You are on page 1of 69

Yoga, all of these Yogic scriptures are pre Buddhist in nature

and share a systematic and broad scientific basis. Katha Upanishad,


one of the first written works on Yoga mentions the Yoga-Vidya
(science of Yoga) and Yoga-Vidhi (the technological know how)
of Yoga. The pure science of Yoga is Adhyatma Vidya (science
of man in depth), while the technology or applied science (rules
of Yoga practice), that is the technology of unification or integration,
is called Yoga-Vidhi. The scientific attitude of Yoga can be seen
from the firm insistence on Pariprasna (enquiry or dialogue)
as a pre requisite to higher knowledge, as enunciated in the
Bhagavad Gita (IV.34). Similarly the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
display a scientific attitude towards the acquisition of Pramana
(true knowledge). Patanjali says that true knowledge can be
acquired (Yoga Sutra: Chapter I, Verse7) by direct perception
(Pratyaksha), rational inference (Anumana), and from reliable
testimony (Agama). This use of the intellect (Buddhi) endowed
with discrimination (Viveka) is typical of all Yoga traditions and
their teachings. The Bhagavad Gita, which is sometimes referred
to as the Yoga Shastra, shows the exchange between Arjuna
and Yogeshwar Krishna to be of a genuine spirit of enquiry and
a keen desire for truth, as one would expect from a modern
scientist and his guide. The Shiva-Samhita (V.26-30) lists the
characters of a fully qualified disciple (Shishya) as follows. Endowed
with great energy and enthusiasm, intelligent, heroic, learned
in the scriptures, free from delusion Arent these very same
qualities required by a true scientist (a seeker of true knowledge)?
The process of Yoga is one of the understanding and achievement
of Mind Control. The Yogis discovered that the mind has many
levels such as Mudha (dull and inert mind), Kshipta (distracted
mind), Vikshipta (partially distracted mind), Ekagratha (concentrated
mind), and Niruddha (controlled mind). They also found that
the thought waves (Chitta-Vritti) were five fold, and are Pramana
(conception), Viparyaya (misconception), Vikalpa (imagination),
Nidra (sleep) and Smrithi (memory). They realized that without
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
xiv
2005 By Yogacharya Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani
All rights reserved
First Edition : 2005
Published by : Kalaimamani Yogacharini
MEENAKSHI DEVI BHAVANANI
Managing Editor
Satya Press
25, 2nd Cross, Iyyanar Nagar,
Pondicherry-13. Tel. (0413) 2241561
E-mail: amma@icyer.com
website: www.geocities.com/yognat2001
Typeset and Designed by : RAAJKUMARS
No.1, Rajarajeswari Nagar,
Vallalar Salai,
Pondicherry - 605 011.
Any material reproduced from this book may be done
so only with prior permission of the author and with
due credit to the source. This is an important aspect
of Yogic culture and we request all readers to follow
this request in the true spirit of Yama and Niyama.
Dr W Selvamurthy, Dr MV Bhole, Prof Dr Madanmohan, Prof
RC Gupta, Sri Yogeshwar, Sri DR Karthikeyan, Shri SK Jindel,
Dr SV Rao, Dr RP Pandey, Dr SR Joharapurkar and Dr MD Khapre
have also influenced my life as ideal role models of men who
have balanced both the external and internal worlds with Yogic
skill and ease.
Receiving the potent blessings of the reverend Shankaracharya
of Kanchipuram Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Swamigal at the age
of ten years has been a great inspiration to me in all my activities.
I thank all my elders who have blessed me in the propagation
of Yoga and given me an excellent foundation upon which I may
build my Sadhana and Yoga Life.
I heartfully thank my beloved Dharmapatni, Yogacharini Devasena
Bhavanani for steadfastly assisting me in all my Yogic and artistic
endeavours and thus making my life more pleasant and joyful,
as well as for bringing the light of joy into my life through our
beloved daughter, Dhivya Priya Bhavanani.
I thank Sonya Buckman, S. Tamilsengolan, V. Renuka Devi,
T. Tamilarasan, and G. Dayanidy for helping me proof read and
for the suggestions of many good ideas for this book.
I wish to put on record my appreciation of the authors of the
following texts from which I have sourced many an idea as,
well as illustrations. May they continue to guide aspirants on
this wonderful path towards the Divine.
1. Yoga: Step-By-Step by Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri.
2. Ashtanga Yoga of Patanjali by Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri.
3. Raja Yoga Sutras by Swami Jyothirmayananda.
4. Four Chapters On Freedom by Swami Satyananda Saraswati.
FROM THE AUTHOR
xi
Dedicated
To
The Greatest Guru In My Universe
THE LION OF PONDICHERRY
Yogamaharishi
Dr Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj
(24.07.1907 - 29.12.1993)
Who Protected the Purity of Rishiculture Ashtanga Yoga
With His Mighty Roar of Truth
5. Light on Yoga by Padmabhusan BKS Iyengar.
6. The Science of Yoga by I K Taimni.
7. Laghu Yoga Vashistha by Narayana Swami Aiyar.
8. Bhagavad Gita by Swami Chidananda.
9. Yoga Kosha. Published by Kaivalyadhama, Lonavla, Maharasthra.
10. Yoga. Published by V. K. Prakashan Trust, Chennai.
11. Hatha Yoga Pradipika. English Translation by Pancham
Sinh.
12. Gheranda Samhita. English Translation by Rai Bahadur
S C Vasu.
13. Shi va Samhi ta. Engl i sh Transl ati on by Rai Bahadur
S C Vasu.
14. The Six Systems of Hindu Philosophy by Swami Harshananda.
15. Shambala Encyclopedia of Yoga by Dr. Georg Feuerstein.
16. Asana, Pranayama, Mudra, Bandha by Swami Satyananda.
17. Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali by BKS Iyengar.
18. A Primer of Hinduism by DS Sharma, Sri Ramakrishna Math,
Chennai.
19. Yoga i n Educati on by Dr HR Nagendra, T Mohan and
A Shriram.
20. Yoga: Its Basis and Applications by Dr HR Nagendra.
21. New Perspectives in Stress Management by Dr HR Nagendra
and Dr H Nagarathna.
22. Integrated Approach of Yoga Therapy for Positive Health
by Dr HR Nagendra and Dr H Nagarathna.
23. Pranayama: The Art and Science by Dr HR Nagendra.
24. Ancient Yoga and Modern Science by Prof TR Anantaraman.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
xii
CONTENTS
Forward i
Appreciation and Blessings iii
Introduction v
From the Author ix
SECTION ONE :
Yantra : Yogic Science of Number, Name and form
Karma Yuga 1
Dharma Marga 9
SECTION TWO :
Yoga : One to Ten
Ekah - One 17
Dwau - Two 27
Trayah - Three 41
Chatwarah - Four 61
Pancha - Five 83
Shat - Six 95
Sapta - Seven 103
Ashta - Eight 109
Nava - Nine 115
Dasha - Ten 125
A Final Word 135
About the Author 139
inheritors of special qualities. I owe this Jnana (wisdom) and
illumination of my Buddhi (intellect) to Dr Jonn Mumford (Swami
Anandakapila Saraswathi). Dr Jonn is an excellent teacher
who brings out the best of numbers through his Yantric teachings.
These teachings given to him by Pujya Swamiji Gitananda Giri
Guru Maharaj many decades ago are now being passed on to
all of us at Ananda Ashram through Dr Jonn, and I have personally
benefi ted tremendousl y from these wonderful teachi ngs.
Dr John was also instrumental in restoring an old manuscript of
Swamijis Yantra teachings, which was published by Satya Press
with his kind cooperation and help. His guidance has enabled
me to understand the link between Swamijis Yantric and Rishiculture
Ashtanga Yoga teachings, and this has spurred me on to the
creation of this work. I must also thank Dr Jonn profusely for
his wonderfully blessed forward to this book, which is typically
him in all ways. May he continue to guide us all with his magnificent
Yantric teachings for many more years to come.
I also thank Sri Bala Ratnam of Australia, a dedicated student
of Swamiji and Founder, Vibrational Breath Therapy, for his blessings
and guidance at all times.
Many great masters of Yoga have blessed me at different stages
in my life and I am privileged to have been the recipient of these
potent blessings. These include Padmabhusan Sri BKS Iyengar,
Sri Yogendra Ji, Sri Sant Keshavdas, Swami Chinmayananda,
Swami Dayananda, Yogi Amrit Desai, Sri Direndra Brahmachari,
Swami Chidananda Saraswathi, Sri Ma Yoga Shakti, Swami
Satchitananda, Maharishi Arunachalam, Swami Veda Bharathi,
Dr. HR Nagendra, Sri TKV Desikachar, Swami Suddananda Bharathi
and Sri Kannaya Yogi.
Great Yogic personalities such as Srila Sri Shankara Giri Swamigal,
Shri RR Diwakar, Prof TR Anantaraman, Prof Dr B Ramamurthy,
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
x
FORWARD
Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani has composed
a unique work, which is a cornucopia of
knowledge about Yoga, Hinduism, and the
classical schools of Indian philosophy.
The creator and the created are inexplicably
bound together. It is not possible to consider
the one independently from the other anymore
than we can produce a one sided coin from
our pocket.
Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani is the son and inheritor of the
Giri lineage from his father, the late Guru Yogamaharishi Dr. Swami
Gitananda Giri, famous throughout the world. His early years
were spent within the nurturing environment of his fathers Gurukula
Ashram in Pondicherry and under the loving attention of his equally
famous mother Yogacharini Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani.
The product of this upbringing is a Sattvic being who brings
great honour to his parents and is a worthy successor and carrier
of the sacred knowledge transmitted to him.
Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani is both a renaissance man and
a being of the 21st century. The breadth of his religious and
artistic education places him amongst the ideal of renaissance
humanists while his medical and postgraduate medical education
embeds him amongst 21st century scientists.
During his medical education he graduated with the Gold Medal
Award for Preventive Medicine and Distinction in General Surgery,
and has proceeded to postgraduate work in Family Health including
the publication of numerous research papers in medical journals.
He is a master of Carnatic Music with emphasis upon vocals and
percussion having won many awards and with CDs to his credit.
His skill as a visual artist is outstanding as demonstrated by
the copious and apt illustrations demonstrating each concept
elucidated throughout Yoga: 1 to 10.
FORWARD
i
taught the Sci ence of Yantra to Swami Gi tananda. Noti ng
that al l Uni versal forms can be broken down to a l i mi ted
number of shapes, he said, God geometrises, man observes.
Carl Gustav Jung, the great psycho analyst, realized the
mysti c qual i ty of numbers and postul ated that they were a
pri mordi al archetypal power, whi ch was sel f-exi stent i n the
human racial sub-consciousness.
