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AURORAS PG COLLEGE
STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010-2011
MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
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STUDENT HANDBOOK
2010-2011
MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
1
st
year 2
nd
SEMESTER
AURORAS PG COLLEGE
RAMANTHAPUR, HYDERABAD - 500013
PH: 040-27030787 Fax: +9140 27036468
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WELCOME NOTE
My dear Students,
The College has produced 13 MBA batches and 15 MCA batches of students till now. Majority of the students have
been placed in reputed Multinational Companies and many got admitted into renowned National and International
Institutes of higher learning. Now it is time for you to emulate your exemplary seniors and to reach higher echelons
of the society.
The College has a clearly defined goal of evolving into one of the best institutes for Post Graduate education. The
central concern of this institution is to strive for pedagogical and scholastic excellence. To reach the envisaged goal,
the college provides highly committed and qualified faculty and excellent infrastructural facilities for curricular, co-
curricular and extra-curricular activities. . Dynamism, experience and erudition characterize the teaching community
at Aurora. Highly qualified with MBA/MCA/M. Tech/M.Phil and Ph.D. degrees, the faculty bring their veritable
expertise and application oriented attitude to the classroom.
One of the innovative features of Aurora is its novel teaching-learning process, that synthesizes conventional
mechanisms of learning through lectures and laboratory sessions, with interactive process like Seminars, Guest
Lectures, Industry-Institute Interaction, Mini Projects, problem - solving sessions and Assignments that makes
learning a pleasure. This handbook, another unique feature of this college, helps you as a ready reckoner in giving
detailed institute interaction and assignment dates to prepare you well in advance. In addition, it also helps in
creating a base for you to prepare for competitive examinations like IES, GATE, GRE etc with its exhaustive reference
material.
The college has been successful in getting reputed organizations for placements and I am happy that preparations
are made to see that all the students of this college would have their future clearly defined.
From the Institutes side, we assure you that we leave no stone unturned to implement and achieve the above goals.
You too, as a student, have a crucial role to play in this arduous but exciting enterprise of making Aurora synonymous
with learning.
I invite you all to join me in this journey towards excellence.
with all best wishes
Principal
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PURPOSE OF THE BOOK
Education has to be placed and organized in an effective manner, both from the institutions side as well as the
students. This would help to achieve things with great clarity and commitment.
Aurora is the first in the country to give a comprehensive student handbook which forms a major aid for the students
to prepare for the classes in advance, know the details of various deadlines, details of the syllabus, co-and extra
curricular activities to be organized etc. It also gives indication of events and activities planned for each semester so
that the student will have an advanced view of all the academic schedules to be implemented in the course of the
semester.
The handbook seeks to inform the student about the rules and regulations of the college, in order that they may
conduct themselves in an appropriate manner. In addition, the handbook makes the student aware of the history of
the college, and the culture and values that it upholds.
The publication of this student handbook was taken up to help students chalk out a systematic plan of study and
to make optimal use of their time. Though a laborious task, our faculty took the preparation of the handbook as a
challenge and completed it in time with high sense of commitment.
Structure of the book
The first part, or the administrative section, comprises the history of the college, college timings, courses offered,
festivals and functions, rules and regulations, code of conduct, facilities, student support system, student related
matters and activities, teaching-learning process & centers of excellence.
The second part gives academic details, like the departmental profile, departmental tree, purpose of the department
almanac for course duration and tentative dates of theory and lab exams; course structure for credits and the number
of hours allocated for various programs; time table - a week-wise calendar of the subject, class time, and the name of
the faculty handling the subject; subject-wise details like the session plan, question bank assignments, guest
lectures, and students seminars; laboratory details; adjunct courses; industrial tours and visits; and finally, the
schedule of unit tests.
The third part provides student details, distribution of students into learning groups and the tasks assigned to each
of these groups.
Everyones cooperation in the successful implementation of all the activities listed out in the handbook is earnestly
solicited. Suggestions for improvement are always welcome.
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ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS
Page No
1. HISTORY 3
1.1 The Beginning
1.2 The Leap
1.3 The Name and Logo
1.4 The Icon & Heritage
1.5 The Traditions
1.6 The Culture
1.7 The Vision
1.8 The Mission
1.9 Quality Policy
2. THE COLLEGE 4
2.1 Introduction
2.2 The Goal
2.2.1 Research
2.2.2 Teaching
2.2.3 Training
2.3 Timings
3. COURSES OFFERED 4
3.1 Department of Management
3.1.1 Master of Business Administration
3.1.1.1 Course Objective
3.1.1.2 Distinct Features of the Course
3.1.1.3 Graduate Destinations
3.2 Department of Computer Applications
3.2.1 Master of Computer Applications
3.2.1.1 Course Objective
3.2.1.2 Distinct Features of the Course
3.2.1.3 Graduate Destinations
4. FESTIVALSAND EVENTS 5
4.1 Festivals
4.1.1 Independence Day
4.1.2 Teachers Day
4.1.3 Ganesh Chaturthi
4.1.4 Republic Day
4.1.5 Guru Purnima
4.1.6 Vasantha Panchami
4.2 Events and Celebrations
4.2.1 Induction Day
4.2.2 Foundation Day
4.2.3 Aurora Family Day
4.2.4 Annual Day
4.3 Events
4.3.1 National Paper Presentations
4.3.2 Adjunct Courses
5. RULES & REGULATIONS 7
5.1 Dress Code
5.2 ID Cards
5.3 Attendance
5.4 Cell Phones
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Page No
6. CODEOF CONDUCT 8
6.1 Ragging
6.2 Discipline
6.3 Lab Code
6.4 Punctuality
6.5 Academic Punishments
7. FACILITIES 11
7.1 Academic Facilities
7.1.1 Library
7.1.2 Laboratory Facilities - MCA Department
7.1.2.1 Language Laboratory
7.1.2.2 DBMS & Application Lab
7.1.2.3 Software Engineering Laboratory
7.1.2.4 OS and Networks Lab
7.1.3 Laboratory Facilities - MBA Department
7.1.4 Laboratory Facilities - Communication Department
7.2 General Facilities
7.2.1 Internet
7.2.2 WIFI Facility
8. SUPPORT SYSTEMS 12
8.1 Placements
8.1.1 Academic Requirement
8.1.2 Attendance
8.1.3 Limited Opportunity
8.1.4 Penalization for Non-acceptance
8.1.5 Commitment
8.1.6 All About You
8.2 Website
9. STUDENT MATTERS 14
9.1 Admission Procedure
9.1.1 Eligibility
9.1.1.1 Management Quota
9.1.1.2 Merit Quota
9.1.2 Filling in the Form
9.1.3 Documents & Admission
9.2 Fees
9.3 Examination System
9.3.1 Internal Evaluation - MCA
9.3.1.1 Theory
9.3.1.2 Practicals
9.3.2 External Evaluation
9.3.2.1 Theory
9.3.2.2 Practicals
9.3.3 Project Evaluation
9.4 Promotion / Detention Rules
9.5 Eligibility for Degree
9.5.1 Award of Division
9.5.2 Award of MCA Degree
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9.6 Readmission Rules
9.6.1 Detained for Shortage of Attendance
9.7 Issue of Documents
9.7.1 Bus Passes and Bonafide
9.7.2 Originals
9.7.3 Memorandum of Marks
9.8 Scholarships
9.9 Violation of Academic Issues
9.9.1 Backlogs
9.9.2 Assignments
9.9.3 Seminars
9.10 Change of Address
9.11 Transfer of Admission
9.11.1 From College to College
10. STUDENT CLUBS 18
10.1 Literary Club
10.2 Cultural Club
10.3 Nature Club
10.4 IT Club
11. TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS 19
11.1 Conventional Learning Methodology
11.1.1 Lectures
11.1.2 Laboratories
11.1.3 Projects
11.2 New Teaching Methodology (Interactive Learning)
11.2.1 Learning Groups
11.2.2 Guest Lectures
11.2.3 Student Assignments
11.2.4 Student Seminars
11.2.5 Industry - Institute Interaction
11.2.6 Mini Projects
11.2.7 Industrial Tours
11.2.8 Adjunct Courses
11.2.9 Student Counselling
11.2.10 Alumni Association
11.2.11 IT Meets
11.3 Guidelines for Final year project work
11.4 Guidelines for Interactive Learning Methodology
11.4.1 Guest Lectures
11.4.2 Student Assignments
11.4.3 Student Seminars
11.4.4 Industry-Institute Interaction
11.4.5 Mini Projects
11.4.6 Adjunct Courses
11.4.7 Student Counselling
11.4.8 Alumni Association
12. CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE 26
12.1 Centre for Communications & Personality Development
12.2 Centre for Career Counselling
13. IMPORTANT RELIGIOUS FESTIVALS 26
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ACADEMIC DETAILS
1. Department Profile 28
2. Tree View-Theory 36
3. Almanac 37
4. Course Structure 38
5. Subject-Wise Details
5.1 Accounts and Financial Management 39
5.2 Object Oriented Programming Using Java 67
5.3 Management Information Systems 83
5.4 Data Structures Using C++ 99
5.5 Computer Organization 115
6. Laboratory Details
6.1 Java Programming Lab 127
6.2 Data Structures in C++ Lab 139
7. Communication Skills 150
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ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS
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1. HISTORY
1.1 THE BEGINNING
It was in 1989 that Ramesh Nimmatoori, a young post-graduate in Computer Science and Engineering, dared to
dream. He made a humble but determined beginning with Aurora Degree College, set up under the aegis of the
Aurora Educational Society. The college had four departments, namely mathematics, computer science, statistics,
and electronics, with 62 students. They were housed in a rented premises in the then suburban locality of
Habsiguda. The college was later shifted to Gandhinagar, but by December 1992, the college moved to its
current location at Chikkadpally, a bustling area in the heart of the city.
1.2 THE LEAP
In 1993, two new departments were added -- biological sciences and commerce. The student strength rose to
600 that year. From then on, there was no looking back and by 1998, the Degree College had more than 2000
students enrolled in various branches of study, and is now rated among the top 20 degree colleges in the
country. In 1995, the Aurora Educational Society established a postgraduate college which offered two
programmes, namely, Master of Computer Applications and Master of Business Administration. In 1998,
Aurora touched new heights when it established its engineering college on a sprawling 600 acre campus. It
was a bold venture in the area of higher education. Not long after, four more engineering colleges came up,
followed closely by two postgraduate colleges. Today, Aurora happens to be one of the largest educational
groups in the state of Andhra Pradesh, with 17000 students on its rolls, more than 1400 faculty and around 500
administrative staff.
1.3 THE NAME AND LOGO
Aurora the name for the college derives from aurora borealis, the celestial northern lights. It also has
association with the Sun God Apollo and the Roman Goddess of Dawn, Aurora. The name symbolises the
fusion of Indian and Western traditions of representing the Sun as a symbol of knowledge and power.
Education is a penance for knowledge and Aurora treats it thus. The logo has three critical components -- the
Italian colours lilac and wild pink; the Egyptian pyramid signifying the letter A, and most importantly, the logo
being emblematic of the spirit of the college i.e. the temple of learning.
1.4 THE ICON AND HERITAGE
Aurora is inspired by the great Indian Teacher Chanakya, who redefined the role of a teacher as being that of
a torchbearer of society. He gave the clarion call Tasmat Uttishta Bharata Oh Indian, Awake! Seeking
inspiration from this great Indian, Aurora imparts man-making education which is firmly rooted in Indias rich
tradition, with our focus clearly on modern science & technology.
1.5 THE TRADITIONS
Aurora is known for establishing unique traditions in every aspect of its functioning. Be it pedagogical
practices, advertising strategies, discipline, extra curricular activities and events, Aurora is in the forefront.
Today, it is no exaggeration that people across the country believe that Aurora is a trendsetter.
1.6 THE CULTURE
Aurora nurtures a knowledge culture. It facilitates in tapping the latent potential of both the students and the
staff. Auroras students and faculty command a distinct recognition among their peers and counterparts. It is
this unique culture which has become the hallmark of Aurora.
1.7 THE VISION
Achieving high standards of excellence in computer education and research by synergizing professional
inputs, cutting edge technologies, learning ambience and social relevance.
1.8 THE MISSION
To groom high caliber software professionals who are familiar with cutting edges and emerging technologies
and who embrace continuous learning as the mission of their life and career.
1.9 QUALITY POLICY
We at APGC, are committed to offer the best in class academic services to students in terms of quality
teaching, state-of-art infrastructure, continuous and updated curriculum, cutting edge professional inputs,
intense learning ambience and ceaseless search for excellence so that we become a leading school of com-
puter science in the country in a decade from now.
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2. THE COLLEGE
2.1 INTRODUCTION
The College is located at Ramanthapur, 10 km from the Secunderabad Railway Station. The college offers
postgraduate courses in Management and Computer Applications (MBA & MCA).
Aurora prepares not just students with PG degrees in their hands, but people with a rounded personality.
It is for this reason that Aurora has become a brand to be trusted among students looking for quality
education.
2.2 THE GOAL
In seeking to fulfill its comprehensive mission, Aurora pursues three principal institutional goals: effective
teaching, meaningful research, and service to society. Contribution towards the realization of these
goals essentially constitutes the standard by which members of the academic staff are evaluated.
2.2.1 RESEARCH
The college acknowledges that the preservation and expansion of knowledge through scholarly
enquiry are functions that distinguish institutions of higher learning. The institution believes that
scholarly enquiry promotes effective teaching, besides being a service to society. Aurora, therefore,
seeks to preserve knowledge in its archives and libraries; employs teaching faculty holding research
degrees awarded by reputed institutions of advanced education; honours those who achieve
distinction as scholars; maintains laboratories, research centers, and numerous administrative
entities that function to promote the expansion of knowledge.
2.2.2 TEACHING
Aurora is committed to the transmission of knowledge. The Institutions primary responsibility is
to its student clientele, and, in this regard, effective classroom teaching is Auroras most pervasive
medium for the dissemination of the results of its facultys scholarly endeavors. The central
concern of the Institution is, therefore, excellence in those instructional activities that provide
students with opportunities for a comprehensive education and a specialized professional training.
The Institution assigns substantial weight to teaching in its process of faculty evaluation,
recognizing that excellence requires not only knowledge on the part of a teacher but a continuing
quest for knowledge, a constant review of curricula and modern teaching methods, flexibility and
creativity in the classroom, and an unceasing effort to individualize instruction. Towards this end,
Aurora seeks to measure the quality of instruction through both student and peer evaluation, and
regularly subject its academic programs to external review by accrediting agencies.
2.2.3 TRAINING
Aurora is an educational institution striving to utilize the services of its highly motivated team of
people, whose collective expertise encompasses virtually every field of human endeavor for the
benefit of the community. Aurora reaches out to serve society by training young men and women
not only in their respective areas of specializations but also in all aspects of human development.
2.3 TIMINGS
The college functions 6 days a week, from 9:10 AM to 4:30 PM, with a lunch break of 40 minutes, from
12:30 to 1:10 PM.
3. COURSES OFFERED
The college offers two Post-Graduate Courses viz.,
1. Master of Computer Applications (MCA)
2. Master of Business Administration (MBA)
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3.1 MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
3.1.1 COURSE OBJECTIVE
The MBA degree offered by the OU is a two-year programme which aims to equip students with the basic
knowledge of all areas of management and provide in-depth knowledge in a chosen area of specialization.
The first two semesters focus on the fundamentals of marketing, finance & human resources. Apart from
core specialization subjects, students are also taught general foundation courses like statistics, operations
research and operations management. The last two semesters provide in-depth knowledge in an area of
choice. In these semesters, students are taught general management subjects like strategic management
and technology management, which help them perform well in middle-level managerial positions.
3.1.2 DISTINCT FEATURES OF THIS COURSE
The MBA is a professional course comprising four main streams -- Marketing, Finance, Human Resources
and Systems . The student is expected to choose one of the above at the beginning of the Third Semester
in order to specialize in it.
3.1.3 GRADUATE DESTINATIONS
Students can seek admission into research programmes in various business schools across the globe.
They can also get into the executive-level or middle-level management positions. Some of the companies
which recruit our MBAs regularly are HSBC, GE, Satyam, Bajaj Alliance, Food World, Mudra, ICICI,
HDFC, SIS InfoTech, Mahindra Satyam, Bloom Soft, Value Labs, HCL, Leisux, ING Vaysya, Cap Gemini,
Garim Industries Ltd, iGate Global Services, Deloitte, NCR, Choice Solutions, Amdocs etc.
3.2 MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
3.2.1 COURSE OBJECTIVE
The main objectives of the course are: to impart basic understanding of concepts, strategies, tools and
techniques of information technology; to provide a strong foundation in all technical aspects of computers
and their applications; to develop communication and soft skills necessary for IT professionals; and to
give hands-on experience in IT applications in industry through projects on computer application software.
3.2.2 DISTINCT FEATURES OF THE COURSE
The program aims at imparting comprehensive knowledge with equal emphasis on theory and practice.
The course curriculum will have enough flexibility to enable a student to undertake advanced studies in
Computer Science.
3.2.3 GRADUATE DESTINATIONS
The MCA program prepares students to take up positions as Systems Analysts,
Systems Designers, System Developers and Managers in any field related to information technology.
4. FESTIVALS & EVENTS
Following are the important events in the Aurora calendar that all the colleges of Aurora Consortium
celebrate. These celebrations symbolize the cultural features that are unique to Aurora.
4.1 FESTIVALS
4.1.1 INDEPENDENCE DAY
August 15 is one of the most important days celebrated at Aurora. The day does not hold mere ceremonial
significance for us. On this day, the faculty, staff and students of Aurora reaffirm their commitment
towards the process of nation-building. Various social development activities and community services
are initiated on this day.
4.1.2 TEACHERS DAY
September 5, the birthday of Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, is celebrated as Teachers Day all over the
country. One of the important days in the Aurora calendar, it is a day on which students give the campus
a festive look. Cultural programs and a formal get-together mark the occasion. The faculty highlight the
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role and contribution of a teacher in a students life. The college presents the Best Teacher award for
teachers who have distinguished themselves in their fields. Senior teachers from other institutions are
also invited and honoured on this day.
4.1.3 GANESH CHATURTHI
On this day, the Aurora fraternity worships Lord Ganesha, also known as the Vighnaharta. His blessings
are sought for the smooth conduct of all activities. This year the chaturthi of the bright lunar fortnight
comes on 11
th
September 2010 and will be celebrated as the birthday of Lord Ganesha.
4.1.4 REPUBLIC DAY
Celebrated on January 26, the Republic Day is another occasion when the staff and students get an
opportunity to uphold their commitment as responsible citizens of India and derive inspiration from the
great leaders and intellectuals whose vision has guided this nation on the path of progress.
4.1.5 GURU PURNIMA
The first guru, Sri Krishna Dvypayana (Vyasa Bhagavan), born on Ashada Purnima, is considered to be
the most revered among all the gurus. Aurora celebrates Guru Purnima in order to recognize his contribution
to the world of letters.
The college celebrated Guru Purnima on 25
th
July, 2010.
4.1.6 VASANTHA PANCHAMI
It is an auspicious day for the Aurora Consortium. On this day, in the year 1989, we laid the foundation
stone of the AURORA EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY. On Vasantha Panchami, we worship Devi Saraswati -
- the Goddess of Learning and Intelligence.
The college celebratedVasantha Panchami on 20
th
January, 2010.
4.2 EVENTSAND CELEBRATIONS
4.2.1 INDUCTION DAY
Every year the new batch of students is warmly welcomed by the college. While the induction is meant
to make students feel at ease in their new environs, it has a serious purpose behind it. It is an initiation
into the culture and traditions upheld by the college. Students are primed about the rules and norms of
the college, and the challenges that they would encounter over the years in such a demanding course. A
week-long celebration consisting of lectures by distinguished personalities, cultural events, and a formal
get-together mark the induction process every year.
For the batch of 2009, the induction day was held on September 4th, 2009.
4.2.2 FOUNDATION DAY
On the Foundation Day of the college, an eminent personality is invited to give the Foundation Day
Lecture. This is the day when the college takes pride in reaffirming its commitment to the cause of
education.
The Foundation Day is held on Vasantha Panchami every year.
4.2.3 AURORA FAMILY DAY
The Aurora Family Day is a festive occasion organized every year by the Aurora Consortium. The staff
along with their families are invited for a get-together. It is an opportunity for everyone to know one
another and to strengthen personal and professional bonds.
The Aurora Family day is planned tentatively in the first week of January, every year
4.2.4 ANNUAL DAY
The annual day celebrations of the college take place at the end of the academic calendar. Sports, cultural
and literary competitions are conducted as a run-up to the main program. Parents, alumni, and other
guests are invited for the event. The annual day is an occasion for the college to speak about its
commitments and its achievements in the academic year. The annual report is presented to the college
board a week before the proposed day.
The annual day celebrations are planned tentatively on 10th during March/April of every year.
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4.3 EVENTS
4.3.1 NATIONAL PAPER PRESENTATION
A national level paper presentation is intended to be organized in the month of October. More than 200
colleges from all over India are expected to participate. The event includes paper presentation. This event
will make Students & Faculty aware of the various developments in the field of Information Technology
& instill an interest for research for them.
For 2009-2010 academic year it was held on 9th & 10th of February 2010.
4.3.2 ADJUNCT COURSES
An adjunct course on LINUX Administration and Database Administration was conducted for the
faculty of Computer Applications on 5th, 6th & 7th of March 2010.
5. RULES & REGULATIONS
5.1 DRESS CODE
Students must observe the following dress code:
Gents: Formal Shirt of Light Cream Color, Jet Black Trousers & Tie. Black Shoes, Belt and ID-Card.
Ladies: Formal Shirt of Light Cream Color, Jet Black Trousers, Half/full Shoes and ID-Card.
Please note that Jeans and T-shirts do not form part of the dress code. Those who are improperly dressed, and
have a shabby appearance will not be allowed into the college premises.
5.2 ID CARDS
Students will be issued ID cards only after they fill up their details in a prescribed form that will be issued to
them at the time of registration. Students are expected to come with their blood group details for this purpose.In
case the card is lost, a duplicate ID card will be issued against a payment of Rs 100. Students will not be allowed
into the college campus without the ID card.
5.3 ATTENDANCE
The continuous evaluation system adopted by the OU and the college clearly expects every student to be
responsible for regularity to class, internal tests and other tasks assigned to him/her in the course. As such,
students are advised not to absent themselves without the prior submission of leave letter to the respective
counselors.
1. A student has to put in a minimum of 75% attendance in aggregate of all the subjects in the semester.
2. Condonation of shortage of attendance in aggregate upto 10% (between 65% to 75%) in a semester may
be recommended by the College Academic Committee to the OU with supporting evidence only in
genuine and valid cases.
3. A student will not be promoted to the next semester unless he/she satisfies the attendance requirement
of the present semester.
4. Shortage of attendance below 65% in aggregate shall in no case be condoned.
5. Students whose shortage of attendance is not condoned are not eligible to take their examination of that
class and their registration shall stand cancelled. They may seek re-admission for that semester when
offered next.
6. A stipulated fee shall be payable towards condonation of shortage of attendance.
7. Students coming out in the middle of a class or entering late into a class will be seriously viewed and
attendance will not be given for that hour.
8. The monthly attendance of each student, along with the unit test marks, will be displayed on the
notice board in the first week of every month. Also a copy of that will be sent to the parents at the address
registered with the college. Postage costs will be borne by the student.
9. Students will not be given lab attendance unless they submit practical records of the previous lab
sessions.
10. In case of ill-health, a student has to submit the proof or evidence of absence and the leave application
to the Principal/Head of the department, immediately on rejoining the college. Late submission of leave
application will not be accepted for consideration at the time of condonation of shortfall of attendance.
11. Students with less than 75% of attendance will not be permitted to participate in co-curricular, extra
curricular and sports activities. No college facilities like bus pass, travel concessions, scholarships will
be admissible for them.
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5.4 CELL PHONES
Students are NOT allowed to keep their cell phones in SWITCH ON mode on the college campus. If any
student is found in possession of camera cell phone, it will be seized by the college and will not be returned.
6. CODE OF CONDUCT
6.1 RAGGING
Ragging is a cognizable and punishable offence.Any student found indulging in ragging will be dealt with
severely as per the existing orders. It is to be noted that ragging in professional colleges has been banned
within or outside the college by the Government of AP, vide Act 26 1997. An extract of the Act is given below.
Ragging includes words either spoken or written, signs, sounds, gestures and visible representation meant to
harass and torture. Ragging is an act which causes or is likely to cause insult/annoyance or fear/apprehension/
threat/ intimidation/outrage of modesty/injury to a student.The full text of Act 26 is placed in the college library.
PENALTY FOR RAGGING
S No Nature of Ragging Punishment
1 Teasing, embarrassing and humiliating
Imprisonment upto 6 months or fine upto
Rs.1000/- or both.
2
Assaulting or using criminal force or
criminal intimidation or both
I mpri sonment upt o 1 year or fi ne upt o
Rs. 2000/ -
3
Wrongful restraining or confining or
causing hurt
I mpri sonment upt o 2 year s or fi ne upt o
Rs. 5000/ -
4
Causing grievous hurt, kidnapping or
raping or committing unnatural offence
Imprisonment upto 5 years and fine upto
Rs.10000/-
5 Causing death or abetting suicide
I mpri sonment upt o 10 years and fi ne upt o
Rs. 50, 000/
1. Students convicted of an offence under section 4 of this Act and punished with imprisonment for a term
shall be dismissed from the educational institution.
2. Any student convicted and punished under this Act for more than six months shall not be admitted in
any other educational institution.
3. Any student dismissed from a college for ragging will be debarred from seeking admission in any other
course of study in any college / university in the state.
4. A student against whom there is prima facie evidence of ragging in any form will be suspended from the
college immediately.
6.2 DISCIPLINE
Discipline is a priority for the success of any venture. Be it related to matters of general conduct, attendance,
punctuality, dress, body language or academic performance, discipline has a bearing on all aspects of a
students personality. At Aurora, discipline is valued and promoted, both among the staff and students.
Students are expected to abide by the rules of the college and refrain from any activity that harms the dignity
of the individual or casts a slur on the image of the institution. Any violation of the college norms shall be dealt
with strictly and the student will be penalized accordingly. Cooperation of parents/guardians is essential in
this regard.
1. Consumption of alcoholic beverages, narcotics and other addictive substances on the college premises,
or coming to college having consumed elsewhere, will entail dismissal from the college and conduct
certificate will not be issued.
2. Smoking on the college campus is strictly prohibited and the student will be suspended from the college
with immediate effect and recommended for punishment as per Section 4 of the Cigarettes and Other
Tobacco Products Act 2003.
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3. Ragging is a legal offence as per Act 26 of the AP Legislative Assembly 1997. Students are cautioned
against indulging in any activity that may be classified as ragging in and around the college campus,
in student buses or at boarding/alighting points. Those found aiding and abetting are also equally
accountable for their actions. Ragging entails suspension, dismissal, heavy fines, and imprisonment.
4. Adherence to the Dress Code laid down by the college is a must.
5. Entry shall not be given if a student is late to college. Students are supposed to be present in the college
by 9:00 AM. The entry of latecomers will be regulated and monitored by the college authorities.
6. The kind of language we use is a reflection of our personality and our home environment. Use of slang
and abusive language, whistling in the college premises, are strictly discouraged and liable to be penalized.
7. Not attending classes while being on the premises and en masse absenteeism are both viewed with
displeasure.
8. Students are advised to mind their body language. It communicates more than words. Slouching in
corridors or sitting on the parapet walls or on the steps at the entrance are discouraged.
9. Any damage to college property, scribbling on walls, tables, drawing boards, is seriously viewed.
10. Rising to greet when a teacher enters the classroom adds value to ones own personality Conduct
towards faculty and peer group should be impeccable.
6.3 LAB CODE
1. Students should report to the scheduled labs as per the time table.
2. Students who turn up late to the labs will in no case be permitted to perform the experiment scheduled for
the day.
3. After completion of the programs, certification of the staff in-charge in the observation book is necessary.
4. Students should bring a notebook of about 100 pages and should write the programs before entering the
Lab.
5. Any damage to the compuler or burn-out of components will be viewed seriously and is punishable
by penalty or the dismissal the student from the lab for the semester/year.
6. Students should be present in the labs for the total scheduled duration.
7. Requisition of Systems for extra practice should be done 24 hrs. prior to the practice.
6.4 PUNCTUALITY
1. All students shall strictly observe the college time. If any student comes late to college, he/she will not
be allowed to the class and attendance will not be marked for that hour.
2. If anyone is found to be regularly late, administrative action, including suspension from classes shall be
initiated.
3. All the students should strictly adhere to the deadlines specified for the submission of assignments,
laboratory reports, seminar and project reports, failing which students will be given academic punishment(s).
6.5 ACADEMIC PUNISHMENTS
A novel method of correcting acts of misconduct has been devised. Instead of monetary penalization, students
will be given academic punishments for a range of undesirable acts, like giving proxy attendance, not attending
classes regularly, cutting classes while on campus, not observing the dress code, scribbling on college property,
littering the classroom and many more such acts.
1. Make a power point presentation on a specified topic.
2. Give a seminar to junior students on a relevant topic.
3. Come to college on holidays or during vacation to take an examination based on previous question
papers.
4. Student may lose attendance for 5 days.
5. Prepare notes for all the subjects.
6. If found guilty of littering the campus, the student may have to conduct sanitation week in the college
premises.
7. If a student loses a library book, he/she has to replace the book with a new copy and write a brief on
library management.
8. Present a seminar on an issue related to environmental science.
9. Present a seminar on the topic covered in the class and clarify peer doubts.
10. Take notes of the hour and answer students queries on that topic in the next class.
11. Gather information on a topic that is not discussed in the prescribed textbook.
12. Write an appropriate program and submit along with updated observation book.
13. Student must give an apology letter stating that he/she will lose 2 days attendance if the action is
repeated.
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14. Must answer a previous exam paper.
15. Prepare 20 objective-type questions from one unit and submit it in two days time.
16. Collect 5 communication protocols and explain them in detail.
17. In the event of harassing a junior, the student offers a detailed apology in the juniors class.
18. Give a seminar on the subject that is a pre-requisite for the course under study.
19. Give a detailed list of the subjects studied so far.
20. Attempt not less than 3 lab exercises.
21. Type chapter notes. This will:
i. increase notemaking speed
ii. the student will learn something about what is being typed
iii. spellings of some key words will be known
iv. notes can be verified by the teacher and circulated to others in the class.
22. Download at least 1MB of tutorials from the Internet on a specified subject.
23. Record his/her reading voice on a cassette for a chapter or part, and submit to the teacher.
24. Do a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities & Threats) analysis chart in a creative fashion under
the direction of one of the disciplinary committee members.
25. Do a role play in English on the topic given by the teacher for at least 7 minutes.
26. Prepare a mind map on the entire topic and present it to the class.
27. Give an extempore for at least 5 minutes on the topic being dealt with in the next class.
28. Solve a problem in the presence of the teacher from the syllabus covered.
29. Solve five problems related to the topic of the day.
30. Present the topic under discussion to the class in the next period itself.
31. Learn ten words given by the teacher. Student should write the synonyms, antonyms, and the different
forms of those words.
32. Write a composition (250-300 words) on a theme suggested by the teacher.
33. Answer essay type questions pertaining to the unit under discussion.
34. Derive all the equations present in the entire syllabus
35. Present a seminar on any topic in the presence of the Principal and the HOD.
36. Prepare a brief on a mathematician who has made significant contribution to the field.
37. Write five or more derivations pertaining to any subject and circulate copies in the class.
38. Repeat the same topic next day and engage the class for the full hour.
39. Prepare charts of difficult circuits, computer programs etc., for display in class.
40. Collect 50-100 jokes related to science & technology.
41. Draw cartoons for any magazine related to science & technology.
42. Suggest two books which are not available in the library. The title, author, publisher, cost, and the name
of the book shop where they are available should also be mentioned.
43. Download the literature on current trends pertaining to the subject under discussion.
44. Write an assignment three times on the topic of the day.
45. Give a seminar on discipline and respect.
46. Submit a write-up on discipline in public places.
47. Write a board stating, Smoking is injurious to health.
48. Write a board stating, Tobacco is injurious to health.
49. If a student is found scribbling on college property, he/she has to clean up the scribbled space.
50. Draw all circuit diagrams in the lab once.
51. Collect the profile of the faculty holding the session.
52. Submit wall posters for the lab.
53. Submit a write-up on the history of the college.
54. Collect information on advancements related to his/her field.
55. Collect related news from various journals.
56. Write a paper.
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7. FACILITIES
7.1 ACADEMIC FACILITIES
7.1.1 LIBRARY
Our library is truly a learning centre with reading space for more than 100 students at a time. The library
stocks textbooks, reference books, journals, magazines and newspapers. It also has an archive of
editorial clippings on interesting subjects.The library subscribes to a large number of national and
international journals and also has a very large collection of reference books on advanced disciplines. In
all, the college library has more than 15,000 volumes and around 6000 titles covering various advanced
topics pertaining to the subjects offered by the college. A dynamic CD library presents data and information
in bytes. Furthermore, information is compiled for the students from various international websites and
is collated topic-wise in the form of printouts. All this is made available free to the students. Supporting
this excellent library facility is the computer-enabled digital library giving access to various international
journals. The college library also offers reprographic facilities like photocopying, lamination, spiral binding,
etc.The library provides facility for the borrowing of books, magazines, freeware and CDs. There is a
separate Book Bank facility supported by the Social Welfare Department of the Governmet of Andhra
Pradesh for SC/ST students.
7.1.2 ISSUE OF LIBRARY CARDS
Every MCA student will be issued three library cards. The student is entitled to borrow a book, CD or
bound journal. MCA students should produce the fee receipt and three stamp-size and one pass-port
size colour photos. Students who secure the first rank in their class or have attendance of more than
85% will be issued an additional library card. A student can keep the book for a maximum period of 10
daysand CD for a maximum period of 2 days.Bound journals should be returned within seven days. A fine
of Rs. 5/- per day on each book will be charged for late returns. A lost book has to be replaced with the
same title or an amount two times the cost of the book should be paid.
7.1.3 LABORATORY FACILITIES MCA DEPARTMENT
7.1.3.1 LANGUAGES LABORATORY
The MCA department has established a networked laboratory with 270 computer systems (90 systems
in Lab-1, 50 Systems in Lab-2 & 120 Systems in Lab -3). The lab has facilities for learning and enhancing
skills in all the necessary programming languages like C/C++, MS-Office, Oracle, OS (Unix), Java,
Rational Rose etc. The college has in its possession legal versions of all the above programming
languages. Efforts are afoot to enhance the facilities in the laboratory in order to encourage projects
and research work in the area of computer science.
7.1.3.2 DBMS AND APPLICATIONS LABORATORY
This lab, with 140 networked systems, is the hub of all database-related activities. It is equipped with
legal versions of Oracle 8i, Data Warehousing and Data Mining tools and other related software. The
lab is also equipped with all the necessary aids and tools to facilitate training and applications
development in the areas of Multimedia and Web-based applications. Students can also develop
projects relating to Data Mining and Warehousing. In addition, the lab has Microsoft development
tools on different platforms.
7.1.3.3 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING LABORATORY
The lab has state-of-the-art hardware and software facilities with 60 computers in network for necessary
skill upgradation and development work in software engineering. Supported by specialized software
tools like Designer2000 and Rational Rose, this lab has enabled the development of the online
examination software. Developed by a team of experts in the college itself, this software has been in
use for the past three years in the college for internal assessment.
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7.1.3.4 OS AND NETWORKS LABORATORY
This is a lab with 60 networked state-of- the-art computing facilities. The lab has all the popular
operating systems like all the variants of Microsoft OS products, SCO Unix, and Linux. A core group
of faculty has been active in the Linux club that is proactively promoting and popularizing the concept
of Open Source Technologies. The group also conducts adjunct courses regularly in OST for students
who have undergone a course in at least one operating system. The team is also working towards
developing some projects in this area. The lab is equipped with suitable software for application and
reasearch work in networking technologies such as protocols and cryptographic implementations.
7.1.4 LABORATORY FACILITIES - MBADEPARTMENT
7.1.4.1 LANGUAGES LABORATORY
The MBA department has established a networked laboratory with 120 computer systems (90 systems
in Lab-1 & 30 Systems in Lab-2). The lab has facilities for learning and enhancing skills in all the
necessary programming languages like MS-Office, Visual Foxpro, SPSS, MSDN etc. The college has
in its possession legal versions of all the above software.
7.1.4.2 DBMS AND APPLICATIONS LABORATORY
This lab, with 120 networked systems, is the hub of all database-related activities. It is equipped with
legal versions of softwares. The lab is also equipped with all the necessary aids and tools to facilitate
training and applications development in the areas of multimedia and web-based applications. Students
can also develop projects relating to Client Server Applications. In addition, the lab has Microsoft
development tools.
7.2 GENERAL FACILITIES
7.2.1 INTERNET
The college has broadband internet connectivity through optical fibre line, enabling students to have
access to online resources. This will establish an essentially electronic and digital virtual private network
for continuous communication. Internet connectivity is especially important for the library as it provides
access to the libraries worldwide. Moreover, all the computer systems are being brought under an
intranet, which helps in effective and paperless communication for the entire college.
7.2.2 WIFI Facility
The entire college campus is WIFI enabled and one can browse internet from anyplace on the campus.
8. SUPPORT SYSTEMS
8.1 PLACEMENTS
1. The Placement Cell of Aurora works in tandem with the students to compile information about each and
every student under an exhaustive portfolio titled All About You.
2. Interaction with companies and organizations in the form of emailing, phone calls, mailing brochures,
hospitality and scheduling placement activities is done weeks in advance by the placement cell.
3. The placement cell coordinates with the Centre for Career Counselling, where the students are educated
about the difference between a job and a career. The Centre for Career Counselling strives to provide
information and counselling to students, which will enable them to identify not only their strengths but
also the areas that need further improvement.
4. The cell is also assisted by the Centre for Communication. This centre does the preliminary job of
scouting and grooming students who are potentially employable. The confidence and self-esteem of
students is enhanced through SWOT sessions, group discussions, mock interviews and sessions on
bodylanguage, etiquette etc.
5. All the final year students undergo interaction with the placement officer. During these interactive
sessions, the officer acquaints them with the activities of the placement cell and helps them to prioritize
their future plans.
6. Student placement coordinators are selected from final years in the months of July or August. Coordinators
are given the necessary orientation for helping their team members.
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7. Students are categorized on the basis of their performance in an aptitude test conducted by the cell and
the centre for communication in the month of June. Based on the results, the students are groomed to
evolve into confident young professionals ready for recruitment.
8. An e-mail club has been established to facilitate communication with the students.
9. A placement fete is organized by the students. Distinguished personalities from the industry are invited
to address and motivate them about the prospects of early career placements. This fete also includes
several competitions like best resume competition, mock interviews, group discussions, JAM sessions,
interview-based dressing, etc.
10. The alumni of Aurora working in reputed organizations are invited to interact with students and explain
their strategies and share their hands-on experiences with them.
11. Students are encouraged to collect and display placement-related literature on the notice board.
The best contribution is duly rewarded.
Based on the observations made in the last few years with regard to the attitude of students
towards placements, the placement cell has come out with a Placement Charter, which sets guidelines
for the system to be effective and to maximize results. An extract from the charter is given below.
8.1.1 ACADEMIC REQUIREMENT
It is mandatory for a student to have a consistent academic record which would be measured in
terms of their percentage of marks. Aggregate must be 65% and above. Also, he / she should not
have any backlogs.
8.1.2 ATTENDANCE
A student with more than 75% attendance in each and every subject can get the benefit of registering
for placements.
8.1.3 LIMITED OPPORTUNITY
In order to provide a fair chance to each student, a maximum of 3 opportunities for placements will
be given. The students are advised to take this seriously and prepare themselves to ensure their
selection.
8.1.4 PENALIZATION FOR NON-ACCEPTANCE
A student once selected in a particular company is required to take up the appointment, failing
which he may not be allowed to participate in the placement process.
8.1.5 COMMITMENT
Recruiting companies generally have a stipulation that an employee should hold the job at least for
a period of two years. The placement cell expects this commitment to be present in all the selected
students.
8.1.6 ALL ABOUT YOU
To facilitate the employer to have an insight into all the aspects of the prospective employee, the
placement cell makes available a copy of All About You directly to the prospective employers.
8.2 WEBSITE
Our website www.aurora.ac.in is a mine of information. Provided in the most interactive manner, it helps
in establishing a virtual family of students, faculty and parents.
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9. STUDENT MATTERS
9.1 ADMISSION PROCEDURE
Students should have completed their study upto Degree level, and appeared for the ICET examination
Integrated Common Entrance Test (ICET) for Admission into M.B.A. / M.C.A. Courses of all Universities in
the Andhra Pradesh and their Affiliated Colleges (conducted on behalf of APSCHE).
9.1.1ELIGIBILITY
1. The candidates should be Indian Nationals and should satisfy local/non-local status requirements
laid down in the Andhra Pradesh Educational Institutions (Regulations of Admission) order, 1974 as
amended upto date (As per G.O. Ms No : 108, Higher Education Dept., dated 30-7-2005).
2. The candidates other than Indian nationals should satisfy the rules of the Universities concerned.
3. A pass (or) appeared at the final year examination of Bachelors Degree (except BOL and BFA) of any
University in Andhra Pradesh or any other university recognized as equivalent thereto.
4. The candidates seeking admission into MBA course should have passed a Bachelors Degree
Examination of not less than three years duration from any recognized University or equivalent
thereof besides passing SSC or equivalent examination with Mathematics as one of the subjects.
5. The candidates seeking admission into MCA course should have passed Bachelors Degree
Examination of not less than 3 years duration in any discipline with Mathematics at 10+2 level (OR)
should have passed Bachelors Degree Examination of not less than 3 years duration in any discipline
with Mathematics as one of the subjects.
6 The candidates who are appearing for the final year degree examination shall also be eligible to
appear for ICET- 2010.
9.1.2 FILLING IN THE FORM
The candidates are required to fill up an application form in their own handwriting giving all their
personal and academic details. This will enable proper communication between the college and the
students.
9.1.3 DOCUMENTS FOR ADMISSION
Candidates should submit their admission forms with the allotment letter either issued by the
convener or the management, along with one set of photocopies of the following certificates:
1. Transfer Certificate from the Institution where the candidate last studied
2. Date of Birth Certificate & SSC Memorandum of Marks
3. Migration Certificate by students coming from other than Osmania University
4. Bonafide Certificate for classes I to XII
5. Income Certificate of the parent/guardian (if necessary)
6. Nativity Certificate from the Mandal Revenue Officer (if necessary)
7. Caste/Community Certificate from an officer, not below the rank of Mandal Revenue Officer (if
necessary)
Note: The college reserves the right to cancel the admission of a candidate at any stage if it is
detected that the admission is against the rules and regulations of the University.
9.2 FEES
Conveners Quota Management Quota
I Year
Tuition Fee Rs.27,000 Rs.78,000
Student Expenses Rs. 5,500 Rs. 5,500
II Year
Tuition Fee Rs.26,700 Rs.63,000
Student Expenses Rs. 2,500 Rs. 2,500
III Year
Tuition Fee Rs.24,300 Rs.63,000
Student Expenses Rs. 2,500 Rs. 2,500
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9.2.1MODE OF PAYMENT
Two separate crossed Demand Drafts/Bankers Cheques for Rs. 26,700 and Rs. 6,500 drawn on any
nationalized bank favouring the Principal, Auroras PG College, and payable at Hyderabad, need
to be submitted along with registration.Those who fail to make the payment before the last date will
have to pay fine as detailed below, in addition to the tuition and other fees.
Period : 10 Days -- Rs.100
