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Translated by / Traducido por Patricio Mason, M.A.

Chilean Copper Commission


Research Department
INVESTMENT IN THE CHILEAN MINING INDUSTRY
Project Portfolio, 2013-2021

DE / 08 / 2013


Intellectual Property Registration No. 231924
Translated by / Traducido por Patricio Mason, M.A.
Contents

Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................... 1
I. Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 3
II. Mining Project Portfolio ..................................................................................................................... 4
2.1 Copper Mining Projects ............................................................................................................... 5
2.2 Gold and Silver Mining Projects ................................................................................................... 6
2.3 Other Relevant Mining Segments ................................................................................................ 6
III. Projected Investment ....................................................................................................................... 7
3.1 Investment Profiles ...................................................................................................................... 7
3.2 Investment Distribution by Project Status and Type ................................................................... 7
3.3 Regional Distribution of Projected Mining Investment ............................................................... 9
3.4 Projected Mining Investment Distribution by Country of Origin ................................................. 9
3.5 Portfolio Comparison, 2012-2013 ................................................................................................ 9
IV. Projected Copper Production to 2021 ............................................................................................ 11
4.1 Mined Copper Production Capacity Through 2021 ................................................................... 11
4.2 Regional Distribution of Mined Copper Production Capacity .................................................... 12
4.3 Estimate Review ........................................................................................................................ 13
4.4 Maximum Concentrate Processing Capacity ............................................................................. 15
V. Estimated Production of Other Minerals ......................................................................................... 17
5.1 Gold and Silver ........................................................................................................................... 17
5.2 Molybdenum ............................................................................................................................. 18
5.3 Iron ............................................................................................................................................. 18
5.4 Industrial Minerals ..................................................................................................................... 19
VI. Concluding Remarks ....................................................................................................................... 20
Annex A - Methodology .......................................................................................................................... 22
Annex B - Copper Mining ........................................................................................................................ 25
Annex C - Gold and Silver Mining ............................................................................................................ 40
Annex D - Iron and Industrial Minerals ................................................................................................... 47

Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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INVESTMENT IN THE CHILEAN MINING INDUSTRY
2013-2021 Portfolio
Executive Summary
Investment in the Chilean mining industry stands at US$112.5 billion. Mining companies have
announced 49 projects involving upwards of US$90 million each. Most are in progress or undergoing
review, with investment decisions slated for no later than 2017 and start-up by 2021. The project portfolio
is as follows:
PROJECTED MINING INVESTMENT
(US$ MN)
Prior to 2013 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Subtotal 2013-
2017
After 2017 TOTAL Share
10,386 7,701 10,401 10,977 12,805 13,024 54,908 21,425 86,718 77.0
1.1) CODELCO 3,397 3,969 4,623 4,757 4,552 4,565 22,466 4,683 30,546 27.1
1.2) Large Private Miners 6,765 3,613 5,390 5,586 7,454 7,735 29,778 16,357 52,899 47.0
1.3) Medium-Scale Miners 224 119 388 634 799 724 2,664 385 3,273 2.9
3,394 813 1,529 2,825 4,125 4,052 13,344 5,050 21,788 19.4
673 1,069 925 553 318 183 3,049 329 4,050 3.6
14,452 9,583 12,855 14,355 17,249 17,259 71,301 26,803 112,556 100.0
2) Gold & Silver
3) Iron & Industrial Minerals
Total (1+2+3)
SECTOR
1) Copper (1.1 + 1.2 + 1.3)

Source: Cochilco, based on published reports.

The portfolio is led by copper mining, with 28 projects and two additional investment lines.
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These
include Codelcos six structural projects, expansion of megadeposits such as Escondida, Pelambres and
Collahuasi, concentrate operations replacing depleted SX-EW operations (El Abra, Quebrada Blanca, etc.),
and new undertakings by medium-size miners.
Second in line is gold mining, with ten projects accounting for 19.4 percent of investment. Three
major gold projects (Caspiche, Cerro Casale, El Morro) will also produce copper while two other
replacement projects will help revitalize major gold mining operations. Iron, titanium and nitrate are also
attracting fresh investment.
Most investment targets are in northern Chile. While Antofagasta leads the way with US$43 billion
or 38 percent, new large-scale gold mining operations in Atacama are attracting a healthy US$34 billion or
30 percent.
Fully 46 percent of all investment comes from Chilean companies, including majors such as Codelco
and Antofagasta Minerals and medium-size Copec and Pucobre. Accounting for the balance are eleven
countries, notably Canada (27%) in gold mining and Japan with a wholly-owned operation (Caserones) and
a minority stake in several companies. India and China are venturing into iron mining.
Due to the nature of the mining business, all investment forecasts are subject to change. In the
industry, projects in progress are considered highly certain while those under review are noted for varying
degrees of uncertainty. As development moves forward, projects undergo changes that tend to impact
expected production capacity, investment amounts, and time frames.

1
Investment by Codelco in development and information projects other than structural projects.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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This update to Cochilcos 2012 mining investment report shows a US$8.2 billion increase in value.
This is the result of a US$7.36 billion upward revision of 22 projects plus a net US$900 million gain caused
by the entry of nine new projects and the start-up or cancellation of seven other projects in 2012.
In addition, some project schedules underwent changes ranging from a one-year acceleration to a
two-year delay. Overall, shorter-term investments declined and more were shifted to beyond 2015.
Additions to production capacity were also impacted as a result. Refined copper production
capacity in 2021 should stand at 8.1 million tons, rising to 8.4 million once all projects start to operate at
capacity.
Most of the increase will come from concentrate production, which should rise from 3.7 million
tons in 2012 to 6.8 million in 2021. By contrast, SX-EW cathode production should decline from 2.3 million
tons in 2012 to 1.4 million in 2021.
One effect of increased concentrating capacity will be a sharper rise in ore volume fed to
concentrating plants. Due to persistent declines in copper grades, throughput is expected to rise upwards
of 180 percent, from 450 million TPY in 2012 to 1.2 billion TPY in 2021, with concentrate production
capacity rising 86 percent from 3.7 to 6.8 million TPY in the same period.
As a result, plants are being redesigned on a larger scale, resulting in added costs and requiring
more energy, water and other inputs to produce a similar amount of copper, with the attendant impact on
demand for these goods and services. Increased productivity is one of the new challenges facing the
Chilean mining industry as it seeks to remain competitive.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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I. Introduction
The Chilean Ministry of Mines considers investment a strategic pillar of long-term mining growth.
This is an industry that turns resources in the ground into tangible wealth that contributes decisively to the
economic and social growth of all Chileans.
The Chilean Copper Commission (Cochilco) systematically tracks mining investment and reviews
planned projects and resulting opportunities. Findings are published annually for the benefit of interested
public officials and private industry players.
This report provides an update to mining industry investment in Chile, notably projected
investment and production capacity potential through the next decade.
It has three sections:
Inventory of copper, gold, silver, iron, and industrial mineral projects. The tally includes all projects
worth upwards of US$90 million either in progress or likely to materialize no later than 2017.
2
It
does not include initiatives in the exploration stage or below the above amount.
Planned investment by Codelco and large and medium-size copper, gold, silver, iron and industrial
mineral mining companies.
A ten-year projection and review of the mined (concentrate; SX-EW cathode) copper production
potential through 2022. Includes a global estimate of gold, silver, molybdenum, iron and industrial
mineral production.
Project amounts, time frames and other information is gleaned from public company reports.
While there is no guarantee that projects will materialize as stated, these reports stand as reliable proof of
interest and company perceptions of the geological potential and economic and political conditions
prevailing in Chile.

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The methodology is explained in Annex A. Copper mining project details are provided in Annex B. Annex C describes gold and
silver projects and Annex D review iron and industrial mineral (iodine, nitrate, potassium salts, titanium oxide) projects.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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II. Mining Project Portfolio
As of July 2013, projected investment in the Chilean mining industry stands at US$112.5 billion.
Companies have announced 49 projects, including US$86.7 billion in copper mining, US$21.7 billion in gold
and silver mining, and US$4 billion in iron and industrial minerals mining. These are as follows:
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TABLE 1: MINING PROJECT PORTFOLIO, 2013-2021
(START-UP DATES REPORTED TO JULY 2013)
!"#$"%&' '$)*+," )'+$#")$ !+,")$ $+-.)/ "0'+ !"#-+
./12 ") *&30
4567
8&!9 :;<
2013-2017 C1PL8 Codelco Chlle ub. Cwned - Cu varlous 8eplacemenL ConsLrucLlon 4,370
2013-2017 lnlC8MA1lCn 8C!LC1 Codelco Chlle ub. Cwned - Cu varlous new ConsLrucLlon 1,337
2013 MlnlS18C PALLS MlnL Codelco MlnlsLro Pales ulvlslon ub. Cwned - Cu AnLofagasLa new ConsLrucLlon 3,433
2013 CASL8CnLS Mlnera Lumlna Copper Chlle Large-Scale Cu ALacama new ConsLrucLlon 3,000
2014 AMA PL8MCSA SCM lnd. Mlns. 1arapac new ConsLrucLlon 1,033
2014 CL88C nLC8C nC81L Cla. Mlnera del aclflco lron ALacama Lxpanslon ConsLrucLlon 880
2014 nLW CxluL PLA LLACP Mlnera Lscondlda LLda. Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa 8eplacemenL ConsLrucLlon 721
2014 LCS CCLC8AuCS LxAnSlCn Cla. Mlnera del aclflco lron ALacama Lxpanslon ConsLrucLlon 413
2014 CC?A Su8 C1ASSluM nl18A1L LAn1 SCM nlLraLo lnd. Mlns. AnLofagasLa Lxpanslon ConsLrucLlon 230
2014 8CML8AL PASL v Cla. Mlnera del aclflco lron Coqulmbo 8eplacemenL leaslblllLy 196
2014 CSC nLC8C Mlnera San llerro Chlle LLda lron ALacama new leaslblllLy 90
2013 SlL88A CC8uA Slerra Corda SCM Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa new ConsLrucLlon 3,900
2013 LSCCnuluA CC l Mlnera Lscondlda LLda. Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa Lxpanslon ConsLrucLlon 3,838
2013 An1uCC?A Mlnera AnLucoya Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa new ConsLrucLlon 1,900
2013 AMA 8LAnCA uC8AuL SCM nlLraLo lnd. Mlns. AnLofagasLa Lxpanslon ConsLrucLlon 663
2013 ulLCC uL ALMAC8C Companla Mlnera Slerra norLe S.A Med.-Scale - Cu ALacama new leaslblllLy 397
2013 LSL8AnZA uC8AuL Mlnera Lsperanza Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa Lxpanslon leaslblllLy 330
2013 LA CClA PASL 7 klnross Mlnera de Chlle LLda. Cold ALacama 8eplacemenL leaslblllLy 200
2013 !L8CnlMC Agua de la lalda S.A. Cold ALacama 8eplacemenL leaslblllLy 423
2013 nuLvA LSL8AnZA - A8CuL8CS Laguna 8esources Chlle Cold ALacama new leaslblllLy 300
2013 vALLL CLn18AL LxAnSlCn Mlnera valle CenLral Med.-Scale - Cu C'Plgglns Lxpanslon leaslblllLy 132
2013 8LLLAvlS1A SanLa le Mlnlng lron ALacama new ConsLrucLlon 143
2016 ASCuA Cla. Mlnera nevada Cold ALacama new ConsLrucLlon 4,230
2016 LnCuLn18C CxluLS Cla. ConLracLual Mlnera LncuenLro Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa 8eplacemenL leaslblllLy 600
2016 CL88C 8LAnCC WhlLe MounLaln 1lLanlum lnd. Mlns. ALacama new leaslblllLy 380
2017 CASlCPL LLon Chlle Cold ALacama new leaslblllLy 4,600
2017 nLW MlnL LLvLL Codelco Ll 1enlenLe ulvlslon ub. Cwned - Cu C'Plgglns 8eplacemenL leaslblllLy 3,303
2017 LSL8AnZA Su8 (Lx 1LLLC8AlC) Mlnera Lsperanza Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa new leaslblllLy 3,300
2017 SAn1C uCMlnCC SanLo uomlngo SCM Large-Scale Cu ALacama new leaslblllLy 1,800
2017 LCMAS 8A?AS lll SuLlluLS Cla. Mlnera xsLraLa Lomas 8ayas LLda. Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa new refeaslblllLy 1,600
2017 vCLCn Andlna Mlnerals Chlle Cold ALacama new leaslblllLy 800
2017 LC8C - MA81L klnross Mlnera de Chlle LLda. Cold ALacama new leaslblllLy 800
2017 LL LSlnC ucobre Med.-Scale - Cu Coqulmbo new leaslblllLy 624
2017 lnCA uL C8C lnca de Cro S.A. Med.-Scale - Cu ALacama new leaslblllLy 600
2017 CL88C MA8lCunCA Mlnera ALacama aclflc Cold Chlle LLda. Cold ALacama new leaslblllLy 313
2018 81 SuLlluLS PASL ll Codelco 8adomlro 1omlc ulvlslon ub. Cwned - Cu AnLofagasLa new leaslblllLy 3,430
2018 LL A88A MlLL 8C!LC1 SCM Ll Abra Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa new leaslblllLy 3,000
2018 CPuCulCAMA1A unuL8C8Cunu Codelco ChuqulcamaLa ulvlslon ub. Cwned - Cu AnLofagasLa 8eplacemenL leaslblllLy 4,080
2018 LL MC88C SCM Ll Morro Cold ALacama new leaslblllLy 3,900
2018 l1-LAn1 18AnSlL8 Codelco Andlna ulvlslon ub. Cwned - Cu valparalso 8eplacemenL ConsLrucLlon 1,420
2018 8CuuC1C8A Socledad Mlnera Ll gulla LlmlLada Med.-Scale - Cu ALacama new refeaslblllLy 700
2018 1CvAku ucobre Med.-Scale - Cu AnLofagasLa new refeaslblllLy 600
2019 CCLLAPuASl LxAnSlCn PASL lll Cla. Mlnera uona lnes de Collahuasl Large-Scale Cu 1arapac Lxpanslon refeaslblllLy 6,300
2019 CuL88AuA 8LAnCA P?CCLnlC Cla. Mlnera 1eck Cuebrada 8lanca Large-Scale Cu 1arapac new leaslblllLy 3,390
2019 8LLlnCPC Cla. Mlnera 8ellncho Copper S.A. Large-Scale Cu ALacama new leaslblllLy 3,900
2020 CL88C CASALL Cla. Mlnera Casale Cold ALacama new leaslblllLy 6,000
2020 LnCuLn18C SuLlluLS Cla. ConLracLual Mlnera LncuenLro Large-Scale Cu AnLofagasLa new leaslblllLy 3,300
2021 LCS LLAM88LS ll LxAnSlCn Mlnera Los elambres Large-Scale Cu Coqulmbo Lxpanslon refeaslblllLy 7,000
2021 nuLvA AnulnA PASL ll Codelco Andlna ulvlslon ub. Cwned - Cu valparalso Lxpanslon leaslblllLy 6,749
664=>>? ")"#3 4567%4546 8&!9 :;<
Source: Cochilco, based on published reports.