It is thus very significant that Yogacharya Dr. Ananda Balayogi
Bhavanani , chi ef di sci pl e and successor of the l i neage of
Yogamaharishi Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj, has
brought out thi s beauti ful book YOGA: 1 to 10, showi ng
the relationship between various Yogic and Yantric concepts
and the numbers associated with these various principles.
Dr. Ananda has skillfully outlined the very basic associations
between numbers and their inherent qualities and powers in
the first section of his book, dealing with the Yantric cycles of
time and the Dharma Marga or birth path. Thereafter, using each
number as a base, he shows how various Yogic ideas and theories
are expressed with numbers in harmony with their essential meaning.
Using drawings and diagrams to illustrate the ideas, the author
thus skillfully presents, deep esoteric information in a form easily
digested even by the neophyte.
May the Gurus wisdom flow into our bodies, hearts and minds
as a continuous stream of light, enlightening all of mankind and
all beings, fortunate enough to manifest on this lovely earth
planet.
- Yogacharini Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani
Ananda Ashram, Pondicherry, India.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
viii
Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani has produced a veritable encyclopedia
of Yoga, Sanathana and classical Indian philosophy, cleverly
expounding profound concepts, albeit simply and clearly, through
a tour of the numbers 1 to 10.
A special feature is his revelations concerning the great secret
of number : Number is not just of the mundane world but a
doorway to the arcane - digits may be used to penetrate beyond
the physical into the metaphysical and this is the secret knowledge
of the Vedic mathematicians who could code Pi into a Bhajan
or derive Phi from the 24 syllables of the Gayatri.
His introduction to this system of Yantra, a unique method characteristic
of the teachings of Ananda Ashram and Gitananda Yoga, carries
keys to understanding our individual Dharma and our cyclic Karmic
flows. This is Ankjyotisha i.e. the influence of numerical coding
embedded in your brain, or propensities from the month, day
and year of your birth. Another term for this area of traditional
Jyotisha is Anka Vignyan or Wisdom of Numbers.
Thus he skillfully enlarges the readers concept beyond number
as mere quantitative manipulation and opens the window to a
contemplative journey into the alternative reality of the animistic,
magical sphere of qualitative mathematics.
His exposition belongs in the library of every practitioner and teacher
of Yoga as it is the best, most comprehensive and most understandable
work upon the subject I have personally ever perused.
This volume is filled with succinct, rare and far-reaching concepts
covering every phase of Yoga, giving innovative insights drawn
f rom Dr Ananda Bal ayogi Bhavanani s Yogi c and medi cal
background.
I congratulate Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani on this magnificent
and original presentation and heartily commend and recommend
this wonderful opus to students and teachers throughout the
world. Yoga: 1 to 10 is a treasure that will be long valued.
Dr Jonn Mumford
(Swami Anandakapila Saraswati)
Sydney, NSW, Australia.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
ii
of various creatures are measured in numerical units and human
history is analyzed in periods of time.
The power of numbers as an ordering device of the mind, which
enables human consciousness to make sense of the seemingly
haphazard flow of events, is obvious. Business is based on calculations.
Governments rise and fall on the power of the numbers of people
they can garner in their support. Large numbers of anything
produce a great power, either for good or for bad. Witness the
power of Nazi Germany or the hordes of Genghis Khan.
Numbers even govern human destiny. Numbers are a measurement
of vibrations, of occurrences, of objects. Indeed, numbers are
the essence of life. In India, a philosophical system evolved
which explained the Universe with numbers. It was called Samkya
and was propagated by the Rishi Kapila. The Greeks also realized
the mystical value and content of numbers. Numbers are at
the root and the base of all things, said Cornelius Agrippa.
The great philosopher mystic Pythagoras said, All lies veiled
in numbers. The Jewish thinkers understood these concepts
and the Kabala taught, The Universe is built on numbers. The
great European thinker Leibniz wrote, Numbers are the Universal
language. Balzao postulated, Number is an Entity, and at the
same time, a Breath emanating from God. The Breath, alone
which could organise the physical Cosmos, where naught obtains
the form but through Deity, which is an effect of number. It is
no coincidence that many famous European philosophers like
Rene Descarte were basically mathematicians. It is said that
anyone who wished to study philosophy with Pythagoras had
first to study mathematics to discipline their mind.
Shri Ram Gopal Mujumdhar, Swami Kanakananda, who was
the Guru of Yogamaharishi Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj,
INTRODUCTION
vii
AN APPRECIATION AND BLESSINGS
iii
APPRECIATION AND BLESSINGS
Born to an i ntel l ectual gi ant Yogamahari shi
Dr Swami Gi tananda Gi ri Guru Maharaj who
was a revered and rare authority on Pranayama
and to the highly respected and accomplished
Yogachari ni Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani ,
Dr Ananda Bal ayogi Bhavanani was bred i n
the ethos of Ananda Ashram where from crack
of dawn till late night he imbibed the essence
and deeper eternal meani ngs of the sci ence
of Yoga. Ananda Ashram i s the one pl ace i n
the world where one can lead a simple, disciplined life, experiencing
the ri ch, many faceted cul tural and Hi ndu rel i gi ous tradi ti ons
of India. Yogacharya Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani is a living
testi mony to i ts Paramparai tradi ti ons.
He was desti ned to be born to hi s i l l ustri ous parents and had
a uni que earl y educati on i n Ananda Ashram, on the l i nes of
Shantiniketan, where he inculcated the best of both the Western
and Eastern educati on. Duri ng those earl y years encouraged
by Amma and assi sted by her, he had publ i shed a smal l book
on Yoga for Children, a remarkabl e feat i ndeed i n the shape
of thi ngs to come.
During Dr Anandas formal education he distinguished himself
in studies and sports. Naturally the rebellious nature in a young
man wanted to take him away from the life for which he was
being groomed, but he took the advice of his school principal
and decided to follow in his great fathers footsteps. I consider
myself privileged to have accosted him during that formative
period of time and helped him realize that he was born to Swamiji
for the purpose of carrying forward his unique message of hope,
recovery and salvation to mankind. I recognized Dr Anandas
doubts about whether he would ever fit into Swamijis mighty
big shoes and even offered to assist him whenever he needed
me, as I realized that Swamijis teachings were way ahead of
his contemporaries, and had to be preserved for posterity. I thank
him for accepting my humble advice.
In certain ceremonies, a particular number of participants are
required, or a certain number of materials. When chanting Mantras,
particular numbers such as 108 are held to be more powerful
than others Rudraksha beads used for counting Mantras are
always strung in groups of 54 or 108 in number. The different
power inherent in odd and even numbers is also well recognized,
and many so called superstitions surround odd and even
timings of the day, or days of the month. One could say that
traditional Hindu life was very much ordered by the realization
of the power that various numbers possessed.
Numbers also serve as a means of structuring memory and storing
facts. All Yogic and spiritual lore is made orderly through this
device of enumeration. But, this enumeration is not at all arbitrary.
The number of facts or concepts associated under a central
principle will always have an inherent real relationship to the
essence of the concept. For example, the number four is associated
with stability in Yantra. Any object, such as a table, acquires
its stability by possessing four legs. Like that, the division of
an ideal human life into four phases Brahmacharya (studentship);
Grahasta (householder); Vanaprastha (withdrawal from worldly
life); and Sanyasa (total renunciation of the material world); gives
the quality of stability to a well-ordered society. Thus, the number
of elements or characteristics in each pattern reflects the inherent
quality of that pattern.
Our days are divided numerically into seconds, minutes, and
hours. Our years are divided into months. Our heart beats a
certain number of times each minute (usually assigned 70 72
beats per minute). Our breath moves in and out about 16 times
per minute. Our bodily functions are governed by numbers and
their regular repetition and rhythm. Disease, and disorders are
diagnosed when these numbers become erratic. The life spans
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
vi
He had the good fortune of learning Yoga from the great man
himself for two long years before he embarked on his medical
education. He got a chance to experience for himself that while
Yoga is for the body, mind and soul, medicine is primarily for
the body, and how they complement each other. Today Dr Ananda
is able to clearly enunciate, just as his great father did, the
physiological and psychological benefits of Yogic practices.
Despite his youth, I particularly like his clarity in the objective
of Yoga. It is for the evolution of the soul. It is for progressing
into higher and higher states of consciousness. He is also blessed
through Swamijis teachings with the wherewithal to achieve these
goals. Swamijis teachings are simple but most powerful, and
Dr Ananda has become his instrument to convey his teachings
to the whole world, thus making his own significant contribution.
It is providential that he has taken over Swamijis mantle and
among other things, I have been humbled by the grand cultural
extravaganzas on environmental and other matters, that Dr Ananda
and hi s mother, Meenakshi Devi (Amma) have el oquentl y
choreographed - so pleasing to the eye and ear and so soul
satisfying. It is aptly fitting that he has been appointed Cultural
Ambassador for the World Yoga Community.
I like the interest Dr Ananda is taking to promote Yoga Sport
throughout the world. He is giving a new sense of hope and
direction for the youth. It is my sincere hope and prayer that
Dr Ananda will be able to introduce Yoga Sport into the Olympics
and thus fulfill one of Swamijis cherished dreams.
My sincere and heartiest congratulations to Yogacharya Dr Ananda
Balayogi Bhavanani on creating this illuminating and captivating
book Yoga: 1 - 10, on the eternal principles and treasured values
of the science of Yoga, the mother of sciences, as enunciated
by Swamiji. Yoga is the bedrock of the rich Indian culture, of
which we are justly proud. Dr Ananda has made the reading
most fascinating by profusely and wisely illustrating the text
with inspiring pictures and his own inimitable cartoons.
May God bless and guide Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani in his
noble mission!
Sri Bala Ratnam
Founder, Vibrational Breath Therapy, Australia.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
iv
INTRODUCTION
THE POWER OF NUMBERS
IN THE EVOLUTION OF HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS
Numbers are not merely arbitrary
symbols invented by the mind of
man to bring order into the diverse
objects of the world. Numbers are
archetypal; they exude their own
power, energy and influence. They
are the outward manifestation of
deep, mystical patterns, which are
the underlying order of the Universe.
Numbers are not simply measures
of quantity, but also reflections of
inherent qualities. The Hindu mystics,
known to the modern world as Yogis, meditated deeply on the
mysterious power of numbers and from these meditations, the
science of Yantra was born. This great science systematically
analyzes the manifest world of number, name and form, and
explores the relationship amongst them. Numbers have the inherent
power not only to reflect inner cosmic patterns, but also are a
means of harnessing primordial forces and energies. These principles
of Yantra may be applied in a practical sense in ones spiritual
Sadhana, as well as in ones mundane pursuits in daily life.
