at the treatment. He was the
very opposite of what some people
think of when they speak of funda-
mentalists today,his widow told a
Star reporter in 1981. He was never
shocked or judgmental about other
peoples conduct or problems. He
could be very naughty himself.
In 1987, a group of Canadians
who knew Liddell as a missionary
in China held a final reunion in
Toronto. They vividly recalled his
last years in an internment camp.
Liddell offered to pawn his watch
for extra rations for fellow pris-
oners, and tried to cheer children
in the camp by improvising chess
tournaments even on Sundays; he
went out of his way to show kind-
ness to prostitutes and vagrants
shunned by other inmates.
A reporter once asked Liddell,
Dont you miss the limelight?
He said, Oh, well, of course, its
natural for a chap to think over all
that sometimes, but Im glad Im at
the work I am engaged in now. A
fellows life counts for far more at
this than the other.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Liddell, Olympian, is dead but not forgotten
Eric Liddell, who had a little-known Canadian connection, was the true-life 1924 Olympic medalist depicted in the Academy Award-winning Chariots of Fire.
OPINION
POLITICAL STAFFERS
BY Tom Korski
12
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
T
ORONTOThe Hill Times
12
th
Annual Terrific 25 Staffers
Survey of people involved in federal
politics was most revealing because
the ranking criteria did not include
most ethical staffer.If members
of the public were surveyed, this
would very likely be their most
important criteria given that dis-
honesty, secrecy, unethical activities,
lack of representation and waste
consistently rank as the Canadians
top concerns about government.
Instead, according to the survey,
political staff are valued for being
most discreet (i.e. most secretive),
closest to the Prime Minister and
most influential (i.e. among other
things, most likely to change elected
politiciansdecisions (including for
lobbyists), and best at spin (i.e. most
misleading), along with most knowl-
edgeable and most experienced.
Would Prime Minister Stephen
Harpers chief of staff Nigel Wright
be named most ethical?The Conflict
of Interest Act does not require him
to recuse himself from any general
matter decision-making process even
if it will directly affect his personal
financial interests, or the interests of
his family or friends or the dozens
of companies in which his company,
Onex, is invested, or the interests
of the companies in which the two
other private holding companies he
owns are invested, or the two dozen
or so other companies in which he
own shares, or the other investments
he placed in his so-called blind trust.
In fact, he has not disclosed any
recusals from any decision-making
processes in the Public Registry for
the Act. That may be because federal
Ethics Commissioner Mary Dawson
has set up a system of so-called ethi-
cal screensto hide recusals by Cabi-
net ministers, staff and appointees, a
system that violates Sec. 25 of the act
(which requires public disclosure of
the details of all recusals).
What the ethics commissioner
did, according to her public testimo-
ny by her before House committees,
is just arrange for public office hold-
ers to recuse themselves from whole
areas of decision-making, but not
declare it. She has admitted more
recently that this is not a correct
approach, but is still only requiring
disclosure of some of those recusals,
again, according to testimony by her
before House committees.
But, in any case, isnt it reason-
able to say that an ethical person
would recuse him/herself from all
decision-making processes that affect
their personal financial interests, and
would publicly disclose their recusals,
even if a flawed law combined with
a lapdog ethics commissioner do not
require these actions?
As for Andrew MacDougall,
director of communications for the
Prime Minister, he helps when he
can,according to Yaroslav Baran, a
former Conservative staffer. Does
he help everyone equally? Or does
he give more help to people who
have worked in the past for Prime
Minister Harper, Conservative
Cabinet ministers, and Conserva-
tive Party election campaigns?
If its the latter, that sounds very
similar to giving preferential treat-
ment which is not allowed under
Sec. 7 of the Conflict of Interest Act
(as Conservative Cabinet minister
Christian Paradis found out recent-
ly, although because the act does
not include any penalties for viola-
tions of its key democratic good
government rules, and because
Prime Minister Harper regularly
ignores the act and his own rules set
out in the Accountable Government
guide for ministers, Paradis remains
an unpenalized Cabinet minister).
And in case anyone is wonder-
ing, these same loopholes and flaws
(and others), and weak enforcement
by Dawson, also undermine the eth-
ical standards set out in the Conflict
of Interest Code for Members of
the House of Commons, and (even
more so), the ethical standards set
out in the Senate Ethics Code (in no
small part because the Senate Eth-
ics Officer is under the control of a
committee of Senators).
And as for all other political
staffers, except senior staff in the
Opposition Leaders Office, no eth-
ics rules apply to them, and they
are not required to disclose any
personal interests (not even financial
interests), so who knows how their
actions would measure up to ethics
criteria if such criteria were included
in your definition of a terrificstaffer.
Maybe they are all acting hon-
estly, ethically, openly, representa-
tively, and preventing waste all of
the time. The public has a right to
know whether they are acting in
these ways (since we pay their sala-
ries), but we wont know until rules
are applied to them requiring them
to act properly, with full disclosure
requirements, and independent
enforcement by a fully-empowered,
well-resourced watchdog with
a strong enforcement approach
(unlike the ethics commissioner),
and the power to penalize violators.
Knowing how committed all of
the federal politicians are to demo-
cratic good government, I am sure
that the MPs on the House Proce-
dural Affairs Committee will strongly
recommend closing the huge loop-
holes and correcting the flaws and
strengthening enforcement of the
MPsethics code when they continue
their review of the code after Parlia-
ment opens again in September. And
I am also sure that the House will
make those changes right away.
I am also sure that the House
or Senate or joint committee that
reviews the Conflict of Interest Act
soon (the review is already seven
months past its legal five-year dead-
line) will also make strong recom-
mendations to close the loopholes
in, and strengthen enforcement of,
the act, and that the Conservative
Cabinet will introduce a bill that
will make those changes that will
pass quickly and unanimously.
I am also sure that the Senate
will clean up its ethics act sooner
than later.
And I am also sure that an ethics
law or code will soon be enacted to
apply to political staffers, so that you
can add it to your survey criteria.
I am so sure of all of these things
because I have faith that federal
politicians will do the right ethi-
cal thing very soon, even though
they havent for the past 145 years,
unfortunately. Better to hope than to
despair, as someone said recently.
Duff Conacher is the founding
board member of Democracy Watch,
Canadas leading democratic reform
and good government organization.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
The Hill Times Terrific 25 Staffers Survey
should include the most ethical too
Parliaments review of the
Conflict of Interest Act is
already seven months past
its legal five-year deadline.
POLITICAL REPORTING
ERIC LIDDELL
BY Duff Conacher
13
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
R
e: Geeks on the Hill: The Big Bang The-
ory meets Yes, Minister,(The Hill Times,
July 16, p. 10). We thank Paul Dufour for
his insightful column that probed both the
impetus and necessity behind the unortho-
dox behaviour of scientists in our nations
capital on July 10. Under normal circum-
stances, scientists would be out in the field
meticulously recording observations, in
their laboratories wrestling with uncoopera-
tive instruments, or in their offices poring
over unexpected experimental results.
But these are not normal circumstances
and this is precisely what compelled sci-
entistsnot traditionally known for their
political advocacyto take to the streets. Mr.
Dufour is correct: scientists are fed up with
a federal government that espouses trans-
parency and accountability but eschews
evidence-based decision-making.
What was the message we wanted Canadi-
ans to hear? Simply, that the current federal
government has mounted a systematic and
deliberate campaign to reduce the role of sci-
entific evidence in decision-making. The cam-
paign involves a reduction in: the capacity
of federal institutions to gather scientific evi-
dence; the ability of both federal institutions
and civil society to bring scientific evidence
forward; and the role of scientific evidence in
law and regulation. It has targeted a number
of science domains which speak directly to
values many Canadians cherishenviron-
mental protection, public health, social justice,
and the welfare of Canadas less fortunate.
As Mr. Dufour noted, Minister of State for
Science and Technology Gary Goodyears
response to the Death of Evidencerally was
a classic political non sequitur that attempted
to shift the focus of the debate away from our
messagethe need for scientific evidence as
the foundation for policy and regulatory deci-
sionstoward his governments investments
in science and technology. One is left wonder-
ing whether the communications department
in the Prime Ministers Office is not itself in
need of a summer recess to float so transpar-
ent a ploy: scientists may be eccentric and
politically nave, but they are not stupid.
The issue raised by scientists should con-
cern all Canadians. Good decisions must be
based on evidence. It is an affront to Cana-
dian intelligence, never mind the twin demo-
cratic principles of transparency and account-
ability, when scientific evidence potentially
incompatible with or inconvenient to political
agendas is simply not gathered, suppressed
or rendered irrelevant by legislative fiat. The
Omnibus Implementation Budget Bill C-38
that steamrolled through the House of Com-
mons this spring is but the tip of the iceberg.
In the months to come, we can expect further
dismantling of our scientific capacity, further
censorship of government scientists, and
further erosion of the influence of scientific
evidence in decision-making.
Let us hope that under the shroud of the
Death of Evidencewas the birth of a new
movementbased on the simple, non-parti-
san idea that all Canadians should demand
that the entire body of evidence underlying
any policy or regulatory decision be brought
forth and displayed, warts and all.
Diane Orihel is a PhD candidate, biologi-
cal sciences, University of Alberta and lead-
er of the Coalition to Save ELA Canadas
Experimental Lakes Area. Scott Findlay,
PhD, associate professor, Department of
Biology, University of Ottawa senior orga-
nizer of the Death of Evidence Rally.
The Hill Times
Feds mount systematic,
deliberate campaign to
reduce role of scientific
evidence in decision-making
The campaign involves a reduction in: the capacity of federal institutions to gather
scientific evidence; the ability of both federal institutions and civil society to bring
scientific evidence forward; and the role of scientific evidence in law and regulation.
OPINION
SCIENCE & DECISION-MAKING
PUBLICATION DATE: JAh0A8Y 28, 2013 ADVERTISING DEADLINE: DECEMBER 7, 2012
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Harper and Laureen Harper
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Photograph by Jake Wright, The Hill Times
14
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
O
TTAWAWhen Parliament
next meets, it will undoubtedly
address Bill C-15, euphemistically
known as Strengthening Military
Justice in the Defence of Canada
Act. Interestingly, there is no such
thing as a Defence of Canada
Actunless our government wants
to retitle the National Defence Act
accordingly. Be that as it may, Bill
C-15 contains a pot-pourri of leg-
islative provisions, some of which,
as listed immediately below, are
welcomed because they are truly
designed to strengthen military
justice: provide for security of
tenure for military judges; specify
the objectives of the sentencing
process; provide for additional
sentencing options; and set out the
duties and functions of the Cana-
dian Forces Provost Marshall.
However, Bill C-15 also contains
a number of other provisions of no
utility or benefit to the military jus-
tice system in general operational
effectiveness, in particular. In fact,
many of these recommended provi-
sions will add unnecessarily to the
already huge operating cost of the
military justice system. These rec-
ommended new provisions need to
be reviewed by the Parliamentary
committee.
1. Appointment of a Deputy
Chief Military Judge. (s. 165.27): At
present, there is one chief military
judge and three military judges
for a total of four. Bill C-15 pro-
poses the addition of a deputy chief
military judge. Why? The Supreme
Court of Canada has a total of nine
judges, including a chief justice
but no deputy judge. The Federal
Court of Appeal has a total of 12
judges, including a chief justice but
no deputy judge. The Court Mar-
tial Appeal Court has a total of 55
judges including a chief justice but
no deputy judge. The Federal Court
of Canada has a total of 34 judges,
including a chief justice but no
deputy judge. It is beyond my com-
prehension as to why a military
court with only four judges would
require both a chief and a deputy
chief. Surely, such featherbedding
cannot be justified on workload
alone as there are, on average, only
60 court martials per year.
2. A military judge may submit
a grievance (s 29(2.1) to be con-
sidered and determined by the
CDS. The very fact that a military
judge can submit a grievance and
that the said grievance would then
be adjudicated by the chief of the
defence staff flies in the face of
the code of ethics for judges which
requires that a judge should uphold
the integrity and independence of
the judiciary, in the best interest of
justice and society. The perception
of a military judge presiding at a
court martial having his grievance
awaiting adjudication by the CDS
does not inspire a neutral observer
as to the independence from the
chain of command.
3. Creation of a Reserve Force
Military Judge Panel (s. 165.22). This
provision authorizes the governor-in-
council to appoint any lawyer with
10 years or more standing at the bar
of a province who is an officer in the
reserve force, to be a military judge.
Given that our existing four military
judges have one of the lowest annual
caseloads for any court in Canada,
the creation of a Reserve Force Mili-
tary Judges Panel is a costly extrava-
gance. Such a proposal flies in the
face of a recent decision by the Fed-
eral Court of Appeal, which in Felipa
v. Minister of Citizenship and Immi-
gration in 2011 VCA 272, declared
that the chief justice of the Federal
Court does not have the authority to
rely on deputy judges.
As an aside, if the government
is sincere in its attempt to reform
and strengthen the military justice
system, it should follow in the foot-
steps of the U.K., Australia, New
Zealand, and Ireland (to name only
a few) by civilianizing these judges.
This can easily be accomplished
by merging the Office of the Chief
of Military Judge (total of 21 per-
sonnel) with the Federal Court of
Canada and creating a new mili-
tary division therein.
Besides realizing substantial
personnel and operations financial
savings, by having, for example, a
single registry as well as technical,
financial and clerical support staff,
a military division at the Federal
Court would give access to a pool
of qualified Federal Court judges
who are already well experienced
in all aspects of federal law, includ-
ing the National Defence Act, since
many of them sit regularly on the
already established Court Martial
Appeal Court. Also, according to
the existing Federal Courts Act,
any judge of the Federal Court may
sit and act at any time and at any
place in Canada hence by their
very nature they would be avail-
able to sit at court martial proceed-
ings anywhere in Canada.
In recommending that Federal
Court judges preside at courts mar-
tial, I can already hear the rumbling
of some JAG lawyers who will
insist that a judge at a court martial
absolutely needs to have military
experience.If that were true, judges
sitting at the Court Martial Appeal
Court or the Supreme Court of
Canada would have to have military
experienceto hear an appeal. Yet, a
crime is a crime is a crime, whether
committed by a person in uniform, a
lawyer, a physician, an accountant,
a diplomat or a hockey player. Also,
any mitigating and special circum-
stances or context of a given crime
can be taken into account by any
sentencing or a reviewing judge, if
properly pleaded by defence coun-
sel. Judges of the Federal Court are
trained initially when they are newly
appointed and continuously during
their careers in all areas of the fed-
eral law, criminal or civil. Addition-
ally, Federal Court judges already
sit on cases dealing with a range of
military administrative law matters.
Moreover, many of these judges
already sit as appellate judges on the
Court Martial Appeal Court which is
itself presided by a judge of the Fed-
eral Court of Canada.
As stated by the then minister
of defence Doug Young in his 1997
Report to the Prime Minister on the
Leadership and Management of the
Armed Forces, The record of mod-
ern warfare clearly demonstrates
that military effectiveness depends
upon Armed Forces being integral
parts of the societies they serve, not
being isolated from them. The soci-
ety in which and for which the CF
serve is in the process of rapid legal,
economic and social change. As a
result, the Forces must respect [. . .
] and conform to other legislation
evolving social values.
4. Delegation of the CDS pow-
ers as the final authority in the
grievance process (s. 29.14). This
new clause permits the delegation
of the CDS powers, duties, and
functions to subordinate officers.
Given the mounting number of
grievances by CF members and the
current state of disrepair of the CF
grievance system, the last thing the
CF leadership ought to do is to fur-
ther distance itself from the griev-
ances submitted by the rank and file
by adopting an out of sight out of
minds stand. In the Armed Forces,
the submission of a grievance is
normally seen as a measure of
last resort imbued with significant
career risks. When a CF member
decides to cross the rubicon and
submit a written grievance to his
commanding officer, he or she holds
the honest belief that the issues giv-
ing rise to the complaint are grave
and serious enough to merit such a
step and they will receive the per-
sonal attention of their superiors.
On the other hand, an effective
commanding general ought to be
tuned with, and sensitive to, the
grievances and complaints submit-
ted by his subordinates, not be insu-
lated by layers of bureaucracy, and
not the other way around.
The delegation by the CDS of
his powers as the final authority in
the CF Grievance System is a ret-
rograde step and a recipe for poor
morale as this would be seen as yet
another step to protect the brand
that is DND newspeak, or fictional
language, that refers to the notion
that senior officers, such as the
CDS image and reputation, are pro-
tected by CF public affairs officials.
In short, the CDS should become
more engaged not more dissociated
with the plight of the grievors so
that he may provide inspired and
informed leadership to people he
directs to be in harms way.
Two major omissions from Bill C-15
Summary Trials. As discussed
previously, I am not opposed to
summary trials per se, but I con-
tinue to be concerned that their
structure and process deviates quite
considerably from civilian statutory
equivalents and, even perhaps, their
constitutionality. Of note, the U.K.,
Australia, New Zealand and Ire-
land, whose military justice systems
resemble that of Canadas, have
seen fit to modify their summary
trial system so as to provide a much,
much fairer judicial process. Why
then are our own sailors, soldiers
and RCAF personnel deprived of
such enlightened substantive and
procedural changes?
Judge-Advocate General. A sec-
ond area of reform which has been
left aside in Bill C-15 is the require-
ment to fundamentally review the
raison dtre of the judge advocate
general since the incumbent now
simultaneously fulfils two separate,
and conflicting, functions: legal
adviser to the executive branch (to
the Governor General, the minis-
ter of defence and the chief of the
defence staff) and superintendence
of the military judiciary system. In
both capacities, the JAG reports to
the minister of National Defence.
Of note, in almost all common-law
jurisdictions, and in particular, the
U.K., Australia, New Zealand, and
Ireland, these two functions have
been properly separated, if for no
other reason than to truly separate
the military judiciary from the
executive branch, and to detach the
military judiciary function from the
military chain of command. In these
countries, the JAG is now a civil-
ian law officer of the Crown who
is also purposely located outside
their equivalent of the Department
of National Defence. If the aim of
Bill C-15 is to strengthen the mili-
tary justice system, then this matter
should be properly addressed, on
a priority basis, by the Department
of Justice whose function is to have
the superintendence of all matters
connected with the administration
of justice in Canada.
Conclusion
All CF members are subject to
the criminal law of Canada wher-
ever they are serving, and they have
a duty to uphold it. In that respect
they are no different from other
citizens. When deployed on opera-
tions abroad they are also subject
to international law, including the
laws of armed conflict. It is axiom-
atic, therefore, that CF members
must exercise the highest standards
of professionalism, as befits their
rank and appointment, at all times
to both safeguard operational effec-
tiveness and Canadas reputation.
At the end of the day, Canadian
military law, which incorporates
both the criminal law of Canada
as well as civil offences commit-
ted outside Canada, is a vital and
necessary law in order to main-
tain discipline and order among
the troops, and is believed to be
one of the many reasons why the
Canadian Forces are considered
one of the worlds best, despite its
small size. Considering the power
that military law has over its audi-
ence, our citizen-soldiers deserve a
world-class military justice system.
A military justice system which is,
first and foremost, just and fair to
the accused while being responsive
to the military need for discipline.
Obviously, the National
Defence Act is still deficient in
some major areas and it requires
more than tweaks and tinkering
to bring it into the 21
st
century.
Michel W. Drapeau is the
co-author of Military Justice In
Action published by Carswell in
November 2011. He teaches mili-
tary law at the Faculty of Law,
Ottawa University.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Bill C-15: strengthening the military justice
system, more questions than answers
The National Defence Act is still deficient in some major areas and it requires more than tweaks and tinkering to bring it into the 21
st
century.
OPINION
MILITARY JUSTICE
BY Michel W. Drapeau
P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h