3
Where no precise information is available, start-up year is estimated based on the methodology on Annex A(5). Includes Cerro
Casale, Collahuasi Phase III, Inca de Oro, and Relincho.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
5
2.1 Copper Mining Projects
The copper mining investment portfolio consists of 30 projects valued at US$86.7 billion, including
16 implemented by large private companies, six by medium-size private miners, and six structural projects
and two lines of investment in a range of minor initiatives
4
to be completed by Codelco in 2013-2017.
Details are reviewed in Annex B.
TABLE 2: COPPER MINING PROJECTS
(BY PRINCIPAL)
!"#$%#!&' !"()*%+
#$-*.+/*$+
0.1 /2
.+&"+30!
!"#$% '%!($)"* +,-./ 0/1-20/1.
345!%67"3!4 '%!($)" 1,88. 0/1-20/1.
6343*"%! #79$* 634$ -,+-8 0/1-
4$: 634$ 9$;$9 -,8/8 0/1.
'3"2'974" "%74*5$% 1,+0/ 0/1<
)#=>=3)767"7 =4?$%@%!=4? +,/</ 0/1<
%" *=953?$* '#7*$ 33 8,+-/ 0/1<
4=$;7 74?347 '#7*$ 33 A,.+B 0/01
+4567 %(8*'%( 9:;<=>
'6?@A !?BC65A /B2A?D
74"=)!C7 1,B// 0/18
$*'$%74D7 ='@%7?$ 88/ 0/18
$4)=$4"%! !E3?$* A// 0/1A
$*'$%74D7 *=% F$G "$9H@%75!I -,8// 0/1.
$4)=$4"%! *=953?$* -,8// 0/0/
9!* '$976J%$* 33 $E'74*3!4 .,/// 0/01
+456 &254E6@6D56 /B2A?67D FG;:<:
>=$J%7?7 J974)7 #C'!@$43) 8,8B/ 0/1.
%$934)#! -,B// 0/1B
+4567 +*%H I;=I:
8(J& #$K. 8* %(''&L0&.# )!997#=7*3 $E'74*3!4 '#7*$ 333 >;<:: 0/1B
M"**!("+3/%/("&$ $9 7J%7 6399 '%!($)" <;::: 0/1<
$*)!4?3?7 4$: !E3?$ #$7' 9$7)# .01 0/1+
$*)!4?3?7 !@' 3 -,<-< 0/18
HNL/ #$+*"$&+#($&' *3$%%7 @!%?7 9;I:: 0/18
!&$ !&%#M#% %(!!*" )7*$%!4$* 9;::: 0/1-
%&!.+($* /#$#N *74"! ?!634@! F;O:: 0/1.
N'*$%("* P.+"&+& 9!67* J7C7* 333 *=953?$* F;>:: 0/1.
/AQBRS3.T67A /B2A?D
$9 $*'34! A0+ 0/1.
"!;7K= A// 0/1<
+4567 !0%(U"* F;VV=
L(+ %L#'# '%!?=)"!%7 G:: 0/1<
!&$&0.+ 34)7 ?$ !%! >:: 0/1.
%(!*% ?3$@! ?$ 7967@%! <IG 0/18
&/*"#N( "*.(0"%*. ;799$ )$4"%79 $E'74*3!4 F<V 0/18
O>;GFO V:F93V:VF
&$+(M&N&.+& /#$*"&'.
%(8*'%( %L#'*
+*%H
UL! U#''#+($
!0%(U"*
+(+&' %(!!*" /#$#$N

Source: Cochilco, based on published reports.

4
See Other Development Projects and Research Projects in Annex A(3).
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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2.2 Gold and Silver Mining Projects
Table 3 shows gold and silver projects expected to start up in 2015-2020.
TABLE 3: GOLD AND SILVER MINING PROJECTS
(BY PRINCIPAL)
kINCIAL kCILC1
INVLS1MLN1
US5 Mn
S1Ak1-U
AMANA GCLD !"#$%&'( 423 )*+,
kINGSGA1L IN1. %-"./ "12"#/%3/ 4 /#5-"#(1 300 )*+,
2/16-/ 78),* )*+9
6"##( 6/1/:" 98*** )*)*
1ota| 8AkkICk GCLD 10,2S0
LkL1Lk kLSCUkCLS CCk. 6/12&6;" 4,600 )*+<
ANDINA kLSCUkCLS .(:6=% 800 )*+<
kINkCSS :(>( 4 '/#?" 800 )*+<
A1ACAMA ACIIIC GCLD 6"##( '/#&6-%@/ S1S )*+<
GCLD CCk. ": '(##( 3,900 )*+A
21,S88 201S - 2020
8AkkICk GCLD
1C1AL GCLD & SILVLk MINING

Source: Cochilco, based on published reports.

These include projects focusing on producing both gold and significant quantities of copper (Cerro
Casale, El Morro, Caspiche). Details are reviewed in Annex C.
2.3 Other Relevant Mining Segments
These include iron, with five projects worth US$1.72 billion, and industrial minerals, with three
nitrate and iodine and one titanium oxide project jointly valued at US$2.32 billion. Details are reviewed
below and in Annex D.
TABLE 4: IRON AND INDUSTRIAL MINERALS PROJECTS
(BY PRINCIPAL)
!"#$%#!&' !"()*%+
#$-*.+/*$+
0.1 /2
.+&"+30!
!"##$ &"'#$ &$#(" ))* +*,-
.$/ !$.$#01$/ "230&/4$& -,5 +*,-
#$6"#0. 370/" 8 ,9: +*,-
+4567 %&! 89:;<
=*>*# ?*$@A*$@ @"(0! $/$ &"'#$ <B +*,-
/#$*"& .&$+& A* ;"..084/(0 8:C +*,<
89DEE EB8:3EB8F
30630 7"#6$/0 ,=*55 +*,-
!$>0 /?# 3$(0//4?6 &4(#0(" 3.0&( +<* +*,-
30630 ;.0&!0 ?3'#01" ::< +*,<
+4567 .G/ 89<:;
?=#+* /(0$+&#$ !"##$ ;.0&!$ C;B +*,:
E9CE; EB8:3EB8H
:9BFB EB8:3EB8H
.G/
.0>+(+&' #$I0.+"#&' /#$*"&'.
+(+&' #"($ /#$#$@ J #$I0.+"#&' /#$*"&'.
%&!
.0>+(+&' #"($ /#$#$@

Source: Cochilco, based on published reports.

Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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III. Projected Investment
3.1 Investment Profiles
Projects have a significant economic impact as they progress from initial review and equipment
purchase to facility construction and assembly through to start-up, a process often lasting several years.
Estimated below are annual outlays in 2013-2017, including some materialized prior to 2013, as
applicable. Outlays beyond 2017 are shown in the aggregate. These estimates are for reference only and
do not represent a company commitment.

TABLE 5: PROJECTED MINING INVESTMENT
(US$ MN)
Prior to 2013 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Subtotal 2013-
2017
After 2017 TOTAL Share
10,386 7,701 10,401 10,977 12,805 13,024 54,908 21,425 86,718 77.0
1.1) CODELCO 3,397 3,969 4,623 4,757 4,552 4,565 22,466 4,683 30,546 27.1
1.2) Large Private Miners 6,765 3,613 5,390 5,586 7,454 7,735 29,778 16,357 52,899 47.0
1.3) Medium-Scale Miners 224 119 388 634 799 724 2,664 385 3,273 2.9
3,394 813 1,529 2,825 4,125 4,052 13,344 5,050 21,788 19.4
673 1,069 925 553 318 183 3,049 329 4,050 3.6
14,452 9,583 12,855 14,355 17,249 17,259 71,301 26,803 112,556 100.0
2) Gold & Silver
3) Iron & Industrial Minerals
Total (1+2+3)
SECTOR
1) Copper (1.1 + 1.2 + 1.3)

Source: Cochilco, based on published reports.

Copper mining accounts for fully 77 percent of the projected US$112.5 billion investment amount,
followed by gold and silver mining with 19.4 percent. The remaining 3.6 percent is destined for iron and
industrial minerals mining projects.
Of this amount, 12.8 percent has been materialized, 63.3 percent will be disbursed in 2013-2017,
and 23.8 percent will materialize in 2018-2021.
The methodology used to compile and process project data is shown on Annex A.
3.2 Investment Distribution by Project Status and Type
Projects often run into internal and external issues that force a revision of the original plan. Per the
methodological criteria explained in Annex A (2), projects herein are classed as either greenfield (i.e., new)
or brownfield (i.e., replacement or expansion of existing operations). In terms of status, they are in
progress or in the feasibility or prefeasibility stages.
These factors help more accurately assess the likelihood of materialization as stated. Conditions
assessed are baseline, probable, and possible.
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5
Baseline: In progress and highly probable. Probable: Replacement, expansion or new projects in the feasibility stage by
companies operating in Chile and slated to start up through 2017. Possible: New projects Feasibility study underway by new
entrants and projects in the prefeasibility stage.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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Table 6 shows estimated investment amounts by project status, type and degree of certainty.
TABLE 6: INVESTMENT DISTRIBUTION BY STATUS AND TYPE
(US$ Mn)
Sector Status / Condition Prior to 2013 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Subtotal 2013-
2017
Beyond 2017 TOTAL Share
In Progress / Baseline 11,319 6,828 6,649 4,228 1,749 1,536 20,991 498 32,808 29.1
Feasibility / Probable 588 866 2,903 3,780 5,146 3,302 15,997 381 16,966 15.1
Feasibility / Possible 2,033 1,199 2,521 4,857 8,094 9,158 25,829 13,462 41,325 36.7
Prefeasibility / Possible 512 690 782 1,490 2,259 3,263 8,484 12,462 21,457 19.1
14,452 9,583 12,855 14,355 17,249 17,259 71,301 26,803 112,556 100.0
In Progress / Baseline 8,367 5,659 5,825 3,200 1,376 1,433 17,493 229 26,089 23.2
Feasibility / Probable 420 496 2,247 3,480 5,046 3,222 14,491 321 15,232 13.5
Feasibility / Possible 1,087 856 1,547 2,807 4,124 5,106 14,440 8,413 23,940 21.3
Prefeasibility / Possible 512 690 782 1,490 2,259 3,263 8,484 12,462 21,457 19.1
10,386 7,701 10,401 10,977 12,805 13,024 54,908 21,425 86,718 77.0
In Progress / Baseline 2,420 380 330 850 270 0 1,830 0 4,250 3.8
Feasibility / Probable 73 140 310 100 0 0 550 0 623 0.6
Feasibility / Possible 902 293 889 1,875 3,855 4,052 10,964 5,049 16,915 15.0
Prefeasibility / Possible 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
3,394 813 1,529 2,825 4,125 4,052 13,344 5,050 21,788 19.4
In Progress / Baseline 533 789 494 178 103 103 1,668 269 2,469 2.2
Feasibility / Probable 95 230 346 200 100 80 956 60 1,111 1.0
Feasibility / Possible 45 50 85 175 115 0 425 0 470 0.4
Prefeasibility / Possible 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
673 1,069 925 553 318 183 3,049 329 4,050 3.6 Amount
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l
s

Source: Cochilco, based on published reports and own estimates.

Although 44.2 percent of the portfolio is expected to materialize in 2013-2017, projects classed as
Possible are subject to greater uncertainty. This segment includes new entrants who have yet to complete
a feasibility study and others who have not secured a permit to start construction prior to 2017.
Possible gold mining projects account for of planned investment and 15 percent of the portfolio.
Projects in the prefeasibility stage are mainly copper projects not scheduled to come on stream before the
end of the decade and therefore subject to change.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
9
3.3 Regional Distribution of Projected Mining Investment
TABLE 7: REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF PROJECTED MINING INVESTMENT (US$ Mn)
REGION Prior to 2013 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Subtotal
2013-2017
After 2017 TOTAL Share
TARAPAC 547 224 474 1,103 2,003 3,203 7,008 5,569 13,123 11.7
ANTOFAGASTA 6,412 5,397 7,762 6,762 7,000 4,949 31,870 4,378 42,659 37.9
ATACAMA 6,406 2,354 2,409 4,165 5,820 6,071 20,818 6,940 34,164 30.4
COQUIMBO 198 167 116 110 410 519 1,322 6,300 7,820 6.9
VALPARASO 317 283 407 936 1,149 1,814 4,588 3,560 8,465 7.5
SANTIAGO 0 224 251 143 122 148 889 0 889 0.8
O'HIGGINS 573 934 1,437 1,137 745 554 4,805 57 5,435 4.8
Country Total 14,452 9,583 12,855 14,355 17,249 17,259 71,301 26,803 112,556 100.0

Source: Cochilco, based on published reports and own estimates.
Northern Chile, led by Antofagasta, is the focus of most investment. Gold and iron projects in
Atacama are also major players.
3.4 Projected Mining Investment Distribution by Country of Origin
TABLE 8: INVESTMENT DISTRIBUTION BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN AND OWNERSHIP
!"# %& "'()* !"# %& "'()* !"# %& "'()* !"# %& "'()*
+',-* !"#!"$ %!&' %'#'(( %)&% "') (&$ $#!$* $&$
+(&(.( )(#+"+ $+&) *#!'' '&! $(#!(! "'&$ ,$) (&,
/(0(& ""#("+ *&' "(#,*( *&! ( (&( )$' (&)
"1,23*)-(&. %#%,( %&( %#%,( %&( ( (&( ( (&(
!&,2*. 4,&5.67 %#$$' )&' %#$$' )&' ( (&( ( (&(
89:2)(-,( %#("+ )&, )#+"+ )&) )(( (&) ( (&(
!&,2*. "2(2*: $#*)( $&, $#!!( $&) ( (&( )'( (&)
;6-(&. $#"%! "&* $#"%! "&* ( (&( ( (&(
;*)9 '(( (&+ ( (&( '(( (&+ ( (&(
46)*( !%( (&! !%( (&! ( (&( ( (&(
<&.,( "(( (&" ( (&( ( (&( "(( (&"
+',&( *( (&" ( (&( ( (&( *( (&"
=>=8? @@ABCCD @EEFE GDBH@G HHFE A@BHGG @IFJ JBECE KFD
+69&2)L
8769&2 +600*) M6-. N ",-O*) <)6& N <&.9:2),(- %,&*)(-:

Source: Cochilco.

Overall, 46.4 percent of investment comes from Codelco, Antofagasta Minerals and other Chilean
majors. With a conspicuous focus on gold, Canada comes second. Japan stands third with a wholly-owned
operation (Caserones) and a minority stake in several companies.
3.5 Portfolio Comparison, 2012-2013
The investment portfolio to June 2013 includes 49 initiatives worth US$112.5 billion, a US$8.25
billion increase from 47 projects and US$104.3 billion reported in June 2012.
6
Changes in project value and
composition are as follows:
(a) Five projects worth US$1.7 billion were omitted due to start-up.
(b) The US$963-million San Antonio Oxides project was canceled. Codelco is reviewing other options to
ensure continuity of its Salvador Division.

