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IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT

FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK


__________________________________________
: Master Docket No. M-21-90 (GBD)
IN RE LITERARY WORKS IN ELECTRONIC MDL No. 1379
DATABASES COPYRIGHT LITIGATION :
__________________________________________


MEMORANDUM OF LAW IN SUPPORT OF OBJ ECTIONS
TO A/B COUNSELS APPLICATION FOR
ATTORNEYS FEES AND COSTS
AND TO SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT PROVISIONS
RELATED TO THAT APPLICATION BY
CLASS MEMBERS BARBARA GARSON, SONIA J AFFE ROBBINS AND
J oANN KAWELL, AND GEORGE ROBINSON, ALEC DUBRO,
RUSSELL MILLER, PHIL MATTERA,
J UDITH LEVINE, MYRNA EDELSTEIN WATANABE,
HARDY S. GREEN AND MARGARET BALD



Martin R. Stolar, Esq.
351 Broadway, 4th Floor
New York, New York 10013
(212) 219-1919
mrslaw37@hotmail.com

Attorney for Objectors to A/B Counsels
Application
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 1 of 32


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
I. Introduction1
Tasini Established The Basis For This Case .............. 2
The Issue Of The Unregistereds 4
II. A/B Counsels Fee-Sharing Agreement, Allocation Formula And Lodestar
And Percentage-of-Recovery Calculations Should Be Rejected As
Contrary To Law . 5

A. A/B Counsels Backing Out Conceit And Approach To Valuation
Are Contrary To Law 6

B. A/B Counsels Allocation Formula Is Contrary To Law 8

C. A/B Counsels Lodestar Calculations Are Contrary To Law 11

1. A/B Counsel Have Improperly Excluded F/Os Tasini Hours
From Her Lodestar 11

2. A/B Counsel Have Included Hours In Their Own Lodestars That Did
Not Benefit The Class And Are Not Properly Includible 11

a. Time Block #1 12

b. Time Block #2 12

c. Time Block #3 13

3. A/B Counsels Hourly Rates Are Not Reasonable and Their
Hourly Rate Subterfuge, Transparent... 15

D. Unless The Component Lodestar Values Are Corrected, A/B Counsels
Allocation Formula Will Yield An Unfair Result........ 16

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Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 2 of 32




E. A/B Counsels Allocation Formula Cannot Be Salvaged... 16

F. Contrary To A/B Counsels Contention, The Goldberger Factors Do
Not Support Its Fee Request . 17

1. Risk of Litigation ............. 17

a. A/B Counsel Did Not Assume Any Risk On The Issue
of Liability .......... 17

b. Authors Guild and Posner Counsel Did Not Assume Risk
On The Issue Of The Unregistereds...... 18
2. Quality of Representation ......... 19

a. Category A Compensation ......... 20

b. Category B Compensation ..... 21

3. Time and Labor Of Counsel .. 21

III. The Court Must Make The Fee And Allocation Decisions
In This Case, Not A/B Counsel ....... 22

IV. A 17.1% Award May Be Inadequate To Compensate All Counsel Who
Benefitted The Class. In That Event, The Court Should Find That 23.5%
Would Be Reasonable . 24

V. Conclusion 25









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Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 3 of 32
TABLE OF AUTHORITIES

Pages

Cases

Blau v. Rayette-Faberge, Inc.,
389 F.2d 469 (2d Cir. 1968) 7

Blum v. Stenson,
465 U.S. 886 (1984)..15

Cablevision Sys. N.Y. City Corp. v. Diaz,
2002 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 12759 (S.D.N.Y. J uly 10, 2002) ... 9

Class Plaintiffs v. Jaffe & Schlesinger, P.A.,
19 F.3d 1306 (9
th
Cir. 1994) 10

DiFillippo v. Morizio,
759 F.2d 231 (2d Cir. 1985) 18

Dubin v. E.F. Hutton Group Inc.,
878 F. Supp. 616 (S.D.N.Y. 1995) 9, 10

Gilson v. Chock Full O'Nuts Corp.,
331 F.2d 107 (2d Cir. 1964). 7

Goldberger v. Integrated Resources, Inc.,
209 F.3d 43 (2d Cir. 2000) passim

Hayes v. Haushalter (In re FPI/Agretech Securities Litig.),
105 F.3d 469 (9th Cir. 1997) ... 9, 10

In re Agent Orange Product Liability Litigation, 818 F.2d 216 (2d Cir.),
cert. denied, 484 U.S. 926 (1987) 10,17, 23

In re AT&T Corp. Sec. Litig.,
455 F.3d 160 (3d Cir. 2006).......... 7

In re Cendant Corporation Securities Litigation (Cendant II),
404 F.3d 173 (3
rd
Cir. 2005) .. passim

In re Diet Drugs Prod. Liab. Litig., 553 F.Supp. 2d 442 (E.D. Pa. 2008),
affd, 582 F.3d 524 (3d Cir. 2009) 7

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Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 4 of 32
Cases (contd)


In re Initial Public Offering Securities Litigation, Case No. 21 MC 92 (SAS),
2011 WL 2732563 (S.D.N.Y. J uly 8, 2011) 22

In re Prudential Ins. Co. of America Sales Practices Litigation, 148 F.3d 283
(3d Cir. 1998) 7

J & J Sports Prods. v. Garcia, 06 Civ. 4297 (GBD)(HBP), 2011 U.S. Dist.
LEXIS 29262 at *15 (S.D.N.Y. March 1, 2011) 9

Literary Works in Elec. Databases Copyright Litig. v. Thomson Corp.,
654 F.3d 242 (2d Cir. 2011)3, 4

Muchnick v. Thomson Corp., 509 F.3d 116 (2d Cir. 2007), revd
sub nom. Reed Elsevier, Inc. v. Muchnick, 559 U.S. 154 (2009) 4, 13

N.Y.S. Association for Retarded Children, Inc. v. Carey, 711 F.2d 1136
(2d Cir. 1983) 9

New York Times Co. v. Tasini, 533 U.S. 483 (2001) passim

Reed Elsevier, Inc. v. Muchnick, 559 U.S. 154 (2009) ... 4

Scott v. City of New York, 643 F.3d 56, 57 (2d Cir. 2011) 9

Smiley v. Sincoff, 958 F.2d 498 (2d Cir. 1992) 10

Sprague v. Ticonic Natl Bank, 307 U.S. 161 (1939) 25

Tasini v. New York Times Co., 206 F.3d 161 (2d Cir. 1999),
affd, 533 U.S. 483 (2001) passim

Victor v. Argent Classic Convertible Arbitrage Fund L.P., 623 F.3d 82
(2d Cir. 2010) 22

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v VISA U.S.A. Inc.,
396 F.3d 96 (2d Cir. 2005) 17

Wechsler v. Southeastern Properties, Inc.,
506 F.2d 631 (2d Cir. 1974). 7


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Statutes and Rules

Fed.R.Civ.P. Rule 23. 23

Fed.R.Civ.P. Rule 54. 23

Fed.R.Civ.P. Rule 72. 23

17 U.S.C. 504(c)(1).... 20

17 U.S.C. 504(c)(2).. 20

28 U.S.C. 1407.. 3

Articles:

Eisenberg and Miller, Attorneys Fees in Class Action Settlements: An Empirical
Study, 1 J ournal of Empirical legal Studies 27 (2004) 24





















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1

It is traditional in class actions for Lead Counsel to make a joint application for fees on
behalf of counsel who have benefitted the class. It is also expected that they will seek
compensation for those who have come before them and discovered the cause of action or
developed the theories or arguments upon which they rely.
This is the rare or unusual case in which, rather than do so, Lead Counsel have accepted
the benefit of earlier counsels work, but sought to deny them compensation.
1

The Lead Counsel in question will be referred to as A/B Counsel since they represent
the A/B works subclass. Earlier counsel is Emily M. Bass and her law firm. (Hereinafter,
they will be referred to as F/O Counsel because they were Frozen/Out of the litigation.)
F/O Counsel originated and actively litigated the Tasini case, which established the foundation
upon which this Class Action stands. She also worked for approximately four years in a Non-
Lead capacity in the Class Action proper
2
until she was frozen out. In both capacities, she
conferred substantial benefits on the Class. (See The History of Tasini and The Issue of the
Unregistereds, post.)
F/O objects to A/B Counsels application for attorneys fees on three basic grounds: (1)
they requested a fee that is clearly inadequate to compensate all counsel who conferred benefits
on the Class (See Point IV, post); (2) they created a fee-sharing agreement and adopted an
allocation formula, both of which are contrary to law and would deny F/O compensation
commensurate with the benefits she has conferred (See Point II (A) (F)); and (3) they used a
variety of mathematical conceits and devices that game the system and have the effect of
obscuring their misapplication of the law. (See Point II (A) (E), post).

1
For the sake of convenience, Memorandum of Law in support of A/B Counsels Application For
Award of Attorneys Fees shall be referred to simply as A/B Mem. at ___.
2
Originally, Gaynor & Bass was appointed to serve on the Executive Committee. Ms. Bass Law
Office is the successor in this matter. Over the past nine years A/B Counsel assigned her no work. (See
Bass Declaration, dated May 6, 2005).
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 7 of 32
2

A Brief Overview of the Tasini Case and Its Relationship to the MDL
In 1993, FO instituted a case on behalf of eleven Freelancers against six Print and
Electronic Publishers (both chosen for their representative qualities) to challenge the practice of
recycling articles that Freelancers had written for print publications and incorporating them into
electronic databases. The lawsuit alleged that the practices violated the Freelancers copyrights.
Each of the plaintiffs who joined the suit had a different arrangement with his or her print
publisher. (None had any arrangement with the electronic publishers.) Some had no agreement
with their print publishers regarding rights. Some had oral, but no written, agreements. Still
others had a variety of written arrangements.
3
Defendants included a variety of print and
electronic publishers to ensure that if copyright liability were established, it would apply
regardless of the type of articulated electronic database. (See Article attached as Exhibit B to
Bass Affidavit, dated J une 30, 2005.)
The objective of the Tasini case was thus twofold: to (1) establish copyright liability on
the part of Print and Electronic Publishers, almost without regard to the particular form of e-
database involved and the arrangement between freelancer and print publisher, and (2) thereby
lay the groundwork for as broad-based a follow-up Class Action as possible. (This is described
more fully in the Bass Affidavit dated J une 30, 2005 at 14 78 and the Article attached as
Exhibit B to Bass Affidavit, dated J une 30, 2005).
Defendants saw beyond Tasinis form and treated it as implicating nothing less than
industry-wide practices and norms. If the Tasini freelancers won, they said, print and electronic
publishers everywhere would be forced to purge the nations archive of all freelancers works.

3
These included inter alia Freelance authors who had only conveyed (a) non-exclusive rights in their
works; (b) first North American serial rights or some other form of first publication rights; (c)
print rights, but not electronic rights ; and/or who, (d) whatever else they may have conveyed, did not
convey exclusive display rights in their works.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 8 of 32
3

Recognizing the defendants and their amici as having made a collective industry-wide threat, the
United States Supreme Court responded by noting that there were industry-wide solutions.
Instead of requiring databases to remove articles, it said, either Authors and Publishers[ ] could
enter into an agreement allowing continued electronic reproduction of the Authors works or a
court could draw on numerous models for distributing copyrighted works and remunerating
authors . . .. N.Y. Times Co. v. Tasini, 533 U.S. 483, 505 (2001).
This consolidated class action affords the global relief that Tasini and the Supreme Court
envisioned. In 2001, Lead Counsel agreed. They filed a Consolidated Amended Complaint in
the Class Action that stated:
The United States Supreme Court decided in New York Times Co., Inc. v. Tasini,
___ U.S. ___, 12 S.Ct. 2381 (2002), that the defendant print publishers, electronic
databases and information aggregators there had no right or privilege under the
Copyright Act to reproduce, display, sell and/or distribute without authorization
copyrighted freelance works through electronic databases as alleged herein. A
class action provides the most effective and meaningful vehicle to effectuate the
Supreme Courts decision and enforce the liabilities that Court established.

Consolidated Amended Class Action Complaint filed in In re Literary Works in Electronic
Databases, MDL. No. 1379 (Dated Sept. 20, 2001).
Even before the Supreme Court decided Tasini and the three class actions were
consolidated, counsel for each class action acknowledged that it raise[d] identical questions to
Tasini and implicated identical practices.
4
If Tasini is upheld by the United States Supreme
Court, Authors Guild and Posner Counsel advised this Court:
defendants liability to plaintiffs will be established as a matter of law, and the
parties will be left to quarrel overclass certification and damages.

4
See Memorandum of Points and Authorities in Support of [Laney] Plaintiffs Motion for Transfer and
Coordination or Consolidation under 28 U.S.C. 1407 at 1, 2 filed by Laney Counsel (stating that Tasini
raises identical questions of fact and law to the class actions); Memorandum in Support of J oint
Responses of Authors Guild and Posner Plaintiffs to Motion for Transfer and Consolidation of Actions at
6 (stating that Tasini v. New York Times established as a matter of law that the identical practices at
issue here [in the class actions] violated the copyrights of freelance authors).
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(See Exh. E at pp. 3-4, attached to Bass Aff., dated J une 30, 2005). Counsel for at least one
Defendant agreed:
MR. FREEMAN: What I wanted to say, your Honor, was after the Second
Circuit reversed and decided in favor of the plaintiffs, that is the point at which
three class action cases, which now are the MDL litigation, were filed. Those
cases were immediately stayed after they were filed because at that point the
Supreme Court had determined to review the Second Circuit decision. As you
know, the Supreme Court affirmed the Second Circuit basically imposing liability
on the defendants. The only issue left to be determined was damages, not only in
the Tasini case but also, obviously, in the followup class action cases.