This Yantric knowledge is deeply embedded in Hindu cultural
patterns, even at the village level. For example, common villagers
know that any effective governing body must be composed of
five members. Hence, traditional village leadership was called
Panchayat or a governing body composed of five members.
INTRODUCTION
v
He had the good fortune of learning Yoga from the great man
himself for two long years before he embarked on his medical
education. He got a chance to experience for himself that while
Yoga is for the body, mind and soul, medicine is primarily for
the body, and how they complement each other. Today Dr Ananda
is able to clearly enunciate, just as his great father did, the
physiological and psychological benefits of Yogic practices.
Despite his youth, I particularly like his clarity in the objective
of Yoga. It is for the evolution of the soul. It is for progressing
into higher and higher states of consciousness. He is also blessed
through Swamijis teachings with the wherewithal to achieve these
goals. Swamijis teachings are simple but most powerful, and
Dr Ananda has become his instrument to convey his teachings
to the whole world, thus making his own significant contribution.
It is providential that he has taken over Swamijis mantle and
among other things, I have been humbled by the grand cultural
extravaganzas on environmental and other matters, that Dr Ananda
and hi s mother, Meenakshi Devi (Amma) have el oquentl y
choreographed - so pleasing to the eye and ear and so soul
satisfying. It is aptly fitting that he has been appointed Cultural
Ambassador for the World Yoga Community.
I like the interest Dr Ananda is taking to promote Yoga Sport
throughout the world. He is giving a new sense of hope and
direction for the youth. It is my sincere hope and prayer that
Dr Ananda will be able to introduce Yoga Sport into the Olympics
and thus fulfill one of Swamijis cherished dreams.
My sincere and heartiest congratulations to Yogacharya Dr Ananda
Balayogi Bhavanani on creating this illuminating and captivating
book Yoga: 1 - 10, on the eternal principles and treasured values
of the science of Yoga, the mother of sciences, as enunciated
by Swamiji. Yoga is the bedrock of the rich Indian culture, of
which we are justly proud. Dr Ananda has made the reading
most fascinating by profusely and wisely illustrating the text
with inspiring pictures and his own inimitable cartoons.
May God bless and guide Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani in his
noble mission!
Sri Bala Ratnam
Founder, Vibrational Breath Therapy, Australia.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
iv
INTRODUCTION
THE POWER OF NUMBERS
IN THE EVOLUTION OF HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS
Numbers are not merely arbitrary
symbols invented by the mind of
man to bring order into the diverse
objects of the world. Numbers are
archetypal; they exude their own
power, energy and influence. They
are the outward manifestation of
deep, mystical patterns, which are
the underlying order of the Universe.
Numbers are not simply measures
of quantity, but also reflections of
inherent qualities. The Hindu mystics,
known to the modern world as Yogis, meditated deeply on the
mysterious power of numbers and from these meditations, the
science of Yantra was born. This great science systematically
analyzes the manifest world of number, name and form, and
explores the relationship amongst them. Numbers have the inherent
power not only to reflect inner cosmic patterns, but also are a
means of harnessing primordial forces and energies. These principles
of Yantra may be applied in a practical sense in ones spiritual
Sadhana, as well as in ones mundane pursuits in daily life.
This Yantric knowledge is deeply embedded in Hindu cultural
patterns, even at the village level. For example, common villagers
know that any effective governing body must be composed of
five members. Hence, traditional village leadership was called
Panchayat or a governing body composed of five members.
INTRODUCTION
v
AN APPRECIATION AND BLESSINGS
iii
APPRECIATION AND BLESSINGS
Born to an i ntel l ectual gi ant Yogamahari shi
Dr Swami Gi tananda Gi ri Guru Maharaj who
was a revered and rare authority on Pranayama
and to the highly respected and accomplished
Yogachari ni Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani ,
Dr Ananda Bal ayogi Bhavanani was bred i n
the ethos of Ananda Ashram where from crack
of dawn till late night he imbibed the essence
and deeper eternal meani ngs of the sci ence
of Yoga. Ananda Ashram i s the one pl ace i n
the world where one can lead a simple, disciplined life, experiencing
the ri ch, many faceted cul tural and Hi ndu rel i gi ous tradi ti ons
of India. Yogacharya Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani is a living
testi mony to i ts Paramparai tradi ti ons.
He was desti ned to be born to hi s i l l ustri ous parents and had
a uni que earl y educati on i n Ananda Ashram, on the l i nes of
Shantiniketan, where he inculcated the best of both the Western
and Eastern educati on. Duri ng those earl y years encouraged
by Amma and assi sted by her, he had publ i shed a smal l book
on Yoga for Children, a remarkabl e feat i ndeed i n the shape
of thi ngs to come.
During Dr Anandas formal education he distinguished himself
in studies and sports. Naturally the rebellious nature in a young
man wanted to take him away from the life for which he was
being groomed, but he took the advice of his school principal
and decided to follow in his great fathers footsteps. I consider
myself privileged to have accosted him during that formative
period of time and helped him realize that he was born to Swamiji
for the purpose of carrying forward his unique message of hope,
recovery and salvation to mankind. I recognized Dr Anandas
doubts about whether he would ever fit into Swamijis mighty
big shoes and even offered to assist him whenever he needed
me, as I realized that Swamijis teachings were way ahead of
his contemporaries, and had to be preserved for posterity. I thank
him for accepting my humble advice.
In certain ceremonies, a particular number of participants are
required, or a certain number of materials. When chanting Mantras,
particular numbers such as 108 are held to be more powerful
than others Rudraksha beads used for counting Mantras are
always strung in groups of 54 or 108 in number. The different
power inherent in odd and even numbers is also well recognized,
and many so called superstitions surround odd and even
timings of the day, or days of the month. One could say that
traditional Hindu life was very much ordered by the realization
of the power that various numbers possessed.
Numbers also serve as a means of structuring memory and storing
facts. All Yogic and spiritual lore is made orderly through this
device of enumeration. But, this enumeration is not at all arbitrary.
The number of facts or concepts associated under a central
principle will always have an inherent real relationship to the
essence of the concept. For example, the number four is associated
with stability in Yantra. Any object, such as a table, acquires
its stability by possessing four legs. Like that, the division of
an ideal human life into four phases Brahmacharya (studentship);
Grahasta (householder); Vanaprastha (withdrawal from worldly
life); and Sanyasa (total renunciation of the material world); gives
the quality of stability to a well-ordered society. Thus, the number
of elements or characteristics in each pattern reflects the inherent
quality of that pattern.
Our days are divided numerically into seconds, minutes, and
hours. Our years are divided into months. Our heart beats a
certain number of times each minute (usually assigned 70 72
beats per minute). Our breath moves in and out about 16 times
per minute. Our bodily functions are governed by numbers and
their regular repetition and rhythm. Disease, and disorders are
diagnosed when these numbers become erratic. The life spans
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
vi
Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani has produced a veritable encyclopedia
of Yoga, Sanathana and classical Indian philosophy, cleverly
expounding profound concepts, albeit simply and clearly, through
a tour of the numbers 1 to 10.
A special feature is his revelations concerning the great secret
of number : Number is not just of the mundane world but a
doorway to the arcane - digits may be used to penetrate beyond
the physical into the metaphysical and this is the secret knowledge
of the Vedic mathematicians who could code Pi into a Bhajan
or derive Phi from the 24 syllables of the Gayatri.
His introduction to this system of Yantra, a unique method characteristic
of the teachings of Ananda Ashram and Gitananda Yoga, carries
keys to understanding our individual Dharma and our cyclic Karmic
flows. This is Ankjyotisha i.e. the influence of numerical coding
embedded in your brain, or propensities from the month, day
and year of your birth. Another term for this area of traditional
Jyotisha is Anka Vignyan or Wisdom of Numbers.
Thus he skillfully enlarges the readers concept beyond number
as mere quantitative manipulation and opens the window to a
contemplative journey into the alternative reality of the animistic,
magical sphere of qualitative mathematics.
His exposition belongs in the library of every practitioner and teacher
of Yoga as it is the best, most comprehensive and most understandable
work upon the subject I have personally ever perused.
This volume is filled with succinct, rare and far-reaching concepts
covering every phase of Yoga, giving innovative insights drawn
f rom Dr Ananda Bal ayogi Bhavanani s Yogi c and medi cal
background.
I congratulate Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani on this magnificent
and original presentation and heartily commend and recommend
this wonderful opus to students and teachers throughout the
world. Yoga: 1 to 10 is a treasure that will be long valued.
Dr Jonn Mumford
(Swami Anandakapila Saraswati)
Sydney, NSW, Australia.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
ii
of various creatures are measured in numerical units and human
history is analyzed in periods of time.
The power of numbers as an ordering device of the mind, which
enables human consciousness to make sense of the seemingly
haphazard flow of events, is obvious. Business is based on calculations.
Governments rise and fall on the power of the numbers of people
they can garner in their support. Large numbers of anything
produce a great power, either for good or for bad. Witness the
power of Nazi Germany or the hordes of Genghis Khan.
Numbers even govern human destiny. Numbers are a measurement
of vibrations, of occurrences, of objects. Indeed, numbers are
the essence of life. In India, a philosophical system evolved
which explained the Universe with numbers. It was called Samkya
and was propagated by the Rishi Kapila. The Greeks also realized
the mystical value and content of numbers. Numbers are at
the root and the base of all things, said Cornelius Agrippa.
The great philosopher mystic Pythagoras said, All lies veiled
in numbers. The Jewish thinkers understood these concepts
and the Kabala taught, The Universe is built on numbers. The
great European thinker Leibniz wrote, Numbers are the Universal
language. Balzao postulated, Number is an Entity, and at the
same time, a Breath emanating from God. The Breath, alone
which could organise the physical Cosmos, where naught obtains
the form but through Deity, which is an effect of number. It is
no coincidence that many famous European philosophers like
Rene Descarte were basically mathematicians. It is said that
anyone who wished to study philosophy with Pythagoras had
first to study mathematics to discipline their mind.
Shri Ram Gopal Mujumdhar, Swami Kanakananda, who was
the Guru of Yogamaharishi Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj,
INTRODUCTION
vii
FORWARD
Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani has composed
a unique work, which is a cornucopia of
knowledge about Yoga, Hinduism, and the
classical schools of Indian philosophy.
The creator and the created are inexplicably
bound together. It is not possible to consider
the one independently from the other anymore
than we can produce a one sided coin from
our pocket.
Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani is the son and inheritor of the
Giri lineage from his father, the late Guru Yogamaharishi Dr. Swami
Gitananda Giri, famous throughout the world. His early years
were spent within the nurturing environment of his fathers Gurukula
Ashram in Pondicherry and under the loving attention of his equally
famous mother Yogacharini Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani.