6 See Inversin en la Minera Chilena - Cartera de Proyectos 2012 - DE/04/2012.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
10
(c) Five copper, two gold and two iron projects worth US$3.6 billion were added.
(d) The estimated value of investment stays consistent at US$20.2 billion or ten projects.
(e) Seven projects revised investment amounts by US$3.09 billion to US$19.7 billion. Time frames
remained unchanged.
(f) Eight projects will be delayed from one to three years although investment remains unchanged at
US$30.6 billion. Further changes are likely.
(g) The cost and time frame of 13 projects were redefined. Costs increased a net US$3.92 billion to
US$32.32 billion while start-up will be delayed from one to two or more years.
(h) Codelco investment in miscellaneous research and development projects increased US$340 million.
Where no official announcement exists (Cerro Casale, Collahuasi Phase III, Inca de Oro, Relincho),
start-up is estimated based on available information and the methodology on Annex A(5).
TABLE 9: CHANGES IN PORTFOLIO, 2012-2013
Start-up 2012 Start-up 2013 Region Project Name
Outlays to
June 2012
(US$ Mn)
Outlays to July
2013
(US$ Mn)
Difference
(US$ Mn)
1,744 --- -1,744
2012 2012 Antofagasta ESCONDIDA CRUSHER RELOCATION 554 --- -554
2012 2012 Antofagasta LOMAS BAYAS II EXTENSION 293 --- -293
2012 2012 Atacama MINA CARMEN 70 --- -70
2013 2012 Antofagasta KCl PRODUCTION UPGRADE 527 --- -527
2013 2013 Tarapac COLLAHUASI EXPANSION PHASE II (*) 300 --- -300
963 --- -963
2015 --- Atacama SAN ANTONIO OXIDES 963 --- -963
--- 3,603 3,603
--- 2014 Atacama OSO NEGRO --- 90 90
--- 2014 Coquimbo ROMERAL PHASE V --- 196 196
--- 2015 Atacama LA COIPA PHASE 7 --- 200 200
--- 2015 Antofagasta ESPERANZA UPGRADE --- 550 550
--- 2015 O'Higgins VALLE CENTRAL EXPANSION --- 152 152
--- 2016 Antofagasta ENCUENTRO OXIDES --- 600 600
--- 2017 Atacama CERRO MARICUNGA --- 515 515
--- 2018 Antofagasta TOVAKU --- 600 600
--- 2018 Atacama PRODUCTORA --- 700 700
20,212 20,212 0
2013 2013 Atacama CASERONES 3,000 3,000 0
2014 2014 Antofagasta COYA SUR POTASSIUM NITRATE PLANT 250 250 0
2014 2014 Antofagasta ESCONDIDA NEW OXIDE HEAP LEACH 721 721 0
2014 2014 Tarapac PAMPA HERMOSA 1,033 1,033 0
2015 2015 Antofagasta SIERRA GORDA 3,900 3,900 0
2015 2015 Antofagasta PAMPA BLANCA UPGRADE 665 665 0
2015 2015 Atacama BELLAVISTA 143 143 0
2017 2017 Antofagasta LOMAS BAYAS III SULFIDES 1,600 1,600 0
2018 2018 Antofagasta EL ABRA MILL PROJECT 5,000 5,000 0
2018 2018 Atacama EL MORRO 3,900 3,900 0
16,701 19,795 3,094
2013 2013 Antofagasta MINISTRO HALES MINE 2,513 3,435 922
2015 2015 Antofagasta ESCONDIDA OGP I 3,800 3,838 38
2015 2015 Atacama DIEGO DE ALMAGRO (**) 227 597 370
2017 2017 Antofagasta ESPERANZA SUR (Ex TELGRAFO) 2,700 3,500 800
2017 2017 O'Higgins NEW MINE LEVEL 3,095 3,505 410
2018 2018 Valparaso PIT-PLANT TRANSFER 1,066 1,420 354
2020 2020 Antofagasta ENCUENTRO SULFIDES (Ex CARACOLES) 3,300 3,500 200
30,690 30,690 0
2013 2015 Atacama NUEVA ESPERANZA - ARQUEROS 300 300 0
2014 2017 Atacama INCA DE ORO 600 600 0
2015 2017 Atacama LOBO - MARTE 800 800 0
2016 2019 Tarapac QUEBRADA BLANCA HYPOGENIC 5,590 5,590 0
2018 2019 Tarapac COLLAHUASI EXPANSION PHASE III 6,500 6,500 0
2018 2019 Atacama RELINCHO 3,900 3,900 0
2018 2020 Atacama CERRO CASALE 6,000 6,000 0
2019 2021 Coquimbo LOS PELAMBRES II EXPANSION 7,000 7,000 0
28,403 32,329 3,926
2013 2014 Atacama CERRO NEGRO NORTE 798 880 82
2013 2014 Atacama LOS COLORADOS EXPANSION 364 413 49
2014 2015 Atacama JERNIMO 300 423 123
2014 2015 Antofagasta ANTUCOYA 1,700 1,900 200
2013 2016 Atacama PASCUA 3,000 4,250 1,250
2015 2016 Atacama CERRO BLANCO 191 380 189
2016 2017 Atacama VOLCN 750 800 50
2016 2017 Atacama CASPICHE 4,800 4,600 -200
2016 2017 Coquimbo EL ESPINO 600 624 24
2016 2017 Atacama SANTO DOMINGO 1,242 1,800 558
2016 2018 Antofagasta RT SULFIDES PHASE II 4,482 5,430 948
2019 2018 Antofagasta CHUQUICAMATA UNDERGROUND 3,735 4,080 345
2019 2021 Valparaso NUEVA ANDINA PHASE II 6,441 6,749 308
5,587 5,927 340
2012-2016 2013-2017 Various OTHER PROJECTS 3,877 4,370 493
2012-2016 2013-2017 Various INFORMATION PROJECT 1,710 1,557 -153
104,300 112,556 8,256
13 REDEFINED IN COST AND TIME FRAME
OTHER CODELCO INVESTMENTS
TOTAL (US$ Mn)
5 NOW ON STREAM
1 CANCELED
9 NEW
10 UNCHANGED
7 CHANGING IN COST ONLY
8 DELAYED

(*) Startup in Q1 2013. (**) SX-EW and concentrate merged into a single project.
Source: Cochilco.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
11
IV. Projected Copper Production to 2021
By expanding Chilean production capacity, particularly in copper, the investment process
underway will help sustain an increased supply to consumer countries.
This chapter estimates maximum copper production capacity by 2021 from operations both
existing and planned.
4.1 Mined Copper Production Capacity Through 2021
Mined copper production capacity includes concentrate and SX-EW cathode production. The
methodology is shown in Annex A(5).
Maximum mined copper production capacity is shown in Table 10. Details by producer are shown
in Annex G. The table shows maximum production capacity in 2012 and information for 2013 to 2021 by
operation and project status, based on data reported to Cochilco. Annual changes in total maximum
production capacity are also shown.

TABLE 10: MAXIMUM MINED COPPER PRODUCTION CAPACITY THROUGH 2021 (kMTF)
!"#"$% ' ()*+,",)* 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
-./0#",*1 ' 2#%/3,*/ 5,992 6,179 6,062 5,629 5,293 5,039 4,854 4,719 4,398 3,927
4* 50)10/%% ' 2#%/3,*/ 0 17 372 495 618 627 590 559 602 669
6/#%,7,3,"8 ' 50)7#73/ 0 0 4 272 483 1,054 1,158 1,484 1,617 1,791
6/#%,7,3,"8 ' 5)%%,73/ 0 0 0 16 27 52 343 515 859 1,313
50/9/#%,7,3,"8 ' 5)%%,73/ 0 0 0 0 0 0 57 85 258 378
:-:;< =4>?@ 5,992 6,195 6,438 6,412 6,421 6,772 7,001 7,362 7,734 8,078
! " #$%& #$'& "($%& ($)& *$*& #$%& *$+& *$)& %$%&
!"#"$% ' ()*+,",)* 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
-./0#",*1 ' 2#%/3,*/ 3,690 4,011 4,020 3,740 3,442 3,248 3,129 3,071 2,894 2,723
4* 50)10/%% ' 2#%/3,*/ 0 14 346 429 508 536 493 485 518 522
6/#%,7,3,"8 ' 50)7#73/ 0 0 4 272 458 1,019 1,108 1,434 1,567 1,741
6/#%,7,3,"8 ' 5)%%,73/ 0 0 0 11 16 41 328 499 841 1,306
50/9/#%,7,3,"8 ' 5)%%,73/ 0 0 0 0 0 0 57 85 258 378
:-:;< (->(?>:A;:? 3,690 4,025 4,370 4,452 4,424 4,844 5,114 5,573 6,079 6,670
! " '$)& ,$-& )$'& "($-& '$*& *$-& '$(& '$)& '$.&
!"#"$% ' ()*+,",)* 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
-./0#",*1 ' 2#%/3,*/ 2,302 2,168 2,042 1,889 1,852 1,790 1,725 1,649 1,504 1,205
4* 50)10/%% ' 2#%/3,*/ 0 3 26 66 110 92 97 74 84 146
6/#%,7,3,"8 ' 50)7#73/ 0 0 0 0 25 35 50 50 50 50
6/#%,7,3,"8 ' 5)%%,73/ 0 0 0 5 11 11 15 16 18 7
50/9/#%,7,3,"8 ' 5)%%,73/ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
:-:;< !BC?D 2,302 2,170 2,069 1,960 1,997 1,928 1,887 1,789 1,655 1,408
! " "*$.& "%$.& "*$+& )$'& "#$*& "+$)& "*$+& ".$*& ")%$'&
Total Mined
(kMTF)
Total
Concentrate
(kMTF)
Total SX-EW
Cathodes
(kMTF)
Source: Cochilco.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
12
4.2 Regional Distribution of Mined Copper Production Capacity
The impact of the investment process underway on production capacity across the various mining
regions of Chile is also important.
The tables below show projected maximum mined copper production capacity by region and type
(concentrate and SX-EW cathodes).
TABLE 11: REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF MINED COPPER PRODUCTION CAPACITY THROUGH 2021 (kMTF)
Region Status 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Operations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Operations 538 701 736 783 732 681 655 650 618 544
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 114 316 445
Subtotal 538 701 736 783 732 681 655 763 934 989
Operations 3,297 3,186 3,078 2,780 2,509 2,404 2,366 2,278 2,029 1,765
Projects 0 14 292 622 884 1,393 1,488 1,689 1,818 2,180
Subtotal 3,297 3,200 3,370 3,401 3,394 3,796 3,854 3,967 3,847 3,945
Operations 409 427 412 357 348 340 318 309 287 237
Projects 0 3 81 136 190 222 484 600 937 964
Subtotal 409 429 493 493 538 562 802 909 1,223 1,201
Operations 561 577 569 531 533 532 532 532 533 529
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 19 32 42 44 91
Subtotal 561 577 569 531 533 551 565 574 577 620
Operations 356 327 330 306 310 313 260 270 270 261
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 211
Subtotal 356 327 330 306 310 313 260 270 270 472
Operations 380 491 466 445 445 420 420 420 420 382
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 380 491 466 445 445 420 420 420 420 382
Operations 450 470 470 427 416 348 303 261 242 209
Projects 0 0 4 26 54 100 143 198 221 260
Subtotal 450 470 474 453 470 448 446 459 463 469
Operations 5,992 6,179 6,062 5,629 5,293 5,039 4,854 4,719 4,398 3,927
Projects 0 17 376 783 1,128 1,733 2,147 2,643 3,336 4,151
TOTAL 5,992 6,195 6,438 6,412 6,421 6,772 7,001 7,362 7,734 8,078
VI. O'Higgins
Country Total
III. Atacama
IV. Coquimbo
V. Valparaso
Santiago
I. Tarapac
II. Antofagasta
XV. Arica &
Parinacota
Source: Cochilco.

TABLE 12: REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF COPPER CONCENTRATE PRODUCTION CAPACITY THROUGH 2021 (kMTF)
Region Status 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Operations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Operations 304 478 539 569 520 514 490 490 465 465
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 114 316 445
Subtotal 304 478 539 569 520 514 490 603 781 910
Operations 1,469 1,470 1,454 1,273 1,040 951 965 945 836 762
Projects 0 14 268 559 756 1,295 1,375 1,589 1,719 2,013
Subtotal 1,469 1,484 1,723 1,832 1,796 2,245 2,340 2,535 2,555 2,776
Operations 270 295 280 249 240 231 220 214 190 169
Projects 0 0 78 128 172 182 439 564 892 934
Subtotal 270 295 358 377 412 414 660 779 1,082 1,103
Operations 536 551 548 514 514 514 514 514 514 514
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 19 28 37 37 84
Subtotal 536 551 548 514 514 533 542 552 552 598
Operations 333 308 314 294 298 301 248 258 258 249
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 211
Subtotal 333 308 314 294 298 301 248 258 258 460
Operations 330 441 416 416 416 392 392 392 392 357
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 330 441 416 416 416 392 392 392 392 357
Operations 448 468 468 424 413 345 300 258 239 206
Projects 0 0 4 26 54 100 143 198 221 260
Subtotal 448 468 472 450 467 445 443 456 460 466
Operations 3,690 4,011 4,020 3,740 3,442 3,248 3,129 3,071 2,894 2,723
Projects 0 14 350 712 982 1,596 1,985 2,502 3,185 3,948
TOTAL 3,690 4,025 4,370 4,452 4,424 4,844 5,114 5,573 6,079 6,670
IV. Coquimbo
V. Valparaso
Santiago
VI. O'Higgins
Country Total
XV. Arica &
Parinacota
I. Tarapac
II. Antofagasta
III. Atacama
Source: Cochilco.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
13
TABLE 13: REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF SX-EW CATHODE PRODUCTION CAPACITY THROUGH 2021 (kMTF)
Region Status 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
Operations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Operations 235 223 197 214 212 167 165 160 153 79
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 235 223 197 214 212 167 165 160 153 79
Operations 1,828 1,716 1,624 1,506 1,470 1,453 1,401 1,332 1,192 1,003
Projects 0 0 23 63 128 98 113 100 100 166
Subtotal 1,828 1,716 1,647 1,569 1,598 1,551 1,514 1,432 1,292 1,169
Operations 139 132 132 108 107 109 97 95 96 68
Projects 0 3 3 8 18 39 45 35 45 30
Subtotal 139 135 135 116 125 148 142 130 141 98
Operations 25 26 21 17 19 18 18 18 19 15
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 7 7
Subtotal 25 26 21 17 19 18 22 23 26 22
Operations 23 18 16 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 23 18 16 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
Operations 50 50 50 29 29 29 29 29 29 25
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 50 50 50 29 29 29 29 29 29 25
Operations 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Projects 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Operations 2,302 2,168 2,042 1,889 1,852 1,790 1,725 1,649 1,504 1,205
Projects 0 3 26 71 146 137 162 140 152 203
TOTAL 2,302 2,170 2,069 1,960 1,997 1,928 1,887 1,789 1,655 1,408
V. Valparaso
Santiago
VI. O'Higgins
Country Total
XV. Arica &
Parinacota
I. Tarapac
II. Antofagasta
III. Atacama
IV. Coquimbo

Source: Cochilco.
4.3 Estimate Review
By helping offset depletion, investments reviewed here have a strong impact on overall copper
production in Chile. Extent and use of maximum production capacities have a long-term impact on mining
and related activities, especially the supply of goods and services, an endeavor of strong local relevance.
While actual production expected in the next few years will not necessarily use the full installed
capacity, maximum production profiles are a valuable tool for estimating demand for related goods,
services and human resources across regions and nationwide. The charts below shows the expected
behavior of both concentrate and hydrometallurgical operations and projects.