b
y

J
a
k
e

W
r
i
g
h
t
,

T
h
e

H
i
l
l

T
i
m
e
s
Defence Minister
Peter MacKay.
Michel Drapeau
says although Bill
C-15 dubs itself
the Strengthening
Military Justice
in the Defence
of Canada
Act, theres
no Defence of
Canada Act.
15
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
T
he Conservatives double standards
tell us who they truly support. It was
reported recently that the government
doesnt want the United Nations to track
global arms sales because it might compro-
mise the legally protected information of
private companies.At the same time, they
want every Canadian union to disclose the
details of their cleaning contracts.
In an overwhelmingly negative speech to
the UN recently, Foreign Affairs Deputy Direc-
tor Habib Massoud laid out the Conservatives
position on the final round of Arms Trade
Treaty negotiations. In Canadas view, detailed
reporting about each and every transaction
can, in certain circumstances, be both imprac-
tical and unrealistic. The sheer volume of such
transactions would overwhelm virtually any
administrative system now in existence.
Taking a position that puts Canada off-
side with the bulk of the international com-
munity, Massoud called for the proposed
arms tracking secretariat to be minimal,
small, and flexibleand financed entirely
through existing UN budgets. He added
that the arms tracking secretariat must
safeguard the legally protected informa-
tion of private companies or the personal
information of private individuals.
While the Conservatives jump to defend
the privacy rights of arms dealers they are
trying to force unions to disclose information
on tens of thousands of Canadian workers
receiving direct or indirect union benefits or
working within or for labour organizations.
Sponsored by Conservative MP Russ Hiebert,
private members bill C-377 is set for final
reading when the House of Commons returns
from its summer break in September. Thus far
the opposition parties have opposed the bill
and the Conservatives have supported it.
Bill C-377 would require every trade
union and labour trust (pension plan, train-
ing fund as well as health and welfare funds)
to file a public information return with the
Canada Revenue Agency on all expenditures
over $5,000. This information would be made
publicly available, which would give employ-
ers an advantage in bargaining or when try-
ing to thwart a unionization drive. A similar
database set up by George Bushs adminis-
tration in the U.S. is used by anti-union busi-
nesses to weaken workers.
Labour unions are among the few institu-
tions that can and do provide a counterbal-
ance to the power of corporations. Yet the
Conservatives are not requiring companies
that bargain with trade unions to file detailed
reports to the Canada Revenue Agency on
their salaries, political, or lobbying spending.
Additionally, they are not requiring other
professional associations that collect fees or
dues from their members, such as the Cana-
dian Medical Association for example, to fol-
low the terms of Bill C-377.
They are only requiring the institutions
created to represent the interests of mil-
lions of workers across the country to file
these detailed records. There is no other
way to interpret this than as an attempt to
disarm a political opponent.
Much like what Habib Massoud was hint-
ing at when talking about those involved
in the arms trade, the detailed reporting
required by Bill C-377 will be burdensome,
costly and threaten the privacy rights of
many individuals, companies, and organi-
zations that work with unions. Incredibly,
under the proposed legislation labour-
associated pension and benefit plans will be
required to publicly disclose the name and
addressand a descriptionof benefits paid
to individuals greater than $5,000. This could
include personal medical information.
Bill C-377 should be scrapped but that
doesnt mean there isnt a need for greater
transparency for all major Canadian insti-
tutions. But any requirements imposed by
the government need to be applied equally.
There shouldnt be one set of standards for
the groups the Conservatives dont like and
another for their friends selling arms.
Dave Coles is president of the Commu-
nications, Energy and Paperworkers Union
of Canada, based in Ottawa.
news@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Feds want every trade
union, labour trust to
file public information
return with Revenue
Agency over $5,000
Meanwhile, the government doesnt want the United Nations
to track global arms sales because it might compromise the
legally protected information of private companies.
OPINION
CANADIAN UNIONS
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P
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h

