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Disaster Risk Reduction and Management

MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT OF SAN JOSE


Rizal Street, Barangay Poblacion VII
San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
(043) 491-2087 / 7950 / 7962
lgu_sjoccmdo@yahoo.com

MUNICIPALITY OF SAN JOSE Ibalik ang Kapangyarihan sa Mamamayan

Province of Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 5100
E-mail: lgusanjose.occimin@gmail.com
Phone: (043) 491-2807


OFFICE OF THE MUNICIPAL MAYOR



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June 25, 2014


THE HONORABLE MEMBERS
Office of the Sangguniang Bayan
San Jose, Occidental Mindoro

Thru: ATTY. REY C. LADAGA
Vice-Mayor and Presiding Officer

URGENT
Gentlemen:

Presented on the following pages is the Municipal Contingency Plan of the Municipality of
San Jose, Occidental Mindoro which we have culled out from the Municipal Disaster Risk
Reduction and Management Plan (MDRRMP) CY 2011-2015 of this Municipality. The latter
has already been approved by your august body through Resolution No. 2583, Series of
2012 dated February 14, 2012.

Because we are still required to submit a contingency plan as a separate document, we have
presented this plan to the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council
(MDRRMC) on June 24, 2014 and sought for their appropriate actions. The same formally
approved this Contingency Plan (CP) as a separate document, in the meantime, endorsed
this to your body, and also recommended its updating in line with the forthcoming updating
of the MDRRMP.

It must be noted that the CP is also set to be updated by end of CY 2015 and/or at the start
of CY 2016 as soon as the MDRRMP has expired and been updated. Consequently, for
documentation purposes and formality of the above as a separate document, this Office is
requesting your urgent approval of a resolution below which we will be presenting to the
concerned agencies, to wit:

Adopting and Approving the Contingency Plan (CP) of the Municipality of San Jose,
Occidental Mindoro.

Copies of the aforesaid Contingency Plan are hereto included for your reference and study.
Your immediate and favorable action is highly anticipated.









C.c.: Office of the Sangguniang Bayan (thirteen sets)
Office the Mayor, Admin Office (two sets)
MPDO File Copy (two sets)


MUNICIPALITY OF SAN JOSE

Province of Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 5100
E-mail: lgusanjose.occimin@gmail.com
Phone: (043) 491-2807


MUNICIPAL DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND
MANAGEMENT COUNCIL



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ATTESTED AND APPROVED BY:



HON. ROMULO M. FESTIN
Municipal Mayor
MDRRMC Chairman


HON. REY C. LADAGA
Municipal Vice-Mayor
MDRRMC Co-Chairman


NOEL N. GUERRERO
Municipal Administrator


ZENAIDA V. DELA CRUZ
Municipal Budget Officer/MDRRMO-designate


JOSEPH E. SALGADO
Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator


ALICIA M. CAJAYON
Municipal Social Welfare and Development Officer


ENID M. ASUNCION, M.D.
Municipal Health Officer


ENGR. EDGAR V. MASANGKAY
Municipal Engineer


HON. DANILO CENTENO
President, Liga ng mga barangay


EDUARDO DOMINGO
Representative, Department of Education


PSI ALLAN F. MONTILLANA, JR.
Chief of Police, SJMPS/PNP


INSP. JOSELITO F. MIRANDA
Municipal Fire Marshall, BFP


LT. GOEFFREY ESPALDON
Station Commander, Philippine Coastguard


MEMVILUZ BAURILE
Municipal Local Government Operations Officer


MENANDRO C. EBORA
Representative, PNRC


1
st
LT ELISONDO FELISIDAD
Bravo Company, Philippine Army


ROSALINDA MADRIAGA
President, Senior Citizens


MERCY ALVARAN
Representative, Private sector


BELLA ISTORES
President, San Jose Care Association


MARCLEO RARO
President, KABROKAMI


GREGORIO UMALI, JR.
President, PWD Federation


GENNIE DAIT
PLAN International


INY LOURDES PEROY
OIC-MAO


RITCHIE LIBORO
Group Chief, REACT Sandugo


MARY ANN VERZOSA
President, Pag-asa Youth Association of san Jose


RICARTE E. AGUILAR
ICO-Municipal Trasurer
COUNCIL RESOLUTION No. 2014-02

APPROVING THE CONTINGENCY PLAN OF THE
MUNICIPALITY OF SAN JOSE, OCCIDENTAL MINDORO AND
ENDORSING THE SAME TO THE SANGGUNIANG BAYAN OF
THIS MUNICIPALITY FOR THEIR ADOPTION AND
APPROPRIATIONS


WHEREAS, the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan of
this Municipality CY 2011-2015 envisions the disaster sector in the
municipality towards transforming the Municipality of San Jose,
Occidental Mindoro into a fair and secure society, in which the impact of
hazards would not hamper development and the ecosystem and will
further ensure the provision of a better quality of life through effective
emergency and disaster services;

WHEREAS, said plan is incorporated with the Contingency Plan and Hazard
Analysis which is essential in the operations and protocol mandated by
the Republic Act No. 10121 and all relevant laws and policies of the state;

WHEREAS, said plan has been approved by the Sangguniang Bayan of San
Jose, Occidental Mindoro through its Resolution No. 2583 on February 14,
2012. Therefore, there is a need to cull out the Contingency Plan from the
aforesaid document into a separate one for the formal approval of this
body;

NOW THEREFORE, resolved to approve the Contingency Plan of the
Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro as contained in the approved
Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Plan of this
Municipality CY 2011-2015;

RESOLVED FURTHER, to review and update the same in line with the
forthcoming expiration and updating of the Municipal Disaster Risk
Reduction and Management Plan of this Municipality CY 2011-2015;

LET COPIES of this Resolution be sent promptly to the Office of Municipal
Mayor, and to all concerned for information, guidance and appropriate
action.

ADOPTED in the Special Session of the Council, this 24
th
day of June, 2014 at
San Jose, Occidental Mindoro

CERTIFIED CORRECT:


DON VINCENT B. BUSTO
Secretary to the MDRRMC

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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
MUNICIPAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT STRATEGIC
FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION


Vision and Goal of the Action Plan

The disaster management strategy seeks to outline the concrete steps required towards
realizing the goal, vision and strategic objectives of the national disaster management policy.


Transform the Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro into a fair and
secure society, in which the impact of hazards would not hamper development
and the ecosystem and will further ensure the provision of a better quality of life
through effective emergency and disaster services


This vision, which establishes a strong link between sustainable human development, risk
reduction and poverty, is in tandem with the national and regional policies of the government.

Goal of the Strategic Plan

The goal of this municipal disaster risk reduction and management strategic action plan is to
contribute to the sustainable improvement of the well-being of San Joseos by:

(i) Creating a socio-economic, legal and institutional environment that is conducive to
disaster management in the Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro and;
(ii) Effectively mainstreaming disaster management issues into national policies as well as
in sector-specific development programs and projects.

