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Valve terminal type 03/05 Electronics Manual Control block SB-202

9602 Only valid in agreement with the printed documentation accompanying the product! Compare this edition code.

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Authors: Editors: Translation: Layout: Type setting:

E. Klotz, S.Rechenberger H.-J. Drung, M. Holder Douglas Smith Festo KG, Dept. PV-IDM DUCOM

Printed on 100% recycled paper

9602 1996 Festo KG, D-73726 Esslingen Federal Republic of Germany All rights reserved, including translation rights. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Festo KG. I

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Part no.: Title: Designation:

152 760 MANUAL P.BE-SB202-03/05-GB

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Contents

Contents

GENERAL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS Designated use Target group Important user instructions Danger categories Pictograms Instructions on this manual Service VII VIII IX IX X XI XII

Chapter 1

SYSTEM SUMMARY

1.1

System summary Programmable valve terminal System structure Type 03: Description of components Type 05: Description of components Description of function

1-3 1-3 1-4 1-6 1-8 1-12

Chapter 2

FITTING

2.1

Fitting the components


Input/output modules End plates Hat rail clamping unit

2-3
2-4 2-6 2-8

2.2

Type 03: Fitting the valve terminal


Wall fitting Hat rail fitting

2-9
2-9 2-10

2.3

Type 05: Fitting the valve terminal


Wall fitting

2-12
2-12

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Contents

Chapter 3

INSTALLATION

3.1

General connecting principles


Cable selection Connecting the cables to the plugs/sockets

3-3
3-3 3-4

3.2

Control block SB-202

3-6

Opening and closing the control block 3-6 Structure of the control block 3-8 Diagnostic interface 3-9 3.2.1 Type 03: Connecting the operating voltages 3-12 3.2.2 Type 05: Connecting the operating voltages 3-18

3.3

Connecting the input modules


Pin assignment

3-25
3-27

3.4

Connecting the output modules


Pin assignment

3-28
3-30

Chapter 4

COMMISSIONING AND PROGRAMMING

4.1

Basic Principles of configuration and addressing


General Calculating the configuration data Calculating the number of inputs/outputs

4-4
4-4 4-4 4-5

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Address assignment of the valve terminal Basic rule 1 Basic rule 2 Basic rule 3 Address assignment after extension/conversion Example of addressing Type 03: MIDI/MAXI valves Type 05: ISO valves Addressing with FST202C 4.2 First steps with FST Prerequisites Create allocation list Load programs Creating EEPROM Programming Programming with FST 202C Programming techniques Task structure of the operating system Program and data backup Practical applications Control of a station Basic stand-alone control System operation with ABG System operation with ABG-2 Emulator as commissioning aid Display and operate software package

4-7 4-8 4-11 4-11 4-12 4-15 4-16 4-17 4-20 4-20 4-24 4-25 4-27 4-32 4-32 4-44 4-44 4-53 4-59 4-59 4-60 4-61 4-64 4-67 4-70

4.3

4.4

4.5

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Contents

Chapter 5

DIAGNOSIS AND ERROR TREATMENT 5.1 5.2 Summary of diagnostic possibilities Diagnosis on-the-spot LED displays Diagnosis by program Status byte Function modules Error treatment Error messages of the operating sytem Reaction of the terminal to faults Short circuit/overload at an output module 5-3 5-4 5-4 5-9 5-9 5-10 5-13 5-13 5-15 5-16

5.3

5.4

Chapter 6 Appendix A

COMMAND INTERPRETER TECHNICAL APPENDIX Technical specifications Cable length and cross section Circuit diagrams GLOSSARY INDEX

A-3 A-7 A-12

Appendix B Appendix C

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General safety instructions

GENERAL SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS

Designated use The valve terminal type 03/05 described in this manual is designated exclusively for use as follows:

for controlling pneumatic and electrical


actuators (valves and output modules)

for interrogating electrical sensor signals by


means of the input modules. Use the valve terminal only as follows:

as designated in the instructions in technically faultless condition without any modifications.


The specified limit values for pressures, temperatures, electrical data, moments, etc. must be observed when additional commerciallyavailable components such as sensors and actuators are connected. Please comply also with national and local safety laws and regulations.

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General safety instructions

Target group This manual is directed exclusively at technicians who are trained in control and automation technology and who have experience in installing, commissioning, programming and diagnosing programmable logic controllers (PLC) and field bus systems.

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General safety instructions

IMPORTANT USER INSTRUCTIONS

Danger categories This manual contains instructions on the possible dangers which can occur when the programmable valve terminals types 03/05 with control block SB-202 are used. A distinction is made between the following instructions:

WARNING This means that injury to human beings as well as material damage can occur if these instructions are not observed.

CAUTION This means that material damage can occur if these instructions are not observed.

PLEASE NOTE This means that this instruction must also be observed.

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General safety instructions

Pictograms Pictograms and symbols supplement the danger instructions and draw attention to the consequences of dangers. The following pictograms are used:

Uncontrolled movements of loose tubing.

Uncontrolled movement of the connected actuators.

High electric voltage or undefined switching states of the electronic components which affect the connected circuits.

Electrostatically vulnerable components which will be destroyed if their contact surfaces are touched.

SF-

202

If you use a valve terminal with field bus connection SF-202, refere to the additional manual P.BE-SF202-03/05-GB and read the important notes given there.

The ISO valve terminal type 05 is very heavy. Please ensure that it is fastened correctly and see that all operating personnel wear safety shoes.

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General safety instructions

Instructions on this manual This manual contains specific information on the installation, commissioning, programming and disgnosis of the programmable valve terminals types 03/05 with control block SB202 and the input/output modules. The following product-specific abbreviations are used in this manual:
Abbreviation Terminal or Valve terminal Meaning Programmable valve terminal type 03 (MIDI/MAXI) or type 05 (ISO) with control block SB202 with/without electric I/Os Field bus node or control block SB-202 Pneumatic sub-base for valves For two single valves type 03 (MIDI/MAXI) For two double solenoid valves or mid-position valves type 03 (MIDI/MAXI) Sub-base for 4, 8 or 12 ISO valves type 05 (as per ISO 5599/I, size 1 or 2) Input Output Input and/or output pneumatic module in general Module with digital inputs/outputs in general (input/output modules Programmable logic controller; or simply controller

Node Valve-sub base S sub-base

D sub-base

ISO sub-base

I O I/O P module I/O module

PLC

Fig. 1: Abbreviations

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PLEASE NOTE All information on the pneumatic modules is to be found in the Pneumatics Manual P.BE-MIDI/MAXI-03-GB or P.BE-ISO-05-GB. A valve terminal with four pneumatic valve sub-bases and four input/output modules is used for the diagrams in this manual.

Fig. 2: Standard fitting for the drawings

Technical terms from the fields of pneumatics, electronics and programming are explained in the Glossary, Appendix B. Service If you have any technical problems, please consult your local Festo Service

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1. System summary

1. SYSTEM SUMMARY

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1. System summary

Contents 1.1 SUMMARY OF SYSTEM System structure Type 03: Description of components Type 05: Description of components Description of function 1-3 1-3 1-6 1-8 1-12

1-2

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1. System summary

1.1 SYSTEM SUMMARY Programmable valve terminal The control block contains its own PLC and thereby makes valve terminals types 03/05 into a programmable valve terminals. Independent automation tasks require the use of sensors. These can be connected directly to the valve terminal. There are four or eight sensor connections per input module. In addition there are output modules each with four electronic outputs. Independent automation tasks can therefore be solved on-the-spot. Advantages of the programmable valve terminal with control block SB-202: integrated PLC protection class IP 65 is fulfilled a control cabinet is not required the manufacturing process is relieved due to independent on-the-spot control fewer cables required easy-to-understand system structure with the controller on the machine valves already fitted pilot valve solenoid coils already wired central exhaust device already tested electrical inputs e.g. for sensors electrical outputs e.g. for actuators variable fitting with digital I/Os and pneumatic valves subsequent extension/conversion is possible different valve sizes.

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1. System summary

System structure The controller fitted is similar in most respects to the Festo FPC 202 controller. It can be operated as follows: by push buttons (START/STOP) by keyboard with text display (ABG) by user-friendly keyboard with text display (ABG2) For programming you will require a PC and the Festo programming software FST 202C V3.11 or later. The PC must be connected to the diagnostic interface of the valve terminal. The following programming languages can be used. LDR (Ladder diagram) STL (Statement list) The following diagram summarizes the system:

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1. System summary

Operate

Program

Display and operating panel

FST 202C V3.11*) STL FST 202C V3.11*) LDR

Operating field ABG

Start/stop operating field ABG 2

*) Software status V3.11 or later

PC (IBM compatible) with programming software FST 202C V3.11*)

Fig. 1/1: System structure of the programmable valve terminals types 03/05

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Type 03: Description of components Valve terminal type 03 consists of individual modules. Each module is assigned with different functions, connection, display and operation elements. These are summarized in the diagram below.

3 No. 1 2

2 Modules

Node with control block SB-202

Electronic modules (input/output modules), fitted with digital inputs (modules with 4 or 8 inputs) digital outputs (modules with 4 outputs)

3 4

End plate left with hole for additional earth cable connection Pneumatic modules (valve sub-bases) fitted with S valves: 5/2 single solenoid valves 5/2 double solenoid valves 5/3 mid-position valves (exhausted, pressurized, blocked) blanking plates S = Auxiliary pilot air Pneumatic MIDI or MAXI modules: pressure supply with integrated exhaust (MIDI) intermediate air supply with integrated exhaust (MIDI) pressure supply adapter with/without regulator (MIDI/MAXI) additional air supply module (MAXI) End plate right, depending on the size of the last sub-base: with common pneumatic tubing connections and integrated regulator for 5 bar auxiliary pilot air (unregulated pilot air is not permitted) with common pneum. tubing connections, but without integrated regulator without common pneumatic tubing connections (only MAXI)

Fig. 1/2: Modules of valve terminal type 03


1-6
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The electronic modules contain the following connection and display elements:

O4 ASI Master

O4

I4

I8

12 No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Meaning

11

10

Output socket for electronic output Yellow LED (status display per output) Red LED (error display per output) Input socket for one electric input Green LED (per input) Input socket for two electric inputs Two green LEDs (one LED per input) Node with LEDs and diagnostic interface detailed description in Chapter "Installation" Right-hand end plate Fuse for inputs/sensors Operating voltage connection ASI master for I/O periphery

Fig. 1/3: Display and connection elements of the electronic modules

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The connections, display and operation elements shown below are to be found on the pneumatic MIDI modules of type 03.

2a

3a 4

7 3b 2b

No. 1 2a 2b 3a 3b 4 5 6 7 8 9

Meaning Node with LEDs and diagnostic interface, detailed description see chapter "Installation" Yellow LED upper valve solenoid coil Yellow LED lower valve solenoid coil Manual override upper valve solenoid coil (14, A) Manual override lower valve solenoid coil (12, B) Valve location inscription field Unused valve location with blanking plate Common pneumatic tubing connections Work connections (per valve) Fuse for internal inputs/sensors Operating voltage connection

Fig. 1/4: Operating, display and connection elements of the pneumatic MIDI modules type 03

1-8

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The connections, display and operation elements shown below are to be found on the pneumatic MAXI modules of type 03.
1 2 3 4 5

10 No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Meaning

9 8

Node with LEDs and diagnostic interface, detailed description see chapter "Installation" Yellow LEDs (per valve solenoid coil) Manual override (per valve solenoid coil) Valve location inscription field (labels) Unused valve location with blanking plate Common pneumatic tubing connections Work connections (2 per valve, positioned vertically) Pressure regulator for auxiliary pilot air Common pneumatic tubing connection Exhaust connections

Fig. 1/5: Operating, display and connection elements of MAXI modules type 03

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Type 05: Description of components Valve terminal type 05 consists of individual modules. Each module is assigned with different functions, connections, display and operating elements. These are shown in the diagram below.

3 No. 1 2

Meaning Node with control block SB-202 Electronic modules (input/output modules), fitted with digital inputs (modules with 4 or 8 inputs) digital outputs (modules with 4 outputs) End plate left with opening for additional earth connection Adapter plate for ISO sub-base (manifold) as per ISO 5599/I sizes 1 or 2 ISO sub-base (manifolds for 4, 8 or 12 locations) fitted with: Pneumatic valves with hole pattern as per ISO 5599/I - single pneumatic valves - double pneumatic valves - pneumatic mid-position valves components for vertical stacking (regulator plates, flow control plates etc.) blanking plates Right-hand end plate with holes for fitting and with thread for lifting eye bolts (M8)

3 4 5

Fig. 1/6: Modules of valve terminal type 05

1-10

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1. System summary

The connections, display and operating elements shown below are to be found on the pneumatic ISO modules of type 05.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 12

10

8 No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Module

11

Node with LEDs and diagnostic interface, detailed description see chapter "Installation" Fuse for inputs/sensors (pin 1) Adapter plate Operating voltage connection of valve terminal type 05 Fuse for valves (pin 2) Valve location inscription field Yellow LEDs (per pilot solenoid) Manual override (per pilot solenoid, pressing or locking) External air control connection Common connections Work connections (per valve) Adapter cable for operating voltage of node and I/O modules

Fig. 1/7: Operating, display and connection elements of ISO modules type 05
The electronic modules are described in this chapter, "Description of components type 03".

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1. System summary

Description of function
Laptop/PC with FST 202C V3.11 or later

Node
I8 I8 O4 O4

Digital inputs
4

Digital output
AA AA AA

Actuator AAA AAA Sensors AAA


1 2

= Compressed air = Work air Electric signal flow

Fig. 1/8: Function summary of the programmable valve terminal type 03/05
The nucleus of the programmable valve terminal is the control block SB-202. This contains a PLC and the electronic components required for controlling a valve terminal independently. In this way you can solve your automation task on-the-spot independently. The user programs for the programmable valve terminal are created on a PC with the programming software FST 202C V3.11 or later. The programming languages LDR and STL can be used. The programs are loaded into the programmable valve terminal via the RS 232 diagnostic interface. Both RAM and EEPROM modes are possible. 1-12
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1. System summary

The input modules process the input signals (e.g. from sensors) and transmit these signals to the internal controller. The output modules are universal electrical outputs and control low-current consuming devices with positive logic, e.g. further valves, lights, etc. The pneumatic modules provide the following:

common channels for supply and exhaust


air

electrical signals from all solenoid valve


coils Work connections 2 and 4 are provided for each valve location on the pneumatic modules. The common channels of the pneumatic end plate are used for supplying the valves with compressed air and for venting the exhaust and pilot exhaust. Modules for pressure supply are also available, e.g. for working with different pressures or for fitting MIDI/MAXI valves or ISO valves onto a node. Further information on their use can be found in the pneumatics manual for your valve terminal. Only the electronic modules and the control block are described here.

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2. Fitting

2. FITTING

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2. Fitting

Contents 2.1 FITTING THE COMPONENTS Input/output modules End plates Hat rail clamping unit (type 03) 2-3 2-4 2-6 2-8

2.2

Type 03: FITTING THE VALVE TERMINAL 2-9 Wall fitting 2-9 Hat rail fitting 2-10

2.3

Type 05: FITTING THE VALVE TERMINAL 2-12 Wall fitting 2-12

2-2

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2. Fitting

2.1 FITTING THE COMPONENTS

WARNING Before fitting switch off the following: the compressed air supply the operating voltage supply for the electronic components (pin 1) the operating voltage supply for the outputs (pin 2)
You thereby avoid:

uncontrolled movements of loose hoses; undesired movements of the connected


actuators;

undefined switching states of the electronic


components.

CAUTION The components of the valve terminal contain electrostatically vulnerable components. Do not therefore touch any contact surfaces on the side plug connectors of the components. Please observe the regulations for dealing with electrostatically vulnerable components.
In this way you can prevent the valve terminal components from being destroyed.

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PLEASE NOTE Treat all modules and components of the valve terminal with the utmost care. Pay particular attention to the following: The screw connectors must not be distorted or subjected to mechanical stress. The screws must fit correctly (otherwise the threads will be damaged). The specified torques must be observed. The modules must be aligned correctly. (IP 65). The connecting surfaces must always be clean (in order to avoid leakage and contact faults). The contacts of the type 03 MIDI valve solenoid coils must not be bent (they are not resistant to bending , i.e. they will break off if bent back). Please consult also the fitting instructions included with modules and components ordered at a later stage.
Input/output modules Before the valve terminal is extended or converted, it must first be unscrewed and dismantled. Dismantling (see also following diagram)

SF-

202

Loosen and remove the screws of the


relevant module. The modules are now held together only by the electric plug.

Carefully pull the modules away from the


electric plug connectors without tilting them.

Replace damaged seals.

2-4

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Fitting (see also following diagram)

PLEASE NOTE Always place subsequently ordered modules after the the last module before the end plate. Do not fit more than 12 electronic modules. Please note also the addressing limits of your field bus protocol.
Fit the modules as follows: Insert a (new) seal on the right-hand contact surface facing the node.

Fit as shown in the following diagram.

Seal

Fastening screws max. 1 Nm

Fig. 2/1: Fitting electronic I/O modules

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End plates You will require a left-hand and a right-hand end plate as the mechanical conclusion of the terminal. These end plates fulfil the following functions:

they comply with protection class IP 65; they contain connections/contacts for protective earthing;

they contain holes for wall fitting and for the


hat rail clamping unit; The right-hand end plate of the ISO valve terminal is sufficiently grounded via the screw connections and pre-fitted spring contacts of the sub-bases. There are different types of right-hand end plate for valve terminals of type 03/05. All are supplied with pre-fitted earth cables.

CAUTION The right-hand end plate of valve terminal type 03 must be grounded via the earth cable before it is fitted. This is to avoid high voltages on the metal surface in the case of a fault.