Next 20 days @ Rs.10 per day
The fine amounts may be added to the student expenses and consolidated Demand Drafts/Bankers
Cheques may be taken as outlined above.Tuition fees will not be accepted beyond 20 days and
admission of defaulters will be cancelled.
Registration
After payment of the fee, the student shall have to register for Odd Semester and shall attend the
counseling as per the schedule.
MCA - II year : 2nd August
MCA - III year : 3rd August
The following are to be produced at the time of registration:
1. Fee payment receipt
2. 6 stamp-size photographs
3. 6 window envelopes with postage worth Rs 5 affixed on each, and 4 envelopes with postage
worth Rs 25 affixed on each.
NOTE
1.Parents are requested to accompany their wards for registration on the scheduled dates.
2. For students of SC and ST communities, fee is not collected from the eligible students,
inanticipation of sanction of schlorship from the government. (Please contact the office for
details.) SC/ST/BC students who are not sanctioned scholarships should clear all fee dues
before obtaining their certificates.
9.3 EXAMINATION SYSTEM
The examination system consists of internal exams and end exams. Internal exams are conducted by the
college on behalf of the Osmania Unversity . The end examination will be conducted by Osmania University.
The performance of a student in each semester shall be evaluated subject-wise with a maximum of 100
marks for theory and 50 marks for practical subject. In addition, industry-oriented mini project, seminar
and project work shall be evaluated for 25 marks.
For theory & practical subjects , the distribution shall be 20 marks & 25 marks for internal evaluation and
80 marks for theory and 50 marks for practical end examination.
9.3.1 INTERNAL EVALUATION - MCA
9.3.1.1 THEORY
The classes which shall be on a semester basis, shall have two tests which includes two internal
tests for 20 marks. All the tests are of one hour duration. The performance in the best two
internal tests will be considered. The distribution of syllabus for conducting the tests shall be as
follows : -
1 - 2 Units - I Internals
3 - 4 Units - II Internals
9.3.1.2 PRACTICALS
For Practical subjects, there shall be a continuous evaluation during the semester for 25 sessional
marks and 50 end examination marks. Of the 25 marks for Internals, 12.5 marks shall be awarded
for I Lab Internals and 12.5 marks for the II Lab Internals.
9.3.2 EXTERNAL EVALUATION
9.3.2.1 THEORY
The performance of a student in each semester shall be evaluated subject-wise with a maximum
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of 100 marks . In addition, industry-oriented mini project, seminar and project work shall be
evaluated for Grading for MBA and 25 marks for MCA respectively.
For theory subjects, the distribution shall be 20 marks for internal evaluation and 80 marks for
the end examination.
9.3.2.2 PRACTICALS
The end examination shall be conducted at the concerned colleges by the external examiner from
other college. The external examiner is appointed by the Osmania University. The evaluation of
papers is for 50.
Note: A student has to carry the hall ticket and identity card to the examination centre , else the
student may not be permitted to write the exam. Students are instructed not to carry any
objectionable material to the exam hall. All the students have to produce their hall tickets to the
invigilators and should be present in the examination hall at least 15 minutes before the
commencement of the examination.Any student found guilty of malpractice/improper conduct is
liable to disciplinary action as per the Osmania University Malpractice Rules. All such cases
are referred to the College Malpractice Prevention Committee, which, after going through the
reports, submits its recommendations to the Osmania Unversity Malpractice Committee
(Controller of Examinations) that has the final authority to decide the case.
9.3.3 EVALUATION OF PROJECT
Students will have to take up an industry-oriented mini project, in collaboration with an industry of
their specialization, during the academic year for MBA - II year and MCA - III year. The Major
Project is done in II Semester, MCA III year.
9.4 PROMOTION / DETENTION RULES
The student is required to put in a minimum of 75% of attendance for promotion from I semester as well
as II semester as per the Osmania University rules. The promotion of the student from I year to II year
is required to pass 75%of subjects for both the semesters ( I Sem & II Sem ) for MBA Course and 50%
of subjects is required to pass for the both semesters ( I Sem & II Sem ) for MCA Course, after I year and
75% of subjects by the end of II year.
9.5 ELIGIBILITY FOR DEGREE
9.5.1 AWARD OF DIVISION
All the students who have fulfilled the academic requirements as per the OU rules are awarded
division in the following four classes:
1. First Class with distinction 70% and above
2. First Class Below 70% but not less than 60%
3. Second Class Below 60% but not less than 50%
4. Pass Below 50% but not less than 40%
9.5.2 AWARD OF MCA DEGREE
A student will be declared eligible for the award of MCA Degree provided he/she fulfills the
following academic regulations:
i. The student who has pursued a course of study for not less than three academic years for
MCAand completes the same in not more than double the academic years.
ii. A student who fails to fulfill all the academic requirements for the award of the degree within
3/3 years (regular student) from the time of admission, shall forfeit the seat in the course and
the seat shall stand cancelled.
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9.6 RE-ADMISSION RULES
9.6.1 DETAINED FOR SHORTAGE OF ATTENDANCE
A student detained for shortage of attendance has to seek readmission in the same semester/class,
and should register at the beginning of the semester/year only. Attendance is considered from day
one onwards.
9.7 ISSUE OF DOCUMENTS
9.7.1 BUS PASSES AND BONAFIDES
Students are required to submit their applications for bus passes and bonafides in schedule time
and collect the same day. This work has to be done only during a free period. A student found
irregular to college may be denied the pass.
9. 7.2 ORIGINALS
The original certificates and memoranda of marks submitted by the student will not be returned
during the study period. They can be issued to the student for valid reasons, after seeking approval
from the Principal. Students should submit an application to the Principal requesting for the same.
The documents have to be returned to the college at the earliest.
9.7.3 MEMORANDUM OF MARKS
The examination cell at the college will give the memoranda of marks after they have been issued by
the university.
9.8 SCHOLARSHIPS
All the SC, ST, and BC students can apply for scholarships, subject to fulfillment of annual income
criteria. Fresh applications for scholarships have to be submitted at the College office.
The documents to be enclosed with the application are:
1. Caste & Income certificates issued by the MRO
2. Photocopies of SSC, intermediate marks memo
3. Transfer certificate
4. Photocopy of parents electoral card/ration card
The following are the rules and regulations pertaining to scholarships:
1. Candidates seeking fee exemption have to submit their application form within the stipulated
time failing which will not be eligible for exemption.
2. Students with less than 75% attendance are not eligible for maintenance allowance.
3. Students applying for scholarships have to open a savings bank account with any nationalized
bank before submitting the application form.
4. The renewal of scholarships will be recommended to the authorities concerned only if the
candidate secures 75% attendance and gets promoted to the next class/semester.
Note : On scrutiny, if any student is found producing wrong evidence or information he/she will
be rusticated from the college.
9.9 VIOLATION OF ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
9.9.1 BACKLOGS
It has been observed that students do not take the end semester/year exams seriously and
consequently perform poorly. This not only puts unnecessary pressure on the students but also
projects a negative image of the college. In order to discourage students from accumulating backlogs,
the college has decided to impose the academic punishment.
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9.9.2 ASSIGNMENTS
The students should submit their assignments as per the schedule given in the student handbook.
The defaulters will not be allowed to write the corresponding unit test.
9.9.3 SEMINARS
The students should submit their synopsis one week before the scheduled date. The synopsis
should mention the books referred to. Students who fail to give the seminar on the prescribed date
and time will have to give the seminar on another day approved by the coordinator for twice the
time of the normal seminar.
9.10 CHANGE OF ADDRESS
In case of change in permanent/contact address, students are required to incorporate the same in the
registration cards to be filled by them at the beginning of every semester. If there is a change in the
middle of any semester, students can forward an application for change of address to the college office
through the Administrative Officer.
9.11 TRANSFER OF ADMISSION
9.11.1 FROM COLLEGE TO COLLEGE
The transfer of admissions from one college to another college will be considered on grounds of ill health
for students of second year only. Students who desire a transfer from one college to another shall submit
their applications to the Commissioner, Technical Education, Government of Andhra Pradesh, along with
the following documents:
1. No objection certificates from both the colleges
2. Medical certificate from a Civil Assistant Surgeon working in a government hospital.
Note: Transfer of students of the III year MCA,may be considered on very serious health grounds.
10. STUDENT CLUBS
The Aurora ethos believes that true education can be accomplished not through imposition but through
aspiration. Nothing can accomplish this better than the club activities that are by the students, of the students
and for the students.
10.1 LITERARY CLUB
The literary club organizes activities like debate, education, essay writing, and general quiz during the academic
year. Competitions are organized on special days like August 15 and the Annual Day. Students with talent and
inclination are motivated to participate. The club also provides a forum for developing communication skills
and cultivating a creative outlook towards their profession.
10.2 CULTURAL CLUB
Under the umbrella of the cultural club, students are encouraged to organize dramas, music, painting, singing
& dance competitions, etc. These activities tap the creativity of students and go a long way in making them
successful as creative professionals. Such activities hone their personalities and allow them to be in sync with
other aspects of their being.
10.3 NATURE CLUB
This club promisses to rediscover man as part of the wonderful creation called Nature. Students here are
involved in photo exhibitions, nature protection activities and awarenes-building programs especially on
sustainable development.
10.4 IT CLUB
This club is a reflection of new ideas in the field of information technology. It shares the latest information on
emerging trends, events and personalities involved in designing and working of technologies.
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11. TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS
The college is making all attempts in right earnest to fulfil its mandate of becoming a world class institution
of higher learning. The new teaching methodology is a major step in this direction. The salient feature of
the methodology is that it synthesizes conventional mechanisms of learning such as lectures, lab
sessions and projects, with interactive teaching-learning aids like seminars, guest lectures, expert sessions,
industrial visits, and assignments.
11.1 CONVENTIONAL LEARNING METHODOLOGY
11.1.1 LECTURES
Lectures are designed to provide the framework of a subject. They normally last for an hour and are given
by expert faculty. Students are expected to note the main points. Handouts summarizing the important
points or explaining complex concepts are frequently given. OHPs, LCDs, smart classrooms and other
such advanced teaching aids are used to enrich the lectures.
11.1.2 LABORATORIES
Laboratory work is essential to science and engineering. It provides students with an opportunity to
apply their knowledge and develop appropriate practical skills. Both group and individual project work is
undertaken in the scheduled laboratory sessions.In addition to the programs prescribed in the syllabi,
students are expected to carry out application-oriented and advanced experiments in the laboratories.
11.1.3 PROJECTS
The knowledge acquired by the students during the course of their studies is reflected in the project work
undertaken. The project delineates not only the knowledge of students in various theoretical courses,
but also shows the applicational skills of the candidate. Needless to say that the project report submitted
by the student would be referred to a group of experts for assessment. The serious involvement of staff
members in the students project work will go a long way in increasing their rapport with the students and
the department also benefits by way of infrastructure and development.
11.2 NEW TEACHING METHODOLOGY (INTERACTIVE LEARNING)
The interactive learning methodology was introduced in the academic year 2004-05. After observing the
workings of the new methodology on a pilot basis during the last four years and the benefits it yielded, it was
felt necessary to implement the concept more rigorously in order to derive maximum advantage of this concept.
It aims at giving the students experience in the practical implementation of theoretical concepts and stimulates
their interest in changing technologies.
11.2.1 LEARNING GROUPS
An innovative concept of learning groups has been introduced to make learning truly interactive
and creative. The students in each class are facilitated to form learning groups of three each. Each
learning group is named after a scientist. It is mandatory for the students to know the contributions
of the scientist after whom the group is named. The group is also expected to submit a profile of the
scientist to the organizer. The idea behind learning groups is to enhance interaction and teamwork
among the students. Separate learning groups are formed for various activities. Each learning
group is guided by a faculty organizer and is ranked based on performance.
11.2.2 GUEST LECTURES
In addition to the curriculum designed by the university, the students need to be exposed to the
latest developments in the field. In view of this, the college invites experts from the industry and
centres of higher learning for giving lectures on topics of current interest. Guest lectures inculcate
rich insights and inspire students to identify the thrust areas for individual and collective excellence.
They go a long way in providing a thorough understanding of concepts, new application areas and
developments which a student may not get exposed to otherwise.
20
11.2.3 STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS
The submission of assignments is mandatory for all the learning groups. The learning group is
given a set of assignments normally from the question bank on each subject. The handbook provides
a question bank for each unit (minimum of 30 questions) with questions drawn from the Osmania
University Examinations. These assignments will enable the students to prepare well for the final
examinations. Each learning group has to submit 5 assignments in all from every subject.
11.2.4 STUDENT SEMINARS
The faculty and all the students are conscious of the importance of student seminars, which form
an important aspect of the new teaching methodology. The seminars are meant to instill confidence
in students and to motivate them constantly to improve both their domain knowledge and
communicative competence. The student seminars have been introduced to hone presentation
skills of the students in order to give them the confidence to aspire for better career opportunities.
11.2.5 INDUSTRY-INSTITUTE INTERACTION
A continuous and healthy interaction with industries is essential for any post graduate college to
retain its dynamism. This will go a long way in upgrading the skills of the staff and the students.
With this objective, Auroras P.G. College is on the verge of signing MOUs with industries. This
is an important step in identifying the common working areas for mutual benefit.
11.2.6 MINI PROJECTS
The goal of the mini projects is to get the student to explore research and development initiatives
in a specific area. The mini projects commence in summer. The projects are undertaken in an
industry or research lab or other academic institutions, as decided by the project advisor. It may,
in some cases, result in a student continuing the work for the final project also, with the concurrence
of the department.
11.2.7 INDUSTRIAL / EDUCATIONAL TOURS
It is important for students of technical education to keep themselves abreast of changes taking
place in the industry. Towards this end, the college regularly organizes industrial tours. Every
semester, students are expected to visit at least one industry or company, either Indian or
multinational. They must prepare in advance a detailed note on the industry to be visited. Information
could be collected from the website of the company or any other source. The students, guided by
the faculty, shall conduct a survey/interview of the people and the place visited and then prepare
a detailed report of the tour for a class presentation.
11.2.8 ADJUNCT COURSES
The adjunct instructor integrates academic content from the lecture with study strategies/ techniques
in order to improve problem-solving skills. Every year during the intervening period of I & II
semesters, each department conducts at least one adjunct course in the areas not covered by the
university curriculum. A minimum of three adjunct courses are to be conducted based on the
response, availability of resource persons and the necessary inputs for conducting the courses.
11.2.9 STUDENT COUNSELLING
For the creation of a healthy academic atmosphere in the college, interaction between the students
and the staff is essential. Staff members are required to counsel the students for academic and
cocurricular activities. Students are also free to discuss personal problems that affect their work
and day-to-day functioning with the staff and seek their counsel.
21
11.2.10 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Aurora is proud to have its students in key positions at several prestigious organizations in India and
abroad. This gives importance to the activities of the Alumni Association. The Association helps its
members and also the students currently studying in the College in various activities.
11.2.11 IT MEETS
The students of the college organise an IT Meet entitled Compteaserevery year inviting participation
and delegations from different colleges. It has various competitive events like programming contest, IT
Quiz, Brain Compiler etc., to stimulate interactive learning.
11.3 GUIDELINES FOR FINAL YEAR PROJECT WORK
The final year project work reflects the knowledge acquired by the students during the course of their study.
The project, an essential ingredient of the PG programme, draws upon the theoretical knowledge and applicational
skills of the student. Needless to say that the project developed by the student would be evaluated by experts
to assess the skills of the candidate. Students are advised to follow meticulously the guidelines given. The
serious involvement of staff members in the projects will go a long way in increasing their rapport with the
students. The department also reaps benefits in terms of infrastructure and development.
Final Year Project is the most important component of MCA program, which paves the way for the students
career choices and placement opportunities. This program is intended to focus on application of skills of
young and aspiring software professionals to lead and pursue IT Carreer by bridging the gap between the
campus and corporate worlds.
OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAM
Final Year Project inducts the students into organizational real-life situations, which cannot be replicated or
taught in the classrooms. In order that Final Year Project becomes meaningful for both the students and the
host organizations it is imperative that the project necessarily focus on areas which are of direct interest and
concern to the host organizations. All the students are advised to follow meticulously the following guidelines
in this regard.
1. Every student of Final Year Project is expected to be in regular contact with the Faculty, for seeking
guidance and reporting on his/her progress from time-to-time.
2. Students must get an overview of the host organization for understanding their requirements. They
should prepare the software requirement specification, physical and logical design, user interfaces
accordingly using the desired high-level language and test within the stipulated period of 15 weeks.
3. Student should always observes formal dress code.
4. Students are expected to be courteous and polite in their interactions with host organization, maintaining
strict confidentiality of company information and cordial relationships with Company Managers and
Executives.
5. Students should never criticize the host organizations Executives or policies and should desist from
making adverse comments about college and/or Faculty guide.
6. The tasks and assignments allotted to individual students by the host organization should always be
completed on time.
7. The students are expected to be punctual to their duties and are not expected to leave the office without
prior permission of external guide at the host organization.
8. Students should desist from inviting their friends to visit their work area at the host organization.
9. All the equipment/material/accessories provided by the host organization on returnable basis to the
student, must be returned and never held back by the student.
10. Students must facilitate the meeting of Faculty guide and the external guide regularly.
11. Students should strictly adhere to the deadlines for submission of weekly reports and making seminar
presentations.
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11.4 GUIDELINES FOR INTERACTIVE LEARNING METHODOLOGY
11.4.1 GUEST LECTURES
The college organizes one guest lecture for each subject in every semester. Learning groups will be
involved in conducting the guest lectures. The procedure to be followed is as follows:
1. Arrangement for guest lecture : The faculty concerned, in coordination with the guest lecture
coordinator, will arrange the guest lecture keeping in view the speakers availability on the planned
date for the lecture.
2. Briefing the Principal / HOD : The faculty will brief the Principal / HOD one week in advance about
the speaker invited to deliver the guest lecture. The biodata will also be obtained.
3. Bringing the guest speaker to the college: One of the learning groups will be responsible for
arranging the vehicle and escorting the guest speaker to the college.
4. On arrival, the guest speaker must be introduced to the HOD and the Principal by the coordinator,
and hospitality must be extended to the guest.
5. Seating Arrangement: The students should be seated as per the learning groups.
6. Attendance: Attendance will be taken before the commencement of the session.
7. Introducing the expert (5 min): A student will be entrusted with the responsibility of preparing the
guest speakers profile based on the biodata, and also introduce the speaker to the audience.
8. A student will be delegated the responsibility of arranging for the LCD, OHP, collar microphone,
and other necessary equipment, in consultation with the guest lecture coordinator.
9. Recording the guest lecture: The guest lecture should be recorded on an audio system and one of
the learning groups is to be entrusted with the responsibility of handing over the recorded lecture
to the coordinator.
10. Question and Answer session will be allocated 20 minutes.
11. Vote of thanks (2 min): The vote of thanks will be given by a student of the learning group who will
also announce the date for the next guest lecture.
12. Lecture material: All the material brought by the guest speaker has to be filed by the coordinator.
13. Photographs: Photographs should be taken, developed, printed and filed in a photo album.
14. If the coordinator has a class during the guest lecture slot, he/she should depute another lecturer
to take care of the arrangements and reception of the speaker.
15. It is mandatory for all the faculty members of the department who are free during the guest lecture
slot to attend the talk.
16. Feedback forms will be distributed to each learning group before the start of the guest lecture, and
later, at the end of the lecture, will be collected and filed by the staff in-charge.
17. Each learning group must submit a synopsis of the guest lecture topic within two days to the
faculty coordinator.
11.4.2 STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS
The following are the guidelines for the submission of assignments.
1. On completion of a unit, each learning group has to submit assignments on 2 questions,
which are listed in the assignment learning group table.
2. The learning group must adhere to the dates given in the assignment submission table for
submitting the assignments.
3. Students are supposed to collect the corrected assignments from the staff members.
4. In addition to the prescribed assignments, the students are advised to collect the assignments
from other learning groups and prepare answers to the questions.
5. If the learning group fails to submit the assignment on or before the deadline given, they will
be asked to do double the number of the prescribed assignments, and may not be allowed to
write the mid-examinations.
23
11.4.3 STUDENT SEMINARS
The college conducts student seminars from the first semester of the Ist year. A minimum of twenty
seminars are given for each class in all the six subjects prescribed. Students of each class are
grouped into batches of three to form a learning group.
Two learning groups are to present a seminar on the given topic in each of the scheduled session.
The following is the procedure to be adopted:
1. Prior Information: To enable the students to have the information in advance, the seminar
topics along with the schedule are included in the student handbook.
2. Preparation of the synopsis and presentation material: The learning groups will submit the
text and the synopsis of the seminar material along with the profile of the scientist one week
in advance to the department coordinator.
3. Editing of synopsis: The subject faculty edits the synopsis and returns the same to the
student within three days.
4. Scrutiny of presentation material: The subject faculty will scrutinize the presentation material to
ensure that it contains relevant and sufficient matter to sustain each student for twenty minutes.
5. Physical arrangements: The essential arrangements for the seminars will be completed a half-
hour before the scheduled time by the learning groups in consultation with the coordinator.
6. Soft copy: The presentation material should be on a CD and loaded onto the computer
earmarked for the purpose, one day in advance.
7. Publicity: The synopsis is to be displayed prominently on the notice board in the seminar hall
or classroom, as the case may be, before the commencement of the seminar.
8. Seating arrangement: Students shall be seated according to the learning groups in the seminar hall.
9. Faculty watch: Three faculty members of the department who are free during the seminar slot
may watch the proceedings.
10. Blank evaluation papers will be distributed to all the learning groups before the commencement
of the seminar and the filled-in papers will be collected at the end.
11. Time break-up:
3 minutes - Introducing the scientist
2 minutes - Introducing group members and the flow of the presentation
20 min (20 x 3 = 60 min.) - Each member for his presentation
10 minutes - Q & A session
12. Student attendance: Attendance of the students shall be marked similar to that for classwork.
13. Q & A session: Members of the learning groups will pose questions on the seminar topic
which will be answered by the presenters.
14. Summing up: At the end of the seminar, the faculty in-charge of the programme presents the
gist of the seminar, and also conveys to the students the observations made by the faculty on
the presentation. The assessment of the faculty and their final grading of the performance in
the seminar will be announced after the last seminar.
15. The programme concludes with a vote of thanks by the seminar presenting group.
16. Result reporting : After the completion of the programme, the faculty presents a report to the
college seminar coordinator -- whether successful or to be rescheduled. If the seminar has
been successfully conducted, a complete assessment performance of the seminar is to be
submitted. If the seminar has to be rescheduled, the date will be decided by the department
coordinator in consultation with the principal.
17. Record of the programme: Soon after the programme, the faculty in-charge will submit a copy
[both soft and hard] of the material presented to the head of the department.
18. Responsibility for the equipment: The seminar group will be held responsible for the equipment
used for the seminar, and they are required to hand over the equipment intact to the stores in-
charge on conclusion of the seminar.
24
Note :
1. Once proposed and approved, no further changes in the schedule of presentation or in the
seminar topics would be entertained.
2. a. If any student in the presentation group is absent for the seminar, he/she has to give a
seminar for 30 minutes on a new topic in the presence of their parents, if so warranted.
b. Students of the class, other than the presenting group, who absent themselves from the
seminar without taking prior permission from the coordinator are liable for severe academic
punishments, besides their parents being summoned and briefed about it, if considered
necessary.
11.4.4 INDUSTRY-INSTITUTE INTERACTION
The college has established contact with industries with the primary intention of:
1. Developing consultancy activity
2. Giving the staff hands-on experience by allowing them to work in the industry for at least two
months in a year
3. Conducting industrial tours for students
4. Arranging mini projects in the summer
5. Catering to industrial requirements by encouraging students to work on projects that will
directly benefit the industry
6. Assisting the placement cell in identifying positions for students in the industry.
11.4.5 MINI PROJECTS
Guidelines to students for carrying out mini/summer projects
Summer projects are due to be carried out by the 2nd and 3rd year MCA students in collge lab /
various Industries.
Students are required to note the following:
1. To start with the student should have a clear idea of the nature of the mini project viz.
observation of process, participation and development of any process.
2. Students must wear their identity cards.
3. On a daily basis, the students should write down the significant points of learning and the
activities carried out.
4. Students must report to the industry/organization on all working days till the completion of
the project and make proper use of the time allocated.
5. Students are required to obtain a list of specialized books/manuals available in the lab along
with the information on the author, publishers, date of publication, etc. This will facilitate our
library to procure them.
6. A project report is to be prepared in the prescribed format. The project report must contain
the following:
a. Profile of the organization where the project is being carried out. This may include an
outline of the areas of activity, important personnel with their addresses (both official
and residential), and the outline of the future plans of the company, if available.
b. Any special processes and procedures followed in the use of this may also be mentioned.
7. The format of the project report is as follows:
a. Title Page
b. Certificate of Completion (signed by both the external and the internal guides)
c. Contents
d. Abstract (limited to one page)
e. Main Report
f. Conclusion and Scope for Further Research
g. Appendix
h. Bibliography
25
11.4.6 ADJUNCT COURSES
1. 100% attendance is compulsory during the entire period of the course.
2. Depending upon the nature of the adjunct course, students may be asked to pay a nominal
fee.
3. The adjunct course may be conducted in association with a technical society or an institution
of learning institution.
4. Students have to follow meticulously the training schedule prepared by the department by
way of practicals, assignments, etc.
5. At the end of the course, students may be asked to write an examination for evaluation
purpose.
6. Only those students who satisfy the above criteria will be awarded a certificate.
11.4.7 STUDENT COUNSELING
The following are the guidelines for student counseling:
1. Each staff member is assigned two learning groups (20 students) -- one from each class.
2. Staff members are required to continuously monitor the academic progress of the students.
3. Staff should be aware of the marks of the students in internal and external examinations.
4. Staff members should note the backlogs of the students.
5. Staff members should try to find the reasons for poor performance in various subjects.
6. Staff members are to continuously monitor the attendance of the students and ensure that the
students attend the classes regularly.
7. Staff members may try to arrange extra coaching as needed by the student or a set of students.
8. Staff members should have the personal details of the students -- address, contact numbers,
parents, etc.
9. Staff members are advised to post the information regarding the progress of the students to
their parents.
10. The counseling staff are also responsible for the behavior of the students on the campus.
11. Students are advised to continuously interact with their counselors and follow the guidelines
given below:
Students are supposed to intimate the counselors regarding the difficulties they may face in
understanding any subject/s.
Students have to seek the guidance of staff members in academic, cocurricular and
extracurricular activities.
Students have to meticulously follow the advice given by the counselor from time to time.
Students have to voluntarily disclose their address, parents name, and contact numbers.
11.4.8 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
The following are the activities conducted by the alumni association:
1. Holding mock interviews, mock screening tests and group discussions for members as well as
for the existing final year students
2. Providing career assistance to help members shape their careers through career counseling
and identification of appropriate agencies in the area of career counseling
3. Upgrading mailing lists of alumni to facilitate contact with them for events such as joining
professional clubs, homecoming, and reunions
4. Collecting information on the nature of jobs of alumni for publication in magazine/newsletter
This helps in identifying the experts generated by the institution working in various
organizations and also to create knowledge centres.
5. Creating and updating the database of the alumni [class-wise & year-wise].
26
12. CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE
The centres for excellence developed in various departments based on the expertise available help in
motivating the student community in cocurricular and extracurricular activities. Each department has
identified centres of excellence in a specific area, based on the research work being done by the faculty,
the industry-institute interaction in that specific area and the infrastructure facilities being developed
by the department. This enables the students to conduct their projects in an effective manner. These
centres not only guide the students in their project work but also motivate them to go for higher studies.
The following are the centres of excellence existing at Auroras P.G. College:
12.1 CENTRE FOR COMMUNICATION AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT
This centre enhances the language and communication skills of the students. The importance of good
communication skills cannot be overemphasized in a globalized world. Aurora imparts special training to
students to be efficient communicators by conducting group discussions, simulations, and mock-interview
sessions, debates, extempore speaking, etc. This will ensure that every Auroran is well equipped to
carve a niche for him/herself in the challenging global scenario.
12.2 CENTRE FOR CAREER COUNSELING
This centre, run by committed faculty coordinators, aims to increase students awareness about courses,
alternatives and job opportunities available after graduation in various fields and disciplines. The centre
collates relevant information from over 500 brochures of universities/institutes across the world, and
presents them as easy-to-understand posters displayed in the college premises. The college also invites
professional counselors and experts to interact with the students and to advise them on the myriad
career challenges that they are likely to encounter.
13. IMPORTANT RELIGIOUS FESTIVALS
Friday, 14th January 2011 - Bhogi
Saturday, 15th January 2011 - Sankranti
Wednesday, 26th January 2011 - Republic Day
Wednesday, 16th February 2011 - Milad-U-Nabi
Wednesday, 02 March 2011 - Maha Sivaratri
Saturday, 19th March 2011 - Holi
Monday, 4th April 2011 - Ugadi
Tuesday, 5th April 2011 - Babu Jagjivan Rams Birthday
Tuesday, 12th April 2011 - Sri Rama Navami
Friday, 14th April 2011 - Dr.B.R.Ambedkars Birthday
Friday, 22nd April 2011 - Good Friday
Monday 15th August 2011 - Independence Day
Tuesday 23rd August 2011 - Sri Krishna Ashtami
Wednesday 31st August 2011 - Ramzan
Thursday 1st September 2011 - Vinayaka Chavithi
Sunday 2nd October 2011 - Gandhi Jayanthi
Tuesday 4th October 2011 - Durga Ashtami
Thursday 6th October 2011 - Vijaya Dasami
Wednesday 26th October 2011 - Deepavali
Monday 7th November 2011 - Bakrid
Tuesday 6th December 2011 - Muharram
Sunday 25th December 2011 - Christmas
27
MCA I Year, Semester II
DEPARTMENT PROFILE
28
MCA I Year, Semester II
1. DEPARTMENT PROFILE
The Department of Computer Science has been in existence since 1992. The present intake of the Department
is 180
Fifteen batches of students have successfully completed their MCA Programme.
The pass percentage in 2004 was 96.67% with 27 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2005 was 94.6% with 38 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2006 was 96.42% with 36 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2007 was 94.80% with 53 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2008 was 97.88% with 52 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2009 was 98.18% with 65 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2010 was 100.00% with 57 first classes.
The Department has 15 strong Computer Science Faculty including 1 Statistics and 1 Mathematics Faculty.
The Department is manned by dedicated teachers, devoted students, committed supporting staff and
expert technical staff.
1.1 STAFF
A total of 15 faculty members and 4 technical staff are committed for the development of the department. In
addition to the departmental load of 35 theory courses and 28 lab courses, the department offers 2 theory
courses and 2 lab courses on an average per semester as service subjects.
1.2 STUDENTS
The students of MCA department are the most technically competent and devoted towards studies.
They have participated in Paper Presentation/Technical Quiz/Programming contests organized by other
colleges as detailed below.
Sl.
No.
Name Of The Student Section Event Organization
1 MD.Javeed Shareef MCA III Paper Persentation-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
2 Nasreen Sultana MCA III Paper Persentation-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
3 E.Ravi Kumar MCA III G.K & Anthashkari-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
4 M.Sangameshwar MCA III Caroms-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
5 Naresh MCA III Quiz-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
6 Venugopal Reddy MCA III Quiz-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
7 Raghu Ram MCA III Quiz-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
8 Ch.Mahesh MCA III Chess-Winner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
9
B.Sampath
B.Naresh
MCA III Carroms-Doubles-Runner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
10 Raghu Ram MCA III Carroms-Winner
Ronald Ross PG College,
R.R District
11 Usha MCAIII IT-Winner BadhrukaPG College
12 Mamatha MCA III IT-Winner Bhadhruka PG College
13 Hari Prasad MCAII IT-Winner Mallareddy Engg.College
14 Shanker MCA II IT-Winner Mallareddy Engg.College
15 B.Sandeep MCA I Shooting Champion ship
Inter University
Tournaments.
29
MCA I Year, Semester II
1.2.1 MCA STUDENTS PLACED FOR THE YEAR 2010
S.No Name of the Student Company
1 Murali Aetukuri Mahindra Satyam
2 Mahipal Cherukupalli Mahindra Satyam
3 Burgu Sravanthi Mahindra Satyam
4 Ruchi K Parekh Mahindra Satyam
5 Ravi Kumar Oleti Mahindra Satyam
6 Gopikrishna N Purapu Mahindra Satyam
7 Modupalli Aruna Mahindra Satyam
8 C. Mahipal Mahindra Satyam
9 Indu Bala Mahendra Satyam
10 Padmini Mahendra Satyam
11 Ch. Swathi Mahendra Satyam
12 Bhanu Prasad Mahendra Satyam
13 Satyanarayana Mahendra Satyam
14 Gurram Venkatesh Value Labs
15 Gaddam Maharaju Value Labs
16 D.Mohan Value Labs
17 Venkatesh Value Labs
18 Suman Value Labs
19 G. Rama Raju Value Labs
20 Mangunuri Satish Value Labs
21 Ranjith Kumar Value Labs
22 Madhavi Dasari Bloom Soft
23 B Rana Prathap Bloom Soft
24 Peddi Naresh Bloom Soft
25 Suroju Prashanthi Bloom Soft
26 Md Abdul Sami Bloom Soft
27 Bukka Navitha Bloom Soft
28 Sarangi Parvathi Bloom Soft
29 Shaik Nasreensultana Bloom Soft
30 M.Sreedhar Bloom Soft
31 M. Swarna Latha Bloom Soft
32 Shaga Sunitha Bloom Soft
30
MCA I Year, Semester II
S.No Name of the Student Company
33 B. Veeraiah Naidu Bloom Soft
34 K. Vijaya Lakshmi Bloom Soft
35 S. Praveen Bloom Soft
36 Deva Ramanjaneyulu Bloom Soft
37 Kishan Kumar Sakala Leisux
38 V. Shiva Shree Leisux
39 K. Vijaya Lakshmi Mallepalli Tech.
40 Sobhan Babu ING Vysya
41 Ravinder CapGemini
42 Ramesh CapGemini
43 K.Rajendra Kumar Data Monitor
44 E.Ravi Kumar Zeta Interactive
45 G.Santhosh Sierra Atlantic
46 G.Venkateswarulu Sierra Atlantic
47 Sasupalti Sierra Atlantic
48 B.Sandeep Sierra Atlantic
49 P.Mani Kumar Grarim Industries Ltd.
50 M.Ramesh iGate Global Services
51 K. Bhagya Laxmi Deloitte
52 B.Sravan Kumar Deloitte
53 V.Pavan Kumar Globe Web Soft
54 K.V.N.Raju Globe Web Soft
55 T.V.Madhavi Accenture
56 Kalyan Chakravarthi Accenture
57 Nasreen sulthana shaik Accenture
58 Krishna Sampath T ISRO
59 K.Phani Kumar Amazon.com
60 Padmavathi Google
61 Rajesh NCR
62 Sandeep Reddy R NCR
63 Manoj NCR
31
MCA I Year, Semester II
S.No. Name of the Student Company
64 Saritha NCR
65 Narsing Amdocs
66 Buchayya Guptha Amdocs
67 Naveen Amdocs
68 Manohar Raju LGS (Lanco)
69 Janardhan LGS (Lanco)
70 Bharath ADP
71 Karthik Missam Technologies
72 Venkata Vijay Kumar Nysa Animation Studio
73 Ch. Vamsidhar Andhara Bank
74 P. Naresh SBI
75 A. Raju SBI
76 M. Rama Rao SBI
77 A. Murali IDBI Bank
78 Md Jareed Shareef Pawaniy Co (Sudi Arabia)
79 S. Suresh Kumar Canara Bank
80 I. Rajith Kumar Prima Imapact Informatics Solutions
81 Naga Dath Ajit APCTP
82 Raj Kumar Polaris
83 CH. Pranitha Aurora's Engg College, Bhongir
84 M. Niranjan Zeta Interactive
85 K Bhagyalaxmi HCL
86 Vijaya Kumar Jinnga ICICI Bank
87 Pavan Kumar Joshi Met Iom IT Solution
88 Parvathi Choice Solutions
89 B. Harish Kumar Infosys
90 K.Bipin Chandrapal Infosys
91 C.Ramesh Infosys
92 A.Prashanth Infosys
93 K. Harini Infosys
94 B. Mounika Infosys
95 V.Pavani Infosys
96 A.Mamatha Infosys
32
MCA I Year, Semester II
1.3 EVENTS &ACTIVITIES REPORT OFTHE DEPARTMENT
1. Parents day meeting-26th February 2011
2. Alaap - 2010
3. Abhyasa IT - Meet -2010
4. CRT - 2010 (Campus Recruitment Training)
5. Two-day faculty development program -"BIT-2009" 4th &5th February2009
6. Faculty development seminars
7. Two professional bodies meets.
8. Two day Workshop - CISCO
9. Three day Workshop on Computer Networks.
1.3.1 PARENTS' DAY MEETING - 1st FEBRUARY 2009.
As part of the Auroras culture to bridge the gap between the students and their parents and to update the
later with their ward's performance as also to take feedback to improve the facilities provided by the
college. The college organises parents meets from time to time. This year also Auroras PG College, MCA
dept. organized Parents' Meet on 01
ST
Feb 2009. About 40-45 parents' attended the meeting. Parents were
englightened about the current intitatives of the college, to improve the overall standards of their wards.
Parents were also detailed about the MOU with various IT giants.
1.3.2 ALAAP -2010 (Induction day Programme) 27-09-2010 TO 2-09-2010
As a part of Aurora's culture it is a freshers party given to the new commers by the mangement of Aurora.
It is a Seven Day schedule programme . we invited the guests from Ramakishna matt sri
Bhodhamayanandha garu ,placement and industry orientation by sitaramaiah garu. The agenda went with
registration, orientation to college,orientation to mca/mba,information on specializations professional
orientation,lecture on personality development, lecture on soft skills, self introduction,faculty
introduction,library orientation,lab orientation ,placement orientation, dress code information, hand book
details, alumini orientation, industry orientation, information on informals ,pledge,networking,fungames.
1.3.3 ABHYASA-2010(An Information Technology Meet)
Date of Event = 11
th
and 12
th
November, 2010.
Total no. of colleges participated = 70-80.
Total no. of Teams registered = 240.
Pre-Event Registration = 155.
On-Spot New Registration = 85.
The whole formal events focused on the General IT awareness, aptitude, reasoning, communication skills,
H/Wknowledge and the programming skills, which was categorized into five major events viz., Power
Whiz, Brain Compiler, IT Tricky Track, Fabricate PC and Paper presentation which were divided into
various levels of rounds. To make the participants well versed in the various placements related activities,
a different kind of event was organized under the banner of Preplacement Event, as part of which about
240 students from different colleges participated. The event focused on the various rounds conducted as
part of any placement drive by different companies.
1.3.4 CRT - 2010 (Campus Recruitment Training)
The College is organizing a pre-placement training program for the MCA final students to prepare them
and to take on and off compus placement drive. We have called up various faculties to train the students
in the various subjects like aptitude, reasoning, english and arithematic from various reputed institutes
(TIME Hyderabad, Made Easy, Delhi, RBI Visiting Faculty, BSC Hyderabad, IMS Hyderabad) and industries
like Sierra Atlantic, Virtusa, Infosys, Mahendra Satyam for technical and HR rounds. Apart from this,
college internal faculties have taken classes on Aptitude, reasoing and technical skills.
33
MCA I Year, Semester II
1.3.5 A TWO-DAY FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM - "B I T - 2009".
As part of the culture of Aurora, to expose the faculty to the latest happenings in the IT world, the
department of MCA has organized a two-day seminar, under the banner of BIT 2009, wherein a large no
of MCA teachers from twin cities colleges were able to update themselves with the hot technologies
grooming in and around the IT world.
Number of Faculty Participated 40
1
ST
DAY: 04-02-2009
FORENOON SESSION:
SPEAKER: Ms.Rama Patnaik, Wipro Tech.
Topic: Green IT
AFTERNOON SESSION:
SPEAKER: Mr.Bhudeb Chakravarthy,IIIT.
Topic:Rational Rose in Project Development Perspective.
2
nd
DAY: 05-02-2009
FORENOON SESSION:
SPEAKER: Ms.Rita Ashar,SQL Star International Ltd.
Topic: Service Oriented Architecture.
AFTERNOON SESSION:
SPEAKER: Ms.Rita Ashar,SQL Star International Ltd.
Topic: Web Oriented Architecture.
1.3.6. FACULTY DEVELOPMENT LIST OF PUBLICATIONS - INTERNATIONAL
1. Two international publications by Mr.Pradosh Chandra Pattnaik,HOD,MCA in International Journal for
Computer Science and networks.
2. Two international publications by Mr.E.Devender Rao, in International Journal for Computer Science and
network security.
3. One international publications by Mr.Md.Ismail in International Journal for Computer Science.
4. One international publications by Mr.Saradhi Seshagiri in International Journal for Computer Science.
1.3.7. PROFESSIONAL BODIES REPORT
1. All the MCA 2nd year Students are registered for the student membership of "Computer Society of India".
(CSI).
2. Section-wise student's Registration forms submitted for CSI registrations.
Section II A 51 Section II B & C 82
T o t a l = 1 3 3
3 . R e g i s t r a t i o n f e e p e r s t u d e n t : R s . 2 0 0 / -
34
MCA I Year, Semester II
1.4 LABORATORIES
The department has 4 fully equipped laboratories with material worth about Rs.1.15 crores.
We have Licensed Software of Rational Rose 2003, Borland C++ and Microsoft Campus Agreement and
Corporate edition of Symantec Norton Antivirus 10.5.
Sl No.
Computer
Systems
Operating System
Applications
1 LAB-1
90 PCs
Windows XP, Windows 2003
Server,
Redhat Linux.
Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
Borland C++; Rational Rose 2003,
Oracle 8i; MS Visual Studio, Tomcat
Server; JDK 1.5, D2K
2 LAB- II
50 PCs
Windows XP, Redhat Linux Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
Borland C++, Oracle 8i, JDK 1.5,
CA, D2K
3 LAB III
60 PCs
Windows XP Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
JDK 1.5, McAfee
4 LAB IV
60 PCs
Windows XP Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
JDK 1.5, McAfee
1.5 TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS
The department has adopted a novel way of teaching which is expected to improve the standards of
students academically. In this process, the following events were conducted during the semester.
Guest Lectures
S.No. Name of the Guest Faculty Course Topic Date
1
Mr. C.Pradeep
MCA II
Software Testing
17-04-10
2
Mr. R.Madhav
MCA III
.Net Frame Work
25-02-10
3 Sri. K. Satyanarayana MCA III, II
Personality
Development for
Careers advancement
21-08-10
4 Mr. Raghu Nandan MCA III, II Soft Skills 23-09-10
5 Mr. A. Sradhanand MCA III
Unified Modeling
Language
25-09-10
6 Mr. Ajay Chandra MCA III Industry Orientation 1-10-10
7 Praveena Hareesha MCA II Softskills 20-10-10
35
MCA I Year, Semester II
Student Seminars
Each student in a class gave a minimum of two seminars one Technical and one General.
Based on assigned learning groups students should give seminars in seminar sessions.
Student Project
A group of 6 students of each II Year and III year MCA are given a Project either Application or System,
to analyze and implement in a semester.
Student Assignment
Questions picked up from previous question papers of in University exam and Campus recruitment are
given to students groups as assignments. The assignments submitted are corrected and thereby students
are given guidance in attempting typical questions.
Student Tutorials
The students are given programs in sessions monitored by faculties from the respective field of expertise.
The students in small groups are assisted to prepare themselves and to write logical and application
oriented programs.
Future Plans
1. Steps will be taken to improve the pass percentage by identifying the weak students and the subjects they
are falling back. Accordingly, special classes will be conducted for their improvement.
2. Attendance monitoring has to be done strictly with periodic warning given to those falling short of 75%.
3. A state level conference on latest trends is planned by the department in the next semester.
4. Adjunct courses to make students aware of the new technologies will have to be conducted.
5. Students are given mini projects to be supervised carefully by the faculty.
6. At least one technical visit has to be arranged for each batch in the coming semester.
7. Staff members have to be encouraged to pursue higher education.
8. Staff members will be deputed for National & International conferences for enhancing their technical
skills.
36
MCA I Year, Semester II
2
.
T
r
e
e