The product of this upbringing is a Sattvic being who brings
great honour to his parents and is a worthy successor and carrier
of the sacred knowledge transmitted to him.
Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani is both a renaissance man and
a being of the 21st century. The breadth of his religious and
artistic education places him amongst the ideal of renaissance
humanists while his medical and postgraduate medical education
embeds him amongst 21st century scientists.
During his medical education he graduated with the Gold Medal
Award for Preventive Medicine and Distinction in General Surgery,
and has proceeded to postgraduate work in Family Health including
the publication of numerous research papers in medical journals.
He is a master of Carnatic Music with emphasis upon vocals and
percussion having won many awards and with CDs to his credit.
His skill as a visual artist is outstanding as demonstrated by
the copious and apt illustrations demonstrating each concept
elucidated throughout Yoga: 1 to 10.
FORWARD
i
taught the Sci ence of Yantra to Swami Gi tananda. Noti ng
that al l Uni versal forms can be broken down to a l i mi ted
number of shapes, he said, God geometrises, man observes.
Carl Gustav Jung, the great psycho analyst, realized the
mysti c qual i ty of numbers and postul ated that they were a
pri mordi al archetypal power, whi ch was sel f-exi stent i n the
human racial sub-consciousness.
It is thus very significant that Yogacharya Dr. Ananda Balayogi
Bhavanani , chi ef di sci pl e and successor of the l i neage of
Yogamaharishi Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj, has
brought out thi s beauti ful book YOGA: 1 to 10, showi ng
the relationship between various Yogic and Yantric concepts
and the numbers associated with these various principles.
Dr. Ananda has skillfully outlined the very basic associations
between numbers and their inherent qualities and powers in
the first section of his book, dealing with the Yantric cycles of
time and the Dharma Marga or birth path. Thereafter, using each
number as a base, he shows how various Yogic ideas and theories
are expressed with numbers in harmony with their essential meaning.
Using drawings and diagrams to illustrate the ideas, the author
thus skillfully presents, deep esoteric information in a form easily
digested even by the neophyte.
May the Gurus wisdom flow into our bodies, hearts and minds
as a continuous stream of light, enlightening all of mankind and
all beings, fortunate enough to manifest on this lovely earth
planet.
- Yogacharini Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani
Ananda Ashram, Pondicherry, India.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
viii
FROM THE AUTHOR
I gratefully acknowledge the great blessing and
good fortune I have had to be born the son of
the greatest Yoga Team of the last century.
I offer this compilation to the lotus feet of my
Guru-Father Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda
Giri Guru Maharaj and my Mother-Guru
Kalaimamani Yogacharini Smt Meenakshi Devi
Bhavanani (Amma), who have inculcated in me the discipline
of Yoga, as well as sowing the seed of this great art and science
in my heart. Amma has also been kind enough to critically review
this manuscript and has played a large part in motivating and
guiding me in this venture. She is also the one who initially
suggested this idea of explaining Yogic concepts through a numerical
codification as an effective and valuable teaching tool.
I owe my love of numbers (a virtual numerophilia) first and
foremost to my beloved Akka, Yogacharini Renuka Giri, who
sowed the seed of this great love during my formative years.
She taught me the beauty inherent in numbers while educating
me i n mathemati cs. Excel l ent mathemati cs teachers at my
school , such as Shri Pandi an, Shri G Sundaresan and
Shri Ravichandran further developed this love till it blossomed
with excellent marks in most examinations at all levels. This
trai ni ng i n numbers al so hel ped devel op my anal yti cal and
scientific temperament, which was very useful in my medical
studies. I strongly feel that medical personnel shouldnt neglect
mathematics at the junior level, as this is vital in developing a
scientific reasoning ability.
My numerophilia has now been transformed into a deeper understanding
that numbers are not only measures of quantity, but are also
FROM THE AUTHOR
ix
CONTENTS
Forward i
Appreciation and Blessings iii
Introduction v
From the Author ix
SECTION ONE :
Yantra : Yogic Science of Number, Name and form
Karma Yuga 1
Dharma Marga 9
SECTION TWO :
Yoga : One to Ten
Ekah - One 17
Dwau - Two 27
Trayah - Three 41
Chatwarah - Four 61
Pancha - Five 83
Shat - Six 95
Sapta - Seven 103
Ashta - Eight 109
Nava - Nine 115
Dasha - Ten 125
A Final Word 135
About the Author 139
inheritors of special qualities. I owe this Jnana (wisdom) and
illumination of my Buddhi (intellect) to Dr Jonn Mumford (Swami
Anandakapila Saraswathi). Dr Jonn is an excellent teacher
who brings out the best of numbers through his Yantric teachings.
These teachings given to him by Pujya Swamiji Gitananda Giri
Guru Maharaj many decades ago are now being passed on to
all of us at Ananda Ashram through Dr Jonn, and I have personally
benefi ted tremendousl y from these wonderful teachi ngs.
Dr John was also instrumental in restoring an old manuscript of
Swamijis Yantra teachings, which was published by Satya Press
with his kind cooperation and help. His guidance has enabled
me to understand the link between Swamijis Yantric and Rishiculture
Ashtanga Yoga teachings, and this has spurred me on to the
creation of this work. I must also thank Dr Jonn profusely for
his wonderfully blessed forward to this book, which is typically
him in all ways. May he continue to guide us all with his magnificent
Yantric teachings for many more years to come.
I also thank Sri Bala Ratnam of Australia, a dedicated student
of Swamiji and Founder, Vibrational Breath Therapy, for his blessings
and guidance at all times.
Many great masters of Yoga have blessed me at different stages
in my life and I am privileged to have been the recipient of these
potent blessings. These include Padmabhusan Sri BKS Iyengar,
Sri Yogendra Ji, Sri Sant Keshavdas, Swami Chinmayananda,
Swami Dayananda, Yogi Amrit Desai, Sri Direndra Brahmachari,
Swami Chidananda Saraswathi, Sri Ma Yoga Shakti, Swami
Satchitananda, Maharishi Arunachalam, Swami Veda Bharathi,
Dr. HR Nagendra, Sri TKV Desikachar, Swami Suddananda Bharathi
and Sri Kannaya Yogi.
Great Yogic personalities such as Srila Sri Shankara Giri Swamigal,
Shri RR Diwakar, Prof TR Anantaraman, Prof Dr B Ramamurthy,
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
x
2005 By Yogacharya Dr Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani
All rights reserved
First Edition : 2005
Published by : Kalaimamani Yogacharini
MEENAKSHI DEVI BHAVANANI
Managing Editor
Satya Press
25, 2nd Cross, Iyyanar Nagar,
Pondicherry-13. Tel. (0413) 2241561
E-mail: amma@icyer.com
website: www.geocities.com/yognat2001
Typeset and Designed by : RAAJKUMARS
No.1, Rajarajeswari Nagar,
Vallalar Salai,
Pondicherry - 605 011.
Any material reproduced from this book may be done
so only with prior permission of the author and with
due credit to the source. This is an important aspect
of Yogic culture and we request all readers to follow
this request in the true spirit of Yama and Niyama.
Dr W Selvamurthy, Dr MV Bhole, Prof Dr Madanmohan, Prof
RC Gupta, Sri Yogeshwar, Sri DR Karthikeyan, Shri SK Jindel,
Dr SV Rao, Dr RP Pandey, Dr SR Joharapurkar and Dr MD Khapre
have also influenced my life as ideal role models of men who
have balanced both the external and internal worlds with Yogic
skill and ease.
Receiving the potent blessings of the reverend Shankaracharya
of Kanchipuram Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Swamigal at the age
of ten years has been a great inspiration to me in all my activities.
I thank all my elders who have blessed me in the propagation
of Yoga and given me an excellent foundation upon which I may
build my Sadhana and Yoga Life.
I heartfully thank my beloved Dharmapatni, Yogacharini Devasena
Bhavanani for steadfastly assisting me in all my Yogic and artistic
endeavours and thus making my life more pleasant and joyful,
as well as for bringing the light of joy into my life through our
beloved daughter, Dhivya Priya Bhavanani.
I thank Sonya Buckman, S. Tamilsengolan, V. Renuka Devi,
T. Tamilarasan, and G. Dayanidy for helping me proof read and
for the suggestions of many good ideas for this book.
I wish to put on record my appreciation of the authors of the
following texts from which I have sourced many an idea as,
well as illustrations. May they continue to guide aspirants on
this wonderful path towards the Divine.
1. Yoga: Step-By-Step by Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri.
2. Ashtanga Yoga of Patanjali by Dr. Swami Gitananda Giri.
3. Raja Yoga Sutras by Swami Jyothirmayananda.
4. Four Chapters On Freedom by Swami Satyananda Saraswati.
FROM THE AUTHOR
xi
Dedicated
To
The Greatest Guru In My Universe
THE LION OF PONDICHERRY
Yogamaharishi
Dr Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj
(24.07.1907 - 29.12.1993)
Who Protected the Purity of Rishiculture Ashtanga Yoga
With His Mighty Roar of Truth
5. Light on Yoga by Padmabhusan BKS Iyengar.
6. The Science of Yoga by I K Taimni.
7. Laghu Yoga Vashistha by Narayana Swami Aiyar.
8. Bhagavad Gita by Swami Chidananda.
9. Yoga Kosha. Published by Kaivalyadhama, Lonavla, Maharasthra.
10. Yoga. Published by V. K. Prakashan Trust, Chennai.
11. Hatha Yoga Pradipika. English Translation by Pancham
Sinh.
12. Gheranda Samhita. English Translation by Rai Bahadur
S C Vasu.
13. Shi va Samhi ta. Engl i sh Transl ati on by Rai Bahadur
S C Vasu.
14. The Six Systems of Hindu Philosophy by Swami Harshananda.
15. Shambala Encyclopedia of Yoga by Dr. Georg Feuerstein.
16. Asana, Pranayama, Mudra, Bandha by Swami Satyananda.
17. Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali by BKS Iyengar.
18. A Primer of Hinduism by DS Sharma, Sri Ramakrishna Math,
Chennai.
19. Yoga i n Educati on by Dr HR Nagendra, T Mohan and
A Shriram.
20. Yoga: Its Basis and Applications by Dr HR Nagendra.
21. New Perspectives in Stress Management by Dr HR Nagendra
and Dr H Nagarathna.
22. Integrated Approach of Yoga Therapy for Positive Health
by Dr HR Nagendra and Dr H Nagarathna.
23. Pranayama: The Art and Science by Dr HR Nagendra.
24. Ancient Yoga and Modern Science by Prof TR Anantaraman.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
xii
25. Yoga Life (International Journal of Yoga Jivana Satsangha)
edited by Yogacharini Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani, Pondicherry.