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Earth the end plates as follows:

Right-hand end plate (type 03)


To earth the right-hand end plate connect the inside cable to the appropriate contacts on the pneumatic modules or on the node (see below).

Left-hand end plate (type 03 and type 05)


Connect the left-hand end plate by means of the ready fitted spring contacts conductively to the other components. Remarks Instructions on earthing the complete valve terminal are to be found in the chapter "Installation". The diagram below shows the fitting of both end plates.

Seal Contact for PE cable

Seal Factory fitted PE cable Fastening screws max. 1 Nm

Fig. 2/2: Fitting both end plates (example terminal type 03)

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Hat rail clamping unit (type 03) You will require the hat rail clamping unit if the terminal is to be fitted on a hat rail (support rail as per EN 50022). The hat rail clamping unit must be fastened to the rear of the end plates as shown in the diagram below. Please observe the following before fitting:

the glueing surfaces must be clean


(clean with spirit); Please observe the following after fitting:

the flat head screws must be tightened (6). the levers must be secured with locking
screws (7).
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Rubber foot, self-adhesive Clamping elements Left-hand lever *) Right-hand lever *) O ring Flat head screw Locking screw

*) Different lever lengths for MIDI and MAXI

Fig. 2/3: Fitting the hat rail clamping unit

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2. Fitting

2.2 TYPE 03:

FITTING THE VALVE TERMINAL Wall fitting (type 03)

WARNING With long terminals use additional supporting brackets every 200 mm. This is to avoid the following: overloading the fastening eyes on the left-hand end plate the terminal sagging natural resonances
Proceed as follows:

Calculate the weight of the terminal (weigh


or estimate). General rule:
MIDI per pneumatic module per node per electronic module 800 g 1000 g 400 g MAXI 1200 g 1000 g 400 g

Make sure that the fastening surface can


carry this weight.

Fasten the terminal with four M6 screws as


shown below (fitting position as desired). Use washers if necessary.
7.6 mm

M6

Fig. 2/4: Wall fitting terminal type 03


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Hat rail fitting (type 03) The terminal is suitable for fitting onto a hat rail (support rail as per EN 50022). For this purpose there is a guide groove on the rear of all modules for hanging the terminal on the hat rail.

CAUTION Fasten the valve terminal onto the hat rail with the hat rail clamping unit. If the terminal is fitted in a sloping position or at a point subjected to vibration, use screw (7) to protect the hat rail clamping unit against unintentional loosening/opening.

PLEASE NOTE If fitted in a horizontal position and with a non-vibrating load, the fastening of the hat rail clamping unit will be sufficient without screws (7). If there is no hat rail clamping unit on the terminal, it can be ordered and fitted at a later stage. The use of MIDI or MAXI clamping units depends on the end plate fitted (MIDI/MAXI).
Proceed as follows:

Calculate the weight of the terminal (weigh


or estimate). General rule:
MIDI per pneumatic module per node per electronic module 800 g 1000 g 400 g MAXI 1200 g 1000 g 400 g

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Make sure that the fastening surface can


carry this weight.

Fit a hat rail (support rail EN 50022 35x15; width 35mm, height 15 mm).

Fasten the hat rail to the mounting surface


at least every 100mm.

Hang the terminal onto the hat rail. Secure


the terminal on both sides against tilting or slipping with the hat rail clamping unit (see diagram below).

If the terminal is fitted in a sloping position


or at a point subjected to vibration, use two screws (7) to protect the hat rail clamping unit against unintentional loosening/opening.

Valve terminal type 03

Hat rail clamping unit unlocked

Hat rail clamping unit locked

Retaining screw (7)

Fig. 2/5: Fitting the valve terminal type 03 onto a hat rail

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2. Fitting

2.3 TYPE 05:

FITTING THE VALVE TERMINAL Wall fitting (type 05)

WARNING With long terminals (e.g. several I/O modules) use additional supporting brackets every 200 mm. This is to avoid the following: overloading the fastening eyes on the left-hand end plate the terminal sagging (I/O side) natural resonances
Proceed as follows:

Calculate the weight of the terminal (weigh


or estimate). General rule:
ISO size 1 Sub-base *) - 4 valve locations incl. valves - 8 valve locations incl. valves - 12 valve locations incl. valves per node per electronic module 8 kg 14 kg 20 kg ISO size 2 12 kg 20 kg 28 kg 1 kg 0.4 kg

*) Components for vertical stacking: Please see pneumatics manual P.BE-ISO-05-GB for weights.

Make sure that the fastening surface can


carry this weight.

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2. Fitting

Proceed as follows when fitting the terminal:

Use 3 screws M10 on the adapter plate and


the right-hand end plate (2)

2 screws M6 on the left-hand end plate (1)


If necessary use additional fitting possibilities as follows:

Fastening hole on the back of the righthand end plate with M10 thread ("blind hole" (3))

supporting angles for I/O modules (see


fitting instructions supplied with the angles) The ISO valve terminal can be fitted as desired. Use washers if necessary and the M8 thread for lifting eye bolt (e.g. transport aid for crane hooks).

M8 thread in end plate for lifting eye bolt

M6

M10

Fig. 2/6: Wall fitting of an ISO valve terminal type 05

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3. INSTALLATION

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3. Installation

Contents 3.1 GENERAL CONNECTION PRINCIPLES Cable selection Connecting the cables to the plugs/sockets 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-6 3-6 3-8 3-9 3-10 3-10 3-12 3-13 3-14 3-18 3-19 3-21

CONTROL BLOCK SB-202 Opening and closing the control block Structure of the control block Diagnostic interface Setting the baud rate Connecting the diagnostic cable 3.2.1 Typ 03: Connecting the operating voltages Calculating current consumption Operating voltage connection 3.2.2 Typ 05: Connecting the operating voltages Operating voltage connection Calculating current consumption

3.2

3.3

CONNECTING THE INPUT MODULES Pin assignment CONNECTING THE OUTPUT MODULES Pin assignment

3-25 3-27

3.4

3-28 3-30

3-2

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3.1 GENERAL CONNECTION PRINCIPLES

WARNING Before installation or maintenance work is carried out, the following must be switched off: the compressed air supply the operating voltage for the electronic components (pin 1) the operating voltage for the outputs/valves (pin 2).
You can thereby avoid:

uncontrolled movements of loose tubing undesired movements of the connected


actuators

undefined switching states of the electronic


components Cable selection The cable selection for the diagnostic interface and the operating voltage connection is described in the following sections:

Diagnostic interface:
Chapter 3.2, Section "Connecting the diagnostic cable"

Operating voltage connection:


Chapter 3.2, Section "Connecting the operating voltages" Appendix A, Section "Cable length and cross section"

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3. Installation

Connecting the cables to the plugs/sockets

CAUTION The position of the pins is different depending on whether plugs or sockets are used The connections of the input/output modules are in the form of sockets. The connections of the diagnostic interface and the operating voltage are in the form of plugs The pin assignment is shown in the following chapters.
When you have selected appropriate cables, connect them to the plugs/sockets in accordance with steps 1 - 7 below. 1. Open the plugs/sockets as follows (see diagram):

Mains connection socket:


Insert the mains connection socket into the operating voltage connection of the valve terminal. Unscrew the housing of the socket and remove the connection part of the socket which is still inserted in the operating voltage connection.

Sensor plug/diagnostic socket:


Loosen the centre knurled nut.

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3. Installation

2. Open the strain relief at the rear of the housing. and push the cable through as described below (see also diagram). Cable outer diameter: PG 7: 4.0 ... 6.0 mm PG 9: 6.0 ... 8.0 mm PG 13.5: 10.0 ...12.0 mm Plugs/sockets (straight/angled): Power supply socket: PG 7, 9 or 13.5 Sensor plug: PG 7 Bus cable socket: PG 7, 9 or 13.5

AAA AAA AAA AAA

Cable Strain relief

Housing

AAAAAAA AAA AAAA AAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAAA AAA

AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA

Connection AAAAAAAA AAAA AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAA AAAA AAAAAAAA Plug

Socket

Fig. 3/1: Individual plug/socket parts and cable routing


3. Remove the insulation from the last 5 mm of the cable. 4. Fit the wires with cable end sleeves. 5. Connect the ends of the conductors. 6. Replace the connection part onto the housing of the plug/socket and screw the two parts together. Pull the cable back so that it is not looped inside the housing. 7. Tighten the strain relief.
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3. Installation

3.2 CONTROL BLOCK SB-202

Opening and closing the control block

WARNING Before installation or maintenance work is carried out, the following must be switched off: the compressed air supply the operating voltage for the electronic components (pin 1) the operating voltage for the outputs/valves (pin 2).
You can thereby avoid:

uncontrolled movements of loose tubing undesired movements of the connected


actuators

undefined switching states of the electronic


components

CAUTION The node contains electrostatically vulnerable components. Do not therefore touch any components Observe the regulations for handling electrostatically vulnerable components
In this way you can prevent the electronic components of the node from being destroyed.

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The following connecting and display elements are to be found on the cover of the node:

Green LED
AAA AAAA AAA PO W EAAAA R RUN AAA AAAA AAA AAAA ERR O R R A M AAAA AAA

Green LED

Red LED Plug for diagnosticinterface

Red LED

Operating voltage connection

Fuse for operating voltage of inputs

Fig. 3/2: Cover of control block PLEASE NOTE The cover is connected to the internal boards by the cables for the operating voltage connection and cannot, therefore, be removed completely.

Opening
Unscrew and remove the 6 Philips screws in the cover. Carefully lift up the cover, but do not damage the cables by mechanical stress.

Closing
Replace the cover. Push the cables for the operating voltage connection back into the housing so that they are not squashed. Tighten the Philips screws of the cover in diagonally opposite sequence.

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3. Installation

Structure of the control block There are four printed circuit boards in the control block. Board 2 contains two LEDs and a plug for the diagnostic interface; board 3 contains two LEDs a switch for setting the configuration.

grne LED rote LED

AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA

AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA

grne LED rote LED

Stecker fr Diagnosekabel

ungenutzt, mssen auf 0 stehen


AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA

Platine1 Platine 2 Abschirmblech

1 2 3 4

DIL-Schalter

Platine 4

Platine 3 Plug for operating voltage connection

Fig. 3/3: Connecting, display and operating elements of the control block

3-8

9602

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3. Installation

Diagnostic interface The transmission rate (baud rate) of the diagnostic interface must be set on the DIL switch. The DIL switch consists of four switch elements. These are numbered from 1 ... 4. The position "ON" is marked.

SF-

202

AA AA AA A

1 2 3

4
O N

AAAA AAAAAA AA AA AAAA AAAAAA AAAA AA AA AAAA AA AAAA AAAAAA AA AAAA AA AAAA AAAAAA AAAA AAAAAA AA

Baud rate for RS 232 Diagnostic interface SB-202 stand alone: Unused, must be at position "ON" SF-202 master/slave: Setting the operating mode

Fig. 3/4: Position and function of the DIL switch

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3. Installation

Setting the baud rate

Set the baud rate on the control block so that it corresponds to the setting on the operating/programming device (PC, terminal, display).

Baud rate of diagnostic interface RS 232 [Baud] DIL switch 300 2400 4800 9600

1 2 3 4 ON

1 2

1 2

1 2

1 2

SB-202 stand alone only: The switch elements 3 + 4 must be at position "ON"

Fig. 3/5: Setting the baud rate

Connecting the diagnostic cable In order to program the valve terminal you will require the following:

PC or laptop with serial


RS 232 interface (V.24)

screened connecting cable


(e.g. Festo diagnostic cable SB-202-BU25 or BU9) Connect the diagnostic cable as follows:

Insert the 4-pin plug into the diagnostic


interface of the valve terminal

Connect the 25-pin or 9-pin socket to the


serial RS 232 interface of your PC/laptop (COMx)

3-10

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3. Installation

If you use a different cable, please observe the following pin assignment:

Pin assignment of diagnostic cable 25-pin 4-pin round plug for diagnostic interface on control block SB-202 RxD TxD GND Screening 1 2 3 4 25-pin socket on PC/laptop (serial RS 232 interface/V.24)

2 3 7 1

TxD RxD GND Screening

Pin assignment of diagnostic cable 9-pin 4-pin round plug for diagnostic interface on control block SB-202 RxD TxD GND Screening 1 2 3 4 9-pin socket on PC/laptop (serial RS 232 interface/V.24) 3 2 5 TxD RxD GND

Pin assignment of diagnostic interface on control block GND


3 4 2 1

TxD

Screening

RxD

Fig. 3/6: Pin assignment of diagnostic cable and interface

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3. Installation

3.2.1 Type 03:

Connecting the operating voltages

WARNING In order that the operating voltage can be isolated reliably, you must use an isolating transformer with at least 4kV isolation resistance complying with standard EN 60742 (DIN/VDE 0551).

CAUTION The operating voltage supply to the outputs/valves (pin 2) must be fused externally with maximum 10 A. With external fusing you can prevent functional damage to the valve terminal in the event of a short circuit.
Please observe the following before connecting the operating voltages:

Calculate the total current consumption


according to the following table and select a suitable power unit as well as cables with a suitable cross section.

Avoid long distances between the power


unit and the terminal. Also calculate the permitted distance according to Appendix A. The following general rule applies:
Consumption Pin 1 = 2.2 A Pin 2 = 10 A max. VB = 24 V Cablecross-section 1.5 mm 2 2.5 mm 2 Distance 8m 14 m

3-12

9602

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3. Installation

Calculating the current consumption type 03 The table below shows how to calculate the total current consumption for terminal type 03. The values specified have been rounded up. If you use other valves or modules, you should consult the relevant technical specifications for their current consumption.
Current consumption of electronic components node type 03 and inputs (pin 1, 24 V 25 %) Node Number of simultaneously assigned sensor inputs: 0.200 A

_____ x 0.010 A

+ +

A A

Sensor supplies: _____ x_____ A (see manufacturer specifications) Current consumption of electronic components node and inputs (pin1) max. 2. 2 A Current consumption of outputs type 03 (Pin 2, 24 V 10 %) Number of MIDI valve coils (simultaneously under power): _____ x 0.055 A Number of MAXI valve coils (simultaneously under power): _____ x 0.10 0 A Number of simultaneously activated electrical outputs:

_____ x 0.010 A

+ +

A A A + = A A

Loading current of simultaneously activated electrical outputs: _____ x_____ A Current consumption of outputs (pin 2) max. 10 A Total current consumption of valve terminal type 03

Fig. 3/7: Calculating the total current consumption type 03

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3. Installation

Operating voltage connection (type 03) The 24V operating voltages are connected at the lower left-hand edge of the control block.

Operating voltage connection type 03

Fig. 3/8: Position of the operating voltage connection


The following components of the valve terminal type 03 are supplied separately with + 24 V DC via this connection:

the internal electronic components, PLC


and inputs of the input modules (pin 1: DC + 24 V, tolerance 25%).

the outputs of the valves and of the output


modules (pin 2: DC + 24 V, tolerance 10%, external fuse max. 10 A required). Recommendation: Connect the operating voltage for the outputs/valves via the EMERGENCY OFF circuit or EMERGENCY OFF contacts.

3-14

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3. Installation

The diagram below shows the pin assignment of the operating voltage connection.

24 V supply electronic components and inputs PE (protective earth connection, incoming socket) 4 3

1 2

24 V supply valves/outputs

0V

Fig. 3/9: Pin assignment of operating voltage connection (type 03) PLEASE NOTE If there is a common power supply for pin 1 (electronic components and inputs) and pin 2 (outputs/valves), the lower tolerance of 10% for both circuits must be observed.
Check the 24V operating voltage of the outputs whilst the system is in operation. Ensure that the operating voltage of the outputs lies within the permitted tolerance even during full operation. Recommendation: Use a closed-loop power unit. Protective earthing The valve terminal has two protective earthing connections: At the operating voltage connection (pin 4 incoming socket). At the left-hand end plate (M4 thread).

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3. Installation

PLEASE NOTE Always connect the earth cable to pin 4 of the operating voltage connection. Make sure that the housing of the valve terminal and the earth cable at pin 4 have the same potential and that no equalizing currents flow. Connect an earth cable of sufficient crosssection to the left-hand end plate if the valve terminal is not mounted on an earthed machine stand. In this way you can avoid interference due to electromagnetic sources.
Connection examples (type 03) The following diagram shows the connection of a common 24V power supply for pins 1 and 2. Please note that:

the supply to the outputs/valves must be


fused externally with maximum 10 A against short circuit/overload.

the supply to the electronic components and


inputs must be fused externally with 3.15 A against short circuit/overload (recommended).

the supply to the sensors is also protected


via the fitted fuse (2 A).

the common tolerance of DC 24 V 10%


must be observed.

when the two protective earth cables are


connected, equalizing currents must be avoided, e.g. by the use of cables with suitable cross section for equipotential bonding.

3-16

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3. Installation

3 1 2 4

Connecting cable for potential equalization of earthing connections Fuse for inputs/sensors (2 A) 3.15 A External fuses
DC 24V 10%

0V
AC 230 V

10 A

EMERGENCY OFF

Protective earth connection pin 4 designed for 12 A

Fig. 3/10: Example - connecting a common 24 V supply and both protective earth cables (type 03)
Power failure bridging time for RAM memory The power failure bridging time is at least 4 hours. If the operating voltage fails at pin 1 of the operating voltage connection (control unit and inputs), all data in the program and work memory will be saved for at least 4 hours if RAMs are used.

PLEASE NOTE If EEPROMs are used, the program data and the remanent operands will be saved permanently.

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3. Installation

3.2.2 Type 05:

Connecting the operating voltages

WARNING In order that the operating voltage can be isolated reliably, you must use an isolating transformer with at least 4kV isolation resistance complying with standard EN 60742 (DIN/VDE 0551).

