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History of the United States Since 1876

HISTORY 1302
INSTRUCTORS CLASS
REQUIREMENTS
Instructor: James Withers, Jr.
Seester: Spring, 2014
Adjunct Faculty, History epartment
Required Text:
!ou should ha"e a copy o# the te$t% Alan &rin'ley, The Unfinished !ation A (oncise
History o# the American )eople, *
th
+dition
Class Focus- Course escri!tio":
HIST 1302 United States History II
A sur"ey o# the social, political, economic, cultural and intellectual history o# the ,nited
States #rom the (i"il War-.econstruction era to the present. ,nited States History //
e$amines industriali0ation, immigration, 1orld 1ars, the 2reat epression, (old War,
and post3(old War eras. 4hemes that may 5e addressed in ,nited States History //
include% American culture, religion, ci"il and human rights, technological change,
economic change, immigration and migration, ur5ani0ation and su5ur5ani0ation, the
e$pansion o# the #ederal go"ernment, and the study o# ,nited States #oreign policy.
)rere6uisite% .72 0891 or .72 0898 1ith a grade o# (, plus achie"e 11 th grade
le"el score on 7elson3enny, or an appro"ed alternati"e.
"OURS# TY$# %cadeic "ore
"OURS# &O%'S %!( '#%R!I!& OUT"O)#S
(ourse goals are lin'ed to re6uired (ore (urriculum /ntellectual (ompetencies,
)erspecti"es, and +$emplary +ducational :5jecti"es as de#ined 5y the 4e$as Higher
+ducation (oordinating &oard. Speci#ic core re6uirements are lin'ed to the class
schedule.
,pon success#ul completion o# this course, students 1ill%
1. Create an argument through the use of historical evidence by using appropriate reading,
listening, writing and critical analysis skills. The student will be able to
a. comprehend te$t materials and other documents;
5. emonstrate an understanding o# lectures, presentations, and #ilm;
c. )repare 1ritten 1or' as assigned.
2. Analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources. The student will be able to
a. (omprehend primary and secondary sources as part o# a larger
understanding o# the discipline o# history and ho1 historians 1or';
5. emonstrate an understanding o# "arious interpretations o# speci#ied
historical e"ents.
. Analyze the effects of historical, social, political, economic, cultural and global forces
on this period of !nited "tates history. The student will be able to
a. +$plain the impact o# industriali0ation and the gro1th o# 5ig 5usiness in the
late nineteenth century;
5. Summari0e the causes and results o# the Spanish3American War in terms o#
,nited States glo5al po1er and ac6uisition o# territory;
c. emonstrate an understanding o# the )opulist and )rogressi"e political
mo"ements and their impact on ,nited States politics in the t1entieth
century;
d. +$plain the causes o# the 2reat epression and the impact o# the 7e1 eal
on American li#e, attitudes, and politics;
e. +$plain e"ol"ing post3World War // politics, #rom the idealism o# the 1<90s
to the neo3conser"atism o# the 1<=0>s;
#. escri5e the Watergate scandal, its impact on the American presidency, and
the role played 5y the media in American politics during Watergate and since
the resignation o# .ichard 7i$on.
4. #emonstrate an understanding of the social growth and development of the !nited
"tates during this period. The student will be able to
a. escri5e the impact o# post3(i"il War segregation on Americans in general
and A#rican3Americans speci#ically;
5. 4race the e"olution o# the (i"il .ights ?o"ement #rom the 5eginning o# the
t1entieth century through the (i"il .ights Act o# 1<94 and the @oting .ights
Act o# 1<9A, 1ith emphasis on the e"ents o# the 1<A0s and 1<90s that
generally de#ine the mo"ement;
c. escri5e post3(i"il War immigration trends as 1ell as the accompanying
issues #aced 5y the ,nited States as a result o# a large population o# arri"ing
immigrants #rom 5oth +urope and Asia;
d. +$plain the gro1th and impact o# mass media #rom the 1=<0s to the present,
including 5ut not limited to yello1 journalism, muc'ra'ers and in"estigati"e
journalism, and the role o# radio and tele"ision during the t1entieth century;
e. escri5e the cultural and political impact o# late t1entieth century
mo"ements in"ol"ing ci"il rights o# minority groups such as 1omen,
Hispanics, 7ati"e Americans and homose$uals.