26. History of Yogic Thought by A Annadurai, Pondicherry.
27. Yoga for Health by Dr HR Nagendra, Bangalore.
28. The Spiritual Heritage of Tyagaraja by C Ramanujachari.
29. Amar Chitra Katha (past issues), India Book House, Mumbai.
30. Tirumantiram, an English translation by Dr B Natarajan,
Sri Ramakrishna Math, Chennai.
31. Pictorial Stories for Children (past issues) Sri Ramakrishna
Math, Chennai.
Yoga is the science of the SELF and can also be termed the
science of man in depth, the science of conscious evolution
or the science of human possibilities. Yoga not only has the
concepts but also the tools and technology needed to find OUR
SELF. While modern science or the modern scientist looks outward
for the smallest single unit of existence, the Yogi searches the
depth of his own self for the largest single unit of existence.
According to Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj,
who was one of the foremost authorities on RISHICULTURE
ASHTANGA YOGA in the last century, Yoga is a science, and
not only is it a science but it is the Mother of Science.
Dr. I K Taimni, another learned scholar known for his great
analytical works on Yoga, even goes to the extent of calling
Yoga the Science of Sciences.
The characteristic of a science or Vidya is the approach and
not merely the content or quality of knowledge. Though Yoga
has its foundations more than 6000 years ago and is principally
an oral tradition, the verbal basis of Yoga-Vidya (Yogic Science)
is found in the Upanishads (especially the Katha-Upanishad,
Shvetashvatara-Upanishad and Maitrayaniya-Upanishad), the
Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, and the Bhagavad Gita. According
to Prof. TR Anantharaman, President of the Indian Academy of
FROM THE AUTHOR
xiii
Yoga, all of these Yogic scriptures are pre Buddhist in nature
and share a systematic and broad scientific basis. Katha Upanishad,
one of the first written works on Yoga mentions the Yoga-Vidya
(science of Yoga) and Yoga-Vidhi (the technological know how)
of Yoga. The pure science of Yoga is Adhyatma Vidya (science
of man in depth), while the technology or applied science (rules
of Yoga practice), that is the technology of unification or integration,
is called Yoga-Vidhi. The scientific attitude of Yoga can be seen
from the firm insistence on Pariprasna (enquiry or dialogue)
as a pre requisite to higher knowledge, as enunciated in the
Bhagavad Gita (IV.34). Similarly the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
display a scientific attitude towards the acquisition of Pramana
(true knowledge). Patanjali says that true knowledge can be
acquired (Yoga Sutra: Chapter I, Verse7) by direct perception
(Pratyaksha), rational inference (Anumana), and from reliable
testimony (Agama). This use of the intellect (Buddhi) endowed
with discrimination (Viveka) is typical of all Yoga traditions and
their teachings. The Bhagavad Gita, which is sometimes referred
to as the Yoga Shastra, shows the exchange between Arjuna
and Yogeshwar Krishna to be of a genuine spirit of enquiry and
a keen desire for truth, as one would expect from a modern
scientist and his guide. The Shiva-Samhita (V.26-30) lists the
characters of a fully qualified disciple (Shishya) as follows. Endowed
with great energy and enthusiasm, intelligent, heroic, learned
in the scriptures, free from delusion Arent these very same
qualities required by a true scientist (a seeker of true knowledge)?
The process of Yoga is one of the understanding and achievement
of Mind Control. The Yogis discovered that the mind has many
levels such as Mudha (dull and inert mind), Kshipta (distracted
mind), Vikshipta (partially distracted mind), Ekagratha (concentrated
mind), and Niruddha (controlled mind). They also found that
the thought waves (Chitta-Vritti) were five fold, and are Pramana
(conception), Viparyaya (misconception), Vikalpa (imagination),
Nidra (sleep) and Smrithi (memory). They realized that without
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
xiv
controlling these mental fluctuations there was no hope of spiritual
evolution. This is why Maharishi Patanjali says, Yoga is the
stilling of the whirlpools of the mind (Yogash chittavritti nirodhah).
Once this is achieved the Yogin rests in his Essential Self (Tada
drishtu swarupeva sthanam). The method to achieve this state
is through dedicated and determined practice and dispassion
(Abyasa vairagyabhyam tannirodhah).
The Yogi views his being as a manifestation of the Divine and
realizes that he is not only the physical body, but he also has
four other bodies; the energy body, the mental body, the body
of wisdom, and the body of eternal bliss. This concept is known
as the Pancha Kosha. He follows the systematic practice (Abyasa)
of the eight-fold path of Ashtanga (Raja) Yoga, consisting of
moral restraints (Yama), ethical observances (Niyama), firm and
comfortable postures (Asana), expansion of the vital life force
(Pranayama), control of the senses (Pratyahara), concentration
(Dharana) leading into meditation (Dhyana) and ultimately transcends
the individual self in cosmic consciousness (Samadhi). This conscious
evolution may take years and years (even lifetimes) of disciplined
and dedicated practice (Abyasa), detachment or dispassion (Vairagya)
and loads of discrimination (Viveka). Through such a systematic
manner, the Sadhak (seeker of Truth) attempts to unite (Yuj)
his individual self (Jivatma) with the universal self (Paramatma).
Swami Vivekananda said, Yoga is really one of the grandest
sciencestake up the study of this science as you would any
other science of material nature and remember there is no mystery
and no danger in it.
Dr. I K Taimni, an eminent scholar known for his excellent work
on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (The Science of Yoga) says,
This science of sciences is too comprehensive in its nature
and too profound in its doctrine to be fitted into the framework
FROM THE AUTHOR
xv
Front Plain
of any particular philosophy-either ancient or modern. It stands
in its own right as a science based upon the eternal laws of the
Higher Life and does not require the support of any science or
philosophical system to uphold its claims. Its truths are based
in the experiences and experiments of an unbroken line of mystics,
occultists, saints and sages, who have realized and borne witness
to them through the ages.
Sri RR Diwakar, who was one of the founding fathers of the
modern Indian political state, has the following to say. While
modern science (that is of an experimental nature) has brought
us to the brink of a nuclear war, the Yoga-Vidya (that is experiential
in nature) on the other hand brings about peace, harmony, love,
friendliness and cooperation.
This experiential nature of Yoga is well brought out by Vyasas
Yoga-Bhashya wherein he says, Yoga must be known through
Yoga. Yoga grows through Yoga. He who is attentive towards
Yoga long delights in Yoga.(III.6). Similarly the Yoga-Shikha-
Upanishad warns of the snare of textbooks (Shastra-Jala),
referring to bookish learning without accompanying experience.
Dr. Georg Feuerstein Ph.D., Founder of the Yoga Research Centre,
USA, says in his excellent book The Shambala Guide to Yoga,
Long before physicists discovered that matter is energy vibrating
at a certain rate, the Yogis of India had treated this body-mind
as a playful manifestation of the Ultimate Power (Shakti), the
dynamic aspect of Reality. They realized that to discover the
true Self, one had to harness attention because the energy of
the body-mind follows attention. A crude example of this process
is the measurable increase of blood flow to our fingers and toes
that occurs when we concentrate on them. The Yogis are very
careful about where they place their attention, for the mind creates
patterns of energy, causing habits of thought and behavior that
can be detrimental to the pursuit of genuine happiness.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
xvi
Dr VSSM Rao writes that, The tradition of Yoga is so perfect
that we have to seek ways of expounding it in modern scientific
terminology instead of simply evaluating it in terms of current
concepts of science, which is expanding so rapidly that a time
may come when man would like to live by his intuition rather
than by scientific planning, bristling with conflicts and balancing
a number of variables not completely understood.
According to Dr B Ramamurthy, the late eminent neurosurgeon,
Yoga re-orients the functional hierarchy of the entire nervous
system. He has noted that Yoga not only benefits the nervous
system, but also the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and
endocrine systems in addition to bringing about general biochemical
changes in yoga practitioners.
Professor Dr SV Rao, an eminent medical doctor says, Yoga
is a science because it is verifiable. Yoga as a science of living
is also an art. Yoga, therefore, may be defined as the science
and art of optimum living. Yoga has the capacity to move, either
side by side with medical science or independently. This is because
Yoga has a sound system of etiology, diagnosis and pathogenesis
of disease. Thus we have a complete system by itself in Yoga.
Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri Guru Maharaj says,
Yoga is scientific and many of it practices can be measured by
existing scientific methods. As a science of mind it offers a safe
method of concentration and meditation educing a practical application
of the power of the human mind. Its entire process is centered
in awareness, that is why I call it the science of awareness.
It is vital that we try to understand the wonderful culture of India
(Bharata Desh) if we are to understand fully the great science
FROM THE AUTHOR
xvii
of Total Man (Yoga) that has arisen from it. It is imperative that
the youth of our world are awakened to the greatness inherent
in Indian Culture and Yoga and the link between both of them.
They must be given a proper and systematic training in Yoga
and our cultural heritage. Catching them young must be our
aim if we are to educate them about the greatness of this cultural
heritage of Yoga.
It is to further this understanding of the link between Indian
culture and Yoga, as well as to understand the deep inherent
connection between numbers and our existence, that this book
has been compiled. Many Yogic concepts can be grouped under
the numbers from 1 to 10, and this book is an attempt to help
us learn the science of Yoga and its philosophy in an enjoyable
and leisurely manner. My attempt has been to present the Yogic
teachings and attitudes within the framework of numbers, as I
feel this is a wonderfully effective tool both for teaching as well
as for learning.
Any material reproduced from this book may be done so only
with prior permission of the author and with due credit to the
source. This is an important aspect of Yogic culture and I request
all readers to comply in the true spirit of Yama and Niyama.
I wish that all those who go through this book find that it enriches
their knowledge of this science of Yoga and Indian Culture as
much as it did for me in its compilation.
I conclude with a favorite quote from Pujya Swamiji Gitananda
Giri Guru Maharaj who said, Health and happiness are your
birthright. Do not forsake your golden culture for the plastic
playthings of the modern world. Learn and live Yoga for then
you will know real health and happiness.
- Yogacharya Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
xviii
T
H
E

Y
A
N
T
R
I
C

C
Y
C
L
E

O
F

T
I
M
E
1
KARMA YUGA:
CYCLES OF TIME
In the Rishiculture Ashtanga Yoga tradition also known as the
Gitananda Yoga Paramparai, there are three important sciences,
namely Mantra, Yantra and Tantra. Yantra is the mystical science
of number, name and form, and is a method by which one can
learn to live in tune with the cycles of the universe, rather
than be out of tune with those very cycles. According to the
Yantric concept as taught by Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda
Giri, each number has a special inherent quality or power, and
numbers are not merely measures of quantities as is usually
presumed. Every aspect of life goes through a phase of nines.