CAUTION The power supply to the outputs/valves (pin 2) must be separately fused externally with max. 10 A. The external fuse prevents the valve terminal from being destroyed in the event of a short circuit.

3-18

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3. Installation

Operating voltage connection type 05 The 24V operating voltages are connected at the adapter plate between the RIO node and the valves. The operating voltage connection of the RIO node and the I/O modules is supplied also via the adapter cable. Operating voltage connection type 05

Fuse for valves (4 A slow blowing)

Adapter cable

Fig. 3/11: Positionof the operating voltage connection type 05


The following components on the valve terminal type 05 are supplied separately via this +24 V DC connection: the operating voltage for internal electric components and the power supply to the input modules (pin 1: DC +24 V, tolerance 25% external fuse recommended with max. 3.15 A). the operating voltage for the outputs of the valves and of the output modules (pin 2: DC +24 V, tolerance 10%, external fuse max. 10 A, slow blowing, required). Recommendation The operating voltage for the outputs/valves should be connected to the EMERGENCY OFF circuit or EMERGENCY OFF contacts. 3-19

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3. Installation

PLEASE NOTE Please note that with common voltage supply for pin 1 (electronic components and inputs) and pin 2 (outputs/valves), the lower tolerance of 10% for both circuits must be observed.
Check the 24V operating voltage of the outputs whilst your system is operating. Please see that the operating voltage of the outputs lies within the permitted tolerances even during full operation. Recommendation

Use a closed loop power unit. Calculate the complete current consumption
according to the following table and select both a suitable power unit and cable cross section.

Avoid long distances between the power


unit and the terminal. Calculate the permitted distance according to Appendix A. The following rule applies for type 05:
Current consumption max.*) Pin 1 = 2,2 A Pin 2 = 10 A U B = 24 V *) Please note that the max. total current consumption (pins 1 and 2) is 12.2 A Cable cross section 1.5 mm 2 2.5 mm 2 Distance

8 m

14 m

3-20

9602

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3. Installation

Calculating the current consumption type 05 The following table shows the calculation of the total current consumption for the ISO terminal type 05. The values are rounded up. If you use other valves or modules, you should consult the appropriate technical specifications for their consumption.
Current consumption of electronic components node type 05 and inputs (pin 1, 24 V 25 %) Node Number of simultaneously occupied sensor inputs: 0.200 A ____x 0.010 A + + A A

Sensor supplies: ____x_____ A (see manufacturer specifications) Current consumption of electronic components, node and inputs (pin 1) max. 2.2 A Current consumption of outputs type 05 (pin 2, 24 V 10 %) Number of valve coils (simultaneously under power): ___ x 0.300 A

+ + + =

A A

Number of simultaneously activated electric outputs: ___ x 0.010 A Load current of simultaneously activated electric outputs

____x_____ A

A A + A

Current consumption of outputs (pin 2) max. 10 A Total current consumption of valve terminal type 05

Fig. 3/12: Calculating the total current consumption type 05

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3. Installation

The following diagram shows the pin assignment of the operating voltage connection on the adapter plate.
24 V supply for electronic components and inputs 4 PE (protective earth connection, leading socket) 3

24 V supply valves, outputs 1 2

0V

Fig. 3/13: Pin assignment of the operating voltage connection


Protective earthing The valve terminal has two protective earth connections:

on the operating voltage connection (pin 4,


leading socket)

on the left-hand end plate (M4 thread).


PLEASE NOTE Always connect the earth cable to pin 4 of the operating voltage connection. Make sure that the housing of the valve terminal and the earth cable at pin 4 have the same potential and that no equalizing currents flow. Connect an earth cable of sufficient crosssection to the left-hand end plate if the valve terminal is not mounted on an earthed machine stand. In this way you can avoid interference due to electromagnetic sources.

3-22

9602

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3. Installation

Connection example type 05 The following diagram shows the connection of a common 24V supply for pins 1 and 2. Please note that:

the outputs/valves must be protected


against short circuit/overload with an external 10 A fuse (slow blowing)

the supply to the electronic components and


inputs must be fused externally with 3.15 A against short circuit/overload (recommended)

that the operating voltage of the sensors is


protected also by the fitted fuse (2 A)

that the operating voltage of the valves is


protected also by the fitted fuse (4 A, slow blowing)

the common tolerance of DC 24 V 10%


must be observed

the operating voltage supplied of the node


is via the adapter cable

equalizing currents must be avoided when


both earth cables are connected, e.g. by means of cables with appropriate cross section as a potential compensation.

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3. Installation

Fuse for inputs/sensors (2A)

Operating voltage connection

Fuse for valves (4 A, slow blowing)

Connected adapter cable Connecting cable for potential compensation of earth connections
0V AC 115V 230V 24 V DC 24V 10%

3 1 2 4

3.15 A External fuses 10 A Emergency off

Earth cable connection pin 4 designed for 12.2 A

Fig. 3/14: Example - connecting a common 24V supply and both earth cables (type 05)
Power failure bridging time for RAM memory The power failure bridging time is at least 4 hours. If the operating voltage fails at pin 1 of the operating voltage connection (control unit and inputs), all data in the program and work memory will be saved for at least 4 hours if RAMs are used.

PLEASE NOTE If EEPROMs are used, the program data and the remanent operands will be saved permanently.

3-24

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3. Installation

3.3 CONNECTING THE INPUT MODULES

WARNING Before installation or maintenance work is carried out, the following must be switched off: the compressed air supply the operating voltage for the electronic components (pin 1) the operating voltage for the outputs/valves (pin 2).
You can thereby avoid:

uncontrolled movements of loose tubing undesired movements of the connected


actuators

undefined switching states of the electronic


components

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3. Installation

Four or eight inputs are available on the input modules of the valve terminal for user applications. The inputs have positive logic (PNP inputs).
Input module 4-inputs Input module 8-inputs

Sockets each with one digital input

INPU T

Green LED

Sockets each with two digital inputs

INPU T

One green LED for each digital input

Fig. 3/15: Digital input modules (4/8 inputs)


Recommendation for 8-input modules: Use the Festo duo-cable to connect two sensors via one plug at low costs.

3-26

9602

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3. Installation

Pin assignment The diagram below shows as an example the pin assignment of all the inputs.
Pin assignment 4 inputs free
2 3

LED

Pin assignment 8 inputs Input Ix+1


2 3

LED 0V

0V

0
Input Ix

0
1 4

Input Ix + 24 V free
2 3

+ 24 V 0V Input Ix+3
2 3

0V

2
Input Ix+2 0V

1
1 4

+ 24 V free
2 3

Input Ix+1 0V

+ 24 V Input Ix+5
2 3

4
Input Ix+4 0V

2
1 4

+ 24 V free
2 3

Input Ix+2 0V

+ 24 V Input Ix+7
2 3

6
Input Ix+6

3
1 4

+ 24 V

Input Ix+3

+ 24 V

Fig. 3/16: Input module: pin assignment 4/8 inputs

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VISB - 03/05

3. Installation

3.4 CONNECTING THE OUTPUT MODULES

WARNING Before installation or maintenance work is carried out, the following must be switched off: the compressed air supply the operating voltage for the electronic components (pin 1) the operating voltage for the outputs/valves (pin 2).
You can thereby avoid:

uncontrolled movements of loose tubing undesired movements of the connected


actuators

undefined switching states of the electronic


components

3-28

9602

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3. Installation

There are four transistor outputs on the output modules of the valve terminal for user applications. These outputs have positive logic (PNP outputs).
Output module (4 outputs)

Yellow LED per output Red LED per output

Sockets each with one digital output

O U TPUT

Fig. 3/17: Digital output module (4 outputs)

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3. Installation

Pin assignment The diagram below shows as an example the pin assignment of all the outputs.
Pin assignment 4 outputs free
2 3

LED

0V

0
1 4

free free
2 3

Output Ox 0V

1
1 4

free

Output Ox+1 0V
2 3

free

2
1 4

free free
2 3

Output Ox+2 0V

3
Output Ox+3

free

Fig. 3/18: Output module: pin assignment 4 outputs

3-30

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4. Commissioning/programming

4. COMMISSIONING AND PROGRAMMING

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4. Commissioning/programming

Contents 4.1 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF CONFIGURATION AND ADDRESSING 4-4 General 4-4 Calculating the configuration data 4-4 Calculating the number of inputs/outputs Type 03 4-5 Type 05 4-6 Address assignment of the valve terminal 4-7 Basic rule 1 4-8 Basic rule 2 4-11 Basic rule 3 4-11 Address assignment after extension/conversion 4-12 Examples of addressing Type 03 MIDI/MAXI valves 4-15 Type 05 ISO valves 4-16 Addressing with FST202C 4-17 FIRST STEPS WITH FST Prerequisites On-line operation Create allocation list Load programs Creating EEPROM Boot mode Auto mode PROGRAMMING Programming with FST 202C Structuring Operators, command set Operands Function modules 4-20 4-20 4-22 4-24 4-25 4-27 4-30 4-31 4-32 4-32 4-32 4-34 4-37 4-41

4.2

4.3

4-2

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4. Commissioning/programming

4.4

PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES Task structure of the operating system Program processing Multitasking process Module processing Program and data backup Program memory RAM Program memory EEPROM Programming EEPROM Boot mode and automode PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS Control of a station Basic stand-alone control System operation with ABG System operation with ABG2 Emulator as commissioning aid Display and operate software package

4-44 4-44 4-44 4-47 4-48 4-53 4-54 4-55 4-57 4-57 4-59 4-59 4-60 4-61 4-64 4-67 4-70

4.5

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4. Commissioning/programming

4.1 BASIC PRINCIPLES OF CONFIGURATION AND ADDRESSING General Before programming you must create an allocation list of all the connected inputs/outputs. This allocation list will simplify addressing or programming. Addressing the valve terminal requires a very exact procedure, as different specifications are sometimes required for each terminal on account of the modular structure. Please note here the specifications in the following sections. Calculating the configuration data The programmable valve terminal can control up to 48 inputs and outputs, whereby a different number of I/Os are assigned per module. The following table shows the I/Os required for each module.
Number of assigned I/Os *) 2 outputs 4 outputs

SF-

202

Module type S valve sub-base (type 03) D valve sub-base (type 03) ISO sub-base (type 05) - 4 valve locations - 8 valve locations - 12 valve locations Output module (4 digital outputs) Input module (4 digital inputs) Input module (8 digital inputs) *)

8 outputs 16 outputs 24 outputs 4 outputs 4 inputs 8 inputs

The I/Os are assigned automatically within the terminal, irrespective of whether an input/output is actually used.

Fig. 4/1: Number of I/Os assigned per module


4-4
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4. Commissioning/programming

Calculating the number of inputs/outputs (type 03) Copy the table for further calculations. Note the different way of calculating the number of outputs for type 03 and type 05.
Table for calculating the inputs/outputs (type 03) INPUTS 1. Number of 4-input modules 2. Number of 8-input modules _______ _______

4 8 +

I I

Total number of inputs to be configured (SB-202: max. 48 SF-202: max. 32) OUTPUTS 3. Number of S sub-bases (type 03) 4. Number of D sub-bases (type 05) _______ _______

2 4 +

O O

Intermediate sum of 4. + 5. 5. Check that the sum of 4. + 5. is divisible by 4 without remainder. This is necessary because of the 4-bit orientated internal addressing of the terminal. A distinction must be made between the following cases: a) If divisible by 4 without remainder then continue with 7 b) If this is not the case, round up (+2 O)

2O

6. Number of electronic 4-output modules

______

O O

Total number of outputs to be configured (SB-202: max. 48 SF-202: max. 32)

Fig. 4/2a: Calculating the number of inputs/outputs (type 03)

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4. Commissioning/programming

Calculating the number of inputs/outputs (type 05) Copy the table for further calculations. Please observe that the calculation of outputs differs for type 03 and type 05.
Table for calculating the number of inputs/outputs (type 05) INPUTS 1. Number of 4-input modules 2. Number of 8-input modules ______ ______

4 8 +

I I I

Total sum of inputs to be configured (SB-202: max. 48 SF-202: max. 32) OUTPUTS 3. ISO sub-base modules for 4 valve locations 8 valve locations 12 valve locations 4. Number of electronic output modules

8 O 16 O 24 O _______


4 =

O O

Total sum of outputs to be configured (SB-202: max. 48 SF-202: max. 32)

Fig. 4/2b: Calculating the number of inputs/outputs (type 05)

4-6

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4. Commissioning/programming

Address assignment of the valve terminal The address assignment of the outputs of a modular valve terminal depends on the equipment installed. The terminal can be equipped in the following ways:

valves and digital I/O modules valves only digital I/O modules only
The rules described overleaf apply to the address assignment of these fitting variants. This is followed by a detailed example for terminals type 03 and type 05.

PLEASE NOTE If two addresses are occupied for a valve location, the following assignment applies: lower-value address pilot solenoid 14 higher-value address pilot solenoid 12 There is a Festo software package which ascertains and prints out the addressing of a terminal (depending on equipment fitted). Please ask your Festo technician.

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4. Commissioning/programming

Basic rule 1 With mixed fitting, the address assignment of the following is taken into account: valves digital I/O modules 1. Outputs The address assignment of the outputs does not depend on the inputs. 1.1 Address assignment of the valves Addresses should be assigned in ascending order without gaps Counting begins on the node from left to right S sub-bases always occupy 2 addresses D sub-bases always occupy 4 addresses ISO valve locations always occupy 2 adr. Max. 26 valve solenoid coils can be adr. 1.2 Rounding up to 4 bits; two cases are distinguished: a) If the number of valve addresses is divisible by 4 without remainder, continue with 1.3. b) If this is not the case, rounding must be made to 4 bits because of the 4 bit orientated addressing. The 2 bits thus rounded in the address range cannot be used 1.3 Address assignment of the output modules After the (rounded 4-bit) addressing of the valves, the digital outputs are addressed Addresses should be assigned in ascending order without gaps Counting begins on the node from right to left. Counting on the individual modules is from top to bottom. Digital O-modules always occupy 4 addresses. 4-8
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4. Commissioning/programming

2.

Inputs The address assignment of the inputs does not depend on the outputs. 2.1 Address assignment of input modules Addresses should be assigned in ascending order without gaps. Counting on the node is from right to left. Counting begins on the node from top to bottom. 4-input modules occupy 4 addresses. 8-input modules occupy 8 addresses. When the operating voltage is switched on, the valve terminal recognizes automatically all available pneumatic modules (Type 03: max. 13 modules, type 05: 4, 8 or 12 valve locations) and digital input/output modules. It also assigns the appropriate addresses. If a valve location is not used (blanking plate) or if a digital input/output is not connected, the appropriate address is nevertheless assigned.

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4. Commissioning/programming

The diagram below shows as an example the address assignment with mixed fitting.
O module 4 outputs O module 4 outputs SINGLE sub-base DOUBLE sub-base DOUBLE sub-base I module 4 inputs I module 8 inputs Double sub-base

14 14 14 14 14 14 14 8 9 10 11 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 0 1 2 4 6 8 10 14

12 12 12 12

Fig. 4/3: Address assignment of a valve terminal with digital I/Os


Notes on Fig. 4/3 If single valves are fitted to double subbases, four addresses will be reserved for valve solenoid coils; the higher address in each case cannot be used (see address 3). If unused valve locations are fitted with blanking plates, the addresses will still be reserved (see addresses 12, 13). Because of the 4-bit orientated addressing of the modular valve terminal, rounding is always made to the full four bits (unless the fitting already uses all 4 bits). Two addresses cannot therefore be used (see addresses 14, 15).

9602

Round up

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4. Commissioning/programming

Basic rule 2 If only valves are fitted, the address assignment is as described in basic rule 1.

PLEASE NOTE Maximum 26 valve solenoid coils can be addressed. There is no rounding of the last two positions on the valve side.
Basic rule 3 If only electrical I/Os are used, the address assignment is always as described in basic rule 1.

PLEASE NOTE Counting begins immediately to the left of the node. There is no rounding of the last two positions on the valve side. Maximum 48 digital outputs/inputs can be addressed.
Basic rule 4
SF202

For SF-202 only.

Please unfold for page 4-10

Please unfold for page 4-12 9602

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4. Commissioning/programming

Address assignment after extension/conversion A special feature of the modular valve terminal is its flexibility. If the demands placed on the machine change, the fittings of the valve terminal can also be changed.

CAUTION If the valve terminal is subsequently extended or converted, the input/output addresses may be shifted. This applies in the following cases: If one or several pneumatic modules is/are subsequently fitted/removed (type 03). If a pneumatic module with single valves is replaced by a new module with double valves or vice versa (type 03). If additional input/output modules are inserted between the node and existing input/output modules. If existing 4-input modules are replaced by 8-input modules or vice versa.

PLEASE NOTE The addressing limit of 48 inputs and outputs must be observed if the terminal is extended or converted.

4-12

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4. Commissioning/programming

Using the standard fitting in the previous diagram, this diagram shows the modifications to the address assignment when an extension is made.

S valve sub-base

POWER SUPPLY

D valve sub-base

D valve sub-base

D valve sub-base

D valve sub-base

S valve sub-base
14 14 18 14 19 17

Input module 8 inputs

Output module 4 outputs

Output module 4 outputs

Input module 4 inputs

14 14 8 9 10 11 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 24 25 26 27 20 21 22 23 0 1

14 2

14 4

14 6

14 8

14 10 12

14 14

16

11

13

15

12 12 12 12 12 12

Fig. 4/4: Address assignment of a valve terminal after extension/conversion


Notes on Fig. 4/4 Pressure supply modules and intermediate supply modules do not occupy any addresses.