b
y

J
a
k
e

W
r
i
g
h
t
,

T
h
e

H
i
l
l

T
i
m
e
s
Sponsored by
Conservative MP
Russ Hiebert, pic-
tured in this file
photo on the Hill,
private members
bill C-377 is set
for final reading
when the House of
Commons returns
from its summer
break in September.
16
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
last week decided to let a chal-
lenge proceed regarding the 2011
election results in seven ridings
across the country, political insid-
ers say the technologies deployed
by political parties in campaigns
are becoming more sophisticated
with each electiongiving those
who play dirty tricks a new edge
over Elections Canada and those
who would catch the perpetrators.
Its not difficult to buy a Smart-
phone thats called a burner that
isnt tied to a company and youre
buying time with cardsyou load
a list on it. That burner then just
automatically, with software, calls
out the 5,000 people you are trying
to perhaps suppress, explained
one longtime Liberal organizer,
who did not want to be identified.
That phone could deliver a mes-
sage to supporters of a political
opponent giving them false infor-
mation, as in the robocalls scandal,
or it could slander the other candi-
date anonymously, he said.
If youre Elections Canada,
how on earth do you monitor that?
You dont,said the organizer.
Elections Canada is currently
investigating the so-called robo-
calls affair, the automated and
live fraudulent calls made in the
last election, to send voters to
the wrong polling stations. Elec-
tions Canada is looking into 1,100
complaints about misleading
calls made in the last election and
Canadas Chief Electoral Officer
Marc Mayrand told MPs in May
that Elections Canada may rec-
ommend the government regu-
late contact with voters during
election campaigns. Mr. Mayrand
also said Elections Canadas next
report will look into how new
technology affects campaigning.
Mr. Mayrand said the report will
be presented by the end of this fis-
cal year next spring.
The purposed of this report will
be to suggest improvements to the
Canada Elections Act in order to deal
with a number of issues relating to
new technologies and social media,
as well as to how political entities
communicate with electors during a
general election, Mr. Mayrand said
before the House Affairs Commit-
tee on May 29. Among other things,
it will address issues such as voter
contacts, either through automated
or live calls, and whether, or to what
extent, these communications need
to be regulated.
Meanwhile, last week the Fed-
eral Court decided to allow a chal-
lenge to proceed in seven ridings
across the country regarding the
2011 election results. Backed by the
Council of Canadians, the voters
want the Federal Court to overturn
the election results in the seven rid-
ings won by Conservatives because
of allegations of misleading phone
calls that attempted to send voters
to the wrong polling stations.
As well, the Supreme Court
heard a separate case challenging
last years election result in Etobi-
coke Centre, where Conservative
MP Ted Opitz was elected by a mar-
gin of 26 votes. An Ontario Superior
Court judge had ruled that 79 voters
in the 2011 election were able to cast
ballots though there were errors in
their eligibility paperwork, or those
documents were missing.
Today, there are a number of
ways to contact voters, whether
through social media sites like
Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare
or through automated phone calls
or telephone town halls enabled
by voice over internet protocol, or
mass emails and text messages.
There are also updates that
enable old tactics to be done more
efficiently. For instance, when auto-
mated phone dialing first became
available, the dialing system had
to have its own phone line, and it
dialed phone numbers one after
another. With VOIP, thousands of
calls can be placed simultaneously,
delivering an automated message
to thousands of listeners at a time.
Most of the technologies are
developed in the U.S. where super-
sized campaign budgets drive
innovation.
There are more new technolo-
gies coming online every campaign,
said a senior Conservative volunteer
and activist who has worked on fed-
eral and provincial campaigns and
who did not want to be identified.
During an election, parties put
their efforts into building a list of
known or potential supporters and
keeping that list updated. Elections
Canada provides candidates and par-
ties with copies of its own voter lists,
and campaigns constantly update
them throughout the election.
Access to these electronic lists,
which contain basic information
on voters identities, is supposed
to be tightly controlled, but in
reality that rarely happens, said
the Liberal organizer.
He said that with an average of
four parties running in each of Cana-
das 308 electoral districts, there will
literally be 10,000 people who have
their hands on it. What happens to
the list from there is up to the ethics
of each of those individuals.
If you want to send out spam
or an email message to 2,000 peo-
ple to misinform them about a
candidate, it is not expensive and
probably would take you about 20
minutes to figure our how to go
offshore, have somebody send the
email for you to that list and never
be tracked,he said.
The Liberal organizer also
noted that while parties try to
keep the list secure by limiting
access to it and assigning access
levels to those who can log into it,
the system isnt foolproof.
The senior Conservative activist
said that the parties have a strong
incentive to make sure that the list
isnt misused because access to this
key tool could be taken away.
But to find those who do break
the rules is exceedingly hard, said
the Liberal.
Its incredibly expensive and
time-consuming,he said.
Elections Canada would have
to be able to forensically audit
thousands of not only communica-
tions traditionallybut theres 20
mediums out there,he explained.
Its also not in Elections Cana-
das job description to monitor the
way political parties engage with
the electorate, said the Conserva-
tive source.
Tyler Sommers, coordinator
of government watchdog group
Democracy Watch, said he was
concerned with how the latest
in voter contact technology was
being misused.
But its not really Elections
Canadas job to keep up with that.
Its the Members of Parliament who
are supposed to pass legislation in
order to deal with that,he said.
The Liberal source said that
Elections Canada would have to
be given the resources and the
technology and the legislation
necessary to audit communica-
tions that are being misused.
The Conservative source said
that its clear that Elections Canada
is conducting investigations and
trying to make improvements, but
the Liberal wasnt as optimistic.
What is understood among
most political operatives is that
Elections Canada historically has
demonstrated little interest in
severely punishing or in exacting
more skin out of people who are
found to be guilty,said the Liberal.
Unless people start to get
charged, and t here s some
accountability, this will get worse
before it gets better,he added.
Mr. Sommers said that Elections
Canada already has sweeping pow-
ers to conduct investigations, and
call witnesses, but that its impossi-
ble to know how strictly or loosely
it enforces the Canada Elections
Act because the results of their
investigations remain private.
Elections Canada has received
3,000 complaints since 1997, he
noted.
The organizations budget will
decline from $136.2-million to
$94.8-million a year by 2014-2015
due to the wind down of certain
programs and budget cuts, but
Elections Canada also has the
ability to draw straight from the
governments bank account when
it comes to funding elections or
investigations.
Elections Canadas operating
reductions will have no impact
on investigations by the Office
of the Commissioner of Canada
Elections, said spokesperson
Diane Benson.
The agency is also reviewing
the procedures used to ensure the
integrity of the electoral system.
Elections Canada is always
looking for ways to improve the
administration of the electoral
system and is committed to
working with Parliament to
address any issues of concern,
said Ms. Benson.
Liberal MP Jim Karygiannis
(Scarborough-Agincourt, Ont.)
was recently in Libya where he
was an elections observer during
that countrys first free elections
since dictator Muammar Gaddafi
was ousted and killed in October
2011, and spoke to The Hill
Times from Nagorno-Karabakh,
an area in Azerbaijan that is in
dispute between that country and
Armenia.
He said that in countries like
Libya, elections volunteers are
given three days of training, as
opposed to a few hours in Canada.
We have got to make sure our
people have enough training, he
said, adding that Canada can-
not allow a replay of the cleri-
cal errors in Etobicoke Centre,
Ont., that may lead to the electoral
results in that riding being over-
turned, pending a Supreme Court
decision.
Mr. Karygiannis added that
Elections Canada needs to investi-
gate complaints of elections she-
nanigansmore quickly.
Its too slow. The trail is hot,
and then it goes cold after a cou-
ple of months and people forget
about it, he said, explaining that
he lodged a complaint with the
agency after a handful of constitu-
ents told him they received robo-
calls purporting to be from the
Liberal Party in the middle of the
night during the last election.
Both the Conservative and the
Liberal organizer said that obser-
vation was the best available safe-
guard against the unscrupulous
players.
The Conservat i ve source
said that elections are highly
observed, highly regulated envi-
ronments.
To look out for voter fraud or
other problems on election day,
a ridings top candidates can
appoint scrutineers to challenge
questionable voters and observe
the ballot count at polling sta-
tions. But the Liberal estimated
that an average downtown riding
would have 200 to 240 polls, at as
many as 80 different locations. To
field enough volunteers to cover
a 16-hour day a candidate would
have to have 160 people to spare.
Its hard to do, but its some-
thing that a well-organized cam-
paign should be able to do, said
the Conservative source.
Conservative pundit Tim Pow-
ers told The Hill Times recently
that fielding scrutineers some-
times takes a back seat to other
priorities when it comes to distrib-
uting volunteers.
I think it depends on the can-
didate. Their needs. The resources
both professional and amateur
that they have and how they are
deployed,he said.
Candidate scrutineers may
fall behind in importance these
days behind using volunteer
resources to get out the vote. Dif-
ferent candidates though will have
different practices,he explained.
Mr. Karygiannis said that in
the last election his campaign had
1,000 volunteers, and he had scru-
tineers at polling stations looking
out for questionable voters.
We teach our people what to
watch out for, and we make sure
that we follow up,he said.
That unscrupulous people try
and get around the system is noth-
ing new, said Mr. Karygiannis.
The Liberal organizer said
that when he started volunteer-
ing for campaigns, it was well-
known that voter cards got stolen
and leaflets misdirecting voters to
the wrong polling stations would
occasionally pop up.
These are old tricks, theyre
just being done electronically
now,he said.
The Conservat i ve source
stressed that there is no magical
black box full of tricks at the dis-
posal of political parties.
What are the tactics were
talking about fundamentally?
Were talking about the ability
to send mail, the ability to make
a phone call, and the ability to
keep peoples names and political
information organized in a data-
base,he said.
The political insiders were split
as to the extent of abuse that takes
place in Canada.
Do I think there is widespread
fraud in the system? No. I think
there is a little bit of goofy fraud,
because there always is. There are
always bad people in any human
enterprise, but I think it would be
very hard in the system we have to
essentially organize a conspiracy
and then keep it quiet, said the
Conservative source.
The Liberal source said that
while compared to other coun-
tri es, Canada s system was
extremely clean that doesnt
mean it is problem-free.
He said: Is there corruption
and fraud going on? Absolutely.
Are there dirty tricks? Every time.
Liberal John Duffy, mean-
while, recently told The Hill Times
that sophisticated new get-out-
the-vote technologies could be
helping unscrupulous candidates
game the systemin an election.
jbruno@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Canadas election system
mostly clean, but corruption,
fraud, dirty tricks do happen,
says political insiders
Meanwhile, Canadas Chief Electoral Officer Marc Mayrand recently said the
government may have to regulate contact with voters during an election campaign.
NEWS
CAMPAIGNS & ELECTIONS
Continued from Page 1
17
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
C
anadas Prime Ministers have
wielded far too much power
for far too long, but its time Can-
ada amend the Constitution and
pass legislation to require more
effective checks and constraints
on the Prime Minister to protect
the House, to restore the political
system to working order, and to
bring back power to the peoples
elected representatives in Parlia-
ment, says one of the authors of
Democratizing the Constitution:
Reforming Responsible Govern-
ment which won the 2012 Smiley
Book Prize as well as the $50,000
2011 Donner Prize for the best
public policy book in the country.
The Prime Minister in Canada
is far more powerful than he
should be and hes far more pow-
erful than he needs to be,said
Lori Turnbull, an associate profes-
sor of political science at Dalhou-
sie University who wrote the book
with Mark D. Jarvis, a doctoral
candidate at the University of Vic-
toria, and along with their mentor,
the now late scholar, Peter Aucoin,
who died before the Donner Prize
winner was announced in May.
Its not an inevitable result of a
Parliamentary system that a Prime
Minister accumulates this kind of
power. Other systems have Parlia-
ments just like we do and have far
more effective constraints on their
Prime Minister,said Prof. Turnbull
in an interview with The Hill Times,
pointing to New Zealand, Australia,
and now the United Kingdom.
The authors argue that the
Constitution and its unwrit-
ten conventions no longer give
effective constraints on the PMs
power.They say the result is a
dysfunctional system in which
the Constitution has degenerated
into whatever the Prime Minister
decides it is and a Parliament
that is effectively controlled by
the Prime Minister, instead of the
other way around.
All MPs have is scrutiny, to
hold the government to account
and to choose a new government
if this ones not working, and to
take that away from them is to
say, Theres nothing, theres no
check on the Prime Minister. He
can just do whatever he wants,
said Prof. Turnbull.
The Prime Minister would
still have lots of power, but the
authors say a handful of reforms
to political parties, to Parliamen-
tary governance, and to the Con-
stitution would democratize the
Constitution and Canadas Parlia-
mentary system. The authors have
come up with four constitutional
reforms, which were blind-peer-
reviewed by seven people before
the book was published, and they
say the reforms must be passed
as a package to work.
We advocate not giving the
Governor General more reserve
powers. We argue that everything
should be written down so that
we know exactly whats supposed
to happen in certain situations.
We propose four major reforms,
said Prof. Turnbull.
Constitutionally, she said, there
should be a deadline requiring the
House of Commons to be sum-
moned within 30 days after a gen-
eral election; there should be fixed
election dates every four years on
a specific date, binding both the
Prime Minister and the Governor
General, unless a majority of two-
thirds of MPs approve a motion to
dissolve Parliament for an early
election; the House should adopt
the constructive non-confidence
procedure; and in order to pro-
rogue Parliament, there should be
two-thirds majority consent in the
House of Commons.
There reforms could be trig-
gered by a political crisis and would
require good faith on the part of
politicians, said Prof. Turnbull.
There would have to be an
acknowledgement that every-
body has an interest in protect-
ing the integrity of the system,
even if youre the Prime Minister,
and even if youre the opposition
leader,she said.
The Q&A with Prof. Turnbull has
been edited for style and length.
Why is this book important and
who should read it?
Everybody should read it. But
were hoping that citizens read
it, political parties read it. Were
hoping the players read it. This is
why I say everyone should read it
because were all players. The point
of the book and why the book is
important is that the Prime Minis-
ter in Canada is far more power-
ful than he should be and hes far
more powerful than he needs to be
and its not an inevitable result of a
Parliamentary system that a Prime
Minister accumulates this kind of
power. Other systems have Parlia-
ments just like we do and have far
more effective constraints on their
Prime Minister.