CHART 1 CHART 2
!
#$!!!
%$!!!
&$!!!
'$!!!
($!!!
)$!!!
*$!!!
%!#% %!#& %!#' %!#( %!#) %!#* %!#+ %!#, %!%! %!%#
-.//01 -.230241540 61.7839.2 -5/53:4; <=>? @
A/0159.2B 61.C034B
!
#$!!!
%$!!!
&$!!!
'$!!!
($!!!
)$!!!
*$!!!
%!#% %!#& %!#' %!#( %!#) %!#* %!#+ %!#, %!%! %!%#
-./01 2345678 9:67;<=6> 23?3<@4A BCDEF
G?8:3=6>H 9:6I8<4H

Source: Cochilco.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
14
4.3.1 National Forecast
Chilean mined copper production should rise to a maximum of 8.2 million tons refined copper in
the next decade, a 36.8 percent increase over the nearly 5.5 million tons estimated for 2012.
7
The annual
rate of growth for the period would be 3.2 percent.
By 2022, depletion and end of mine life will cut output from existing operations, not considering
new investment amounts some of them will require, to 3.64 million tons refined copper, 2.35 million tons
less than the baseline year (2012). Therein lies the importance of materializing projected investment plans,
as these would add 4.55 million TPY or 56 percent of maximum production capacity estimated for 2022.
Planned developments rely mainly on increasing concentrate capacity from 3.7 million tons in 2012
to 6.9 million tons in 2022, for an annual rate of growth of 6.4 percent. With that, concentrate output as a
share of mined copper production would expand from 62 percent in 2012 to 84 percent in 2022.
Hydrometallurgical copper is expected to slide from over 2 million tons SX-EW cathodes in recent
years to some 1.9 million tons through 2018 and 1.32 million by 2022.
Causes include a declining number of hydrometallurgical projects, depletion of leachable ores and
closure of major operations, notably Codelcos Salvador, Mina Sur, and Radomiro Tomic Oxides, as well as
Quebrada Blanca and other private operations. That said, Codelco and other players may yet move to
prolong the lifespan of some operations while others may shift to mining underlying primary sulfides.

4.3.2 Maximum Production Capacity By Likelihood
While the above capacity is estimated based on all projects materializing as stated, mining projects
are inherently subject to change. As such, maximum production capacity profiles are classed per the
criteria in Annex A(2) in a manner similar to the corresponding investment profiles.
Table 10 shows that maximum production remains subject to internal and external contingencies.
The baseline profile, consisting of existing operations and projects in progress, should stand at 4.6 million
tons refined copper by 2021. This is equivalent to only 77 percent of maximum production capacity in 2012
and to 57 percent of estimates for 2021, which explains the critical nature of the less advanced projects
reviewed below.
The probable profile, which includes projects in the feasibility study stage by companies with
existing operations in Chile and slated for start-up no later than 2017, should add an additional 1.8 million
tons, 390,000 tons above the current maximum production capacity.
The largest quantitative increase should come from possible projects, which includes those in the
preliminary feasibility study stage and new entrant projects with feasibility study underway. These would
add a combined 1.7 million tons or 21 percent of total maximum capacity expected in 2021.

7
Production stood at 3.40 million tons concentrate and 2.03 million tons SX-EW cathodes, for a total of 5.43 million tons.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
15
CHART 3 CHART 4
!
#$!!!
%$!!!
&$!!!
'$!!!
($!!!
)$!!!
*$!!!
+$!!!
,$!!!
%!#% %!#& %!#' %!#( %!#) %!#* %!#+ %!#, %!%! %!%# %!%%
-
.

/
0
1
2
0
3

4
5
6
6
0
7

87539:;52 4<6<:=>? @? 4<>0A57? B%!#&C%!%#D
E607<;2A F G<H0I=20 J2 675A70HH F G<H0I=20
K0<H=@=I=>? F 875@<@I0 K0<H=@=I=>? F 85HH=@I0
870L0<H=@=I=>? F 85HH=@I0
!"#$#%&'(')'*+ -
!.&&'()#/ 01
2#%&'(')'*+ -
!.&&'()#/ 341
2#%&'(')'*+ -
!".(%()#/ 551
67 !".8"#&& -
9%&#)'7#/ :1
;<#"%=78 -
9%&#)'7#/ >?1
!"#$% '())$* +*(%,-.(# '/)/-"01 21 '/0$3(*1 4567 !# 0(#8 "# 9:97;

Source: Cochilco.

4.3.3 Regional Forecast
While Chiles overall copper production capacity is expected to expand 34.8 percent from 2012 to
2021, growth will not be equally distributed across mining districts.
In Atacama, refined copper production capacity should jump 194 percent from 409,000 tons in
2012 to 1.2 million tons in 2021 due mostly to the copper output of three major gold projects and four
other medium- and large-scale copper mines. These projects should significantly boost mining and related
activities in the region.
Production in Tarapac should expand 96 percent to some 1 million tons by 2021, driven mostly by
the Collahuasi Phase III Expansion and the new Quebrada Blanca undertaking.
However, most projects in Atacama and Tarapac remain classed as Possible and thus subject to
change. As an established mining district, Antofagasta is expected to retain the lead. While maximum
capacity should rise 19.6 percent to about 3.95 million tons refined copper, projects are either in progress
or have feasibility studies well underway. As some major operations, including RT Oxides, Chuquicamata
Open Pit and Mina Sur, are being wound down, most new projects are designed to recoup capacity.
The Andina expansion in Valparaso is expected to increase output by 32.5 percent in the period.
The single-largest project in OHiggins is the new El Teniente mine level, also designed to recover
production capacity.

4.4 Maximum Concentrate Processing Capacity
As the roster shows, most projects are designed to increase copper concentrate production. With
grades declining across the board, new plants are being designed to handle a larger throughput.
As plant requirements are driven by throughput rather than output, larger, more expensive
processing facilities, increased ore and overburden extraction and additional milling and flotation work
translate into higher consumption of fuels, power, water and other key inputs.
Shown below is annual concentrating plant throughput from existing and new operations coming
on stream.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
16
CHART 5
COPPER CONCENTRATING PLANT THROUGHPUT THROUGH 2021 (MILLION TPY)
!
#!!
$!!
%!!
&!!
'(!!!
'(#!!
'($!!
#!'# #!') #!'$ #!'* #!'% #!'+ #!'& #!', #!#! #!#'
-./012345 6-46/42012/ .0-7/628

Source: Cochilco.

In the coming scenario, plant throughput and refined copper content do not correlate well. As
shown below, throughput expansion of 11.5 percent a year in 2012-2021 will result in annual copper
content growing only 6.1 percent in the same period.


CHART 6
CONCENTRATING PLANT THROUGHPUT AND COPPER CONTENT THROUGH 2021 (MILLION TPY)
!
#!!
$!!
%!!
&!!
'(!!!
'(#!!
'($!!
!)!
#)!
$)!
%)!
&)!
'!)!
'#)!
'$)!
#!'# #!'* #!'$ #!'+ #!'% #!', #!'& #!'- #!#! #!#'
./0) 123345 12674685/84 952:;7<26 1/3/7=8> ?.@A 12674685/<6B 9C/68 1/3/7=8> ?.@A

Source: Cochilco.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
17
V. Estimated Production of Other Minerals
This chapter reviews the contribution of the 2013 project portfolio to maximum gold, silver,
molybdenum, iron and industrial mineral production capacity.
Shown for gold and iron is current maximum production capacity and the potential scenario in
2021 based on project data. Shown for silver and molybdenum, which are largely dependent on copper
and gold output, are estimated maximum production for each project and possible capacity contribution
once fully operational. Shown for industrial minerals is the contribution of each project reviewed.
5.1 Gold and Silver
TABLE 14: MAXIMUM GOLD AND SILVER PRODUCTION CAPACITY CONTRIBUTION
GCLD
(kg Au)
SILVLk
(1ons)
!ernlmo Agua de la lalda S.A. 2013 4,700 ---
La Colpa hase 7 Companla Mlnera ManLos de Cro 2013 6,220 ---
nueva Lsperanza - Arqueros Laguna 8esources Chlle 2013 230 100
ascua Cla. Mlnera nevada 2016 19,800 1,100
volcn Andlna Mlnerals Chlle 2017 8,800 ---
Casplche LLon Chlle 2017 21,600 26
Cerro Marlcunga ALacama aclflc Cold Chlle 2017 8,300 ---
Lobo - MarLe Mlnera SanLa 8osa 2017 10,900 ---
Ll Morro Ll Morro SCM 2018 11,000 ---
Cerro Casale Mlnera Casale 2020 28,000 ---
MlnlsLro Pales Codelco Chlle 2013 --- 300
Slerra Corda Mlnera Cuadra Chlle 2013 1,928 ---
ulego de Almagro Companla Mlnera Slerra norLe S.A. 2013 713 ---
lnca de Cro lnca de Cro S.A. 2017 1,244 ---
SanLo uomlngo Mlnera SanLo uomlngo 2017 2,000 ---
Ll Lsplno Ll Lsplno S.A. 2017 1,600 ---
Lsperanza Sur (Lx-1elegrafo) Mlnera Lsperanza 2017 4,980 ---
roducLora Socledad Mlnera Ll gulla LLda. 2018 1,320 ---
LncuenLro Sulfldes (Lx-Caracoles) Mlnera LncuenLro 2020 3,600 ---
128,03S 1,S26
Copper (Add|t|ona| Secondary roduct|on)
1ota| roduct|on Capac|ty
kCILC1 kINCIAL S1Ak1-U
MAk. kCDUC1ICN CA.
Go|d (r|mary roduct|on kep|acement)
Go|d (Add|t|ona| r|mary roduct|on)

Source: Cochilco.
Increases in gold production come from primary production or from production secondary to
copper mining. By 2021, these projects are expected to increase maximum production capacity to 178
tons, up 256 percent over the 49.9 tons reported in 2012. At present, primary gold production contributes
some 30,000 kg/yr. while production secondary to copper mining contributes an additional 19,870 kg/yr.
Future contributions from both sources are estimated at 145,600 and 39,800 kg, respectively, both from
existing operations and new projects coming on stream.
Silver projects in this report should contribute some 1,526 TPY to maximum production capacity.
Sources when fully operational in 2021 are gold mining (1,226 TPY) and copper mining (300 TPY).
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
18
5.2 Molybdenum
Most molybdenum produced in Chile is a byproduct of copper mining. Major copper concentrate
projects in the portfolio (Caserones, Sierra Gorda, Esperanza Upgrade, Quebrada Blanca Phase II,
Relincho)
8
contemplate producing 36.7 kTPY molybdenum concentrate. These contributions should place
the refined molybdenum production capacity at about 74 kTPY by 2021.

TABLE 15: MAXIMUM MOLYBDENUM PRODUCTION CAPACITY BY PROJECT (TPY)
PROJECT PRINCIPAL START-UP
MAX. PRODUCTION CAP.
MOLYBDENUM (TPY)
Copper (Secondary Production New Capacity)
Caserones Pan Pacific Copper 2013 3,000
Sierra Gorda KGHM International 2015 11,000
Esperanza Upgrade Minera Esperanza 2015 11,500
Quebrada Blanca Phase II Teck 2017 5,200
Relincho Teck 2018 6,000
Total 36,700
Copper (Secondary Production Maintain Capacity)
Sulfides Phase II Radomiro Tomic Division 2018 7,000
Chuquicamata Underground Chuquicamata Division 2018 18,000
Total 25,000
Source: Cochilco.

The Chuquicamata Underground and RT Sulfides Phase II projects should help keep the
contribution to maximum production capacity of Codelcos Chuquicamata and Radomiro Tomic Divisions
stable at about 25 kTPY molybdenum concentrate.
5.3 Iron
Production in 2012 stood at 17.33 million tons iron ore or some 10.2 million tons refined iron. The
project portfolio and associated output is expected to increase maximum production capacity by 111
percent to 37 million tons in 2021.
At implementation, projects by iron concentrate, screening and pellet feed producers CAP, Minera
San Fierro and Santa Fe Mining, plus secondary production from the Santo Domingo copper project
(Capstone), were expected to contribute some 20.1 million tons iron ores or 11.9 million tons refined iron,
9

as noted in Table 16.

8
Collahuasi, Los Pelambres and Valle Central expansions not considered due to insufficient information.
9
Iron products contain from 58% to 65% Fe.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
19
TABLE 16: EXPECTED IRON PRODUCTION BY PROJECT (TPY)
PROJECT PRINCIPAL START-UP
MAX. PRODUCTION CAP.
Iron Ores (kTPA)
Refined Content
(kTPA)
Iron
Cerro Negro Norte CAP 2014 4,000 2,360
Los Colorados Expansion CAP 2014 5,800 3,420
Romeral Phase V CAP 2014 2,500 1,475
Oso Negro Minera San Fierro 2014 1,091 600
Bellavista Santa Fe Mining 2015 2,500 1,620
Copper
Santo Domingo Capstone Mining 2017 4,200 2,478
Total 20,091 11,953
Source: Cochilco.

The net result will boost Chilean production capacity to 31 million tons iron ores or better than 19
million tons refined iron content in the second half of this decade.

5.4 Industrial Minerals
Nitrate investment projects undertaken by SQM are expected to progressively increase annual
production capacity by 2.5 million tons nitrate, 11,000 tons iodine and 1.55 million tons potassium
chloride.
In addition, White Mountain Titaniums Cerro Blanco project will produce some 200 kTPY titanium
dioxide concentrate (95% TiO2) with production of some 1.5 million TPY feldspar
10
starting in 2016.

10
Chilean feldspar production is a modest 8 kTPY.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
20
VI. Concluding Remarks
The overall investment portfolio includes 49 initiatives worth an overall US$112.6 billion. Leading
the field is the copper mining industry, with 30 initiatives worth US$86.7 billion. Highlights include:

The Codelco investment plan focuses on six structural projects (Ministro Hales Mine, Radomiro
Tomic Sulfides Phase II, El Teniente New Mine Level, Andina Phase II, Andina Pit-Plant Transfer)
designed to ensure long-term sustainability. Codelco has two additional investment lines covering
a range of smaller projects.
Large private miners (Escondida, Los Pelambres, Collahuasi) hold reserves that stand among Chiles
and the worlds largest. They are currently expanding operations in order to raise productivity and
prolong mine lifespan.
A distinctive element are copper concentrating projects taking over from fast-depleting leachable
surface ore operations (RT Sulfides, QB Hypogenic, El Abra Mill, Lomas Bayas Sulfides). The result
will a net increase in copper production capacity.
New entrants reflect sustained interest in joining one of the worlds leading mining districts.

Second in line with ten projects and 19.4 percent of overall investment is gold mining. Highlights
include:

Three large-scale projects (Caspiche, Cerro Casale, El Morro) will also produce copper, while two
replacement projects will be instilling new life into major gold mining operations.
The binational Pascua-Lama project is being required to ensure its activities are compatible with
the law, after which construction could resume.
Atacama is the second-largest investment destination, most of it going to gold mining.