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VISB - 03/05

4. Commissioning/programming

Example of addressing type 03 MIDI/MAXI valves

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Single sub-base

4-input module

4-output moduleh

8-input module

14

14

14

14

14

12 14 12 14 12 14

12 14 12 14

8 9 10
11

0 1 2 3

28 29 30 31

24 0
25 26 27 1 3
5

8 10

13 12 15 14

16

17

19 18 21 20 22

4 5 6 7

9 11

23

12 12 12 12

PLEASE NOTE If a valve location occupies two addresses, the assignment is as follows: low value addresses pilot solenoid coil 14 higher value addresses pilot solenoid coil 12

Fig. 4/5: Address assignment of a valve terminal type 03 (MIDI/MAXI valves)

Round up 4-15

E5a

4-output moduleh

VISB - 03/05

4. Commissioning/programming

Example of addressing type 05 ISO valves

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

Double sub-base

12 8 9 10 11 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 1

14

12

14

12

14

Single sub-base

14

12

14

12

14

12

14

14

11

10

13

12

15

14

PLEASE NOTE If a valve location occupies two addresses, the assignment is as follows: low value addresses pilot solenoid coil 14 higher value addresses pilot solenoid coil 12

Fig. 4/6: Address assignment of a valve terminal type 05 (ISO valves)

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Single sub-base

4-output module

4-output module

4-input module

8-input module

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4. Commissioning/programming

Addressing with FST 202C

PLEASE NOTE There is a Festo software package which ascertains and prints out the addressing of a terminal (depending on equipment fitted). Please ask your Festo technician.
The programmable valve terminal SB-202 contains maximum 48 inputs and outputs. These are addressed by the FST 202C with 8 input and output words each with 8 bits. Non available inputs are "logic 0" here. The following tables show the assignment of the I/Os between the terminal and the FST; once as a complete table and once by means of an example (standard fitting).

SF-

202

PLEASE NOTE If two addresses are occupied for a valve location, the following assignment applies: lower-value address pilot solenoid 14 higher-value address pilot solenoid 12

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Inputs Terminal
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

Outputs Terminal
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

FST 202C
I0.0 I0.1 I0.2 I0.3 I0.4 I0.5 I0.6 I0.7 I1.0 I1.1 I1.2 I1.3 I1.4 I1.5 I1.6 I1.7 I2.0 I2.1 I2.2 I2.3 I2.4 I2.5 I2.6 I2.7 I3.0 I3.1 I3.2 I3.3 I3.4 I3.5 I3.6 I3.7 I4.0 I4.1 I4.2 I4.3 I4.4 I4.5 I4.6 I4.7 I5.0 I5.1 I5.2 I5.3 I5.4 I5.5 I5.6 I5.7

FST 202C
O0.0 O0.1 O0.2 O0.3 O0.4 O0.5 O0.6 O0.7 O1.0 O1.1 O1.2 O1.3 O1.4 O1.5 O1.6 O1.7 O2.0 O2.1 O2.2 O2.3 O2.4 O2.5 O2.6 O2.7 O3.0 O3.1 O3.2 O3.3 O3.4 O3.5 O3.6 O3.7 O4.0 O4.1 O4.2 O4.3 O4.4 O4.5 O4.6 O4.7 O5.0 O5.1 O5.2 O5.3 O5.4 O5.5 O5.6 O5.7

Fig. 4/7: Addressing the inputs and outputs with FST 202C

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O module 4 outputs

O module 4 outputs

DOUBLE

SINGLE

DOUBLE

DOUBLE

I module 4 inputs

I module 8 inputs

8 9 10 11

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

20 21 22 23

16 17 18 19

10 12 14

11 13 15

Inputs Terminal 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 FST I0.0 I0.1 I0.2 I0.3 I0.4 I0.5 I0.6 I0.7 I1.0 I1.1 I1.2 I1.3

Outputs Terminal 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 * ** FST O0.0 O0.1 O0.2 O0.3 O0.4 O0.5 O0.6 O0.7 O1.0 O1.1 O1.2 O1.3 O1.4* O1.5* O1.6** O1.7**

Outputs Terminal 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 FST O2.0 O2.1 O2.2 O2.3 O2.4 O2.5 O2.6 O2.7

Blanking plate (unused) cannot be used (rounded)

Fig. 4/8: Example - addressing the standard fitting

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4.2 FIRST STEPS WITH FST

Prerequisites
SF202

When the programmable valve terminal has been fully connected, commissioning can be started. A program must always be commissioned in RAM. If there is a failure of the operating voltage during commissioning, the following will apply:

The information will be stored in RAM for at


least 4 hours. In most cases, commissioning can therefore be completed.

The programs are still available on the PC


and must be reloaded if the information is lost. Fast and reliable commissioning can be made with the Festo programming software FST 202C. This is installed on a personal computer which is then connected to the programmable valve terminal by means of the diagnostic cable KDI-SB202-Bu25 or -Bu9 (RS232 interface).

Software-Tools

FESTO
Software-Tools

Fig. 4/9: Software and PC for commissioning

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The installation and operation of the software package is described in detail in the appropriate manual. Please consult this manual for more information on the FESTO software tools (FST). The following sections show only the most important steps in commissioning. The programming software responds with the following picture when accessed.

Fig. 4/10: Title mask of programming software

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The programming software FST 202C contains the following functions, amongst others: Programming in STL

Programming in LDR Setting and resetting individual outputs


On-line operation When you select the operating mode on-line, the following mask appears:

Fig. 4/11: Selection mask for ON-LINE operation


This initial mask shows the configuration of the control unit and the amount of free memory space. With key F1 you can access the menu for bit-by-bit switching on/off (setting/resetting) of the outputs (display FPC-Info).

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Display FPC-Info: The status of the inputs/outputs is shown as follows in this menu.

Fig. 4/12: Switching on/off the outputs bit-by-bit


Switching the outputs on/off:

WARNING When the system is switched on, the outputs react immediately to the entry on the screen. Make sure that there is no danger to human beings or to the machine when the outputs are switched on/off.

Activate bit-by-bit entry with the Select the relevant output with the cursor Set, reset or switch over the relevant output
with the keys F1 to F3. 4-23 keys or with the mouse. TAB key (I).

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Create allocation list The function "allocation list" can be found in the utility programs of the FST202C. The allocation list is an assignment list in which the logical outputs (operands for valves and electrical outputs) are assigned with their mechanical functions. The allocation list will be required later for creating the program. It facilitates programming and enables documentation to be clear and complete. Recommendation: Create an allocation list for all projects.

Fig. 4/13: Allocation list editor of the FST

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Load programs Programs for the programmable valve terminal are grouped together as a project in the FST 202C and loaded into the terminal via the RS-232 interface. The individual steps are shown below. A detailed description is to be found in the FST 202C user manual. Proceed as follows: Use the cursor keys or the mouse to select the function Load project under project management and activate the function with ENTER or double click.

Fig. 4/14: Select load project

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In the following mask select the individual


programs or modules which are to be loaded into the programmable valve terminal.

Fig. 4/15: Selection of programs to be loaded

Start loading the programs with key F1.


When programs have been newly created or modified, they must then be translated into machine code. When all programs are in machine code, the FST 202C loads them into the valve terminal. When loading is complete, the message "Loading complete" appears.

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Creating EEPROM When a program has been loaded and tested, it is copied into the EEPROM, whereby commissioning is concluded. The controller can now function reliably and free of maintenance. For this purpose, the program is first read and then stored as a file on the hard disc of the computer. Proceed as follows: Use the cursor keys or the mouse to select the function Read controller under Utilities and activate the function with ENTER o r double click.

Fig. 4/16: Read controller


The FST 202C then reads the whole program, including the contents, from the controller and stores it as a file.

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When reading is complete, the file contents can be loaded into the EEPROM. Programming the EEPROM is incorporated into the Program call as an individual utility program. The installation routine writes the entries correctly into the configuration file. Proceed as follows: Use the cursor keys or the mouse to select and activate the function Program call under Utilities. Use the cursor keys or the mouse to select and activate the function EEPROM programming under Program call.

Fig. 4/17: Program call EEPROM

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The EEPROM programmer then responds with the mask shown below. Proceed as follows: Start programming with key F4.

Fig. 4/18: Input message of EEPROM programmer

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Boot mode When the EEPROM has been programmed, the next booting from the EEPROM is usually desired (boot mode). The FST 202C asks whether or not this is to be done and the question must be answered with Yes.

Fig. 4/19: Conversion of boot mode to EEPROM mode


The transfer of the boot mode to EEPROM is shown on the mask illustrated below.

Fig. 4/20: Boot mode converted to EEPROM mode


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Auto mode As the last step in commissioning, you can determine whether or not the programmable valve terminal is to start processing the program automatically when the operating voltage is applied (auto mode: ON). The program with the lowest number will be started (usually program 0). Proceed as follows: Select ON-LINE menu Select auto mode with key F5 Answer the question "Automode on/off?" with Y (=Yes).

Fig. 4/21: Conversion to auto mode


Commissioning is then concluded.

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4.3 PROGRAMMING

Programming with the FST 202C


SF202

The programming languages Statement list (STL) and Ladder diagram (LDR) can be used for creating the user programs and program modules. The programming conditions, the programming languages and programming techniques are described in the manuals:

FESTO Software Tools


Statement list for the FPC 202C Manual FST 202C

FESTO Software Tools


Ladder diagram for the FPC 202C Manual FST 202C The following sections give a brief summary of the most important steps in programming and draw attention to special features of the programmable valve terminal. Structuring The programmable valve terminal makes the following aids available for structuring a program or project: 8 programs 8 program modules 3 function modules For ease of programming and to relieve the user programs, frequently required command structures can be programmed in program modules (subprograms). Program modules and function modules differ depending on whether they are to be programmed by the user himself or whether they are already defined in the operating system.

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Both types of modules can be accessed from within an active program. When the modules have been fully processed, the accessing program continues at the point at which it was interrupted. Program modules Program modules can be created with the FESTO programming software in statement list or ladder diagram or as a text module with the text display editor. In certain cases, program modules can also be obtained from the factory. Maximum eight such modules can be stored in the user memory of the programmable valve terminal. Function modules Function modules are part of the operating system and are supplied by the factory. The operating system of the programmable valve terminal can manage maximum 256 (0 to 255) function modules. At present three modules have been predefined. They are stored in the operating system EPROM. When a program or a project has been planned and structured, progamming can be started. The following are required here: operators/command set operands (remanent, non remanent) function modules These are described briefly overleaf.

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Operators, command set Depending on the programming language selected (STL or LDR), different operators must be used for creating the program. The permitted operators (command set) are listed below. STEP IF THEN OTHRW NOP CFMn CMPn JMP TO SET
For sequencing programs a symbolic step mark is permitted Initiation of a conditional part Initiation of an executive part, if the condition is fulfilled under IF. Initiation of an alternative executive part, if the condition is not fulfilled under IF. Non-operation, must be in the IF part. Substitute symbol in executive part. Call up function module (CFM0 .... CFM255) Call up program module (CMP0 .... CMP7) Jump to step mark, instructions follow in an executive part. One bit operands are set to logic ONE, timer, counter or programs are started. Instruction follows in an executive part. Memory command. One bit operands are set to logic ZERO. Timer, counter or programs are stopped. Instruction follows in an executive part. Memory command. With this command one and multi-bit operands and constants are loaded in the accumulator. In the multi-bit accumulator higher and lower value bytes are exchanged. In the multi-bit accumulator all bits are moved one position to the left. Bits forced out at the left are lost.

RESET

LOAD SWAP SHL

Fig. 4/22a: Operators of the programmable valve terminal


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SHR ROL

In the multi-bit accumulator all bits are moved one position to the right. Bits forced out at the right are lost. In the multi-bit accumulator all bits are rotated anti-clockwise; the last bit becomes the first, the last but one becomes the last, etc. In the multi-bit accumulator all bits are rotated in a clockwise direction; the first bit becomes the last, the second becomes the first etc. Initiates a change of processor, is used to terminate the program. Converts the contents of the multi-bit accumulator from dual to decimal code. Converts the contents of the multi-bit accumulator from decimal to dual code. Open brackets. Start of a collection of several instructions Arithmetical instruction for addition, also as a sign for constants. Arithmetical instruction for subtraction Arithmetical instruction for multiplication Arithmetical instruction for division Arithmetical comparison (less than ....) Arithmetical comparison (less than or equal to .... ) Arithmetical comparison (equal to ...) Arithmetical comparison (equal to or greater than .... ) Arithmetical comparison (greater than ...) Arithmetical comparison (unequal to .... ) Close brackets, End of collection of several instructions Logical instruction for bit-by-bit AND operation

ROR

PSE BID DEB ( + * / < <= = => > <> ) AND

Fig. 4/22b: Operators of the programmable valve terminal


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OR EXOR TO SHIFT INC DEC WITH N CPL INV

Logical command for bit-by-bit OR operation Logical command for bit-by-bit exclusive OR operation Transfers in combination with LOAD operand 1 to operand 2 Exchanges the subsequent one bit operand with the value in the one-bit accumulator Multi-bit operands are increased in value by 1 (incremented) Multi-bit operands are decreased in value by 1 (decremented) when modules are called this is used to introduce parameter transfer (CMP .... WITH) Negation: negates operands, i.e. they are interrogated to logic ZERO Complements multi-bit operands according to the second complement method Complements multi-bit operands according to the first complement method

Fig. 4/22c: Operators of the programmable valve terminal


If STL is used as the programming language, all the commands can be used. If LDR is used as the programming language, some commands cannot be used or only in another form. All arithmetical operations are made in boxes. The exact syntax is described in detail in the relevant FST 202C manual.

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Operands The table below contains the operands managed by the operating system of the FPC 202C. They can be addressed with the statement list and ladder diagram. RAM mode Whilst the program is running, all operands in RAM (remanent RAM) can be used. If the operating voltage fails, all the operands will still be available in RAM for at least 4 hours. EEPROM mode Some of the operands will be copied into the EEPROM (remanent EEPROM) if the boot mode "EEPROM mode" has been set. The remainder will be lost after 4 hours (non remanent). The following tables summarize the: available operands remanent operands.
Operands Inputs Number Designation 64 I Parameter {0-7}.{0-7} Comment Single-bit operand, assignment depends on configuration Multibit operand Single-bit operand, assignment depends on configuration Multibit operand Single-bit operand 16 flag words each with 16 flags Multibit operand Single-bit operand, FI only with LDR

Input words Outputs

8 64

IW O

{0-7} {0-7}.{0-7}

Output words Flag

8 256

OW F

{0-7} {0-15}.{0-15}

Flag words Init flag

16 1

FW FI

{0-15} 1

Fig. 4/23a: Operands available with the programmable valve terminal


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Operands Counters Counter preselects Counter words Timers

Number 32 32 32 32

Designation C CP CW T/TE/TA

Parameter {0-31} {0-31} {0-31} {0-31}

Comment Single-bit operand Multibit operand Multibit operand Single-bit operand, all timers can be programmed as impulse timer T, with LDR also as switchon delay timer TE, switch-off delay timer TA Multibit operand Multibit operand Multibit operand Single-bit operand Multibit operand Single-bit operand Create on PC in STL or LDR in operating system EPROM Multibit operand

Timer preselects Timer words Registers Errors Error word Programs Program modules Function modules Special operands

32 32 64 1 1 8 8 3

TP TW R E EW P CMP CFM

{0-31} {0-31} {0-63} 1 1 {0-7} {0-7} See section "Function modules" {0-23} and {32-47}

40

FU

Fig. 4/23b: Operands available in the programmable valve terminal

PLEASE NOTE Not all inputs and outputs physically exist nor can they be connected.

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Operands Flags Flag words Counters Counter preselects Counter words Timers Timer preselects Timer words Registers Errors Error word Programs Program modules Function modules Special operands

Designation/ parameter F0.0 ... F15.15 FW0 ... FW15 C0 ... C31 CP0 ... CP31 CW0 ... CW31 T/TA/TE 0... 31 TP0 ... TP31 TW0 ... TW31 R0 ... R63 E EW P CMP CFM FU0 ... FU23 FU32 ... FU47

Remanent RAM EEPROM F2.0 ... F15.15 FW2 ... FW15 C0 ... C31 CP0 ... CP31 C0 ... C15 CP0 ... CP15

CW0 ... CW31 CW0 ... CW15 non remanent TP0 ... TP31 TP0 ... TP15

non remanent R0 ... R63 E, + EW P CMP CFM non remanent non remanent R0 ... R30

Fig: 4/24: Remanent/non remanent operands

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Remarks on the special operands:

The special operands FU0 to FU23 have


not yet been defined. They can be used as freely-available 16-bit registers. They are not remanent in any operating mode.

The special operands FU32 to FU47 serve


as transfer or return parameters with program and function modules. They are available twice because the programmable valve terminal can process two programs simultaneously with two tasks. Each task has a group of transfer parameters.

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Function modules FN/CFM Entry format STL THEN CFM 0 WITH <P1> Parameter P1: Mode (0...3) (see below) P1 has the following meaning: 0: 1: 2: 3: Delete all counters Delete all Delete all Delete all registers, flags, timers and registers flags timers and counters

0
Delete internal operands

Comment Parameter P1 can be a constant (e.g. V3) or a variable (e.g. R33). Return parameter Case 1 P1 (FU32) = {-1} Processing successful Case 2 P1 (FU32) = {0} Processing incorrect P2 (FU33) = {error number}

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FN/CFM

1
Locate short circuit

Entry format STL CFM 1

Parameter No parameter Comment: When called, the first short-circuited electrical output sends a return signal. Return parameter: Case 1 P1 (FU32)= {-1} Processing successful P2 (FU33)= {-1} No short circuit or no output available P3 (FU34)= without meaning Case 2 P1 (FU32)= P2 (FU33)= P3 (FU34)= Case 3 P1 (FU32)= P2 (FU33)=

{-1} Processing successful Word number of the first short Bit number
circuited output

{0} Processing incorrect {error number}

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FN/CFM

2
Indirect setting/resetting of local outputs

Entry format STL THEN CFM 2 WITH <P1> , <P2>, <P3> Parameter P1 = {0, 1} P2 = {0 ... 7} P3 = {0 ... 7} The parameters have the following meaning: P1 = 0: Reset output = 1: Set output P2 = Word number of output P3 = Bit number of output Return parameter Case 1 P1 (FU32) = {-1} Processing successful Case 2 P1 (FU32) = {0} Processing incorrect P2 (FU33) = {error number} The function modules are suitable for diagnosis and error treatment. Further details are to be found in Chapter 5 "Diagnosis and error treatment."