V
i
e
w


-

T
h
e
o
r
y
37
MCA I Year, Semester II
PRACTICE
BEYONDCLASS
ROOM&
SYLLABUS
PERSONALITY
DEVELOPMENT
LOCAL
INDUSTRIAL
VISIT
SUMMERMINI
PROJECTS
ADJUNCT
COURSES
INDUSTRIAL
TOURS
VISITSTO
INSTITUTESOF
EXCELLENCE
STUDENTS
SEMINARS
PROJECT
REPORTS
REPORTSON
GUEST
LECTURES
LOCALVISITS
INDUSTRIAL
TOURS
SPORTS
DEBATTING
ESSAYWRITING
PROFESSIONAL
STUDENTS
FORUMS
SYMPOSIUMS
C++ LAB
DSLAB
WEB
PROGRMMING
LAB
UMLLAB
PROJECT
WORK
UNIXSYSTEM
PROGRMMINGLAB
&
NETWORK
PROGRMMINGLAB
DBMS
LAB
EITLAB
ADVANCED
JAVALAB
CORE
JAVA
LAB
TREEVIEW- PRACTISE
COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
3. ALMANAC I SEMESTER
Commencement of classes : 04-10-2010
Last date of Instructions (15 weeks) : 08-01-2011
Theory examinations I/I, (main) : 17-01-2011 to 27-01-2011
Practical Exams : 31-01-2011 to 09.02-2011
II SEMESTER
Commencement of classes : 14.02.2011
Last date of Instructions : 28.05.2011
Theory Examinations I/I, Supplementary) : 30.05.2011 to 11.06.2011
Theory examinations (I/II Main) : 13.06.2011 to 25.06.2011
Practical Exams (Main & Supplementary) : 27.06.2011 to 07.07.2011
2. Tree View - Theory
38
MCA I Year, Semester II
4. COURSE STRUCTURE
Sub. code Subject T P
CM 651 A c c o u n t i n g a n d F i n a n c i a l M a n a g e m e n t 5 -
CS 652 P r i n c i p l e s o f O b j e c t O r i e n t e d P r o g r a m m i n g 5 -
CS 653 M a n a g e m e n t I n f o r m a t i o n S y s t e m s 4 -
CS 654 D a t a S t r u c t u r e s U s i n g C + + 5 -
CS 655 C o m p u t e r O r g a n i z a t i o n 5 -
Practicals
CS 681 Programming Lab III (J a v a P r o g r a m m i n g ) - 3+3
CS 682 Programming Lab IV (D a t a S t r u c t u r e s i n C + + ) - 3+3
Total 24 12
Note: All end Examinations (theory and Practical) are of three hours duration
T : Theory P : Practicals
MCA I Year, II Semester
39
5. SUBJECT DETAILS
5.1 ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
5.1.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.1.2 Scope
5.1.3 Prerequisites
5.1.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.1.5 Suggested Books
5.1.6 Websites
5.1.7 Experts Details
5.1.8 Journals
5.1.9 Findings and Developments
5.1.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.1.11 Session Plan
5.1.12 Tutorial Plan
5.1.13 Question Bank
MCA I Year, II Semester
40
MCA I Year, II Semester
41
5.1.1 OBJECTIVES AND RELEVANCE
In the competitive world the employers are looking out for versatility in various fileds like Accounting, and
Management, to improve effeciency and effectiveness of employee. That is the reason this subject is a part
of curriculum.
5.1.2 SCOPE
The subject basically aims to impart the knowledge of financial management. The subject contains the
basics aspects of financial accounting and their analysis.
5.1.3 PREREQUISITES
The students should have analytical skill along with capacity for hard work.
5.1.4 SYLLABUS O.U
UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
This chapter discuss the basic concepts and conventions of accountancy. The chapter throws light on
books of original entry and the terminal statement of accounts, and balance sheet.
SYLLABUS
An overview of Accounting cycle - Basic concepts and conventions - Books of Account - Terminal
Statements.
UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
The chapter deals with analysis of financial statements (P&L A/c and Balance Sheet.) The chapter further
discusses the use of various ratios. In short, the chapter discusses various tools that help in analysing the
financial health of the company.
SYLLABUS
Financial Statement Analysis and Interpretation - Ratio Analysis.
UNIT III
OBJECTIVE
This chapter highlights the funds flow and cash flow analysis. The student will acquire the knowledge of
intricacies of funds flow and cash flow, apart from financial analysis.
SYLLABUS
Working capital - Sources and uses - Funds flow and cash flow analysis - Management of Inventory
UNIT IV
OBJECTIVE
The chapter discusses various techniques of capital budgeting and also the cost of capital. The students
get an indepth knowledge of computation of cost of capital of a company.
SYLLABUS
Capital Budgeting - Techniques of evaluation - Cost of capital - Computation of specific costs and weighted
average cost of capital.
UNIT V
OBJECTIVE
This chapter introduces the concept of marginal costing in the form of cost, volume and profit analysis to
the students. The students will be well versed with the concepts of marginal and absorbtion costing and
when the company is going to achieve Financial Break Even Point.
SYLLABUS
Analysis of costs and their behaviour - Cost volume - Profit analysis Variable costing and absorption
costing.
MCA I Year, II Semester
42
Budgets - Flexible Budgeting - Long and Short term forecasting.
5.1.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS
TEXT BOOKS
T1. James C. Van Horne, Fundamentals of Financial Management, Pearson edition, Eleventh edition, 2001.
T2. Khan MY, Jain PK, Financial Management, Tata MCGraw Hill, Second Edition, 1993.
T3. Maheshwari SN, Management Accounting and Financial Control, Sultan Chand & Co
T4. Gupta G. Radhaswamy M, Advanced Accountancy, Sultan Chand & Sons
T5. Sharma and Shashik Gupta, Management AccountingHimalaya Publishers. 2005.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. I.M. Pandey, Financial Management, Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, 2004.
R2. S.N. Maheshwari, Financial Accounting , Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, 2005.
R3. Khan M.Y and P.K Jain Management Accounting , 4th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2007.
R4. G. Prasad and V. Chandrashakara Rao, Accounting for Managers, Jai Bharat Publications.
5.1.6 WEBSITES
1. www.beyond gupinstripes.org
2. www.universal_accounting_centre.com
3. www.accountancy experts.info
4. www.practical commerce.com
5. www.pasdbc.org/events.
6. www.accounting coach.com
5.1.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. Lawrence.J.Getman
University of Southern California
Email: www.aw.com/getman
2. Mr. Anthony Atkinson
University of Waterloo
www.prenhall.com / atkinson
NATIONAL
1. Dr. S.N.Maheshwari
Director, Delhi Institute of Advanced Studies
G..G.S. Indraprastha University
Delhi - 110085
2. S. Venkatesh, Asst Professor
Finance and Accounting
IIMB.
REGIONAL
1. Prof. B. Satyanarayana Chary
Institute of Public Enterprise
Hyderabad.
5.1.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. The Accounting Review
2. Journal of Accounting
3. Auditing and Finance
MCA I Year, II Semester
43
NATIONAL
1. The Charatered Accountants
2. Finance India
5.1.9 FINDINGSAND DEVELOPMENTS
1. Capital Vs Revenue Expenditure - Fusion, Confusions Elucidations by Shantimal Jain. The Chartered
Accountant Vol.55, No.12, P.G.No-1910.
2. Depreciation on Investments by Banks. Its allowability in Income Tax, by RK Gupta, The Chartered
Accountant Vol.55, No9, P.G. No-1448.
3. Integration of ethics into accounting curriculem - Dilip kuar sen, Rushdi, - Journal of Accointing finance,
April -Sept 2010.
4. Success and failure in Technology Acquisitions lessons for buyers and sellers.
5.1.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS
1. Concepts and Conventions of Accounting.
2. Inventory Pricing Techniques
3. Cost Sheets.
4. Budgets flexible and Fixed.
5.1.11 SESSION PLAN
Sl.
No
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and Sub-modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT - I
Definition of Accounting, types of
accounting (Management Accounting,
Financial Accounting, Cost Accounting)
L1 T4-Ch.1
Concept and conventions L2, L3 T4-Ch.2
Accounting Cycle L4 T4-Ch.1
Definition of transaction and Accounts L5 T4-Ch.3
Accounting Equation L6 T4-Ch.2
Books of original entry. (Journal)
L7, L8 T4-Ch.6
Subsidary books (Cash book, Single,
Double)
L9, L10 T4-Ch.6
Cash book (Triple column)
L11 T4-Ch.6
Leger Accounts L12 T4-Ch.6
Leger Accounts (Personal A/c opening L13 T4-Ch.6
Trial Balance L14 T4-Ch.6
Preparation of financial statement without
adjustments
L15, L16 T4-Ch.7
Financial Statement with Adjustments L17, L18 T4-Ch.7
Company Financial Statement without
Adjustments (Trading, profit & Loss A/c,
Profit & Loss Appropriation A/C,
Balance Sheet)
L19, L20 R5-Ch.9
1 Accounting
Cycle
Company Financial Statements with
Adjustments
L21, 22 R5-Ch.9
MCA I Year, II Semester
44
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and Sub-modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT II
Scope and purpose of financial analysis L23
T1 - Ch.8
T3 - Ch.B1
Ratio Analysis Liquidity Ratios L24
T3 - Ch.B2
T2 Ch.6
Activity Ratio L25
T3 - Ch.B2
T2 Ch.6
Structural and coverage ratios L26
Profitability Ratios L27
Valuation Ratios L28
T3 - Ch.B2
2 Financial
Statement
Analysis
From the Ratios preparation of Balance
Sheet
L29, L30
T2 - Ch.6
UNIT III
Current Assets, Current Liabilities, Concept
of Working Capital
L31
T1 Ch.8
T2 Ch.13
Gross working capital and
Networking capital, problems increase or
decrease in working capital
L32
T1 Ch.8
T2 Ch.13
Working
Capital
Sources of working capital
Uses of working capital
L33
T1 Ch.8
T2 Ch.13
Ascertainment of funds from
operations (Sources of funds and
application funds)
L34 T1 Ch.7
Preparation of Fund flow statements L35, L36 T1 Ch.7
Fund flow and
cash flow
statement
Ascertainment of funds from
operation and cash flow statement
L37, L38
T1 Ch.7
T2 Ch.5
Definition of Inventory, Pricing techniques
of Inventory
L39, L40 T2 Ch.16
3
Inventory
Management
Objective of Inventory management L41 T2 Ch.16
UNIT IV
Capital
Budgeting
Definition of capital Budgeting Techniques
for Evaluation
L42, L43
T1 Ch.13
T2 Ch.9
T2 Ch.10
Cost of Capital, Cost of debt, Cost of
preference shares, cost of equity, cost of
retained earnings.
L44, L45 T2 Ch.11
4
Cost of Capital
Weighted Average cost of capital L46 T2 Ch.11
UNIT V
Definition of cost, Types of costs L47 R5 - Ch.11
Cost volume profit Analysis L48, L49 T2 - Ch.6
Variable costing definition, problem in
variable costing
L50
R4 - Ch.1
R5 - Ch.1
Absorption costing definition, problem
in variable costing
L51
R4 - Ch.1
R5 - Ch.1
Difference between variable costing and
absorption costing
L52
R4 - Ch.1
R5 - Ch.1
5 Costing
Budgets ; Flexible, Long term & Short term L53 T2 Ch.8
MCA I Year, II Semester
45
5.1.12 TUTORIAL PLAN
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1 Accounting Standards
Indian Accounting Standards and international
accounting standards
T2 Final Accounts Inventory Valuation
T3 Final Accounts Depreciation Valuation
T4
I
Final Accounts Problems with adjustments
T5 Ration Analysis Discussion about formule
T6 Ration Analysis Activity and Liquidity Ratios
T7
Ration Analysis
Leverage and Profitability Ratios
T8
II
Ration Analysis Indirect Problems
T9 Working Capital Gross and Net Working Capital
T10 Funds Flow
Funds from operations and statement of
changes
T11 Funds Flow Sources and uses of funds
T12
III
Cash Flow Cash flow statements
T13 Capital Budgeting Pay back period and ARR
T14 Capital Budgeting NPV, IRR and PI
T15 Cost of Capital
Cost of equity, debt, preferences and retained
earnings
T16
IV
Cost of Capital Overall cost of capital
T17 CVP Analysis Formule and Graphical methods
T18 Variable Costing Problems
T19 Absorption Costing Problems
T20
V
Budgets Flexible, Zero based and long and short run
MCA I Year, II Semester
46
5.1.13 QUESTION BANK
UNIT-1
1. What is an Accounting Cycle? Give the coverage of Accounting Cycle. (Old Dec 2010)
2. From the following Trial Balance, prepare Profit and Loss A/c for the year ending 31 March,2008 and
Balance Sheet as on that date. (Old Dec 2010)
Particulars Debit Rs. Credit Rs.
Capital - 42,000
Bills payable - 12,000
Sundry Creditors - 6,400
Provision for bad debts - 1,500
Gross Profit - 10,000
Sundry Debtors 16,000 -
Bills receivables 4,800 -
Furniture 3,000 -
Machinery 20,000 -
Salaries 4,000 -
Electricity 1,200 -
Rent 2,000 -
Advertisement Expenses 1,600 -
Closing Stock 3,000 -
Investment @ 12% interest 15,000 -
Bank 4,300 -
Total 71,900 71,900
Additional information
(a) Rent prepaid is Rs.200 (b) Depreciation on machinery at 10% and furniture at 20% p.a. (c) Salaries
outstanding Rs.1000 (d) Interst on investments is accrued (e) Maintain provision for bad debts at
5% on debtors.
3. What do you understand by subsidiary books? Explain the objectives of preparing such books.
(New Dec 2010)
4. Prepare the Final a/c. from the following Trail Balance on 30-06-98 of Sri Manohar. (New Dec 2010)
Trail Balance as on 30-06-1998
Particulars Debit Rs. Credit Rs.
Capital - 37,000
Cash in hand 4,000
Purchases, Sales 45,000 95,000
Returns 500 600
Wages 8,500
Power & Fuel 3,500
Salaries 6,500
Carriage on purchases 1,800
MCA I Year, II Semester
47
Stock (1-7-97) 7,200
Buildings 25,000
Machinery 15,000
Furniture 5,000
Debtors, Creditors 12,000 9,000
General expenses 2,600
Drawings 5,000
Total 1,41,600 1,41,600
Adjustments:
(1). Closing stock Rs.14,000 (2). Depreciate Rs.750 and Rs.250 on machinery and furniture respectively.
(3). Wages outstanding Rs.500 (4) Bad debts to be writtern off Rs.600. (5) Charges 5% on drawings.
5. Breifly Describe the Accounting Concepts and conventions (Nov 2008/Jun 09/Nov 09)
6. From the following Trial Balance, prepare final accounts for the year ending 31 March,2008 (Nov 09)
Particulars DebitRs. CreditRs.
Capital - 80,000
4% Bank Loan - 20,000
Bills payable - 22,000
Sundry Creditors - 24,000
Sales - 2,00,000
Provision for bad debts - 1,200
Cash in hand 1,200 -
Purchases 1,20,000 -
Opening Stock 35,000 -
Sundry Debtors 50,000 -
Plant and Machinery 60,000 -
Furniture 20,000 -
Bills receivables 10,000 -
Rent and taxes 16,000 -
Wages 15,000 -
Salaries 20,000 -
Total 3,47,000 3,47,000
Additional information
1) Closing stock Rs. 40,000 2) Provide outstanding liabilities : Rent and taxes Rs. 2,000; Wages Rs.3,000
and Salaries Rs. 4,000 3) Depreciation : on Plant & Machinary@5% on furniture@10% 4) Write off Rs.
500 as based debts 5) Maintain Provision for bad debts@2.5% on sundry debtors.
7. From the following Balances prepare Trading and Profit & Loss Account for the year ending 30-6-2005
and the Balance sheet as on that date. (Jun 09)
Rs. Rs.
Stock on 1-7-2004 18600 Loan taken 5,000
Coal and coke 200 Creditors 4,000
Manufacturing wages 11,000 Debtors 16,000
Purchases 80,000 Profit & Loss A/C(Cr.) 4,000
Sales 1,20,000 Leasehold property 6,500
Repairs 1,000 Machinery 8,000
Carriage outwards 1,500 Patents 1,000
Loose Tools 1-7-04 1,300 Discount received 600
Capital 40,000 Goodwill 15,000
Lighting Expenses 1,800 Cash at bank 5100
Salaries 2,600 Cash in hand 200
Office Furniture 500 Discount allowed 1,500
MCA I Year, II Semester
48
Adjust the following:
a) Charge depreciation at 25%, 10% and 5% respectively on patents, machinery and furniture.
b) Wages Rs. 200 & salaries Rs.100 are outstanding.
c) Lighting expenses are to be divided between factory and office in 2:1 ratio
d) On 30-6-2005 the stock value was Rs. 12,000 and loose tools Rs. 1,000
e) Maintain 5% bad debts reserve.
f) 6% interest on loan is outstanding
8. Following is the ledger balances of a trader as on 31
st
March 2008 (Nov 2008)
Debit Balances Amount
(Rs.)
Credit Balances Amount
(Rs.)
Machinery 28,400 Capital 1,80,000
Manufacturing Wages 98,570 Bad debts reserve 2,000
Opening stock 63,520 Creditors 48,740
Purchases 2,17,490 Sales 4,53,000
Carriage(Factory) 5,920 Bank Loan 30,000
Repairs 2,440 Misc. receipts 80
Rent and Rates(Factory 12,840 Commission received 6,900
Rent and Rates(office) 3,400 Bills Payable 17,990
Cash in hand 1,950
Advertising 12,870
General Expenses
(3/4 factory and office)
9,880
Patents 98,570
Debtors 78,400
Bad Debts 1,000
Salaries 48,720
Sales returns 4,810
Managers Salary 15,250
Office furniture 7,500
Motor Lorries 18,620
Insurance
Factory 5,620
Office 3,300
7,38,710 7,38,710
You are required to prepare Trading & profit & Loss a/c for the year ended March 31,2008 and a Balance
Sheet as on that date after taking into account the following adjustments.
(a) Depreciation on Machinery 10% and on Office Furiture 8%
(b) Closing stock Rs.87,530.
(c) 1/3 of the advertising is to be carries forward to next year
(d) Bad debts Rs.400/-
9. (a) With the help of suitable examples, explain the concepts and conventions of the accounting system.
(Supply Jan 2008)
MCA I Year, II Semester
49
(b) From the following balances in the Ledger of ABC Ltd., for the year ended 31
st
December 2006, prepare
Manufacturing, Trading and Profit & Loss Account. (Supply Jan 2008)
Particulars Amount (Rs.)
Discount (Dr.) 5,700
Carriage Inwards 8,900
Purchase of Raw Materials 3,00,000
Sales 5,90,000
Rent 25,000
Stationery 5,000
Wages 8,000
Opening Stock of Raw Materials 75,000
Opening Stock of Finished Goods 40,000
Carriage Outwards 9,400
Marketing Expenses 12,600
Electricity 2,800
Insurance Cover 19,700
Paid for Telephone charges 1,900
Interest Paid 12,300
Salaries 33,000
Miscellaneous Expenses 14,400
Bad Debts 17,500
Fuel Charges 11,100
Depreciation on Shed 9,200
Depreciation on Plant and Machinery 22,900
Fuel 21,900
Stock as on 31
st
December 2007 was Raw Materials Rs.24,400 and Rs.15,000 for Finished Goods.
10. (a) What is Trail Balance? Why does it tally and why it does not tally? (Old Jan 2008)
(b) Find out the gross profit and net profit from the following:
Rs. Rs.
Sales 1,60,000 Closing stock 22,100
Purchases 91,300 Purchases Returns 4,000
Wages 18,100 Sales returns 5,000
Factory rent 3,000 Office Salaries 6,000
Office Rent 2,000 General expenses 4,500
Freight on purchases 3,000 Discount from creditors 1,100
Freight on sales 1,500 Discount to customer 1,800
Opening stock 24,000 Trade charges 2,000
Coal, gas and water 2,500 Advertisement 1,500
MCA I Year, II Semester
50
11. T h e T r a i l B a l a n c e o f M r . X o n 3 1
st
December, 2003 revealed the following balances: (Old Jan 2008)
Debit Balances Rs. Credit Balances Rs.
Plant & Machinery 80,000 Capital account 1,00,000
Purchases 68,000 Sales 1,27,000
Sales returns 1,000 Purchases returns 1,275
Opening stock 30,000 Discount received 800
Discount allowed 350 Sundry creditors 25,000
Bank charges 75
Sundry debtors 45,000
Salaries 6,800
Wages 10,000
Freight in 750
Freight out 1,200
Rent, Rates and Taxes 2,000
Advertisements 2,000
Cash at bank 6,900
2,54,075 2,54,075
Adjustments:
(a) The stock on 31
st
December, 2003 was valued at Rs.35,000.
(b) Outstanding wages Rs.200; salaries Rs.700
(c) Prepaid rent Rs.500.
(d) Purchase include Rs.1,200 worth of furniture purchased for domestic use
Prepare Trading and Profit & Loss Account for the year ending 31
st
December, 2003 and Balance Sheet as on
that date
12. Describe briefly the accounting cycle mechanism. (June 07)
13. From the following balances in the Ledger of Mr.Malik for the year ended 31
st
December.2006, prepare
Manufacturing, Trading and Profit and Loss Accouint: (June 07)
Particulars Amount Rs.
Discount (Dr.) 3,500
Carriage Inwards 9,200
Purchase of Raw Materials 1,00,000
Sales 2,80,000
Rent 15,000
Stationery 3,000
Wages 6,000
Opening Stock of Raw Materials 50,000
Opening Stock of Finished Goods 20,000
Carriage Outwords 6,400
Marketing Expenses 8,900
Electricity 1,700
Insurance Cover 9,700
Paid for Telephone charges 900
Interest Paid 2,400
Salaries 13,000
Miscllaneous Expenses 4,400
Bad Debts 7,000
Fuel Charges 1,900
Depreciation on Shed 6,100
MCA I Year, II Semester
51
14. Define Accountancy and explain the principles of Double entry system with examples. (June 07/old)
15. From the following Trail Balance Prepare final accounts for the year ending31
st
December, 2004 of Mr. Ram
Swaroop: (June 07/old)
Rs. Rs.
Opening Stock 80,000 Capital 2,50,000
Debtor 25,000 Sales 3,00,000
Discount 3,000 Purchases returns 2,000
Manufacturing expenses 6,000 Creditor 20,000
Freight on Purchases 8,000 Bills payable 10,000
Land and Buildings 3,00,000 Interest 3,000
Administrative expenses 7,000
Purchases 40,000
Trade expenses 1,000
Machinery 60,000
Bad Debts 1,000
Advertising exp. 4,000
Investments 50,000
______ ______
5,85,000 5,85,000
______ ______
Adjustments:-
(i) Provide depreciation on Machinery @ 10%
(ii) Closing stock Rs.25,000
(iii) Bad Debts Rs.2,000.
(iv) Outstanding manufacturing expenses Rs.3,000.
16. i. Discuss various Accounting Conventions (Nov 06 supply)
ii. Explain the purpose of preparation of Trail Balance
17. Prepare Final Accounts from the following information. (Nov 06 supply)
Rs. Rs.
Purchases 15,000 Loan 35,000
Sales Returns 500 Creditors 25,000
Bad Debts 500 Capital 1,50,000
Carriage in 1,000 Bills Payable 6,000
Salaries 5,000 Commission 2,000
Rent 4,000
Furniture 10,000
Plant & Machinery 1,60,000
Opening Stock 20,000
Debtors 2,000
______ ______
2,18,000 2,18,000
______ ______
Adjustments:-
(i) Closing stock Rs.5,000
(ii) Outstanding Rent Rs.2,000
(iii) Advance receipt of Commission Rs.500.
(iv) Provide depreciation on furniture @ 5%.
MCA I Year, II Semester
52
18. Discuss briefly the basic accounting concepts and fundamental accounting assumptions.
( May 06 main/supply)
19. From the following Train From the following Trial Balance Prepare final accounts for the year ending 31
st
December, 2004 of Mr. Ram Swaroop: (May 06main/supply)
Particulars Dr. Cr
Opening Stock| of Raw Materials 30,000
Opening Stock of Finished goods 16,000
Opening Stock of Work-in-process 5,000
Capital 72,000
Purchases of Raw materials 2,50,000
Sales 4,00,000
Purchases of Finished goods 8,000
Carriage Inwards 4,000
Wages 50,000
Salaries (75% Factory) 26,000
Commission 3,000
Bad Debts 2,000
Insurance 4,000
Rent, Rates and Taxes 12,000
Postage and Telegram 2,800
Tea and Tiffin 1,600
Travelling and Conveyance 3,500
Carriage Outwards 2,600
Machinery 40,000
Furniture 5,000
Debtors 60,000
Creditors 53,500
________ ________
5,25,500 5,25,500
________ ________
The Closing Stocks are as follows:
Raw Materials 40,000
Work-in-progress 12,000
Finished Goods 8,000
UNIT-II
1. Explain the limitations of financial statements? (Old Dec 10)
2. From the following particulars, prepare the Balance Sheet of a Company as on 31st March 2008
(Old Dec 10)
Working Capital Rs. 75,000
Reserves and Surplus Rs. 1,00,000
Bank Overdraft 60,000
Current ratio 1.75:1
Liquid ratio 1.15.1
Fixed Assests to proprietors funds ratio 0.75
MCA I Year, II Semester
53
3. What are the limitations of Ratio analysis? Does ratio analysis really measure the financial performance
of a company. Explain its significance. (New Dec 10)
4. Calculate (i) Current ratio (ii) Quick ratio (iii) Ratio of total assets to total outside liabilities (iv) Return
on gross capital employed from the following Balance sheet of XYZ Limited on 31-12-2002.
(New Dec 10)
Liabilities Rs. Assets Rs.
Equity capital 20,000 Fixed Assets 30,000
10% loan from IDBI 10,000 Stocks 14,000
Creditors 8,000 Debtors 10,000
Overdraft 2,000 Investments 2,000
Provision for taxation 1,000 Cash in hand 1,000
P&L a/c after taxation &
interest on loan
20,000
Less dividends 2,000
Less reserves 2,000 16,000
Total 57,000 57,000
5. What do you mean by analysis of financial statements (Nov 09)
6. From the following particulars, prepare the Balance sheet of a Company as on 31
st
March.2008
(Nov 09)
Sales for the year Rs. 3,00,000
Sales to Net worth 4 times
Current liabilities to net worth 50%
Total debt to net worth 70%
Current ratio 2.0
Sales inventory 8 times
Average collection period 35 days
Fixed asset to net worth 60%
7. Briefly explain different types of Rations. (Jun 09)
8. Following is the income statement of X Ltd. For the year ending 31
st
. December 2008. Income statement
(Jun 09)
To Opening stock 47,750 By sales 3,00,000
To Purchases 189150 By closing stock 59,100
To Carriage 1200
To Wages 3,000
To Gross profit 1,20,000
359,100 3,59,100
To operating expenses 72,000 By Gross profit 1,20,000
To Nonoperating
expense
1,200 By Non-Operating
income
3600
To Net profit 50400
1,23,600 1,23,600
MCA I Year, II Semester
54
You are required to calculate :
a) Gross profit Ratio
b) Net profit Ratio
c) Operating Ratio
d) Operating profit Ratio
e) Stock turnover Ratio
9. Give a brief account of the ratios to analyse the liquidity position of a Business concern. (Nov 08)
10. Calculate the following rations from the balance sheet given below. (Nov 08)
a. Debt equity ratio.
b. Liquidity ratio.
c. Fixed assets ratio.
d. Fixed assets turn over ratio.
e. Fixed assets to net worth ratio.
Balance Sheet as on 31-12-2006
Liabilites Rs. Assets Rs.
Equity share capital 1,00,0000 Goodwill 60,000
Reserves 20,000 Fixed assets 1,40,000
P& L a/c 30,000 Stock 30,000
Secured Loans 80,000 Debtors 10,000
Creditors 50,000 Cash Balances 30,000
Provision for taxation 20,000 Bank Balance 30,000
3,00,000 3,00,00
Sales for the year Rs.5,60,000.
11. Discuss briefly the financial ratios that are widely used in the field of financial analysis (Jan 08)
12. From the following annual statements of Goodluck Enterprises Ltd., calculate the following ratios:
i. Gross Profit Ratio
ii. Current Ratio
iii. Liquid Ratio
iv. Debt-Equity Ratio (Jan 08)
Particulars
Amount
Rs.
Particulars
Amount
Rs.
Materials Consumed Sales 1,00,000
Opening Stock 15,800 Profit due to sale of investment 1,600
Purchases 76,900
92,700 Interest received due to Investment 10,000
Closing Stock 32,700
60,000
Carriage Inwards 1,690
Office Expenses 18,000
Sales Expenses 10,000
Misc. Expenses 6,900
Net Profit 30,010
1,26,600 1,26,600
13. What is Ratio analysis? Explain briefly the different ratios calcuated to evaluate Liquidity position, Solvency
position, Operation efficiency and Profitability of a firm. (Jan 08)
MCA I Year, II Semester
55
14. With the help of the following information, draw the Balance Sheet of a company: (Jan 08)
Current ratio 2.5; Quick ratio 1.5;
Net working capital Rs.3,00,000; Gross profit ratio 20%;
Fixed Assets turnover ratio 2 times
Stock turnover ratio (Cost of sales/closing stock) 6 times
Average collection period 2 months;
Fixed assets to shareholders equity - .8;
Reserves and Surpluses to Share capital .5
15. What are the objectives of analyzing financial statement of a company with regard to different stake
holders (June 07)
16. Consider the below information of MAK & Co.Ltd. and prepare a Balance Sheet: (June 07)
Stock Velocity 5
Capital Turnover ratio 3
Fixed Assets turnover ratio 4
Gross Profit 15%
Debt Collection period 3 months
Duration given by Creditors 4.5 months
The gross profit was Rs.89,000 and the excess opening stock was Rs.10,000.
17. Discuss the significance and limitations of Ratio analysis in the analysis of financial statements.
(June 07)
18. Assuming that a firm has Owners Equity of Rs.1,00,000, the ratios of the firm are: (June 07)
Current Debts to Total Debts 0.40
Total Debts to Owners Equity 0.60
Fixed assets to Owners Equity 0.40
Total assets Turnover 2 times
Inventory Turnover 8 times
Prepare the Balance Sheet 16
19. From the following information presented by X Co. Ltd. for the year ended 31-12-2004, prepare the Balance
Sheet. (Nov 06)
20. Define Turnover Ratios. Describe the significance of the following turnover ratios with imaginary figures:
i. Stock-turnover ratio
ii. Debtors-turnover ratio
iii. Creditors - -turnover ratio (Nov 06)
21. How do you analyse the financial position of a company from the point of view of:
i. An investor
ii. A Creditor
iii. A Financial executive of the company. (May 06)
22. From the following information, prepare, a Balance Sheet of Raj Ltd. for the year ended 31
st
March 2006:
Fixed Assets to Net Worth. (May 06)
MCA I Year, II Semester
56
Fixed Assets to Net Worth 5 : 8
Current Ratio 2 : 1
Acid Test Ratio 1 : 1
Reserves to Proprietors fund 1 : 5
Current Liabilities Rs. 3,60,000
Cash in hand Rs. 15,000
Fixed Assets Rs. 6,00,000
UNIT III
1. What is Working Capital? Explain the factors determing working capital. (Old Dec 10)
2. From the following balance sheet of XYZ Limited as on 31 March, 2007 and 2008. you are required to
prepare funds flow statement. (Old Dec 10)
Liabilities 2007
Rs.
2008
Rs.
Assets 2007
Rs.
2008
Rs.
Creditors 40,000 44,000 Cash 10,000 7,000
Loan from Mr. X 25,000 - Debtors 30,000 50,000
Loan from Bank 40,000 50,000 Stock 35,000 25,000
Share capital 1,25,000 1,53,000 Machinery 80,000 55,000
Land 40,000 50,000
Buildings 35,000 60,000
Total 2,30,000 2,47,000 Total 2,30,000 2,47,000
Additional information :
During the year, a macchine costing Rs.10,000 (accumulated depreciation being Rs.3,000) was sold for
Rs.5,000. The Provision for depreciaiton against machinery as on 1-4-2007 was Rs.25,000 and on 30-3-2008
was Rs.40,000. Net profit for the year 2008 amounted to Rs.45,000.
3. Explain briefly about the sources and management of working capital. (New Dec 10)
4. Prepare cash flow statement from the following Balance sheet of Desai company. (New Dec 10)
Liabilities 31-3-94 31-3-95 Assets 31-3-94 31-3-95
Share capital 70,000 74,000 Cash 9,000 7,800
Debentures 12,000 6,000 Debtors 14,900 17,700
Reserves for doubtful debts 700 800 Stock 49,200 42,700
Trade creditors 10,360 11,840 Land 20,000 30,000
P & L a/c 10,040 10,560 Goodwill 10,000 5,000
1,03,100 1,03,200 1,03,100 1,03,200
MCA I Year, II Semester
57
7. Explain the factors which determine the requirements of working capital. (Jun 09)
8. The following are the summarized balance sheets of XYZ Ltd as on December 2002 and 2003 (Jun 09)
Balance sheet
You are required to prepare (a) statement of changes in working capital (b) Funds flow statement.
9. What is working capital? Explain the estimation of working capital required for a manufacturing concern.
(Nov 08)
Liabilities 2002 2003 Assets 2002 2003
E. share capital 2,20,000 2,50,000 Machinery 2,00,000 2,30,000
10% Preference Buildings 1,50,000 1,76,000
Share capital 1,00,000 1,10,000 Land 18,000 18,000
Share Premium 20,000 26,000 Cash 42,000 32,000
P&L a/c 1,04,000 1,34,000 Debtors 38,000 38,000
12% Debentures 70,000 64,000 B/R 42,000 62,000
Creditors 38,000 46,000 Stock 84,000 98,000
B/P 5,000 4,000
Provision for Tax 10,000 12,000
Dividend payable 7,000 8,000
6,64,000 5,74,000 6,64,000 5,74,000
5. Explain the factors determining working capital (Nov 09)
6. From the following balance sheet of Western Company Limited as on 31 March, 2007 and 2008. you are
required to prepare funds flow statement. (Nov 09)
Liabilities 2007
Rs.
2008
Rs.
Assets 2007
Rs.
2008
Rs.
Share Capital 350000 435000 Buildings 300000 340000
Debentures 225000 320000 Plant 325000 375000
General
reserves
12000 175000 Investments 165000 185000
Profit & loss
account
75000 95000 Preliminary Exp 9000 ----
Depreciation
reserve
9000 135000 Inventories 75000 145000
Creditors 75000 95000 Debtors 95000 175000
Bills payable 9000 110000 Bills receivable 40000 65000
Cash 16000 80000
Total 1025000 1365000 Total 1025000 1365000
Additional information :
1. Dividend for 2008@15% was paid during the year 2008
2. A plant costing Rs.75.000(Depreciation provided Rs. 25000) was sold for Rs.55000.
3. Investment amounting to Rs. 40000 were realized for Rs. 32000.
MCA I Year, II Semester
58
10. The following are the Balance Sheets of XYZ Ltd. as on 31-12-2006 and 31-12-2007. (Nov 08)
Liabilities 2006 2007 Assets 2006 2007
Share Capital 1,60,000 2,20,000 Buildings 1,40,000 2,18,000
P& L a/c 2,50,000 5,00,000 Stock 3,00,000 3,50,000
Creditors 2,30,000 1,80,000 Bank preliminary 40,000 80,000
Outstanding
expenses
6,000 3,000 Expenses 14,000 12,000
Depreciation on
buildings
10,000 11,000 Debtors 1,62,000 2,54,000
6,56,000 9,14,000 6,56,000 9,14,000
Additional Information:
a. During the year, a building which was purchased earlier for Rs.14,000(depreciation written off Rs.1000)
was sold for Rs.1200/-.
b. A dividend of Rs.40,000/- has been paid during the year. From the above information, you are required to
prepare:
i. A statement of changes in working capital.
ii. Funds flow statement
11. Bring out the salient features of maintaining working capital efficiently. (Jan 08)
12. From the following Balance Sheet of R & R Ltd., prepare a Statement of Sources and Uses of Funds:
Liabilities
2005
Rs.
2006
Rs.
Applications
2005
Rs.
2006
Rs.
Equality Share Capital 3,90,000 3,50,000 Goodwill 1,33,000 1,50,000
8% Redeemable Land & Building 2,11,000 1,90,000
Preference Shares 1,50,000 1,00,000 Plant 66,000 1,75,000
General Reserves 44,500 60,000 Debtors 50,600 1,00,000
P & L A/c. 23,500 48,000 Stock 90,000 40,000
Proposed Dividend 51,000 50,000 Bills Receivable 52,000 44,000
Creditors 26,000 83,000 Cash in Hand 1,29,400 23,000
Bills Payable 29,000 18,000 Cash at Bank 22,000 29,000
Provision for Tax 40,000 42,000
7,54,000 7,51,000 7,54,000 7,51,000
Note: Depreciation of Rs.21,000 and Rs.39,000 has been charged on plant account and land account
respectively in the year 2006. an interim ivident of Rs.30,000 has been paid in 2006. Income tax Rs.45,000
was paid during the year 2006. (Jan 08)
13. The following information is related to the total cost of manufacturing a product of a business firm:
i. The Selling price - Rs. 10
ii. Raw material cost per unit - Rs.3
iii. Labour cost per unit - Rs.2
iv. Overhead cost per unit - Rs.4
v. Budgeted Sales 52,000 units during the future year.

MCA I Year, II Semester
59
vi. 8 weeks stocks of raw materials, 4 weeks stocks of finished goods are to be maintained.
vii. Factory processng will take 2 weeks
viii. Customers are required to be given 8 weeks credit while suppliers offer 5 weeks credit.
ix. A minimum cash balance of Rs.3,000 to be maintained.
x. Time lag in payment of wages is 2 weeks and in case of expenses 4 weeks.
You are required to prepare a statement showing the working capital requirements of the business and 10%
of net working capital for contingencies. (Jan 08)
14. From the following information, prepare Funds Flow Statement: (Jan 08)
Balance Sheet
Liabilities
2001
Rs.
2002
Rs.
Applications
2001
Rs.
2002
Rs.
Share capital 4,50,000 4,50,000 Fixed Assists 4,00,000 3,20,000
General Reserve 3,00,000 3,10,000 Investment 50,000 60,000
Mortgage Loan - 2,70,000 Stock 2,40,000 2,10,000
Provision for taxes 75,000 10,000 Debtors 2,10,000 4,55,000
Creditors 1,68,000 1,34,000 Cash 1,49,000 1,97,000
Profit & Loss A/c 56,000 68,000
10,49,000 12,42,000 10,49,000 12,42,000
Additional Information:
i. Investment costing rs.8,000 were sold during the year 2002 for Rs.8,500.
ii. Provision for taxes made during the year 2002 was Rs.9,000.
iii. During the year 2002, part of fixed assests costing Rs.10,000 were sold for Rs.12,000.
iv. Divident paid during the year 2002 was Rs.40,000.
15. Bring out the salient featuares of maintaining working capital efficiently. (June 07)
16. From the following balance sheet of R and RLtd., prepare a statement of sources and uses of funds:
(June 07)
Liabilities 2005 2006 Applications 2005 2006
Rs. Rs. Rs. Rs.
Equity Share Capital 2,90,000 3,50,000 Goodwill 1,25,000 90,000
8% Redeemable
Preference Shares 2,00,000 1,00,000 Land & Building 2,09,000 2,90,000
General Reserves 40,500 60,000 Plant 75,000 75,000
Debtors 1,45,000 1,10,000
P&L a/c 30,500 48,000 Stock 83,000 90,000
Proposed Dividend 42,000 50,000 Bills Receivable 32,000 44,000
Creditors 55,000 83,000 Cash in Hand 19,000 23,000
Bills Payable 19,000 18,000 Cash at Bank 24,000 29,000
Provision for Taxes 35,000 42,000
______ ______ ______ ______
7,12,000 7,51,000 7,12,000 7,51,000
Note: Depreciation of Rs.21,000 and Rs.39,000 has been charged on plant account and land account
respectively in the year 2006. An interim dividend of Rs.30,000 has been paid in 2006. Income tax Rs.45,000
17. What is Working Capital? Discuss the different sources of Working Capital (June,old 07)

MCA I Year, II Semester
60
18. From the following income statement, ascertain the amount of funds from operations: (June,old 07)
Income Statement
Rs. Rs.
To Salaries 10,000 By Gross Income 45,000
To Rent 6,000 By Profit on sale of Furniture 1,000
To Reserve for Doubtful Debts 4,000 By Dividend 4,000
To Interest and Commission 5,000
To Provision for Depreciation 6,000
To Provision for Taxation 8,000
To Loss on Sale of Plant 2,000
To Discount on issue of Shares 1,000
To Net Income 8,000
_____ ______
50,000 50,000
19. Calculate the EOQ from the following particulars under (i) Equation Method and (ii) Tabular Method.
Annual Demand - 300 units
Buying Cost per order Rs.25
Carrying Cost of inventory @ 15% on Cost
Cost per unit Rs. 10. (Nov 06)
20. Discuss the objectives of inventory management and explain the techinques of inventory management.
(Nov 06)
21. Explain the concept of Working Capital. Briefly discuss the sources of working capital of a firm (May 06)
22. From the figures given below, prepare a Statement showing application and sources of funds: (May 06)
Particulars Previous Year Current year
Assets
Fixed Assets (Nett) 5,10,000 6,20,000
Investments 30,000 80,000
Current Assets 2,40,000 3,75,000
Discount on Debentures 10,000 5,000
7,90,000 10,80,000
Liabilities
Share Capital (Equity) 3,00,000 3,50,000
Preference Capital 2,00,000 1,00,000
Debentures 1,00,000 2,00,000
Reserves 1,10,000 2,70,000
Provision for doubtful debts 10,000 15,000
Current Liabilities 70,000 1,45,000
7,90,000 10,80,000
i. During the year a machine costing rs.70,000 (Book Value Rs.40,000) was disposed off for Rs.25,000.
ii. Dividend @ 15% was paid on equity shares for the previous year.
iii. Preference Share redemption was carried out at a premium of 5%
iv. The provision for depreciation stood at the beginning of the current year at Rs.1,50,000 and Rs.1,90,000 at
the end of the year.