You say Canadas time-honoured
system of responsible govern-
ment is failing usand that the
executive must be accountable to
the peoples elected representa-
tives, but that its slipping away.
What are you talking about?
If we assume the Governor
General has reserve powers, then
the Governor General has a role
in protecting democracy by pro-
tecting us from a Prime Minister
who goes too far. The trouble is
because we dont have an agree-
ment on what those conventions
are, they dont work because a
Governor General might make
an argument, Well, this kind of
looks pretty political to me, and
the House of Commons should be
allowed to exercise its authority.
Well, that would be like a
Governor General trying to make
a judgment call, assuming too
much authority. If that had hap-
pened in 2008 [that she had not
allowed the prorogation of Parlia-
ment], the Prime Minister and the
Conservatives would have had
absolutely done as much as they
could to destroy the reputation of
the Office of the Governor of the
Governor General because if she
had said, The House of Commons
should be allowed to speak in this
regard, Im just going to let this go,
prorogation is not necessary right
now, then arguably, we would
have come back to the House on
Dec. 8, the government would
have fallen, and the coalition
would have taken over; if she had
allowed that to go ahead.
And the Conservatives would
have done an excellent job of
painting this person who was
intruding in Cana-
dian democracy
because thats what
he did to [Stphane]
Dion. He did a great
job of convincing
everybody that this
wasnt true; that
Canadians choose
their government.
And it was amazing
the power of YouTube
and the internet
because support for
the coalition wasnt
great to begin with,
but it evaporated over
the course of that
week when Harper
kept saying, A coali-
tion cant come in
and take over, when
you dont have a say
in it, and No one
chose this government, and We
allow people to choose the govern-
ment.Well, no, we live in a Par-
liamentary system which means
if a government loses confidence,
thats what the House is for.
All MPs have is scrutiny, to
hold the government to account,
to choose a new government if
this ones not working, and to
take that away from them is to
say, Theres nothing, theres no
check on the Prime Minister. He
can just do whatever he wants.
How can power be restored to
where it belongs with the peo-
ples elected representatives in
Parliament, as you put it?
We advocate not giving the
Governor General more reserve
powers. We argue that everything
should be written down so that
we know exactly whats supposed
to happen in certain situations.
We propose four major reforms.
First, we argue that we should
have fixed-term elections. We do
have a fixed-election date law now,
but its not enforceable. The gov-
ernment can still choose to ask for
dissolution whenever it wants. So
thats not working and these four
reforms are supposed to appear as
a set; if you do them one-off they
dont really make any sense, but
if you roll them all together, we
think its going to work.
So if we have fixed-term elec-
tions, you have the election held
every fourth October, and the
only way you get an early dissolu-
tion is with two-thirds consent in
the House and if you have two-
thirds consent, not necessarily
every time, but most of the time,
thats going to require more than
one party, so youre not going
to see a Prime Minister do it all
by himself. Even Harper now
wouldnt be able to dissolve by
whipping his own party.
Youd have to get at least
another party to get involved and
there might be times when an
early dissolution makes sense:
if we chose a new electoral sys-
tem, if we chose new electoral
boundaries, if theres some crisis
or reason to have an early dis-
solution, usually that wouldnt
happen, but if it did, there would
be some kind of safety valve to
allow that to happen through a
super majority in the House. But,
for the most part, it would mean
were stuck with the Parliament
weve got for four years.
We also argue that proroga-
tion should only occur with a
super majority, or two-thirds, vote
in the House too. And the reason
to do that, as I said, it forces the
Prime Minister to get at least one
other party to support the mea-
sure and by proroguing or dis-
solving, the Prime Minister is able
to silence the House. If hes able
to do it unilaterally, it means hes
able to make the House go quiet
when it works for him and by
having the super majority thresh-
old, it means that he cant do that.
It means the House has to
consent to its own purge and that,
hopefully, will mean that a Prime
Ministers not able to pull the
plug just because things were get-
ting bad for him because majority
Prime Ministers do it too.
Chrtien did it, even though
he had a majority and even
though he knew he wasnt going
The Prime Minister
is far more powerful
than he should be
Democratizing the Constitution: Reforming Responsible Government
co-author Lori Turnbull argues for more written checks and constraints
on the Prime Minister of Canada, for the sake of the House of Commons.
THE Q&A
LORI TURNBULL
By KATE MALLOY
Continued on Page 18
Reforming Political Parties
Res tore the power of party caucuses
to dismiss the party leader, including a
sitting Prime Minister, and to appoint a
new interim leader
Rem ove the party leaders power to
approve or reject party candidates for
election in each riding.
Reforming Parliamentary Governance
Adopt legislation limiting the size of
ministries to a maximum of 25 individuals
and the number of Parliamentary
secretaries to eight at any given time.
Use secret preferential ballots by
committee members to select House
of Commons committee chairs for the
duration of the Parliamentary session.
Adopt a set schedule for opposition days
in the House of Commons that cannot be
altered by the government unilaterally.
Reduce, by 50 per cent, the partisan
political staff complement on
Parliamentary Hill.
Four-Part Constitutional Reform
Establish a deadline requiring the House
of Commons to be summoned within 30
days after a general election.
Establish xed election dates every four
years on a specic date, binding both
the Prime Minister and the governor
general, unless a majority of two-thirds
of MPs approve a motion to dissolve
Parliament for an early election.
Adopt the constructive non-
condence procedure.
Require the consent of a two-thirds
majority of the House of Commons in
order to prorogue Parliament.
Power to the people:
Lori Turnbull, co-author
of the Donner Prize-
winning Democratizing
the Constitution:
Reforming Responsible
Government, pictured
recently in Ottawa.
P
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b
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K
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M
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,