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4.4 PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES This chapter deals with some special features of the operating system which are of assistance in clarifying complex procedures and which enable programs to be optimally organised. A section on data saving concludes this chapter. Task structure of the operating system The operating system of the programmable valve terminal is capable of multi-tasking, i.e. several tasks can be carried out parallel. Of the 8 user programs in the controller two can be processed simultaneously. The calling program and the program called up are active, all other programs are passive. Program processing Start a program (preferably P0) using the RUN command or automode.

SF-

202

P0
active

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

passive passive passive passive passive passive passive

Fig: 4/25: Program start


Recommendation: Use Program no. 0 as organisation program P0 for the following tasks: Starting and stopping other programs General monitoring

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Note: In this case further programs should only be started from P0, otherwise P0 itself will be stopped and general monitoring will become ineffective. From the active program 0 a second program, for example P4, can be called up:

before:

P0
active

P1

P2
call P4

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

passive passive passive passive passive passive passive

after:

P0
active

P1

P2

P3

P4
active

P5

P6

P7

passive passive passive parallel program processing P0 and P4

passive passive passive

Fig. 4/26: Parallel program processing 1


Both user programs are now processed alternately. With compiled programs, the processing change takes place after a complete cycle. The cycle consists of the following: with LDR a program cycle (= complete LDR program) with STL a program step (from STEP... to STEP...)

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A maximum of two programs can be processed simultaneously. If an additional program is called up from one of the active programs, the calling program and the newly set program run parallel, the third is automatically stopped.

before:

P0
active

P1

P2

P3
call P7

P4
active

P5

P6

P7

passive passive passive

passive passive passive

after:

P0
active

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7
active

passive passive passive passive passive passive

parallel program processing P0 and P7

Fig. 4/27: Parallel program processing 2

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Multi-tasking The operating system of the programmable valve terminal is designed for multi-tasking, enabling the processor to process several tasks simultaneously. Two of these tasks are available to the user. Tasks are always changed with an STL program before the commands STEP and Processor change. With an LDR program the task change always takes place at the end of the program. The two active programs are processed alternately. Only one program can be processed at one time.

Program x STEP 1

Program y STEP 1

STEP 2

STEP 2

STEP 3

STEP 3

Fig. 4/28: Program processing


Step 1 of program y is processed first, if step 1 of program x has been run through once. This change over between programs is known as task changeover. Processing takes place so quickly that it appears to occur simultaneously.

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Module processing Process diagram The programmable valve terminal works with process diagram. At the start of the processing cycle all the states of the inputs are read (process diagram inputs, PAE), then the program is processed and finally the outputs are set or reset depending on the processing result (process map outputs, PAA). Module in LDR/STL without STEP Calling a program module or function module is interpreted as if a subprogram were being called. When the program module or function module has been fully processed, the user program is continued from the point at which it was interrupted. This applies to: modules in LDR modules in STL without step

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PAE
P0 (task 0)

Process diagram read inputs

Module 1 P3 (task 1) IF THEN CMP1 WITH.. IF THEN... IF THEN... IF THEN...

Additional programs or modules

IF THEN...

PAA

Process diagram write outputs

Fig. 4/29: Module in LDR/STL without STEP

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Module in STL with STEP As with the STEP command within a program, a task change is carried out within the module prior to this command. As a result the entire program from which the module is called ceases to be processed until the module has been processed.

PAE

PAE

Process diagram read inputs B. . .C

P0 (Task 0)

P3 (Task 1)
IF THEN CMP1 WITH...

A B

Module 1
STEP IF THEN... STEP IF THEN... STEP IF THEN...

A B

IF THEN...

C C

Change task

Change task

PAA

PAA

Process diagram write outputs

Fig. 4/30: Module in STL with STEP

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Module for character output With the output of texts via the serial interface, a similar response is produced as with the modules in STL with STEP. The calling program is then interrupted. This is an important point to remember when planning the program.

PAE

PAE

Process diagram read inputs B ... G

P0 (Task 0)

P3 (Task 1) A B C D E F G

Module 1 (character) A B C D E F G

IF THEN CMP1 WITH...

IF THEN...

Change task

Change task

PAA

PAA

Process diagram write outputs

Fig. 4/31: Module processing for character output

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Remarks on previous diagram: An assembler module compiled with the aid of the display editor is called up from a program. This is the task to be processed. The module transfers a character to the interface driver (UART) and then carries out a change of task. This prevents the whole process from coming to a halt until output of the text is completed. However, the calling program will not be processed further until the text has been output completely. At a transmission rate of 9600 baud this is approximately 1ms per character. With a text of 50 characters this gives an interruption time of 50 ms for the calling program. It is essential to take this into account when planning the program.

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Program and data backup The programmable valve terminal is provided with a main memory in the form of a static RAM. When the program is being processed it must be in RAM during run time. Internal operands too, such as register, flag, counter etc. are filed in RAM. Programs can be backed up if they are programmed and stored in a permanent EEPROM. The EEPROM programming is supported by the utilities program for EEPROM programming via the function Program call-up of the FST 202C. With the boot mode RAM or EEPROM you can later specify whether or not the data and programs are to be transferred when the controller is switched on, either: directly from RAM or from EEPROM and copied into RAM.

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Program memory RAM The RAM is permanently soldered onto the PC board. The program memory serves simultaneously as the main memory. The RAM has a capacity of 32 KByte, of which approximately 26 KByte is available as program memory. In this operating mode all internal function units are remanent. Reaction to power failure: 1. If the operating voltage fails for less than 4 hours, all data and programs will be retained in RAM. 2. If the operating voltage fails for longer than 4 hours, all data and programs in RAM will be lost.

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Program memory EEPROM In addition to the RAM, a permanent EEPROM is installed for data backup. The EEPROM does not lose any data if there is an operating voltage failure and can be programmed several times with the FST 202C. All programs are therefore retained. Of the internal operands, only those designated as "remanent EEPROM" are protected against power failure.

RAM
Power on

EEPROM

Program

Programming with FST max. 10000 times

Program

Operands

Remanent operands

Remanent

Power on Power off 310000 times

Fig. 4/32: Memory management system in EEPROM operation

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Remarks:

EEPROM can be programmed maximum


10.000 times using FST 202C.

Usually the EEPROM is programmed when


commissioning has been completed. Commissioning takes place in RAM. The contents of the RAM will be retained for at least 4 hours even without a battery. If the data are lost, they can be loaded again from the PC.

If there is a failure in the operating voltage,


the remanent operands and current auto mode will be "rescued" in EEPROM. This requires a programming procedure. The special memory management system enables these programming procedures to be repeated 310.000 times, e.g. with 50 interruptions to the operating voltage daily the EEPROM will have a life of 17 years.

Once the maximum number of programming


cycles has been reached (FST programming 10.000, interrupted operating voltage 310.000), the fault message 8 "EEPROM defective or missing" appears and the red LED fault indicator will light up.

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Programming EEPROM Programming of the EEPROMs is controlled by the FST 202. The FST functions Load Program or Load Project always use the RAM. On completion of the program/project the following procedure must be adopted:

Activate FST function read controller


The entire contents of the RAM are transferred to the PC and filed in the current project path under the name "3Z0C00V1".

Select EEPROM programming on the FST


function program call.

Press function key F4, program EEPROM


The contents of "3Z0C00V1", previously filed on the PC, will be loaded into the EEPROM of the programmable valve terminal.

Use function key F3, to set boot mode,


EEPROM operation. The screen will show the number of completed programming procedures of the EEPROM.

Boot mode and auto mode The boot mode determines which program memory is to be processed (RAM or EEPROM). Once the operating voltage supply has been switched on, the auto mode function determines whether or not the existing program in the selected program memory is to be processed.

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Boot mode EEPROM

PLEASE NOTE: Data in RAM is overwritten.


When the operating voltage supply is switched on the entire contents of the EEPROM (programs and remanent operands) are copied into RAM. Note: When programs are loaded from the FST 202C into the programmable valve terminal, the following message appears on the screen: "Warning: With POWER ON data from the EEPROM is loaded. Boot mode RAM No copying process takes place when the unit is switched on. Automode When the operating voltage supply is switched on in Automode ON, the program with the lowest number is started. Response of programmable valve terminal when project/program is loaded When project/program is loaded, the programmable valve terminal switches all outputs off and stops the program processing.

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4.5 PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS The programmable valve terminal is designed to handle a wide range of different control tasks, e.g.:

As part of an extensive control system with


higher order control.

For independent control with user-friendly


operations by means of keyboard and text display. Control of a station Using the two electrical inputs and two electrical outputs the programmable valve terminal can be operated as a subsystem (slave).

Parts control

Release for run

completed

Error message

I8

I8

I4

O4

Fig. 4/33: Programmable valve terminal as slave in a control system


The main controller (master) starts the programs filed in the programmable valve terminal and receives an acknowledgement of completion (or an engaged signal if the sequence is still running).
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The extra inputs are available for additional information, for example, parts control. Using the second output the programmable valve sensor terminal can supply information about a specific situation to the higher order controller. Separate connection of the operating voltage for the valves enables the higher order controller to shut down the valves of the programmable valve terminal in an emergency. Basic stand-alone control Keys and display units can be connected to the electrical inputs and outputs for simple operation of small, stand-alone devices or machines.

Start

Error

Start

Stop EMERGENCY OFF Operation

EMERGENCY OFF pin 2

Fig. 4/34: Simple operation with push buttons

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System operation with ABG With the display and control unit E.ABG it is easy to work with operating mode selection, manual operation of control elements and input for time and quantity values.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAA AAAA AA AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AA AAAA AAAA AA AAAA A AA AAAA AAAAA AAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAA AAAA AAAA AA AAAA AA AAAA AAAA AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAA AAAA AAAA AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AA AAAA AAAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAA AA AAAA AAAA AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAA AAAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAA AA AAAA AAAA AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAA AAAA AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA A AA AAAA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAA AAAA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA A AA AAAA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAA AA AAAA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAA AA

Fig. 4/35: Display and operating unit E.ABG


The display and operating unit ABG has an LCD display with 2 x 16 characters and a keypad with 16 keys. The ABG is connected to the diagnostic interface of the programmable valve terminal. Software links to user programs are made using the program module, the parameters of which can be specified, and which displays the function keys on flags, and which files the numerical keys in a multi-bit function unit.

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The functions Start and Stop can be controlled from the keyboard or through the inputs. The EMERGENCY STOP switch is always connected, as a hardware-related function, to the programmable valve terminal via pin 2.

AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAAAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAAAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAA AAAA AAA AAAAAA AAAA AAA AAAA AAA

V.24/RS232

Bild 4/36: Operating the system with ABG

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The display in the ABG is programmed via the FST display editor, which offers very simple and easy-to-use programming of the texts.

Fig. 4/37: Text programming with FST Display Editor


Standard operation is available on diskette. This standard operation is written in STL and can easily be adapted to the requirements of a particular system. See overleaf for further details about standard software.

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System operation with ABG-2 With the display and operating unit E.ABG-2 it is easy to work with a selection of operating modes, manual operation of the control elements and input of time and quantity values.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAA AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAA AA AAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA A AA AAAAAAAA AAAA A AA AA AAAAA AAAAA AAAAA AAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAA A AA AA AAAAA AAAAA AAAAA AAAAA AAAAAAAA A AAAA AA AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AA AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AA AAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AA AAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAA A AA AAAA A AAAA A AAAA A AAAA AA AAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA A AA

Fig. 4/38: Display and operating unit E.ABG-2


The display and operating unit E.ABG-2 has a fluorescent tube with 2 x 20 characters and a keyboard with 20 keys and 20 LEDs. The keys and LEDs may be allocated as required. Exchangeable inscription labels can be used to assign a text to each key. The ABG-2 is connected to the diagnostic interface of the programmable valve terminal. A program module, the parameters of which can be specified, and which displays all keys and LEDs on flags, is used for the software link to the user program.

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The functions Start and Stop can be activated via the keyboard or through the inputs. The EMERGENCY STOP switch is always connected through pin 2 to the programmable valve terminal as part of the hardware.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAA AAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA

V.24/RS232

Fig. 4/39: Operating the system with ABG-2

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4. Commissioning/programming

The FST display editor is used for programming the display in ABG-2. It permits very simple and easy-to-use programming of the texts.

Fig. 4/40: Text programming with FST Display Editor


Standard operation is available on a diskette. This standard operation is written in STL and can easily be adapted to the requirements of a particular system. Additional details about standard software are given overleaf.

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Emulator as commissioning aid While commissioning is taking place the PC is linked with the programmable valve terminal by means of the serial interface, enabling programs to be loaded and the program sequence to be followed.

V.24/RS232

Fig. 4/41: PC connection during commissioning


It may be necessary to control the content of multibit function units or the status of single bit function units or to alter them. In this case control via ABG or ABG-2 is interrupted. The entries required by ABG-x can still be made by emulators, which offer software simulation of the operating and display units. Depending on the program in use, the appropriate emulator is loaded as a background program into the PC memory. The key combination ALT F10 is then used to call up the emulator and the ABG-x appears on the screen.

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Fig. 4/42: Emulator for the ABG


All outputs of the programmable valve sensor terminal are then show in the ABG display on the PC screen. All permissible entries normally via the function keys are interpreted as outputs of the ABG-x by the programmable valve terminal. When the entries have been completed, press ESC to quit the emulator. The FST 202C will then be available for normal use.

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Fig. 4/43: Emulator for the ABG-2


With the ABG-2 the LEDs are additionally emulated, with the circle symbol for the LED changing (0 = LED out, X = LED alight).

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4. Commissioning/programming

Display and operate software package A software package has been compiled, augmenting the programming tools. It can be used for easy compilation of the user programs and to simplify commissioning.

AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA A AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA A AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA A AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA

AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAAA AA AAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA AAA

2 1 3 4 5

1 Extending the library of the display editor for ABG 2 Program module for reading the keyboard of the ABG 3 Extending the library of the display editor for ABG-2 4 Program module for reading the keyboard of the ABG-2

5 Emulators for ABG and ABG-2 for entering the control commands during commissioning, can run on IBM-compatible PCs

! Prepared standard operating software for ABG and ABG-2

Fig. 4/44: Display and operate software package

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4. Commissioning/programming

The software package is supplied on a diskette together with a description. The emulators can be easily incorporated into the FST 202C and the required operating software is simple to include in the project. The standard operating software contains the following functions:

Operating mode selection


manual automatic adjustment value entry

Individual cycle continuous operation Manual operation for individual functions Prepared step modules

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5. Diagnosis/error treatment

5. DIAGNOSIS AND ERROR TREATMENT

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5. Diagnosis/error treatment

Contents 5.1 SUMMARY OF DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES DIAGNOSIS ON-THE-SPOT LED displays Control unit SB-202 Valves Input/output modules DIAGNOSIS BY PROGRAM Status byte Function modules ERROR TREATMENT Error messages of the operating sytem Reaction of the terminal to faults Faults when the operating voltage is applied Faults in load project/program Runing time faults (errors 100 to 109) Short circuit/overload at an output module 5-3 5-4 5-4 5-4 5-6 5-8 5-9 5-9 5-10 5-13 5-13 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-15 5-16

5.2

5.3

5.4

5-2

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5. Diagnosis/error treatment

5.1 SUMMARY OF DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES The programmable valve terminal offers extensive and user-friendly possibilities of diagnosis and error treatment. The following possibilities can be used, irrespective of how the terminal is equipped.
Programmable valve terminal Diagnostic posibilities LEDs Status byte (IW 6)
7 6 Vout 5 Vval 4 Vsen 3 2 1 0

Error word EW (Multibit operand)

AA AAA RUN POWER AA AAA ERROR RAM AAA AA

none

none none none Short circuit/ overloa d

Function modules CFM1 CFM2 Brief description The LEDs show directly configuration error, hardware error etc. Fast "on-thespot" error location The status byte and the function modules must be read and evaluated user-program controlled. The errror word must be read and evaluated user-program controlled Detailed error recognition by program with programming or operating system errors Chapter 5.4

Advantage

Detailed error recognition, by program with faults in electrical system

Detailed description

Chapter 5.2

Chapter 5.3

Fig. 5/1: Possibilities of diagnosis and error treatment

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5.2 DIAGNOSIS ON-THE-SPOT

LED displays
SF202

Control unit SB-202 The LEDs on the cover of the field bus node supply information on the operating status of the valve terminal.

green LED
AAAA AAA R U N AAAA AAA PO W E R AAAA AAA AAAA R A M AAA AAAA AAA E R R O R
DIAG

green LED

red LED

red LED

Fig. 5/2: LEDs of control unit SB-202

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Possible LED displays on the operating status of the programmable valve terminal are shown in the table below.
LED Status Operating status Operating voltage for electronic components normal (pin 1). Exception: Despite output being switched (yellow LED lights up) a valve does not switch. Possible cause: Operating voltage of the outputs does not lie in tolerance range or is not applied (pin 2). Compressed air supply not correct. Pilot exhaust blocked. out Operating voltage of electronic components not applied. RUN mode active. A program is running No program started or started program is stopped because of fault RAM (red) alight out RAM operation EEPROM operation Fault in controller or program. Controller/program without error or controller/program inactive. Error treatment None

POWER alight (green)

Check the ...

operating voltage of outputs (pin 2), tolerance range 21.6...26.4 V. compressed air supply (work air and, if necessary auxiliary pilot air) pilot exhaust channels Check operating voltage connection of electronic components (Pin 1) None No program or start program (set auto mode) or read error from error word (see error messages) None None Read error from error word (see error messages) None None

RUN (green)

alight out

ERROR alight (red) out

Fig. 5/3: LED display - operating status

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Valves There is a yellow LED for each solenoid valve coil. This LED shows the switching status of the solenoid valve coil.