This phase may be nine years, nine months, nine weeks or even
nine days. This concept can be further extended both ways to
go down to nine milliseconds on one hand or up to nine lifetimes
on the other.
The evolutionary phases of the five Tattwas (elements) are an
inherent natural cycle that manifests in all human endeavors.
By understanding these cycles we may move with natural rhythm,
rather than go against the tides of time. We thus fulfill ourselves
in a positive logical way rather than living haphazardly. This
cyclical pattern duplicates the agricultural cycle of SOWING (three
phases), CULTIVATING (three phases), and HARVESTING (three
phases). On the wheel of life, these nine distinct phases are
found to exist in a nine unit cycle of time. This cyclic progression
of time is known as the Karma Yuga, and the different phases
are as follows :
KARMA YUGA: CYCLES OF TIME
16
9. MANGALA (MARS) - HUMANIST-SPIRITUALIST
Keynote adjective: Psychic Power. People
in this birth path often incarnate where they
are unable to express their qualities. This is
the vibration of the so-called helping professions.
Self-actualization occurs by living a life of
service to others. They must be a friend to
all and engage in both social welfare and
psychiatric fields. It is obligatory for one born
with this Dharma to accept spiritual leadership
i f the occasi on ari ses. They are hi ghl y
inspirational. Despite deep spiritual urges,
emotionality and temperamental displays are
inherent weaknesses, and these people often
personify martial personalities. When unbalanced factors are
present, they may suffer from substance abuse and experience
loss of love through death or divorce. All aspects of the central
and autonomic nervous system are at risk when stressed. They
are always a potential candidate for the burn-out or wounded
healer syndromes.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
Yoga Therapy Consultation with
Yogacharya
Dr. ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
(Member, International Association of Yoga Therapists, USA)
Tuesday and Thursday from 6.00 pm. to 9.00 pm.
For Pri or Appoi ntments Contact :
25, I I
nd
Cross, I yyanar Nagar, Pondicherry-605 013.
Tel: 2241561 Cell: 98423-11433 E-mail: abb@doctor.com
www.geocities.com/ yognat2001/ i_am_here
8
depending upon what we have sown previously.
This is the time for philosophical reflection
so that you may garner a constructive seedling
from the past to plant anew in the forthcoming
ONE phase. The NINE cycles are the time to
tie all loose strings or loose ends together
and prepare for a fresh start in life. This can
be an emotional period and for some may
bring deep spiritual experiences. The NINE
phases are a wonderful opportunity for integration,
re-integration, forward planning and experiencing
the satisfaction and rewards of work well done.
BUDDH
SHUKRA CHANDRA
GURU SURYA MANGALA
KETU SHANI RAHU
NAVA GRAHAS: RULERS OF THE NINE DHARMA MARGAS
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
DHARMA MARGA :
THE INDIVIDUAL PATH
LIFETIME AFTER LIFETIME
A musician must make music; an artist must paint, a poet must
write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself. What one
can be, one must be. Abraham Maslow
The Dharma Marga or Birth Path, which is a central teaching
in the science of Yantra, represents our psychic and spiritual
inheritance in this lifetime. Through understanding our Dharma
Marga, we may guide consciously our spiritual evolution as we
progress Life after Life. Adding up the date, month and complete
year of our birth, and then reducing the resultant number to a
single digit, is the method of calculating our Dharma Marga.
For example, if one were born on April 16, 1972, one would be
a THREE in his birth path or Dharma Marga, and his whole
life would be influenced by the qualities associated with the
number THREE. (April is the fourth month, so 4 + 16 + 1972
may be reduced to 4 +7 + 1 which is further reduced to 3). One
may see how numbers affect an individuals destiny by studying
how Yantra associates the various birth paths (Dharma Marga)
with certain qualities of character, as well as with the appropriate
planet, element and associated Deity (Cosmic Energy). The
Yantric concept of Dharma Marga is like a guideline or a detailed
map or blueprint of lessons which the individual soul must learn
and the path he/she much walk during his/her lifetime in the
present body.
DHARMA MARGA: THE INDIVIDUAL PATH LIFETIME AFTER LIFETIME
9
T
H
E

Y
A
N
T
R
I
C

C
Y
C
L
E

O
F

T
I
M
E
of Total Man (Yoga) that has arisen from it. It is imperative that
the youth of our world are awakened to the greatness inherent
in Indian Culture and Yoga and the link between both of them.
They must be given a proper and systematic training in Yoga
and our cultural heritage. Catching them young must be our
aim if we are to educate them about the greatness of this cultural
heritage of Yoga.
It is to further this understanding of the link between Indian
culture and Yoga, as well as to understand the deep inherent
connection between numbers and our existence, that this book
has been compiled. Many Yogic concepts can be grouped under
the numbers from 1 to 10, and this book is an attempt to help
us learn the science of Yoga and its philosophy in an enjoyable
and leisurely manner. My attempt has been to present the Yogic
teachings and attitudes within the framework of numbers, as I
feel this is a wonderfully effective tool both for teaching as well
as for learning.
Any material reproduced from this book may be done so only
with prior permission of the author and with due credit to the
source. This is an important aspect of Yogic culture and I request
all readers to comply in the true spirit of Yama and Niyama.
I wish that all those who go through this book find that it enriches
their knowledge of this science of Yoga and Indian Culture as
much as it did for me in its compilation.
I conclude with a favorite quote from Pujya Swamiji Gitananda
Giri Guru Maharaj who said, Health and happiness are your
birthright. Do not forsake your golden culture for the plastic
playthings of the modern world. Learn and live Yoga for then
you will know real health and happiness.
- Yogacharya Dr. Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
xviii
17
EKAH - ONE
PARA BRAHMAN
The Universal spirit of One-
Ness i s known as Para
Brahman. This is the mighty
energy of the universe that
creates, and sustains, as well
as evolves through change.
This metaphysical principle
of the universe is of the nature
of pure existence, pure consciousness and pure bliss (Sat-Chit-
Anandam). It is formless and not bound by the laws of space,
time or causation. It is Nirguna, i.e. beyond the qualities of the
three Gunas. According to the Shwetasvatara Upanishad, The
Divine is omnipresent, penetrating everything and is everywhere
simultaneously at one and the same time. Although many Gods
are worshiped externally in Hinduism (Sanathana Dharma), it
is well understood that behind them all, there is the same all
pervasive Brahman. This spiritual insight sees the identity of
the undying external Brahman and undying internal Atman as
one and the same. According to the Isa Upanishad, all animate
and inanimate objects of the universe are pervaded by the same
universal spirit and this is exemplified by the verse, Isavasyam
i dam sarvam yat ki m cha j agatyam j agat. Al l the four
Mahavakyams, which are concise utterances of the Upanishads,
reiterate the oneness of the Atma, the Self within, and the Brahman.
SIDDHA ASANA
According to the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, the most important
ONE Asana is the Siddha Asana. This is the pose of the Siddha,
EKAH - ONE
38
KURMA AVATARA
Kurma Avatara, the tortoise, is the second incarnation of Mahavishnu.
This Avatara helped sustain the great mountain Mandara while
the Devas and Asuras churned the ocean for Amrita (nectar of
i mmo r t a l i t y ) ,
using Vasuki the
serpent as a
churni ng rope.
There i s an
Asana cal l ed
Kurma Asana
and there is also
an Upa Prana
Vayu (minor air)
known by this name.
JALA (APAS)
Jala or Apas is the second element of the Pancha Maha Bhutas
and is related to the Swadhisthana Chakra. The dexterity offered
by the hands, the adaptability of ones nature, and the sensation
of taste are all related to the fluidity of this element. Water may
be a life giving, healing spring, a soft mountain stream, a swift
flowing river or even the mighty ocean. The silvery crescent
moon represents the Apas Mandala, as the movement of the
tides with the phases of the moon is a well-known influence of
celestial bodies on the elements.
ARDHA NARISHWARA
Ardha Narishwara is the perfect symbol of Hatha Yoga, as this
concept represents balance of the opposites. The two flows of
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
28
of the Tantrics is based on the principle of reversal (Viparita).
He says that they seem to indulge in the sensual pleasure (Bhoga),
whereas in reality they cultivate transcendental bliss (Ananda).
The Tantric principle of Pancha Makaras or the five Ms is
the best example of the divergent views of the two schools.
These five actions are Madya, Maamsa, Matsya, Mudra and Maithuna.
The Vama Margis perform the five actions in the literal manner,
while the Dakshina Margis of the evolutionary school practice
entirely different rituals, as they understand the five actions
metaphorically rather then literally. According to the Vama Margis,
these five principles are drinking wine (Madya), flesh eating
(Maamsa), fish eating (Matsya), eating cereals (Mudra), and
sexual activity (Maithuna). The Dakshina Margis, on the other
hand, take them to mean imbibing the glandular ambrosia and
listening to universal sounds (Madya), vow of silence (Maamsa),
suppression of the Vayus to awaken the Kundalini (Matsya),
and symbolic concentration and meditation leading to a union
of all activities of life in the cosmic being (Maithuna). Vama
Margis break social taboos, and this may be justified by understanding
that their goal is not sensual gratification, but self-transcendence
in the context of bodily existence. Tantra has its own fully developed
secret language (Sandha Bhashya) and unless the Sadhaka
understands this, he may lose himself in the body rather than
transcend it.
DWAITHA
Dwaitha Philosophy is the dualistic philosophy
that was propagated by Saint Ramanuja and
Madhavacharya. It views this world that is
a modification of nature as different from
Brahman and individual souls (Jivas). Devotion
to Ishwara or the Divine is said to be the
MADHAVACHARYA
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
27
DWAU - TWO
TWO MAJOR SCHOOLS OF TANTRA
Tantra is the ancient Indian science of energy activation and
control. There are two major divisions or paths in Tantra. The
Vama Marga (left hand) Tantra deals with principles
of energy in a materialistic, exoteric and literal manner,
whereas the Dakshina Marga (right hand) deals with
them in a subtler, esoteric and more refined
manner. Pujya Swamiji Gitananda Giri Guru
Maharaj was an exponent of the Bengali
Dakshina Marga Tantra, as taught to him by
his Guru, Pujya Swami Kanakananda Brighu
Guru Maharaj. Pujya Swamiji termed Vama Marga
as the outer or exoteric path and Dakshina Marga
as the esoteric or inner path. Dakshina Marga
is often mentioned as the Sattvic path, while
Vama Marga is mentioned as the Rajasic and
Tamasic path. It is also taught that Vama Marga utilises the
lunar, feminine, physical, emotional energies of the
Ida Nadi , whi l e the Dakshi na Marga uti l i zes the
masculine, solar, mental, intellectual energies of
Pingala Nadi. This is in principle similar to
the concept of Hatha Yoga, i n whi ch an
understanding of the body having two equal
and yet opposite energies flowing through
either half (of the body) is cultivated. The beauty
of Indian thought is an acceptance that there
are many paths, and though they may appear
contradictory on the surface, each has its own
validity within its own framework. According to
Dr Georg Feuerstein, the seemingly weird behavior
DAKSHINA
MARGA
VAMA
MARGA
DWAU - TWO
40
and emotionally steady state of Samatvam or Sama Bhava. The
person who has attained that steady state is known as a Sthitha
Prajna, or man of steady wisdom. This is one of the most important
qualities necessary for spiritual evolution. Patanjali says that
when Asana is perfected, the Dwandwas will cease to affect us
(Tato dwandwa anabhighaatah). Dwandwas may also be interpreted
as proprioceptive mechanisms of the body that are important
for posture and movement. Unless the opposite (antagonist)
groups of muscles relax when the one (agonist) group is acting,
tremors will result instead of smooth, uninterrupted action. The
overcoming of the Dwandwas through restoration of nerve-muscle
connections in the body leads to a balanced action between
agonist and antagonist muscles that is Samatvam at a physical
level.