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H
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e
s
18
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
But let the premiers, the provinces, and the
federal meet in a constitutional conference
and decide how they want to do it. But
right now they dont want to do it. I can
tell you right now that the majority of the
provinces dont want to change the Senate.
They dont want elections. So why?
Now Mr. Harper, I support him, I respect
him, and I support reforming the Senate to
make it contemporary and thats really what
he wants because what he promised was I
will reform the Senate.
And when he first promised [Senate
reform], this Triple-E idea had come up,
but hes now been here long enough and
hes seen that outcry for that is no longer
out there. There are a few people, academic
types, who live in a bit of an ivory tower
and dont really know the real world, those
people are asking for it but Harper is
seeing, Yeah, it probably would be good
to change the way theyre appointed, yeah
probably good to have terms.
My impression is that Harper is a man
of very good faith, he wants to do the right
thing, he wants to honour a commitment he
made to reform the Senate. At the time that
he made the commitment, Triple-E was the
big buzzword. But that thing is off the table,
Im pretty sure, thats not what people want.
Would having an elected Senate worsen
the partisan bickeringyou referred to in
the 2008 Senator of the Monthinterview
where you stated that the Senate was in a
bad place?
Yeah, it would. It would be totally dys-
functional. A bit like the States, youd have
gridlock.At that time, you know [Liberal
Senators] were blocking the stuff and that
isnt our role. Our role is to improve. But lets
say were in the opposition and were against
capital punishment, but a bill comes up and
the government has been elected democrati-
cally on a ticket of capital punishment and a
bill comes in and you and I and all of our col-
leagues in the Senate on our side are against it.
So, instead of examining the bill and
making sure that its well-drafted and its
going to bring in capital punishment in a
workable way, we try to make ourselves into
the government. Well, were not the govern-
ment, were the opposition so tough luck, and
thats why they were so criticized. We did it
too, the Conservatives, when we were in the
opposition and had a lot more Senators and
we blocked a lot of Liberal stuff. Its wrong.
And thats where you get a bad reputation
because youre unelected and your job is not
to block, its to give sober second thought. Its
not to legislate or to bring out the ideas. So
when they start doing what theyre not sup-
posed to do thats why you start saying, Well
wed better reform the Senate.
What do you plan to do now that youre
retiring from the Senate?
I leave with some pride with what weve
accomplished with this energy study [in the
Senate Energy, Environment and Natural
Resources Committee]... but its time to go.
Ive been here 20 years and Im 75 years old
and its time to move on. I dont feel like Im
75 but I may on Monday morning when
they cut me open. Id like to continue doing
things for the country.
Ive had three major things going on at
once: Ive had the Senate especially with
this energy study; Ive been chairman with
the McGill University Health Centre, were
building a $2.8-billion hospital, and Ive been
a senior partner with a big law firm. Im out
of the law firm and out of the hospital and
now Im out of the Senate. Im having some
medical repairs done. So I have an absolute-
ly clean slate. So what do I intend to do?
As I mentioned in the Senate, I have a
great interest in mental health. Its a ter-
ribly neglected area, and this has been said
before. So I will be giving a lot of my time on
that. Ive just donated a lot of money to the
McGill University Health Centre, the Mon-
treal General Hospital site for their mental
health patients, and we opened that on the
18th of June and dedicated it and that was
personal money. Im really interested in that.
I have a daughter who has a serious
mental issue that shes laboured with and
managed very well, but I see how families
suffer. And its very prevalent. And its not
just schizophrenia, or paranoia, or these
things. There are a whole lot of new mental
diseases and theyre in the shadows. We
dont give them proper resources. We dont
help the families deal with these people. Its
a stigma. The stigmatization makes it worse.
If someones acting funny, they say,
Hes acting schizophrenic, and we misuse
that term. Its BS.
So thatll be my main sphere of influence.
Public life, I dont know, well see. Ive told the
PM that I feel that I have a lot of energy and
that I would like to continue serving Canada
and he knows that. So stay tuned.
jgrigg@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
to lose votes, but he didnt like being
criticized on certain files so he prorogued
when it worked for him too. So the super
majority is also there to protect us from a
Prime Minister who can dissolve or pro-
rogue when he wants.
We also argue for a constructive confi-
dence vote. This is one that would probably
need a bit more of an explanation. It means
that if the House decides to vote non-confi-
dence in a government, at the same time the
House has to identify the MP who is going
to be Prime Minister next. So you cant leave
the people hanging and this removes any
kind of discretion for the Governor General
in making any decisions on whether or not a
future government is going to last.
What it would mean is that sometimes a
government might have an incentive to dis-
solve early because the conditions are right
and they think theyre going to be able to
make a majority, or a bigger majority, out of
this, and weve seen majority Prime Minis-
ters do that and minority government Prime
Ministers would do that too.
But sometimes the opposition has an
incentive to bring the government down if
they think the conditions are right; they might
be into a power grab too. So our argument
is in order to correct that on both sides, you
make it so that nobody gets an automatic dis-
solution and election by calling an early dis-
solution or by tearing down the government.
Were going to be stuck with the Parliament
we have and the opposition can only defeat
the government if its prepared to take over.
And sometimes a Prime Minister and Cabi-
net will try to throw it, theyll try to make it
impossible for the House to support them.
Thats the type of thing we dont want
because in 2011 Harper and his Cabinet had
only been in government for two-and-a-half
years, and there was no reason to have an
election then. If the Liberals wanted to take
down the government and got the NDP to
support them on this contempt of Parlia-
ment business, why wasnt there some
kind of discussion between the Governor
General and Liberal leader about whether
or not he could form a government? But as
far as we can tell, there was nothing and
not even a consideration of that possibility.
That would never happen in New Zealand,
Australia, or even in the U.K. now. You see if
theres a government on the other side.
Was there a fourth?
Yes, one other thing. Right now our only
rule with regards to summoning Parliament
after an election is that it has to happen
once a year and after an election that gives
a Prime Minister a long time before he has
to meet the House and theres no reason for
that. Most Prime Ministers dont push their
luck on that. You dont see a Prime Minister
ignoring the House for a year, but Joe Clark
ignored it for quite a while after that elec-
tion. The argument for us is that Parliament
should be summoned within 30 days of an
election. Internationally, thats not unusual.
Most systems have some kind of rule in
place and youve got to show back-up and
figure out whats going to happen.
How realistic is it that this will happen?
There are different ways it could hap-
pen. It could happen by legislation. Thats
how it happened in the U.K. and thats how
it is happening in the U.K. They ended up
with a political situation that they know is
going to require some regulation, so they
end up with this coalition which is very
unusual for the U.K., and they come up
with a piece of legislation that will allow
them to go forward basically.
So they come with an agreement on
what would have to happen for the House
to dissolve and there would be a new elec-
tion and thats supposed to provide stabil-
ity in that context. What triggered it was a
political crisis, or a political unknown vari-
able. That doesnt normally happen, so how
are we all going to deal with it?
So in order for it to happen, a trig-
gering event would probably be helpful
as well as good faith on the part of the
actors involved. There would have to be an
acknowledgement that everybody has an
interest in protecting the integrity of the
system, even if youre the Prime Minister,
and even if youre the opposition leader.
There has to be an acknowledgement
that there is a point to having rules that
protect everybody and protect the demo-
cratic integrity of what were doing. But it
seems like thats what isnt there.
It doesnt seem like it is, I dont know,
maybe Im wrong about that but it seems
like in our system, what happened in 2008
didnt lead to, that could have been a trig-
gering event, but after that happened, it
could have been the case that everybody
said, Now, going forward, we really should
figure this out, but that didnt happen.
What you had was a debate among
scholars and lawyers about what should
have happened and were still talking
about that, but the Liberals and the NDP
did come forward with proposals for rules
on when prorogation should happen, but
the government didnt engage them.
If the government doesnt want to coop-
erate with this stuff it makes it very difficult.
Australia, and even the U.K., have managed
to come up with a better system than we
have on this. So if everybody else is able to
do better, why arent we? This stuff doesnt
mean a Prime Minister wouldnt still be
powerful. He certainly would. The Prime
Ministers powers go on and on and on.
These reforms would mean, in the context
of the Prime Ministers relationship with
the House of Commons, there are rules that
protect the House from being silenced by a
Prime Minister who has the power to make
it go away, at least for a little while.
Do you think every MP should read your
book?
Yes, definitely.
kmalloy@hilltimes.com
The Hill Times
Our system was designed
to only have two parties
Prorogation should only
occur with a super majority,
or two-thirds, vote in House
of Commons, says Turnbull
Retiring Quebec Conservative Sen. David Angus says it gets
complicated when there more than two federal political parties.
Executive must be accountable to peoples elected representatives,says Turnbull
THE Q&A THE Q&A
DAVID ANGUS LORI TURNBULL
Continued from Page 17
Continued from Page 7
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A public life: Sen. David Angus said he suspects a triple-E Senate is off the table, but that Prime
Minister Stephen Harper will do the right thing and honour his commitment to reform the Senate.
19
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
P
MO deputy chief of staff Derek
Vanstone has decided to make
a dash for the door and is set to
officially take up his new job as
vice-president for Air Canadas
corporate strategy, industry, and
government affairs on Sept. 10.
Mr. Vanstone, a Toronto lawyer,
first started on the Hill back in 2007
when he left his job with the Gowl-
ings Lafleur Henderson law firm
to serve as chief of staff to Finance
Minister Jim Flaherty, who he used
to work for back in the Mike Har-
ris days. Before then, according to
his LinkedIn account, Mr. Vanstone
was an associate at Toronto law firm
Iacono Brown. Mr. Vanstone has a
bachelor of political science and a
law degree from the University of
Saskatchewan.
In his new role at Air Canada,
Mr. Vanstone will be responsible
for the companys dealings with
federal, provincial, and municipal
governments as well as reaching
out to and handling community
and industry affairs.
Mr. Vanstone wont take up
his new role until September, but
according to CBC News, he has
already been informed by Ethics
Commissioner Mary Dawson that
accepting the position wouldnt con-
travene the Conflict of Interest Act.
The federal government and
Air Canada have intersected fre-
quently this year as a result of
ongoing labour negotiations, and
the government has introduced
back-to-work legislation for Air
Canada workers three times since
June 2011. The most recent back-
to-work legislation, Bill C-33, was
passed March 14.
Derek has no involvement
with Air Canada on any aspect of
Bill C-33 or any other legislation
affecting Air Canada,said Andrew
MacDougall, director of communi-
cations to Prime Minister Stephen
Harper, in media reports last week.
Under the Conflict of Interest
Act a number of post-employment
restrictions are placed upon former
public office holders, like Mr. Van-
stone, which includes a one-year
cooling-off period before being able
to take up a position with an orga-
nization with which they had direct
and significant official dealingsdur-
ing their last year in public office.
In an email to co-workers on
July 19 announcing his plans to
leave the PMO, Mr. Vanstone said he
first came to Ottawa to work for Mr.
Flaherty five years ago next month.
Five years later, I couldnt
be more proud of what we have
accomplished,said Mr. Vanstone.
I am so very fortunate and proud
to have been part of a remarkable
team working for two amazing
leaders in Minister Flaherty and
Prime Minister Harper, during a
unique confluence of political and
economic events.
Mr. Vanstone is taking over
Duncan Dees position as vice-
president at Air Canada. Mr. Dee,
42, announced he would be taking
early retirement from his job with
Air Canada on June 6, after working
with the airline for 15 years. Mr. Dee
is himself a former Hill staffer, hav-
ing worked as a legislative assistant
and press secretary to former Lib-
eral Cabinet minister Sheila Copps.
Joanne McNamara is set to
replace Mr. Vanstone as deputy
chief of staff in the PMO; she is cur-
rently serving as chief of staff to
Heritage Minister James Moore. In
his announcement email, Mr. Van-
stone said PMO chief of staff Nigel
Wright had convincedMs. McNa-
mara to take up the deputy chief of
staff responsibilities, which Mr. Van-
stone will help her transition into.
Ms. McNamara has been work-
ing on the Hill since the Conserva-
tive parties days as official opposi-
tion. After working as an assistant
in the constituency office for then
Ontario MPP for London North-
Centre, Dianne Cunningham, also
the Ontario minister of training, col-
leges and universities, for approxi-
mately three years, Ms. McNamara
made her way to the Hill as a leg-
islative assistant to then rookie
Conservative MP Bev Oda, then her
partys Canadian cultural critic.
By the fall of 2005, Ms. McNa-
mara had begun working as an
executive assistant to Conservative
Senator Hugh Segal but was only
there for a few months. Following
the 2006 election, which brought the
Conservatives into minority power,
Ms. McNamara was hired to serve as
chief of staff to then newly-appoint-
ed Heritage minister Ms. Oda.
Originally from London, Ont.,
Ms. McNamara worked with Ms.
Oda for a number of years, following
her to the International Cooperation
portfolio when Ms. Oda was shuffled
in August 2007 to continue serving
as chief of staff. In July 2009, Ms.
McNamara became chief of staff to
Heritage Minister James Moore.
Ms. McNamara has a bachelor
in political science from Western
University in London, Ont.
Mr. Moores office declined to
comment on staffing changes.
Minister Blaney poised for
new communications director
Veterans Affairs Minister Ste-
ven Blaney isnt known for his
love of talking to the media, but
with the recent departure of direc-
tor of communications Codie Tay-
lor, Mr. Blaney will have to find
someone new to manage media.
Ms. Taylor left Mr. Blaneys
ministerial office approximately
three weeks ago and is now a
senior consultant at Bluesky
Strategy Group in Ottawa.
The majority of Ms. Taylors
almost five years on the Hill was
spent working in the Veterans
Affairs portfolio, where she was
first hired in late 2007 as assistant
to then Parliamentary Secretary
to then Veterans Affairs minister
Greg Thompson, former Conser-
vative MP Betty Hinton.
During her first round in the
Veterans Affairs Canada office, Ms.
Taylor climbed up the Hill ladder,
and held the position of director of
Parliamentary affairs by the time
she left the office to become press
secretary to Heritage Minister Mr.
Moore in October 2010. However,
Ms. Taylor worked for Mr. Moore
for less than a year and rejoined
the Veterans Affairs ministerial
office in June 2011, when she was
hired to serve as Mr. Blaneys new
communications director.
With Ms. Taylor now gone,
Jean-Christophe de le Rue is
serving as Mr. Blaneys commu-
nications director in the interim.
The office does not comment on
staffing matters, so timelines for
the arrival of a new communica-
tions director are unknown.
Mr. De le Rue has been work-
ing for Mr. Blaney for a number
of years, having started as an
assistant in the MPs Hill office
before becoming a special assis-
tant in communications for the
minister. In October 2011, Mr. De
le Rue was promoted to the role
of press secretary to Mr. Blaney.
In addition to Ms. Taylor, Mr.
Blaney has recently said goodbye
to his executive assistant. Aymer-
ic Floury began working as Mr.
Blaneys EA in October 2011; Hill
Climbers could find no previous
mention of Mr. Floury working on
the Hill.
PMO adds more weight to
stakeholder relations unit
The Prime Ministers Office
has welcomed a new Hill staffer
to the Langevin Block team with
the addition of Rmi Moreau.
Mr. Moreau has joined the
issues management unit of the
PMO, which is under the direc-
tion of Chris Woodcock. Origi-
nally from Quebec, Mr. Moreau
was brought in from the office of
Transport and Economic Develop-
ment for Quebec Regions Minister
Denis Lebel where he had been
working as a special assistant.
Based on travel and hospitality
expense reports for the department,
Mr. Moreau likely began working
for Mr. Lebel sometime between
September and December 2011.
Mr. Moreau fills a recent
vacancy in the issues management
unit left by Daniel Dufort, who is
now working as an adviser in the
PMOs stakeholder
relations unit.
Mr. Dufort first
began working in the
issues management
unit, and the PMO
overall, in December
2010, coming in after
working for almost
a year as a senior
consultant in pub-
lic affairs with the
GCI Group. Between
Jan. 4 and Nov. 23,
2010, during his time
working for GCI, Mr.
Dufort was registered
to lobby the federal
government on behalf
of Nexter Group Systems, Egg
Farmers of Ontario, McMaster
University, Globalive Wireless
Management Corp, the Heart and
Stroke Foundation of Canada,
and Cameco Corp.
According to Mr. Duforts Linke-
dIn account he studied a bachelor
of law at the University of Laval
in Quebec. The first mention Hill
Climbers could find of Mr. Dufort
on the Hill was from 2007, when he
was working as a summer intern
in policy to then Industry minis-
ter Maxime Bernier; in 2009, Mr.
Dufort spent some time working as
legislative assistant to Conservative
Caucus Chair Guy Lauzon.
Minister Duncan hires another
policy adviser, Sandra Dykxhoorn
Aboriginal Affairs Minister
John Duncan has hired a new
policy adviser to join his ministe-
rial office.
Sandra Dykxhoorn is the
newest member of Mr. Duncans
policy team, which is under the
guidance of new director of Par-
liamentary affairs, policy and
regional affairs, Ravina Bains.
Back in February 2007, Ms.
Dykxhoorn was working as a
research assistant to then Agri-
culture minister Chuck Strahl, but
before the year was out she had
followed Mr. Strahl to the Aborigi-
nal Affairs portfolio when he was
shuffled in August 2007. Accord-
ing to the departments proactive
disclosures, Ms. Dykxhoorn was
working in Aboriginal Affairs until
the reporting period between Sept.
2, 2008 and Dec. 1, 2008.
Its unclear where Ms. Dykx-
hoorn went after leaving Aborigi-
nal Affairs, but during the May
2011 federal election campaign
she volunteered for Ottawa
Centre Conservative candidate
Damian Konstantinakos. Mr.
Konstantinakos ultimately came
second with 21.73 per cent of the
votes, losing to NDP incumbent
Paul Dewar who was voted back
into his House of Commons seat
with 52.03 per cent support.
Ms. Dykxhoorn is a graduate of
Trinity Western University, a Chris-
tian university in Langley, B.C.,
where she studied business admin-
istration and political science.
In addition to Ms. Dykxhoorn
in Mr. Duncans policy unit, there
is Daniel Doucet, policy and
regional affairs adviser; new pol-
icy adviser Alayna Johnson; Paul
Komaromi, policy and regional
affairs adviser; Laura Smith,
policy and regional affairs advis-
er; and Moira Wolstenholme, a
senior special assistant and policy
and regional affairs adviser.
Minister Fantino brings his EA
to new office, rest remain
Hill Climbers has continued to
try to determine the fate of staff
in the former ministerial offices
of recently former Associate
Defence minister Julian Fantino
and Minister of State for ACOA
and La Francophonie Bernard
Valcourt. The offices arent talk-
ing, but at least one staffer has
decided to follow their minister.
On July 4, Prime Minister Ste-
phen Harper announced a small
Cabinet tweak, following then
International Co-operation min-
ister Ms. Odas July 3 announce-
ment that she would be retiring
from politics, leaving Cabinet
immediately and officially step-
ping down as Durham, Ont. MP
on July 31. Mr. Harper appointed
then Associate Defence minister
Mr. Fantino to the CIDA portfolio,
and in turn boosted the workload
of Minister of State Mr. Valcourt by
giving him the added title of Asso-
ciate Defence Minister.
Mr. Fantino has already taken
over Mr. Odas ministerial staff-
ing roster on the governments
electronic directory service. The
list largely remains the same: Neil
Desai is chief of staff; Stephanie
Rea is director of communica-
tions; Justin Broekema is press
secretary; Idee Inyangudor is
senior policy adviser; Shuvaloy
Majumdar is policy adviser;
Christine Blakeney handles coor-
dination of ministerial invitations
and records; Julie Trpanier and
Cline Boisvert are assistants;
Clarissa Lamb is special assistant,
communications; and Allison Fil-
leul is scheduling assistant. The
only change to be noted is the
addition of Elecia Elliott as exec-
utive assistant to the minister.
Ms. Elliott has followed Mr.
Fantino from Defence office
where she had also been serving
as his executive assistant.
On GEDS, however, Mr. Fantino
is also still listed in his Associate
Defence role as it has not yet been
updated, giving Hill Climbers no
indication if the office has changed
under Mr. Valcourt. Mr. Valcourts
Minister of State office has
remained the same, according to
the directory service, with Mlisa
Leclerc still chief of staff; Sophie
Doucet, director of communica-
tions; Guy Levesque, senior policy
adviser; Andrea Richer, execu-
tive assistant and press secretary;
Doug Chiasson, policy adviser and
caucus liaison; and Melanie Book,
special assistant.
Mr. Valcourts office declined to
comment on staffing matters. Mr.
Fantinos office did not respond to
Hill Climbers by publication.
The Hill Times
HILL CLIMBERS
POLITICAL STAFFERS
McNamara to replace Vanstone as PMs deputy chief
of staff, Blaney poised for new communications chief
Vanstone is leaving PMO: Derek Vanstone, deputy
chief of staff, pictured with Prime Minister Stephen
Harper, and former PMO staffer Dimitri Soudas.
BY Laura Ryckewaert
P
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HILL TIMES CLASSIFIED
INFORMATION AND ADVERTISEMENT PLACEMENT: TEL. 613-232-5952, FAX 613-232-9055
20 CLASSIFIEDS
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
0010 RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE
21 BAYSWATER PLACE
Civic Hospital - $739,900. Spacious 4 bed-
room, 2 bath family home. Entertainment
sized principal rooms. Located on a quiet
child friendly street. Susan Chell, Broker,
RE/MAX metro-city realty ltd., Brokerage,
Independently owned and operated. www.
susanchell.com
AYLMER, PRESTIGIOUS MANOIRS
CHAMPLAIN, MINUTES FROM OTTAWA
Luxurious bungalow on 1/2 acre, no rear
neighbours, 3+2 bdrms, 3 full baths, insu-
lated double garage, Novoclimat, $499900.
MLS_8698139. Joanna Jasinska, Real
Estate Broker Remax Vision (1990) 819-
351-5151 joanna.jasinska@live.com
AYLMER, RIVERMEAD FOR SALE
OR RENT
Spectacular, new, custom built open con-
cept, modern design 4 bdrms 3+2 baths,
mezzanine, walk-out basement, garage,
2 fireplaces. $699,900. Joanna Jasinska
Real Estate Broker Remax Vision (1990).
819-351-5151. joanna.jasinska@live.com
http://pages.videotron.com/showcase
BUNGALOW
Newly Renovated, Rockcliffe Mews, 3+2
bed and 3 baths. $439,000. Visit www.
realtor.ca MLS# 832357 for more or call
613-979-1027.
CONTEMPORARY STYLE HOUSE
Offering 3200 square feet, open concept, 3
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, big modern kitchen,
double heated garage, large wooded lot
visit: http://www.remax-quebec.com/en/
inscription/O/8753419.rmx. Please call
613-240-8424 or 819-665-0033.
HOUSE FOR SALE
Island Park Drive classic, elegant, four-plus
bedroom home perfect for entertaining or
embassy. Walk to trendy Westboro shops,
parks, schools. Bike to Parliament Hill.
$995,000. Contact: Mike Dawson 613-884-
6453 or visit www.477islandpark.com.
LUXURIOUS CONDO WITH PANORAMIC
VIEW OF RIVER & PARK IN THE MOST
BEAUTIFUL AND QUIET SECTOR (VAL
TETREAULT, HULL) IN GATINEAU
2 large bedrooms, a few steps from the
river, Gatineau park and bicycle path. 5
minutes drive from downtown Ottawa
and Hull. $1,450,000. 819-775-2785.
MOST BREATHTAKING WATER VIEWS IN
THE OUTAOUAIS!
Deeded access to Gati neau Ri ver,
4-bedroom, Herbert Otto open concept
designed home with magnificent windows
& stunning exposures in Cantley, high
end finishes, 2 acres, professional land-
scaping. $799,000 Virtual tour: obeo.
com/728512 Steve Gagne, Century 21
Macintyre Inc., 819-827-1646.
SANDY HILL
Beautiful Executive semi-detached, 3
br, 2 full baths (with jacuzzi tub), gas
fireplace, cozy backyard, short walk to
downtown, DND or the University of
Ottawa. You will be impressed! Mike
Baj ur ny 613- 725- 4438, Col dwel l
Banker Rhodes and Company 613-236-
9551 mls: 829299 OPEN HOUSE June
17, 2-4. More photos at www.homes.
luckbirdphotography.com/195henderson
0015 OUT OF TOWN PROPERTIES