MCA I Year, II Semester
61
UNIT - IV
1. What is cost of capital? Explain the components of cost of capital. (Old Dec 10)
2. A choice is to be made between two competing projects which require an equal investment of Rs.50,000
and are expected to generate net cash flows as under:
(Old Dec 10)
End of the year
Project A
Rs.
Project B
Rs.
1 25,000 10,000
2 15,000 12,000
3 10,000 18,000
4 nil 25,000
5 12,000 8,000
6 6,000 4,000
The cost of capital of the company is 10%, using NPV method, recommend which proposal is to be
preferred.
3. Explain the concept of capital budgeting. Write about its features, objectives and significance.
(New Dec 10)
4. Calculate Net Present Value (NPV) of the two projects given below and suggest which should be accepted
assumin a discount rate of 10%. (New Dec 10)
Project X Project Y
Initial Investment Rs.20,000 Rs.30,000
Life 5 Years 5 Years
Scrap Rs.1,000 Rs.2,000
The cash inflow after tax are as follows:
5. What is cost of capital? State how would determine the weighted average cost of capital of a company.
(Nov 09)
6. An investment proposal would initially cost Rs. 25,000 and would generate year-and cash inflows Rs.
9,000, Rs. 8,000, Rs. 7,000 and Rs. 5,000 in one through five years. The required rate of return is assumed
to be 10%. Calculate. Net Present value. (Nov 09)
7. Discuss different methods of capital budgeting in the evaluation of Projects? (Jun 09)
8. A project costs Rs. 25,000 and has scrap value of Rs. 5,000 after 5 years. Assume taxation@50% the Net
profit before depreciation & taxes for the 5 years are : 1
st
year Rs. 5,000: 2
nd
year Rs.6,00; 3
rd
year Rs. 7,000,
4
th
year-Rs. 8,000; & 5
th
year Rs.10,000. Calculate ARR for the project. (Jun 09)
9. Define the concept of cost of capital? State how you would determine the weighted average cost of
capital of a firm (Nov 08)
Years 1 2 3 4 5
X 5,000 10,000 10,000 3,000 2,000
Y 20,000 10,000 5,000 3,000 2,000
MCA I Year, II Semester
62
10. From the following information calculate the net present value of the two projects and suggest which of
the two projects should be accepted assuming a discount rate of 10%. (Nov 08)
ProjectX Project Y
Initial investment 20,000 30,000
Estimated life 5 years 5 years
Scrap value 1000 2000
The cash inflows after tax are as follows
Years 1 2 3 4 5
X 5,000 10,000 10,000 3,000 2,000
Y 20,000 10,000 5,000 3,000 2,000
11. Write briefly about different types of capital budgeting techniques in vogue. (June 08)
12. i. Explain the virtues in using Weighted Cost of Capital (WACC) mechanism.
ii. Calculate the WACC using the following information:
Cost and proportion of Equity : 13% & 65%, Cost and Proportion Preference: 15% & 10% and Cost and
Proportion of Debt: 9% & 25% respectively, while the tax rate 35%. (June 08)
13. A company is considering a project, involving an initial investment of Rs.60,000 with an estimated life of 3
years at the end of which, it has not scrap value. The project is depreciated on straight-line basis and the
project is expected to generate the net income after tax of Rs.10,000 at the end of each year through 1 to 3
years of its expected life. The cost of capital of the firm is 15%. Using (a) Pay-back period method; (b)
Average Rate of Return Method; (c) Net Present Value method and (d) Profitability Index methods, suggest
whether the project is acceptable. (Jan 08)
14. A Ltd., has the following capital structure: (Jan 08)
20,000 Equity Shares Rs. 20,00,000
6% Preference Shares Rs. 5,00,000
8% Debentures Rs. 15,00,000
The market price of equity share is Rs.200. It is expected that the company will pay a current dividend of
Rs.20 per share which will grow at 7% every year. The companys tax rate is 40%.
i. You can required to calculate weighted average cost of capital of existing capital structure.
ii. Calculate the new weighted average cost of capital if the company raises an additional Rs.10,00,000 debt
capital by issuing 10% debentures. This would result in increasing the dividend rate expected by the equity
to Rs.30 per share and brings down the market price of share to Rs.150 per share, leaving the growth rate
unchanged.
15. Underline the importance of cost of capital in the field of capital budgeting. (June 07)
16. A and B Ltd. are considering an investment proposal the details of which are given below, you are required
to advise whether to reject or accept the project based on payback period, NPV and IRR capital budgeting
techniques. The initial investment of the project is Rs.4,00,000. (June 07)
Year Cash Flows
1 40,000
2 45,000
3 42,000
4 41,000
MCA I Year, II Semester
63