Guiding Principles for Strategic Programming

All the activities in operationalizing this DRRM strategic action plan and policy must consider
the following crosscutting core principles and mainstream them into local development:
.
Advocacy
Service delivery
Capacity building
Community/local empowerment
Emergency preparedness
Integrated planning and programming
Partnership and alliance building

For any DRRM program, the following features are essential for any success:

Social cohesion and solidarity (self-help and citizen-based social protection at the
neighborhood level)
Trust between the authorities and civil society
Investment in economic development that explicitly takes potential consequences for
risk reduction or increase into account
Investment in human development
Investment in social capital
Investment in institutional capital (e.g., capable, accountable and transparent
government institutions for mitigating disasters.)

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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
Good coordination, information sharing and cooperation among institutions involved in
risk reduction
Attention to lifeline infrastructure
Attention to the most vulnerable
An effective risk communication system and institutionalized historical memory of
disaster
Political commitment to disaster management
Laws, regulations and directives to support all of the above

Key Stakeholders

The stakeholders involved in the implementation of this strategy are numerous and can be
categorized as follows:

Government including local authorities
NGOs including civil society organizations
Private sector
International development partners
Local communities
Women and youth groups
Other vulnerable groups such as children and the physically challenged

Priority Areas for Action

The definition and identification of disaster management priority areas for intervention over
the next four years is informed by its policy, bill and the outcome of disaster analysis in the
country. This strategic plan is thus an important framework for the establishment of an
institutional framework for Municipality especially the MDRRMC and its enforcing body which
will position itself as an Office of excellence by responding to disaster and risk reduction
matters in an efficient and prudent manner. The following priority areas will be the disaster
management agencys building blocks to championing disaster management and risk reduction
issues in the Municipality of San Jose.

Priority Area 1: Development of institutional framework and structures capable of
preventing, preparing for and responding to disasters.

Interventions in this area will aim at creating institutional environment for addressing disaster and
risk reductions. This will involve the establishment of Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and
Management Office (by virtue of an Executive Order depending on PS Cap and could be either an
independent office under the Office of the Mayor or an office section under the MPDO) and related
technical and operational committees and the strengthening of capacities of all actors: government,
civil society, organized private sector, decentralized agencies, institutions and development partners.

Priority Area 2: Integration of DRR into sustainable policies and plans.

The interventions in this area will focus on mainstreaming DRRM into local policies and development
plans through the development of local platform for disaster management, sensitization, and
awareness creation on disaster management, capacity building and introduction of disaster risk
reduction into the school system. Establishing the necessary linkages and capacity building will be
among the key activities. Interventions in this area will aim at building capacity at all levels and
develop and implement an effective resource mobilization mechanism and necessary follow ups.
Mechanisms will be developed for mainstreaming disaster issues in overall development plans and
policies.


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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
Priority Area 3: Creation of a body of knowledge that is useful to support the local
government, humanitarian organizations and other partners; to anticipate, plan for and
manage disasters effectively.

Interventions in this area will aim at developing and improving on effective early warning systems,
development of a comprehensive database, system development, conduct surveys and develop
communication channels.

Priority Area 4: Create broad and effective partnership among government, humanitarian
organizations and other partners, to engage in disaster risk reduction activities and
addressing the underlying factors in disasters

The MDRRMCs as well as the MPDO/MDRRMOs intervention will focus on ensuring that the
necessary platform or structures and processes exist for genuine partnership and concerted efforts
in disaster risk reduction. The interventions will focus on policy dialogue and establishment of
effective linkage with the environmental impact assessment process.

Priority Area 5: Develop an efficient response mechanism to disaster management and make
available the necessary resources

Interventions in this area will aim at building capacities at all levels; develop strategies for resource
mobilization and for monitoring and evaluation.

Priority Area 6: To strengthen the LGUs capacity in the timely detection, prevention, control,
and investigation and reporting of all cases of calamity/epidemic and other diseases within
animal and human populations.

Interventions in this area will focus on training livestock, wildlife and health personnel and other
critical partners for early diagnosis and reporting. It also emphasizes the need to provide basic
supplies and also strengthen laboratory diagnostic capabilities.

Priority Area 7: Introduction and/or building knowledge about regional and international
best practices in disaster risk reduction and management.

The LGU will establish links with external institutions for best practices and sharing of experiences in
disaster and risk reduction issues that may be applied in the municipality depending on the
resources and capacities.

Expected Outcomes

A well-functioning Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office under the
Municipal Planning and Development Office in the short-term and under the Office of
the Mayor (as an independent department or office) in the long-term
Formation of well-functioning participatory structures e.g., committees at all levels
Strengthened municipal/local capacities in disaster risk reduction and management
strategies
Availability of sufficient, reliable and timely data for informed decision-making on DRR
matters
Disaster issues fully mainstreamed or realigned in all local policies, programs and
projects
School system introduces DRRM in their teaching curriculum e.g., integration into social
studies
Resources available for DRRM activities. (The LGU should take the lead role by making
adequate provision as a startup for counter funding.)
The approval of a Municipal DRRM Code and adoption of the national action plan for
DRRM and policy providing legal and administrative authority for implementing the set
actions as well as adoption and approval of MDRRMP.

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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
Existence of an early warning system which is regularly updated.
Existence of effective communication strategy and a well-informed citizenry on disaster
and risk reduction issues.

Priority target groups

This strategy will assist everybody in the development sector of the Municipality in particular
all the departments/offices of the LGU, state authorities and agencies in the Municipality,
collaboration with other local governments, private sector, civil society, youth organizations,
children, women, the physically-challenged, reproductive health needs of vulnerable groups,
parliamentarians, opinion leaders, schools, technical and financial partners to acquire
knowledge, skills and right attitude for the attainment of an effective DRRM system in the
Municipality.

Special attention will be paid to special interest groups like school (formal and non-formal) and
people living in highly disaster prone areas.

Strategies

To achieve this, the MPDO/MDRRMC/MDRRMO with the support of the LGU as a whole will
embark on the following:

1. Financing and Resource Mobilization Strategy

To mobilize funds for financing of the strategic plan, two funding sources are identified, namely:
To take advantage of available resources by incorporating some of the activities of the
plan into the regular annual budget of LGU
To resort to the mobilization of additional resources from development partners and
the private sector for activities that could not be incorporated in the LGUs budget.

For resource mobilization, the LGUs budget is very important for successful implementation of
the strategic plan. It will illustrate local governments strong commitment to DRRM.

The MDRRM Secretariat will organize mini roundtable discussions with its development
partners and other stakeholders with a view of informing them about the programs of the
strategic plan and identifying possibilities for partnership and financing.

2. Partnership Strategy

The MDRRMC together with the LGU specifically the MPDO/MDRRMO will establish strategic
partnerships and network with key actors involved in disaster management and risk reduction
in the country namely:

National government agencies
Disaster management focal points
National, regional and local NGOs
Traditional institutions and leaders
Private sector/business community
Researchers
Civil society organizations
Faith-based organizations
Security and emergency services


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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
The Council will also develop partnership with actors in other places to share knowledge,
experience and good practices.