0015 OUT OF TOWN PROPERTIES
FREE BROCHURE
Kings County - Land of Orchards,
Vineyards & Tides- Nova Scotias beau-
tiful Annapolis Valley. Live! Work! Start
Business! - Toll-Free: 1-888-865-4647.
www.kingsrda.ca.
0020 CONDOS FOR SALE
LARGE, BRIGHT
CONDO
In a quality, well-managed building in
one of Ottawas greatest location. View
of Jacques Cartier park, walking distance
to Parliament and the Byward Market.
Enjoy a 19x40 feet private terrace and
exercise room with 2 saunas and indoor
parking. $389,000. Tel: 613 697-0271
http://duproprio.com/condo-a-vendre-
gatineau-quebec-336614
EXQUISITE PENTHOUSE PROPERTY
FACING RIDEAU CANAL
Close to downtown. 3 Indoor parking
spaces (#s 29,30,51). 2 Bedrooms,
2 Full Bathrooms, Den with built-in
wall unit, Large dining room with bal-
cony access, Up-graded eat-in kitchen,
Gleaming hardwood and marble floor-
ing, Storage locker ($6). Wood burning
fireplace, 24 hr. security-Shows beauti-
fully! MLS# 825448 Stephen Weiner,
Coldwell Banker First Ottawa Realty.
(613)728-2664.
0029 PROPERTY RENTALS
56 58 60 Bruyere. Executive Byward
Market townhouses. 3bed 2bath. 1
parking. Totally re-done. Avail imme-
diately. $2200-$2400/mo. 66 Kings
Landing. 3bed 4bath townhouse w/
Canal vi ews. Avai l i mmedi at el y.
$2,400/mo. 6 Old Sunset-Dows Lake.
3bed 2bath single. Renovated. Avail
immediately. $2,450/mo. Call Brent
McElheran 613-851-1377
0029 PROPERTY RENTALS 0030 CONDOS FOR RENT
90 GEORGE
Executive 2BD, 2BTH & Den for rent in
5 star Condo in the Heart of the Byward
Market. Corner Suites, approx. 1,300 sq
ft 9 ceilings, floor to ceiling windows, hard-
wood throughout, gourmet kitchen with
granite, large balconies, stunning views,
valet parking, 24 hour security, 9,000 sq
ft Byward Market Terrace and much more.
Please call 90 Sales Office at 613-234-
5957 or Catherine Mullen 613-863-5600
or email catherine.mullen@canril.com
CENTRAL 211 WURTEMBURG
Watergate spacious 3bedroom/2bath,
hardwood floors, balcony river-view,
A/C, underground parking, gym, sauna
$2025 utilities included. 613-567-2816
ilohorvath@yahoo.ca
LARGE & CLEAN
2 bed, 1 bath condo for rent, 285
Laurier St./Hull, overlooking the Ottawa
River, 4 stainless steel appliances, a stor-
age room, $1195.00/month, includes a
parking spot, hot water & internet, avail-
able July 1st. mahzour@hotmail.com
LARGE MODERN CONDOS
Gatineau, 2 bedrooms 1 bath, 1100 Sqft.
Open concept Wood/Cermaic. One with
2000 sqft backyard/deck $900/$950 +
hydro approximate $70. 613-878-2462.
LEBRETON FLATS CONDO
Great location. East view of Parliament
and West view of the river, large bal-
cony, 2 Bed/2Bath, hardwood, granite,
$1850/month. (613) 837-8098.
TUNNEYS PASTURE
1 bdrm, 5 appl, electric heat, a/c,
heated undrgrd pkg. Hydro extra. No
smoking. No pets. $1175.00. Avail 15
Jul 12. 613-729-7359.
WALK TO PARLIAMENT HILL
Spacious, beautiful 2 bedroom down-
town condo with city view! 2.5 bath-
rooms, 2 balconies, gym, pool, sauna,
hot-tub. Unfurnished. Available Sept. 1st.
Must see! 647.979.5770.
WESTBORO
Luxury one bed, granite countertop,
hardwood floors throughout. Beautiful
view, large windows. Gym, party room,
patio. $1400. 613-722-1388
WESTBORO CONDO FOR RENT
2 bedroom, 2 full bath. Executive loft, 1,250
sq. ft. Richmond rd. at the Exchange. Short
walk to transitway. 15 minutes to Parliament
Hill. $2500. Call 613-355-3712
WESTBORO PENTHOUSE
The Exchange. Luxury 1659 sq ft. 2bed
+ den/bed. Designer Finished, granite,
stainless. Grand entertainment living &
dining. River views. Parking. Steps to
shops, restaurants & parks. $3200/mos.
Karen Habib, Coldwell Banker Rhodes.
613-850-1150 khabib@cbrhodes.com
0032 TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT
BEAUTIFUL RENOVATED TOWNHOUSE
3 bedrooms + rec, 2 bathrooms,
appliances, Garden/patio, 2 parking.
Huntclub. $1450/Furnished $1800.
Hydro extra. 613-878-2462
STUNNING
3BR end-unit townhouse in Centretown.
Hardwood floors, tons of windows and
light, trendy updated kitchen and 2 bath-
rooms. Gas fireplace, 5 brand new appli-
ances, balcony off of kitchen and master
bedroom. A/C, parking for 1 car included.
Close to shopping, parks and entertain-
ment. $2250 plus utilities. No dogs, no
smoking. To schedule a showing please call
Cityview Rental Services at 613-255-6494.
Please leave a message if no answer.
0040 HOUSES FOR RENT
CHAPEL HILL
Executive 4 bedroom, 3.5+ bath, 5
app, hardwood, finished basement, 2
car garage, cedar deck, $2600 + util,
613-290-4240
EXECUTIVE HOME - NEAR PRINCE
OF WALES
5 bedrooms + en-suite nanny, 5 bath-
rooms, 5 appliances, hardwood, 2 fire-
places, Great for entertaining, double
car garage. security system, central
air. Snow Removal, lawn maintenance
included in $2985. August 1st 613-
823-1616.
0040 HOUSES FOR RENT
GOLDEN TRIANGLE AREA
5 bedroom, 2 bathroom, living & din-
ing, kitchen, front and back garden,
two parking. Non-smoking. Available
Sept. 1-2012. $2500.00+utilities.
613-762-7431.
HAUTE PLAINES - SEPT. 1ST
Spacious 3BR house minutes from
Ottawa, Gatineau Park and Old Chelsea.
Lovely yard, 3 baths, main floor laun-
dry, office/den, family room, finished
basement, double garage. $1850 plus
utilities. Snow removal and lawn mainte-
nance included. 613-286-0236.
HUNT CLUB
4 bdrm, 3.5 bath, 2 car garage (6 car
parking), AC, backing onto NCC, shop-
ping nearby, 20 min to parliament,
$2,950 + utilities, Sep 1. 736-0205.
MANOTICK WATERFRONT
3 BEDRM/BATHRM...OFFICE...$3,000
per month or $799,000 for sale.....
WWW.GRAPEVINE.CA # 20179 ....
613 749-0209
MARKET LIVING!
Spaci ous 3 bedroom/1 bath bri ck
row- house. Hardwood throughout,
large living room/dining room, eat-
in kitchen, stainless steel appliances,
rear cedar deck, 2 parki ng spots,
$2000/mont h+ut i l i t i es. Sept . 1.
613-680-0227.
NEW EDINBURGH
Sun-filled new energy efficient home
backing onto Stanley Park & Rideau
River. 3 Bedrooms/3.5 Bathrooms.
5 SS appliances. HE washer & dryer.
In-floor radiant heating throughout.
Alarm. Rear covered balconies. Terrace.
Covered parking. Private backyard.
$3, 500/mo+ut i l i t i es, $4, 000/
mo+utilities furnished. vertdesign.ca/
rideau.html 613-558-2500.
ORLEANS, FALLINGBROOK
Executive Bungalow, 2+ Bedrooms, 3
Bath (Jacuzzi), Gourmet Kitchen, SS
Appliances, Washer/Dryer, Finished
Basement, Granite, Hardwood, Gas
Fireplace, Central Air, Alarm System,
Fenced Backyard/Garden, Garage(2).
No Smoking/Pets. $1,900 + utilities.
Contact 613-850-8076 (Susanne).
OVERBROOK
For Rent - 82 Glynn Ave. 3+1 bdrm
home, MLS# 833240, $2,100. 119
Glynn Ave. 2 bdrm bungalow, MLS#
833239, $1,600. Georgi a Li ndi a,
Royal LePage Performance Real ty,
613-733-9100
georgialindia@royallepage.ca
RIVERSIDE SOUTH
Spacious 4 Bdrm, 2.5 Baths, Large
Living/Dining Room, Main Floor Family
Room, Eat-In Kitchen, 5 Appliances, A/C,
yard, double garage, Aug. 1. PMA Realty
613-742-5778.
SMALL QUIET
3 bedroom house & yard. Off Fisher Ave.
$1400 + utilities. Available Sept. 1st.
Call Mike 613-731-9925.
0041 APARTMENTS FOR RENT
APARTMENT NEAR CANAL
Very Large 1 bedroom , 3rd floor of
Vi ntage Home. Har dwood f l oor s,
Di s h wa s h e r , $1250/mo n t h .
613-236-7707
CLASSIC ELEGANCE!
Distinctive apartment residence at 111
Echo Drive overlooking the Rideau Canal.
Over 3,000 square feet living area, 2
bedrooms, 3 baths. $4,900/month.
Clive Pearce, Broker of Record, Guidestar
Real ty, Brokerage 613- 226- 3018,
ext. 222.
LEBRETON FLATS
2BR/2 Bath/Ensuite/Walk-in Closet,
700 SQ FT Rooftop Terrace, Floor to
Ceiling Windows E-N-W Views Parliament
Hill, Ottawa River and Gatineau Hills, 6
Appliances/Heat/AC/BBQ Gaz/PKG,
Locker/Gym/Sauna/Function Room.
Immediate $2300. Call John 613-841-
4355 or johndube@magma.ca
LUXURIOUS LOFT FOR RENT
Facing river, walking distance from
Parl i ament Hi l l . Moder n/10 feet
cei l i ngs. Parki ng. $1450/month.
819-770-5081
0044 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
DOWNTOWN OTTAWA
2 bedroom apts. The luxurious Juliana
offers spacious suites with spectacular
views of the city, Ottawa River & Gatineau
Hills. Short walk to Parliament Hill and the
best shopping, dining and arts venues in
Ottawa. From $1895/month incl. heat,
water, A/C and 5 appliances. Please call
to view: 613-688-2222.
0045 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
ROCKCLIFFE
Large Penthouse suite for rent near presti-
gious Rockcliffe Park and the Rideau River.
3000 sq ft., 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
hardwood flooring, 6 new appliances, bal-
conies on 3 sides, stunning views. Indoor
parking spot, A/C & utilities included.
Fast access to major roads, bus routes
and downtown Ottawa. $2995/month.
Please call to view: 613-688-2222.
0050 FURNISHED RENTALS
BYWARD MARKET
Heritage house (2 bdrms) to sublet
(6-12 months) available September -
Quiet area, fully furnished, AC, parking
(w/d DFAIT/Hill). $1,950.00/month +
utilities. (613) 302-1305.
FULLY FURNISHED
3 Bedroom apartment with parking.
Avai l abl e now. $2200/MONTH +
HYDRO. Call Richard 613-290-5846.
LOVELY FURNISHED
Three Bedroom Victorian House in the
Golden Triangle for Rent from September
2012 through May 2013. Yard, Parking,
All Amenities. Asking $2,500/mo.
Please contact dponka@rogers.com
0055 FURNISHED CONDOS FOR RENT
DOWNTOWN CANAL VIEW
October 15 to May 15. Immaculate 2
bedroom, 2 bath. Indoor parking. No
smoking, no pets. All utilities. $1595.
613-565-4494.
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM+DEN ON
SUSSEX AND CLARENCE
A beautiful one bedroom plus den is avail-
able in the Byward Market fully furnished!
It features a great location along with a
rooftop patio, concierge, and 24 hour fit-
ness and laundry facilities. $1,900 includ-
ing underground parking. The unit would be
a lease take over and as of Oct. 1, 2012,
it would become a month to month lease.
60 days notice would still be required if
you would like to move at any point after
this date. This unit is on the top floor of
the building with easy access to the rooftop
patio and is 846 square feet! The suite
features hardwood floors in the main living
areas with carpet in the bedroom and den.
The building is quiet and has a maintenance
team on site for anything you might need.
If interested, please call 416-930-1087
to set up a viewing. A formal application
process is required in order to be approved
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22
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
committee member Linda Duncan (Edmonton-
Strathcona, Alta.).
One of our major roles, surely as an
elected official, is to properly scrutinize the
bills and spending by the government each
year, and right now the system does not
allow for that,Ms. Duncan said.
The House Government Operations
Committee has asked the Treasury Board
Secretariat to implement or study two major
changes in how spending is reported so that
MPs and Senators can have a better chance
of understanding where the money is going
and making sure it is being spent well.
The government tables spending estimates
four times a year. They currently outline spend-
ing requests by portfolio in large catch-all
categories such as capital expenses or grants
and contributions. Parliamentarians are then
expected to vote on approving these funds.
The committee has recommended switching
from the existing categories to a program basis,
meaning an entire government initiative, and all
the costs it entails, could be shown in the esti-
mates books and even in the related appropria-
tions bill that Parliamentarians vote on.
Having that financial context of what
we are spending on, what needs to be
spent, whether we should continue to
spend on it those are the kinds of analy-
ses that I think the public expects their
Members of Parliament to be doing,said
Conservative Mike Wallace (Burlington,
Ont.), vice-chair of the committee.
Treasury Board has until the end of
March 2013 to come up with a timeline for
implementing the change.
When its officials appeared before the
House Government Operations Committee last
spring to speak on this study, they cautioned
that detailing expenses by program in the esti-
mates and having Parliamentarians vote on that
basis could mean that politicians are bogged
down with a flood of financial information.
The more votes you have, the more
cumbersome the system becomes,said
TBS assistant secretary of expenditure
management Bill Matthews May 14.
Mr. Matthews said that right now there
are 191 votes for 135 government organiza-
tions. If each program gets voted on indi-