5 35,000
6 39,000
7 41,000
8 38,000
9 40,000
10 39,000
17. A firm is considering two mutually exclusive projects X and Y,the details of which are as follows:
Particulars Project X Project Y
Investment Rs. 1,00,000 Rs. 1,00,000
Expected life 5 Years 5 Years
Cash flows
after depreciation and taxes:
Year Rs. Rs.
1 40,000 60,000
2 44,000 54,000
3 56,000 44,000
4 50,000 50,000
5 60,000 40,000
Cost of Capital 10%
Which project should be accepted under NPV method and why? Rank the projects under profitability index
method. (June old 07)
18. What is the weighted average cost of capital? Examine the rationale behind the use of weighted average
cost of capital (June old 07)
19. Define Capital Budgeting and explain the techniques of evaluation of investment proposals (Nov 06)
20. Examine critically the different approaches to the calculation of cost of Equity Capital. (Nov 06)
21. Explain the concept of Cost of Capital and how do you measure the Weighted Average Cost of Capital.
(May 06)
22. A company is considering an investment proposal to install new milling controls. The project will cost
Rs.50,000. The companys tax rate is 55% and uses straight line method of depreciation. The estimated cash
flows before tax (CFBT) are as follows: (May 06)
Year CFBTRs.
1 110,000
2 11,000
3 14,000
4 15,000
5 25,000
Compute the following:
i. Payback Period
ii. Average Rate of Return
iii. NPV
iv. IRR.
UNIT V
1. What is Budget? Discuss its utility and limitations. (Old Dec 10)
MCA I Year, II Semester
64
2. The following particulars are relating to a company: (Old Dec 10)
Y e a r s
S a l e s
R s .
P r o f i t
R s .
2 0 0 7 8 0 , 0 0 0 2 0 , 0 0 0
2 0 0 8 1 , 2 0 , 0 0 0 3 0 , 0 0 0
From the above data, calculate:
(a) P/V Ratio (b) Fixed Costs (c) Break-Even-Point (d) Required sales at a profit of Rs.50,000 and
(e) Profit if sales are Rs.1,80,000.
3. Explain the features, advantages and limitations of marginal costing. (Old Dec 10)
4. From the following information, you are required to find out (Old Dec 10)
i. Contribution
ii. Beak-even point in units
iii. Margin of safety
iv. Profit
v. Volume of sales to earn profit of Rs.12,000.
5. What is purpose of Budgeting ? Discuss the essentials of an effective budget. (Nov 09)
6. Your are given the following information : (Nov 09)
Year Sales Profit/Loss
Rs. Rs.
2007 90,000 -10,000
2008 1,30,000 10,000
Calculate: a) P/V Ratio
b) Fixed costs
c) Break Even Point
d) Expected profit sales are Rs.1,80,000
7. Write short notes on : (a) Budget (b) Budgeting (c) Budgetary Control (d) Flexible Budget (Jun 09)
8. The sales and profit of company for the two years was as follows: (Nov 09)
Sales Profit
2002 3,00,000 40,000
2003 4,00,000 60,000
Calculate (a) PV ratio (b) BEP (c) Fixed Cost & (d) Margin of Safety.
9. Define budgetary control? What are its advantages and limitations (Nov 08)
10. The following data are available from the records of a company (Nov 08)
Sales Rs.1,00,000
Variable Cost 60,0000
Fixed Cost 20,000
You are required to calculate p/v ratio, Break even point and Margin of safety. Also study the impact of
change in the following variable on p/v ration, BEP and Margin of safety.
a. Increase in selling price by 10%.
b. Decrease in fixed cost by Rs.5,000
MCA I Year, II Semester
65
11. Write a short note on the difference between Variable costing and Absorption costing. (June 08)
12. What do you understand by Long-term and Short-term forecasting? (June 08)
13. The following information is obtained from the costing records of a company: (Jan 08)
Sales Rs. 1,00,000
Variables Cost Rs. 60,000
Fixed Cost Rs. 30,000
i. Find the P/V ratio, break-even sales and margin of safety at the present level;
ii. Calculate the effect of the following on P/V ratio, Break-even point and Margin of safety:
i. 20% increase in selling price;
ii. 10% decrease in selling price;
iii. 5% decrease in sales volume;
iv. 5% increase in sales volume;
v. 20% increase in sales price accompanied by an increase of fixed overhead by Rs.10,000.
vi. 20% increase in sales price accompanied by 10% decrease in variable costs and 10% increase in fixed
costs; and
vii. 20% increase in sales price accompanied by 10% increase in variable costs and 10% decrease in fixed
costs
14. The following information at 50% capacity is given. Prepare a flexible budget and forecast profit or loss at
60%, 70% and 90% capacity. (Jan 08)
Items of expense
Expenses at
50% capacity
(Rs.)
Fixed expenses: Salaries 50,000
Rent and Taxes 40,000
Depreciation 60,000
Administrative expenses 70,000
Variable expenses: Materials 2,00,000
Labour 2,50,000
Others 40,000
Semi-variable expenses: Repairs 1,00,000
Indirect labour 1,50,000
Others 90,000
It is estimated that fixed expenses will remain constant at all capacities. Semi variable expenses will not
change between 45% and 60% capacities. It will rise by 10% of the above figures between 60% and 75%
capacity, increase by 15% of the above figures over 75% capacity. The estimated sales at various levels of
capacity are : at 50%, Rs. 10,00,000; at 60% Rs.11,00,000; at 70%, Rs.13,00,000; and 90%, Rs.15,00,000.
15. What are the advantages and disadvantages of Flexible Budgeting technique? (June 07)
16. You are required to calculate the following variables of Grow-Well Enterprises using the stated information:
(a) Margin of Safety (b) Fixed Cost
(c) Prerequisite Sales volume for profit of Rs.25,000
(d) Break Even volume of Sales. (June 07)
Particulars Year 2005 (Rs.) Year 2006 (Rs.)
Sales 50,000 55,000
MCA I Year, II Semester
66
17. From the following information calculate:
i. BEP in units and in rupees.
ii. Number of units that must be sold to earn a profit of Rs.60,000 per year.
iii. How many units are to be sold to earn a net income of 10% of sales? (June 07)
Sales price Rs. 20 per unit
Variable manufacturing cost Rs. 11 per unit
Variable selling costs Rs. 3 per unit
Fixed factory overheads Rs. 5,40,000 per year
Fixed selling costs Rs. 2,52,000 per year
18. Define budget. What do you understand by flexible budget? Briefly explain the purposes served by
udgeting units and 6,000 units. (June 07)
19. From the following data find out:
i. P/V Ratio
ii. BEP
iii. Net Profit if the sales were Rs.2,50,000 and
iv. Sales to get a net profit of Rs.70,000. (Nov 06)
20. Write notes on the following:
i. Margin of Safety
ii. Flexible Budgets
iii. Functional Budgets
iv. Zero-Base Budgeting (Nov 06)
21. Distinguish variable costing from absorption costing. Explain the managerial uses of CVP analysis
(May 06)
22. Compute the following items: (May 06)
i. P/V Ratio and Fixed Cost.
ii. Break even level of sales.
iii. Sales required to earn a profit of Rs.9,000.
iv. Margin of Safety:
2004
(Rs.)
2005
(Rs.)
Sales 15,000 20,000
Profit 3,000 5,000
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MCA I Year, II Semester
7. SUBJECT DETAILS
5.2 PRINCIPLES OF OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING .
5.2.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.2.2 Scope
5.2.3 Prerequisites
5.2.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.2.5 Suggested Books
5.2.6 Websites
5.2.7 Expert Details
5.2.8 Journals
5.2.9 Findings and Developments
5.2.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.2.11 Session Plan
5.2.12 Tutorial Plan
5.2.13 Question Bank
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MCA I Year, II Semester
68
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MCA I Year, II Semester
5.2.1 OBJECTIVE AND RELEVANCE
The main objective of this subject is to teach students the fundamentals concepts of object oriented
programing language using Java. It forms a clear way for programming , problem solving and to understand
the programming concepts and designing programs by using Java.
5.2.2 SCOPE
This is an advanced course for learning an object oriented programming languages. After completion of
this subject students can gain the knowledge in core concepts of Java. It involves variety programs to
apply each of the object oriented concepts- class, methods, Inheritance, Polymorphism and GUI based
applications, Serialization I/O Streams etc.
5.2.3 PRE-REQUISITES
Students should have knowledge of OOPs concepts and basic programming knowledge including procedural
language. Then he/she can learn java programming easily.
5.2.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.
UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
This will deals with understanding object oriented development concepts, and Benefits, and also gives the
introduction to Java programming fundamentals like classes, methods, Inheritance, Packages and Inter-
faces.
SYLLABUS
Object Oriented System Development: Understanding Object Oriented Development, Understanding Object
Oriented Concepts, Benefits of Object Oriented Development.
Java Programming Fundamentals: Introduction, Overview of Java, Data types, Variables and Arrays,
Operators, Control Statements, Classess, methods, Inheritance, Packages and Interfaces.
UNIT - II
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with Handling of Exceptions, Multithreaded Programming, Reading and writing the data
into and from files and standard I/O devices.
SYLLABUS
Exceptional Handling, Multithreaded Programming, I/O basics, Reading console input and output, Reading
and Writing Files, PrintWriter Class, String Handling.
UNIT - I I I
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with collection framework classes and interfaces, Legacy classes. It also deals with classes
like Date, Calender String Tokenizer etc.
SYLLABUS
Exploring Java.lang, Collections Overview, Collections Interfaces, Collection Classes, Iterators, Random
Access Interface, Maps, Comparators, Arrays, Legacy classes and Interface,String Tokenizer, BitSet, Date,
Calender, Observable, Timer.
UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with Java Input / Output classes it also deals with Streams and Byte classes which is used
to read and write files. It also explains serialization of objects.
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MCA I Year, II Semester
SYLLABUS
Java I/O classes and Interfaces, Files, Stream and Byte Classes, Charater Streams, Serialization.
UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with event driven programming and introduction to Event Delegation model. and Graphical
user interface programming basics, layout managers.
SYLLABUS
GUI and Event Driven Programming: Applet Class, Event Handling, Delegation event model, event classes,
event listener Interfaces. Customizing Frame Windows, GUI Programming Basics, Text Related GUI
Components, Layout Managers, Effective use of Nested panels, Other GUI components, Menus and
Handling Mouse Events.
5.2.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Patrick Naughton JAVA2, The Complete Reference Tata McGraw Hill 2005.
T2 Richard A. Johnson, Java Programming and Object Oriented Application Development Cengage Learning,
India edition 2009.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 John Dean and Raymond Dean ,Introduction to Programming with Java problem solving approach,
Mc Graw Hill 2008.
R2 Joe Wigglesworth and Paul Mc Millan, Java Programming : Advanced Topics Cengage Learning,
3
rd
edition 2009.
5.2.6 WEBSITES
1. www.javacofeebreak.com
2. www.javacruel.com
3. www.java.sun.com
4. www.javaworld.com
5.2.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Robert ho Dondero,
Jr. Princeton University
Ph: 609-258-2211
Email: ralondero@cs.princeton.edu
2. Vlado Keselj
Associate Professor
Dalhouse University
Email: vlado@cs.dal.ca
3. Dr. Arthur E. Sedgwick
Ph: 902-494-2882
Email: Sedgurick @cs.dal.ca
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MCA I Year, II Semester
NATIONAL
1. Bernard Nereszes
Professor, IIT, Mumbai.
Ph: 912225767906
Email: bernard@it.iite.ac.in
2. Mr. Sivadas K.P,- University of Calicut, Kerela
Email: sivadaskr@gmail.com
3. Mr. Deepak, B. Phatak
Ph: 91-22-2576-7747
Email:dbp@it.iitb.ac.in
4. Mr. Bermard Manezes
Ph: 91-22-2576-7906
Email: bermard@it.iitb.ac.in
5. Mr. A Sanyal
Ph: 91-22-2576-7707
Email: as@cse.iitb.ac.in
5.2.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Dobbs Journals
2. Java Developers Journals
3. IEEE COMputer Society
4 Data Quest
5 PC Quest
6 PC Magazine
NATIONAL
1. ACM Transactions on programming languages and systems.
2. Journal of Object-Oriented Programming
3. Journal of Programming Languages
5.2.9 REFERENCES
1. Design Implementation and Evaluation of a Complication Server, H.B.lee, A. Diwan, JEB Moss, Vol: 29, 07,
No: 4. PP:1, ACM Transactions on Programing Language and Systems.
2. Reusable Associations, Moatin Solekup and Jiri Soukup PP.51, Issue. No: 402, Nov: 2007, Dr. Dobbs.
3. Multithreading Java & OSGI, Oliver Goldman, PP: 30, Volno: 31, Issue. No: 388, Sep: 2006, Dr. Dobbs.
4. Multithreaded Asynchoronous I/O & I/O Completion, Ports Tom R.Dial, Issue. No: 400, SeptL 07, PP.53.
5.2.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS
1. Class and Object
2. Multithreading
3. Dynamic Polymorphism
4. Thread Synchronization
5. Collection Classes
6. Serialization
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MCA I Year, II Semester
7. I/O Streams
8. GUI applications
9. Applets
10. Exception Handling
5.2.11 SESSION PLAN
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and sub Modules
Lecturer
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT I
Understanding Object Oriented
Development
Understanding object oriented concepts
L1 T1-Ch.2
R1-Ch.1
T2-Ch.1
Object Oriented
System
Development
Benefits of object oriented development L2 T1-Ch.1
R4-Ch.1
Introduction, Overview of Java L3 T1-Ch.2
R4-Ch.1
Data Types L4,5 T1-Ch.3
R1-Ch.1
Variables and Arrays L6 T1-Ch.3
R1-Ch.6
Operators L7 T1-Ch.4
R1-Ch.6
Control Statements L8,9 T1-Ch.5
R4-Ch.3
Classes Methods L10,12 T1-Ch.6
R1-Ch.2
Inheritance L13,14 T1-Ch.8
R3-Ch.3
1
Java
Programming
Fundamentals
Packages and Interfaces L15,
16,17,
18
T1-Ch.9
R3-Ch.4,
13
UNIT II
Exceptional Handling L19,20,
21
T1-Ch.10
R4-Ch.11
Multithreaded programming L22,23,
24
T1-Ch.11
R4-Ch.12
I/O basics L25,26 T1-Ch.12
R4-Ch.14
Reading console input and output L27 T1-Ch.12
R3-Ch.15
Reading and writing files L28,29 T1-Ch.12
R3-Ch.15
Print writer class T1-Ch.12
R1-Ch.3
2 Multi-threading
String Handling
L30,31
T1-Ch.13
R2-Ch.2
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MCA I Year, II Semester
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and sub Modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT - III
Exploring Java. Lang L32 T1-Ch.14
R4-Ch.2
Collections Overview L33 T1-Ch.15
R3-Ch.16
Collection Interfaces L34 T1-Ch.15
R3-Ch.16
Interators L35 T1-Ch.15
R3-Ch.16
Random Access Interface Maps L36 T1-Ch.15
R3-Ch.16
Comparators Arrays L37 T1-Ch.15
R1-Ch.3
Legacy classes and Interfaces L38 T1-Ch.15
R3-Ch.4
String Tokenizer, Bitset L39 T1-Ch.15
R3-Ch.17
Date, Calendar L40 T1-Ch.16
R3-Ch.19
3 Overview of Java.
Lang
Obserrable, Timer L41, L42 T1-Ch.16
R3-Ch.19
UNIT-IV
Java I/O classes and Interfaces L43,L44 T1.Ch.17
R3-Ch.18.5
Files L45,46 T1.Ch.17
R3-Ch.15
Stream and Byte, classes L47 T1.Ch.17
R1-Ch.12
Character Streams L48 T1.Ch.17
R3-Ch.15
4 Exploring Java. I/O
Classes and
Interfaces
Serialization L49, L50 T1.Ch.17
R3-Ch.15
UNIT-V
Applet Classes L51 T1-Ch.19
R4-Ch.10
Event Handling L52,53 T1-Ch.20
R4-Ch.8
Delegation event model L54 T1-Ch.20
R4-Ch.8
Event Classes L55,56 T1-Ch.20
R4-Ch.7
Event Listener Interfaces L57 T1-Ch.20
R4-Ch.9
Customizing Frame Windows L58 T3-Ch.14
R4-Ch.13
GUI Programming Basics L59 T3-Ch.14
R2-Ch.13
5 GUI and Event
Driven
Programming
Text Related GUI Components L60 T3-Ch.14
R2-Ch.9
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MCA I Year, II Semester
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1
A close look at methods and classes
T2 Objects and Nested Classes
T3
Inheritance, Exception Handling
T4
I
Java Programming
Fundamentals
Packages and Interfaces
T5 Thread Priorities
T6 Thread Synchronization
T7 Deadlock, Creation Multiple threads.
T8
II
Multithread Programming
Inter Thread Communication
T9 Collection Classes
T10 Random Access Interface
T11 Calendar Class
T12
III
Exploring Java. Lang Package
Iterators , Observer Interface
T13 Files
T14 Stream classes
T15 Serialization
T16
IV
I/O classes and Interfaces
Deserialization
T17 Applet class
T18 Event handling
T19 Delegation Event Model
T20
V
GUI and Event driven
Programming
Event Listener Interfaces, GUI programming
basics.
5.2.12 TUTORIAL PLAN
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and sub Modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
Layout Managers L48 T1-Ch.22
R1-Ch.9
Effective use of Nested parels L49 T3-Ch.14
R3-Ch.5
Other GUI components L50 T3-Ch.14
R4-Ch.8
Menus and Handling Mouse Events L51,L52 T3-Ch.14
R4-Ch.9
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MCA I Year, II Semester
5.2.13 QUESTION BANK
UNIT - I
1. i. What is meant by method overloading? What is the difference between method overloading and method
overriding? Explain with example.
ii. What are packages and why are they used for?Describe the various Java API packages. (July 10)
2. i. What is Interface? Write an Example for implementing multiple inheritance? (July 10)
ii. Difference between abstract class and interface . Explain about final with inheritance with example.
3. i Describe about following keywords: (Dec 10)
(i) Final (ii) Static (iii) Super (iv) This
4 i. What is method overriding ?Explain it with good example. (Dec 10)
ii What is an interface? Explain it with example.
5. i. Explian the concept of inheritance and give example on each type. (Dec 10)
6. i. Explain the concepts of package with a good example (Dec 10)
ii. List out benefits of object oriented development
7 i. Explain object oriented concepts.
ii. List out benefits of object oriented development.
iii. Explain the concept of inheritance. (Nov 09)
8. i. Explain in detail about object oriented concepts, supported with simple examples.
ii. Explain the concepts of control statements with examples. (June 09)
9. i. What is type conversion and casting?Explain with examples. (Nov 08)
ii. Write a program in Java to illustrate interface inheritance concept.
10. i. What are abstract classes? Write a Java program to show the implementation of abstract method and
classes. (Nov 08)
ii. Explain the significance of the keyword static.
11. i. Expalin (June 08)
i. Abstraction and encapsulation. ii. ? : operator iii. Dynamic method dispatch
ii. What is a constuctor? Write a java program that implements overloading of constructor?
12. i. What is an Interface? Write a program in java applying interfaces. (June 08)
ii. What is Inheritance?
iii. What is JVM? Explain the steps involved in execution of a Java Program. (June 07)
13. Explain
i. Garbage Collection
ii. Final Variable
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MCA I Year, II Semester
iii. Finalize ( )
iv. Inner Classes (June 07)
14. What is a package? How do you create and execute a package in Java? (June 07)
15.. Explain the type promotion rules in Java with examples. (June 07)
16. What are the features of object oriented system development. Explain the beenfits of object oriented
development.
17. Explain how java is a strongly typed language. What are the datatypes used in java?
18. What is an array? Write a java program on one dimensional arrays and multidimenstional arrays.
19. What are different java operators available and illustrate with an example?
20. Explain java control statements.
21. Explain with an example how java supports recursion.
22. Illustrate with an example how access specifiers and used in java.
23. Illustrate the concept of method overloading in Java with an example.
24. Explain the concept of constructors with an example.
UNIT - II
1. Explain the difference types of exception with examples. (Dec 10)
2. What are different types of I/O streams? Write a program to accept number from keyboard display the
factiroal of that number of result. (Dec 10)
3. i. What is an Exception ?Explain handling of user-defined Exceptions with a good example. (Dec 10)
ii. Write a program to read twonumbers from keyboard and find the big among them.
4. i. What is thread ? Describe different states of thread? Write an example program which creates thread using
Runnable interface. (July 10)
ii. Describe about different Built-in Exception.
6. i. What is an Exception ?Explain the concept of Exception Handling.
ii. Explain the concept of multi threaded programming. (Dec 10)(Nov 09)
7. i. Explain all details about reading and writing files.
ii. Expalin the concept of string handling?
iii. What is multithreading ? Explain different states in which a thread exists? (Dec 10)(June 09)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
8. i. What is a thread? Illustrate with an example the role of multithreading
ii. Explain the usage of try, catch, throw,throws clauses of exception handling.
iii. Discuss different methods of buffered I/O streams of Java (Nov 08)
9. i. Expalin the different types of I/O Streams with example (June 08)
ii. How is Inter Thread communication acheived? Give an example for the same?
10. Expalin (June 08)
i. Java Built in Exceptions.
ii. Native methods.
iii. Special String Operations.
11. i. What is the difference between an error and an exception. Explain different exception types.
ii. Explain how do you create your own exception sub classes (June 07)
12. What is multithreading. Explain different states in which a thread exists. (June 07)
13. Explain is Alive ( ) and Join ( ) methods of a thread with examples (June 07)
14. What is an Exception Differentiate between user defined exception and built in exception.
15. List out different types of exceptions. Wrote a program to handle multiple exceptions.
16. i. Describe Try and catch, finally block.
ii. Difference between throw and throws.
17. i. Explain how synchronization is achieved in multithreaded programming.
ii. Define how many ways thread is created. Explain with an example.
18. Write a program for Interthread communication, using wait ( ), notify ( ), notify All ( )
19. Define two types of streams and list out the classes supported by I/O streams.
20. Write a program to read console input and write console output.
21. What is PrintWriter class? Give with an example. Write a program for reading and writing files.
22. Explain in how many ways a string is handled with an example.
23. Explain how string objects are immutable and how it is different from string buffer. List out the methods for
modifying a string with an example.
UNIT - III
1. i. What is importance of java.util package and explain about (i)maps (ii) arrays
ii. Explain about Hashset class. (Dec 10)
2. i. Explain about legacy classes and interfaces with example. (Dec 10)
ii. Write an exapmle program for storing user-defined classes in collections.Assume mail address list
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MCA I Year, II Semester
3. Explain method in detail with example
i. Date
ii. Calender. (Dec 10)
4. i. Describe about collections API .Explain adout Iterator Interface (Jul 10)
ii. Write an example program TreeMap Class.
5. i. Explain about List and Vector with examples.
ii. What is purpose of Timer and Timer Task classes? (Jul 10)
6. i. Explain the concept of string Tokenizer with an example.
ii. Explain concept of Random Access Interaface. (June 09)
7. i. Explain the usage of clone() and the cloneable interface with an example
ii. Explain map interfaces with suitable examples.
iii. Explain the different types of standard collection classes (Nov 08)
iv. What are type wrappers? Write a Java program that accepts numbers and coverts it into string.
8. i. What is an Observer Interface? Demontrate the implementation with an example?
ii. Explain
i. BitSet. ii. String Tokenizer. iii. Random class
iii. Write about the important methods of an Object class. (June 08)
iv. What is a Comparator?Write a java program using a Comparator to sort accounts by last name.
9. i. Explain the concept of collection Interface.
ii. Explain concept of Random Access Interaface .(Dec 2010) (Nov 09)
10. i. Explain the concept of string Tokenizer with an example.
ii. Explain concept of Random Access Interaface. (June 09)
11. i. Explain the usage of clone() and the cloneable interface with an example
ii. Explain map interfaces with suitable examples.
iii. Explain the different types of standard collection classes (Nov 08)
iv. What are type wrappers? Write a Java program that accepts numbers and coverts it into string.
12. i. What is an Observer Interface? Demontrate the implementation with an example?
ii. Explain
i. BitSet. ii. String Tokenizer. iii. Random class
iii. Write about the important methods of an Object class. (June 08)
iv. What is a Comparator?Write a java program using a Comparator to sort accounts by last name.
13. Write a java program to find sume of list of numbers entered by a user. It must convert the string representation
of each number into an integer using the required string function
14. What is comparable interface?Explain it with the help of a program.
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MCA I Year, II Semester
15. What is a string Tokenizer? With the help of a program explain the methods defined by a string Tokenizer
class
16. Explain
i. Collection interfaces
ii. Legacy interfaces (June 07)
17. Describe
i. Bitset
ii. Observable
iii. Timer
18. Explain different types of collection interfaces, collection classes and give differences betweenArray List
and Linked List.
18. Differenciate between hash set and linked hash set class. Write a program using array list with itrators
interface.
20. Write a program using Date class.
21. Write a program using Calender class.
22. What are legacy classes. Illustrate with an example.
23. Write a program using Linked List - class.
24. List out different types of interator interfaces in detail.
25. What is a Comparator interface?Explain with an example.
26. Write a program using Stringtokenizer.
UNIT - IV
1. i. Write an example program using steam Tokenizer class,for finding no. of words,charesters,lines,ina given
input.
ii. Briefly describe about Reader ,Writer Classes. (Dec 10)
2.. i. What is serialization? Explain about different classes and interfaces which support serialization.
ii. Explain about file class.
(Dec 10)
3. Explain the stream and byte classes with examples. (Dec 10)
4. Explain all details of serialization?Explain all interfaces and classes that support serialization (Dec 10)
5. Explain the concept of character streams. (Jul 10)
6. i. Explain in detail files.
ii. Explain concept of serialization. (Nov 09)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
7. i. Expalin in detail the files concept with good example.
ii. Expalin the concept of serialization. Describe the interfaces and classes that support serialization?
(June 09)
8. i. Briefly explain various byte stream classes
ii. Write a program to copy a file into another file using character stream (Nov 08)
iii. Explain
i. Serializable ii. Externalizable iii. Object Input Stream iv. Object Output Stream
9. i. Explain (June 08)
i. PushBackInputStream ii. PrintStream
ii. What is CharaterStream? Write a java program to demonstrate CharArrayReader? (June 08)
iii. What is Serialization? Write a program in java for object serialization and Deserialization?
10. What is Serialization? Describe the interface and classes that support serialization. (June 07)
11. What is file input stream? Write a Java Program that demonstrates file output stream. (June 07)
12. Write and explain the hierarchy of stream classes. (June 07)
13. Give the list of stream classes supported in Java and explain each of them.
14. Explain file input stream and file output stream with a program
15. What are filtered streams? Explain their functionality.
16. Differentiate between buffered writer and print writer
17. What is a Serialization? Explain how Serialization is achieved in Java with an example.18.
What are filtered streams? Explain their functionality.
18. Differentiate between buffered writer and print writer
19. What is a Serialization? Explain how Serialization is achieved in Java with an example.
20. Differentiate between
i. Serialization and externalizable.
ii. Transient variables and Non-Transient variables.
21. Explain Reader and writer classes. List out the methods defined by reader and writer in character streams.
22. Write a program to demonstrate Byte Array Input stream and Byte Array output stream.
23. Write a program to demonstrate character Array Reader and Character Array writer.
24. Write a program to demonstrate buffered reader and Buffered writer.
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MCA I Year, II Semester
25. Write a program to demonstrate Pushback Reader and Pushback writer.
UNIT - V
1. i. What is adaper class?Give an example for using adapter class (July 10)
ii. Describe about inner classes with an example.
2 . i . W r i t e a b o u t A W T c o n t r o l s .
i i . E x p l a i n a b o u t A p p l e t w i t h a n e x a m p l e . (Dec 10)
3. Explain applet class with its Architecture with an example. (Dec 10)
4. Explain
i. Event listener interface (Dec 10)
ii. Cusomizing frame windows.
5. i. What is an applet? Explain the applet architecture.Give an Emaple for scrolling text. (Dec 10)
6. i. Explain Applet class. and Event Handling. (Dec 10)
ii. Explain Layout Managers and EventListener Interface. (Dec 10) (June 09)
7. i. Briefly explain the life cycle of an applet
ii. Explain the delegation event model. (Dec 10)
iii. Write a Java program to handle mouse events in both child and applet window. (Nov 08)
8. i. Expalin about
i. Adapter classes. ii. Inner classes. iii. Annonymous Inner classes.
ii. Write a program for java Applet which has withdrawal form of a bank?
9. i. What is an Applet? Explain Applet Architecture.
ii. List and explain the applet intialization and termination methods.
iii. What is event based programming? How is it different from traditional programming.
iv Explain the event listener interfaces (June 07)
10. What is an Applet? Explain the lifecycle of an Applet.
11. Write a program to demonstrate a scrolling banner using applet.
12. Define i. Event Handling ii. Delegation Event Model
13. What are the types of event listeners and event classes? Explain in detail.
14. Write a program to demonstrate mouse events, using mouse event class
15. Describe list of event listner interfaces in java.12.
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MCA I Year, II Semester
16. Write a program to demonstrate inner class mechanism
17. What is Anonymons, innerclass?Differentiate Innerclass and Nested class.
18. Explain AWT Classes supported in Java.
19. i. Explain Container, Panel, Window, Frame, and Canvas.
ii. Explain details of text related GUI components. (Nov 09)
20. Explain about Layout Managers? (Dec 10) (June 08)
i. What is layout manager. What are different types of layout managers. Write a program to demonstrate
menu bars, and menu items.
ii. Give an overview of fundamental controls supported by AWT., Write a program to demonstrate labels,
Buttons, checkboxes, checkbox group, choice, lists, scrollbar, text field, text area.
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MCA I Year, II Semester
5. SUBJECT DETAILS
5.3 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
5.3.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.3.2 Scope
5.3.3 Prerequisites
5.3.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.3.5 Suggested Books
5.3.6 Websites
5.3.7 Experts Details
5.3.8 Journals
5.3.9 Findings and Developments
5.3.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.3.11 Session Plan
5.3.12 Tutorial Plans
5.3.13 Question Bank
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MCA I Year, II Semester
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MCA I Year, II Semester
5.3.1 OBJECTIVE AND RELEVANCE
Keeping in view of how managers should be involved with system planning, development and implementation,
the syllabus has been so designed. Students begins to see the relevance of abstract ideas and are therefore
better motivated.
5.3.2 SCOPE
The syllabus is designed in such a way that the students will expose themselves on how information
system resources can be used at all levels of decision making and in the major functional management
areas. They also come to know how IT can be used to support organization strategy without over whelming
students with technical datails.
5.3.3 PRE-REQUISITES
Students must be in a stage to identify information systems needs that create a business advantage, ie,
they must understand how IT can provide better products, enhance existing services and create how
business opertunities.
5.3.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.
UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
This unit introduces the concepts of systems, their characteristics, inter-action with the environment and
the system approach to problem solving. Managers will be in a position to assess how IT can be used to
support business activities and the impacts of IT.
SYLLABUS
An introduction to concepts of System and Organizations. Strategic Uses of Infomation Technology.
Business Process in Engineering and Information Technology.
UNIT - II
OBJECTIVE
This unit mainly focuses on the major areas of decision making commonly found in organizations. Managers
will be in a position to apply what we have learned about information systems and computer system
resources to problems in mangerial decison making, accounting and finance, marketing, production and
human resources.
SYLLABUS
Applications of Operational Information Systems to Business, Tactical and Strategic Information System
to Business.
UNIT - III
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with the information systems planning and analysis. By learning about planning methods
the managers develop a better understanding of how Information Systems can be used to provide feedback
on overall business performance. Managers must also be in a position to analyse current business sys-
tems, recommand necessary changes in buiness process, evaluate alternative hardware and software
options and how to judge the financial and technical feasibility of a project.
SYLLABUS
Information Systems Planning, Approach to System Building, Alternative Application Development.
UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This unit explains the role of knowledge management and knowledge management programs in business.
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MCA I Year, II Semester
it describes different types of decision and the decision making processes. Demonstrates how executive
support systems can help senior managers make better decisions, identify the challenges posed by decison
support systems, group decision support systems and executive support systems.
SYLLABUS
Managing Knowledge, Knowledge Management in the Organization, Enhancing Management Decision
Making, DSS, GDSS, ESS.
UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
This uint explains about how to manage the information systems. Access the business value of security
and control. It evaluate elements of an organizational and managerial frame work for security and control.
It also explains about the management of firm infrastructure and enterprise systems.
SYLLABUS
Management of information Systems, Information System security and control, Ethical issues. Managing
Firm Infrastructure and Enterprise System.
5.3.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS
TEXT BOOKS
T1. Robert Schultheis, Mary Sumner, Management Information Systems-The Managers View, Tata McGraw
Hill, 4
th
Edition, 2006.
T2. Kenneth C Laudon, Jane P Laudon Management Information Systems Prentice Hall 2008.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Ralph Stair, George Reynolds, Principles of Infromation Systems Cengage Learing 2008.
R2. James A, OBrien, Management Information Systems, Tata McGraw Hill, Sixth Edition, 2004.
5.3.6 WEBSITES
1. www.mhhe.com
2. www.bus.ucf.edu
3. www.information builders.com
4. www.dssresources.com
5. www.uky.edu
5.3.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Russell Morton
Dept of Accounting & MIS
Winston-Salem State University
School of Business and Economics
Ph: 336-750-2359
Fax: 336-750-2335
Email: Montonn@wssu.edu
2. Yain Levy Ph.d
Asst Professor
Graduate School of computer and information sciences
Nova Southeastern University
Email: levyy@nova.edu
Ph : 954-262-2006
Fax: 954-262-3915
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MCA I Year, II Semester
3. Nancy J. Abram
Adjunct Lecturer
University of Iowa
Ph: 319-335-0981
Email: nancy_abram@uiowa.edu
4. Donna L. Pearcy
Adjunct Lecturer
University of Iowa
Ph: 319-335-3756
Email: donna_pearcy@uiowa.edu
NATIONAL
1. Mr. S.N. Maheshwari
Professor
IIT Delhi,
Ph: 91-11-26591283
2. Mr. N.S.Narayana Swamy
Asst. Professor
Department of Computer Science & Engineering
IIT Madras,
Ph: 225-74369
3. Prof. Anupam Basu
IIT Kharagpur
Ph: 91-3222-283462
Email: Anupam@cse.iitkgp.ernet.in
REGIONAL
1. Dr. M. Subramanya Sarma
Asst. Professor
Depeartment of Commerce & Business Management University College,
Kakatiya University
Ph: 229-0872-438001
Fax: 0872-438800
2. Dr. Shaik Ahmed Hussain
Asst. Professor
Departmant of Commerce & Business Management University College
Kakatiya University
Ph: 229-0872-438001
Fax: 0872-438800
5.3.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. International Journal of Information Systems and Management
2. Journal of MIS
3. Knowledge and Information Systems
NATIONAL
1. Advanced topics in global information management
2. Indian Journals.com
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MCA I Year, II Semester
3. IBIMA.org/IBIMA.stml.
5.3.9 REFERENCES:
1. Knowledge based Strategies and Information system technologies, Meir Russ, Jeannette K. Jones, Vol.2,
Nos, 1/2, 2006.
2. Escalating commitment to information systems projects, Rajiv Sabherwal, Maung K. Sein, George M,
Marakas, Information & Management, Volume 40, issue 8, (September 2003).
5.3.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS
1. The systems and strategies
2. System analysis and modeling
3. System Design
4. System Management
5.3.11 SESSION PLAN
Sl .
No .
To p i c s i n OU
Sy l l a b u s
Mo d u l e s a n d Su b Mo d u l e s
Le c t u r e
No .
Su g g e s t e d
Bo o k s
Re m a r k s
UNIT - I
Systems concepts, systems and their
environments.
L1 T1-Ch.2
T2-Ch.1
R1-Ch.3, 5
R2-Ch.1
How a system works, using the
systems approach in problem solving
L2 T1-Ch.2
T2-Ch.1
R1-Ch.3, 5
R2-Ch.1
1. An Introduction to
concepts of system
and organizations
Using IS for feedback, making the
transition to the learning organization.
L3 T1-Ch.2
T2-Ch.1
R1-Ch.3, 5
R2-Ch.1
How IT supports business activities,
using IT for competitive advantage
L4 T1-Ch.3
T2-Ch.2
R1-Ch.4
R2-Ch.1
2 Strategic Uses of
IT
Inter organizational systems, the
strategic impact of the Internet &
E-commerce
L5 T1-Ch.3
T2-Ch.2
R1-Ch.4
R2-Ch.1
The impact of IT, the Reengineering
of work
L6 T1-Ch.4
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.1
IT and Business process Redesign L7 T1-Ch.4
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.1
3 Business process
Reengineering and
IT
Continued, IT and organizational
structure
L8 T1-Ch.4
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.1
7
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MCA I Year, II Semester
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and Sub Modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT - II
Managers View L9 T1-Ch.10
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.2
Operational Accounting and Financial
IS
L10 T1-Ch.10
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.2
Operational Marketing IS L11 T1-Ch.10
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.2
Operational Production IS L12 T1-Ch.10
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.2
Operational Human Resource IS L13 T1-Ch.10
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.2
4. Applications to
operational IS to
Business
Continued L14 T1-Ch.10
R1-Ch.2
R2-Ch.2
The Nature of Tactical and
Strategic IS
L15 T1-Ch.11
Tactical Accounting and Financial IS L16 T1-Ch.11
Strategic Accounting and Financial IS L17 T1-Ch.11
Tactical Marketing IS L18 T1-Ch.11
Strategic Marketing IS L19 T1-Ch.11
Tactical Production IS L20 T1-Ch.11
Strategic Production IS L21 T1-Ch.11
Tactical Human Resource IS L22 T1-Ch.11
5. Tactical and Strategic
IS to Business
Strategic Human Resource IS L23 T1-Ch.11
UNIT - III
IS planning Strategies, problems with
determining information requirements
L24 T1-Ch.15
R2-Ch.4
Managing by wire in a complex
Business Environment
L25 T1-Ch.15
R2-Ch.4
Critical Success Factors L26 T1-Ch.15
R2-Ch.4
Business Systems Planning L27 T1-Ch.15
R2-Ch.4
Ends / Means (E/M) Analysis L28 T1-Ch.15
R2-Ch.4
Technology planning in an age of
uncertainty
L29 T1-Ch.15
R2-Ch.4
6 Information System
Planning
Organizing the IS Plan L30 T1-Ch.15
R2-Ch.4
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MCA I Year, II Semester
Sl.
No.
Topics in OU
Syllabus
Modules and Sub Modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
Systems life cycle L31 T1-Ch.14
T2-Ch.12
R1-Ch.4, 7
Prototyping L32 T1-Ch.14
T2-Ch.12
R1-Ch.4, 7
7 Approach to
system building
Rapid Application development (RAD) L33 T1-Ch.14
T2-Ch.12
R1-Ch.4, 7
Strategies to overcome the systems
development projects
L34 T1-Ch.15
R1-Ch.4
Project management and control, a
portfolio approach to project management
L35 T1-Ch.15
R1-Ch.4
Cost Benefit analysis L36 T1-Ch.15
R1-Ch.4
8 Alternative
application
development
approaches
Implementation L37 T2-Ch.14
UNIT - IV
9 Managing
Knowledge
Role of Knowledge Work System L38 T2-Ch.15
3 roles in knowledge management L39 T2-Ch.15
Knowledge work systems L40 T2-Ch.15
10 Knowledge
Management in
Organization
Requirements of knowledge work system L41 T2-Ch.15
DSS L42 T2-Ch.16
T3-Ch.8
R2-Ch.3
GDSS L43 T2-Ch.16
T3-Ch.8
R2-Ch.3
11 Enhancing
Management
Decision
Making
ESS L44 T2-Ch.16
T3-Ch.8
R2-Ch.3
UNIT - V
Security and control Issues in IS L45 T3-Ch.11
R2-Ch.5
Continued L46 T3-Ch.11
R2-Ch.5
Understanding ethical and social issues
related to systems
L47 T2-Ch.5
T3-Ch.11
A model for thinking about ethical, social
and political issues
L48 T2-Ch.5
T3-Ch.11
Key technology trends which raise ethical
issues
L49 T2-Ch.5
T3-Ch.11
12 Management of
IS
Managing firm Infrastructure and
Enterprise System.
L50 T2-Ch.5
T3-Ch.11
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MCA I Year, II Semester
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1
An Introduction to concept of
systems and organization
How a system works
Systems approach in problem solving using
Information System for feedbacks.
T2
Strategic uses of Information
Technology
Strategic impact of the Internet and electronic
commerce.
Inter Organizational systems
Uses of Information Technology
T3
Business process in
Engineering
The reengineering work
T4
I
Business process in
Information Technology
Information Technology and Business process
redesign
Information Technology and organizational
Structure
T5 Nature of operational IS Its Pros and cons
T6
Application of operational IS
to Business
Operational accounting and financial IS
Operational production IS
T7
Nature of tactical and strategic
IS
Its Pros and cons
T8
II
Tactical and strategic IS
Tactical and strategic accounting and financial
IS
Tactical and strategic marketing in IS
T9 Information System planning Its strategies
T10
Problems with determining
Information requirements
CSF,BSP, E/M analysis
T11 Approach to system Building
Strategies to overcome the system
development
T12
III
Alternative application
development
A portfolio approach to project Management
Cost benefit analysis
T13 Managing knowledge Knowledge, system, knowledge management
T14
Knowledge management in
the organization.
Various approaches to design of knowledge
management in an organization
T15
Enhancing Management
decision making
Its pros and cons
T16
IV
DSS, GDSS, ESS
How they enhance group decision making
Benefits and limitations