(Statement of New York Times Counsel, George Freeman, from Transcript of Hearing, in Tasini
93 Civ. 8678 (GBD), dated J une 17, 2004).
5

Since 2005, the United States Supreme Court, in one instance, and the Second Circuit, in
two, confirmed that the Class Action is predicated on Tasini. See Reed Elsevier, Inc. v.
Muchnick, 559 U.S. 154, 158 (2009) (noting, in Tasini, we agreed with the Second Circuit
and affirmed the principal theory of liability underlying copyright infringement suits that other
freelance authors had filed after the Court of Appeals had issued its Opinion) ; Literary Works
in Elec. Databases Copyright Litig. v. Thomson Corp., 654 F.3d 242, 245 (2d Cir. 2011);
Muchnick v. Thomson Corp., 509 F.3d 116, 118 (2d Cir. 2007), revd sub nom. Reed Elsevier,
Inc. v. Muchnick, supra.
F/O Counsel Conferred A Second Major Benefit On The Class: Adding The Unregistereds"

In addition to having been principally responsible for establishing the copyright liability
principles upon which the MDL is based, F/O Counsel bestowed another significant benefit on
the Class by expanding the class of works and claimants to include the unregistereds. She

5
Not to be left out, Counsel for the Objectors (who has become Counsel for the C Claims) also
acknowledged the Class Action derives from Tasini. See Brief for Objector-Appellants, in 05-cv-5943 at
p. 5 (This litigation stems from this Circuits decision in Tasini which was affirmed by the Supreme
Court . . .).
.
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discovered that, like those who had registered their works with the Copyright Office, those
who hadnt had a cause of action under Tasini. Consistent with this theory, she convinced Co-
Counsel in the Laney case to define the Class on whose behalf the suit was being brought as
including all Freelancers whose works had been infringed, whether or not they were registered.
Prior to that time, all other A/B Counsel had filed class action complaints limiting the
U.S. authors on whose behalf they were suing to those who had registered their works with the
United States Copyright Office. (See Exhs. attached to Bass Reply Aff., dated 9/30/2005).
With the expansion of the Class to include claims for the infringement of unregistered
works, F/O Counsel dramatically transformed the Action. The claims that F/O added to the
litigation account for at least 97% of the Class. Cf. Literary Works, 654 F.3d at 246 (Category
C claims comprise more than 99% of authors total claims).
A/B Counsel take the position that F/Os work both in Tasini and in expanding the Class
to include the C works claims should be assigned a value of zero.
F/O Counsel respectfully suggests there are two ways out of the morass. (Pts II & IV).
II. Lead Counsels Fee-Sharing Agreement, Allocation Formula and Lodestar and
Percentage-of-Recovery Calculations Should Be Rejected as Contrary to Law.

If the Court accepts the $3.3 million fee and award of 17% as inviolate, then it will need
to decide a variety of questions: Who conferred what benefits on the Freelancer Class? How
should each of these benefits be valued? How should fees be allocated?
Moreover, if the lodestar approach is used as a cross-check, the list of questions grows
longer: What hours could each of the firms involved in this litigation reasonably bill for? Are
those the only hours that can be included in their lodestars? Must hours that were worked, but
did not benefit the class, be excluded? Should pre-appointment hours that conferred a benefit be
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included? What hourly rates are reasonable? Are the hourly rates A/B Counsel have used in line
with market rates in this region?
Before we address these questions, we examine how A/B Counsel proposed to value
counsels respective contributions and allocate fees. A/B Counsel employed at least three
devices or conceits in an effort to create the impression that the common funds creation is
attributable to their efforts alone. The truth stands in stark contrast.
A. Device #1: A/Bs Backing-Out From Conceit Is Contrary to Law
At pages 20-21 of their Memorandum in Support of their Application for Fees, Lead
Counsel suggest that the total value of the settlement can be estimated as $12 million plus $0.3
million plus $5 million plus $2 million, or $19.3 million. (A/B Mem. at 20). For purposes of
this discussion, we accept that estimate.
They then recount the increases to the Fund and improvements to the Settlement that C
Counsel negotiated and claim that
. . . backing out the increased amounts negotiated by C Counsel will reflect the
results achieved by A/B Counsel. Reducing the $19.3 million settlement value
by those amounts ($610,000, $343,500, and $517,000) yields approximately
$17.8 million in settlement value attributable to A/B Counsel.

(A/B Mem. at 21). They deduce from this that [t]heir requested fee of $2.7 million is only 15
percent of the value they have created (A/B Mem. at 21), and, thus, easily passes scrutiny
under the percentage method. (A/B Mem. at 20).
There are fundamental problems with Lead Counsels assertions and math. The cases
are unanimous that simply doing work on behalf of the class does not create a right to
compensation; the focus is on whether that work provided a benefit to the class. Cendant II, 404
F.3d at 191. The attorneys making a fee request must be the competent producing cause of the
benefits for which they are claiming fees. See Wechsler v. Southeastern Properties, Inc., 506
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F.2d 631, 635 (2d Cir. 1974). Accord, e.g., Blau v. Rayette-Faberge, Inc., 389 F.2d 469 (2d Cir.
1968); Gilson v. Chock Full O'Nuts Corp., 331 F.2d 107 (2d Cir. 1964)(in banc). Where others
have discovered a cause of action or developed theories or arguments that have led to a recovery,
they are its competent producing cause and not those who have subsequently jumped on the
bandwagon. See, e.g., Cendant II, 404 F.3d at 197.
It follows that in determining a fee application by any attorney or group, the court must
deduct any benefits that were created by the efforts of other attorneys or groups. See, e.g.,
In re AT&T Corp. Sec. Litig., 455 F.3d 160, 165 (3d Cir. 2006); In re Prudential Ins. Co. of
America Sales Practices Litigation, 148 F.3d 283, 338 (3d Cir. 1998); In re Diet Drugs Prod.
Liab. Litig., 553 F.Supp. 2d 442, 480 (E.D. Pa. 2008). Here, F/O Counsel:
(1) developed the theories of liability upon which the Second Circuit and U.S. Supreme
Court ruled in the Freelancers favor in Tasini. With one minor exception, these are the very
same liability principles, upon which the Freelancer Class Action is predicated; and

(2) was responsible for expanding the Class of Works the Freelancer Action encompasses
to include unregistered works. This expansion meant that instead of covering approximately
8,000 works, the Action now covers 314, 000 works.

By devising and using this back-out maneuver, A/B Counsel assigned these
contributions a value of Zero. They recognized and deducted for subsequent contributions made
by C Counsel, but not for any of F/Os earlier and very substantial contributions. The effect of
A/B Counsels failure to deduct for these benefits is at least threefold: (i) to claim the benefits as
their own; (ii) to significantly overstate the value of the benefits A/B Counsel conferred; and (iii)
to significantly understate the relation of the fee they seek to the value they created.
Put another way, A/B Counsels back-out maneuver has the effect of assigning the
following values to the following contributions of Counsel:

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Liability Extent/Composition of Class Damages
Cat. A: F/O Counsel