vidually, there would be over 2,000 votes. If
Parliamentarians voted on groups of pro-
grams, there would be 593 votes.
He also told the committee that it would
take three to five years to change the format
for presenting funding for voted approval.
Mr. Matthews did add that TBS could
give Parliamentarians information on pro-
grams without changing the way they vote.
The committee has also asked TBS to
study the accounting basis for the estimates.
Right now, the estimates are based on a cash
system of accounting, meaning that when
money is spent or received, it is put on the
books. This is a straightforward accounting
method that a number of the experts the com-
mittee heard from recommended keeping.
The other potential system is accrual
accounting, an industry standard that both
the budget and the public accounts are based
on. Accrual accounting is more complex,
and when an expense or credit shows up in
accounts is based on more subjective factors.
Mr. Wallace pointed out that under an accru-
al accounting system, the more than $1-billion
owed to public servants for severance entitle-
ments accumulated over several years wouldnt
have shown up on this years books.
If we were using accrual account-
ing, that would never show up because it
was already booked in a sense, from an
accounting perspective,he said.
The government has been contemplating
going to accrual accounting for at least six
years. The problem with keeping both systems
is that with some of the governments financial
papers using one system, and some using the
other, its impossible to compare them.
Mr. Matthews estimated that it would
take about seven years to change the esti-
mates from cash to an accrual system.
The estimates are not the only documents
that will potentially change as a result of the
study. The committee also recommended that
the budget be tabled earlier in the year, no later
than Feb. 1, so that more of its initiatives could
be included in the estimates for scrutiny.
What most modern jurisdictions have
done is they combined the timing of the
budget, the estimates, and the actual depart-
mental plans for what they are doing. So you
can actually look at the spending, compare it
with what theyre proposing to do, and then
also review how well theyve delivered previ-
ously. Its just that simple,said Ms. Duncan.
This study is the third in 15 years look-
ing into improving the estimates. Com-
bined with this committees suggestions,
MPs have made almost 150 recommenda-
tions on the subject, with little success.
This time around, committee members said
they are hopeful that their list of 16 recommen-
dations is practical enough to get done.
They are all doable changes that will
make Parliamentarians, in my view, more
efficient and effective in reviewing the
standing of government,said Mr. Wallace.
The report contains a number of specific
recommendations for amendments to the
standing orders, or House rules, that would
be relatively simple to implement, should
the government chose. These include man-
dating a minimum amount of time for the
study of the estimates, and giving commit-
tees enough at least a two-week window to
study them in before they must be passed.
What we decided to do is to concen-
trate on what we thought the most critical
measures are. Its not that there arent
additional things that could be done, but
these ones that weve recommended are
the bare minimum to actually enable prop-
er scrutiny of spending,said Ms. Duncan.
Other recommendations include regular
training for MPs on how to read the estimates,
and providing questions to departmental offi-
cials in advance of their appearance, so that
the right witnesses are called. This is a prac-
tice in other Parliamentary democracies.
The committee heard from more than 30
witnesses over four months for the study.
While the Conservatives, NDP and Liberals
all agreed that the estimates system needs to
be reformed, and on the recommendations
the report puts forward for doing so, there is
one major sticking pointthe independence
of the Parliamentary Budget Officer.
The committee heard from a number of
witnesses, including Canadian spending
expert David Good of the University of Vic-
toria and former House of Commons clerk
Robert Marleau, as well as international
expert Joachim Werner of the London
School of Economics, who recommended
that the PBO be made independent.
The report recommends that the commit-
tee study the role of the PBO and whether
or not the position remains in the Library
of Parliament or becomes an independent
agent reporting directly to Parliamentarians.
Mr. Wallace said that such a study could
take place at the Government Operations Com-
mittee as early as this fall session, and that any
changes to the job could be implemented when
the next Parliamentary budget officer starts his
or her term next year. The term of current PBO
Kevin Page ends in spring of 2013.
Both the NDP and the Liberals, who are
a minority on the committee, say that the
PBO needs to be made independent now.
To delay solidifying his position is
very critical. Its absolutely instrumental to
implementing our recommendations that
his office be beefed up and be made more
independent,said Ms. Duncan.
She said that the Conservatives dislike of
the PBO, which has produced a number of
reports critical of government costing esti-
mates for items like F-35 fighter jets and the
tough-on-crime agenda, is causing the delay.
Liberal committee member John McCal-
lum (Markham-Unionville, Ont.) said that a
study of the PBO is unnecessary.
What do you think we just did? We just
did a study, we dont need another study,
we want them to implement the recom-
mendations. It was clear from the wit-
nesses both that they were positive on the
PBO and that they thought he should be an
officer of Parliament,he said.
Mr. Wallace said that the opposition is
being hasty.
They have picked an option without
looking at all of the options,he said.
Despite the dispute over the PBO, overall,
the committee worked well together, said Mr.
McCallum. He said that the unanimity of the
report as well as the governments apparent
interest in the study is cause to be optimistic
that changes will be made.
Given the attitude of Conservative MPs
and seemingly the Treasury Board Presi-
dent, maybe there is a chance that they
will take action but I guess well have to
wait until the government responds to the
report in the fall,he said.
Treasury Board President Tony Clement
(Parry Sound-Muskoka, Ont.) appeared at
the committee last spring and encouraged its
members to look into issues like the timing
of the budget and switching to programs.
Meanwhile, Mr. Clement is glad to have
read the committees recommendations
and that the committee shares his commit-
ment to improving the transparency and
accountability of the budget and estimates
process,said spokesperson Sean Osmar.
As the report has only recently been
released its suggestions will need to be
examined in greater detail,he added.
The government has until October to
respond to the report.
Said Mr. McCallum: I think the rec-
ommendations will result in substantive
improvements, but I dont think theyre
super radical. That, I think, increases the
odds that something will come of this.
Federal departments
could be forced to
dramatically change way
they report billions in
spending to Parliament
MPs and Parliamentary experts
call the current process arcane
and subject to partisan abuse.
CIVIL CIRCLES
SPENDING ESTIMATES & OVERSIGHT
sa|oscHaudlororosdovHolo|s.com 800-S6/-l962
Celebrate...
with up-to 500 of your closest friends & family!
Continued from Page 1
Just do it: Conservative MP Mike Wallace, NDP MP Linda Duncan, and Liberal MP John McCallum
all want MPs to do a better job of scrutinizing the billions spent each year by the federal government.
P
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BY Jessica Bruno
23
THE HILL TIMES, MONDAY, JULY 23, 2012
MONDAY, JULY 23
Guided Tours of Parliament HillVisi-
tors to Parliament Hill can take guid-
ed tours of the Parliament Buildings.
Centre Block, year-round; East Block,
daily until Sept. 3, 10 a.m.-5:15 p.m.
Visits of the East Block provide an
opportunity to see grand old rooms
and offices restored to the way they
looked at the time of Confederation.
For details, visit www.parl.gc.ca
TUESDAY, JULY 24
Webinar: Promoting Health and Safety
Management in Immigrant Communi-
tiesLearn about innovative health
and safety initiatives in Auckland and
Vancouver that promote healthy living
through community education and
accessible programming that ensures
new immigrants and their families
are safe and healthy. July 24. Pre-
sented by Cities of Migration, http://
citiesofmigration.ca/webinar/webinar-
healthy-living-promoting-health-and-
safety-in-immigrant-communities/
Changing of the GuardThe Depart-
ment of National Defence presents
the pomp and pageantry of the
Changing of the Guard Ceremony.
Centre Block, year-round; East
Block until Sept. 3, daily, 10 a.m.-
5:15 p.m. Visits of the East Block
provide an opportunity to see grand
old rooms and offices restored to
the way they looked at the time of
Confederation. www.parl.gc.ca
WEDNESDAY, JULY 25
Classic Theatre FestivalOttawa Val-
leys professional summer theatre
presents Two for the Seesaw, a quirky
love story of two lost souls who find
each other in 1958 New York City.
Runs through Aug. 5; Wed.-.Sat- 8
p.m.; 2 p.m. matines Wed., Sat.
and Sun. Mason Theatre, 13 Victoria
St., Perth, Ont. 877-283-1283 or
www.classictheatre.ca
THURSDAY, JULY 26
Ottawa Chamberfest 2012Ottawa
Chamberfest 2012 presents two
weeks of musical celebration in
Canadas capital, featuring local,
national, and international art-
ists. Highlights include The Israeli
Chamber Project and the Nash
Ensemble of London. July 26-Aug.
9. www.ottawachamberfest.com
Global Conference on Disaster Man-
agementThe premier event for all
issues common to all aspects of
disaster and emergency prepared-
ness and management. July 26.
The Drake Hotel, 140 East Walton
Place, Chicago, Ill. http://www.
disasterconference.org
FRIDAY, JULY 27
Afghanistan: A Canadian Perspec-
tiveMichael Bonner will give
a talk on Afghanistan: A Cana-
dian Perspective, an overview of
Afghanistans history and culture.
July 27, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Toy Facto-
ry Lofts, 43 Hanna St., Suite 410,
Toronto, Ont. RSVP to 416-961-
3620 or allan@allanbonner.com
SATURDAY, JULY 28
Parliamentary AssociationsThe
Canada-United States Inter-Parlia-
mentary Group meets in Charleston,
West Virginia for the 66
th
Annual
Meeting of the Southern Legisla-
tive Conference. July 28-Aug.
1. For more information, please
visit http://www2.parl.gc.ca/iia
SUNDAY, JULY 29
36
th
Annual Conference of New Eng-
land Governors and Eastern Canadian
PremiersQuebec Premier Jean
Charest and Peter Shumlin, gover-
nor of Vermont are the co-chairs of
the 36
th
Annual Conference of New
England Governors and Eastern
Canadian Premiers. July 29-30.
Burlington, VT. www.cap-cpma.ca
MONDAY, JULY 30
An Evening with Gordon Pinsent
Legendary Canadian actor Gordon
Pinsent narrates The Carnival of the
Animals by Camille Saint-Sans, with
poetry by Ogden Nash. Part of the
Ottawa 2012 Chamberfest. July 30,
7-9:30 p.m., $35. Dominion-Chalm-
ers United Church, 355 Cooper St.,
Ottawa, Ont. www.chamberfest.com
TUESDAY, JULY 31
Screening: The UnionThe NORML
Womens Alliance of Canada pres-
ents a screening of the ground-
breaking, highly-acclaimed film on
cannabis in Canada. The screening
will be followed by a Q&A to be
moderated by The NORML Womens
Alliance and special guests. July
31, 6-9 p.m. Theatre Ste. Cathe-
rine, 977 Ste. Catherine, Montreal,
Que. http://www.facebook.com/
events/383653698350026/
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 1
From Far and Wide: Honouring Great
CanadiansThis exhibit showcases
Canadas national honours and
the contributions of Canadians
from across the country and from
all walks of life. It also includes
the work of the Canadian Heraldic
Authority in creating coats of arms
and other national emblems. Until
Nov. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 90 Wel-
lington St., Ottawa, Ont. 613-991-
4422 or www.gg.ca/expo
THURSDAY, AUG. 2
Ottawa Busker FestivalSparks
Street comes alive with a myriad
of street performers for the Ottawa
Busker Festival. Aug. 2-6. Free.
Sparks Street Mall, Ottawa, Ont.
sparkstreetmall.com
FRIDAY, AUG. 3
Rideau Canal FestivalThe Rideau
Canal Festival celebrates the 180
th