3. Communication Strategy

Communication strategy is instrumental not only in the implementation of the strategic plan
but also in the area of profiling and positioning the proposed organization of an MDRRMO in the
Municipality and beyond.

Within the framework of information and communication technology (ICT) the MDRRMO will:

Establish a documentation and information center responsible for collecting, managing
and disseminating reliable information on disaster and risk reduction in the country.
Develop a national platform that will organize on-line (and/or other interactive means
such as in the broadcast) discussions on current and emerging DRR issues in the
Municipality and the province/region as well.
Create a bi-annual news letter that will keep all actors informed on MDRRM issues or
by incorporating it in the LGU newspaper.
Involve the private and public media in the activities of the National Office.

4. Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Strategy

Monitoring and evaluation is part and parcel of any planning process, as it is critical to the
assessment of progress against benchmarks.

While monitoring and evaluation are closely linked, it is important to understand the
distinction between them. Whereas monitoring is a routine on-going activity to assess program
implementation in terms of resources (inputs) invested in the programme and the outputs
produced, evaluation is concerned with the assessment of the programs impacts on disaster
and risk reduction management e.g. on the safety and welfare of citizens.

5. Municipal/Local Emergency Strategy

There is an urgent need to develop a national emergency strategy/plan since not all
emergencies are classified as disaster but could be fatal and threaten national security and
stability.

Risks

During the implementation of this strategic plan, the disaster management agency is likely to
face a number of risks that can undermine and or slow down the effective implementation of
the well-outlined strategic actions. Some of these risks are:

Lack of adequate capacity to implement the strategic plan owing to the weak
Council/LGU staffing (in quality and quantity)
Lack of enough funding is also an important risk as, without enough resources, the
agency will not be able to translate the strategy into concrete actions.



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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
RISK PROFILE: THE HAZARDSCAPE AND RECURRING ISSUES


DRRM Context at the Local Level

The proneness of the Philippine archipelago to hazards is defined by its location and natural
attributes. It is situated in the Pacific Ring of Fire where two major tectonic plates (Philippine Sea
and Eurasian) meet. This explains the occurrence of earthquakes and tsunamis, and the existence of
around 300 volcanoes of which 22 are classified as active because their eruptions have been found
in historical records. The Philippines is located along the typhoon belt on the Western North Pacific
Basin where 66 percent of tropical cyclones enter or originate. On the average, the country faces 20
tropical typhoons a year, of which 5 to 7 can be rather destructive. The eastern seaboard is highly
exposed to tropical cyclones with wind speeds greater than 150 kilometers per hour. Mean annual
rainfall in the country varies from 965 mm to 4,064 mm. Extreme rainfall events trigger landslides
and lahar flows and are responsible for severe and recurrent flood in low lying areas. Tropical
cyclones are responsible for an average of 40 percent of the annual rainfall in the country. Slow
moving or almost stationary tropical cyclones account for extended periods of rainfall. Other facts
about Philippine disasters are:

Annual direct damage from previous reported disasters between 1990 and 2006 amount to
PhP20 billion per year in constant 2005 prices based on NDCC data. This is roughly 0.5% of
the GDP on the average every year;
Flooding has become the most prevalent disaster since 2000;
Coastal areas along the over 17,000 km coastline are increasingly exposed to high risk and
more vulnerable to tidal surges (some associated with seasonal typhoons) due to high
population density;
Based on historical average, earthquakes kill the most per event and cause the highest
economic loss. The single event that killed the most (6,000 dead) was the earthquake of
1976 while the Luzon earthquake of 1990 caused PhP695 million of economic damages, the
second highest ever recorded; and
From 1995-2003, an annual average of 8,161 fire incidents occurred nationwide.

Environmental factors such as denuded forests aggravate flood risks. The pace of deforestation
since the 1930s accelerated in the 1950s and 1960s, before falling slightly in the 1980s. Even now,
the effects of loose soil and reduced forest cover from past forestry activities are felt in frequent
landslides and floods. The likelihood of drought and poor availability of water is also increased by
the loss of forest cover. Tropical cyclones (also called windstorms) have caused the most loss of
lives and property. Accompanying or resulting from these hazard events are secondary phenomena
such as strong winds, landslides, floods/flash floods, tornado and storm surges. There is evidence
that the occurrence of extreme weather events is a consequence of climate change. The Philippines
may therefore be substantially affected by climate change. Along with China and Thailand, the
Philippines is among the lower middle income countries, according to World Banks country income
classification. High risk due to the above hazards can discourage foreign investments in the country
and affect long-term economic development.

However, the different regions and their component provinces, municipalities and cities that
comprise differ in terms of exposure to hazards, risks and vulnerabilities. Some parts of the country
are more prone to specific hazards than others; some parts are exposed to more hazards than
others. In an analysis of natural disaster hotspots by the Hazard Management Unit of World Bank,
the Philippines is among the countries where large percentages of population reside in disaster
prone areas. Many highly populated areas are exposed to multiple hazards: 22.3% of the land area
is exposed to three or more hazards and in that area, 36.4% of the population are exposed. Areas

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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
where two or more hazards are prevalent comprise 62.2% of the total area where 73.8% of the
population are exposed.

The western and central portions of the archipelago are less exposed to the full extent of tropical
cyclones that enter the countrys boundaries. Provinces with the highest climate risk in central
Luzon are also those with the most urban centers. Climate risk includes exposure to super
typhoons, and other extreme weather, El Nio-events (droughts), projected rainfall change and
projected temperature increase. The sub-national picture is highlighted by disparities in poverty
incidence. Majority of the poorest provinces in terms of income are found in the Autonomous
Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) and Bicol Region while those with the lowest incidences are in
Luzon, particularly Regions I to IV. The ARMM is rated to have a very high risk to El Nio; it is also
situated in an area which has high tsunami potential. The Bicol river valley which traverses several
Bicol provinces is a flood-prone area.

Natural hazards are part and parcel of the Philippine environment, but disasters happen because
human settlements, infrastructure, people and their economic activities are placed where hazards
happen. Costs of disaster impacts are borne by government and individual households; thus,
threatening socio-economic development gains. Other threats that warrant attention are complex
emergencies that are primarily human-induced, often associated with armed conflict. Issues related
to internally displaced persons (IDPs) are part of dealing with such threats. The country has also
been preparing for regional and emerging risks such as avian influenza, weapons of mass
destruction, and climate change. According to studies, the World Wide Fund for Nature once
declared that the Philippines, particularly all regions are extremely vulnerable to the ravages of
climate change. Occidental Mindoro is ranked 23
rd
among the 80 provinces in overall vulnerability.
(Henrylito D. Tacio Philippines: A Hotspot for Climate Change). The municipality, like Philippine
archipelago, has the proneness to hazards due its location and natural attributes. It is situated east
of the South China Sea and the southern tip of the Manila Trench where two of the major trenches
(Manila and Negros trenches) almost meet. Southern Mindoro Fault is also identified as one of the
active faults in the country; however, crustal movements are almost unnoticed even by equipment.
Mindoro Island is located along the South China Sea where almost 30% percent of tropical cyclones
enter or originate. Other feature that may be relevant to the municipality is its coastal areas which
may also be prone to tsunami and other fortuitous events caused by geological movements.