The portfolio also includes five iron, four nitrate and one titanium dioxide mining project, all at
widely varying stages of development. As is often the case in the industry, projects in progress are
considered highly certain while those under review are noted for varying degrees of uncertainty. As
development moves forward, projects undergo changes that tend to impact expected production capacity,
investment amounts, and time frames.
Such variability is reflected in this update to the mining project portfolio. This report shows a
US$8.2 billion increase in value. This is the result of a US$7.36 billion upward revision of 22 projects plus a
net US$900 million gain caused by the entry of nine new projects and the start-up or cancellation of seven
other projects in 2012.
In addition, some project schedules underwent changes ranging from a one-year acceleration to a
two-year delay. Overall, shorter-term investments declined and more were shifted to beyond 2015.
Additions to production capacity were also impacted as a result. Refined copper production
capacity in 2021 should stand at 8.1 million tons, rising to 8.4 million once all projects start to operate at
capacity.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
21
Most of the increase will come from concentrate production, which should rise from 3.7 million
tons in 2012 to 6.8 million in 2021. By contrast, SX-EW cathode production should decline from 2.3 million
tons in 2012 to 1.4 million in 2021.
One effect of increased concentrating capacity will be a sharper rise in ore volume fed to
concentrating plants. Due to persistent declines in copper grades, throughput is expected to rise upwards
of 180 percent, from 450 million TPY in 2012 to 1.2 billion TPY in 2021, with concentrate production
capacity rising 86 percent from 3.7 to 6.8 million TPY in the same period.
As a result, plants are being redesigned on a larger scale, resulting in added costs and requiring
more energy, water and other inputs to produce a similar amount of copper, with the attendant impact on
demand for these goods and services. Increased productivity is one of the new challenges facing the
Chilean mining industry as it seeks to remain competitive.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
22
Annex A - Methodology
1. Scope
This report covers investment in replacement, expansion or new copper, gold mining, iron and
industrial minerals projects by Codelco and medium- and large-scale private miners. It considers projects
worth upwards of US$100 million either in progress or likely to materialize in 2013-2017.
The Prior to 2013 category refers to project outlays (i.e., studies, construction) made through
2012, followed by estimated outlays through 2013-2017. Projects scheduled for start-up beyond 2017 are
identified as such.
Project particulars are complemented by estimations on copper output added, if any, plus notes on
current status.
Information is provided on a best-guess basis, based on data current at the time of writing. Where
no such data is available, annual investment allocations are estimates not necessarily supported in sources.
2. Project Type, Stage of Development and Likelihood
Investment information is qualified by project type and stage of development. Projects are ranked
from most to least likely.
2.1 Project Type
This classification provides information on project likelihood, which varies for existing and new
operations. Categories are as follows:
a) Replacement: Includes brownfield projects designed to prolong the life of the mine and
maintain existing production by addressing declining grades and/or depletion issues.
b) Expansion: Includes brownfield projects designed to increase operating capacity, scale up
production and cut unit costs, notably as ore grades start to decline.
c) New: Includes greenfield projects requiring environmental and other clearances, construction
of facilities and opening up a new site. Also includes brownfield projects involving a complete
change from one mode of production to another (i.e., leaching to concentrating), which often
requires developing an entirely new deposit.
2.2 Stage of Development
Based on the assumption that projects in a more advanced stage of development are often more
likely to materialize, these are classed as follows:
a) In Progress: Investment approved and permits secured. Detail engineering and construction
underway.
b) Feasibility Study Stage: Undergoing feasibility and environmental (EIA or DIA) review, investment
decision not yet made.
c) Prefeasibility Stage: Undergoing initial review; decision to proceed to next stage not yet made.
2.3 Likelihood
Projects are ranked as Baseline, Probable or Possible based on type and stage of development.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
23
a) Baseline: In progress. Deemed highly probable, although start-up may undergo delays. Production
is added to that of existing operations.
b) Deemed Probable: Includes feasibility-stage replacement, expansion or new projects by companies
with operations in Chile, with start-up scheduled for 2013-2017. While subject to significant
changes or delays, they are deemed certain as they prolong the lifespan of existing operations.
c) Deemed Possible: Includes feasibility-stage projects by new entrants, replacement or expansion
projects with start-up scheduled no earlier than 2018, and all prefeasibility-stage projects. Projects
by new entrants often face hurdles that can cause significant changes and delays, or even
cancellation. In the case of brownfield projects, a far-off start-up date often results in major
revisions that can also cause significant changes and delays.
3. Codelco Investment Plans and Sources of Information
Investment estimates
11
are based on information presented in Codelcos 2013 Business and
Development Plan (PND 2013) for development and/or research projects.
Development projects are directly connected to production prospects and approval requires
compliance with certain return on investment standards. These include:
a) Structural Projects: Selected development projects that fully leverage available mineral resources
and provide a baseline for long-term growth. This report provides specifics and investment
amounts.
b) Other Development Projects: Included in the Codelco investment portfolio are discrete or shorter-
term projects deemed complementary to structural projects and thus essential to company
continuity. This report provides specifics and investment amounts.
Codelco also implements research projects designed to acquire new information considered
relevant to further development. While not listed as part of a specific investment project, these include
prefeasibility, feasibility, and environmental assessment of prospective sites, basic and generative
exploration, and R&D. Given their manifold nature, these projects are reported on the aggregate.
While outlays on equipment replacement, facility upgrades, environmental cleanup, workplace
safety, and employee benefits in the PND 2013 also require API approval, they are omitted in order to
facilitate comparison with private firms which do not provide such information.
Also omitted are investments not requiring API approval and thus outside the purview of this
report.
All information is gleaned from public reports provided by company officials or on the Codelco web
site, complemented by data contained in the Codelco Business and Development Plan and other official
reports submitted on a regular basis to the Cochilco Investment Evaluation & Enforcement and Compliance
Department (DEIF). As such, the information herein should be construed as a strategic planning tool rather
than as binding on the reviewing agencies.
4. Private Mining Investment and Sources of Information
Sources include public reports and announcements culled from company web sites, the news
media, trade publications, and filings to the environmental assessment system.

11
Spending by Codelco requires Investment Project Authorization (API), a review conducted jointly by Cochilco and the Ministry of
Social Development. Disbursements considered as investments by Codelco (i.e., deferred expenses and the like) which require no
authorization are not included. Inclusion in the 2013 PND does not imply authorization.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
24
Often only global amounts and intended start-up year are known. In such cases, annual estimates
are based on tentative completion time frames reported to the environmental assessment system or on
empirical knowledge of like projects.
The review includes all projects under construction. Projects under review were checked for
progress and their investment, start-up schedule and estimated production profiles were updated based
on the most recent information available. Changes noted included:
a) New principals following changes in ownership.
b) Production capacity and products of interest.
c) Investment amount, start-up date and project schedules.
d) Inclusion of new projects.
e) Removal of recent start-ups.
f) New requirements, such as the use of seawater.
While projects are assumed to reflect outlays made during the construction stage, prior outlays
may be included. Where no precise information is available, start-up year is estimated as shown below.
5. Estimating Start-up Dates
Internal and external factors may impact project development. Some of the latter include the need
to cut electricity costs, modify environmental impact statements and/or secure construction permits.
The former, for their part, often encompass project timing relative to corporate goals, securing
financing, and the need to enhance investment and/or operating cost indicators. Where no public start-up
date announcement exists, Cochilco uses the following methodology:
a) A standard one-year delay is deemed if a project is impacted by external factors, even if these
entail only minor changes to the feasibility study.
b) A standard two-year delay is deemed if a project requires reformulating a prefeasibility or
feasibility study.
6. Projected Mined Copper Production Capacity
Maximum potential concentrate and/or SX-EW production capacity is the sum of maximum
production profiles by existing mining operations and projects starting up within the decade, shown as
tons of refined copper.
Future profiles for existing operation are based on recent production performance and estimation
of key parameters, including ore grades, concentrating plant capacity, and acid consumption by
hydrometallurgical operations. Assumptions are based on maximum plant capacity operating nonstop 360
days a year, based on data reviewed by Cochilco.
Project production profiles are based on company descriptions of maximum processing capacities
under nonstop operation 360 days a year and key expected mining and metallurgical parameters.
Tracking project rankings, production profiles are also classified from most to least likely.
All figures are shown as estimated maximum potential capacity relative to 2012, based on the most
recent data available as of this writing.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
25
Annex B - Copper Mining

I) STRUCTURAL CODELCO PROJECTS (www.codelco.cl)
MINISTRO HALES MINE (Ministro Hales Division)
Ministro Hales stands in Antofagasta, halfway between
the Chuquicamata minesite and the city of Calama. It is
a copper sulfide deposit holding reserves estimated at
289 million tons with 0.96 average copper grades and
high silver content. The homonymous Codelco Division
was set up to develop and operate this mine.
Once in operation, the mine is expected to process up
to 50 kTPD in a concentrating plant sited adjacent to
the open pit. Processes handled include primary
crushing, transport by conveyor belt, stockpiling,
milling (one SAG mill and two ball mills), and flotation.
High arsenic levels will require fluidized bed roasting
(up to 350 kTPY) yielding high-grade concentrates
(37% refined copper content) to produce some 183
kTPY refined copper and 300 TPY silver. Plant gases will
be abated in a sulfuric acid plant. Due to their special
characteristics, these concentrates may also be used as
smelter feed or sold.
Massive pre-stripping has created an opportunity to leverage a significant volume of leachable ores. As
such, a complementary project now underway will convey ores to a heap leaching site, with the resulting
solution fed to the Chuquicamata Division Hidrosur SX-EW Plant for an expected 79,000 tons refined
copper in 2014-2016.
This is a deep deposit and plans include moving to underground mining in the future.

Workforce: 3,000 during construction; 450 during operation.
Throughput: 50 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$3.43 billion.
Status: Under construction. Once concluded, dry (primary crusher, stockpile), wet (milling, flotation,
tailings thickening) and roasting systems will be load-tested. Start-up slated for late 2013.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
26
RADOMIRO TOMIC SULFIDES PHASE II (Radomiro Tomic Division)
Phase II involves mining sulfides emerging at Radomiro Tomic as overlying oxides become depleted.
Estimated reserves stand at 2.6 billion
tons with 0.48 average copper grades.

Plans are to continue mining the
current open pit and process ores in a
200-kTPD concentrating plant slated to
come on stream in late 2017. This will
add an estimated 350 kTPY refined
copper and 7 kTPY molybdenum
concentrate.

The project will extract and desalinate
seawater at a 1,600 l/s reverse
osmosis plant, then pump it 160 km to
an altitude of 3,000 m. A conventional
tailings dam will be used through 2021,
then replaced by thickened tailings technology that will allow for optimized dam use and sizing, help
reclaim more water, and reduce particulate emissions. This will require subsequent construction of a high-
density thickening plant.
The Division also plans to leverage the available hydrometallurgical infrastructure to bioleach low-grade
sulfides.
Workforce: 12,100 during construction; 2,200 during operation.
Throughput: 200 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$5.43 billion, including desalination and pumping infrastructure but not the
thickening plant.
Status: Finalizing feasibility and investment approval. Environmental, sector and construction
permits secured in 2014, start-up expected
in late 2017.
NEW MINE LEVEL (Teniente Division)

The project involves mining a new sector at altitude 1,880 m,
100 m below the current mine level, thereby adding an extra 2
million square meters of mining surface. Reserves stand at 2.02
billion tons with 0.86 average copper grades and 220 ppm
molybdenum.

Mining will be based on panel caving, with 100 percent of the
area preconditioned with hydraulic fracturing. The mine level
scheme will be characteristic El Teniente: sinking, production,
ventilation, haulage, and crushing. Ores will be sent to the
surface Coln concentrator by conveyor belt.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
27

The project will ensure the long-term 137-kTPD divisional target and extend the life of mine for over 50
years after 2017, while creating an option to increase throughput to 180 kTPD within a decade.

The project calls for 98,450 m of horizontal tunnels and 3,454 m of vertical air shafts and transfer pits to be
built in 2011-2017.

Workforce: 3,500 in the construction stage.
Throughput: 137 kTPD sulfide ores, up to 180 kTPD within a decade.
Est. Investment Amount: US$3.5 billion.
Status: In progress. Engineering and construction of the 16-km, two-way Maitenes-Confluencia
road was awarded in November 2012. Gradual start-up expected in H2 2017.

CHUQUICAMATA UNDERGROUND (Chuquicamata Division)
Codelco is exploring reserves estimated at 1.65 billion tons with 0.71 copper grades deep under the
existing Chuquicamata mine.
Plans call for using block caving methods
on four underground mining faces. Works
to be built include a 7.5-km main access
tunnel, five clean-air injection ramps and
two air exhaust pits. Production would
start at 2.7 kTPD, then climb up to a design
capacity of 140 kTPD nine years later,
eventually adding 366 kTPY refined copper
and over 18 kTPY refined molybdenum.
Start-up would coincide with the end of
open pit economic life, with ores feeding
existing concentrators.
Workforce: 3,767 during construction;
4,837 during operation.
Throughput: 140 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$4.08 billion.
Status: Finalizing feasibility study and building early works. Scheduled for 2013 are construction of main
and ventilation tunnels and deepening the air exhaust shaft. Environmental Assessment
Resolution (RCA) has been secured. Gradual production would start in 2019.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
28
NEW ANDINA: PHASE II - 244 KTPD EXPANSION / (Andina Division)
Phase II of Andina Division plans to harness its full
potential calls for upgrading mining and processing
capacity from 94 to 244 kTPD.
Plans call for significantly expanded mining
operations, a new 150-kTPD concentrating plant
with primary crushing, ore transport and
secondary and tertiary crushing facilities, collective
and selective flotation and molybdenum leaching
plants, a filtration plant, and a concentrate storage
site in Montenegro, near Santiago.
The expansion should add 343 kTPY refined
copper, helping the Division produce an overall
600 kTPY.
Phase III, calling for expanding capacity to 290 kTPD, is under review. Also considered is underground
development of the Sur-Sur Mine once the third panel is shut down.
Given the vast amount of low-grade sulfides generated by massive mining operations, forced leaching is
being considered to help mitigate the environmental impact of acid water. Phase III is not considered in
this report.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: An additional 150 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$6.74 billion.
Status: Feasibility study started in September 2009, expected completed in 2013. Environmental
Impact Assessment Review was refiled in January. Replies to 2,200 queries received in
April must be filed by September. Start-up not expected before 2021.
NEW PIT-PLANT TRANSFER / (Andina Division)
Includes all work required to replace the current Don Luis pit/crushing plant ore transfer scheme, as plant
location will be impacted by development of the new pit required to feed the new 94 kTPD capacity.
Works include building a platform at node 3,500, a cave-in protection system, a new primary crusher, the
Haulage III conveyor tunnel, a SAG hopper distribution and feed system, and a new secondary crushing
plant. The project will extend pit life through 2033.

Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: N/A.
Est. Investment Amount: US$1.42 billion
Status: In progress, early work underway, basic engineering proceeding concurrently.
Expected operational in 2022.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
29
II) Major Private Copper Miners
2.1 Antofagasta Minerals (www.antofagasta.co.uk)
ANTUCOYA (Minera Antucoya Ltda.)