Assigned $0 Value
1
st
Level: F/O Counsel

Assigned $0 Value

Cat. A: A/B Counsel
Cat. B: F/O Counsel

Assigned $0 Value

2
nd
Cir.: A/B Counsel* Cat. B: A/B Counsel

A/B Have Assigned Shaded Areas A Combined Value
of $17.8 million

Cat. C: F/O Counsel

Assigned $0 Value

S.Ct.: A/B Counsel* Cat. C: C Counsel

Assigned $1.4 million

* based in significant part, albeit not entirely, on F/O Counsels work
This assessment of the respective benefits counsel have conferred bears little relation to reality.
B. Device #2: A/Bs Allocation Formula Is Contrary to Law
A/B Counsel employed a second stratagem to game the system. They propose using a fee
allocation formula that, on its face, appears to be fair, reasonable and objective, but in fact is
none of these. They describe their plan of allocation in full on page 22 of their Memorandum in
Support of their application for fees. A/B Mem. at 22. Reduced to its essence, A/B Lead
Counsel propose to divide any fees awarded by the Court into three equal parts. Each of the
three Leads will then allocate fees as between them and Non-Lead Counsel on their teams
strictly in accordance with their respective lodestars.
Although it sounds inoffensive enough, in fact, purpose and effect, the process and
formula are designed to be anything but fair and objective. There are at least five problems with
A/B Counsels plan. First, the law requires (and Para. 9(c) of the Revised Settlement Agreement
contemplates) that fees be allocated on the basis of the relative contributions counsel have made
and not in proportion to time spent. See, e.g., Hayes v. Haushalter (In re FPI/Agretech
Securities Litig.), 105 F.3d 469, 473 (9th Cir. 1997). F/O Counsel has not agreed to any other
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arrangement. Second, although Lead Counsel acknowledged knowing, throughout the past nine
(9) years, that F/O Counsel was always ready, willing and able to work, they assigned her zero
hours during this period. Third, during the same period that they assigned her no work, Lead
Counsel appropriated theories she had developed and benefits she had conferred and presented
them as their own. They thereby utilized F/Os work to increase their own lodestars, while
ensuring that F/Os lodestar was frozen. Fourth, on top of not assigning her work after 2005,
Lead Counsel also sought to exclude her pre-appointment work from her lodestar. Put another
way, they refused to acknowledge that her Tasini work conferred substantial benefits on the
Class and excluded her Tasini time from her lodestar. As a consequence, they understated F/Os
lodestar by at least $ 1,274,664.72. (They also denied F/O reimbursement of $67,170.17 in
expenses.) (See 6/30/2005 Bass Aff., attached to 7/1/2005 Notice of Motion, at 104). Fifth,
conversely, A/B Counsel included untold amounts of time in their own lodestars that are not
properly included inflating them, it would appear, by possibly as much as a factor of three.
6

Sixth, on top of this, A/B Counsel further magnified the discrepancy between their own lodestars
and F/Os lodestar by effectively freezing F/Os hourly rate at 2005 levels, while, in significant
part, utilizing 2014 rates for themselves.

6
It is impossible to determine, with even ballpark precision, how much time was improperly
included because A/B Counsels motion for attorneys fees is not accompanied by contemporaneous time
records. Rather, as they did (over objection) nine years ago, each A/B firm summarized its activities over
the nine-year period in a few pages or paragraphs and provided a single all-in figure for each claiming
attorney. That single all-in figure represents the total number of hours over the nine-year period that
attorney is alleged to have worked. But see, N.Y.S. Association for Retarded Children, Inc. v. Carey, 711
F.2d 1136, 1147-48, 1154 (2d Cir. 1983) (requiring that counsel applying for fees produce
contemporaneous time records indicating, for each attorney, the date, the hours expended, and the nature
of the work done). Accord, Scott v. City of New York, 643 F.3d 56, 57 (2d Cir. 2011) (Carey establishes
what is essentially a hard-and-fast-rule from which attorneys may deviate only in the rarest of case);
Dubin v. E.F. Hutton Group Inc., 878 F.Supp. 616, 621-622 (S.D.N.Y. 1995) (collecting cases to the
same effect). "Attorneys' fees applications that do not contain such supporting data 'should normally be
disallowed.'" J & J Sports Prods. v. Garcia, 06 Civ. 4297 (GBD)(HBP), 2011 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 29262 at
*15 (S.D.N.Y. March 1, 2011); Cablevision Sys. N.Y. City Corp. v. Diaz, 01 Civ. 4340 (GEL)(FM), 2002
U.S. Dist. LEXIS 12759 at *5 (S.D.N.Y. J uly 10, 2002), quoting Carey, supra, 711 F.2d at 1154.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 15 of 32
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Even putting aside the fact that a formula that allocates fees according to time, rather than
benefits, is contrary to law, such a formula cannot fairly, accurately and objectively compare
lodestars unless the lodestars are properly determined. Here, they were not properly determined.
Rather, as stated above, A/B Counsel grossly overstated their own lodestars and understated
F/Os lodestar so as to ensure that, if fees are allocated in proportion to lodestars, they will be
assured the lions share of the fees.
While [t]here is very little case law concerning the allocation of attorneys fees among
co-counsel, that which does exist indicates that district courts may refuse to accept a fee
allocation agreement whenever there is good cause to do so. Hayes v. Haushalter,105 F.3d at
473. Accord, In re Agent Orange Prod. Liab. Litig., 818 F.2d 216, 222 (2d Cir.), cert. denied,
484 U.S. 926 (1987). The district court need not find a legal irregularity before it rejects such a
formula or agreement. [I]t may reject an agreement as to attorneys fees just as it may reject an
agreement as to the substantive claim . . . [w]henever . . . [it] finds good reason to do so . . ..
Smiley v. Sincoff, 958 F.2d 498, 501 (2d Cir. 1992).
One good reason for refusing to approve such an agreement or formula is that it will
result in Lead and Non-Lead Counsel being compensated out of proportion to the benefits each
conferred on the Class. That is always the touchstone for a fee: the value of the benefits
conferred. See, e.g., Hayes v. Haushalter, 105 F.3d at 473 (a court may reject a fee allocation
agreement where it finds that the agreement rewards an attorney in disproportion to the benefits
that attorney conferred upon the class even if the allocation in fact has no impact on the
class.); Class Plaintiffs v. Jaffe & Schlesinger, P.A., 19 F.3d 1306, 1308 (9
th
Cir. 1994); Dubin,
845 F.Supp. at 1013 ([w]hen a fund is created through the settlement of a class action, the court,
as guardian of the rights of the class members, is not bound by the amount of the fee award
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 16 of 32
11

requested by counsel even where notice of the fee request has been provided to all class members
and no objections have been received).
Here, there are countless reasons that militate in favor of rejecting A/B Counsels fee-
sharing agreement, allocation formula and analyses.
C. A/B Counsels Approach to Lodestars Is Contrary to Law.
1. A/B Counsel Improperly Excluded F/Os Tasini Hours From Her Lodestar.
F/O Counsel filed a motion nine years ago, seeking the inclusion of her firms Tasini
hours in her lodestar.
7
The motion was fully litigated and is now ripe for decision. There, F/O
Counsel demonstrated the benefit her firms work conferred on the Class. The determination of
that motion will govern this aspect of these Objections.
By excluding F/Os Tasini hours, A/B Counsel profoundly understated her lodestar.
2. A/B Counsel Have Included Hours in Their Own Lodestars That Did
Not Benefit the Class and Are Not Properly Includible.