Southwestern Mindoro is alongside with the Manila Trench which is associated with frequent
earthquakes, and the plate movements. Convergences between the Philippine Mobile Belt and the
Manila Trench have been estimated using GPS measurements. The 2006 dual Pingtung earthquake
event and the 2004 South Asia tsunami highlighted the potential tsunami hazards from Manila
trench. Based on the faults parameters issued by USGS and the seismic record from Global CMT, a
study created a hypothetical earthquake tsunami scenario caused by seismic motion at Manila
trench. The magnitude of the earthquake is 9.35 (Mw), the total length is 990km, and the maximum
initial free-surface height is 9.3m. (Tso-Ren Wu, Hui-Chuan Huang: Modeling tsunami Hazards from
Manila Trench)

A lot of areas in the urban center have medium to high susceptibility to flood. These areas are vast
plains and do not have proper drainage systems. On the other hand, some parts in the north and
east including some parts of the island barangays, which are mountainous are risked to landslides.
Coastal areas and urban areas of the municipality are liquefaction susceptible as Identified by the
liquefaction Susceptibility Map of the Philippines and the Active Faults and Liquefaction
Susceptibility Map of region IV-B from the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. This
has also further elaborated that Sothern Mindoro Fault, one of the active faults in the country,
encompasses the municipality. San Jose is also included in the collision zone of the Manila Trench
and the Negros Trench. Based on the maximum computed wave height and inundation using the
worst case scenario earthquakes from major offshore zones, PHIVOLCS Tsunami Hazard Map of

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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
Mindoro Island identified the area as prone to a six to 12 meter Tsunami. The area is potentially
high prone to tsunami as it had a history of tsunami occurrence.

Other facts about disasters in the Municipality of San Jose are:

In 2009, Ondoy and Pepeng affected 3, 151 families roughly resulting to Php 51, 513, 300.00
agricultural production loss and damages to infrastructures amounting to Php 8, 750,
000.00;
5, 400 hectares of agricultural lands are rain fed while 2, 500 hectares of arable land are
highly vulnerable to drought;
Small floods occur along low-level roads where incapacitated drainage systems are
prevented;
Latest earthquake bulletin showed that Occidental Mindoro experienced an average of 1.13
to 2.53 earthquake magnitude among 34 recorded earthquakes for the first 83 days of the
year 2011. Thirty three of these arent being felt in San Jose.
Coastal areas are among the most densely populated barangays which are all prone to
tsunami. Seven inland barangays and 13 island barangays are among these places;
Based on historical average, tsunami prone area map from PHIVOLCS, San Jose has had a
historical tsunami; and
Of the 55, 192.94 hectares of land area based on the 2000 CLUP, 8,639.50 hectares of land
are prone to erosion hazards while majority of the 1,703.69 hectares of existing built-up
areas have high susceptibility to hazards.

Environmental factors such as denuded forests aggravate flood risks. The pace of deforestation
since the 1930s accelerated in the 1950s and 1960s, before falling slightly in the 1980s. Even now,
the effects of loose soil and reduced forest cover from past forestry activities are felt in frequent
landslides and floods. The likelihood of drought and poor availability of water is also increased by
the loss of forest cover. Agricultural sector is the most affected when it comes to tropical storms and
extreme drought for more than 5,400 hectares of agricultural lands are highly dependent on
rainfall. However, the place is along the western and central portions of the archipelago which are
less exposed to the full extent of tropical cyclones that enter the countrys boundaries. Climate risk
includes exposures to super typhoons, and other extreme weather, El Nio-events (droughts),
projected rainfall change and projected temperature increase.

The Stakeholders

The demand on disaster-related organizations has changed dramatically and the intensity of
performance demanded of certain tasks has become more pronounced. With a paradigm shift from
response and relief to preparedness and mitigation, long-term recovery needs to be considered
earlier or before a hazard strikes. Planning for recovery essentially becomes part of preparedness
planning. As the enactment of RA 10121 was welcomed, the Build Back Better principle has
influenced the current practice greatly. This is to advocate that rebuilding does not create more
vulnerable dwellings. Also, as disaster-affected households and communities need to recover, the
need to be inclusive in making decisions that will affect them cannot be overemphasized. In this
sense, planning for DRR is similar to planning for development; approaches that promote feedback
and empowerment are needed. Stakeholder roles in DRR range from legislating or adopting policies
or programs on all local levels (public entities and officials), implementing the policies, mandating
others to take action or provide incentives for others to take action, to assisting in implementation
and providing political momentum such as advocacy groups. In this sense, capability building
among public officials, participating organizations, and other individuals concerned is a necessity. A
community-based warning system is a must in order to integrate a participating community to
disaster preparedness.
Recurring Issues

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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100

Numerous projects and activities have been undertaken by various stakeholders. Some of these
efforts have been valuable experiences for those who have been involved; however; sustaining the
positive results has always been constantly threatened. There are indications that these positive
results have not simply penetrated day-to-day affairs or businesses. Old practices of doing things
remain and existing organizational and societal structures do not allow the gains to thrive in the
decision-making environment as well as operational setting.

Although human (or technical) and financial resources are often committed, in-kind contribution
must however be neglected. Partnerships between government and private entities public private
partnerships have been done spontaneously when need arises or in a few instance, formalized
through memorandum of agreement (or understanding). These significant moves, however, do not
fall under a general strategic plan of action where the contribution of each stakeholder is seen in
terms of the larger whole, particularly through the lens of national safety or resilience. Threats
remain if the level of awareness about dealing with hazards is low and when little focus on risks is
considered whenever one is faced to make a decision. In the worst case, this behavior may manifest
a culture of disasters rather than a culture of prevention.

The locality must have adopted risk management standards which will set into a motion a wide-
ranging set of activities spurring government and private sectors to re-think and ultimately adopt
the risk management framework into their business philosophy and day-to-day operations. The
message is that awareness must penetrate all levels of government, and in household, firms, and
offices. At the national level, disaster management issues are gradually being given more attention
in national planning processes but until recently was seen in sectoral lens and hardly have the
effective structures, policy, legal framework and more so the proper understanding and capacities.
The recurrence of disaster events and the increasing concerns about disaster impacts have attracted
a lot of attention from both governments and development partners not the least because the risk
calculus for vulnerable groups within society and the infrastructure is enormous.