14 14

14

12 14 12 14

12 12

Yellow LEDs

,
LED Yellow off Yellow alight Switch position Valve solenoid coil Basic position switch position or basic position Meaning Logic 0 (no signal) Logic 1 (signal applied) Logic 1 but: Operating voltage of outputs is below permitted tolerance range (DC 21.6V...26.4V) or compressed air supply not correct or pilot exhaust blocked or call servicing personnel

Fig. 5/4: LED display - switching status of solenoid valve coil

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5. Diagnosis/error treatment

There is a yellow LED for each pilot solenoid coil. This LED shows the switching status of the pilot solenoid coil.

1 2 1 2 1 2 1 41 41 4

2 1 41

Yellow LEDs LED Yellow off Yellow alight Switch position Valve solenoid coil Basic position switch position or basic position Meaning Logic 0 (no signal) Logic 1 (signal applied) Logic 1 but: Operating voltage of outputs is below permitted tolerance range (DC 21.6V...26.4V) or compressed air supply not correct or pilot exhaust blocked or call servicing personnel

Fig. 5/5: LED displays - switching of ISO pilot solenoid coil type 05

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Input/output modules There are one or two LEDs (status displays) on the input/output modules next to the relevant connections. These LEDs have the following colours: green (status display of digital inputs) yellow (status display of digital outputs) red (error display of digital outputs) The current signal at the relevant input or output is shown by means of the yellow and green LEDs. The red LEDs of the outputs indicate a short circuit or overload of the relevant output.
Yellow LEDs (switching status display of outputs) I8 I8 I4 O4 RED LEDs (short circuit/overload display of outputs)

Green LEDs (switching status display of inputs)

LED Yellow or green Yellow or green Red Red out out alight alight out alight

Status logic 0 (signal not applied) logic 1 (signal applied) Output without short circuit/overload Short circuit/overload at relevant output

Fig. 5/6: LED display of input/output modules

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5. Diagnosis/error treatment

5.3 DIAGNOSIS BY PROGRAM The modular valve terminal offers the following possibilities of diagnosis by program:
SF202

with a status byte with three function modules


Status byte The diagnostic information of a valve terminal is gathered together as a status byte and is shown in input word 6 [IW6]. The following error states can be recognized with this status byte and sent to the control unit:

Diagnosticinformation Vval ve (V val) Voutputs (V out )

Meaning Monitors the tolerance of the operating voltage of the valves and electrical outputs. Monitors the operating voltage of the valves and electrical outputs (no voltage, e.g. EMERGENCY OFF). Monitors the operating voltage to the inputs/sensors. Monitors the electrical outputs of the output modules.

Cause Operating voltage at pin 2 of operating voltage connection < 21.6V Operating voltage at pin 2 of operating voltage connection < 10V Internal fuse triggered Short circuit or overload

Vinputs (V inp) Short circuit/ overload

Fig. 5/7: Error states of the valve terminal

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5. Diagnosis/error treatment

Composition of status byte:


Bit no. Diagnostic information Signal status Meaning Signal status 0: Signal status 1: no error error 7 None 6 Vout 5 Vval 4 Vinp 3 None 2 1 0 None

None Short circuit/ove rload

0 or 1

Fig. 5/8: Composition of diagnostic byte (input word IW6)


Function modules The function modules CFM 1 and CFM 2 are particularly suitable in the event of a short circuit. Recommendation Proceed as follows in the program: 1. Ascertain short circuit in the status byte 2. Locate short circuit with CFM 1 3. Reset the relevant output and, if necessary, set again with CFM 2.

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FN/CF M

1
Locate short circuit

Entry format STL CFM 1

Parameter No parameter Comment When called the first short-circuited electrical output sends a signal. Return parameter: Case 1: P1 (FU32)= {-1} Processing successful P2 (FU33)= {-1} No short circuit or output does not exist P3 (FU34)= Without meaning Case 2: P1 (FU32)= P2 (FU33)= P3 (FU34)= Case 3: P1 (FU32)= P2 (FU33)=

{-1} Processing successful Word number Bit number

{0} Processing incorrect {error number}

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FN/CF M

2
Indirect setting/resetting of local outputs

Entry format STL THEN CFM 2 WITH<P1> , <P2>, <P3> Parameter P1 = {0,1} P2 = {0...7} P3 = {0...7} The parameters have the following meaning: P1 = 0: = 1: P2 = P3 = Reset output Set output Word number of output Bit number of output

Return parameter Case 1: P1 (FU32) = {-1} Processing successful Case 2: P1 (FU32) = {0} Processing incorrect P2 (FU33) = {error number}

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5. Diagnosis/error treatment

5.4 ERROR TREATMENT

Error messages of the operating system


SF202

The red error display (ERROR) lights up when the error status is not 0. The following error numbers are entered in the error word.
Explanation Checksum test incorrect Hardware error in node or I/O module Hardware error in P module EEPROM defective or missing Cause, remedy, effects User memory and the remanent memory area are deleted. Defective hardware in node or I/O module. Controller runs. Defective hardware in P module Max. number of operating voltage interruptions reached or user program not valid. Repair required. Shorten project/program to fit available space. Then repeat load process. User memory and remanent memory area deleted. Repeat load process. Fit only permitted I/O or P modules. Reduce number of I/O modules. Reduce number of I/O modules.

Error number 01 02 07 08

23

Memory full

24

Load error

48 49 51

Type of module not permitted More than 12 I/O modules fitted I/O address area exceeded

Fif. 5/9a: Error messages of the operating system (switch on/initialization phase)

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Error number 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109

Explanation Number of parameters incorrect, Error in parameter 1, Error in parameter 2 Error in parameter 3, Error in parameter 4, Error in further parameters, Error in module call Error in program call Division incorrect Muliplication incorrect

Cause, remedy, effects

Check transfer parameter

A module with the number specified does not exist A program with the number specified does not exist Division by zero or divisor - 32768 Value range exceeded in multiplication (+/- 32767) Module addressed does not exist or is missing

112

I/O module error

Fig. 5/9b: Error messages of the operating system (running time errors)

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Reaction of the terminal to faults Faults when the operating voltage is applied

Reaction to errors 2, 7, 48, 49, 51 and


automode on: The programmable valve terminal starts program processing. Evaluation of the error bit or error word in the user program is possible.

Reaction to errors 1, 8 and automode on:


The programmable valve terminal enters the stop status; no program is started.

Faults in load project/program

Reaction to errors 23 and 24:


The programmable valve terminal enters the stop status. Errors 100 to 109 (running time faults)

If there is a running time fault in the


programmable valve terminal in the RUN status, program processing will be continued. Evaluation of the error bit or the error word in the user program is possible.

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Short circuit/overload at an output module In the case of a short circuit or overload:

the digital output will be switched off the relevant red LED will light up the short circuit error bit of the status byte
will be set at logic 1 (I6.2). In order to activate the output again, proceed as follows:
Step Eliminate short circuit or overload, Set output at 0 (RESET) Manual (on-line operation, test system) Automatic in PLC program (e.g. locating the short-circuited output with CFM 1 and resetting output with CFM 2). The error bit in the status byte of the terminal is reset at logic 0. Explanation

Fig.5/10: Eliminating short circuit/overload


The output can then be set at 1 again. If the short circuit still exists, the output will be switched off again.

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6. Command Interpreter

6. COMMAND INTERPRETER

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6. Command Interpreter

COMMAND INTERPRETER Summary Connection to an interactive unit Accessing the command interpreter Exiting the command interpreter Command structure Command identification Parameter definition Memory addresses Load format Description of commands Display memory content Display memory User memory System memory Display operands Single-bit operands Multibit operands Special operands Display format Handshake format Program Module Library Available user memory EEPROM

6-4 6-4 6-6 6-7 6-8 6-8 6-9 6-10 6-11 6-11 6-13 6-13 6-13 6-14 6-15 6-17 6-17 6-18 6-19 6-19 6-19 6-19 6-22 6-23 6-23 6-24

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6. Command Interpreter

Form checksum Checksum and checkbyte User memory System memory Modify Modify operands Single-bit operands Multibit operands Special operands Display format Handshake format Memory management Memory allocation Create program/module Create library Delete user memory Delete files Delete programs Delete modules Delete libraries Delete operands Delete flags Delete registers Delete timers Delete counters Data backup Data backup EEPROM Select RAM/EEPROM Read data Load data Program start Program stop Function module Call function module

6-25 6-25 6-25 6-26 6-27 6-27 6-28 6-29 6-30 6-30 6-30 6-31 6-31 6-32 6-32 6-33 6-33 6-33 6-34 6-34 6-35 6-35 6-35 6-35 6-35 6-36 6-36 6-36 6-37 6-38 6-39 6-39 6-40 6-40

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COMMAND INTERPRETER Summary The command interpreter forms part of the operating system of the programmable valve terminal, enabling the latter to be operated externally by means of a terminal. It forms the interface to the FST 202C in on-line mode (user-friendly terminal function).

Terminal

FST 202 in on-line operation

User programs STL, LDR

FST compiler

Command interpreter

Compiled user programs

Operating system of programmable valve terminal

Fig. 6/1: Summary of command interpreter

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6. Command Interpreter

Operating possibilities with the terminal Programs can be started, can be stopped, can be loaded, can be deleted individually or all simultaneously, can be altered, can be used to form checksums. Function units can be altered, can be displayed. Memory areas can be displayed, (individually or all programs) the index can be displayed, all stored data can be displayed.

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6. Command Interpreter

Connection to an interactive unit Before the command interpreter can be used, the programmable valve terminal must be connected to a suitable interactive unit. Either of the following can be used:

PC with RS232 interface Terminal with RS232 interface


The diagnostic interface serves as the interface for the programmable valve terminal. This is an RS232 interface (V.24), galvanically isolated by means of optocouplers (see Appendix A, Technical specifications). Connect the interactive unit as follows:

Switch off the operating voltages for the


interactive unit and the valve terminal.

Set the RS232 interface parameter (hardware).

Connect the interface. Switch on the operating voltage, first for the
valve terminal, then for the interactive unit.

If necessary, set the software for the RS232


interface parameter.

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6. Command Interpreter

Accessing the command interpreter

WARNING The command interpreter contains commands which can reorganise or delete parts of the memory. Existing files may therefore be destroyed. Use only commands with which you are familiar.
Access with FST 202C The command interpreter can be operated easily with function keys. Select for this purpose "on-line mode" in the menu "Utilities." A terminal can also be simulated within the FST 202C. Select for this purpose F3 "Terminal mode" in on-line mode. Access with terminal The second possibilitiy is access with a terminal. The following commands are then required:
Input format CTRL T Response from command interpreter FPC-202C V3.x >_

Please note: The command interpreter can also be accessed with CTRL T when the controller registers an error. However, this error must be rectified before any further commands can be entered.

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6. Command Interpreter

Exiting the command interpreter The command interpreter can be exited either from the controller or from the interactive unit.
Input format X <CR> Response from command interpreter No response from command interpreter

Command structure Each command has a defined entry format. This includes: a letter (for command identification) a parameter (letter or number as per parameter definition) a memory address (not always necessary)
Input format <command letter>, [<parameter>] [<memory address>] Response from command interpreter Depends on command

Remarks Entries are possible in upper and lower case letters. Entries must be concluded with <CR>. Corrections are possible with DEL, Backspace and CRTL H.

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6. Command Interpreter

Command identification The letters given below can be used for the commands.
Command letter and command H = D = C = M = Z = N = Y = P = W= L = R = S = F = X = HEX-DUMP DISPLAY CHECKSUM MODIFY (= Hexadec. memory dump) (= Display operands) (= Checksum) (= Modify operands ) Explanation Display contents of memory/operands Form checksum Modify Memory management

Allocation of memory position NULLIFY (= Delete programs and operands) INITIALIZE directory (= EEPROM) (= Data output) (= Data input) (= Start) (= Stop) (= Function modules) (= Exit)

PROM WRITE LOAD RUN STOP FUNCTION EXIT

Progr. EEPROM, set boot Data backup

Start program Stop program Acces function modules Exit command interpreter

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6. Command Interpreter

Parameter definition Various parameters should be entered, depending on the operand, file or memory area to which a command is intended to apply.
Parameters C S Meaning Entire memory capacity without free user memory Depending on preceding command, freely available user memory or system interrogation (depends on previous command) Depending on preceding command, directory (listing contents of program) or display format Configuration Library Handshake format Program no. m Program module no. m Input no. m.m *) Input word no. m *) Output no. m.m *) Output word m *) Flag no. x.x Flag word no. x Counter no. y Counter word no. y Counter preselect no. y Timer no. y Timer word no. y Timer preselect no. y Register no. z y = {0,...,31} z = {0,...,63}

D K L{A/K/F} H P<m> B<m> E<m>.<m> EW<m> A<m>.<m> AW<m> M<x>.<x> MW<x> Z<y> ZW<y> ZV<y> T<y> TW<y> TV<y> R<z> n = {0,..., 2} m = {0,..., 7} x = {0,...,15}

*) Depending on the size of the programmable valve terminal

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6. Command Interpreter

Memory addresses The controller uses either a 32KByte RAM or a 32KByte EEPROM as user memory. Both memories are permanently installed. Selection is made via a command within the programming software FST 202C. Approximately 26 kByte is available to the user as user memory. The following memory addresses may be used ($ indicates hexadecimal address):
Storage area System memory User memory Data memory Address area $0000 - $7FFF $8000 - $EFFF $F000 - $FFFF

Load format Data is loaded or read by the command interpreter via the diagnostic interface using the "INTELHEX format". One feature of this data format is that each line contains not only its memory address but also its checksum. This increases reliability in the case of serial data transmission.

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6. Command Interpreter

A loaded file is represented as follows in the INTELHEX format: <Length> <AA> <Type> <Data><Checkbyte>

Length

Number (two digit in hex. form) of data bytes per line. Initial address of the first data byte (four positions). 00 = the line contains information 01 = the line is the final transmission line and does not contain any information. Existing record is an "End record". Data bytes (each two positions)

AA

Type

Data Check byte

Check byte of all bytes in the line.

Example
relative address data bytes

: 10 023000 640170017C0188019401A001AC01B801 46

Line contains10-hex =16-dec data bytes

Line contains information

Check byte

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6. Command Interpreter

Description of commands The following section contains an explanation of the individual commands, with examples where necessary. Display memory content (H command) The following commands can be used for displaying memory contents:

H
HEXDUMP

HEX-DUMP command:
Displays the memory

DISPLAY command:
Displays the operands Display memory The H command enables memory areas to be shown in hexadecimal form on the display. The H command can be terminated by pressing the <CR>-key.

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6. Command Interpreter

User memory
Input format Meaning Display memory line

H $ <AA>

H $ <AA> - <EA>

Display memory area

H $ <AA> <length>

Display memory area

AA = start address EA = end address, addresses from $8000-$FFFF

After completion of the command by <CR> the command interpreter supplies 16 data bytes in pairs in the same line. An unlimited number of lines of this kind can be displayed.
Example 1 H$8088 8088: 19D0 0BFF 0507 2106 2205 2109 220A 21D0

Example 2 H$8000-8030 8000: 8010: 8020: 8030: A01C 5383 1480 5882 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 90A5 DA01 0500 16D0 800A 0AFF 1940 0BFF 0501 2100 210F 21D0 0AFF 19D0 A1

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6. Command Interpreter

System memory
Input format Meaning Display memory line

HS $ <AS>

H S $ <AS> - <ES>

Display memory area

H $ <AS> <length>

Display memory area

AS = start address, ES = end address, Addresses from $0000-$7FFF Example1: >HS$0000 0000: 0201 0002 3F02 FFFF FFFF FF02 041D FFFF Example2 >HS$0100-0120 0100: 0110: 0120: 787F E4F6 D8FC 7581 5112 0139 E535 20E6 0B75 503A F5F0 1203 F785 F0J5 E5JE 20E6 0B

Example3 >HS$1500 0020 1500: 1510: 9480 F990 F20C 743A F0A3 7431 F0A3 7430 F0A3 E912 15AE E812 15AE 7430 F0A3 7430

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6. Command Interpreter

The following displays are possible:

the complete memory area the index individual files


Input format HC Meaning Display all programs, program modules and libraries Display index Display program no. 0 to no. 7 Display program modules no. 0 to no. 7 Display libraries Display task control blocks 0, 1, and 2

HD HP { 0,..., 7} HB { 0,..., 7}

HL {A, K, F} HY { 0, 1, 2}

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6. Command Interpreter

D
DISPLAY

Display operands (D command) The DISPLAY command can be used to display the status and content of the operands and the current status of the programs. The response by the command interpreter is always shown in the input line.