T17
Management of Information
System
Its pros and cons
T18
Information System security
and control
Its common threats, risks and vulnerability
with reference to IS
T19 Ethical issues
Ethical and psychological issues in the design
of IS
T20
V
Managing firm Infrastructure
and enterprise system
Basic concepts of Enterprise computing
5.3.11 TUTORIAL PLAN
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MCA I Year, II Semester
5.3.12 QUESTION BANK
UNIT I
1 i. Why is feedback useful in controlling the internal workings of a systems?
ii. What is the difference beween balancing feedback and reinforcing feedback? (Dec 10)
2. What is the role of sponcer,steering committee, design teams, champion, implementation team in business
reengineering? (Dec 10)
3. i. Define the following terms:
(i) System Boundaries. (ii) System and Subsystem (iii) System entropy
(iv) System Environment
ii. What are the five compeitive forces that information technologycan address at firm level? (Jul 10)
4. Define business reprocess design.Explain the steps in Bussiness process redesign. (Jul 10)
5. Describe how do we use IT for competitive advantage. Describe with reference to the five competiting
factors :buyers, suppliers, substitute products,rivals and new entrants. (Nov 09)
6 Provide a framework for determining the application of IT that have an impact on individual, functionalunit
and organization. Describe the approaches to improve efficiency,effectiveness and facilitate transformation.
(Nov 09)
7. i. Differentiate open and closed systems.
ii. Explain how information technology is used for competitive advantage. (June 09)
8 .i. Explain about Information Technology and Business process design
ii. Define Re-engineering of work. (June 09)
9. i. Discuss about various strategic uses of IT. (Nov 08)
ii. How can information systems support the companies business operations?
10 i. Discuss the role of IT in business process reengineering with the suitable examples. (Nov 08)
ii. What is the role pf engineering in business process?
11. i. Discus about System and Organisation
ii. How can information systems support the companies business operations? (June 08)
12. i. How can a business process be reengineered with the support of IT? Explain.
ii. Discuss the role of IT in the global business? (May 08)
13. i. Discuss different types of systems
ii. What is a business process? Discuss the five steps in business process redesign (Dec 07)
14. i. Discuss strategic uses pf Information Technology
ii. What are the five competitive forces that can address at the firm level. (Dec 07)
15. i. Explain how information technology applications improve business processes
ii. Write a detailed notes about reengineering work done by organizations
iii. Briefly explain the five steps to redesign business process using information technology. (May 07)
16. i. What is the information that can be used to provide feedback about employee morale and new product
sales? Explain briefly (May 07)
ii. Explain the five competitive forces that information technology can address at the firm level Jan 07)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
17. i. Distinguish between an Open and Closed system.
ii. Write a detailed note on the systems approach to problem solving (Dec 06)
18. i. What are the five competitive forces that information technology can address at the firm level? Describe
each one in detail
ii. Write brief notes on the strategic impact of the internet and electronic commerce
giving the applications of internet and e-commerce (Dec 06)
19. i. List any two differences between an open and closed system
ii. What are the five competitive forces that can address at the firm level (May 06)
20. i. How can a computer manufacturer use information Technology to achieve low-cost leadership?
ii. What is a business process? Discuss the five steps in business process redesign. (May 06)
UNIT II
1. What are the management advantages by automating operational information systems? (Dec 10)
2. Explain tactical HRIS. (Dec 10)
3. Explain operational HRIS. (July 10)
4. Compare the operational and tactical marketing IS, interms of the type of data they process and the types
of output they produce. (July 10)
5. i. Write a brief note on computer aided design and manufacturing system.
ii. Explain about the quality control system used in a manufacturing organization and their effect on improved
performance. (Nov 09)
6. Descibe about the advantages of application information system technology to operational information
system-with reference to cost,speed,accuracy,customer service and data for decision making. (Nov 09)
7. i. Explain operational information system in Marketing and Production functions?
ii Write notes on manufacture resource planning system (June 09)
8. i Explain strategical information system in all the 4 business functions of Finance, Marketing, Production
and human resource. (June 09)
9 i. Discuss the role of tactical and strategic information systems in business. (Nov 08)
ii. Discuss about: (i) computer system and (ii) computer-based information system.
10 i. What are the various components of an information system? Explain.
ii. Compare and contrast between transaction processing systems, process control systems and enterprise.
collaboration systems. (Nov 08/ June 08)
11. i. Write a note on tactical and strategic information systems in business .
ii. Differentiate between computer system and a computer-based information system . (June 08)
12. i. What is Human Resource Information Technology? Discuss its need.
ii. Distinguish between strategic programming and strategic planning. (Dec 07)
13. i. What are the advantages of automating operational information system?
ii. What is financial strategic planning? Explain the process of strategic planning. (Dec 07)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
14. i. What are the different components of an operational financial accounting information system? Explain at
least three of them in detail.
ii. Explain the features of tele marketing system and sales force automation systems. (May 07)
15. i. Strategic accounting and financial information systems include several types information flows. Discuss
grange forecasting systems and financial condition analysis systems among these.
ii. Write detailed notes on strategic marketing information systems. (May 07)
Jan 07)
16. i. Write notes on material requirements planning system, capacity planning system, production scheduling
system and manufacturing resource planning system
ii. Explain how a job analysis and design system contributes to an organization (Dec 06)
17. i. Discuss the need of a human resource information system in a manufacturing Organization.
ii. Explain inventory control system and cost accounting system (Dec 06)
18. i. What are the benefits of automating operational information System (May 06)
ii. In what way can a computerized inventory system provide a competitive advantage to an organization.
19. i. What is Human Resource Information System (HRIS)?. Discuss Its need.
ii. What is Financial Strategic Planning? Explain the process pf strategic planning (May 06)
UNIT - III
1. i. Explain the business system planning with reference to BSP study activities, BSP study team, assesment
of problems& determining priorities.
ii. Write detailed notes on information system planning strategies, (Dec 10)
2. Explain cost -benifit analysis. (Dec 10)
3. Explain the following information planning methods.
i. BDP (Business System Planning)
ii. CSF (Critical Success Factors )
iii. E/M Analysis (Ends/Means) (Jul 10)
4. Explain the terms:
i. Software packages
ii. Prototyping
iii. User-Developed Systems (Jul 10)
5. Write detailed notes on strategic production information systems with reference to site planning and
selection, technology placing and assessment, process position and plant details. (Nov 09)
6. i. Explain business system planning with reference to BSP study activities, BSP study team, assessment
of problems and determing priorities.
ii. Write detailed notes on information system planning strategies. (Nov 09)
7. i. Explain structured analysis and Design
ii. What are the advantages of prototyping approach in system design? (June 09)
8. Explain about alternative approaches for application development. (June 09)
9 i. What is Integrated Information System? Discuss about various types of information systems in detail
ii. What are the key issues in the implementation process of an online data submission for Income Tax
returns? (Nov 08)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
10 Discuss in detail how do you plan for hardware, software and other services for a state level transport
organization ? (Nov 08)
11. i. Write a note on strategic information system planning.
ii. What are the key components in the implementation process of a business change? Explain. (June 08)
12. Discuss in detail how do you plan for hardware,software and other services for a global business organization.
(June 08)
13. i. Discuss the steps of information systems planning.
ii. Discuss the steps of prototyping strategy for application development. (Dec 07)
14. Discuss the steps of system development life cycle method. (Dec 07)
15. i. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of using software packages, doing prototyping and studying
user development.
ii. Explain with a suitable example the use of Gantt chart for project management and control. (May 07)
16. i. Explain what do you understand by cost benefit analysis.
ii. Explain the objectives of the business system planning methodology. (May 07)
Jan 07)
17. i. Define critical success factors.
ii. How are critical success factors used to determine information system opportunities? (Dec 06)
18. Name several risk factors associated with a project development. Explain each one of them in detail.
(Dec 06)
19. i. Define the following terms:
(i) Tangible benefits (ii) Prototyping (iii) Risk
ii. Discuss the four major types of projects proposed by McFarlan. (May 06)
20. What is SDLC? Discuss the various phases in SDLC. (May 06)
UNIT - IV
1. What are the important features of the decision support systems? (Dec 10)
2. Explain Artificial intelligence and expert system? (Dec 10)
3. What are the characteristics of DEcision Making System? (Jul 10)
4. Explain the models for group decision support system? (Jul 10)
5. What are the characteristics of decision making process? List out and explain each of them. (Nov 09)
6. i. Describe the relation between artificial intelligence and export system.
ii. Write detailed notes decision support development lifecycle. (Nov 09)
7. i. Differentiate between DSS and ESS.
ii. Write notes on knowledge management process. (June 09)
8. i. Explain features of Decision support systems.
ii. Explain about GDSS and its features. (June 09)
9. i. Can knowledge be managed? What is the role of knowledge management in a production organization?
ii. What is meant by Decision making? Discuss various decision-making models with suitable examples.
(Nov 08)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
10. What is the role of DSS, GDSS and ESS in a learning Organisation? Explain with suitable examples.
(Nov 08)
11. i. What is knowledge management? Discuss the need and importance of knowledge management in a
business organization.
ii. Discuss the role of knowledge management in enhacing the managerial decision making capability of an
organization. (June 08)
12. What is the role of Dss,GDSS and ESS in a learning organization? Explain with suitable examples.
(June 08)
13. i. Discuss the steps in implementing knowledege management system. (Dec 07)
ii. What is an Expert System? What are its components? Give any two advantages of an Expert System.
14. What is GDSS? How is it different from DSS? Explain how a GDSS can be helpful in making a meeting
effective. (Dec 07)
15. i. What is a knowledge management? Discuss the various approaches to the design of knowledge
management in an organization.
ii. Discuss the various characteristics of decision making system. (May 07)
16. i. Describe the various components of a decision support system.
ii. Describe briefly the various software tools used for decision support system. (May 07)
Jan 07)
17. i. Explain what do you understand by GDSS. How is GDSS different from DSS? Discribe how a GDSS is
helpful to make a meeting effective? (Dec 06)
18. i. Explain the meaning of the terms artificial intelligence, natural language processing and expert system.
ii. Write in detail about the advantages of an expert system, limitations of an expert system and tools used in
expert system. (Dec 06)
19. i. What is GDSS? How is it different from DSS? Explain how a GDSS can be helpful in making a meeting
effective. (May 06)
20. i. What is a Knowledge Management? Discuss the various approaches to design of Knowledge Management
in an Organization. (May 06)
ii. What is an Expert System? What are its components? List any three advantages of an Expert System.
UNIT - V
1. i. Explain about industrial espionage and hacking and the role played by fire walls.
ii. Distinguish between the terms risks, threat and vulnerability as used in computer installation with suitable
examples. (Dec 10)
2. Explain ethical issues and information systems. (Dec 10)
3.. Explain briefly about common threats, NAtural disasters,Employee errors, Computer crime, Fraud and
Abuse,Industrial espionage, Hacking. (Jul 10)
4. i. List four types or categories of Controls
ii. What is a Firewall and how does it protect an organization.. (Jul 10)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
5. i. Explain about industrial expionae and hacking and the role played by firewalls.
ii. Write notes on the aspects of data in an organization and its effect on the organization (Nov 09)
6. i. Distinguish between the terms risks, threat and Vulnerability as used in computer installation with suitable
examples.
ii. Distinguish between centralized data processing and distributed data processing. (Nov 09)
7. i. Differentiate between centralized, decentralized and distributed data processing.
ii. Explain issues in information system security and control. (June 09)
8. i. Explain about risks, and Vulnerabilities?
ii. Write notes on Ethical Issues in information systems. (June 09)
9 i. What are the various components involved in the development of an MIS for a retail business? Discuss
ii. What are the various ethical issues in MIS? (Nov 08)
10. i. What are the issues and problems associated with the Security and control developing and MIS for a
Hospital? Discuss.
ii. Explain the need and methodology in Managing firms infrastructure. (Nov 08)
11. i. What are the various componenets of MIS? Discuss?
ii. Write a note on various ethical issues related to MIS. (June 08)
12. i. What are the issues and problems associated with security and control of systems? Discuss
ii. Explain: (a) Managing firms infrastructure and (b) Enterprise system (June 08)
13. i. Discuss the nature of ethical issues which you bind in business.
ii. Discuss the role of Government and Trade Associations in developing ethical judgement. (Dec 07)
14. Write short note on the following:
i. Ethical leadership
ii. Computer Viruses
iii. Firewalls (Dec 07)
15. i. What is a risk? Explain two examples of potential losses to information systems.
ii. List out and explain five types of data validation controls. (May 07)
16. Write short note on the following:
i. Firewall
ii. Computer Viruses
iii. Hacking
iv. Industrial epionage (May 07)
Jan 07)
17. i. Distinguish between centralized data processing, decentralized data processing and distributed data
processing. (Dec 06)
ii. Describe the difference in job nature of an application programmer and that of a maintenance prorammer
18. i. List out the common threats and controls of an information system facility. Explain briefly.
ii. What is the role of a firewall in the security of computer installations? (Dec 06)
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MCA I Year, II Semester
19. Write short note on the following:
i. Hacking
ii. Industrial Espionage
iii. Firewalls
iv. Computer viruses (May 06)
20. Discuss the various ethical and psychological issues in the design of Information Systems. (May 06)
MCA I Year, II Semester
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5. SUBJECT DETAILS
5.4 DATA STRUCTURES USING C++
5.4.1 Objectives and Relevance
5.4.2 Scope
5.4.3 Prerequisites
5.4.4 Syllabus - O.U.
5.4.5 Suggested Books
5.4.6 Websites
5.4.7 Experts Details
5.4.8 Journals
5.4.9 Findings and Developments
5.4.10 Student Seminar Topics
5.4.11 Session Plan
5.4.12 Tutorial Plan
5.4.13 Question Bank
MCA I Year, II Semester
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MCA I Year, II Semester
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5.4.1 OBJECTIVE AND RELEVANCE
The main objective of this subject is
1. To sharpen programming skills in a problem solving environment.
2. To understand the meaning of stacks, queues, heaps, lists, trees, hash tables and graphs.
3. To understand how various data structures are allocated and used in memory.
4. To understand the major applications of various data structures.
5. To know how to implement various data structures in higher level languages.
6. To understand the costs and benefits of particular choices of data structures and choices between static
and dynamic allocation of data structures.
5.4.2 SCOPE
The study of data structures is an essential part of virtually every under graduate and graduate program in
computer science. It involves mainly organized in increasing degree of complexity. It involves learning
programs to construct both linear and non-linear data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, trees
and graphs.
5.4.3 PRE-REQUISITES
The programming language C++ with its extended features is the most powerful software tool that supports
the design and implementation of data structures. Students at the tertiary level are generally exposed to
both C and C++ before moving on the study of data structures and algorithms. Then it provides a sound
foundation even to construct object-oriented data structures using the powerful class mechanism of C++.
5.4.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.
UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
It describe about concepts of Data Structures i.e., it is the backbone of the study by examining various
methods of representing data such as formula-based, linked, simulated pointer and indirect addressing.
This chapter develops C++ classes to represent the linear list data structure, using each representation
method.
SYLLABUS
Linear Lists: Array based representation.Linked Lists: Properties,Operations,Ordered Linked Lists,Dou-
bly Linked Lists,Circular Linked Lists.
UNIT - II
OBJECTIVE
It contains topics like - Matrices, Stacks and Queues.It describes what is matrix and different types of
matrices,special and sparse matrices.Stacks and Queues are most frequently used data structures. This
unit explains stack and queue ADT and operations, representation and applications.
SYLLABUS
Matrices: Special and Sparse matrices.
Stacks: Operations,array and linked representation of stacks,applications of stacks.
Queues: Operations,array and linked representation of queues,applications of queues.
UNIT - III
OBJECTIVE
The world of data structures also has a wide variety of trees. This unit contains introduction, terminology,
properties and representation of trees and different types of trees such as general trees, Binary Trees,
Binary Search Trees , AVL Trees and B-Trees along with their applications.
MCA I Year, II Semester
102
SYLLABUS
Trees: Definitions and properties.Binary trees: Binary tree traversal(recursive and non recursive). Binary
Search Trees: Operations and Analysis. AVL Trees : Operations on AVL trees . B-Trees, Operations on
B-Trees.
UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
It contains 3 topics such as searching, sorting and Hashing. Searching is the process of locating a data item
in the list using different techniques like linear search and binary search.Sorting is the process to represent
the data in a specific order. It includes different sorting techniques such as Merge, Selection, Heap etc.
Hashing is another randomized scheme that is used to search, insert and delete records. This unit explains
representation of hash tables, different types of techniques etc.
SYLLABUS
Searching Algorithms :Sequential Search and Binary Search. Complexity analysis of searching algorithms.
Hashing:Collision resolution,Open addressing,Quadratic probing,Chaining.Hashing Analysis.Sorting Al-
gorithms:Selection Sort,Quick Sort,Merge Sort,Heap Sort,Shell Sort.Complexity analysis of sorting algorit-
ms.
UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
This unit includes the topic of non-linear data structures such as graphs . About graphs it explains the
terminology, types of graphs, representation and search Methods such as Breadth-first Search and depth
first search. It also includes the applications of graphs.
SYLLABUS
Graphs: Definitions,notations and representations.Operations on Graphs,Graph Traversals,Applications
of Graphs:Shortest path and Minimal Spanning Tree algorithms.
5.4.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++ Second Edition University Press, 2005.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik Data Structures using C++, Thomson Learning, 2003.
R2. Cormen Leiserson & Rivest, Introduction to Algorithms, Prentice Hall India, 1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
R4. Fundamentals of Data Structures in C++, Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Sahni, Dinesh Mehta
R5. Class Data Structures, D. Samanta.
5.4.6 WEBSITES
1. www.datastructures.net
2. http://ds4begineers.wordpress.com
3. http://www.brpreiss.com
4. http:// www.c4swimmers.net
5. http:// www.informit.com
6. http:// www.cs.pdx.edu
7. http:// www.cise.ufl.edu
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5.4.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Norbert Zen
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Email: nzeh@cs.dal.ca
Ph: 902-494-3154, Off: 314
http:// www.cs.dal.ca/cspeople
2. Dr Allan G. Jost
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Email: jost@cs.dal.ca
Ph: 902-494-2509
NATIONAL
1. Amitabha Bagchi
Professor in IIT Delhi.
Email: bagchi@cse.iitd.ac.in
Ph: 9111-2659-6397
2. Sanjeev Saxena
Professor in IIT Kanpur
Email: ssax@ieee.org, ssax@computer.org
Ph: 91-(512)-259-7611
REGIONAL
1. Dr. M. Shashi; Ph.D.
Professor in Andhra University
Email: smogalla2000@yahoo.com
Ph: (Office) 0891-2844863, 0891-2551203 (R)
2. Sri. K. Venkata Rao
Professor in Andhra University
Email: professor_venkat@yahoo.com
webmasterau@yahoo.com
Ph: 9985504584, Office: 0891-2844099, 0891-2844864.
3. B. Prajna
Asst Professor in Andhra University
Email: prajna_btech@yahoo.com
Ph: 0891-2577030 (R).
5.4.8 JOURNALS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Dobbis Journal
2. Programming Languages ACM Trans on
3. Journals on object-oriented programming.
MCA I Year, II Semester
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NATIONAL
1. Journal of object-oriented programming
2. C++ Journal
3. Data Structures for C++
5.4.9 REFERENCES
1. Alias types for recursive Data Structures (Extended version)
2. Developments in spatial data handling by Pater F Fisher.
5.4.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS
1. Priority Queues and operations
2. Double ended Queues and operations
3. Linked Lists and Circular linked lists
4. Various types of trees and how to represent a tree in memory.
5. Graph Search methods
6. Its Data Structures are reliable for space and time complexing
5.4.11 SESSION PLAN
Sl .
No .
To p i c s i n O.U
Sy l l a b u s
Mo d u l e s a n d Su b mo d u l e s
Le c t u r e
No .
Su g g e s t e d
Bo o ks
Re ma r
k s
UNIT I
Introduction L1 T1-Ch.3.1
Linear lists L2 T1-Ch.3.2
Formula-based representation and
program
L3 T1-Ch.3.3
Linked list and types
Single linked list & program
Double linked list & program
Circular linked list & program
L4, 5 T1-Ch.3.4
R1-Ch.5
Indirect Addressing
Program for Indirect Addressing
L6 T1-Ch.3.5
Simulating Pointers & program L7 T1-Ch.3.6
Applications & linked list L8 T1-Ch.3.7
Bin Sort Program & Radix Sort
Program
L9 T1-Ch.3.7
1 Data Representation
Convex Hull L10 T1-Ch.3.8.4
MCA I Year, II Semester
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Sl.
No.
Topics in O.U
Syllabus
Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT II
The Array ADT & Operations L11 T1-Ch.4.1
Programs on Arrays L12 T1-Ch.4.1
Matrices & Operations L13 T1 -Ch.4.2
Special Matrices & types
Programs on Special Matrix
L14 R1 -Ch. 4.3
2 Arrays
Sparse Matrix & Operations L15 T1-Ch. 4.4
Stack ADT & operations T1-Ch.5.1
R1-Ch.7
Stack using formula-based
Representation
L16
T1-Ch.5.3
Stack using linked representation L17 T1-Ch.5.4
Applications of Stacks L18 T1-Ch.5.5
3 Stacks
Programs for Applications and
Stacks
L19 T1-Ch.5.4
Queue ADT and Operations T1-Ch.6.1
R1-Ch.8
Queue using formula-based
representation
L20
T1-Ch.6.2
Queue using linked representation L21 T1-Ch.6.3
Circular Queue using formula
based representation and program
L22 T1-Ch.6.3
Circular Queue using linked
representation and program
L23 T1-Ch.6.3
4 Queues
Applications of Queues L24 T1-Ch.6.4
UNIT III
Definitions and properties of trees L25 T1-Ch.8.1
Binary Trees and representation L26 T1-Ch.8.2
Operations on binary tree and
representation
L27 T1-Ch.8.4
Binary tree traversal T1-Ch.8.5
T1-Ch.8.6
Binary Search Tree L28 T1-Ch.11.1
R1-Ch.11
Conversion of General Trees to
Binary Trees
L29 R4-Ch.5.7
Conversion pre-order to post-order L30 R4-Ch.5.7
AVL Trees L31 T1-Ch.11.2
Operations on AVL Trees L32 T1-Ch.11.2
5 Trees
Programs for Trees L33 T1-Ch.11.2
B-Trees of order m L34 T1-Ch.11.4.3
R2-Ch.18
Operations on B-Trees L35 T-1Ch.11.4.3
R2-Ch.18
6 B-Trees
Applications of B-Trees L36 T1-Ch.11.5
MCA I Year, II Semester
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Sl.
No.
Topics in O.U
Syllabus
Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT IV
Merge sort and program L37 T1-Ch.10
Selection sort and program L38 T1-Ch.10
Heap sort & exercise on Heap sort L39 R1-Ch.10
Program on Heap sort L40 R2-Ch.6
Complexity Analysis L41 R2-Ch.6
Sequential Search & Program
6 Sorting
Binary Search & Program
L42 R1-Ch.9
R1-Ch.9
Hash Table Representation L43
Types of Hashings L44
T1-Ch.7.4
R1-Ch.9
R2-Ch.11
7 Hashing
Collision Resolution Techniques
for Hash tables
L45, L46 R1-Ch.9
UNIT V
Definitions & properties of graphs L47 T1-Ch.12.1
R1-Ch.12
Representation of Graphs L48 T1-Ch.12.5
Graph search methods
Breadth first search
Depth first search
L49 T1-Ch.12.10
Applications of Graphs L50 T1-Ch.12.11
T1-Ch.12.2
Spanning Tree L51 T1-Ch.12.11.3
8 Graphs
Algorithms for Spanning tree L52 T1-Ch.13.3.6
R2-Ch.23
MCA I Year, II Semester
107
Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1 Linear list Insertion, Deletion, Display functions.
T2 Linked list, Arrays Difference, advantages, disadvantages
T3 Linked List, Circular LL Difference, various functions.
T4
I
Indirect Addressing Insertion, Deletion, Display functions.
T5 Stacks Various functions
T6 Queues Insertion, Deletion, Display functions.
T7 Stacks, Queues Applications, Differences.
T8
II
Matrices Different types of matrices.
T9 Definitions Tree, Binary Tree, Complete, full Binary Tree
T10 B Tree Insertion, Deletion, Display functions.
T11 AVL Tress All types of rotations.
T12
III
Traversal Techniques Preorder, In order, post order, level order.
T13 Hashing Different Types
T14 Quick Sort Programming
T15 Merge Sort Programming
T16
IV
Selection Sort Programming
T17 Graphs Definition, different types of graphs
T18 BFS Algorithm
T19 DFS Algorithm
T20
V
Representation Representation of graphs in memory
5.4.12 TUTORIAL PLAN
MCA I Year, II Semester
108
5.4.13 QUESTION BANK
UNIT - I
1. i. Write a c++ program to implement all operations on a Linear List with Array Representation. (Dec 10)
ii. Discuss how to represent polynomials using Linked Lists.
2. i. Define the class Linked List with the following member function definations. (Dec 10)
i. insert an element at kth position.
ii. delete an element present at kth position.
iii.to find the length of the Linked List.
ii. Explain briefley about Double Linked Lists.
3. i. Write a routine to perform each of the operationsgiven below for double linked circular lists. (Dec 10)
a. Append an element to the end of a list
b. Concatenate two lists.
c.Reverse a list, so that the last element becomes the first,and so on....
ii. What are the applications of linked lists.
4. i. What is LinearList?What is the difference between linearlist and arrays? (Dec 10)
What are the strengths and weaknesses of linear lists?
ii. Write an ADT for Linear List?
5. i. Implement a doubly linked list with the following member functions:
(a) add a node to the front. (b) delete a node from front. (c) display the contents of a list. (Nov 09)
ii. Differentiate between formula-based. linked -representation using example.
6. Let C be of type chain
i. Write a function split to create two chains A and B. A contains all elements in odd positions of C, and B co-
ntains the remaining elements. Your function should not change list C. (Nov 09)
ii. What is complexity of your function?
7. i. Write a C++ program to implement linear list with various operations by using indirect addressing method
of representation. (June 09)
ii. Compare the merits and demerits in different methods of representation of linear list.
8. i. Write a C++ program to implement linear list with various operations by using formula based representa-
tion. (June 09)
ii. Explain about Bin sort application.
9. i. Write a C++ program to implement linear list with various operations by using simulating pointers
representation (Nov 08)
ii. Compare the merits and demerits in different methods of representation of linear list.
10. i. Write a C++ program to implement Bin sort application of linear list. (Nov 08)
ii. Explain about indirect addressing representation of linear list.
11. i. Difference between formla-based linked representations using circular list.
ii Implement a singly linked list with the following member function : (June 08)
(i) Add a node in the front (ii) Delete a node in the front (iii) Display entire list
12. i. Let L = (a,b,c,d,e) be a linear list that is represented as a chain. Draw figures showing the chain following
each operation in the operation sequence: (June 08)
initial state, insert (0, f), insert (3, g), insert (7, h), erase(0), erase(4)
MCA I Year, II Semester
109
13. i. Implement a singly linked list with the following member function : (June 07)
(i) Add a node in the front (ii) Delete a node in the front
(iii) Display the contents of singly linked list
ii. What is circular doubly linked list? Explain
14. Let L = (a,b,c,d,e) be a linear list that is represented as a chain. Draw figures showing the chain following
each operation in the operation sequence: (June 07)
initial state
insert (0, f)
insert (3, g)
insert (7, h)
erase(0)
erase(4)
1 5 . D i s c u s s t h e d i f f e r e n c e m e t h o d s f o r r e p r e s e n t i n g a L i n e a r L i s t . C o m p a r e t h e i r m e r i t s a n d d e m e r i t s .
(Nov/Dec 06)
16. Write a C++ program to create, insert into or delete from a Linear List. (Assume indirect addressing method
of representation) (Nov/Dec 06)
17. i. Write a class definition for doubly linked list.
ii. Write procedures for inserting an element in a singly linked linear list. (May 06)
18. i. Explain how pointers can be simulated
ii. Distinguish between singly linked list and doubly linked list. (May 06)
UNIT - II
1. i. Write a program to implement all operations on a stack using Lined Representation. (Dec 10)
ii. Discuss about Special Matrices.
2. i. Write a program to implement Sparse Matrix Addition (Dec 10)
ii. Discuss about Dequeues and priority queues.
3. i. Write an algorithm for converting infix expressinon to postfix expression . (Dec 10)
ii. Write an algorithm to implement threee stacks using only one array.Your algorithm should not declare an
overflow unless every slot in the array is used.
4. i. Write an algorithm to implement stacks using. (Dec 10)
i.Linked lists ii.Arrays.
ii. Write an algorithm for evaluating postfix expression?Explain with exmple?.
5. i. Develop the row-major mapping function for a K-dimensional array.
ii. Extend the stack ADT by adding functions to: (Nov 09)
(i)Determine size of stack. (ii).Input stack (iii).Output stack. Extend the class definition of formula-b-
ased stack to include these functions.
6. i. Develop C++ class for queues. (Nov 09)
ii. Give applications of queues.
7. i. Write a C++ program to implement stack with various operations using linked representation. (June 09)
ii. Write a C++ code to implement Tridiagonal matrix with operations create,store and retrieve by using one
dimensional array.
MCA I Year, II Semester
110
8. i. Write a C++ code to implement parenthesis matching application of stack. (June 09)
ii. Explain indetail Railroad car rearrangement application of Queue.
9. i. Write a C++ program to implement queue with various operations using linked representation.
ii. What is a sparse matrix? Explain advantages and applications of sparse matrix. (Nov 08)
10. i. Explain about multiple stacks in one dimensional array with various operations.
ii. Develop the row-major mapping function for a K-dimensional array. (Nov 08)
11. i. Extend the stack ADT by adding functions to split a stack in two. The first contains the bottom half
elements, and the second the remaining elements.
ii. Develop the row-major mapping functio for a k-dimensional array. (June 08)
12. i In a queue applications the elements to be put on a queue are already in nodes of type chain node. For
this application it is required to name the methods push node; which adds the node at the back of the
queue. write code for this method.
ii Give applications of queues (June 08)
13. i. Develop the column-major mapping functio for a k-dimensional array.
ii. Extend the stack ADT by adding functions to split a stack in two. The first contains the bottom half
elements, and the second the remaining elements. (June 07)
14. i. Support that a 500 x 500 matrix that has 2000 non-zero terms is to be represented. How much space is needed
when a 500 x 500 two-dimensional array of type int is used? How much space is needed when sparse matrix
is used.
ii. In some queue applications the elements to be put on a queue are already in nodes of type chain Nodde.
For these applications it is desirable to name the methods push Node (chain Node the Node), which adds
the Node at the back of the queue. Write code for this method. (June 07)
15. Write a C++Program using linked representation to implement various operations on Sack. (Nov/Dec 06)
16. i. What is a Sparse Matrix? Discuss its advantages? Give any two applications.
ii. Explain the operations of a dequeue with Pseudo Code. (Nov/Dec 06)
17. i. Implement the operations on stacks using singly linked lists.
ii. Write a C++ procedure to delete elements from a deque. (May 06)
18. i. What are the different methods to represent sparse matrices?
ii. Write an algorithm for finding the transpose of a sparse matrix. (May 06)
UNIT - III
1. i. Explain about the properties of Binary Tree. (Dec 10)
ii. The inorder and the preorder Traversal of a binary Tree are respectively.
8,2,16,9,20,10,15,4,13,35,60 and 15,20.
8,16,2,9,10,35,4,13,60.
Construct Binary tree.
2. i. Discuss in detail about the deletion operation on an AVL search Tree.Cosider all cases.
ii. explain about B-Trees. (Dec 10)
MCA I Year, II Semester
111
3. i. Write C++ functions for binary tree traversal techniques and explain each one of them.Afull node is node
with two children.Prove that the number of full nodes plus one is equal to the no.of leaves in a non-empty
binary tree.
ii. Write a C++ function for find out height of a Binary tree. Show that the maximum number of nodes in a
binary tree of height H is 2pow h+1-1. (Dec 10)
4. Write an algorithm that takes only a pointer to the roof of a binary tree T and computes the number of nodes
in T? (Dec 10)
5. i. Draw the binary expression to each of following :
(i) (a+b)/(c-d*e)+e+g*h/a (ii) -x-y*z+(a+b+c/d*e) (Nov 09)
ii. Start empty binary search tree insert keys 20,30,5,4,10,5,6,4,8,1. Draw the tree after each insert.
6. i. What is AVL tree?What is an indexed AVL search tree?
ii. Write steps for AVL search tree insertion. (Nov 09)
7. i. Write C++ functions for binary tree traversal techniques and explain each one of them.
ii. Write a C++ function for find out height of a Binary tree. (June 09)
8. Define AVL search tree and write an algorithm to insert an element into the AVL search tree. (June 09)
9. Write a C++ functions for:
(a) Insert a node (b) Delete a node (c) Search a node in a binary search tree. (Nov 08)
10. i. What is an AVL tree? Given the following inputs sequence (Nov 08)
INPUT:21,26,30,9,4,14,28,18,15,10,2,3,7
Construct the corresponding AVL tree by inserting each number one by one and show the
required rotation after the insertion of an element , if the tree becomes imbalanced.
ii. Write a C++ functions for LL-rotation and RR-rotation in an imbalanced tree.
11. i. Draw two binary trees whose preorder is abcdefgh and whose postorder is dcbgfhea. List in inorder also.
ii. Wapplications of binary tree? (June 08)
12. i. What is an AVL tree? What is an indexed AVL search tree?
ii Draw the binary expression trees to each of the fallowing.
a) (a+b) / (c-d*e)+e+g*h/a b)-x-y*z+(a+b+c/d*e). (June 08)
13. i. Start with an empty binary search tree, insert the keys 10, 5, 20, 14, 30, 8, 6, 35, 25, 3, 12, 17 in this order. Draw
the tree following each insert.
ii. What is an AVL tree? What is an indexed AVL search tree? (June 07)
14. i. Start with an empty binary search tree, insert the keys 10, 5, 20, 14, 30, 8, 6, 35, 25, 3, 12, 17 in this order.
Draw the tree following each insert.
ii. What is an AVL tree? What is an indexed AVL search tree? (June 07)
15. i. Write a C++ Code to (i) Insert a node and (ii) delete a node from a Binary Search Tree.
ii. Differentiate between Complete binary tree and Full binary tree. Give examples. (Nov/Dec 06)
16. i. Write a C++ code for performing the tree Binary Tree traversals.
ii. Define AVL tree. Explain its properties. (Nov/Dec 06)
MCA I Year, II Semester
112
17. i. Define an AVL tree and give an example for an AVL tree.
ii. Write a procedure in C++ to implement the delete operations on an AVL tree. (May 06)
18. i. Write a non-recursive algorithm for traversing a binary tree using post order.
ii. Constract the binary tree whose preorder sequence is A B C D E F G H I and with the inorder sequence is
B C A E D E H F I . (May 06)
UNIT - IV
1. i. Discuss the merge sort Technique and write the function for performing Merge sort (Dec 10)
ii. Discuss the complexity Analysis of searching algorithms.
2. i. Explain Hashing with collision Resolution And Chainning (Dec 10)
ii. Discuss the Heap sort and perform Heap sort Techinque on the following elements
10,2,12,85,99,75,9,14,10
3. Write an algorithm for implementing Quick sort?and show how it processes the input (Dec 10)
85.500.300,250,186,225,175
4. What is the difference between insertion sort and selection sort.Explain with examples?what are the time
complexities of both the selection sort and insertion sort? (Dec 10)
5. i. Write an C++ program for heap sort. (Nov 09)
ii. What is linear probing?What is a uniform hash function.
6. i. Explain heap sort with example. (Nov 09)
ii. Comment on the difficulty of providing sequential access when a linear-open addressed hash table is used.
7. What is heap? Write a C++ program for heap sort and explain with an example. (June 09)
8. Write a C++ functions for sequential search and Binary search. Example them with an example. (June 09)
9. Write a C++ program by using recursive function for merge sort and Explain he program with an example.
(Nov 08)
10. What is a uniform hash function? Explain the following:
i. Hashing with linear open addressing
ii. Hashing wih chains. (Nov 08)
11. i. Write C++ program for selection soft.
ii. What is Linear Probing? What is a uniform hash function? (June 08)
12. i. Explain real soft with example?
ii. Differentiate between binary search and linear seach? (June 08)
13. i. Give a recursive C++ program for Merge sort and explain.
ii. What is Linear Probing? What is a uniform hash function? (June 07)(June 07)
14. i. Explain the heap sort technique with an example.
ii. With an example explain under what conditions would you use a sequential search and when would a
binary search be more useful? (June 07)
MCA I Year, II Semester
113
15. Write a C++ Program for selection sort and trace the process for the given numbers
5, 10, 9, 6, 8, 4 (Nov/Dec 06)
16. i. Differentiate between Sequential Search and Binary Search.
ii. What is Hashing? Explain the different Collision Resolution Trchniques. (Nov/Dec 06)
17. i. Write a program in C++ for selection sort and illustrate with an example.
ii. Describe various types of hashing techniques. (May 06)
18. i. What are the differences between internal and external sorting.
ii. Write a C++ program for quick sort. (May 06)
UNIT - V
1. i. Discuss about Graphs and their represantations,with examples. (Dec 10)
ii. What is the difference between BFS &DFS?And write algorithms for BFS and DFS.
2. i. Give an example where DIjkstras algorithm gives the wrong answer in the presence of a negative edge but
no negative cost cycle. (Dec 10)
ii. Write an algorithm for prims algorithm?And what is the difference between Prims and Kruskals algorithm..
3. i. Explain about variuos Graph Representations with examples. (Dec 10)
ii. Explain Applications of Graphs.
4. Write a program to find the Minimal Spanning Tree. (Dec 10)
5. i. Give pseudo code for depth-first search and explain with example. (Nov 09)
ii. Explain B-trees insertion and deletion with examples.
6. i. Draw sample diagram for following and explain it : (Nov 09)
(i) Worst case for BFS (ii) Best case for DFS (iii) Worst case for DFS (iv) Best case for BFS
ii. Write brief note on B-trees.
7. i. Define graph and explain the following representation schemes of graphs.
(i) Adjacency Matrix (ii) Packed-Adjacency Lists (iii) Linked-Adjacency Lists. (June 09)
ii. Write an algorithm for Breadth-First search and explain with an example.
8. Define B-tree and write an algorithm for insert a node into a B-tree. (June 09)
9. i. Define graph and explain the following representation schemes of graphs
(i) Adjacency matrix (ii) Packed-Adjacency Lists (iii) Linked-Adjacency Lists. (Nov 08)
ii. Write an algorithm for Depth-first search and Explain with an example.
10. Define B-tree and write an algorithm for delete a node from B-tree. (Nov 08)
11. i. Give a Pseudo Code for Breadth-First search and explain with an example.
ii. Explain B-trees-insertion and deletion. (June 08)
12. i Write short note on B-Trees.
ii Write different representations of graphs? (June 08)
MCA I Year, II Semester
114
13. i. With a sample diagram, explain:
Worst case for DFS,
Best case for BFS,
Worst case for BFS,
Best case for DFS.
ii. Write short notes on B-tree (June 07)
14. i. Give a Pseudo Code for Breadth-First search and explain with an example.
ii. Using examples explain these operations on B-trees-insertion and deletion. (June 07)
15. i. Define B-Tree and give an example of order 4.
ii. Explain how to insert a node into a B-tree.
iii. Give any application of a Graph. (Nov/Dec 06)
16. i. Write C++ Code for various operations on B-tree.
ii. What is meant by Depth-First Search? (Nov/Dec 06)
17. i. Explain the terms Adjacency list and Adjacency matrix of a Graph and give an example for each.
ii. Write a procedure to traverse a graph using breadth first search. (May 06)
18. i. Describe the Warshals algorithm for finding the transitive closure of a digraph.
ii. Explain the Kruskals algorithm for finding the minimum spanning tree of a graph. (May 06)
115