Anniversary of the Rideau Canal.
Activities will include animated heri-
tage presentations, stone carvers, live
music, flotillas and fireworks. Aug. 3-6.
Bytown Museum/Ottawa Locks and
Dows Lake. www.rideaucanalfestival.ca
SATURDAY, AUG. 4
Sound & Light International Fireworks
CompetitionThe shores of Lac
Leamy come alive at the Sound
and Light International Fireworks
Competition. Aug. 4, France; Aug.
8, Spain; Aug. 11, U.S.; Aug. 15,
China; Aug. 18, grand finale. $10-
$12. Casino Lac Leamy, Gatineau,
Que. http://www.feux-qc.ca
MONDAY, AUG. 6
Colonel By DayColonel By Day cel-
ebrates the accomplishments of Lt.
Colonel John By and his workers in
constructing the Rideau Canal and
the founding of Bytown. Activities
include musketry, blacksmithing,
live reenactments and more. Aug.
6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Bytown Museum,
1 Canal Lane, Ottawa, Ont. http://
choocopo.ca/english/cbday.html
Parliamentary AssociationsThe Can-
ada-United States Inter-Parliamentary
Group meets in Chicago, Illinois for
the National Conference of State
Legislatures Legislative Summit.
Aug. 6-Aug. 9. For more information,
please visit http://www2.parl.gc.ca/iia
TUESDAY, AUG. 7
Rain: A Tribute to the BeatlesAll
your fave tunes from the Fab Four.
Aug. 7-12, 8 p.m., Aug. 11 & 12,
2 p.m. Centrepointe Theatre, 101
Centrepointe Dr., Ottawa, Ont.
http://centrepointetheatre.ca/
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 8
Mosaika: Sound and LightMosaika
is the story of Canada set against
the backdrop of the Parliament Hill
to music and lights. July 6-Sept.
3. July, 10 p.m., August, 9:30
p.m., Sept. 9 p.m. Parliament Hill,
Ottawa, Ont. www.canadascapital.
gc.ca/celebrate/mosaika
THURSDAY, AUG. 9
81
st
Annual Couchiching Summer Con-
ferenceDavid A. Dodge, chancellor
of Queens University and former gov-
ernor of the Bank of Canada, is this
years recipient of the Couchiching
Award for Public Policy Leadership at
the 81
st
Annual Couchiching Sum-
mer Conference. This years theme is,
The Arab Spring: Implications and
Opportunities for Canada. Special
guests include Robert Fisk and Elias
Khoury. Aug. 9-12. YMCA Geneva
Park, Lake Couchiching, Ont. www.
couchichinginstitute.ca
FRIDAY. AUG. 10
Parliamentary AssociationsThe
Canada-United States Inter-Par-
liamentary Group meets Rio Mar,
Puerto Rico for the 78
th
Annual
Meeting of the Southern Governors
Association. Aug. 10-12. For more
information, please visit http://
www2.parl.gc.ca/iia
SATURDAY, AUG. 11
Kingston and the Islands Federal Lib-
eral Summer BBQThe Kingston and
the Islands FLA is hosting a summer
BBQ. All welcome, but a special
invitation is extended to any decided
or undecided Liberal leadership
hopefuls. Aug. 11, 2:30 p.m.,
$6-$12. Rotary Park, 1285 Cover-
dale Dr., Kingston, Ont. Contact:
Ron Hartling at 1-866-899-1613.
SUNDAY, AUG. 12
Great South Island Family BBQThe
Southern Vancouver Island and the
Saanich-Gulf Island Federal Liber-
als host a Family BBQ. Aug. 12,
11 a.m. Eagle Beach at Elk Lake,
5100 Patricia Bay Hwy, Saanich,
B.C. www.liberal.ca
CMA 145
th
Annual MeetingPhysi-
cians from across Canada will gather
to discuss health equity and how to
address health gaps within the popu-
lation. Keynote speaker Sir Michael
Marmot will open the meeting. Aug.
12-15. Yellowknife, NT. 613-731-
8610 ext. 1266 or www.cma.ca
MONDAY, AUG. 13
Changing of the GuardThe Depart-
ment of National Defence presents the
pomp and pageantry of the Changing
of the Guard Ceremony. Centre Block,
year-round; East Block until Sept. 3,
daily, 10 a.m.-5:15 p.m. Visits of the
East Block provide an opportunity
to see grand old rooms and offices
restored to the way they looked at the
time of Confederation. www.parl.gc.ca
TUESDAY, AUG. 14
Mosaika: Sound and LightMosaika
is the story of Canada set against
the backdrop of the Parliament Hill
to music and lights. Until Sept. 3.
August, 9:30 p.m., Sept. 9 p.m. Par-
liament Hill, Ottawa, Ont. www.cana-
dascapital.gc.ca/celebrate/mosaika
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 15
Ottawa GreekfestDancing, music,
food and more for the whole family.
Aug. 15-26. 1315 Prince of Wales
Dr., Ottawa, Ont. www.ottawagreek-
fest.com
FRIDAY, AUG. 17
National Capital Craft Beer WeekA
two-day out door festival showcasing
products from regional craft brewer-
ies. Aug. 17-18. Various venues.
www.nationalcapitalbeerweek.com
Capital Pride FestivalA celebration
of the LGBT community in Ottawa.
Aug. 17-26; Aug. 26, parade, 1
p.m. Ottawa, Ont. www.capital-
pride.ca
Green Party ConventionThe Saanich-
Gulf Islands riding association hosts
the 2012 Green Party Convention.
Highlights include training sessions,
policy workshops, a shadow Cabinet
meeting with members, and more.
Aug. 17-19. Mary Winspear Centre,
Sidney, B.C. convention@greenparty.ca
SATURDAY, AUG. 18
Steven Blaney to Mark Dieppe Raid
Veterans Affairs Minister Steven
Blaney (Levis-Bellechasse, QC) will
lead an official delegation to France
to mark the 70
th
anniversary of the
Dieppe Raid. At least 500 guests
are expected, including Canadian
veterans, a CF contingent and Cana-
dian cadets and scouts. Aug. 18-20.
Dieppe, France. 613-992-7468.
Ottawa Lumiere Festival Evening of
LightsAnnual Asian, Indian and Euro-
pean lantern festival featuring local
musicians, craftspeople and perform-
ers. Aug. 18. New Edinburgh Park,
Ottawa, Ont. www.lumiereottawa.com
Okanagan Regional Policy Develop-
ment ConferenceThe Kelowna
Liberals are holding the first
Okanagan Regional Policy Devel-
opment Conference with special
guest Liberal MP Ralph Goodale
(Wascana, Sask.). Aug. 18, 9 a.m.,
$45-$100. Best Western Kelowna,
2402 Hwy 97 North, Kelowna, B.C.
www.liberal.ca
SUNDAY, AUG. 19
Navigating Uncharted WatersIPAC
presents its national annual con-
ferenceNavigating Uncharted
Waters: Embracing the Tides of
Change. Aug. 19-22. The Delta
St. Johns Hotel and Conference
Centre, 120 New Gower St., St.
Johns, NL. www.ipac.ca
MONDAY, AUG. 18
A Company of Fools Torchlight Shake-
speareLast chance to see A Com-
pany of Fools put a madcap twist
on William Shakespeares Henry V
with their Torchlight Shakespeare
series in various parks across the
region. Mondays until Aug. 18,
7-8:30 p.m., $15 donation sug-
gested (pass the hat). For full
schedule and locations, visit http://
fools.ca
TUESDAY,
AUG. 21
Aboriginal Par-
ticipation in Major
Resources Develop-
ment Opportuni-
tiesThe Public
Policy Forum
is convening a
national roundtable
series to explore
opportunities and
challenges to effec-
tive engagement of
Canadas aboriginal
population in the
development of
major resources
sector projects.
Aug. 21, 11:30
a.m.-2 p.m. Royal
Bank of Canada,
Georgian Room,
Toronto, Ont. www.
ppforum.ca
TUESDAY,
AUG. 22
Van Gogh: Up
Closeis the first
major exhibition in
Canada in over 25
years of works by
this famous Dutch
artist. It brings
together more than
40 of Van Goghs
paintings from private and public col-
lections around the world. Until Sept. 3.
National Gallery of Canada, 380 Sussex
Dr., Ottawa, Ont. http://www.gallery.ca
FRIDAY, AUG. 24
Federal Liberal Victory GameThe
Stormont-Dundas-South-Glengarry
Federal Liberal Riding Association
hosts a fundraising golf game. Aug.
24, shot gun T-off, 1 p.m.; dinner,
6 p.m. $115. Summerheights Golf
Links, 1160 South Branch Rd.,
Cornwall, Ont. Contact: Tom Manley
at 613-984-0490 ext. 225.
SATURDAY, AUG. 25
Vancouver Kingsway Community BBQ
NDP MP Don Davies (Vancouver-King-
sway, B.C.) hosts the annual Vancou-
ver Kingsway Community BBQ. Aug.
25, 1-3 p.m. Rain or shine. Slocan
Park, 2570 E 29th Ave., Vancouver,
B.C., www.dondavies.ca
SUNDAY, AUG. 26
Barrie FLA Summer Golf Tournament
The Barrie FLA hosts a summer golf
tournament. Consecutive tee times fol-
lowing lunch (1:03 p.m.). Aug. 26, 12
p.m., $105. Innisbrook Golf Course,
211 Lockhart Rd., Barrie, Ont. RSVP
to 705-719-9039; www.liberal.ca
MONDAY, AUG. 27
The Dean Heywood Gonzo Golf Tourna-
mentAn afternoon of golf and fun with
proceeds going to the University of Otta-
wa Heart Institute. Aug. 27, 12 p.m.,
$100 (includes dinner, cart and dona-
tion in Deans name); $45 dinner only.
The Mississippi Golf Club, 341 Wilson
St., R.R.#3, Almonte, Ont. RSVP to
Dave Mathews at 819-682-8186 or
Dave@MathewsCommunications.ca
The Parliamentary Calendar is a free
listing edited by listings editor Alia
Heward who can be reached at 613-
232-5952, ext. 200. Information
regarding political, cultural and govern-
mental events should be sent to alia@
hilltimes.com with the subject line
Parliamentary Calendar by Wednes-
days at noon. Send in your event in a
paragraph with all the relevant details.
Our fax number is 613-232-9055.
We cant guarantee inclusion of every
event, but we do our best.
alia@hilltimes.com
FEATURE
EVENTS
Mosaika: Sound and Light
show now playing on the Hill
CALENDAR
PARLIAMENTARY
THE
MOSAIKA: SOUND AND LIGHTMosaika is the story of Canada set against the backdrop of the Parliament Hill to music and lights. July
6-Sept. 3. July, 10 p.m., August, 9:30 p.m., Sept. 9 p.m. Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Ont. www.canadascapital.gc.ca/celebrate/mosaika
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