Single-bit operands Displaying the status (0-signal or 1-signal) of the selected operand.
Input format Timers D T <z> Response from command interpreter DT<z> DZ<z> = = {0/1} {0/1} {0/1} {0/1} {0/1}

Counters D Z <z> Inputs Outputs Flags D E <x>.<x> D A <x>.<x> D M<y>.<y>

DE<x.x> = DA<x.x> = DM<y.y> =

x = {0,..., 7}, y = {0,...,15}, z = {0,...,31}

Example 1 Display the status of the single bit operand output 0.6 DA0.6=1 >_ Example 2 Display the status of the single bit operand input 1.5 DE1.5=0 >_

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6. Command Interpreter

Multibit operands The following interrogations are possible for displaying the contents of multibit function units:
Input format Input words: Output words: Flag words: Timer words: Counter words: Timer preselect: Counter preselect: Error word: Register: D E W <x> D A W <x> D M W <w> D T W <y> D Z W <y> D T V <y> D Z V <y> DF D R <z> Response from command interpreter DEW<x> = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} DAW<x> = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} DMW<w>= {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} DTW<y> = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} DZW<y> = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} DTW<y> = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} DZW<y> = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} DF DR<z> = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.} = {$HEXADEC./SIGNED DEC./DEC.}

x = {0,..., 7}, w = {0,...,15}, y = {0,...,31}, z = {0,...,63}

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6. Command Interpreter

Special operands

A) Display format
Input format D D Response from command interpreter >DD={S/D/H}

S = signed decimal (default), D = decimal, H = hexadecimal

B) Handshake format
Input format D H Response from command interpreter >DH={0/1}

0 = without handshake, 1 = with handshake (default)

C) Program
Input format D P <x> Response from command interpreter >DPx = <program type>,*) <program length>,*) <program status>,*) [,<current program Step no.>*) [,<module number>,*) <current module Step no.>]]*)

x = {0,..., 7) *) These responses are explained in detail overleaf.

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6. Command Interpreter

Program type The program type is displayed in coded form in accordance with the following bit pattern (in decimal or hexadecimal form).

BIT

File name:

000 001 010 011 0 1 000 001 010 0 or 1

= = = = = = = = =

program module library external file relocatable absolute LDR STL Assembler

Type of memory: Type of language:

Checksum bit:

Fig. 6/2: Coding the program type

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6. Command Interpreter

Example: Relocatable (shiftable) STL module with checksum bit.

Coding:

1 0 0 1 0

0 0 1
decimal hexadecimal

Representation: >DP3=145,... >DP3=$0091,...

Fig. 6/3: Example of program type


Program length The program length indicates the number of data bytes in a program. Program status Program status = 0 means Program is inactive, Program status = 1 means Program is active.

Program step no. The current program step number (0 to 255) will only be displayed if the program is active (status = 1): LDR Progr.: No. 0 STL Progr.: No. 0-255

Module no. If an active the module no. (0-255)

and module step no. program processes a module, no. (0 to 7) and the module step are displayed.

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6. Command Interpreter

D) Module
Input format D B <x> x = {0,..., 7} Response from command interpreter >DB<x>= <module type>, <module length>

Module type See Program type

Module length The module length indicates the number of data bytes in a module.

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6. Command Interpreter

E) Library
Input format D L {A/K/F} Response from command interpreter >DL{A/K/F} = <library length>

Library length The library length indicates the number of data bytes in a library.

F) Available user memory


Input format DS Response from command interpreter >DS=$<available user memory>

Available user memory Using the DS-command, the size of the remaining user memory is indicated either in decimal, hexadecimal or signed decimal.

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6. Command Interpreter

G) EEPROM 1. Display number of programming cycles for programs, display current boot mode.
Input format DC Response from command interpreter >DC = <number of programming cycles>, <boot mode>

Number of programming cycles = {0...9999} Boot mode = {80, 82} 80 = EEPROM 82 = RAM 2. Display number of programming cycles for remanent function units (if there is a failure in the operating voltage).
Input format DC<x> Response from command interpreter >DC [<number of times switched off area x>, <number of times switched off area (x+1) *),...]

x =

{0...30}; *) The number of times the unit has been switched off can be shown for a maximum of 16 areas simultaneously.

Number of times swiched off = {-1, 0...9999} -1 = Unused area

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6. Command interpreter

C
CHECKSUM

Form checksum (C command) The command interpreter enables any areas of the user memory to be checked. Checksum and checkbyte The C command is used to form the checksum and checkbyte for a particular area of memory and to show them on the display. User memory
Input format C $ <AA> Meaning Checksum for a memory line

C $ <AA>-<EA>

Checksum for a memory area Checksum for a memory area

C $ <AA><length>

AA = start address, EA = end address, addresses from $8000 - $FFFF

After completion of the command by <CR>, the command interpreter supplies the appropriate information on the same line.
Example 1 C$8000=00064C:B4 Example 2 C$80AF-81EB=00600C:F4 Example 3 C$820C 0080=002E79:87

The checksum is displayed to six positions, the checkbyte to two positions, hexadecimally.

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6. Command interpreter

System memory
Input format CS $ <AS> CS $ <AS>-<ES> C $ <AS><length> Meaning Checksum for a memory line Checksum for a memory area Checksum for a memory area

AS = start address, ES = end address, addresses from $0000-$7FFF

In the same way the respective checksum can be formed for the entire memory range, for the directory on its own, or each file.
Input format CC Meaning Checksum for all programs, program modules, libraries Checksum for the directory Checksum for program no. 0 to 7 Checksum for module no. 0 to 7 Checksum for libraries

CD CP {0,...,7} CB {0,...,7} CL {A/K/F}

Example 1 CP2=001500:00 Example 2 CLK = 02F300:00

The checkbyte for the entire memory range, the directory or each individual file must always be 00. If it is unequal to 00, the memory range being interrogated contains an error.

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6. Command interpreter

M
MODIFY

Modify The command interpreter can be used to modify operands. Modify operands (M command) Using the M command you can modify the content or status of operands. The user can display the operand if he wishes.

In order to modify an operand directly


without displaying it beforehand, the required value should be entered after the command, and it should be concluded with <CR>.
Example: >MAW1=255

If you wish to see the contents or status of


the operand in advance, select <CR> after entering the command. The command interpreter will supply the current value. The new value can then be entered after the colon and concluded with <CR>.
Example: >MAW1=255:126

The values can be displayed in decimal, hexadecimal or signed decimal form (see display format).

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6. Command interpreter

Single-bit operands The following entry is required in order to modify the status of operands:
Input format Outputs Flag status Timer status Counter status : : : : M A <x>.<x> M M <y>.<y> M T <z> M Z <z>

x = {0,...,7}, y = {0,...,15}, z = {0,...,31}

Example >MA1.6 = 1 : 0 prior to modification following modification

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6. Command interpreter

Multibit operands The following inputs can be used to modify the content of multibit operands:
Input format Output word Flag word Timer word Timer preselect Counter word : : : : : M A W <x> M M W <y> M T W<z> M T V <z> M Z W <z> M Z V <z> M R <u> M

Counter preselect: Register Error : :

x = {0,...,7}, y = {0,...,15}, z = {0,...,31}, u = {0,...,63}

Example >MZW0=9662:xxxxx

Current counter value

Counter value to be selected

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6. Command interpreter

Special operands A) Display format


Input format M D = {D/S/H} D = decimal, S = signed decimal, H = hexadecimal

B) Handshake format
Input format M H = {0/1} 0 = without handshake, 1 = with handshake

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6. Command interpreter

Z
ALLOCATION

Memory management As soon as programs are to be deleted or loaded into the control system, commands are needed to organise the memory. Memory allocation (Z command) The Z command must be entered before the following are loaded (see also read data):

programs modules libraries


The Z command organises the memory and controls the following functions:

It checks whether or not enough free


memory space is available.

It creates new memory areas for programs,


modules and libraries.

It shifts existing programs and modules to


the last position in the user memory if a program or module with the same number is to be loaded.

It checks the version number of existing


libraries.

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6. Command interpreter

Create program/module
Entry format ZP <program number> <program length> Response from command interpreter $"Address between 8000 and E800" or E9: MEMORY FULL *) >_ $"Address between 8000 and E800" or E9: MEMORY FULL *) >_

ZB

<module number>, <module length>

Program or module number = {0...7} Program or module length = Length of file in bytes *) The program to be loaded does not fit the user memory

Create library
Entry format ZL <library type> <library length> Response from command interpreter $"Address between 8000 and FFFF" Meaning Library does not yet exist and can be loaded with the LL command. Library exists already, must not therefore be loaded into the controller. Existing library has incorrect version or max. number of libraries already loaded. Library does not fit user memory.

or $"Address between 0000 and 7FFF"

or E8: ACCESS ERROR

or E9: MEMORY FULL Library type = (= statement list) or (= ladder diagram) F (= external library) Length of library in bytes K

Library length =

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6. Command interpreter

Y
INITIALIZE

Delete user memory (Y command) A separate command must be used depending on whether you wish to delete all files (programs, program modules, libraries) simultaneously or just a single file.

WARNING The Y command deletes the complete user memory (including the index). All files will therefore be lost.

A) Delete all files


Entry format Y Entry format Y <CR> <CR> If everything is to be deleted If the Y command is not to be used Response from command interpreter >DEL ALL ? [Y/N]:_

N
NULLIFY

B) Delete individual programs


Entry format N P <program number> Program number = {0,..., 7}

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6. Command interpreter

C) Delete individual modules


Entry format N B <module number> Module number = {0,..., 7}

D) Delete individual libraries


Entry format NL<library type> Library type = {A/K/F} Entry format Y <CR> <CR> If everything is to be deleted If the Y command is not to be used Response from command interpreter DEL ALL ? [Y/N]:_

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6. Command interpreter

Delete operands A) Delete all flags


Entry format NM

B) Delete all registers


Entry format NR

C) Delete all timers


Entry format NT

D) Delete all counters


Entry format NZ

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6. Command interpreter

P
PROM

Data backup The command interpreter offers various commands for data backup. Data can therefore be:

copied from RAM into EEPROM (backup in


case of power failure)

read from the controller to external storage


(redundancy)

loaded into the controller (from external


backup) Data backup EEPROM (P command) E) Select RAM/EEPROM There are three commands for copying the program from RAM into the EEPROM. The commands are protected and can only be accessed when CTRL A is entered.
Entry format CTRL A PE Copy contents of RAM into EEPROM Response from command inter> *)Release protected commands > PE = {-1} Processing successful > PE = {0, error number} > PP = {-1} Processing successful > PP = {0, error number} > PR = {-1} Processing successful > PR = {0, error number}

PP

Boot mode EEPROM

PR

Boot mode RAM

*) The commands remain unprotected until: CTRL A is entered again or the command interpreter is exited

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6. Command interpreter

W
WRITE

Read data (W command) The W command is used to read a specified area of the user memory in load format (= INTELHEX format) via the diagnostic port. The address of the lines read with the W command is relative, i.e. it refers to the start address of the relevant storage area.
Entry format W $ <AA> W $ <AA> <EA> W $ <AA> <length> Meaning Read a memory line Read a memory area Read a memory area

AA = Start address, EA = End address, Addresses from $8000-$FFFF

You can also display the complete storage area, the directory alone or each file individually.
Entry format WC Meaning Read all programs, program modules and libraries Read directory Read programs nos. 0 to 7 Read modules nos. 0 to 7 Read library

WD WP {0,...,7} WB {0,...,7} WL {A/F/K}

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6. Command interpreter

L
LOAD

Load data With the Load command (read data) you can load files (programs, program modules, libraries) from the interactive unit into the memory of the programmable valve terminal.

PLEASE NOTE Before the L command can be used, the new program must be created in the memory or moved to the end of the valid user memory with the Z command. The data loaded will be stored as from the position specified in the Z command.
Entry format LC LD LP {0,...,7} LB {0,...,7} LL Meaning Load complete memory area Load directory Load programs nos. 0 to 7 Load modules nos. 0 to 7 Load library

The criterion for aborting is the end record (otherwise hard reset), then from the terminal <DC1> or <CR> (with or without handshake). The command interpreter transfers the data in INTELHEX format.

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6. Command interpreter

R
RUN

Program start (R command) If a ready-to-run program is to be activated in the control system, the R command should be used.
Entry format R

The R command on its own starts the first ready-to-run program entered in the directory. Recommendation: Program number 0 should be assigned to the organisation program. If a special program is to be started, this must be directly specified.
Entry format R P <Program number> Program number = {0,..., 7}

S
STOP

Program stop (S command) Das S command stops all current programs.


Entry format S

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6. Command interpreter

F
FUNCTION MODULE
Entry format

Call function module (F command) Function modules are accessed with the F command. If the module call is successful, up to six parameters will be returned.
Response from command interpreter

F <FBN> [,P1 [,P2 [,P3 [,P4 [,P5 [,P6 ] ] ] ] ] ] FBN = Function module number * {0...255} * At present nos. 0, 1 and 2 are defined.

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Appendix A

TECHNICAL APPENDIX

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Appendix A

Contents TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS General Operating voltage for electronic components and inputs Operating voltage for outputs/valves Electronic input modules Electronic output modules Control unit SB-202 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) A-3 A-3 A-4 A-4 A-5 A-5 A-6 A-6

CABLE LENGTH AND CROSS SECTION Calculating with a graph Calculating with a formula

A-7 A-8 A-10

CIRCUITRY EXAMPLES Operating voltage connection (type 03) Operating voltage connection (type 05) 4-input module PNP 8-input module PNP 4-input module NPN 8-input module NPN 4-output module

A-12 A-12 A-13 A-14 A-15 A-16 A-17 A-18

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Appendix A

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
General specifications Protection class (as per DIN 40050)
SF202

IP 65

Temperature during operation storage/transport Chemical resistance

- 5 oC . . . +50o C -20o C . . . +60oC s. Festo-Pneumatic Catalogue (resistance table)

Vibrations (as per DIN/IEC 68 part 2-6 and IEC 721/part 2-3) transport

3.5 mm distance at 2-8 Hz 1 g acceleration at 8-25 Hz 0.35 mm distance at 25-57 Hz 5 g acceleration at 57-150 Hz and 1 g acceleration at 150-200 Hz

operation/use

Shock (as per DIN/IEC 68 part 2-27 and IEC 721)

30 g at 11 ms

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Appendix A

Operating voltage electronic components and inputs (Pin 1 Operating voltage connection) Rated value (protection against incorrect polarity) Tolerance Residual ripple Current consumption (at 24 V) Fusing of supply to inputs/sensors Power consumption (P) Calculation Bridging time if logic voltage drops

DC 24 V 25 % (DC18 V . . . 30 V) 4 Vpp 200 mA + sum of current consumption of inputs internal 2 A, slow-blowing

P[W] = (0.2 A + I Inputs ) 24 V min. 20 ms

Operating voltage outputs/valves (Pin 1 Operating voltage connection) Rated value (protection against incorrect polarity) Tolerance Residual ripple Current consumption (at 24 V) External fuse required (typ. 10 A, see therefore chapter 3.2 connection examples) DC 24 V 10% (DC 21.6 V ... 26.4 V) 4 Vpp 10 mA + Sum of current consumption additional outputs + Sum of current consumption of switched valve solenoid coils (e.g. per MIDI valve solenoid coil 55 mA) P[W] = (0,01 A + Iadditional outputs + Isolenoid coil) 24 V

Power consumption (P) Calculation

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Appendix A

Electronic input modules Input voltage range Logic level PNP ON OFF Logic level NPN ON OFF Current consumption (at 24V) (current from sensor to input at "logic 1") Response delay (at 24 V) Common fuse for operating voltage supply to sensor Galvanic isolation DC 0 ... 30 V 12.5 V 7V 5V 11 V typ. 9 mA

typ. 5 ms

2 A, slow-blowing

None

Electronic output modules Loading per digital output max. 0.5 A (Bulbs max. 10 W because of PTC resistor characteristics)

Current consumption (at 24V) (input consumption at "logic 1") Electronic fusing (short circuit, overload) Tripping current Response time (short circuit) Galvanic isolation

typ. 9 mA

max. 1.5 A max. 1 s

none

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Appendix A

Control unit SB-202 Diagnostic interface Version Type of transmission Synchronising system RS 232, floating serial, asynchronous, full duplex, software handshake (1 start bit, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit) 300 Baud 2400 Baud 4800 Baud 9600 Baud 32 KByte 4 hours 32 KByte 10 000 310 000 48/48

Transmission rate (adjustable using DIL switch)

User memory RAM Buffer period EEPROM Programming cycles Disconnections from mains Programmable inputs/outputs (max.)

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) Resistance to interference tested as per EN 50082-2 Radio interference suppression tested as per EN 55011 Limit value severity B

Technical specifications for pneumatic components and valves are to be found in the Pneumatics Manual.

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Appendix A

CABLE LENGTH AND CROSS SECTION

PLEASE NOTE The following information assumes that the facts quoted in the Chapters "Installation" of this manual are already known and is to be used exclusively by personnel with the necessary training in electrotechnology.
A load-dependent voltage drop occurs on all three cables for the operating voltage supply of a valve terminal. This can cause the voltage at pin 1 or pin 2 of the operating voltage connection to lie outside the permitted tolerance. Recommendation

Avoid long distances between the power


unit and the terminal. Calculate the suitable length and cross section of cable in accordance with the following graphs or formulas. Please note that: the graphs supply approximate values for the cross sections 1.5 and 2.5 mm2. the formulae supply exact values for all cross sections.

PLEASE NOTE The following graphs and formulae assume that the cross sections of the operating voltage cables (pins 1, 2 and 3) are the same.

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Appendix A

Calculating with a graph Proceed as follows: 1. Calculate the maximum current consumption of the outputs/valves (I2). 2. Calculate the lowest voltage (VOmin) to be expected on the power unit during operation. Take into account here: the load dependency of the power unit the fluctuations in the primary power voltage 3. Read in the table for your cross section the permitted cable length. Example for 1.5 mm2: VOmin = 22.8 V, I2 = 2 A; Lmax = 25 m

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Appendix A

VOmin in volt V Current I2 in ampere


14A 12A 10A 6A

+10% 26,4 26

8A

4A

25

3A

24

2A

23

22 -10% 21,6

Cross section 1.5 mm2

10

20

30

40

50

Cable length in metres

VOmin in volt V Current I2 in ampere


+10% 26 ,4 26 14 A 12 A 10 A 8A

6A

25 4A 24

3A 2A

23

22 ,6 -1 0% 21

Cross section 2.5 mm2

10

20

30

40

50

Cable length in metres

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Appendix A

Calculating with a formula Proceed as follows: 1. Calculate the maximum current consumption of the inputs and electronic components (I1) as well as of the outputs/valves (I2). 2. Calculate the lowest voltage (VOmin) to be expected on the power unit during operation. Take into account here: the load dependency of the power unit the fluctuations in the primary power voltage 3. Enter the values in the appropriate formula. The equivalent circuit diagram and the example explain the correlation.