SUBJECT DETAILS


5. 5 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION

5. 5. 1 Obj ecti ves and Relevance

5. 5. 2 Scope

5. 5. 3 Prerequi si tes

5. 5. 4 Syll abus - O. U.

5. 5. 5 Suggested Books

5. 5. 6 Websi tes

5. 5. 7 Experts Detai ls

5. 5. 8 Journal s

5. 5. 9 Fi ndi ngs and Developments

5. 5. 10 St udent Semi nar Topics

5. 5. 11 Session Plan

5. 5. 12 Tutorial Plan

5. 5. 13 Question Bank






















116




























































117

5.5.1 OBJECTIVE AND RELEVANCE
The Basic Architecture of computers provide the relevant knowledge of the representation of
data, the execution of Instructions, the storage technique and more. It enables the students to
have all necessary knowledge about organization of computer.

5.5.2 SCOPE
The syllabus is designed in such a way that it supports the students to take up advanced
courses on Hardware, Assembly language & Micro Processors.

5.5.3 PRE-REQUISITES
Some basic knowledge about functions of OS, basic knowledge about memory organization
and number systems.

5.5.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.

UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
To know the logical circuits of computers, basic components of computers. Data
Representation such as Binary codes.

SYLLABUS
Digital Logic Circuits: Digital Computers, Logic Gates, Boolean Algebra, Map
Simplification, Combinational Circuits, Flip Flops, Sequential Circuits.
Digital Components: Integrated Circuits, Decoder, Multiplexers, Registers, Shift Registers,
Binary counter, Memory unit.
Data Representation: Data Types, Complements, Fixed and Floating Point Representation,
Other binary codes and errors Detection codes.

UNIT - I I
OBJECTIVE
To have the knowledge of micro operations of micro processors. Arthimetic Logical Micro
Operations, Basic Registers, timing and control of computers.

SYLLABUS
Register Transfer and Micro operations: Register Transfer language, Register transfer, Bus
and Memory Transfer, Arithmetic Micro operations, Logic Micro operations, Shift Micro
operations and Arithmetic logic shift unit.
Basic Computer Organization and Design: Instruction codes, Computer Registers,
Computer Instructions, Timing and Control, Instruction Cycles, Memory Reference
Instructions.,Input, Output and Interrupts, Design of Accumulator logic.

UNIT - I I I
OBJECTIVE
To get the details of Machine Language, Assembly Language Programming, the operations of
Assembler, the control unit & Micro program concepts.

SYLLABUS
Programming the Basic Computer: Introduction, Machine Language, Assembly Language,
The Assembler, Programming Arithmetic and Logic Operations, Subroutines, and input-
output,Programming.
Micro programmed Control: Control Memory, Address Sequencing, Micro program
Example, Design of Control Unit.


UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
To ensure the students getting the knowledge of CPU, the different types of instructions,
Addressing modes, Parallel Processing, the Instruction sets and the Arithmetic logics.

118

SYLLABUS
Central Processing Unit: Introduction, General Register Organization, Stack Organization,
Instruction Formats, Addressing Modes, Data Transfer and Manipulation, Program Control,
RISC.
Parallel Processing: Pipelining, Arithmetic Pipeline, Instruction Pipeline, RISC Pipeline.
Computer Arithmetic: Addition and Subtraction, Multiplication algorithms, Division
Algorithms, Floating point arithmetic operations, decimal arithmetic unit, and decimal
arithmetic operations.

UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
To know about the I/O devices, how data is transferred between memory and I/O devices and
how the memory is organized. How data is getting stored in memory efficiently.

SYLLABUS
Input Output Organization: Peripheral Devices, I/O output Interface, Asynchronous data
transfer, Modes of transfer, Priority Interrupt, DMA, Input output Processor, Serial
Communication.
Memory Organization: Memory Hierarchy, Main Memory, Cache Memory.

5.5.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS

T1. M. Morris Mano, Computer System Architecture, Pearson Asia, Third edition, 1993.

REFERENCE BOOKS

R1. Miles Murdocca, Vincent Heuring, Computer Architecture and Organization, John Wiely &
Sons 2007.

R2. Sivarama P Dandamudi Fundamentals of Computer Organization and Design, Wiley Dream
Tech Publishers, 2003.

R3. William Stallings, Computer Organization & Architecture, Pearson Education,Sixth
Edition,2003.

R4. G. V. Anjaneyulu Computer Organization.

5.5.6 WEBSITES
1. www.acm.org.dl
2. www.cs.wise.edu
3. www.umiacs.umd.edu
4. www.ieee.org
5. www.williamstallings.com
6. www.ittg.ernet.in
7. www.iitkgp.ernet.in
8. www.iitd.ernet.in
9. www.iitb.ernet.in
10. www.iitm.ernet.in
11 www.iitr.ernet.in
12. www.iitk.ac.im
5.5.7 EXPERTS DETAILS

INTERNATIONAL

1. Dr. William Stallings
Email: ws@shore.net


119

2. Prof.James E. Smith
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Wisconisn - Madison
Email: jes@ece.wise.edu

NATIONAL

1. Mr. Ravi Nair
Department of Electrical & Electronics,IEEE
Email: nair@us.ibm.com

2. Prof. Shirharesh Majumdar
Department of Computer system Engineering
Carleton University
Olcawa Canada
Email: majumdar@sce.carleton.ca

REGIONAL

1. Prof. Govindarajulu
IIT, Hyderabad
Email: govindarajulu@iiit.ac.in / govindarajulu@iiit.net

2. Prof. G. V. Anjaneyulu
Head CSE Department
CBIT, Hyderabad
CBIT, Gandipet Hyderabad.

5.5.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL

1. IEEE transaction on Computer.
2. IEEE transaction on parallel and distributed computing.
3. IEEE transaction on Electron Devices.
4. IEEE Computers, Innovative Technical for Computers.

NATIONAL

1. IEEE The Journal of institution of Engineeres.
2. IEEE 754.
3. The Journal of Institution - Level Parallelism.
4. IEEE Computer Society Task Force on Cluster Computing.


5.5.9 REFERENCES

1. The Architecture of Computers James E. Smith, Ravi Nair, , May 2005, IEEE Magazine on
Virtual Machine.
2. Nanoscale Design & Test Challenges, Yerwant Zorian, Feb 2005, Volume 38, number 2,
IEEE Magazine of
Computers
3. Emerging Grid Standards Mark Baker, Amy Apow, Clayton Ferner and Jeff Brown, April
2005, Volume
38,Number 4, IEEE Magazine of Computers
4. Low Cost Tast Scheduling for Distributed - Memory Machines A.Radulescu and A.J.C. van
Gemund,
June 2002, Volume 13, Number 6. IEEE trans of parallel an distributed systems.
120
5. OCR in Indian Scripts: Survey Peeta Basa Pati and A.G.. Ramakrishnan, May - June 2005,
Vol.22, No.3, IETE Technical A Review.
6. A Survey on Fast Packetswitching Techniques, A. Shanmugam and G. Shanthi, March - April
2005, Vol.22,
No.2, IETE Technical Review.
7. Stable States and Sufficient Conditions for Correct Retrieval in the Bidirectional Associative
Memory,
V.Ravi Chandran Narayan Srinivasan, Jan - feb 2003, IETE Journal of Research.
8. Computer Aided Simulation Tools for the Analysis of Semiconductor Lasers, D. Nyaneshwar,
S.Patil and
D.K.Gautam, Nov - Dec, 2003, Vol.20, No.6, IETE Technical Review.