A counsels lodestar consists of the number of hours reasonably billed to the class
multiplie[d] . . . by an appropriate hourly rate. Goldberger v. Integrated Resources, Inc., 209
F.3d 43, 47 (2d Cir. 2000). In order to be reasonably billed under common fund principles, the
work attorneys do must confer a benefit on the Class. See, e.g., Cendant II, 404 F.3d at 191
([T]he cases are unanimous that simply doing work on behalf of the class does not create a right
to compensation; the focus is on whether that work provided a benefit to the class.)
It follows that three blocks of time must be excluded from A/B Counsels lodestars or
significantly reduced or discounted. They can be described generally as follows:


7
See Notice of Motion, dated J uly 1, 2005, together with Exhibits A through I, the
accompanying volume of contemporaneous time records, Memorandum and Reply Affidavits.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 17 of 32
12

a. Time Block #1: A/B Counsels Appellate Work on the Question
of Whether the First Settlement Was Fair, Reasonable And Adequate
8


The great bulk of A/B Counsels work during these two periods necessarily concerned
the F.R.A. Objectors contention that the First Settlement was not fair, reasonable and adequate.
The Objectors prevailed on this question on appeal and their Counsel (who became C Counsel)
billed the Class for his appellate time. (See Chalmers Dec. in Support of Application for
Attorneys Fees, Doc. 26 at 3, 6). Is A/B Counsel really suggesting that both winning and
losing counsel on appeal can reasonably bill the Class for their time? We think not.
b. Time Block #2:
9
A/B Counsels Phase I Work Related to
The First Round of Mediation.

The Second Circuit found a fundamental conflict between different claims groups
(A, B and C) and that, accordingly, inadequate representation of the C works claims. (654
F.3d at 252-255). Are A/B Counsel really suggesting that they can reasonably bill the Class for
work the Second Circuit found to have been conflicted? We think not.
10




8
This first time block covers much of A/B Counsels appellate work before the Second Circuit and
covers two distinct periods: (i) from November 2, 2005 to approximately December 2007 and (ii) from
March 2, 2010 to August 17, 2011.
9
This second major block of time covers the period from September 1, 2001 to September 27, 2005.
10
While it is undoubtedly true that some of A/B Counsels work during Time Blocks 1 and 2 was
compensable, there is no practical way to separate compensable from non-compensable time because A/B
Counsel havent produced contemporaneous time records. The best that F/O Counsel can do, insofar as
Phase I is concerned, is to suggest the following rough justice basis for apportionment: since 97% of
the Class consists of C works claims, the Court should presume that 97% of A/B Counsels Phase I
work was not compensable and 3% was. In other words, essentially, the Second Circuit required a do-
over of the Phase One mediation.
While, at first blush, this conclusion may appear to be harsh, it is fully coincides with A/B Counsels
own assessment. See Plaintiffs-Appellees Petition for Panel Rehearing and Suggestion For Rehearing In
Banc at p. 13, where A/B Counsel assert that if the Second Circuit adheres to its August 17th Opinion, it
will have vitiate[d] the settlement in full, leaving the parties where they were at the outset of the
litigation)(emphasis added); id. at p. 5 (where they assert that adhering to the 8/17/11 Opinion would
have the effect of completely unravel[ing] a comprehensive settlement reached after years of mediated
negotiation). On November 17, 2011, the Second Circuit denied the parties petitions for rehearing.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 18 of 32
13

c. Time Block #3:
11
A/B Counsels Appellate Time on the J urisdictional Issue

Throughout Phase I, A/B Counsel were unenthusiastic about the argument that the
District Court had subject matter jurisdiction over the unregistered claims and, therefore, that
such claims could be included in the Class. (In truth, they were hostile to the argument.) With
the promulgation of J udge Walkers dissent on November 29, 2007, however, A/B Counsel
appeared to do an about-face. (See Muchnick v. Thomson Corp., 509 F.3d at 128 (dissent)). From
that point forward, they embraced several jurisdictional arguments F/O had developed and
presented them as their own.
12
Thus, beginning with their Petition for Rehearing and/or
Rehearing in Banc in the Second Circuit and continuing through their Opening and Reply Briefs
in the United States Supreme Court, A/B Counsel utilized arguments F/O developed in support
of the assertion that a district court has jurisdiction over unregistered claims.
Unlike A/B Counsel, who have assigned zero value to F/Os Tasini work and de
minimis value to her other work, F/O Counsel is not so uncharitable. She does not believe that
A/B Counsel should be denied all compensation for the work they did on the jurisdictional issue.
Rather, in line with Cendant II and other common fund cases, she believes there should be a
deduction from A/B Counsels lodestars since others discovered or developed the arguments.
In this instance, ironically, probably the largest benefit conferred on the Class during the
Supreme Court proceedings, was conferred by counsel for the Defendants. In many respects,
they - and not Plaintiffs Counsel at all - led the way to a victory. To the extent that A/B Counsel
contributed, they did so once again on the back of F/O. Accordingly, F/O Counsel proposes,
conservatively, that A/Bs hours in Time Block #3 should be reduced or discounted by half.

11
This third block also covers the period from approximately December 2007 through March 2, 2010.
12
To be clear, F/O Counsel does not object to A/B Counsel having used arguments she
developed. Rather, her objection is that they have increased their own lodestars by piggybacking on her
work, while keeping her lodestar frozen and denying her compensation. They should not be unjustly
enriched.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 19 of 32
14

At present, A/B Counsel credit themselves and Associated Non-Lead Counsel with
having put in almost 17,000 hours on this matter. See A/B Mem. at 10. As best as F/O
Counsel can tell, A/B claim 16,951.28 hours, with the breakdown in their hours as follows:
13

Firm Phase I Hrs

Phase II Hrs Claimed Hours
(I +II)
Claimed
Lodestar
Kohn Swift 3,013.80 721.70 3,735.50 1,534,574.50
Boni Zack 1,620.75 1,620.75 1,158,618.75

Girard Gibbs 2,642.00 1,649.40 4,291.40 1,924,834.50

Brobeck 2,569.23 2,569.23 1,125,603.00
Hosie

850.01 2,326.25
(from 2003)
3,176.26 ??
(see note 13)
1,215,035.05
Fergus 533.20 490.80 1,024.00 702,477

Hoguet 534.14 534.14 220,262
Totals 10,142.38 6,808.90 16,951.28 ?? 8,277,224

Notwithstanding their claim to have worked close to 17,000 hours and to be entitled to a
total lodestar of over $8 million, see A/B Fee Petition at p. 10, A/B Counsel repeatedly
emphasize they are only asking to be paid approximately one-third of their lodestar, id. at 10 -
in other words, approximately 6,000 hours and 2.7 million U.S. Dollars. They pretend to be
voluntarily reducing their fee by two-thirds out of modesty and in a spirit of altruism.
Modesty and altruism have nothing to do with it. Common fund principles determine
what can and cannot be billed for, and preclude billing for work that did not confer a benefit on
the Class. Here, that means, at a minimum, that substantial reductions must be made in A/B
Counsels hours for work performed during Time Blocks 1, 2 and 3. Such reductions could well