$. #emonstrate an understanding of how history is related to other disciplines. The
student will be able to
a. (omprehend the relationship o# history to economics;
5. (omprehend the relationship o# history to sociology;
c. (omprehend the relationship o# history to psychology;
d. (omprehend the relationship o# history to literature;
e. (omprehend the relationship o# history to philosophy;
#. (omprehend the relationship o# history to the arts;
g. (omprehend the relationship o# history to other rele"ant disciplines.
%. #emonstrate an understanding of the !nited "tates& place in a global society, both
historically and as a prelude for understanding both the present and the future. The student
will be able to
a. +$plain the causes and conse6uences o# American in"ol"ement in World
War / and World War //;
5. +$plain the cultural and political impact o# the (old War Bc. 1<4*31<=<C
5et1een the ,nited States and the So"iet ,nion, including the con#licts o#
Dorea and @ietnam;
c. Analy0e the role o# the ,nited States in the 1orld during the t1entieth
century through e$aminations o# selected ,nited States )residential
administrations.
"OURS# %SS#SS)#!T
Student success is measured 5y assessment techni6ues aligned 1ith course goals and
learning outcomes. A "ariety o# techni6ues may 5e used, including 5ut not limited to
o5jecti"e e$ams, essay e$ams, 1ritten reports, 1ritten journals, oral presentations, and
group projects. /ndi"idual #aculty mem5ers are responsi5le #or designing e"aluation
instruments to measure student mastery o# course goals and learning outcomes and #or
indicating the nature o# such e"aluation instruments in the instructor>s class re6uirements.
S"HO'%STI" (ISHO!#STY
Students are responsi5le #or adhering to the 4(( policy on scholastic dishonesty as
stated in the outline student hand5oo' at 111.tccd.edu
R#SOUR"#S
For additional in#ormation regarding the student hand5oo', academic calendar, course
e"aluations, attendance policy, S(A7S s'ills, (ore (ompetencies, etc. see 111.tccd.edu
/nstructional ?ethod
4he class #ormat is lecture-discussion. 4here 1ill also 5e "ideo presentations.
+$aminations 1ill 5e gi"en in class in accordance 1ith the 4esting Schedule. ?a'e3up
e$aminations 1ill not 5e allo1ed. Students 1ho miss assignments are directed to1ard
e$tra credit assignments to regain lost credit.
4e$t .e#erence ?aterial
!ou should ha"e a copy o# the te$t% Alan &rin'ley, The Unfinished !ation A (oncise
History o# the American )eople, *
th
+dition
2rading )ractices
!our grade 1ill 5e determined 5y the traditional grading scale. Eetter grades 1ill #ollo1
a percentage 5rea'do1n 1hich 1ill correspond to a point system.
<0F G A <0 H 100 <00 or more points
=0F G & =0 3 =< =003=<< points
*0F G ( *0 3 *< *003*<< points
90F G 90 3 9< 90039<< points
F &elo1 90 A<< or less points
!our grade 1ill 5e 5ased on 1,000 points. !ou 1ill ac6uire points 5y completing graded
assignments 1hich include tests, 6ui00es, and projects. 4here 1ill 5e 8 multiple choice
e$ams 1orth 100 points each. 4he #inal e$am 1ill 5e a 4
th
e$am and it 1ill 5e
comprehensi"e. /t 1ill 5e 1orth an additional 100 points. We 1ill ha"e 1A 6ui00es
1orth 20 points each #or a total o# 800 points. 4here 1ill also 5e home1or' 1hich 1ill
5e "alued at 200 points. Additional assignments 1hich 1ill add to your grade 1ill 5e an
essay 1hich is "alued at 100 points, and optional e$tra credit assignments 1hich you may
complete, i# you 1ant. Failure to ta'e an e$am or complete an assignment or 6ui0 1ill
result in a #ailing grade #or that test or assignment. Failure to ta'e the #inal e$amination
1ill result in a 0 #or the e$amination grade. Here is a 5rea'do1n o# assignments and
ma$imum points you can earn%
4est I1 100 points
4est I2 100 points
4est I8 100 points
4est I4 100 points
1A Jui00es 800 points
Home1or' 200 points
+ssay 100 points
4otal 1,000 points
Tests
4here 1ill 5e #our tests. 4est I1 1ill consist o# 100 multiple choice 6uestions K 1 point
each, #rom chapters 1A31=.