5.5.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Boolean Algebra
2. Combinational Circuit
3. Sequential Circuit
4. Multiplexers, Registers
5. Complements
6. Assembler
7. Instruction Formats
8. Addressing modes
9. DMA
10. Virtual Memory

5.5.11 SESSION PLAN



S. No.
Topics in O.U.
Syllabus
Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
UNIT -I
Digital Computer, Logical Gates L1 T1-Ch.1.1
T1-Ch.1.2
Boolean Algebra
Map Simplification
L2, L3
T1-Ch.1.3
T1-Ch.1.4
Combinational Circuits L4, L5
T1-Ch.1.5
Flip-flops L6 T1-Ch.1.6
Digital Logic
Circuits
Sequential circuits L7, L8 T1-Ch.1.7
Integrated circuits, Decoder L9
T1-Ch.2.1
T1-Ch.2.2
Multiplexers, Registers, Shift
Registers
L10,L11 T1-Ch.2.3
T1-Ch.2.4
T1-Ch.2.5
1
Digital
Components
Binary counter, Memory unit L12 T1-Ch.2.6
T1-Ch.2.7



S. No.
Topics in O.U.
Syllabus
Modules and Sub modules
Lecture
No.
Suggested
Books
Remarks
Data Types L13 T1-Ch.3.1
Complements, Fixed Point
representation
L14, L15
T1-Ch.3.2
Floating Point Representation L16
Data
Representation
Errors Detection codes L17
T1-Ch.3.3
T1-Ch.3.4
T1-Ch.3.5
T1-Ch.3.6

121
UNIT II
Register Transfer language L18 T1-Ch.4.1
T1-Ch.4.2
Register transfer. Bus and
Memory Transfer
L19 T1-Ch.4.3

Arithmetic Micro operations L20 T1-Ch.4.4
Register Transfer
and Micro-
operations
Logic Micro operations,
Shift Micro operations
and Arithmetic logic shift unit.
L21 T1-Ch.4.5
T1-Ch.4.6
T1-Ch.4.7
Instruction codes, Computer
Registers
L22, L23 T1-Ch.5.1
T1-Ch.5.2
Computer Instructions, timing
and Control
L24 T1-Ch.5.3
T1-Ch.5.4
Instruction Cycles L25 T1-Ch.5.5
Memory Reference Instructions L26, L27
T1-Ch.5.6
2
Basic Computer
Organization and
Design
Design of
Accumulator logic
L28 T1-Ch.5.7
T1-Ch.5.10

UNIT III
Machine Language L29 T1-Ch.6.1
T1-Ch.6.2
Assembly Language and
The Assembler
L30, L31 T1-Ch.6.3
T1-Ch.6.4
3 Programming the
Basic Computer
Programming Arithmetic and
Logic Operations,
Subroutines,
and input output programming
L32, L33 T1-Ch.6.6
T1-Ch.6.7
T1-Ch.6.8
Control Memory L34 T1-Ch.7.1
Address Sequencing L35 T1-Ch.7.2
4
Micro programmed
Control
Micro program Example, Design
of Control Unit.
L36,L37 T1-Ch.7.3,
T1-Ch.7.4

UNIT - IV
General Register Organization L38 T1-Ch.8.1
T1-Ch.8.2

Stack Organization L39 T1-Ch.8.3

Instruction Formats L40 T1-Ch.8.4

Addressing Modes L41 T1-Ch.8.5

5
Central Processing
Unit
Data Transfer and Manipulation
RISC
L42

T1-Ch.8.6
T1-Ch.8.7
T1-Ch.8.8


Pipelining, Arithmetic Pipeline L43 T1-Ch.9.2
T1-Ch.9.3


Parallel Processing
Instruction Pipeline, RISC
Pipeline
L44 T1-Ch.9.4
T1-Ch.9.5


Addition and Subtraction T1-Ch.10.1
T1-Ch.10.2


Multiplication algorithms,
Division Algorithms
L45
T1-Ch.10.3


Computer
Arithmetic
Floating point arithmetic
operations
L46

T1-Ch.10.5
T1-Ch.10.6






122


UNIT - V
Peripheral Devices, I/O Interface L47 T1-Ch.11.1
T1-Ch.11.2
Asynchronous data transfer L48 T1-Ch.11.3
Modes of transfer L49
T1-Ch.11.4
Serial Interrupt L50
T1-Ch.11.5
Parallel Priority L51
T1-Ch.11.5
Input Output
Organization
DMA L52
T1-Ch. 11.6
Memory Hierarchy L53 T1-Ch.12.2
Main Memory L54 T1-Ch.12.3
6
Memory
Organization
Cache Memory L55, L56 T1-Ch.12.5



5.5.12 TUTORIAL PLAN

Tutorial
No.
Unit
No.
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
T1 Sequential Circuit
T2
Logic circuits
Karnaugh Maps
T3 Digital Components Register Design
T4
I
Data Representation Error Detection Modes
T5 Logic Micro operation
T6
Register Transfer
Shift Micro operation
T7 Computer Instruction
T8
II
Basic Computer Organization
Design of AC Logic
T9 Asembler Passes
T10
Assembly Language
Arithmetic and Logic
Programming
T11 Address Sequencing
T12
III
Micro Program Control
Micro Program Example
T13 Instruction Format
T14
CPU
RISC
T15 Parallel Processing Pipelining
T16
IV
Computer Arithmetic Multiplication Algorithm
T17 Interrupts
T18
I /O Organization
DMA
T19 Associate Memory
T20
V
Memory Organization
Cache Memory



123


5.5.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I


1. i. What is a combinational circuit?Explain about various flip-flops. (Dec 2010)
ii. Simplify the boolean function F(A, B, C, D) =(1,0,1,2,5,8,9,10) using four variable maps.

2. i. Define binary counter? Explain about 4-lbit synchronous binary counter.
ii. Convert the following decimal numbers to the bases indicated. (Dec 2010)
i. 7562 to octal
ii. 1938 to hexa decimal
iii. 175 to binary.

3. i. Simplify the boolean function:
F(A,B,C,D) = (0,1,2,3,4,5,8,9,10) using four variable Karnaugh map.
ii. A sequential circuit has two D flip-flops A and B, two inputs x and y and one output Z. The
flip - flop input equations and circuit output are as follows:
D
A
= x
1
y+xA, D
B
= x
1
B + xA, Z = B
Draw the logic diagram of the Circuit
Tabulate the state of the Ciruit.


4. i. Construct a 16-to-1 line multiplexer with two 8-to-1line multiplexers and one 2-to-1 line
multiplexer. Use block diagram for three multiplexers.
ii. Convert the following decimal numbers to the bases indicated. (Jun 09/Nov 09)
i. 7562 to octal
ii. 1938 to hexa decimal
iii. 175 to binary.
5. i. Draw the block diagram of dual 4 - to - 1 line multiplexers and explain its operation by means
of function table. (Jun 09)
ii. Explain error detection with odd parity bit.

6. Construct a 5-to-32 line decoders with four 3-to-8 line decoders with enable and one 2-to-4
line decoders.
(Jun 09)

7. i. What is the purpose of Karnaugh Map? (Nov 08)
ii. Use the Karnaugh map to simplify the Boolean Function as sum of productions.
F(A, B, C, D) =?(1, 4, 7, 10, 12, 13, 15)
iii. Draw the block diagram of any decoder and explain its operation.

8. i. What is the range of numbers represented by a computer using 32 bit word length. It uses a
floating point representation with 24 bits per Mantissa, one bit per sign and 7 bits for signed
exponent.
ii. If it uses a twos complement fixed point number system repeat part of the question. (May 2008)

UNIT - II

1. i. Construct a common bus system for four registers. (Dec 10)
ii. Explain about hardware implementations and applications of logic micro operations.







124


2. i. Explain and draw the block diagram of control nunit of basic computer. (Dec 10)
(use K-map).

ii. Disscuss about four phases of instruction cycle with suitable flow chart.

3. i. Explain the organisation of control unit of Basic computer. (Nov 09)
ii. For following transfer statements specify a memory, explain the memory operation in each
case.
i. R2M[AR] ii. M[AR]R3 iii. R5M[R5] (Nov 09/Jun 09)

4. i. Write micro-operations for Fetch cycle of Basic computer. (Nov 09)
ii. Derive the control gates associated with the program counter PC in Basic computer. (Nov 09/Jun 09)

5. Design a 4-bit combinational ciruit decrementer using four full-adder circuits. (Jun 09)


6. What is the difference between a direct and indirect instruction? How many references to
memory are needed for each type of instruction to bring an operand into processor register? (Jun 09)

7. i. Explain arithmetic right shift operation with suitable example.
ii. Design a 4 bit arithmetic unit with facilities of addition, substraction, incrementation and
decrementation. Draw the circuit in a block diagram form and explain its operation. (Nov 08)

8. i. It is required to implement the following register transfer statements. (Nov 08)
xT1 : R3 R4, R1 R2
Draw a suitable block diagram to implement the above.
ii. List out the computer registers required for simple computer and explain the purpose served
by them.


9. i. What is Instruction Cycle ? Explain its operations through a Flow Chart. (Jan 08)
ii. Explain how the basic computer provides timing and control?

10. i. Write micro operations for Fetch Cycle. (Jan 08)
ii. Write micro operations for execution cycle of the following instructions
(i) ADD B (ii) LDA A (iii) STA A

UNIT - III

1. Define an assembler.Explain about first pass and second pass of assembler using flow charts. (Dec 10)

2. What is meant by address sequencing?Draw and explain about Microprogram sequences (Dec 10)
for a control memory.

3. i. Write a short notes on subroutines and interrputs.

ii. Distinguish between hardwired control unit and micro-programmed control. (Nov 09/Jun 09)

4. What is an assembler? Explain the process of assembly using 2-passes. (Nov 09)

5. Write a program to multiply two positive numbers by a repeated addition method. For
example, to multiply 5x4 the program evaluates the product by adding 5 four times
(5+5+5+5). (Jun 09)

6. Define the following: (Jun 09)
i. Microoperation ii. Micro Program





125



7. i. Define the following terms micro operation, micro instructions, micro program and micro
code with reference to microprogrammed computer. (Nov 08)
ii. Explain the various arithmetic instructions used in a typical computer.



8. i. A computer uses 16 registers, an ALU with 16 logic and 16 arithmetic functions, a shifter
with 8 operation and uses a memory of 16 K bytes. Design a suitable instructions format for
this computer.
ii. Write an assembly language program using two and one address instructions to compute the
expression.
Y = ( H + G | F * E ) / (D C * B + A ) (Nov 08)

9. i. Write an Assembly Language Program for basic computer to find the largest of 10 numbers
stored in the memory. (Jan 08)
ii. What is an Assembler ? Explain the roles of Assembler Directives

10. Explain how the address sequencing takes place in micro programmed control unit. (Jan 08)

NIT - IV

1. i. Discuss about the characteristics of RISC and CISC . (Dec 10)
ii. Write short notes on: (i) instruction formats (ii) Stack organisation.

2. i. What is meant by parallel processing?Discuss about pipeline processing. (Dec 10)
ii. Explain Booths multiplication algorithm for multiplying binary integer.

3. i. Write short notes on instruction formats. (Jun 09/Nov 09)
ii. Draw a space-time diagram for six-segment pipeline showing the time it takes to process eight
tasks.

4. i. Distinguish between RISC and CISC processors.
ii. Explain Booths multiplication algorithm for multiplying binary integers. (Jun 09/Nov 09)

5. Convert the following arithmatic expression into reverse polish notation and show the stack
operation for evaluating result 3+4[10(2+6)+8]. (Jun 09)


6. Design a floating point addition /subtraction unit using pipeling techniques. Identify the
number of pipeline segments used . Explain its operation using a numerical example. (Nov 08)

7. Explain the different addressing modes used in a typical counter with numerical examples. (Nov 08)

8. i. A computer has 32 bit instructions and 12 bit addresses. If there are 250 two-address
instruction , how many one address instructions can be formulated ? (Jan 08)
ii. Explain how the effective address is evaluated in respect of the following addressing modes:
(i) Direct (ii) Indirect (iii) Relative (iv) Indexed

9. i. Distinguish between RISC and CISC processors. (Jan 08)
ii. Draw a space time diagram for six-segment pipe







126



UNIT - V

1. a) Explain about working of DMA controller using a neat diagram. (Dec 10)
b) Discuss about the operation of a typical asychronous communication interface.

2. a) What is a mapping process? (Dec 10)
b) Write about three types of mapping procedures for organisation of cache memory.

3. i. What is an Associate Memory? Derive match logic. (Jun 09/Nov 09)
ii. Draw the block diagram of a typical asychronous communication interface. Explain its
operation.
(Nov 09)
4. i. Write short notes on virtual memory. (Jun 09/Nov 09)
ii. What is Cache memory? Explain how Associate Memory can be used as a Cache memory. (Nov 09)

5. What is difference between isolated I/O and memory mapped I/O? What are the advantages
and disadvantages of each? (Jun 09)

6. Explain data transfer of DMA. (Jun 09)

7. i. Explain the function of I/O processor with the help of a block diagram.
ii. With the help of a block diagram, explain daisy chain approach of priority. (Nov 08)

8. What is Associative Memory? Explain the operation of associative memory with the help of a
block diagram. Clearly bringing out the read and write operations. (Nov 08)

9. i. What do you understand by DMA controller? (Jan 08)
ii. It is required to transfer data from main memory to a peripheral device and vice versa. With
the help of a block diagram. Explain how this function is performed.

10. i. Compute the bit ratio of a memory system having main memory access time of 500 nsecs,
secondary storage access time of 20 msec and average access time of 4.4 m secs. (Jan 08)
ii. List out the characteristics of memory device used for main memory. Explain brief about
these characteristics.

127
MCA I Year, II Semester
6. LAB DETAILS
6. 1 JAVA PROGRAMMING LAB
6.1.1 Objectives and Relevance
6.1.2 Prerequisites
6.1.3 Preamble
6.1.4 Syllabus - O.U.
6.1.5 Suggested Books
6.1.6 Websites
6.1.7 Experts Details
128
MCA I Year, II Semester
129
MCA I Year, II Semester
6.1.1 OBJECTIVE AND RELEVANCE
The main aim of the lab course is to provide practical knowledge of using core J ava. The basics of all
concepts involved in J ava programming are implemented. The student is expected to become familiar with
all aspects of implementation.
6.1.2 PREREQUISITES
The student need to be aware of fundamental logics of programing. Its better if the student has done C++
programming nicely.
6.1.3 PREAMBLE
This lab covers experiments in Object Oriented Programming Using JAVA subject. The University (O.U)
has included 20 experiments for this laboratory course. The students are advised to go through the
theory part in the mentioned reference books before doing the experiment.
6.1.4 SYLLABUS OU
EXPERIMENT 1
ILLUSTRATE CLASS WITH CONSTRUCTORS, METHODS AND OVERLOADING
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement a class with constructors, methods and how to overload
functions.
PREREQUISITES
The student should be aware of the concepts and implementation of object oriented programming.
DESCRIPTION
The main function in J ava is included in a class.A class contains constructors , methods and overloaded
functions.
APPLICATION
To do further programming using J ava.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT2
ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT OF INHERITANCE AND DYNAMIC POLYMORPHISM
OBJECTIVE
The objective is to implement inheritence and dynamic polymorphism using java language.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know the syntax of deriving a class, knowlege of access specifiers and dynamic
polymorphism.
DESCRIPTION
Some functions when present in both base class and derived class, invoking of one of these functions is
solved at runtime by creating the objects of derived class and base class.
APPLICATION
130
MCA I Year, II Semester
In all real time application, these concepts are very potential.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 3
ILLUSTRATATE THE CONCEPT OFABSTRACT CLASS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to create an abstract class using J ava Programming.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know how to create abstract class.
DESCRIPTION
In this program the functions are declared as abstract which we can write or implement in an inherited
class
APPLICATION
Any abstract implementation.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 4
ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT OF MULTI-THREADING
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement multithreading concept.
PREREQUISITES
The students should know about the concept of multithreading and where to use it.
DESCRIPTION
For this students should know, how to program with thread concept and creating multiplethreads.
Multithreading is useful in programming with threads and including threads into that.
APPLICATION
Multithreading concept is used to do realtime programming.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 5
ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT OFTHREAD SYNCHRONIZATION
131
MCA I Year, II Semester
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement the concept of synchronizing threads implemented through
moniters.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know how to use Syncronized Keyword.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, the program is divided into some no.of threads and these threads will run simultaneously.
The time complexity will be reduced.
APPLICATION
Implementation of thread synchronization in Realtime programming.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 6
A PROGRAM TO ILLUSTRATE EXCEPTION HANDLING
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement the Exception handling.
PREREQUISITES
Exceptions is abnormal condition during the code sequence.
DESCRIPTION
It avoids run time errors.There are different types of exceptions like checked and unchecked exceptions
APPLICATION
It continues our program even we will get runtime errors.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 7
A PROGRAM TO ILLUSTRATE USER-DEFINED EXCEPTIONS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement the user-defined Exception
PREREQUISITES
Eception is included in java.lang package.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, User have to handle the errors.This kind of exception is called checked exception.
APPLICATION
User have to handle the errors manually.
132
MCA I Year, II Semester
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 8
ILLUSTRATE THE USAGE OF USER-DEFINED PACKAGES
BJECTIVE
The objective of this class is to implement packeges in java
PREREQUISITES
The student should have to use package keyword followed by user defined package name.
DESCRIPTION
To include the same module classes in a one category we use packages.
APPLICATION
This is used in realtime projects.
TEXT BOOKS
T1.The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 9
ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT OF STRINGTOKENIZER
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to divide a string into tokens.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know the String and String Tokenizer class methods.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, the given string is divided into number of Tokens with the available methods.
APPLICATION
It is used by a user to extract tokens.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 10
ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT OF LINKEDLIST CLASS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement LinkedList class, and manipulating it.
133
MCA I Year, II Semester
PREREQUISITES
The student should know LinkedList class and methods of utility package.
DESCRIPTION
In this LinkedList class first we have to import the utility package. Then we have to override the necessary
methods of the LinkedList class.
APPLICATION
Univariante polynomials.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 11
ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT OFTREE SET CLASS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to provide an implementation of the set interface that uses a tree for
storage.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know various constructors of TreeSet class and methods to implement.
DESCRIPTION
Objects are stored in sorted, ascending order. Access and retrieval times are fast, which makes TreeSet a
better choice for storing large amount of data.
APPLICATION
Used in applications where large amount of data are to be stored and which also requires fast retrieval.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 12
USAGE OF HASH SETAND ITERATOR CLASSES
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement HashSet class and Iterator class.
PREREQUISITES
The students should know about the functionality of Hashset and Iterator class in J ava.
DESCRIPTION
For this students should know about Hashtable concept, in which contents are stored through the use of
Hashing technique. And also know about how to create loops to display values in interactions.
APPLICATION
134
MCA I Year, II Semester
Used in applications where large amount of data is to be stored with hashing and invoke iteratively using
J ava.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS.
R1. Thinking in J ava
EXPERIMENT 13
A PROGRAM USING MAP CLASS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement the Map class
PREREQUISITES
The student should know the classes of Collections.And have to import java.util package.
DESCRIPTION
Map is used to store key, value pairs.Keys are unique.
APPLICATION
Is used to store objects.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 14
USAGE OF ENUMERATION AND COMPARATOR INTERFACES
OBJECTIVE
The objective is to order elements in different ways and to enumerate the elements in a collection of
objects.
PREREQUISITES
The student must know about the legacy classes, interfaces and iterators.
DESCRIPTION
The enumeration interface is to obtain the elements one at a time in the given set of objects comparator is
to change the way comparison is normally done.
APPLICATION
For invoking elements one by one, in different orders from any pre-defined data structure.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 15
ILLUSTRATE THE USAGE OF FILTERED AND BUFFERED I/O STREAMS
135
MCA I Year, II Semester
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement the filtered and buffered I/O streams.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know the classes of buffered and filtered I/O streams in I/O package.
DESCRIPTION
First we have to import the I/O package in our program. Then, we have to extend or implement the
necessary classes. After that we can override the methods of Buffered I/O stream class.
APPLICATION
Input and output using Buffers.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 16
A PROGRAM TO ILLUSTRATE THE USAGE OF BYTE AND CHARACTER I/O STREAMS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to store charecter and byte information.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know how to use java.io package.
DESCRIPTION
Using this program we can write byte data and character data in a file.
APPLICATION
We can store different kinds of data in a file..
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 17
ILLUSTRATE THE USAGE OF SERIALIZATION
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to save the state of the object to the persistent storage.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know how to implement I/O package.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, we implement remote method invocation which allows a J ava object on one machine to
invoke a method of a J ava object in a different machine.
APPLICATION
136
MCA I Year, II Semester
Storing the state of an object.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 18
A PROGRAM USING DATE CLASS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to illustrate the Date functionality.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know how to use java.util.Date package.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, we can retrieve the current date and time.
APPLICATION
To get the current date and time.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava.
EXPERIMENT 19
ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT OF GUI WITH DIFFERENT CONTROLS, MENUS AND EVENT
HANDLING
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to handle the events, which are performed by mouse, keys etc., These
operations are perfromed by event handler.
PREREQUISITES
The students should know the diferent types of GUI controls and components, and concept of event
handling
DESCRIPTION
Controls and components are the basic blocks of GUI, events are the core part of user interface.
APPLICATION
We can perform the various operations by mouse and keystrokes etc,.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
137
MCA I Year, II Semester
EXPERIMENT 20:
IMPLEMENTINGAN APPLET
OBJECTIVE
To create an applet and to run in both applet viewer and internet explorer.
PREREQUISITES
The student should know about the Applet class, awt package, life cycle of applet and to run in applet
viewer.
DESCRIPTION
Applets can be used to make interactive application. Many controls can be inserted in the applet application
to give user friendly environment.
APPLICATION
To create interactive application.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. The Complete Reference for J ava
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Thinking in J ava
6.1.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Patrick Naughton J AVA2, The Complete Reference Tata McGraw Hill 2005.
T2 J ames M Slack Programming and Problem Solving with J AVA Thomson Learning 2000.
T3 C Thomas Wu An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming with J AVA Tata McGraw Hill, 2005.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Core J ava
TM
2, 7
th
edition by lays Horstmann & gary cornell.
R2 Programming with J ava, 2
nd
edition, by J ohn R. Hubbard.
R3 The J ava Programming Language 3
rd
edition, by Kenarnold, J ames Gosling, David Holmes.
R4 Introduction to J ava by Y. Daniel Liang.
6.1.6 WEBSITES
1. www.javacofeebreak.com
2. www.javacruel.com
3. www.java.sun.com
4. www.javaworld.com
6.1.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Robert ho Dondero,
J r. Princeton University
Ph: 609-258-2211
Email: ralondero@cs.princeton.edu
2. Vlado Keselj
Associate Professor
Dalhouse University
Email: vlado@cs.dal.ca
138
MCA I Year, II Semester
3. Dr. Arthur E. Sedgwick
Ph: 902-494-2882
Email: Sedgurick @cs.dal.ca
NATIONAL
1. Bernard Nereszes
Professor, IIT, Bombay
Ph: 912225767906
Email: bernard@it.iite.ac.in
2. Mr. Sivadas K.P,- University of calicut, kerela
Email: sivadaskr@gmail.com
3. Mr. Gregories, Impetus Technologist, INC.
4. Mr. Deepak, B. Phatak
Ph: 91-22-2576-7747
Email:dbp@it.iitb.ac.in
5. Mr. Bermard Manezes
Ph: 91-22-2576-7906
Email: bermard@it.iitb.ac.in
6. Mr. A Sanyal
Ph: 91-22-2576-7707
Email: as@cse.iitb.ac.in
139
MCA I Year, II Semester
6. LAB DETAILS
6. 2 DATA STRUCTURES IN C++ LAB
6.2.1 Objectives and Relevance
6.2.2 Prerequisites
6.2.3 Preamble
6.2.4 Syllabus - O.U.
6.2.5 Suggested Books
6.2.6 Websites
6.2.7 Expert Details
6.2.8 Lab Schedules
140
MCA I Year, II Semester
141
MCA I Year, II Semester
6.2.1 OBJECTIVE AND RELEVANCE
The objective is to learn how to program all the fundamentals of data structures as possible. There is
detailed logical implementation of each of them. Data structures form the basic for all programming data
and is essential to learn and develop any application known.
6.2.2 PREREQUISITES
Student should be familiar with fundamentals of programming in C++
6.2.3 PREAMBLE
This covers experiments in Data Structures using C++ . The University (O.U) has included 10 experiments
for this laboratory course. The students are advised to go through the theory part in the mentioned
reference books before doing the experiment.
6.2.4 SYLLABUS OU
EXPERIMENT NO.1
IMPLEMENTATION OF STACKS AND QUEUES
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement Stacks and Queues.
PREREQUISITESS
Student should know about Stack and Queues concepts and functionality in programming.
DESCRIPTION
In this program, stack follow first in last out and in queues follow first in first out. These differences
should be understood with implementation.
APPLICATION
Using stacks we can convert infix expressions into post fix expressions. Queues are for sequential order
delayed access.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.2
INFIX - POSTFIX CONVERSION, EVALUATION OF POSTFIX EXPRESSION
OBJECTIVE
The objective of Infix-postfix conversion is to convert the expression from infix to postfix. To evaluate the
postfix expressions, stacks will be used.
142
MCA I Year, II Semester
PREREQUISITES
Student should know about expressions and infix, postfix, prefix operations.
DESCRIPTION
The expression can be converted from Infix to Postfix. By using stacks the evaluation of postfix will be
done.
APPLICATION
In Realtime programming and it can be aplied in Arithmetics.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.3
IMPLEMENTING LINKED LISTS(SINGLE,DOUBLE,AND CIRCULAR)
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement single,double and circular Linked List.
PREREQUISITES
Student should know about classes and pointers..
DESCRIPTION
Creating a linked list means creating a set of nodes and linking them with each other.The nodes contain
data and a link to the next node.
APPLICATION
Bin Sort,Radix Sort,Convex Hull and Union-Find Problem.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.4
BINARY SEARCH AND HASHING
OBJECTIVE
The objective is to search the element in given sorted array and to use hash functions ,hash map
addresses to store and retrieve elements in 0 (1).
143
MCA I Year, II Semester
PREREQUISITESS
Student should know about arrays, sorting and implementing hash functions.
DESCRIPTION
In binary search the given sorted array is split into two and element is searched. In hashing the given
element is mapped according to the hash function value and the same function is used for retrieving.
APPLICATION
Used in searching elements and hashing for storing and retrieving values efficiently.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO 5
IMPLEMENTATION OF COLLISION RESOLUTION TECHNIQUES.
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement the collision resolution techniques.
PREREQUISITIES
The student should have the knowledge about hash table data structure.
DESCRIPTION
We can resolve the collision using seperate chaining or open addressing.
APPLICATION
We can use it to resolve collisions in hashing.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.6
SELECTION, SHELL, INSERTION,MERGE AND QUICK SORTS
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement the selection, shell, merge and quick sorts.
PREREQUISITIES
The student should know the basic sorting techniques
144
MCA I Year, II Semester
DESCRIPTION
We have to import the utility package and we have to implement the classes and override the methods
which are used to sort the elements.
APPLICATION
To sort the database.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT No.7
OPERATIONS ON BINARY TREES
OBJECTIVE
The objective is to create a Binary Tree.
PREREQUISITIES
Student should have the knowledge of creating, representing, inserting and deleting the element from the
Binary Tree.
DESCRIPTION
Inserting a node as a left child or right child to a particular node in the binary tree if it is not empty.If it is
empty insert it as a root.Deleting a node without children is easy and with children require little effort.
APPLICATION
Placement of Signal Boosters and Union-Find Problem.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT No.8
TRAVERSAL ON BINARY TREES
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to learn how to span all the nodes of a binary tree.
PREREQUISITES
Student should know tree traversal techniques which are inorder, preorder and postorder and also should
know how to construct a binary tree.
145
MCA I Year, II Semester
DESCRIPTION
In this program, student should follow the traverse techniques to know all the elements of a tree in a
specific order.
APPLICATION
Finding Bi-connected components.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.9
IMPLEMENTATION OF BINARY SEARCH TREES
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement binary search trees.
PREREQUISITES
The student should have the knowledge of binary trees.
DESCRIPTION
A Binary Search Tree is a binary tree where the keys in the left subtree are less than the root node and
the keys in the right subtree are greater than the root.
APPLICATION
Histogramming,Best-Fit Bin Packing and Crossing Distribution.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.10
HEAP SORT
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to implement heap sort to sort the elements of an array.
PREREQUISITIES
The students should know about heap sort algorithm.
DESCRIPTION
This program is implemented through constructing a tree with given contents and then sorting from root
in the tree, by adjusting as and when the element is deleted from the heap.
146
MCA I Year, II Semester
APPLICATION
To sort any set of elements
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.11
OPERATIONS ON AVLTREES
OBJECTIVE
The objective is to create a balanced search tree called AVL Tree.
PREREQUISITIES
Student should have the knowledge of creating, representing, inserting and deleting the element from the
AVL Tree.
DESCRIPTION
An empty binary tree is an AVL Tree. If T is a nonempty binary tree with TL and TR as its left and right
subtrees. Then T is an AVL Tree if
i. T
L
and T
R
. are AVL Trees.
ii. h
L
- h
R
1 where h
L
and h
R
are the heights of T
L
and T
R
.
APPLICATION
AVL Trees can be used for efficient search of elements in a tree.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT No.12
IMPLEMENTING RED-BLACK TREES
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to implement the Red-Black trees.
PREREQUISITIES
Student should have the knowledge of Binary Search trees and AVL trees.
147
MCA I Year, II Semester
DESCRIPTION
The root and all external nodes are colored black.No root-to-external-node path has two consecutive red
nodes.All root-to-external-node paths have the same number of black nodes.
APPLICATION
Many data structures used in computational geometry can be based on red-black trees.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik, Data Structures using C++ Cengage Learning 2003 ,
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO.13
TRAVERSAL ON A GRAPH
OBJECTIVE
The objective of the program is to learn to span all the vertices and edges of a binary tree.
PREREQUISITIES
Student should know about graph traversal techinques which are bredth first search and Depth first
Search and also should know how to construct a graph.
DESCRIPTION
This program follows the traversal techniques to know shortest path to the destination.
APPLICATION
Finding Bi-connected Components.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
EXPERIMENT NO 14
PROGRAM TO FIND A MINIMAL SPANNING TREE
OBJECTIVE
The objective is to find a minimal spanning tree.
PREREQUISITIES
The student should have a knowledge about graphs.
148
MCA I Year, II Semester
DESCRIPTION
The minimum spanning tree for a connected weighted graph is a subset of the edges that forms a tree
that includes every vertex,where the total weight of all the edges in the tree is minimized.We can use
Kruskals algorithm for this purpose which is very simple.
APPLICATION
Solving the travelling salesman problem.
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik "Data Structures using C++",Cengage Learning,2003
R2. Cormen Leiserson &Rivest,Introduction to Algorithms,Prentice Hall Indian,1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
8.2.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS
TEXT BOOKS
T1. S. Sahani, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++ Second Edition University Press, 2005.
REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. D S Malik Data Structures using C++, Thomson Learning, 2003.
R2. Cormen Leiserson & Rivest, Introduction to Algorithms, Prentice Hall India, 1996.
R3. Mark Allen Weiss,Data Structures and AlgorithmAnalysis in C++,Third Edition,Pearson Education,
2007.
R4. Fundamentals of Data Structures in C++, Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Sahni, Dinesh Mehta
R5. Class Data Structures, D. Samanta.
8.2.6 WEBSITES
1. www.datastructures.net
2. http://ds4begineers.wordpress.com
3. http://www.brpreiss.com
4. http:// www.c4swimmers.net
5. http:// www.informit.com
6. http:// www.cs.pdx.edu
7. http:// www.cise.ufl.edu
8.2.7 EXPERTS DETAILS
INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Norbert Zen
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Email: nzeh@cs.dal.ca
Ph: 902-494-3154, Off: 314
http:// www.cs.dal.ca/cspeople
149
MCA I Year, II Semester
2. Dr. Allan G. J ost
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Email: jost@cs.dal.ca
Ph: 902-494-2509
NATIONAL
1. Amitabha Bagchi
Professor in IIT Delhi.
Email: bagchi@cse.iitd.ac.in
Ph: 9111-2659-6397
2. Sanjeev Saxena
Professor in IIT Kanpur
Email: ssax@ieee.org, ssax@computer.org
Ph: 91-(512)-259-7611
.
REGIONAL
1. Dr. M. Shashi.
Professor in Andhra University
Email: smogalla2000@yahoo.com
Ph: (Office) 0891-2844863, 0891-2551203 (R)
2. Sri. K. Venkata Rao
Professor in Andhra University
Email: professor_venkat@yahoo.com
webmasterau@yahoo.com
Ph: 9985504584, Office: 0891-2844099, 0891-2844864.
3. B. Prajna
Asst Professor in Andhra University
Email: prajna_btech@yahoo.com
Ph: 0891-2577030 (R).
150
MCA I Year, II Semester
7 COMMUNICATION SKILLS
7.1 Syllabus
7.2 Session Plan
151
MCA I Year, II Semester
SUGGESTED BOOKS
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Plain English Guide, Martin Cutts (OUP: 1995)
2. Business Vocabulary in Use, Bill Mascull (CUP: 2002)
3. English Vocabulary in Use, Michael McCarthy and Felicity ODell (CUP : 1994)
4. English Phrasal Verbs in Use, Michael McCarthy and Felicity ODell (CUP : 2004)
7 COMMUNICATION SKILLS
7.1 SYLLABUS
Some of you would have made a formal study of English Grammar at some stage of your education. On the
other hand there may be many among you who have not undergone any course in Grammar. A basic knowl-
edge of English Grammar is quite necessary to speak good English. The Syllabus is divided into two units.
Unit -I attempts to provide the form as well as the functions of the various structures in English. Unit - II
includes Vocabulary.
7.2 SESSION PLAN
S.No. Topics Contents Lecture No.
Orientation L1
Word Classes L2
Tenses L3, L4, L5, L6
Auxillaries L7, L8
Modals L9, L10
Passive Voice L11, L12
Reported Speech L13, L14
`IF Conditions L15, 16
Subject-Verb Agreement L17
1 Grammar
Written tasks for the above mentioned topics L18, L19
UNIT - II
Synonyms / Antonyms L20
Homonyms L21
Affixes L22
One Word substitutes L23
Collocations L24
Idioms L25
Phrases L26
2 Vocabulary
Class Assignments L27, L28, L29, L30
i
AURORAS PG COLLEGE
RAMANTHAPUR, HYDERABAD - 500013.
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