13
This does not include C Counsels hours. It also does not include F/O Counsels hours. There is
also an ambiguity regarding the Hosie Firm. It is unclear whether the total number of hours it claims to
have worked is 2,326.25 hours or 3,176.26. Hosie McArthur claimed 850.01 hours in the First Petition;
Hosie Frost, 2,326.25 hours in the Second. But the Second Petition suggests it may include hours covered
by the First Petition since it includes hours going back to 2003.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 20 of 32
15

have the effect of reducing A/B Counsels time by two-thirds. In other words, it would appear
that A/B Counsel are only asking to be paid for one-third of their time because that is all they can
reasonably bill for. It necessarily follows that is all they can include in their lodestars.
One question remains: If they are not even asking to be paid for the other two-thirds,
why even attempt to include those additional hours in their lodestars? Logically, there are two
possible explanations: First, to make themselves appear so reasonable that the Court will shrink
from reducing their fee request further. Second, to ensure that, if permitted somehow to apply
their allocation formula, use of these all-inclusive lodestars for themselves will assure them a
more favorable pay-out. See Point II (D), post.
3. A/B Counsels Hourly Rates Are Not Reasonable and Their
Hourly Rate Subterfuge Is Transparent

There are three reasons the hourly rates A/B Counsel employed are unreasonable. First
and foremost, because the current market rates they are claiming are not in line with those
[rates] prevailing in the community for similar services by lawyers of reasonably comparable
skill, experience, and reputation. Blum v. Stenson, 465 U.S. 886, 895 n. 11 (1984). Their
claimed rates of between $650 and $800/hr. are significantly higher. Second, because they have
use dramatically different rates for different law firms. Thus, they have computed a substantial
portion of their own lodestars using current rates, while multiplying all of F/Os hours using a
lower 2005 rate.
14
Third, they cannot reasonably use current rates to compensate for a delay in
payment (A/B Mem. at 17) when they themselves are largely responsible for the delay.

14
In another effort to gain the Courts sympathy, at page 17 of their Brief, A/B Counsel state that their
reported lodestar actually understates the present value of the time they spent because they could have,
but did not, valu[e] all their time in this case using current rates. (A/B Mem. at 17 n. 4). They have
only used current rates for time after J une, 2005, but not before then. Id. at 16. Again, what initially
sounds reasonable turns out to be another mathematical sleight of hand. By calculating different firms
lodestars at dramatically different rates, A/B Lead Counsel have ensured themselves a more favorable
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 21 of 32
16

D. Unless The Component Lodestar Values Are Corrected, Lead Counsels
Allocation Formula Will Yield an Unfair Result.

The math is relatively straightforward. Under A/B Counsels allocation formula, the total
A/B fee of $2.7 million is supposed to be divided, initially, into three equal shares. In other
words, each of the three A/B Leads is supposed to get $900,000. Two of the three are then
supposed to share that amount with Non-Lead counsel in proportion to their A/B-approved
lodestars. A/B Counsel have approved a highly inflated or overstated lodestar of $1,924,834.50
for Girard Gibbs, and a grossly understated lodestar for Bass or F/O Counsel of $280,536.00.
That means that the proportion in which Girard Gibbs presently plans to share any fee
they receive is 87.3% to themselves and 12.7% to F/O Counsel. It follows that, if the allocation
were done today, out of the $900,000 they received in the initial 3-way split, Girard Gibbs
would pay $785,700 to themselves and $108,000 to F/O. It is not being done today, however; it
will be done on or after the Effective Date. By then, given the amount that remains to be done
administering the Settlement, F/O has little doubt that GGs lodestar will have so increased
as to afford F/O a fee of only half that amount or approximately $50,000.
In sum, if A/B Counsel are afforded discretion in the matter, F/O Counsel will receive
between $50,000 and $108,000 for twelve-plus years of work that not only established the basic
liability principles for this case, but expanded the Class from 8,000 to 314,000 claims.
E. Even If the Lodestars Are Adjusted, the Allocation Formula Will
Yield an Unfair Result. The Formula Cannot Be Salvaged.

If we credited A/B Counsel with only those hours for which they can reasonably bill
i.e., which by their own account would appear to approximate 1/3 of their lodestar - the lodestar
for Girard Gibbs would be closer to $641,611.50 than to $1,924,834.50. Conversely, if F/Os

split under the second part of their allocation formula. At first blush, three firms would appear to be
affected; on closer examination, only two. (A/B Mem. at 22). F/O Counsel is one of them.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 22 of 32
17

lodestar is adjusted to include her Tasini hours, as it properly should be, her lodestar would be
$ 1,590,267.72 rather than the $280,536-lodestar A/B Counsel assigned her.
Now, if we apply A/B Counsels allocation formula, the allocation is turned on its head.
Out of $900,000, Girard Gibbs would receive $259,200 and F/O Counsel would receive
$640,800. Although this allocation might be fairer and truer to the benefits each conferred on the
Class, both sets of counsel would then be undercompensated. F/O Counsel is not looking for an
unfair result. Another solution must be available.
15

F. The Goldberger Factors Do Not Support A/B Counsels Fee Request
The trend in this Circuit is to apply the percentage-of-recovery approach to determine an
appropriate fee. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v VISA U.S.A. Inc., 396 F.3d 96 (2d Cir. 2005). In
determining the appropriate percentage to apply, courts look to several Goldberger factors.
Recompense for counsels risk of litigation is perhaps the foremost factor to be considered.
See, e.g., In re Agent Orange, 818 F.2d at 232.
1. Risk of Litigation: Here, A/B Counsel claim to have taken enormous risks
deserving of substantial recompense. (A/B Mem. at 12). The truth is the opposite. There were
two and only two issues that were ever risky: (1) the underlying issue of liability, and (2) the
issue of whether or not the unregistereds could be included in the Class.
With one exception, A/B Counsel did not take either risk. F/O Counsel took both.
a. A/B Counsel Did Not Assume Any Risk on the Issue of Liability
A/B Counsel are being less than forthright with the Court when they state at pages 12-13
of their Memorandum:

15
Nor should Girard Gibbs alone bear the impact of the inclusion of Tasini hours in F/Os lodestar. F/O
Counsels Tasini work conferred a benefit on all members of the Class. Accordingly, the cost of
achieving those benefits should not be so cabined.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 23 of 32
18

Tasini by no means minimized A/B Counsels litigation risk, as such risk is
measured at the time the case is filed. The Supreme Court did not decide Tasini
until after this litigation was initiated.

A/B Mem. at 13 (emphasis added).
A/B Counsel neglect to mention three critical facts: First, the class actions piggybacked
on the Second Circuits Tasini decision.
16
Class actions were commenced in California
(Posner), Delaware (Laney) and the Southern District of New York (Authors Guild).
17
Second,
counsel for the Authors Guild and Posner cases fought to have Laney transferred to New York
and the three class actions coordinated or consolidated there precisely so as to be able to rely on
Tasini. (See Mem. in Support of J oint Responses of Authors Guild and Posner Plaintiffs to
Motion for Transfer and Consolidation of Actions at 6-7). After all, they pointed out, Tasini was
only binding precedent in the Second Circuit. In other Circuits, it was only persuasive authority.
(Id. at 7). Third, when the Supreme Court subsequently granted certiorari in Tasini, three of four
A/B Counsel sought and obtained stays of their own actions in order to avoid any risk that the
Second Circuit might be reversed. Those stays were lifted and the actions proceeded only after
the Supreme Court ruled in the Freelancers favor. Shortly thereafter, a Consolidated Class
Action Complaint was filed and the case was sent to mediation.
b. Authors Guild and Posner Counsel Did Not Assume Risk
on the Issue of the Unregistereds