Located 125 km NE of Antofagasta and 45 km from the coast, with proven and probable reserves of 642
million tons and 0.35 copper grades (0.21 cutoff grade). Expected to produce 85 kTPY copper cathodes
through the first decade, then settle at 80 kTPY through the second and last decade of expected life.

Antucoya will be a conventional open-pit mine. Ores will be leached in a dynamic heap and processed in an
SX-EW plant using raw seawater. Albeit a low-grade greenfield project, the orebody is relatively shallow
and pre-stripping to remove some 35 million tons of overburden should take only nine months. The
overburden/ore ratio is a low 1:1 and the deposit lies within a established mining zone, which ensures ease
of access to existing infrastructure, including energy, water, and human resources.
Construction was halted in late December 2012 to revise the project given rising current and potential
costs. Following adjustments, construction restarted in Q2 2013.

Workforce: 5,000 to 7,000 during construction, 1,400 during operation.
Throughput: High-grade ores to 96 kTPD; run-of-mine to 38 kTPD.
Est. Investment Amount: US$1.9 billion, not including a potential acid plant.
Status: In progress after restart. Start-up expected in mid-2015.
CENTINELA DISTRICT
The Centinela mining district (formerly Sierra Gorda) is the main focus of Antofagasta Minerals exploration
targets in Chile. The Group owns or controls several copper oxide and sulfide deposits in this 30-km long
district located in the homonymous municipality.
These include Esperanza, El Tesoro, Esperanza Sur and Encuentro (oxides and sulfides). In addition, the
Polo Sur prospect holds reserves of 704 million tons with 0.37 grades plus gold and molybdenum.
Antofagasta Minerals is also exploring other deposits in the area, notably Penacho Blanco.
Reserves at the larger Esperanza Sur (Ex-Telgrafo) and Encuentro (Ex-Caracoles) deposits add up to a
combined 4.3 billion tons with 0.36 average copper grades (plus gold and some molybdenum), providing
about 30 percent of overall mineral resources held by Antofagasta Minerals.
Development plans are as follows:
a) Esperanza Sur (Minera Esperanza S.A.)
Named for its position at the south end of the Esperanza operation. Resources stand at 2.96 billion tons
with 0.34 average copper grades. Sulfide ores account for 2.9 billion tons with 0.34 grades (plus 0.010
molybdenum and 0.11 g/t gold) while oxides account for some 64.1 million tons with 0.21 copper grades.
Esperanza Sur will help support current mining plans and gradual expansion of the existing concentrating
plant.

Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
30
On-site studies show that on the order of 150 million tons of material will need to be pre-stripped,
including 50 million tons of oxide resources that could be processed by the El Tesoro SX-EW plant starting
in 2017.

As to sulfide resources, a new concentrating plant could add some 140 kTPY copper and 160,000 oz. gold
through the first ten years, over an estimated total lifespan of 34 years.

Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: An additional 95 kTPD sulfide ores.
b) Encuentro (Antofagasta Minerals S.A.)
Encuentro stands 10 km SE of Esperanza. Resources are an estimated 1.3 billion tons with 0.41 average
copper grades. Sulfides account for 1 billion tons with 0.41 copper grades (plus 0.014 percent molybdenum
and 0.15 g/t gold), while oxides stand at 212 million tons with 0.40 copper grades.
i. Encuentro Oxides:
Encuentro requires pre-stripping some 600 million tons, including some 150 million tons of oxide ores that
could be processed by the El Tesoro SX-EW plant starting in 2016, extending plant life for an extra eight
years. This initiative is known as Encuentro Oxides.
The project contemplates a new crushing plant, heap leaching facilities, and piping the pregnant leach
solution to the El Tesoro plant for processing.
Construction could start in early 2014, provided the Environmental Impact Assessment Review (EIA) filed in
December 2012 is approved in 2013. Construction should extend through two years, with first production
expected in 2016. The project could add some 50 kTPY copper cathodes over eight years.
Workforce: 2,000 during construction; 500 during operation.
Throughput: About 65 kTPD, including high-grade ores and run-of-mine.
ii. Encuentro Sulfides:
Current plans call for accessing sulfides once oxide mining begins. An independent feasibility study based
on results from a preliminary feasibility study completed in 2012 is being conducted to this effect.
Encuentro Sulfides could support a 95-kTPD concentrating plant producing 140-160 kTPY copper and 160-
180,000 oz. gold over 22 years.
Tests show that raw seawater can be used to process sulfide ores directly.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: 95 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$7.6 billion (Esperanza Sur: US$3.5 billion; Encuentro Oxides: US$600 million;
Encuentro Sulfides: US$3.5 billion).
Status: Feasibility study underway. Plans are to begin construction of Encuentro Oxides in
2014 and start-up in 2016. Depending on progress on additional feasibility studies,
Esperanza Sur might begin production no earlier than 2017 and Encuentro Sulfides in
2020.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
31
ESPERANZA UPGRADE (Minera Esperanza S.A.)
Minera Esperanza, 30 km from Sierra Gorda, in Antofagasta, is optimizing its operations through two
Environmental Impact Statements (DIA) filed in 2013.
Esperanza Upgrade III, the first of these, had its DIA approved in May 2012. It seeks to increase the supply
of critical inputs (water, process inhibitors and reagents, etc.), process oxide ore resources in areas to be
cleared for use as dumpsites, and construction of a new molybdenum processing plant.
The leading component is a molybdenum plant to be built near the collective flotation area, next to the
existing concentrating plant. This includes a standard 5.5-kTPD selective flotation circuit encompassing
primary flotation, cleaning flotation, filtration, drying, and concentrate storage. The resulting copper-gold
concentrate will be the tailings to be sent to the existing concentrating plant for processing.
The Esperanza Upgrade IV Process Optimization, whose DIA was filed in June, focuses on improving
existing milling and flotation systems through a secondary and tertiary crushing plant designed to
complement current capacity. Plans also contemplate new concentrate and tailing thickeners.
Once completed, the Esperanza upgrades will boost concentrating plant throughput by 12 kTPD to 105
kTPD, which would translate into an additional 19 kTPY copper concentrate. The molybdenum plant will
produce an estimated 11.5 kTPY during operation lifespan.
Workforce: 875 during construction; 49 during operation.
Throughput: An additional 12 kTPD sulfide ores and 5.5 kTPD molybdenum.
Est. Investment Amount: US$550 million (Esperanza Upgrade III: US$200 million; Esperanza Upgrade IV
Process Optimization: US$350 million).
Status: Under construction and feasibility study underway, respectively. Upgrade III secured
approval of its Environmental Impact Statement (DIA) in May 2012 while Upgrade IV
awaits approval of DIA filed in June 2013. Start-up for both expected no earlier than
2015.
LOS PELAMBRES EXPANSION IV (Minera Los Pelambres S.A.)
Los Pelambres stands 170 km east of Los Vilos, at an altitude of 3,100 m. Baseline resources stand at 5.6
billion tons with 0.52 copper grades (plus 0.013 molybdenum and 0.03 g/t gold), over four times the
current operation reserves.
The company is exploring two long-term development options. Option 1 requires no new infrastructure
and involves increasing concentrating plant capacity by up to 15 percent. Option 2, or Los Pelambres
Expansion, seeks to increase processing capacity by 175 kTPD.
The company has been conducting a preliminary feasibility study of both options since 2012. Last year a
drilling campaign succeeded in reclassifying available mineral resources.
While the long-term goal is to double the ore processing capacity, the project will proceed gradually to
ensure sustainability.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: An additional 175 kTPD sulfide ores.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
32
Est. Investment Amount: At least US$7 billion.
Status: Preliminary feasibility study completed in 2013, to be followed by feasibility study.
Start-up expected no earlier than 2021; production to rise gradually starting in 2022.
2.2 BHP Billiton (www.bhpbilliton.com)
ESCONDIDA OXIDE LEACH AREA PROJECT (Minera Escondida Ltda.)

The Oxide Leach Area Project (OLAP) calls for construction of a new dynamic heap and a system of
conveyors designed to maintain oxide leaching capacity at current levels after depletion of the existing
heap in 2014. Current SX-EW cathode production equipment and facilities will remain in use.
Workforce: 420 to 800 during construction; 85 during operation.
Throughput: 67.5 kTPD, same as current.
Est. Investment Amount: US$721 million.
Status: In progress, start-up expected in mid-2014.

ESCONDIDA ORGANIC GROWTH PROJECT I (Minera Escondida Ltda.)
In 2011 BHP reformulated the original
Escondida Phase V project as an organic growth
project calling for addition of a new mill to the
Laguna Seca Plant, increasing plant throughput
by 15 kTPD, and build a new 152-kTPD
concentrating plant replacing the Los Colorados
facility, slated for decommissioning to clear the
area for new mining.
Plans include a second organic growth project
(OGP II) which calls for adding a third plant, a
seawater desalination facility, and power line
infrastructure. OGP II is at the scoping study
stage.
Workforce: 5,900 to 8,570 during construction; 739 during operation.
Throughput: Net 47 kTPD sulfide ores increase: a) Boost Laguna Seca Plant by 15 kTPD to 135 kTPD sulfide
ores. b) Decommission 120-kTPD Los Colorados plant. c) Add 152-kTPD concentrating plant.
Est. Investment Amount: US$3.83 billion.
Status: In progress since February 2012, 30 percent completed in June 2013. Concentrating
plant start-up expected in Q1 2015.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
33
2.3 Capstone Mining (www.capstonemining.com)
SANTO DOMINGO (Minera Santo Domingo)
Santo Domingo is the largest of four IOCG deposits being reviewed by Capstone Mining in the Diego de
Almagro district following its June 2011 acquisition of Far West Mining. A preliminary feasibility study
completed in August 2011 reassessed project investment and operating parameters.
Available information suggests possible development of sulfide resources to produce over 100 kTPY
refined copper, 470 kg/yr. of gold, and 4 million TPY iron ores (magnetite and hematite).
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: 70 kTPD sulfide ores through the first five years, 63.5 kTPD sulfide ores thereafter.
Est. Investment Amount: US$1.8 billion.
Status: Feasibility study and preparation of Environmental Impact Assessment Review underway.
In late 2012 the company deferred completion of feasibility study to 2014 and start-up to
no earlier than 2017, assuming reasonable electricity costs.
2.4 Doa Ins de Collahuasi (www.collahuasi.com)
COLLAHUASI EXPANSION (PHASE III)
Collahuasi is expanding its ore processing capacity from 140 to 270 kTPD with a view to boosting refined
copper production to +1 million TPY.

Expansion plans, first designed to boost processing from 140 to 270 and then to 260 kTPD, had a new stage
added in 2011.
a) Phase I, completed in October 2011, optimized facilities for throughput of 150 kTPD.
b) Phase II, completed in Q2 2013, is part of optimization plans designed to achieve a 160 kTPD
processing rate. Last March SAG mill 3, which handles nearly two-thirds of site output, underwent
the necessary overhaul during a scheduled 45-day shutdown.
c) Phase III, currently undergoing a preliminary feasibility study, would add 1 or 2 milling lines
designed to boost processing to 260-350 kTPD in order to achieve Collahuasis +1 million TPY
refined copper target.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: An additional 260 to 350 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: Phase III: US$6.5 billion.
Status: Phases I and II completed. Per Collahuasis 2012 Annual Report, Phase III expansion will
remain in the prefeasibility stage until operating stability is restored. Based on this,
Cochilco expects start-up no earlier than 2019, two years later than estimated in 2012. As
such, investment amounts remain subject to review.

Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
34
2.5 Freeport-McMoRan (www.fcx.com)

EL ABRA MILL (Ca. Contractual Minera El Abra)
First envisaged a decade ago, then shelved in favor of the recently commissioned Sulfolix
hydrometallurgical project, the project ensures operational continuity by processing primary sulfide
reserves emerging under leachable resources. A preliminary feasibility study for a new concentrating plant
was started in July 2010.
The new plant intends to process 150 to 200 kTPD in order to produce some 300 kTPY copper concentrate,
double the current copper cathode output. An exploration campaign conducted in 2012 shows that El Abra
Mill has the potential to produce over 450 kTPY copper concentrate.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: 150 to 200 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$5 billion.
Status: Feasibility study underway, with a focus on evaluating a potential large-scale milling
operation. An exploration campaign points to significant sulfide resource potential.
Start-up expected no earlier than 2018.
2.6 Pan Pacific Copper (www.ppcu.co.jp)
CASERONES (Minera Lumina Copper Chile)
Caserones stands at 4,200 m altitude, 115 km southeast of Copiap, in Atacama. The project entails mining
sulfides for their copper, gold and molybdenum content and leaching lower-grade resources. Plans call for
expanding concentrating capacity to 160 kTPY copper and 3 kTPY molybdenum and leaching capacity to 30
kTPY SX-EW cathodes.
Sulfide stage implementation contemplates 80-90 kTPD concentrating throughput through the first four
years, then a boost to 125 kTPD to offset declining grades. Expected average concentrating grades are 0.35
oxides and 0.45 sulfides through the first five years. Expected average leaching grades are 0.22 soluble
copper and 0.34 total copper concentrating grades through the entire 28-year life of mine.
Pre-stripping of 15 million tons of overburden was performed from December 2011 to December 2012.
Workforce: 5,000 during construction; 1,500 during operation.
Throughput: 80-90 kTPD sulfide ores during first four years, then a boost to 125 kTPD to offset declining
grades.
Est. Investment Amount: US$3 billion.
Status: SX-EW plant was commissioned in March 2013 and began shipping in May 2013. First
copper concentrate production expected in late 2013, with full production in Q1 2014.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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2.7 KGHM International (www.quadrafnx.com)
SIERRA GORDA (Minera Quadra Chile)
A deposit located in the vicinity of Spence and Tesoro, 140 km east of Antofagasta. A joint venture by
KGHM International (55%) and Sumitomo (45%).
Exploration suggests the presence of major copper, gold and molybdenum reserves that could be
processed at a rate of 110 kTPD to produce some 220 kTPY refined copper in concentrate and cathode
form plus 62 koz/yr. gold and 11 kTPY molybdenum over a 20-year lifespan.
Changes introduced by KGHM in April 2012 to the Environmental Impact Assessment Review approved in
2011 increased the final investment amount to US$3.07 billion. Pre-stripping got underway in December
2012, following final EIA approval. Some 61.1 million tons of overburden had been removed to March
2013.
After year 3 the company plans to expand to 190 kTPD at a cost of US$828 million in order to maintain
copper production targets.
Workforce: 6,000 during construction; 2,000 during operation.
Throughput: 110 to 190 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$3.9 billion.
Status: In progress, pre-stripping 33 percent completed. Seawater piping and tailings dam
construction ongoing since Q1 2013. Plant construction 25 percent completed. Start-up
expected in 2015.
2.8 Teck (www.teck.com)
QUEBRADA BLANCA PHASE 2 (Minera Quebrada Blanca)
A hypogenic primary sulfide deposit underlying secondary supergenic sulfide ores currently yielding some
80 kTPY SX-EW cathodes. Development is slated to coincide with depletion of economic leachable reserves
and should prolong the life of mine by 39 years.
Project calls for a 135-kTPD concentrating plant using desalinated water. Expected production stands at
200 kTPY copper concentrate and 5.2 kTPY molybdenum concentrate.
In October 2012 the company withdrew its EIA with plans to restate and resubmit it by Q2 2013. This
implied a one-year delay in the project schedule, a time frame the company intended to use to bargain
with electricity suppliers and secure financing. In late April 2013, however, the company reported that the
restated EIA would not be filed before 2014 due to issues with permits that need to be revised in light of
the new EIA filing. The company is also taking steps to substantially reduce capital expenditures.
Workforce: 7,000 to 9,200 during construction; 1,787 to 2,053 during operation.
Throughput: 135 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$5.59 billion.
Status: Feasibility study underway. EIA being restated due to the need to secure revised permits
for existing facilities. EIA filing expected no earlier than 2014. If approved, construction
could start in early 2016, with start-up in 2019.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
36
RELINCHO (Minera Relincho)
A copper and molybdenum deposit 50 km north of Vallenar, bought by Teck in 2008 and kept in reserve.
Preliminary studies call for a processing capacity of 140 kTPD to produce up to 180 kTPY copper
concentrate and 6 kTPY refined molybdenum over 22 years. Similar to Quebrada Blanca, it would use
desalinated water.
In late 2012 the company reported contractor issues securing port and power facility construction permits.
As a result, completion of feasibility study has been deferred to late 2013.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: 140 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$3.9 billion, excluding desalination.
Status: Feasibility study underway, although issues securing port and power facility construction
permits have delayed completion to late 2013. Cochilco now expects start-up in 2019.
2.9 Glencore Xstrata (www.xstrata.com)
LOMAS BAYAS III SULFIDES (Minera Lomas Bayas)
Xstrata Copper is conducting a preliminary feasibility study of Lomas Bayas III, a sulfide undertaking
designed to ensure the continuity of current operations. The project calls for developing underlying
measured and indicated sulfide resources of about 435 million tons with 0.39 average copper grades.
Includes construction of a 70-kTPD concentrating plant adding 70 kTPY of copper concentrate to current
cathode production through at least 18 years. Contemplates use of seawater, to be confirmed by feasibility
study.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: 70 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$1.6 billion.
Status: Deemed possible, undergoing preliminary feasibility study. Start-up expected in 2017.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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III) Medium-Scale Copper Mining