SHIRSHA ASANA AND SARVANGA ASANA
These t wo Asanas make an i nt erest i ng pai r. Whi l e Shi rsha
Asana i s known as t he Ki ng of Asanas, Sarvanga Asana i s
known as the Queen of Asanas. Both are
excel l ent postures, uni que to Hatha Yoga
and usef ul f or rest ori ng normal acy t o
t he psycho- neuro-i mmuno - endocri ne
system. They are more useful , however,
as preventi ve, i nsurance agents agai nst
di sorders of t hi s syst em. Whi l e Shi rsha
Asana i s useful to i ncrease prani c fl ows
t o t he head, neck and spi ne, as wel l
as creat e a great drai nage of t he
l ower l i mbs, Sarvanga Asanas i s
great for endocrine well-being and
for reposi ti oni ng organ prol apses
t hat are common i n women.
SARVANGA
ASANA
SHIRSHA
ASANA
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
59
MUMMALAM
According to Tirumoolar in the Tirumandiram, Pasas (fetters)
that bind the Pasu (unevolved, ignorant souls that are animal
- like in nature) are of three types. They are called Malas or
stains or impurities. They are the Anava Mala, Karma Mala,
and Maya Mala. Anava Mala corresponds to the Mother Klesha
of Avidya (Mula-Avidya). The soul feels confined to and limited
to the body and the sense organs. This Anava makes the Jiva
ignorant of its real glory and power. Under the influence of Anava
Mala, the Jiva indulges in all manners of actions and acquires
merits and demerits, thus becoming subject to the birth death
- rebirth cycle. This cycle of action-reaction is the Karma Mala
that causes union of the conscious and unconscious. The third
Mala is Maya, which gives souls the means and objects of enjoyment.
Through spiritual disciplines, the Maya and Karma Malas can
be effaced, but it is only through the grace of the Divine that
Anava Mala can be removed. Souls are classified on the basis
of lingering Malas into Sakalars (having all three Malas), Pralayakalars
(those who have got rid of Maya but are still stuck with Karma
and Anava), and the Vignanakalars, who are the highest evolved.
The Vignanakalars have only Anava Mala and they may be freed
from it only by the grace of the Divine. When all Malas are removed
the Jiva becomes one with the Divine
FIRE
Tej as or fi re i s the thi rd of the mani fest el ements (Pancha
Maha Bhuta) and i s rel ated to the Mani pura Chakra. The red
i nverted tri angl e (Tej o Mandal a) that symbol i zes creati vi ty,
moti vati on, power and energy i s the Mandal a associ ated wi th
thi s el ement. Thi s Mandal a has a deep correl ati on wi th the
Indi an cl assi cal danci ng art of Bharata Natyam, where the
TRAYAH - THREE
39
energies in the body are the positive, masculine,
solar energy on the right side, and the
negative, feminine, lunar energy on
the left side. Balancing the energies
of the Ha on the right side and the
Tha energy on the left is the essence
of Hatha Yoga. Ardha Narishwara is that
form of Shiva where he is depicted as Lord
Shiva on the right half and Goddess Parvati on
the left side. We must realise that each one of
us has both masculine as well as feminine qualities
inherent within us and it is Yoga Sadhana that
can bring these opposite energy flows into the
ideal balanced state of perfect physical, emotional
and mental being.
DWANDWAS
Dwandwas are literally the pairs of opposites. They are an
important obstacle course that must be
transcended in our Yoga journey. These
pairs of opposites include praise
- blame, good - bad, pleasant -
unpleasant, right - wrong, hot-
col d, hunger-sati ety, honour-
dishonour etc that affect us at
the physical, emotional and mental
planes, and create ripples of
disturbances that stimulate the
chain reactions and vicious cycles/
spirals of action-reaction. Unless
the Dwandwas are transcended
we cannot attain to the mentally
STHITHA PRAJNA
DWAU - TWO
60
basi c shape of the body used i s that of the tri angl e. Fi re gi ves
us the l i ght of vi si on and wi sdom, but it i s al so capabl e of
burning us if we arent careful. Agni Devatha is the deity associated
wi th fi re and he i s propi ti ated through the vari ety of Homas
or Yagnas (fi re offeri ngs) that are part and parcel of the Indi an
way of l i fe. Agni sthana, the abode of Agni , i s sai d to extend
i n the human body from the navel to the hi ps. Panchagni or
fi ve forms of fi re resi de i n the vi tal body. These may al so be
described as the centres of energy consumption in the physical
body. Classically, the Panchagni are listed as Kalagni, Vadavagni,
Parthivagni, Vaidutagni, and Suryarupagni or Jatharagni. Kalagni
(Patal agni or Bhutagni ) i s sai d to burn i n the Mool adhara,
whi l e Vadavagni (Kashthapashanayorvahni ) i s i n the bones.
Parthi vagni (Kashtha-pashanagni ) i s i n the second part of the
duodenum where bile enters the digestive process. Vaidutagni
(Svantaratmakagni ) burns i n the ear, whi l e Suryarupagni or
Jatharagni is the digestive fire that burns brightly in the Manipura
or Nabhi Mandal a. Jatharagni i s sti mul ated by vari ous Hatha
Yogi c practi ces, such as the Agni sara.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
82
Ayamatma Brahma - This Self is Brahma
(Mandookya Upanishad - Atharva Veda)
All of these four Mahavakyams reiterate the universal oneness
of the Atma, the self within, and the Brahman.
ANAHATHA CHAKRA
Anahatha Chakra, the fourth Chakra, is often referred to as the
heart centre, and is depicted as a lotus having twelve petals.
This centre of Unstruck Sound is correlated to the air element
(Vayu) and the Tanmatra of touch (Sparsha). The spirit of being
young at heart is inherent to this Chakra, which is activated
by the vibratory sound Yung. The Mandala shape of the Chakra
is a six-sided dark blue hexagon formed by two interlaced triangles.
It is interesting that the hexagonal star shape is also associated
with Lord Muruga of the South Indian Hindu pantheon, who is
always depicted as a young, energetic, and handsome God.
This interfaced triangle symbol is also sacred to the Jewish people,
for whom it is known as The Star of David.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
61
CHATVARAH - FOUR
FOUR PATHS TO GOD REALIZATION
Four approaches to the Ultimate reality are blue printed in the
Siddhanta tradition of South India. These are Charya, Kriya,
Yoga, and Jnana. These are similar to the concepts of Bhakti
Yoga, Karma Yoga, Raja Yoga, and Jnana Yoga. In the Charya,
the Bhakti aspect is emphasized and is also known as the Dasa
Marga, or the path of the servitor. It leads to the Salokya Mukti,
where the devotee abides in the sphere of the Lord. In the second
path of Kriya, also known as Satputra Marga (path of the Lords
child), there is emphasis on ritualistic worship and right action.
It leads to the Samipya Mukti, where the devotee is close to the
Lord. The third approach is that of Yoga with intense contemplation
and is known as the Sakha Marga, the path of the Lords friend.
It leads to the Sarupya Mukti, where the devotee attains the
form of the Lord. The final path is that of Jnana or direct realization
known as the Sanmarga and it culminates in Sayujya Mukti, or
complete Union with the Lord
CHATVARAH - FOUR
80
Prana is the vital life force that acts as a catalyst in all our
activities, and Ayama, the expansion or control of this force.
Thus, Pranayama can be defined as the science of controlled,
conscious expansion of Prana. Gurus of Vedic times placed great
importance on Pranayama, and advocated its practice in order
to unleash the hidden potential energy known as the Kundalini
Shakti. Sage Vasishtha says that when the energy of the life
force (Prana) is restricted, then the mind dissolves like a shadow
of an object when the object is absent. He also says, The currents
of the life force are restrained through dispassion, the practice
of philosophical argument, reasoning, and
the abstention of effort, as well as knowledge
of the Ultimate Reality. The Shandilyopanishad
equates Pranayama with the Omkara.
In the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, Swatmarama
says, Disturbed breath leads to a disturbed
mind, hence, cultivate a steady and quiet
breath in order to control the mind and prolong
the life. He also says , The Lord of the
senses is the mind, the Lord of the mind is
the breath; the master of breath is the nervous
system; qui etness of the nerves and
concentration depend solely on the steady,
smooth and rhythmic sound of inhalation
and exhalation.
While the Vishnu Purana
defines Pranayama
as the technique that
brings under control
all that is connected
with Prana (the vital
PRANAYAMA MUDRAS
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
62
CHATUR AVASTHAS
According to Shiva Samhita there are four stages (Avasthas)
in Pranayama Sadhana. They are Arambha Avastha (the stage
of commencement), Ghatavastha (the stage of
intense endeavor), Parichayavastha (the stage
of intimate knowledge), and Nispattivastha
( t h e s t a g e o f c o n s u mma t i o n ) .
The Hat ha Yoga Pr adi pi ka
al so menti ons these four
Avasthas as stages of
progress i n Yoga
Sadhana itself.
CHATUR ASHRAMAS
The Chatur Ashramas or four stages of human life, as described
in the Yogic science of Yantra, are Brahmacharya, Grahasta,
Vanaprastha, and Sanyasa. Brahmacharya is the period of life
from birth to 27 years of age. This is the period of ones life
that is devoted exclusively towards attaining knowledge. It is
the period of study at the feet of a realised master (Guru). The
second phase of ones life is the Grahasta Ashrama, or the householder
phase. It is said to be from 27 to 54 years of age. This is the
period of responsibility and obligations. It is the productive period
of life in family, financial and personal pursuits. The world can
be said to turn because of the persons in this Ashrama, as they
have the responsibility to take care of all the other three groups.