The countrys Strategic National Action Plan has elaborated these recurrences as a strong challenge
and needs to be addressed by every LGU. Being 23
rd
among disaster-risk provinces from which the
Municipality belongs, San Jose local government should take into consideration every measure to at
least be prepared and mitigate disasters. The implications for the Province of Occidental Mindoro,
particularly the Municipality, in this ranking is evident in that if no prevention and preparedness
measures are taken now to mitigate this high risk, it may erode the significant development gains
registered in the Municipality especially in the area of infrastructure and the well elaborated
poverty reduction strategies among others. The risk calculus for vulnerable groups within society
and infrastructure will be enormous and hence the urgent need to design this strategy that would
outline the development of standard instruments for disaster prevention and preparedness as well
as the organizational mechanisms for plan implementation. The underlying assumption, as
indicated in the SNAP, is that disaster prevention and preparedness are crucial entry points for
disaster risk reduction.

Despite the potential high risk been posed by disaster, the old view of disasters as temporary
interruptions on the path of social and economic progress and should be dealt with through
humanitarian relief is deeply rooted in the country. Until recently, disaster issues were treated and
handled through our various environmental management programs and sectors as an added on
activity. It is increasingly becoming evident that those notions are no longer credible and disaster
issues are too big to be an added on to a sector or being perceived as a sectoral mandate. Disaster
issues are multidimensional, multi-sectoral and need to be mainstreamed in all development
concerns with a central coordination.



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Erosion

Soil erosion is a natural process wherein soil is removed from the land by water, wind or other
media. Rate of erosion is dependent upon physical factors such as length and degree of slope,
rainfall intensity, type and density of vegetation and the inherent erodibility of the soil. Except for
vegetative cover, the risk of massive and destructive erosion increases as any or a combination of
the factors increases. Rainfall erosivity represents the potential of rainfall to cause soil erosion. It is
largely determined by the intensity and amount of rainfall.

Soil erodibility refers to the susceptibility of a soil to the forces of erosion. It depends on the texture,
structure, and other soil properties that affect infiltration, detachability (or aggregate stability), and
sedimentation of soil particles. Based on the soil texture, out of the 46,805.62 hectares total land
area of the 24 barangays, 16,475.98 hectares are free from erosion. Other areas are experiencing
different intensity or erosion. Approximately 19,548.29 hectares are slightly eroded, 8,938.68
hectares are moderately eroded and 1,528.06 hectares are severely eroded. The degree of soil
erosion is affected by various factors particularly topography, soil, climate, vegetation cover, and
land management practices. Erosion is a concern that requires attention for this reduces land
productivity and causes pollution in water bodies.

No. Barangay
No
Apparent
Erosion
Slight
Erosion
Moderate
Erosion
Severe
Erosion
River Total
1 Ambulong 251.27 709.65 960.92
2 Ansiray 52.01 609.74 113.46 775.21
3 Bangkal 245.23 352.47 597.70
4 Batasan 2,020.24 4,284.08 2,578.27 1,232.77 8.12 10,123.48
5 Bayotbot 860.22 857.12 639.95 2,357.29
6 Buri 8.73 481.21 151.89 641.83
7 Camburay 646.19 409.66 1,055.85
8 Caminawit 152.5 152.5
9 Catayungan 94.08 315.51 92.30 492.73
10 Central 2,502.94 816.61 305.32 3,624.87
11 Ilin Proper 346.22 730.09 297.03 1,373.34
12 Inasakan 270.81 202.52 473.33
13 Ipil 0.22 495.92 110.5 606.64
14 Labangan
Ilin
21.08 549.30 95.05 665.43
15 Labangan
Poblacion
708.98 708.98
16 Mabini 513.40 513.40
17 Mangarin 910.50 456.92 1.54 1,368.96
18 Mapaya 976.44 44.94 1,021.38
19 Monte
Claro
2,223.68 7,264.91 1,582.06 248.81 11,319.46
20 Murtha 2,016.03 1,734.64 1,190.97 1.17 4,942.81
21 Natandol 320.64 127.65 448.29
22 Pag-asa 119.71 119.71
23 Pawican 15.77 640.49 276.36 932.62
24 San Agustin 1,519.73 1,519.73
Total 16,475.98 19,548.29 8,938.68 1,528.06 314.61 46,805.62


Barangay Murtha (1,232.77 hectares), Monte Claro (248.81 hectares), Mapaya (44.94 hectares) and
Mangaring (1.54 hectares) with areas adjoining Oriental Mindoro and Municipality of Calintaan
were identified of having severe erosion. These areas are considered to be free from occupancy and
settlements.





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Landslide

Landslide hazards exist in the site because of both natural and artificial causes. Among the natural
factors that favor landslides to occur include the steep slope gradient, water saturation of soils, poor
vegetation cover leading to run-off, and deeply weathered rocks. Artificial conditions that increase
the likelihood of slope failure include earthmoving activities, devegetation and other interventions
that alter the character of water infiltration into the earth.

Among the total land area of the 24 barangays, about 19,558.70 hectares falls within a very low
prone to landslide while only 2,130.74 hectares are highly susceptible to landslide.


No. Barangay
None to
Very Low
Medium High No Data Total
1 Ambulong 975.92 975.92
2 Ansiray 774.38 774.38
3 Bangkal 600.75 600.75
4 Batasan 2,999.44 5,712.90 1,411.14 10,123.48
5 Bayotbot 1,131.36 1,193.61 32.32 2,357.29
6 Buri 641.83 641.83
7 Camburay 650.58 405.27 1,055.85
8 Caminawit 150.14 150.14
9 Catayungan 502.07 502.07
10 Central 3,357.91 266.96 3,624.87
11 Ilin Proper 1,325.12 1,325.12
12 Inasakan 470.11 470.11
13 Ipil 606.64 606.64
14 Labangan Ilin 644.97 644.97
15 Labangan Poblacion 708.98
16 Mabini 513.40 513.40
17 Mangarin 819.11 567.04 1,386.15
18 Mapaya 986.44 33.41 1,019.86
19 Monte Claro 5,352.46 5,289.71 677.28 11,319.46
20 Murtha 2,012.78 2,920.04 10.00 4,942.82
21 Natandol 455.96 455.96
22 Pag-asa 157.12 157.12
23 Pawican 975.24 975.24
24 San Agustin 1,427.95 1,427.95
Total 19,558.70 16,388.94 2,130.74 7,972.99 46,051.37


Flood Susceptibility

High intensity rainfall normally associated with typhoons and the southwest monsoon season cause
flooding hazards. The temporal pattern of typhoon occurrence is analyzed using a time series
analysis in determining the flood hazards. A terrain analysis to determine areas susceptible to
floods was also undertaken. The assumption is that, during the seasonal occurrence of rainfall, some
of these weather disturbances will bring unusually heavy rains. Assuming the occurrence of heavy
rains, the drainage capacity of the river channels will be exceeded, resulting in unusual increase in
the water levels. Subsequently identified were various floodplains and channels adjacent to the
major waterways, and some flatlands susceptible to flooding.

In terms of flood susceptibility, a total of 1,650.97 hectares has low susceptibility in flooding. A large
portion of about 5,422.13 hectares are moderately prone to flooding and about 3,982.15 hectares
with high susceptibility in flooding.