3.1 Amerigo Resources (www.amerigoresources.com)
VALLE CENTRAL EXPANSION (Minera Valle Central S.A.)
Minera Valle Central stands 8 km east of Rancagua and 90 km south of Santiago, at 700 m altitude. This
operation currently handles some 45 kTPD of Colihues Dam tailings and 135 kTPD of fresh El Teniente
Division tailings.
In January 2013 the company filed an EIA concerning a plan to increase capacity from 45 to 85 kTPD in
order to process tailings from the older Cauquenes Dam.

Workforce: 595 during construction; 178 during operation.
Throughput: 70 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$152 million.
Status: Currently in the feasibility stage, awaiting EIA approval. Start-up expected in 2015,
following a two-year construction stage.

3.2 Copec (www.empresascopec.cl)
DIEGO DE ALMAGRO (Minera Sierra Norte S.A.)
An IOCG (iron oxide-copper-gold) deposit some 12 km west of Diego de Almagro, 15 km SW of the Pampa
Austral dam, and 50 km east of Chaaral. Reserves include 300 kMT copper and 27 koz of gold in two areas
known as Esther and Carmen-Paulina. Originally a Cerro Dominador project, it is now owned by Minera
Sierra Norte, a mining subsidiary of the Copec Group.
The project calls for open-pit development and processing of up to 100 million tons of oxide, sulfide and
mixed resources. Oxides will be handled in a 2-kTPD LX-SX-EW plant in order to produce some 11 kMT SX-
EW cathodes. Sulfides will be processed in 24-kTPD concentrating plant to produce 22 kTPY copper
concentrate. The project is expected to extract and pipe seawater to its facilities.

Workforce: 595 during construction; 178 during operation.
Throughput: 24 kTPD sulfide ores; 2 kTPD oxide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$597 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway, awaiting approval of EIA filed in November 2012. Start-up
expected no earlier than 2015.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
38
3.3 Hot Chili (www.hotchili.net.au)
PRODUCTORA (Soc. Minera El guila Ltda.)
Productora stands in Sierra Coyiguales, 18 km SW of Vallenar, Atacama. A scoping study showed sulfide
resources of over 165 million tons with grades of 0.6 copper, 0.1 g/t gold and 123 ppm molybdenum. Plans
call for open-pit development and processing in a 30-kTPD concentrating plant to produce 50 kTPY refined
copper and 42 Koz/yr. gold through a lifespan of 20 years. A preliminary feasibility study, slated for
completion in late 2013, is assessing development options. EIA filing expected in the second half of 2013.

Workforce: Not available
Throughput: 30 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$700 million.
Status: Completion of preliminary feasibility study expected in late 2013, investment decision
expected in 2014. Start-up no earlier than 2018.

3.4 PanAust (www.panaust.com.au)
INCA DE ORO (Ca. Minera Inca de Oro)
A project first scoped by Codelco following exploration in the Diego de Almagro district. A preliminary
feasibility study called for production of 50 kTPY copper concentrate and 40 koz/yr. of gold. Plans include
storing pre-stripping overburden for subsequent oxide leaching in order to offset an expected subsequent
decline in copper concentrate output.
Since this is a minor project for Codelcos scale of operation, a 66 percent share was sold to Australias
PanAust under Law 19137, with Codelco retaining 34 percent ownership. The agreement included payment
of an additional net smelter return (NSR) fee to Codelco.
A feasibility study completed in June 2012 determined that at a price of US$3/lb., the project was not
robust enough and recommended postponement. The company is now considering improvements that
include addition of adjoining prospects Carmen and Artemisa. Competitive electrical rates will also be
negotiated.

Workforce: 1,000 during construction; 350 during operation.
Throughput: 30 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$600 million.
Status: Revising feasibility study completed in June 2012. As a result, Cochilco restates its start-up
estimate to no earlier than 2017.

Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
39
3.5 Pucobre (www.pucobre.cl)
EL ESPINO (El Espino S.A.)
A copper/gold project 36 km NE of Illapel, in the province of Choapa, Coquimbo. It is owned by Pucobre
through wholly-owned El Espino S.A., bought in March 2011 from Canada-based Explorator Resources Inc.
Recent estimates suggest reserves of 735 kMT copper and 828 Koz of gold. Plans call for a 6.3-kTPD LX-SX-
EW plant and a 20-kTPD concentrating plant handling sulfide ores. Expected output is 7.2 kTPY copper
cathodes from oxide leaching, 32.8 kTPY refined copper from sulfides, and 25 Koz/yr. gold concentrate
over an 18-year lifespan.
Workforce: 2,900 during construction; 700 during operation.
Throughput: 20 kTPD sulfide ores, 6.3 kTPD oxide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$624 million.
Status: Undergoing preliminary feasibility study, EIA filed in April 2013. Company expects EIA
approval in 2014 and start-up in 2017.

TOVAKU (Sociedad Punta del Cobre S.A.)
Tovaku, formerly Puntilla Galenosa, is a copper oxide joint venture with Codelco, which provides the
mining concession while Pucobre assumes feasibility and exploration costs. If feasible, the project will be
60 percent owned by Pucobre and 40 percent by Codelco.

Tovaku, 50 km from Tocopilla, in Antofagasta, is in the preliminary feasibility stage. Estimated investment
amount is US$600 million for production on the order of 40 kTPY copper cathodes.

Workforce: 4,700 during construction; 650 during operation.
Throughput: Not available.
Est. Investment Amount: US$600 million.
Status: Preliminary feasibility study underway. EIA filing expected in late 2013; start-up
expected in 2018.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
40
Annex C - Gold and Silver Mining
1. Atacama Pacific Gold (www.atacamapacific.com)
CERRO MARICUNGA (Minera Atacama Pacific Gold Chile
Ltda.)
Cerro Maricunga, owned by Canada-based Atacama Pacific
Gold, stands 140 km NE of Copiap, Atacama, at the northern
end of the Maricunga gold belt, some 20 km south of Kinross
Golds La Coipa gold and silver mine.
Measured and indicated resources are 248 million tons with
gold grades of 0.42 g/t, equivalent to over 3.34 million oz.
Inferred resources stand at 226 million tons with gold grades
of 0.36 g/t or some 2.65 million oz. of gold content.
Based on a Preliminary Economic Assessment finalized in
March 2013, the project calls for an open-pit operation and
heap-leaching of 80 kTPD oxide ores to produce some 298
Koz/yr. gold through the first five years, then an average of
220 Koz/yr. during a lifespan of 10 years.
In June 2013 the company and Eton Chile, an Exeter Resources subsidiary developing the Caspiche project,
entered into a joint venture to explore groundwater sources in shared areas of Cuenca Dos and Laguna
Verde, Atacama. In July 2013 the company bought a flow of 2.5 million cbm/year (80 l/s) from utility Aguas
Chaar S.A. to supply its 65-kTPD processing plant option. Flow rates could rise to 100 l/s if the 80-kTPD
plant option is selected.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: 65 to 80 kTPD of oxide ores for cyanide leaching.
Est. Investment Amount: US$515 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway. Currently considering elimination of proposed secondary
and tertiary crushers in order to cut CAPEX for the 65-kTPD operation. EIA should be
filed in August 2013. Start-up expected no earlier than 2017.
2. Barrick Gold (www.barrick.com)
PASCUA (Ca. Minera Nevada S.A.)
(www.pascualama.com)

Pascua, a gold deposit at 4,600 m altitude 53 km
north of the old El Indio Mine, forms a single unit
with the Lama deposit on the Argentine side of the
border. Global reserves are estimated at 17.1
million oz. gold and 560 million oz. silver, mostly in
oxide form.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
41
Three-fourths of reserves lie in Chile (Pascua) and the remainder in Argentina (Lama). Ores will be crushed
on-site in Chile, then trucked to facilities across the border. These include a cyanide leaching plant
processing free-milling ores (83%) to produce metal dor
12
and a concentrating plant processing refractory
ores (17%) to obtain a gold- and silver-rich copper concentrate.
Expected annual output stands at 850 koz/yr. gold and 35 million oz. silver (about 26 TPY gold and 1.1
million TPY silver, respectively), about from the Chilean side. Information on marginal copper content is
not available.
Barrick has halted construction in Chile in order to meet environmental and other conditions imposed by
regulatory authorities, although activities deemed necessary for environmental protection will carry on as
authorized. Construction in Argentina, site of most key infrastructure, including the processing plant and
tailings dam, is not affected.
Workforce: 6,000 during construction; 1,660 during operation.
Throughput: 33 kTPD through the first three years; 44 kTPD thereafter.
Est. Investment Amount: US$4.25 billion (portion to be disbursed in Chile, total cost is US$8.5 billion).
Status: Construction on hold following a July 2013 restraint order granted by the Court of Appeals
of Copiap to five Huasco River Valley native communities that charged Barrick with
numerous environmental standard violations. These included razing glaciers Toro 1, Toro 2
and Esperanza near the minesite and contaminating local water resources by dumping
untreated overburden. New details were expected in late May. The project had
additionally been fined over CLP$160 million in March and April. Barrick has indicated its
intention to restructure construction of a processing plant and other facilities on the
Argentine side in order to start producing in mid-2016.
CERRO CASALE (Minera Estrella de Oro Ltda.) (www.cerrocasale.cl)
Located in Aldebaran, on
the southern tip of the
Maricunga gold belt 100 km
due east of Copiap, Cerro
Casale is among Chiles
largest undeveloped gold
deposits.
The project contemplates
gold, silver, and copper
production. A 75-kTPD
cyanide leaching plant will
process free-milling ores to
obtain dor while a 150 to
170 kTPD concentrating plant will process sulfide ores to obtain a gold- and silver-rich copper concentrate.
Expected gold production through the first five years is estimated at 1 million oz. (31 TPY) and some 850
koz/yr. thereafter. Copper production is an estimated 115 to 127 kTPY concentrate through a 17-year
lifespan.

12
A gold and silver alloy in bar form. It is a common commercial gold ore form. Dor is further refined to separate gold and silver.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
42
An Environmental Impact Assessment Review filed for Cerro Casale in July 2011 was approved in Q4 2012.
In May 2013 the Court of Appeals of Copiap dismissed an application for injunctive relief filed by
members of the Colla native community against approval of the EIA for Cerro Casale. The ruling held that
the process was not arbitrary and that native communities had been consulted as required under ILO
Convention 169. The Colla native community appealed on 9 May but withdrew its appeal in June 2013.
Workforce: 11,000 during construction; 2,000 during operation.
Throughput: 75 kTPD oxide ores for cyanide leaching; 150 to 170 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$6 billion.
Status: Feasibility study completed, awaiting investment decision. Barrick is reviewing
conditions in the Environmental Assessment Resolution (RCA). In the current high-cost
environment, Barrick will not consider a construction decision until Pascua-Lama gets
underway. In Cochilcos view, this stance will delay project start-up by at least two
years to no earlier than 2020.
3. Exeter Resource Corp. (exeterresource.com)
CASPICHE (Minera Eton Chile)
Caspiche stands in the Maricunga gold
belt, 120 km of Copiap, between the
Cerro Casale gold/copper deposit and the
Refugio Mine, at altitudes of 4,200 to
4,700 m.
Project resources are an estimated 889
million tons with 0.58 g/t gold, 0.24
copper and 1.13 g/t silver grades
translating into 19.3 million oz. gold, 41.5
million tons silver and 2.1 million tons
copper (30.1 million oz. gold equivalent).

A preliminary feasibility study released in
January 2012 estimated a 19-year open-
pit operation with a 150-kTPD
concentrating plant and a leaching plant
for oxide ores and low-grade copper. The
leaching plant will process some 72 kTPD during the first five years, then fall back to 33 kTPD through the
end of oxide processing in year ten.

Gold and silver will be recovered in an activated carbon recovery circuit. Average lifespan production is an
estimated 696 koz/yr. gold and 844 koz/yr. silver (about 21 TPY gold and 26 TPY silver, respectively) plus
110 kTPY copper concentrate containing some gold and silver.

Two milestones were announced in June 2013. First, land rights and easements were secured. The second
was a joint venture with the Chilean affiliate of Canada-based Atacama Pacific Gold, now developing the
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
43
Cerro Maricunga project, to explore groundwater sources in shared areas of Cuenca Dos and Laguna
Verde, Atacama.

Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: 150 kTPD sulfide ores and up to 72 kTPD oxide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$4.6 billion.
Status: Preliminary feasibility study completed in January 2012; feasibility study underway,
expected completed in late 2013. The company is reviewing project guidelines with a view
to adding oxide ore processing to mining plans in order to minimize CAPEX. Start-up
expected in 2017.
4. Goldcorp (www.goldcorp.com)
EL MORRO (Minera El Morro)
Project spans two deposits (El Morro and
Fortuna, the latter holding the largest
potential) located in Alto del Carmen,
Atacama, 80 km east of Vallenar. Reserves are
an estimated 6.7 million oz. of gold and 2.56
million tons of copper.
The estimated 90 kTPD processing capacity
should result in 150 kTPY copper concentrate
with high (353 Moz/yr.; 10 TPY) gold content
over 15 years.
The project contemplates a 740-l/s
desalination plant and pumping infrastructure
capable of supplying most water requirements.
Construction was halted after Environmental Assessment Resolution approval was overturned by the Court
of Appeals of Antofagasta, a ruling ratified on appeal by the Supreme Court in late May 2012. In May 2013,
the Environmental Impact Assessment Service (SEA) was ordered by the Court of Appeals of Copiap to
reverse a mid-March resolution ordering El Morro to consult with native communities as required by the
Supreme Court decision. The order was grounded on an application for a restraint order filed by members
of the Diaguita native community of the Upper Huasco Valley, claiming that the SEA resolution failed to
meet international standards. These developments have pushed back both the native consultation and EIA
approval processes by at least six months.
Workforce: 3,800 during construction; 2,000 during operation.
Throughput: 90 kTPD sulfide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$3.9 billion.
Status: Investment decision on hold pending review of compliance with ILO Convention 169
standards after native consultation was halted in May 2013. El Morro expects to resume
construction in 2014. Start-up expected no earlier than 2018.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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5. Hochschild Mining Plc. (www.hochschildmining.com)
VOLCN (Andina Minerals Chile)
Volcn stands in the Maricunga gold belt, some 120 km east of Copiap, Atacama, at altitudes ranging
from 4,600 m to 5,200 m, 23 km NW of the Refugio Mine. Volcn is owned by Peruvian-based Hochschild
Mining Plc. following acquisition of a 90.84 percent stake from Andina Minerals in early 2013.
The property contains mineral deposits El Dorado and Ojo de Agua. The company is focusing on the
former, size of the largest high-grade gold reserves. Resources are estimated at 389.68 million tons with
grades of 0.71 g/t and reserves at 282.6 million tons with gold grades of 0.73 g/t.
A preliminary feasibility study released in February 2011 calls for an open-pit operation producing an
average of 283 koz/yr. gold through a lifespan of 15 years. Throughput is an estimated 55 kTPD, including
11 kTPD milled for flotation and 44 kTPD heap-leached.
The new owner is conducting a feasibility study on variables not considered in the preliminary feasibility
study, including the potential of sulfide flotation for copper recovery, reducing cyanide consumption,
improving gold recovery, continuous plant optimization, increased development and processing capacity,
engineering costs, and potential synergies with nearby operations.
Workforce: Up to 3,000 during construction; 550 during operation.
Throughput: 11 kTPD sulfide ores; 44 kTPD of oxide ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$800 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway and awaiting EIA approval. Once both tasks are concluded,
construction could commence in 2014 and start-up in 2017.
6. Kingsgate Consolidated Ltd.
(www.kingsgate.com.au)
NUEVA ESPERANZA (Laguna Resources Chile
Ltda.)
Nueva Esperanza, formerly Arqueros, stands in
the Maricunga gold belt, east of Copiap.
The project consists of well-defined orebodies
Arqueros, Chimberos and Teterita, plus a range
of other exploration targets. In 2000-2004
Arqueros was mined underground on a limited
scale, yielding some 288 koz of gold equivalent.
Chimberos was previously developed as an
open-pit mine, yielding about 40 million oz. of silver in 1998-1999. Resources stand at a combined 29.7
million tons with grades of 0.25 g/t gold and 79 g/t silver (1.9 million oz. gold equivalent).
Nueva Esperanza will initially process leftover resources from the previous development, with a 6-kTPD
plant handling crushing, milling, cyanide agitation leach and Merrill Crowe recovery of metal dor.
Production is an estimated 250 kg/yr. gold and 100 TPY silver over a 15-year lifespan.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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In early 2013 the company reached a final impact remediation agreement with affected native
communities under ILO Convention 169. Following RCA approval in July, the company intends to start
construction in September while continuing to apply for other necessary permits.
Workforce: Up to 800 during construction; 150 during operation.
Throughput: 6 kTPD oxide ores for cyanide leaching.
Est. Investment Amount: US$300 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway; RCA approved in July. Construction start expected in
September 2013. Start-up of initial stage expected in late 2014, followed by phase-in of
remaining stages.
7. Kinross (www.kinross.com)
LA COIPA PHASE 7 (Compaa Minera Mantos de Oro)
A gold mine some 1,000 km north of
Santiago and 140 km NW of Copiap,
in the Maricunga gold belt, in
Atacama.
The project, referred to in its EIA as La
Coipa Phase 7, calls for mining gold
and silver from the new Pompeya
deposit, ensuring operational
continuity after the impending
depletion of current resources.
Plans call for conventional open-pit
development and ore treatment at an
existing processing plant nearby.
La Coipa has a 15-kTPD design capacity. The company EIA confirms that the new phase will require no
plant capacity, equipment, or facility enhancements. Ore volume fed to the plant will be below that
handled in past years, thus requiring fewer inputs.
Similarly, as the existing infrastructure remains available, no new construction or expansion of facilities will
be required, including minesite camps, shops, explosive storage, input supply or industrial or household
waste management.
Start-up for a four-year operation expected in H1 2015, with site closure commencing in 2019.
Workforce: 100 during construction; 80 during operation.
Throughput: 15 kTPD of ores for cyanide leaching.
Est. Investment Amount: US$200 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway, EIA filed in July 2013 and awaiting approval no later than Q1
2014, with construction set to start soon thereafter. Start-up expected in Q1 2015.

Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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LOBO-MARTE (SCM Santa Rosa)
Deposit located in the Maricunga gold belt, 160
km east of Copiap, at 4,200 m altitude.
A preliminary feasibility study calls for open-pit
mining at a rate of 47 kTPD, then leaching ores
to obtain an estimated 350 koz/yr. gold (about
10 TPY) in dor form.
Work was halted in August 2012 in order to
downsize the project and investment amounts.
At present the company remains exploring
further technical and economic improvements.
Workforce: 3,000 during construction; 900 during operation.
Throughput: 47 kTPD oxide ores for cyanide leaching.
Est. Investment Amount: US$800 million.
Status: Feasibility study being restated, EIA filed in June 2011. Start-up not expected before 2017.
8. Yamana Gold (www.yamana.com)
JERNIMO (Agua de la Falda S.A.)
Agua de la Falda is 57 percent owned by Yamana Gold and 43 percent by Codelco. Jernimo, a.k.a. El
Hueso, is an undeveloped area of the operation shut down in June 2002 after producing 226,341 oz. gold
in 1997-2002.
The project calls for metallurgical, tailings management and electrical supply changes to the project in
effect through 2002. Development will be based on the underground room-and-pillar method. Resulting
waste rock will be used to fill rooms when recovering pillars and to build the tailings starter dam. Ore
treatment processes will include three-stage crushing, milling, flotation, sulfide oxidation, cyanide
leaching, elution, electrowinning and smelting to obtain metal dor in bars.
Resources are an estimated 26.35 million tons with grades of 3.45 g/t gold. Expected production stands at
about 150 koz/yr. (4.5 TPY) over ten years. Some 190 koz/yr. are expected initially, declining gradually
thereafter.
After withdrawing the EIA first filed in August 2011, the company refiled in November 2012 with a revised
investment amount of US$423 million.
Workforce: 600 during construction; 416 during operation.
Throughput: 4.2 kTPD oxide ores for cyanide leaching.
Est. Investment Amount: US$423 million.
Status: Feasibility study completed but awaiting improvements, EIA refiled in November 2012.
Results of improvement study expected in 2013. EIA refiling pushed the project back by at
least a year. Start-up delayed to no earlier than May 2015.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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Annex D - Iron and Industrial Minerals
I. IRON MINING
1.1 CAP S.A. (www.cap.cl)
LOS COLORADOS EXPANSION (Ca. Minera del Pacfico S.A.)
Project involves building a new plant to complement an existing 3.35-million TPY facility and expand
production of iron ore preconcentrate to 9.15 million TPY. The new facilities will add 2 million tons to
Huasco Pellet Feed Plant capacity.
Workforce: Not available.
Throughput: Not available.
Est. Investment Amount: MMUS$413
Status: In progress; start-up expected in late 2013. Part of the larger project schedule for 2014.
CERRO NEGRO NORTE (Ca. Minera del Pacfico S.A.)
Open-pit development of the Cerro Negro Norte iron mine with a view to producing on the order of 4
million dry TPY iron concentrate through a lifespan of 20 years. Project facilities include:
Cerro Negro Norte, comprising the mine proper, waste rock dumpsites, ore stockpiles, primary
crushing facilities, ore beneficiation plant, concentrating plant, thickened tailings dam, and a
pipeline pumping water from wells in Toledo, in the Copiap River Valley.
Water/slurry pipeline, comprising a pipeline pumping water from the port to Cerro Negro Norte
and a slurry pipeline transporting iron ore concentrate from the plant to existing port facilities.
Punta Totoralillo, comprising expansion and/or modification of the filtration plant, emergency
pond and stockpile areas based on the existing port infrastructure. While port facilities are cleared
for use by the authorities, additional demand from the project will require an expansion. This area
will include facilities pumping water reclaimed from iron ore concentrate filtration back to Cerro
Negro Norte.
Workforce: 1,610 during construction; 810 during operation.
Throughput: Not available.
Est. Investment Amount: US$880 million.
Status: In progress; start-up expected in Q4 2013.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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1.2 Hebei Wenfeng Industrial Group (www.wfsteel.com)
OSO NEGRO (Minera San Fierro Chile Ltda.)
Oso Negro, owned by Chinas Hebei Wenfeng Industrial Group, stands in Cerro Bandurrias, 60 km south of
Copiap. Iron ores mined from the site will be shipped to China for processing.
The operation will first process overlying cakes and waste rock, then mine ores from a pit 1,200 m long by
300 m wide.
Plans call for mining about 4,805 TPD for subsequent crushing and dry magnetic separation to produce
2,988 TPD of dry concentrate with 55 percent iron content.
The processing plant will feature primary and secondary crushers, fine ore stockpile, high-pressure grinding
roll (HPGR) crushing, dry magnetic separation, conveyor belts, dust suppression systems, and dry
concentrate transportation to final stockpiles at the ports of Punta Caleta or Punta Totoralillo.
Workforce: 220 during construction; 500 during operation.
Throughput: 4,805 TPD iron ores.
Est. Investment Amount: US$90.2 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway, awaiting approval of EIA filed in September 2012. Start-up
expected no earlier than 2014.

1.3 Santa Fe Mining (www.santafegrupo.com)
BELLAVISTA (70% JSW Steel, 30% Minera Santa Fe)
Bellavista stands in Llanos de Chamonate, Copiap, 2.7 km from the Cerro Imn minesite, 10 km from
Copiap and 65 km from the port of Caldera. Plans call for producing some 2.5 million TPY iron concentrate
(65% iron content) over 25 years.
The project includes optimizing iron recovery through wet magnetic concentration. Iron concentrate will
be shipped in 28-ton trucks to the port of Punta Totoralillo for shipment abroad.
Workforce: 500 during construction; 257 during operation.
Throughput: Not available.
Est. Investment Amount: US$143 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway, Environmental Impact Statement (DIA) approved. Construction
expected to take two years, start-up no earlier than 2015.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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II. INDUSTRIAL MINERALS
2.1 SQM S.A. (www.sqm.cl)
PAMPA HERMOSA (SQM)
The project stands south of Pozo Almonte, in the new Nueva Victoria Industrial Zone, site of SQMs long-
term iodine and nitrate production facilities.
The project, designed to increase prilled iodine production from 4.5 kTPY to 11 kTPY, also calls for a new
1.2-million TPY sodium/potassium nitrate plant.
Some 37 million TPY of nitrates will be mined in five areas. After leaching, solutions will be transported to
iodine plants and then to solar ponds for crystallization of salts and subsequent purification in the nitrate
plant.
Workforce: 882 to 1,438 during construction (12 months); 448 to 678 during operation.
Throughput: Not available.
Est. Investment Amount: US$1.03 billion.
Status: In progress, RCA approved. Construction considers gradual implementation over five years.
COYA SUR POTASSIUM NITRATE PLANT (NPT4) (SQM Industrial)
The plant will stand in the Coya Sur Industrial Zone, 2 km south of Mara Elena, 77 km SW of Tocopilla and
198 km NE of Antofagasta.
The plant will include ore stockpiles, waste salt disposal sites and evaporation ponds. Salts will be
processed, including by lump ore dissolution, thickening, crystallization and centrifugation, to obtain a final
product in prilled or bulk form.
The plant will produce 550 kTPY sodium/potassium nitrate or 450 kTPY of both, plus 40 kTPY boric acid
over 40 years. Production is shipped to the Port of Tocopilla for transportation.
Workforce: 380 to 570 during construction; 30 during operation.
Throughput: Not available.
Est. Investment Amount: US$250 million.
Status: Early work in progress, awaiting DIA approval. Start-up expected in 2014.
PAMPA BLANCA EXPANSION (SQM Industrial)
Pampa Blanca, south of SQMs Mara Elena hub, will add six new mining zones increasing the nitrate
extraction rate to 37.3 million TPY over 50 years.
Plans call for construction of two industrial areas to increase iodide production to 10 kTPY iodine
equivalent in order to feed a new 10 kTPY iodine plant to produce 3.425 million TPY nitrate-rich salts
(1.293 million TPY sodium nitrate).
The project will have a new power transmission system and be supplied by 500 l/s of seawater pumped
from the Bay of Mejillones.
Workforce: 765 during construction; 510 during operation.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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Throughput: Not available.
Est. Investment Amount: US$665 million.
Status: Early work in progress, awaiting DIA approval. Mining area and ancillary facility
construction is expected to take no less than 39 months. Industrial facility
construction will start with the iodide plant, to be built in tandem with mining areas,
and should take three years. Subsequent construction of a planned iodine plant will
take another two years. Start-up expected no earlier than 2015.
2.2 White Mountain Titanium Corp (www.wmtcorp.com)
CERRO BLANCO
Cerro Blanco, named for the mountain on which it lies, is a rutile deposit near the port city of Huasco, 39
km west of Vallenar, Atacama.
Recent company estimates point to reserves of 81.5 million tons with 1.97 average grades and 0.8 cutoff
grades. The overburden/ore ratio is an estimated 1.78.
The project calls for conventional open-pit development and processing of some 11 million TPY of ores to
produce 4 million TPY of rutile over 20 years and 4 months.
A gravity concentration, flotation and magnetic concentration plant will produce some 73 kTPY rutile
concentrate with 96 percent grades. Complementary feldspar production considered in the original
feasibility study will be reevaluates at a later time by the company.
In April 2012 the company secured seawater extraction permits for a desalination plant.
The project has an estimated lifespan of 24 years, including six months for acquisitions and detail
engineering, 18 months for construction, 21 years for operation, and one year for site closure.
Workforce: 450 to 705 during construction; 658 to 795 during operation.
Throughput: 11.4 kTPD rutile.
Est. Investment Amount: US$380 million.
Status: Feasibility study underway, start-up expected in 2016.
Chilean Copper Commission - Research Department July 2013
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A Cochilco Research Department Publication Prepared By

Vicente Prez Vidal
&
Cristin Cifuentes Gonzlez





Director, Research Department
Mara Cristina Betancour Muoz


July 2013