As A/B Counsel concede, risk is to be determined ex ante, rather than in hindsight. (See
A/B Mem. at 13, citing DiFillippo v. Morizio, 759 F.2d 231, 234 (2d Cir. 1985). At their

16
By their own account, A/B Counsel commenced work on their Class Actions [b]eginning in
October 1999. (Boni Dec., dated J une 14, 2005 at 2). The date is not a happenstance: The Second
Circuit ruled in the Freelancers favor on September 24, 1999. See Tasini v. New York Times Co., 206
F.3d 161 (2d Cir. 1999), affd, 533 U.S. 483 (2001). Also, see footnote 5, ante.
17
Although they originally filed in the Northern District of California, a month later, the Posner
plaintiffs voluntarily dismissed the case in California and refiled in the Southern District of New York.
(Rice Dec. at 3.)
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 24 of 32
19

commencement, the Authors Guild and Posner cases only included U.S. authors to the extent
that they had registered their works with the United States Copyright Office. The Complaints in
those two cases did not include claims for their unregistered works. There was absolutely no risk
whatsoever in such a lawsuit. Tasini had established liability and the standing of registereds to
sue for damages was clear on the Acts face.
As already noted, the GG-F/O team was the lone exception. They alone defined the Class
as including all Freelancers whose works had been infringed, within the meaning of Tasini,
whether or not they had been registered with the U.S. Copyright Office. Accordingly, only that
team assumed the risks associated with maintaining the litigation on behalf of unregistered
authors and certifying a class that included them. (Cf. A/B Mem. at 12, where A/B Counsel
claim that they all took these risks.) The Girard Gibbs-F/O team did so at F/O Counsels
instance, based upon theories she had already developed.
In sum, at the commencement of litigation, most A/B Counsel assumed virtually no risk.
2. Quality of Representation: A/B Counsel seem to believe they should be awarded
fees here because of work they did in other actions. Consistent with this position, their
Declarations contain lengthy resums that dwarf the barebones summaries of their work in this
case. But, achieving victories in other lawsuits confers benefits on other classes and not this one.
Accordingly, at least in this Circuit, as A/B Counsel concede, the rule is that the quality of legal
representation is best measured by the result obtained. (A/B Mem. at 13, citing Goldberger,
209 F.3d at 55). A/B Counsel characterize the result achieved here as outstanding, and their
work as at all times skillful, non-duplicative, diligent and efficient. (A/B mem. at 13, 14,
16, 10, and 21). We briefly examine that proposition.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 25 of 32
20

There are considerable grounds on which to question these assertions. Since A/B
Counsel neither established the legal principles upon which (i) classwide liability was predicated
nor (ii) the Class was expanded to include the unregistereds, the quality of A/Bs work should
be judged by their degree of success in representing the A and B claims. The fruit of their
labors in this regard is summed up or encapsulated in 3.a and 3.b of the Settlement.
While F/O does not question the fact that the formulas contained in these two
subparagraphs satisfy the requirement that they be fair, reasonable and adequate, the result
A/B achieved can hardly be called outstanding. Consider the following.
a. Category A Compensation: Category A claims are those entitled to statutory
damages. Ordinarily, under the Copyright Ac t, statutory damages range from a minimum of
$750 to $30,000 per infringed work. 17 U.S.C. 504(c)(1). Where infringement is willful,
statutory damages range from $750 to $150,000 per work. 17 U.S.C. 504(c)(2).
Here, A/B Counsel negotiated a formula for A claimants that pegs pay-out to number
of works infringed. For the first fifteen A works written for and infringed by any one pub-
lisher, a Class Member will receive $1,500 per work; for the second fifteen, $ 1,200 per work;
and after the first thirty, $875 per work. (Settlement at 3.a). While certainly not inadequate,
these figures can hardly be called exceptional when one considers the statutorily-prescribed
range.
18


18
This conclusion is only reinforced when one considers a further fact: i.e., that the compensation
formula is bifurcated. Sixty-five (65) % of the amount being paid represents compensation for past
infringement. The remaining thirty-five (35) % represents payment for a non-exclusive license going
forward, under which certain Defendants will be permitted to continue to use the work. See Settlement at
4.a, 4.b. But, this means that Class Members are really receiving payments of $975, $780 and $568.75
for past infringements. $568.75 is 24% below the statutory minimum. See 17 U.S.C. 504(c)(1) (the
copyright owner may elect an award of statutory damages in a sum of not less than $750 per
infringed work).
This does not invalidate the Settlement. Negotiated settlements often yield less than would be
achieved by victory at trial. The result, however, can hardly be called outstanding.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 26 of 32
21

b. Category B Compensation: The issue here concerns a discrepancy in
treatment. Category B is a true hybrid. Insofar as past infringement is concerned, a Category B
claim is indistinguishable from a Category C claim. (Neither is entitled to statutory damages.)
Insofar as licensing and compensation going forward is concerned, however, Category B claims
and A claims are indistinguishable . Yet, first-tier A Claims will receive $525 per work for a
license, while it appears most B claims will receive a flat $52.50 for their continued use. In other
words, even though - in this regard - they are similarly situated, a B claimant will only get one-
tenth of what the first-tier A claimant gets for the continued use of their registered work.
While this doesnt require that the B compensation formula be rejected, meeting a
threshold requirement and achieving an outstanding result are two very different things.
3. Time and Labor of Counsel: We have already addressed this issue at length
elsewhere. Here, we make an even more fundamental point. A/B Counsel piggybacked on other
counsels work in terms of liability and the unregistereds. C Counsel negotiated compensation
for the C Claims. That leaves A/B Counsel with the responsibility of negotiating
compensation for the A and B Claims.
Can it really have taken them thousands of hours to do so, or some significant portion of
that? And, if it did take them thousands of hours, how can one explain this? Logic suggests that
there may have been (i) redundant, unnecessary and/or duplicative work over the 14 years and/or
(ii) seasoned attorneys performing work that should have been delegated to paralegals or
administrative personnel. Logic also suggests that not all of these hours can be reasonably
billed.
19
Since they have not produced contemporaneous time records, however, A/B have
deprived the Court, Class and other counsel of the necessary means to answer these questions.