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Flood Prone Susceptibility of the Barangays


No. Barangay
Low
Susceptibility
Moderate
Susceptibility
High
Susceptibility
Total
1 Batasan 348.98 528.17 462.60 1,339.76
2 Bayotbot 520.08 81.68 601.76
3 Camburay 298.67 217.65 8.48 524.80
4 Caminawit 128.25 128.25
5 Central 214.84 1,251.34 1,079.59 2,545.77
6 Mabini 328.21 135.23 463.44
7 Mangarin 287.37 292.89 580.26
8 Mapaya 582.19 542.69 1,124.88
9 Monte Claro 184.45 185.12 397.81 767.38
10 Murtha 604.04 411.18 199.03 1,214.25
11 Pag-asa 56.35 114.04 170.39
12 San Agustin 1,054.47 539.86 1,594.32
Total 1,650.97 5,422.13 3,982.15 11,055.25





Flood prone areas

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Earthquake Epicenters and Fault lines

Earthquakes are either tectonic or volcanic in origin. The high level of seismicity is generally
attributed to movements along the major tectonic plate boundaries or along subduction zones
as well as those generated by movements along active faults.

There were five (5) identified epicenters of earthquake. One each in barangays Batasan, Ansiray
and Ambulong and two epicenters in barangays Murtha. Fault lines recognized at the mainland
barangays of Monteclaro, Batasan, Camburay, Labangan Poblacion, Mangarin, Mapaya and
Caminawit and island barangays of Labangan Ilin, Buri, Catayungan, Natandol and Ambulong.


The major effects of
natural hazards are the
destruction or damage to
property and the
endangerment of life and
safety of individuals. How
to minimize these risks
are the primary
considerations for
mitigation. PHIVOLCS and
PAGASA regularly issue
warnings for impending
volcanic eruptions and
typhoons, respectively.
Strict adherence to
precautionary and safety
measures issued by these
two agencies would
minimize the risk.


Locally, strong
earthquakes that could
damage weak structures
can accompany volcanic
activities. It is also
accompanied by ash fall;
which settles back on
land. Thickness of deposit
and extent of affected
areas are determined by
the height of the eruption
column, prevailing wind
condition, distance, and
climatic condition.







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Capacity Assessment

The promotion of a culture of prevention is practically enabled by access to examples of best
practice in disaster risk reduction. In addition to the adoption of such measures training and
capacity-building strategies, mechanisms for disseminating information on best practice in
disaster risk reduction can make a difference especially in South Africa where it is much
needed as a integrated function of all activities. This includes the development of learning
material and support guides for different risk scenarios and contexts for the agricultural sector.

The Stakeholders

The demand on disaster-related organizations has changed dramatically and the intensity of
performance demanded of certain tasks has become more pronounced.

With a paradigm shift from response and relief to preparedness and mitigation, long-term
recovery needs to be considered earlier or before a hazard strikes. Planning for recovery
essentially becomes part of preparedness planning. As the enactment of RA 10121 was
welcomed, the Build Back Better principle has influenced the current practice greatly. This is
to advocate that rebuilding does not create more vulnerable dwellings. Also, as disaster-affected
households and communities need to recover, the need to be inclusive in making decisions that
will affect them cannot be overemphasized. In this sense, planning for DRR is similar to
planning for development; approaches that promote feedback and empowerment are needed.

Stakeholder roles in DRR range from legislating or adopting policies or programs on all local
levels (public entities and officials), implementing the policies, mandating others to take action
or provide incentives for others to take action, to assisting in implementation and providing
political momentum such as advocacy groups. In this sense, capability building among public
officials, participating organizations, and other individuals concerned is a necessity. A
community-based warning system is a must in order to integrate a participating community to
disaster preparedness.

Recurring Issues

Numerous projects and activities have been undertaken by various stakeholders. Some of these
efforts have been valuable experiences for those who have been involved; however; sustaining
the positive results has always been constantly threatened. There are indications that these
positive results have not simply penetrated day-to-day affairs or businesses. Old practices of
doing things remain and existing organizational and societal structures do not allow the gains
to thrive in the decision-making environment as well as operational setting.

Although human (or technical) and financial resources are often committed, in-kind
contribution must however not to be neglected. Partnerships between government and private
entities public private partnerships have been done spontaneously when need arises or in a
few instance, formalized through memorandum of agreement (or understanding). These
significant moves, however, do not fall under a general strategic plan of action where the
contribution of each stakeholder is seen in terms of the larger whole, particularly through the
lens of national safety or resilience. Threats remain if the level of awareness about dealing with
hazards is low and when little focus on risks is considered whenever one is faced to make a
decision. In the worst case, this behavior may manifest a culture of disasters rather than a
culture of prevention.

The locality must have adopted risk management standards which will set into a motion a wide-
ranging set of activities spurring government and private sectors to re-think and ultimately
adopt the risk management framework into their business philosophy and day-to-day

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Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100
operations. The message is that awareness must penetrate all levels of government, and in
household, firms, and offices. At the operation level, the commitment of budget for DRR is not
yet a practice. Putting up separate office to handle DRR is mandated by the RA 10121 but doing
so puts strain in the government bureaucracy.

1. Multi-sectored platforms

There was minimal exchange of information and experiences on DRR outside post-event
activities. There are several initiatives on DRR provided a venue for local, regional, national and
international players in DRR in which to take stock of progress and move forward. These are
however not yet institutionalized.

2. Planning Instruments

The municipality has drafted its medium-term development goals as its planning instrument.
However, the plan has no policy statement about DRR and its role in sustainable development
and attainment of the acknowledge damage from natural resources but that vulnerability
jeopardizes development gains due to socio-economic, environmental, and information losses.

3. Community participation

While preparedness measures are undertaken by some groups in communities, there is
weakness regarding linking these with the larger municipal response and other post-event
mechanisms. Ways and means to systematically involve volunteers and community members in
contingency planning exercises and development processes should be done by the MDRRMC led
by the local chief executive. Roles and responsibilities must therefore be assigned to all
stakeholders.

4. Resource allocation

LGUs are mandated by R.A. 8185 to allocate five percent (5%) of its Internal Revenue Allotment
(IRA) as Local Calamity Fund (LCF now called MDRRM Fund) and can only be used upon
declaration of a state of calamity by the local legislative body. In 2003, a Joint Memorandum
Circular issued by the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) Circular issued by the
Department of Budget and Management (DBM) and the Department of Interior and Local
Government (DILG) permits the use of the LCF/MDRRMF for disaster preparedness and other
pre-disaster activities.

5. Data analysis, risk assessments, and maps

The LGU does not have the full capacity to generate data on disasters and their impacts. On the
other hand, local residents should also be mobilized and enabled to provide ground truth data
on risks and vulnerabilities. Some of the techniques are already being employed by certain
projects but are not fully utilized to generate a more permanent database for communities and
linked to the planning information of LGU. It is not fully equipped with the capability to collect
and store planning data and information such as population statistics.