4est I2 1ill consist o# 100 multiple choice 6uestions K 1 point each #rom chapters 1<3
22.
4est I8 1ill consist o# 100 multiple choice 6uestions K 1 point each #rom chapters 283
29.
4est I4 BFinal +$aminationC 1ill 5e comprehensi"e and consist o# 100 multiple choice
6uestions K1 point each #rom chapters 1A382.
"*assroo %ssi+nents,-ui..es:
4his is 1or' to 5e completed in class. 4here 1ill 5e 1A assignments 1orth 20 points
each.
#ssay
4here 1ill 5e one essay 1orth 100 points. 4he su5ject o# the essay 1ill regard )resident
Fran'lin elano .oose"elt>s 7e1 eal policy, 1hich represented a contro"ersial remedy
to cure the ills o# the 2reat epression. 7ot e"eryone 1as impressed 1ith F.>s 1ay o#
coping 1ith the epression. And in #act, .oose"elt did not ha"e a coherent plan, or a
#ully de"eloped set o# ideas a5out ho1 the ,.S. economy 1or'ed and ho1 it could 5e
re#ormed. His approach 1as, as he put it, Lto ta'e a method and try it. /# it #ails, admit it
#ran'ly and try another.M Within the conte$t o# his re#orm policy, .oose"elt said the
#ollo1ing in a 1<82 speech% L4he country needs, and unless / mista'e its temper, the
country demands 5old, persistent e$perimentation. /t is common sense to ta'e a method
and try it. /# it #ails, admit it #ran'ly and try another. &ut a5o"e all, try something.M
What 1ere some o# the e$periments that .oose"elt tried to implement in his e##orts to
help the countryN Who 1ere some o# .oose"elt>s critics, and 1hat did they sayN o you
agree 1ith .oose"elt>s idea here a5out Lcommon senseNM B7:4+% An e$pression o#
your personal opinion 1ill 5e a "ital element o# this essay.C
4he essay is to 5e type1ritten, dou5le3spaced and should 5e 2 to 2 O pages in length.
!our essay should 5e constructed 1ith a thesis statement or introduction. !ou should
support that statement and #inally, reach a conclusion. +ssays should 5e neat and #ollo1
a legitimate academic #ormat, as directed 5y your instructor. !our essay should contain
your name, the title o# the essay #ollo1ed 5y the essay narrati"e. 7o co"er page or other
super#luous data is re6uired. !ou should also include a minimum o# three 1or's cited.
!our 1or' should 5e stapled at the top o# the page on the le#t side. Spelling, punctuation
and neat appearance 1ill 5e considered. 4his should 5e your most pro#essional 1or'.
!ou should ma'e a point, support that point, and then #inali0e your report.