19
The suggestion that A/B Counsel could reasonably bill for thousands of hours to come up with the
A and B compensation formulas or matrices is suspect for at least three reasons: It flies in the face of
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 27 of 32
22

III. The Court Must Make the Fee and Allocation Decisions in This Case, Not A/B Counsel.

At pages 21-22 of their Memorandum, A/B Counsel assert that it is appropriate for A/B
Counsel to allocate the fee award among themselves and other Co-Counsel. See A/B Mem. at
21. In Section 9(c) of the Settlement Agreement, they provide for the Court to cede them this
authority. Such a delegation would be unlawful and inappropriate for at least six reasons.
First, the cases that A/B Counsel rely upon to support such a delegation are both PSLRA
cases. See Victor v. Argent Classic Convertible Arbitrage Fund L.P., 623 F.3d 82 (2d Cir. 2010)
and In re Initial Public Offering Securities Litigation, Case No. 21 MC 92 (SAS), 2011 WL
2732563 (S.D.N.Y. J uly 8, 2011). A class action under the PSLRA differs from a non-PSLRA
class action in at least two significant respects. Under the PSLRA, the Court is required to select
an institutional investor or other plaintiff with a large financial stake in the case to serve as lead
plaintiff. 15 U.S.C.S. 78u-4(a)(3)(B)(iii)(I). Once the lead plaintiff is appointed, it is
assigned the right to appoint and duty to monitor lead counsel for the class. 404 F.3d at 180.
In turn, generally, the lead counsel it selects controls subsequent decisions regarding the
assignment and compensation of counsel. This is not a PSLRA case, nor is a comparable
statutory scheme involved. Accordingly, the Court retains plenary authority over the assignment
and compensation of counsel.
Second, in all class actions even PSLRA cases decisions regarding pre-appointment
work are for the Court to make, not lead counsel. (Cendant II, 404 F.3d at 194-95, 197). Here,
almost all work for which F/O Counsel is seeking fees was performed pre-appointment. That
includes both her Tasini work (all of it) and her inclusion of the unregistereds in the Class. But

common sense. The A and B matrices had already been agreed upon by March or April, 2003, i.e., over
11 years ago. Finally, the formulas did not change at all during Phase II. (Notice of Revised Class Action
Settlement, dated 1/22/2014, at p. 4, 1
st
para.) (The payment schedules for Category A and B Subject
Works remain unchanged). Yet, the hours for which A/B Counsel claim to be reasonably billing have
continued to rise and rise. (Their lodestars appear to have increased by 6,808 hours during Phase II.)
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 28 of 32
23

for her work in the latter regard, there would have been no Complaint filed on behalf of a Class
of U.S. authors whose unregistered, as well as registered, works were infringed. Since all of
this transpired pre-appointment, it is for this Court and not A/B Counsel to make all decisions
regarding F/Os compensation.
Third, in non-PSLRA cases, Lead Counsel isnt competent to make fee determinations
either as to pre- or post-appointment work. This conclusion is required by Fed.R.Civ.P. 23(h).
Under the present rule, all applications for attorneys fees must be made by motion and on
notice, whether they are made by Lead, Non-Lead or Non-Designated Counsel. Fed.R.Civ.P.
23(h)(1). As to each applicant, the Court must make findings of fact and conclusions of law.
Fed.R.Civ.P. 23(h)(3). While it is empowered to refer issues concerning the amount of the
award to a special master or magistrate . . . (Fed.R.Civ.P. Rule 23(h)(4)), it is nowhere
given the authority to refer such issues to private counsel. Equally significantly, even a referral
to a magistrate judge or special master can only be as provided in Rule 54(d)(2)(D). In other
words, their authority is to recommend and report. Fed.R.Civ.P. 72(b). It necessarily follows
that A/B Counsels claim, here, to have plenary authority over fees i.e., greater authority than
a Magistrate J udge or Special Master is absurd.
Fourth, A/B Counsel are self-interested. Permitting them to determine F/O Counsels
fees would be a denial of due process.
Fifth, A/B Counsel in any event disqualified themselves from making fee determinations
by their pronouncements and conduct. See, generally, Cendant II, 404 F.3d at 200 . They failed
to disclose their fee-sharing arrangement until four years into the litigation. But see In re Agent
Orange, 818 F.2d at 226. They announced that any authority they are given over fees will be
exercised both contrary to Section 9(c) of the Settlement Agreement and contrary to law.
Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 29 of 32
24

(Compare Sec. 9(c) with A/B Mem. at 22, where A/B Counsel confessed they have no intent of
going so far as to in good faith weigh[] relative contributions of counsel and award fees
in proportion to benefits that have been conferred). Finally, they have clearly, consistently and
unremittingly evinced their bias towards F/O over the course of eleven years. Most recently,
they concluded a Settlement Agreement that they are well aware, if approved without any
alteration, will deprive F/O of two significant property interests. (See Bass Dec., dated May 6,
2014). Notwithstanding this, they did not even bother to serve her with the Settlement
Agreement or the Preliminary Approval papers or notify her of same. Id.
IV. A 17.1% Award May Be Inadequate To Compensate All Counsel Who Benefitted
The Class. In That Event, the Court Should Find That 23.% Would Be Reasonable.

If, notwithstanding the above, the Court concludes that A/B are entitled to the amounts
they have requested, a further question remains: Is the $3.3 million A/B negotiated adequate to
compensate all Counsel who conferred benefits? If not, what should be done?
Even a cursory examination of the literature suggests that the total amount allocated is
low. Thus, the $3.3 million that has been requested for fees represents 17.10% of the Class
recovery. By Eisenberg and Miller standards, the percentage is remarkably small. See Eisenberg
and Miller, Attorneys Fees in Class Action Settlements: An Empirical Study, 1 J ournal of
Empirical Legal Studies 27 (2004). According to their classic study, for nonsecurities class
actions, the mean and median percentages awarded as attorneys fees for class recoveries in
the range of $15 to $22 million are 26.6% and 30.0%, respectively. Id. at 73. See Manual on
Complex Litigation (4th) 14.121 (25% of a common fund "represents a typical benchmark.")
Here, an award of only 23.5% would fully compensate all counsel entitled to an award of
fees. It would compensate F/O Counsel for the benefits she has conferred on the Class and A/B
and C Counsel at the levels they have requested. There would be no diminution in any counsels
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25

fee requests, and no need for further proceedings. Moreover, the percentage-of-recovery
awarded would still be at least 3 to 6.5 percentage points below established norms. (F/O Counsel
does not seek by this suggestion to have the Class recovery diminished, but for Defendants to
contribute an additional adequate amount towards fees.)
It is clearly within this Courts power to find and undersigned Counsel respectfully
suggests it is for the Court to consider that the amount A/B Counsel negotiated is not adequate
to compensate all Counsel who benefitted the Class. The Court has this power under the
common fund doctrine, as well as both Rule 23 and the Agreement. Indeed, the latter not only
empowers the Court to modify any aspect of the Agreement, but clearly contemplates that it
may do so. In the event, the parties can determine whether or not to proceed with the settlement
as modified by the Court. (Settlement Agreement at 11.e).
CONCLUSION
The common fund doctrine has roots deep in equity. Sprague v. Ticonic Natl Bank,
307 U.S. 161 (1939) (tracing equity courts authority over fees to the First J udiciary Act). Its
rationale is to prevent the unjust enrichment of those benefitting from a lawsuit without
contributing to its cost. Goldberger, 209 F.3d at 46. It would be unfortunate, indeed, if a
doctrine designed to prevent unjust enrichment were instead used to promote it.
Dated: May 8, 2014
Respectfully submitted,

__________________________________
Martin R. Stolar, Esq.
351 Broadway, 4
th
Floor
New York, New York 10013
(212) 219-1919
mrslaw37@hotmail.com

Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 31 of 32
26

Attorney for Barbara Garson, Sonia J affe Robbins
and J oAnn Kawell, and George Robinson, Alec
Dubro, Russell Miller, Phil Mattera, J udith Levine,
Myrna Edelstein Watanabe, Hardy S. Green and
Margaret Bald

Case 1:00-md-01379-GBD Document 30 Filed 05/16/14 Page 32 of 32