Operating voltage supply

Equivalent circuit diagram Cable resistor VO


(incoming)

R L1 VO AC 10 AT DC
EMERGENCY OFF

VL1

RL2

VL2

3.15 AT

I1

Valve terminal

Pin 1 I2 Pin 2 I0 Pin 3

Vterm. R I1 R I2

0V

Distance (cable length) L RL0 0V VL2 + VL1 Cable resistor (returning)

Fig. A/3: Cable length (L) and cable resistor (RL)

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Appendix A

Formula for cable length (VOmin VTERMINALmin) A Cu 2 I2 + I1

This means:

VTERMINAL = 24 V 10%,

minimum: VTERMINALmin 21.6 V supply (at power unit)

VOmin = minimum operating voltage Current I1 = current for electronic components and inputs

Current I2 = current for outputs/valves A = cable cross section


(uniform e.g. 1.5 mm2) (uniform e.g. Cu = 56

= conductance value of cables


m mm 2
)

Example: I1 = I2 = VO = VTERMINALmin

1 A; 5 A; 24 V; = 21.6 V ; m Cu = 56 ; mm 2 Result of example: L 18 m for A = 1.5 mm2 L 30 m for A = 2.5 mm2

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Appendix A

CIRCUITRY EXAMPLES

Operating voltage connection (type 03)


Pin assignment (node) 1: 24 V supply to electronic components

2: 24 V supply Outputs/valves

4: PE Circuitry example and internal structure type 03

3: 0 V

Electrical outputs Electrical inputs/sensors (fused 24 V electronic internally) components (fused internally) 2A

Valves (must be fused externally)

1 4 3 2

Operating voltage connection on the node of valve terminal type 03

Power unit (e.g. central voltage supply) 3.15 A AC 230 V DC 10 A


EMERG. OFF

24 V 10 % 24 V 10 % 0V PE

Fig. A/4a: Circuitry example: operating voltage connection type 03

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Appendix A

Operating voltage connection (type 05)


Pin assignment (adapter plate) 1: 24 V-supply to electronic components

2: 24 V-supply Outputs/valves

4: PE Circuitry example and internal structure type 05 Electric outputs (must be fused externally) 2A Electric inputs/sensors (fused internally)

3: 0 V

Adapter cabel

4A 24 V-electronic components (fused internally) Valves max. 50% simultaneity (internally fused)
1 4 3 2

Operating voltage connection for adapter plate (type 05) Power unit (e.g. central power supply) 3.15 A AC 230 V DC 10 A
Emerg. off

24 V 10 % 24 V 10 % 0V PE

Fig. A/4b: Circuitry example: operating voltage connection type 05

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Appendix A

4-input module PNP


Internal structure 24 V 25 % free PLC/I-PC Ix
Logic identification Ix

Pin 1 2

4 green LED Ix

0V Pin assignment 2: free 1: + 24 V Circuitry examples 3: 0 V 4: Input Ix

AAAAA A positive AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAA AAAAA A switching AAAA AAAAA A

AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA AAAA

positive switching

Three-wire sensor

Two-wire sensor

Contact

Fig. A/5: Circuitry example: 4-input module PNP

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Appendix A

8-input module PNP


Internal structure 24 V 25 % PLC/I-PC Ix+1
Logic identification

Pin 1 2 PLC/I-PC Ix
Logic identification Ix

Ix + 1

green LED Ix + 1

green LED Ix 3 3: 0 V 4: Input Ix

0V Pin assignment 2: Input Ix+1 1: + 24 V Circuitry example

Two-way distributor (T piece e.g. Festo DUO cable)

AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A

AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A

Sensor 2 (Ix+1 )

Sensor 1 (Ix)

Fig. A/6: Circuitry example: 8-input module PNP

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Appendix A

4-input module NPN


Internal structure Pin 3 free PLC/I-PC Ix
Logic identification Ix

0V

4 green LED Ix

24 V 25 % Pin assignment 2: free 1: + 24 V Circuitry examples 3: 0 V 4: Input Ix

negative switching

negative switching

Three-wire sensor

Two-wire sensor

Contact

Fig. A/7: Circuitry example: 4-input module NPN

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Appendix A

8-input module NPN


Internal structure 0V PLC/I-PC Ix+1
Logic identification

Pin 3 2 PLC/I-PC Ix
Logic identification I x

Ix + 1

green LED Ix + 1

4 green LED Ix

24 V 25 % 1 Pin assignment 2: Input Ix+1 1: + 24 V Circuitry example 3: 0 V 4: Input Ix

Two-way distributor (T piece e.g. Festo DUO cable)

AAAA AAAAA A AAAA A AAAA AAAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A

AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A AAAA AAAAA A AAAAA

Sensor 2 (Ix+1)

Sensor 1 (Ix)

Fig. A/8: Circuitry example: 8-input module NPN

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Appendix A

4-output module
Internal structure 24 V 10 % free free PLC/I-PC Output driver Pin 1 2 4

Diagnosis - output status - overload 0V Pin assignment 2: free 1: free 3: 0 V 4: Output O x red LED yellow LED 3

Circuitry examples

Example 1

Example 2

NOT PERMITTED

+ 24 V

+ _

Fig. A/9: Circuitry example : 4-output module

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Appendix B

GLOSSARY

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Appendix B

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Appendix B

A
Address selector switch The field bus address of the valve terminal is set on the address selector switches in the field bus node. Auto mode If auto mode is selected for programmable logic controllers, the program with the lowest program number is started when the operating voltage is switched on. Otherwise a program must be started explicitly (e.g. with the terminal/command interpreter, PC/FST202C).

B
Baud rate The baud rate specifies the speed of data transmission. 1 baud = 1 bit/s. Sender and receiver must both be set at the same baud rate, otherwise there will be errors in transmission. Boot mode "Booting" is the starting/running up of programmable devices (PCs, PLCs, programmable valve terminals). The boot mode determines what happens during this starting phase. The following boot modes are available with the programmable valve terminal: Boot mode RAM When the operating voltage is switched on, the user program in RAM is accessed. Boot mode EEPROM When the operating voltage is switched on, the complete contents of the EEPROM are copied into the RAM. The program is then processed in RAM.
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Appendix B

C
Control block The control block is the "intelligent part" of the programmable valve terminal and contains the electronic components (PLC) required to program a standard valve terminal. The control unit complies with protection class IP65. The built-in programmable logic controller can therefore be installed directly on the system to be controlled. The main features of the built-in PLC include: permanent RAM and EEPROM; maximum 48 addressable inputs and outputs; programmable in STL and LDR; flags, timers, counters etc. are available. Command interpreter The command interpreter forms part of the operating system of the programmable valve terminal. It has two main functions:

It forms the logical (i.e. software) interface


between the programmable valve terminal and the programming software FST202C. The programmable valve terminal can then process the coded STL and LDR programs.

It is also used for testing, servicing and


programming. Commands can be sent to the command interpreter with a terminal or PC with FST 202C in on-line mode. Programs, memory commands, function modules, etc. can be controlled with these commands.

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Appendix B

D
Data transmission Transfer of digital data between various computers or modules, or between a computer and peripheral devices (e.g. valve terminals). Diagnostic byte The diagnostic byte supplies information on the status of the valve terminal when a fault occurs. Diagnostic bytes are interrogated by the user program of the PLC via the field bus. The status information thus acquired can be evaluated with software. Errors can then be displayed in clear text. Diagnostic interface The diagnostic interface connects the programmable valve terminal to the following devices:

operating devices (text display and operating unit ABG and ABG-2, terminal)

programmer (PC with RS232 interface)


The diagnostic interface comforms to international standard V.24/RS 232.

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Appendix B

E
EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Read Only Memory) A fixed value memory the contents of which can be electrically erased and programmed with new information. EEPROMs can be programmed up to 10,000 times. User programs of the programmable valve terminal can therefore be loaded into the EEPROM up to 10,000 times by the PC/FST202C. The operands of a program, which are saved from RAM into EEPROM in the event of a power failure, can be programmed/saved up to 310,000 times thanks to the operating system of the programmable valve terminal. Exhaust air Compressed air which escapes into the atmosphere. In a valve terminal the exhaust is collected in a common channel. Sufficient flow rates and, in common exhaust systems, nonreturn valves must be provided.

F
Festo software tools FST software packages from Festo for menu and mouse controlled programming of the Festo controllers FPC 101, 202, 404, 405, 606 as well as the programmable valve terminals. Function modules Function modules are used for dealing with special tasks which are solved with hardware and software in the FPC 400 series. There are already three function modules for the programmable valve terminal and further modules are in preparation. B-6
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Appendix B

L
LDR (LaDdeR diagram) Graphical description for link-orientated control tasks corresponding to the electrical circuit diagram.

M
Manual override A plunger on the pilot valve e.g. of a solenoid valve, with which the valve can be switched without an electrical signal. Multitasking The ability of a computer or control system to process several programs or processes simultaneously.

O
Operand The control instructions of a program for a programmable logic controller are usually divided into operation and operand: The operation specifies what needs to be done; the operand specifies the means by which this is to be achieved. The operand can be the address of an I/O module or an internal control address (e.g. a flag, timer, counter, etc.). Example: with the instruction AND I3.2 "AND" is the operation, "I3.2" is the operand.

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Appendix B

Operating system The operating system forms part of every computer system. It determines its performance characteristics and area of application. The operating system of the programmable valve terminal controls the processor, manages the user and program memory and the peripheral devices connected to the diagnostic interface (PC, terminal, display and operating unit). Operation Part of the command set of a PLC (see Operand). Operator (Synonym: Operation, see Operand)

P
PAA

(See Process diagram)


PAE

(See Process diagram)


Periphery External devices outside the controller which are connected with the control system and which are used for entry, output, visual displays or for saving data (e.g. terminal, printer, disk drive).

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Appendix B

Process diagram (PAA = Write process diagram of outputs, PAE = Read process diagram of inputs). In order to define the timing of switching of the inputs and outputs in a control system, these are read/set only at a defined time. This always takes place when there is a change of task in the operating system for the progammable valve terminal. A change of task occurs when:

a program step is completed in an STL


step-by-step program.

the program is completed in an STL sequence program or LDR program. Program module To facilitate programming and to relieve the user programs, frequent command sequences or text outputs are grouped into program modules (subprograms). The text outputs (text modules) are created with a special text display editor and stored as program modules. Program modules are accessed from the current program. The programmable valve terminal manages up to eight program modules in the user memory.

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Appendix B

R
RAM (Random Access Memory) The contents of a RAM can be read, deleted or amended simultaneously by the computer. When the address is specified, the stored data can be accessed. This provides rapid access to all stored data at any time. When the operating voltage is switched off, this memory ceases to function and its contents must therefore be backed up on another storage medium (e.g. EEPROM, hard disc) or by means of a battery buffer to prevent loss of data. Relocatable (opposite of: absolute) In general, a program written in one of the main programming languages (LDR, STL) is relocatable at any point in the memory. If fixed transfer addresses (absolute) are defined when the program is translated into the machine code of the respective processor, a program of this type can only be stored at one point in the memory. Remanent Remanent operands do not modify their status when the controller is switched off and then on again. The following difference applies with the programmable valve terminal:

Boot mode RAM: all operands are available


in RAM whilst the program is running. If there is a power failure, the operands can be saved for up to 4 hours in RAM. After this period they are lost.

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Appendix B

Boot mode EEPROM: If there is a power


failure, some of the operands will be saved in the EEPROM. When the system is switched on again, they will be available to the user memory in unmodified form. The non-remanent operands (i.e. those not saved) will be lost if the power supply fails for more than 4 hours. RS 232 An internationally standardized format for the transfer of data between different devices (PC, printer, operating units, and many others). Data is transferred to the programmable valve terminal via an RS 232 interface (diagnostic interface) with the following specifications: serial, asynchronous, full duplex and with software handshake. The baud rate can be set at 300, 2400, 4800 or 9600 baud.

S
Seal Seals between the sub-bases of the valve terminal prevent leaks in the pneumatic system. Seals between the electronic modules of the terminal guarantee protection in accordance with standard IP65. Silencers Silencers are used for reducing noise at the exhaust connections of valves. Pressure supply modules for the valve terminals can be fitted with external or integrated silencers.

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Appendix B

Solenoid valve An electromagnetically operated valve. In electropneumatic or electrohydraulic systems, the solenoid valve forms the interface between the electrical and pneumatic or hydraulic components. Statement list (STL) Programming language for programmable logic controllers. All logical links and processes can be programmed with the commands of this language. A statement list can contain both step-orientated and link-orientated elements.

T
Task A term often used in control technology when a processor/operating system can process several taks at the same time. The term multitasking operating systems (e.g. programmable valve terminal) is then used. Task change If a number of programs are being processed simultaneously, the operating system will separate the individual programs into tasks. These tasks will then be dealt with in sequence by the processor. Task change takes place if:

an LDR or STL sequence program is being


processed.

if a step has been completed in an STL


step program. The process diagrams are read/written (PAA/PAE) with each task change.

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Appendix B

V
V.24 Synonym: RS 232 interface (see RS 232). Valve Pneumatic element for controlling pressure and compressed air. A distinction is made between directional control valves, pressure valves, flow control valves and non-return valves.

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Appendix C

INDEX

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Appendix C

PLEASE NOTE The index is based on key words. It therefore supplements the contents which are based on a function/action-orientated grouping. In the index you will not find e.g. "Connecting the operating voltage", but the separate entries "Connections" and "Voltage".

A
Address FST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17 inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9 outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Allocation list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24 programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Auto mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31, 4-57

B
Baud rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Boot mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30, 4-57

C
Cable connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 diagnostic interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 operating voltages . . . . . . . . . 3-12, 3-20, A-7 selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3, A-7 Circuity example - inputs NPN . . . . . A-16 - A-17 Circuity example - inputs PNP . . . . . A-14 - A-15 Circuity example - outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18 Command interpreter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4 Command set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-34 Commissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1, 4-20

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Appendix C

Connections diagnostic cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 diagnostic interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26 operating voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14, 3-18 outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29 Control block SB-202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Current Cable selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20 Calculating (type 05) . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13, 3-21 fuses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14, 3-17, 3-23, A-12 power unit design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20 selecting cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12, A-7 Current consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21

D
Data backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-53 Data transmission interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 - 3-10, 6-6 Diagnosis error word. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3, 5-13 function module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3, 5-10 LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 - 5-4 status byte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3, 5-9 Diagnostic cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Diagnostic interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 transmission rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 DIL switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10

E
Earthing valve terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15, 3-22 EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-27, 4-53, 4-55 EMERGENCY OFF . . . . . 3-14, 3-17, 3-19, A-12 Emulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-67 C-4

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Appendix C

Error evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3, 5-9, 5-13 LED display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4 treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Error messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 load project/program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-13 running time faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 valve terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 Examples addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10 addressing with FST 202C . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17 basic stand-alone control . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-60 control of a station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-59 emulator as commissioning aid . . . . . . . . 4-67 system operation with ABG . . . . . . . . . . . 4-61 system operation with ABG-2 . . . . . . . . . 4-64

F
Festo software tools . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4, 1-12, B-6 Fitting Hat rail fitting type 03. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10 Wall fitting type 05 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 FST 202C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17, 4-20, 4-32 FST display editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-63, 4-66 Function modules . . . . . . 4-32 - 4-33, 4-41, 5-10 Fuses external. . . . . . . . 3-14, 3-16, 3-18, 3-23, A-12 internal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7, 3-16, A-12

L
LDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LED display inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26, node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7, outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29, valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 5-8 5-4 5-8 5-6

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Appendix C

M
Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48, 5-10 Multi-tasking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-47

O
On-line mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22 Operands counter preselects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 counter words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 error word. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 flag words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 function modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 init flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 input words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 output words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 program modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 remanent RAM/EEPROM . . . . . . . 4-39, 4-55 special operands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37 timer words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 Operands remanent RAM/EEPROM. . . . . . . 4-55 Operating and display elements . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 Operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-32, 4-44 Operating voltage supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 Operators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-34 Organisation program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44

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Appendix C

P
PAA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48 PAE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48 PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Pin assignment inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27 operating voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15, 3-22 outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30 PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-48 Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44 Program backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-53 Program start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44 Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1, 4-32 addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7, 4-17 auto mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-31 boot mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-30 load programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25 prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 programming techniques . . . . . . . . 4-32, 4-44 Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-25

R
RAM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37, FST 202C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Relocatable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Remanent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37, Return parameter . . . . . 4-40 - 4-43, 5-10 RS-232 interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 4-53 4-20 6-20 4-39 5-12 3-10

S
Screening diagnostic interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Short circuit eliminate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-16 fuses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14, A-12 fusing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-18, 3-23 C-7

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Appendix C

STL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4, 4-32, 4-47 Switching status inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8 outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8, 5-16 valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 - 5-6

T
Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-49, 4-59 structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44 Terminal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Timer preselects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-38 Transmission rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9 Type 03 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15 Type 05 Connecting the operating voltages . . . . . 3-18 Connection example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-23

V
V.24 interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10, A-6 Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6, 1-8 Voltage cable selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20 connecting . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4, 3-15, 3-18, 3-22 selecting cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12, A-7 selecting power unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14

C-8

9602