Hoe/or0 $ro1ect %
4his assignment 1ill 5e su5mitted in #our increments. 4here 1ill 5e 20 separate topics to
5e reported 5y the student. 4hese 1ill 5e su5mitted in increments o# A as directed 5elo1%
H:?+W:.D 4:)/(SPFirst &atch B,+ 2-4C
1. .adical .epu5licans
2. (ompromise o# 1=**
8. Andre1 (arnegie
4. W.+.&. u &ois
A. )opulism
H:?+W:.D 4:)/(SPSecond &atch B,+ 8-4C
9. 4heodore .oose"elt
*. /mperialism
=. Woman Su##rage
<. Woodro1 Wilson
10. 4he Scopes 4rial
H:?+W:.D 4:)/(SP4hird &atch B,+ 4-=C
11. 4he 2reat epression
12. Fran'lin . .oose"elt
18. Attac' on )earl Har5or
14. Harry S. 4ruman
1A. 4he (old War
H:?+W:.D 4:)/(SPFourth &atch B,+ A-1C
19. 4he (u5an ?issile (risis
1*. ?artin Euther Ding, Jr.
1=. 7i$on>s .esignation
1<. .onald .eagan
20. Septem5er 11, 2001
4he student should record entries regarding each o# the a5o"e topics. 4his project should
5e 5rought to class on the due dates listed a5o"e. 4he ma$imum grade #or the project is
200 points or 10 points #or each topic. 4his project shou*d 2e hand/ritten in a
note5oo' or 1ritten on indi"idual = Q 10 note5oo' paper. !ou should complete at least
one complete page regarding each topic. !ou may 1rite on the 5ac' o# the paper.

Ma"dator# Atte"da"ce $olic#
Re%ular a"d !u"ctual class atte"da"ce is ex!ected at Tarra"t
Cou"t# Colle%e& Stude"t a'se"ces (ill 'e recorded )ro* t+e
)irst da# t+e class *eets& I" case o) a'se"ce, it is t+e stude"t-s
res!o"si'ilit# to co"tact t+e i"structor& Stude"ts a'se"t o"
o))icial sc+ool 'usi"ess are e"titled to *a.e u! course(or.
*issed& I" all ot+er cases, t+e i"structor (ill /ud%e (+et+er t+e
stude"t (ill 'e !er*itted to *a.e u! (or. a"d (ill decide o"
t+e ti*e a"d "ature o) t+e *a.eu!& 0o(e1er, t+e stude"t is
ex!ressl# res!o"si'le )or a"# (or. *issed re%ardless o) t+e
cause o) t+e a'se"ce& T+e stude"t *ust discuss suc+ (or. (it+
t+e i"structor a"d s+ould do so i**ediatel# o" retur"i"% to
sc+ool& Co**u"icatio" 'et(ee" t+e stude"t a"d i"structor is
*ost i*!orta"t, a"d it is t+e stude"t-s res!o"si'ilit# to i"itiate
suc+ co**u"icatio"& I) stude"ts do "ot a!!ear at t+e
!rearra"%ed ti*e )or *a.eu! (or., t+e# )or)eit t+eir ri%+ts )or
)urt+er *a.eu! o) t+at (or.& Stude"ts (+o sto! atte"di"%
class )or a"# reaso" s+ould co"tact t+e i"structor a"d t+e
Re%istrar2s o))ice to o))iciall# (it+dra( )ro* t+e class& Failure
to o))iciall# (it+dra( *a# result i" a )aili"% %rade )or t+e
course& 3our ad+ere"ce to t+is !olic# (ill 'e a!!reciated&
Withdra1al )rocedures
.egular attendance is e$pected and recorded. Ho1e"er, i# you are una5le to complete the
course, it is your responsi5ility to drop o##icially. Withdra1al is a #ormal procedure
1hich you must initiate. / cannot do it #or you. /# you stop attending class and do not
1ithdra1 you 1ill recei"e a per#ormance grade, usually an LFM. Students o#ten drop
courses 1hen help is a"aila5le that 1ould ena5le them to continue. / hope you 1ill
discuss your plans 1ith me i# you #eel the need to 1ithdra1.