6. Information management and public awareness

When communication facilities break down during strong typhoons, the local government does
not have an alternative system to communicate warnings to residents and inform when and
where to evacuate. There is no proper early warning system except the media organizations
present in the municipality. Information, education, and communication (IEC) campaign is not
that intensive.

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7. Upline and stakeholder coordination

The LGU should have established a direct link to national agencies concerned to DRR. National,
regional and local mechanisms to inform and educate citizens in support of international
coordination in early warning should be established and utilized.

8. Formal education and trainings

Although posters are produced and distributed every year, budgetary constrains limit the
development, production and distribution of other IEC materials using various media.
Stakeholders should be enjoined to conduct their IEC campaigns within their organization to
instill DRR consciousness among the management and staff. The message of the campaign shall
be that managing risks is everybodys responsibility; they are themselves champions of DRR.

9. Environmental integration

Enforcement of laws dealing with environment and natural resources has not been easy. It has
been known for the past decades that the decline and degradation of forests, mangroves,
mountain slopes, hydrological capacity of rivers, and other natural attributes of communities
have resulted in sub-optimal conditions that lead to severe disasters impacts. In consideration
of the above, any DRM bill should take into account how to harmonize with the existing laws,
especially environment laws.

10. Social development

Any progress to reduce vulnerability is easily set back as intractable issues surface. Although
there is increasing consciousness on finding ways to handle DRR in places where armed conflict
takes place, issues related to some crises need to be dealt with. Integrating DRR into support
systems for the poor and victims of disasters needs to be institutionalized. Issues pertaining to
food and grains, in particular and poverty alleviation, in general are dealt with in a piecemeal
manner.

11. Reduction of economic vulnerabilities

Very little has been done to protect economic activities and productive sectors. Although some
private enterprises may have business continuity plans, how well these are linked with a local
governments contingency plan leaves many doubts.

12. Incorporating DRR to planning and population activities

Current planning practices need only to be enhanced so that DRR capacities such as the
use of appropriate tools at various planning levels are strengthened. Suitability analysis of
relocation areas should also be included among tasks in land use planning by LGUs. A
collaborative working arrangement with mapping and risk assessment agencies and entities
thus links with DRR partners are not only limited during the hazard event or post-event
activities but also further strengthened in a broader development sense.

13. Post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation

Though generally heading towards a sustainable development approach, post-disaster activities
need to be assessed within the context of development plans of the LGU.

14. Assessment of disaster risk impacts

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PLAIN BARANGAYS

Flood, Pests, Vehicular Accidents
Typhoo, Diseases, Hunger
Drought (El Nio)
Fire
Earthquake, Tornado

INLAND/UPLAND BARANGAYS
Typhoon
Landslide
Arm Struggle between AFP & NPA, flashflood
El Nio, La Nia, Fire, Earthquake

COASTAL BARANGAYS
Typhoon
Flood
Epidemic
Waste File-up
Fire
Earthquake
Tidal Wave
Tsunami
Dike Breach
Building Collapse
Oil Spill
Grass Fire



ISLAND BARANGAYS
Typhoon
Epidemic
Waste File-up
Fire
Earthquake
Tidal Wave
Tsunami
Oil Spill
Grass Fire

INTER-AGENCY GROUP
Typhoon
Flood
Fire
Vehicular Accident
Drought
Terrorism
Earthquake
Landslide
Storm Surge
Epidemic
Other hazards






Commitments to integrate DRR into their strategies, plans and programs are steadily being
carried out by government and non-government organizations, however, it is evident that
majority of infrastructures are sub-standards and are prone to damages and destruction.

15. Policy review and other institutional mechanisms

Mainstreaming of DRR in line agencies and in the LGU is hampered by unresponsive
organizational structures and practices that need modification and adaption to the risk
management process. The local government need further guidance from national government
agencies and their regional offices to pursue DRR as an intrinsic part of a devolved function and
as an element of the development strategy.

16. Updated contingency and other disaster preparedness plans

The SNAP quotes that, No disaster is the same as the last. Therefore, stakeholders at
different levels have to be alerted on this fact, and that new lessons are learned after every
disaster. It is therefore a must to update each contingency plan periodically. The Municipality
should always review its policies regarding the disasters faced by the area.

17. Post-event reviews and contingency mechanisms

Post-event reviews that involve various stakeholders are not regularly conducted.


Hazard Prioritization



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With the prioritization results on the above figure, the groups/council convened and identified
the event to plan for using two criteria: (a) likelihood to happen, and (b) will create the most
impact.


Sectoral Plans, Arrangements and Flowcharts

DRRM is divided into five sectors which will function based on each sectors objectives.

Communication, Warning, and Public Information
o To provide adequate information/communication system and warning
mechanism to be used during calamities and disasters
o To provide proper information thru any available communication based according
to the information about weather disturbance from PAG-ASA.

























The Communication, Warning & Public Information flow chart begins from the issuance of
warning signal from PAG ASA and other agencies. These warning signals or information are
then disseminated to the 38 barangays of San Jose through radio, text brigades and other
means of communication.

Upon receipt of the information the Communication, Warning & Public Information Sector is
activated. The sector then receives information/reports from affected barangays and
concerned agencies. Then it manages and disseminates these information/reports to and
from the communities and concerned agencies. The reports are then processed,
consolidated, prepared, and submitted to the Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and
Management Council (MDRRMC). The MDRRMC then submits the report to the Provincial
Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (PDRRMC) who submits it to the Regional
Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (RDRRMC). The RDCC then submit it to
the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC).

ISSUANCE OF
WARNING
SIGNALS FROM
PAGASA & OTHER
AGENCIES
DISSEMINATION OF
INFORMATION/
WARNING
TO DIFFERENT
BARANGAYS
THRU RADIO, TEXT
BRIGADES & OTHER
MEANS
ACTIVATION OF
COMMUNICATION,
WARNING & PUBLIC
INFORMATION
SECTOR

PROCESSING,
CONSOLIDATION,
PREPARATION &
SUBMISSION OF
REPORTS TO
PDRRMC

MANAGEMENT &
DISSEMINATION OF
INFORMATION/
REPORTS TO & FROM
COMMUNITIES &
CONCERNED
AGENCIES
RECEIPT OF
INFORMATION
/ REPORTS FROM
AFFECTED
BARANGAYS &
CONCERNED
AGENCIES
MDRRMC
PROCESSING,
CONSOLIDATION,
PREPARATION &
SUBMISSION OF
REPORTS TO
PDRRMC
PDRRMC
PROCESSING,
CONSOLIDATION,
PREPARATION &
SUBMISSION OF
REPORTS TO
RDRRMC
RDCC PROCESSING,
CONSOLIDATION,
PREPARATION &
SUBMISSION OF
REPORTS TO
NDRRMC

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Transportation and Evacuation
o To provide enough transportation and evacuation center to affected families and
population in a timely manner
















The Transportation & Evacuation Sector Flow Chart begins with the receipt of an early
warning from the Communication, Warning & Public Information Sector. Upon receipt
of the information, the Transportation & Evacuation Sector is activated. It then
coordinates with the other sectors. After coordination with the other sector, the
transport vehicles are then dispatched and the evacuation centre starts operation. The
centre then starts receiving evacuees. The Transportation & Evacuation Sector then
monitors, evaluates, consolidates and reports the whole operation.