?a'e3,p +$aminations
?a'e3up e$aminations are gi"en only in cases o# una"oida5le a5sence and only 1ith
indi"idual appro"al 5y the instructor. Such cases 1ould 5e e$treme personal illness,
employment con#licts, #amily tragedy, etc. ?ost cases 1ill re6uire 1ritten "eri#ication o#
reason #or a5sence. ?a'e3up e$ams 1ill 5e arranged on an indi"idual 5asis. ?a'eup
1or' generally 1ill not 5e allo1ed. 4he student is directed to1ard completing e$tra
credit assignments to ma'eup missed points.
4he course is di"ided into #our units. !ou 1ill pace yoursel# in completing the units.
.eading assignments and test dates are as #ollo1s%
U!IT O!# 3#4%) 15
4he ,n#inished 7ation, (hapters 1A, 19, 1*, and 1=

U!IT T6O 3#4%) 25

4he ,n#inished 7ation, (hapters 1<, 20, 21 and 22



U!IT THR## 3#4%) 35
4he ,n#inished 7ation, (hapters 28, 24, 2A and 29
U!IT 7OUR 3#4%) 85
4he ,n#inished 7ation, (hapters 2*, 2=, 2<, 80, 81 and 82
7I!%' #4%) 3#4%) 95
4he ,n#inished 7ation, (hapters 1A382
East day to drop is April 12
th
.
4entati"e (ourse (alendar, organi0ed 5y date R topic%
1-14 H 1-19 /ntro, .econstruction
1-20 ?ED ay no class
1-21 4he Eure o# the West
1-28 /ndustriali0ation
1-2= 4he Ea5or ?o"ement
1-80 4he 7e1 ,r5an 7ation
2-4 .e"ie1 +$am 1 F/.S4 &A4(H :F H:?+W:.D 4:)/(S ,+
2-9 +$am 1
2-11 H 2-18 )opulism-/mperialism
2-1= H 2-20 4he )rogressi"e ?o"ement-7ational .e#orm
2-2A H 2-2* World War /
8-4 .e"ie1 +$am 2 S+(:7 &A4(H :F H:?+W:.D 4:)/(S ,+
8-9 +$am 2
S)./72 &.+AD
8-1= H 8-20 4he 1<20s-4he 2reat epression
8-2A H 8-2* 4he 7e1 eal-2lo5al (oncerns
4-1 H 4-8 World War //
4-= .e"ie1 +$am 8 4H/. &A4(H :F H:?+W:.D 4:)/(S ,+
4-10 +$am 8
4-1A 4he (old War +ra
4-1* 4he (i"il .ights ?o"ement
4-22 4he @ietnam War 4+.? )A)+.S ,+ :7 4-22 A4 S4A.4 :F (EASS
4-24 )olitical isorder
4-2< A World 4rans#ormed +Q4.A (.+/4 ASS/27?+74S ,+
A-1 .e"ie1 Final +$am F:,.4H &A4(H :F H:?+W:.D 4:)/(S ,+
Wee' o# Finals Final +$am
:##ice Hours are 4uesday 12%80 )? H 1%80 )? 7ortheast (ampus
?onday 12%80 )? H 1%80 )? 7orth1est (ampus
:##ice% 7ortheast (ampus Faculty :##ice &uilding, room 7FA( 2120
7orth1est (ampus :##ice is located at WS4, 2=18A.
:##ice )hone #or 7ortheast (ampus B=1*C A1A39808.
:##ice )hone #or 7orth1est (ampus B=1*C A1A3*4A*
(ell )hone B=1*C <<<3A809
)y T"" $orta*
Student in#ormation such as grades can 5e "ie1ed through the ?y 4(( )ortal. All email
to the instructor should 5e directed through ?y 4((.
At any time during the semester, / 1ill 5e a"aila5le #or indi"idual con#erences. /# you
can not contact me through any o# the a5o"e methods, you can do so through the
&usiness R Social Sciences i"ision :##ice. 4he phone num5er is B=1*C A1A3994A.
::::::THIS S"H#(U'# IS T#!T%TI;# %!( SU<=#"T TO "H%!&#::::::

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