Recovery and Rehabilitation
o To identify the affected areas and provide immediate services needed such as
repairs/reconstruction of destroyed infrastructures and facilities that largely
affect the community.
o To provide immediate response on rescue operation to the affected families.
o To provide security assistance during the engineering activities and rescue
operations.

















The Relief and Rehabilitation Flow Chart stars from the receipt of warning signals from
PAGASA. Upon the receipt of the warning signals the Relief and Rehabilitation Sector is

EARLY
WARNING
ACTIVATION OF
TRANSPORTATI
ON &
EVACUATION
CENTER
COORDINATION
WITH OTHER
SECTOR
MONITORING,
EVALUATION,
CONSOLIDATIO
N & REPORTING
RECEIVING OF
EVACUEES
DISPATCH
TRANSPORTATIO
N &
OPERATIONALIZA
TION OF
EVACUATION
CENTER
RECEIVES STORM
SIGNAL WARNING
FROM PAGASA
ACTIVATE OR
CONVENE THE
MEMBERS OF RELIEF
SECTOR
ENSURE / CHECK THE
STOCKS / GOODS /
ITEMS FOR RELIEF
ARE COMPLETE AND
READY
COMMUNICATE
WITH OTHER
SECTORS FOR AND
REGARDING NEEDS /
HELP
IDENTIFICATION OF
AFFECTED AREAS
THAT NEED
ASSISTANCE
DISTRIBUTION OF
RELIEF GOODS AND
ASSISTANCE
REPORTING AND
ACCOUNTING

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convene or activated. The Sector then ensures of checks its relief stock, goods, or items
are complete and ready. The Relief and Rehabilitation Sector then communicate with
other sectors for and regarding needs or help. From this communication affected areas
that need assistance are identified. Relief goods and assistance are then distribution to
these areas. After distribution reporting and accounting of distributed and
undistributed relief stocks, goods, or items is done.

Health and Medication
o Provide medical services the soonest possible time
o Maintain cleanliness of the area
o Prevent the spread of diseases
o Provide safe drinking water









The Health sector flow chart starts with the presence of weather disturbance which is
relayed by the Communication and Warning Sector to the four other sectors including the
Health Sector. Upon receipt of the information and Health Sector immediately convenes.
After convening it then prepares it resources: manpower, materials, methods, and
machinery. Then, it coordinates with other sectors to reach the target areas. The actual
operation begins upon reaching the specific target areas. After the operation, reports are
then prepared for filling and submission to proper authorities.

Relief and Operations/Search and Rescue
o To secure funds for disaster relief and provides services to the affected areas the
soonest possible time.




SEARCH & RESCUE
COMMANDER
ADMINISTRATION
RESEARCH &
MONITORING
PLANNING &
OPERATION
LOGISTICS
PUBLIC
INFORMATION
OFFICE
WEATHER
DISTURBANCE
COMMUNICATION
AND WARNING
SECTOR
HEALTH SECTOR
CONVENE PREPARATION
COORDINATION
WITH OTHER
SECTOR
ACTUAL
OPERATION
REPORTING

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The Search and Rescue Sector is headed by the Search and Rescue Commander and has
five sub-sectors namely: administration, research & monitoring, planning & operation,
logistics and public information office.











Upon receipt of the Alert Advisory, the Search and rescue Sector immediately prepares and
consolidate resources namely: manpower, machinery and equipment and methods. Then it
identifies the target area based on information and data gathered. After the target area
identification the search and rescue personnel are prepositioned to ensure safe, effective
and efficient operations. Then the actual response or search and rescue operation takes
place. It is followed by evacuation. And lastly consolidation of reports and inventory of
resources used in the operation.


The following pages will show how relief goods and other items will be needed when things
comes worse. TAKE NOTE THAT TRANSPORTATION MEANS AND OTHER ITEMS COMING
FROM THE PRIVATE SECTOR WERE NOT CONSIDERED ON THE NEEDS PROJECTIONS AND
ARE YET TO BE INCLUDED:
IDENTIFICATION
OF TARGET AREA
PREPOSITIONING
OF PERSONNEL
RESPONSE/
SEARCH &
RESCUE
EVACUATION
CONSOLIDATIO
N &
INVENTORY
PREPARATION &
CONSOLIDATION
ALERT
ADVISOR
Y

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Contingency Plan
Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro 5100




























The Municipal Government of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro


ROMULO M. FESTIN
Municipal Mayor

ATTY. REY C. LADAGA
Municipal Vice-Mayor

JOSE FRANCO MENDIOLA
PHILIP LIM
SANTIAGO JAVIER
SENEN ZAPANTA, JR.
NATHANIEL CRUZ
AUGUSTO ABELEDA
EMMANUEL AGUSTIN
JUNE PALMARES
Sangguniang Bayan Members

LNB PRES. JERRY BALAGOT III
Sangguniang Bayan Ex-Officio Members

NOEL N. GUERRERO FELMA AGUILAN
Municipal Administrator Secretary to the Sanggunian


JOSEPH SALGADO
Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator/MDRRMO-designate

RICARTE E. AGUILAR
Municipal Treasurer

ZENAIDA DELA CRUZ
Municipal Budget Officer

MARIDEL RALLETA
MHRMO

PABLO ALVARO
Municipal Accountant

NORMA S. BALINGIT
Administrative Officer V / OIC-MHRMO

ENGR. EDGAR MASANGKAY
Municipal Engineer

DR. ENID ASUNCION
Municipal Health Officer

ALICIA CAJAYON
Municipal Social Welfare and Development Officer

INY LOURDES PEROY
Agricultural Technologist / OIC-MAO

OLIVIA SALGADO
Municipal Assessor

PULE BACAY
Administrative Aide VI / OIC-Public Market Office

INANAMA GALLARDO
Head, MTO Business Permits and Licensing

MICHELLE F. RIVERA
Executive Assistant II / OIC-Tourism Officer

CORAZON SANTOS
Head, MTO Collection Division/Land Tax Division

MYRNA APOLINARIO
Administrative Assistant III / In-Charge of Office General Services Office

MILDRED CASTRONUEVO
Administrative Aide III / OIC-Fishport Office

JAIME BOONGALING
Market Supervisor / OIC-Slaughterhouse Office


DON VINCENT BUSTO
Administrative Officer II
Secretariat / Technical Working

MEMVILUZ L. BAURILE
Municipal Local Government Operations Officer


The Contingency Plan of the Municipality of San Jose, Occidental Mindoro is prepared by Don Vincent B. Busto in compliance with the mandates of all applicable regulations specifically by the Department of Interior and Local Government and the
Contingency Planning for Emergencies Guidebook.