The third stage of life is the Vanaprastha that runs from 54 to
81 years of age. This is the retirement time when one can sit
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
79
progress and practice if one is not introspective. Study of the
scriptures is an important method of understanding the self and
so many authorities translates Swadyaya as scriptural study.
Patanjali promises us that perfection in Swadyaya leads us to
union with our desired form of the Divine (Ishta Devatha).
PRANAYAMA
The systemati c
practice of Yoga,
as codi fi ed by
Maharishi Patanjali,
places Pranayama
as the fourth limb or Anga of Ashtanga
Yoga. He puts it above the Yama-Niyama
and Asana and says that one must practice
the Yama-Niyama and try to master Asana
in order to be able to practice Pranayama.
He defines Pranayama as The regulation
of the movements of i nhal ati on and
exhalation. He also states that by the
practice of Pranayama, the darkness that
hides the light of wisdom is destroyed.
He goes on to advise us that our mind
attains fitness for the Samyama practices
of Dharana, Dhyana and Samadhi through
perfection in Pranayama. Patanjali states
that Pranayama is regulated by place,
time, and number, meaning that at various
ti mes i n our Yoga Sadhana, di fferent
Pranayamas are required to be practiced
in order to attain the ultimate spiritual
goal of Moksha.
PRANAYAMA
MUDRAS
CHATVARAH - FOUR
63
back and relax in a quiet, reflective, meditative state. Inner unfoldment
may be given paramount place without undue concern for worldly
matters. Sanyasa Ashram is the fourth stage of life where total
renouncement occurs. It is the period of ones life beyond 81
years of age wherein the spiritual consciousness of the person
may manifest in totality. It is important to note that this final
stage of Sanyasa is to be entered after completing ones duties
in the three earlier phases. Many take Sanyasa as an escape
from the world, and this is not the traditional teaching. Sanyasa
is the culmination of a life well lived and never an escape from
responsibility. As Pujya Swamiji often said, Many want to renounce
the world, but they dont have anything to renounce in the first
place!
CHATUR PURUSHARTHAS
The four legitimate aims of life are Dharma, Artha, Kama and
Moksha. Tiruvalluvar deals with the first three in his great Tamil
scripture Tirukkural, under the headings of Aram, Porul and
Inbam. Dharma or Aram is the living of a righteous life with
fulfillment of all duties in the spirit of Nishkama Karma (selfless
CHATVARAH - FOUR
78
FOURTH YAMA
The fourth Yama i s Brahmacharya, or the
continuous residence in the principle of creativity.
Control of the creative principles and right -
use - ness of these God given abilities for the
right purpose is enshrined in this important
Yama. It may be interpreted as sexual celibacy
for the student as well as purity of mind for
the mature seeker of spiritual unity. It involves
establishing bonds of understanding and goodwill
towards others, avoiding sexual selfishness
and the desire to possess the objects of love.
When one loves, the love must be pure like
that of a Brahmacharya for his Guru, or the
Bhakta for the Lord. It must be understood
that all the Sapta Rishis were married and raised
fami l i es. Yoga has never been agai nst the
development of a Yogic family, and there are
many examples of the wives of the Yogis becoming
great masters in their own right, such as Maitreyi
and Gargi. Patanjali says that great Virya (valour
and vigour) is gained and fear of death is lost when one perfects
this Yama. It is also said to be a Maha Vrata, or Mighty Vow,
and Bhishmacharya of the Mahabharatha got his name for undertaking
this mighty vow for the sake of his father, Santhanu. Lord Hanuman
is also praised as the mighty Brahmacharya, and is worshipped
by all young men of India for his grace.
FOURTH NIYAMA
The fourth Niyama is Swadyaya, or an introspective self-analysis.
This quality of introspection and self-analysis is vital on the
Yoga Marga, as it is easy to develop false ideas of ones evolutionary
LORD HANUMAN
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
93
VISHUDDHA CHAKRA
Vishuddha Chakra is the fifth Chakra
of the subtle body and is related
to Akash, the element of space
or ether. Vishuddha is the centre
of great purity and has sixteen
petals with the Sanskrit vowels
as their respective Dhala Bhija
Mantras. Situated in the throat region,
this Chakra is correlated with the thyroid
gland, as well as with the pharyngeal plexus in the physical
plane. The Jnanendriya of Shotra (ears) and the Karmendriya
of Vak (speech) are closely linked to this center, which is presided
over by Lord Shiva himself in the form of Vakvishudda (the bestower
of pure speech). Hung is the Dhara Bhija that activates the
potent qualities of freedom, communication and empathy that
are associated with this Chakra. The classical shoulder standing
Sarvangasana is an excellent posture to activate this centre
and bring out its inherent qualities.
BAHIRANGA YOGA
Bahiranga Yoga, or the outer Yoga, consists of the five external
processes of Ashtanga Yoga. These are listed as the Yama,
Niyama, Asana, Pranayama and Pratyahara in the Yoga Sutras
because they are external to the Samyama practices. They can
be seen and valued externally. However Yogamaharishi Dr Swami
Gitananda Giri has maintained that Pratyahara belongs to the
inner processes of Antaranga Yoga, as sensory control and restraint
are inner processes and not external. It is withdrawal from the
senses that is required, and not external manipulation such as
blinding oneself, plugging the ears and nose, etc.
PANCHA - FIVE
PANCHA JNANENDRIYA
The five traditionally accepted senses
of man are known as the Jnanendriyas,
as they help us to realise the existent
world. They are Shotra (auditory
apparatus), Chakshu (visual
apparatus), Grahna (olfactory
apparatus), Jihva (gustatory
apparatus), and Tvak (cutaneous sensory apparatus). These
senses are to be perfected through Yoga practices such as the
Shat Karmas, and then controlled through the practice of Pratyahara
for the purpose of higher Yoga Sadhana. Practices such as the
Shanmuki Mudra are an excellent practical representation of
sensory control in Yoga, as the fingers are used to shut down
the five senses.
PANCHA KARMENDRIYA
In Yoga, the actions of the five action organs are known as the
Pancha Karmendriyas. These are Pada (locomotion), Pani (dexterity),
Payu (excretion), Upastha (reproduction), and Vak (communication).
These are actually the sensation-based actions of the feet, hands,
rectum, genitals, and mouth, but are function-
dependent and not organ-specific. For example,
when we walk on our hands, the hands are
performing the function of Pada (feet-locomotion).
Similarly when we paint with our toes, they
are performing the function of Pani (hands-
dexterity). Padmasana with the hands in Yoga
Mudra is an excellent example of a physical
Pratyahara techni que, as al l the fi ve
Karmendriyas are kept under control in this
posture.
92
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
91
PANCHA CHITTA BHUMI
The five states of the mind according to Yoga and Indian philosophy
are Mudha (the dull, inert, mindless state), Kshipta (the totally
distracted state of the mind), Vikshipta (the partially distracted
state of mind), Ekagratha (the one pointed state), and Niruddha
(the controlled state of no-
mind). Most worldly people
are in the first two states
as either they are either
dull or totally distracted.
Tel evi si on commerci al s
keep getting shorter and
shorter as the attention span
keeps decreasing rapidly.
The Yoga Sadhaka is able
to keep his mind in the state
of partial distraction and
one-pointedness, and it is
the real Yogi who can go
beyond the whirlpools of
the mind into the no-mind
state.
PANCHA CHITTA VRITTI
According to Maharishi Patanjali, the five manifestations of the
sub conscious mental chatter of the Chitta Vritti are Pramana
(cognition or right knowledge), Viparyaya (misconception or wrong
knowledge), Vikalpa (imagination), Nidra (process of sleep) and
Smrithi (process of memory). All these five mental processes
must be curtailed by Abhyasa (dedicated and disciplined practice),
and Vairagya (dispassionate detachment), in order for us to rest
in our true self.
PANCHA - FIVE
94
TANMATRAS
The five subtle elements, known as Tanmatras, are perceived
by the different Jnanendriyas (sensory organs) such as the eyes,
ears, nose, tongue, and skin. These Pancha Tanmatras are Shabda
(hearing through the auditory apparatus), Rupa (sight through
the visual apparatus), Gandha (smell through the olfactory apparatus),
Rasana (taste through the gustatory apparatus), and Sparsha
(the cutaneous sense of touch through the sensory apparatus).
These are a subtle mirror to the gross elements of earth (smell),
water (taste), fire (sight), air (touch), and space or ether (hearing).
PRATYAHARA
The fifth step in Ashtanga Yoga is Pratyahara. This is the process
of restraining the outgoing senses at the cerebral level by higher
consciousness. There are various Pratyahara Kriyas, such as
the Shabda Kriya, in the Gitananda Yoga tradition, and they all
help us to withdraw from the external sensory world just as a
tortoise withdraws into its shell. Pratyahara is an essential aspect
of Yoga, and the senses (all 18 of them according to Yoga) are
to be controlled, in order for further spiritual progress to occur.
Unless the senses are
controlled there can be
no Dharana and without
that, there is no Samyama
either. We must not forget
that the Mind (Manas) is
also a sense according
to Indian culture, and the
control of the mental
process is also part of
Pratyahara at another
level.
YOGA IS HARNESSING THE SENSES
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
90
Vyana is controlled from the spinal cord and permeates the whole
body. It has its centre of energy near the sex organs. It is responsible
for the contraction and relaxation of muscles, both voluntary as
well as involuntary, and is the principal energy of circulation.
Other functions controlled by the Pancha Prana Vayus include
the following. Udana stimulates the glossopharyngeal nerves
and moves the muscles in the throat. Prana forces the air from
the lungs. Samana helps to circulate the glucose in the blood
stream to the body parts. Apana is responsible for windy discharges
from the rectum. Vyana is used for all kinds of body motions.
PANCHA UPA PRANA VAYU
The five Upa Prana Vayus (the lesser or minor vital airs) are Naga,
Kurma, Krikara, Devadutta, and Dhananjaya. These are also known
as the Nagadi Prana Vayus because they start with the Naga. Naga
is the energy that causes eructation, or belching and vomiting. As
a force it is bubbling. Kurma causes hiccoughing (hiccup) and eye
blinking. Its force is convolutionary. Krikala or Krikara is used in
sneezing and gastric secretion. As a force it is explosive. Devadutta
is used in yawning and in hunger, and as a force it is said to be
of a drawing or yearning nature. Dhananjaya is the energy used
in fatigue and is associated with the drooping of the eyelids and
the redness of the ears before sleep. It
also functions in the distribution of fatty
globules to body parts.
Naga means serpent; Kurma,
tortoise; Krikala, lizard; Krikara,
a type of partridge; Devadutta,
God-giving, and Dhananjaya, Fire-
that-fattens.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
88
world. The five major
elements of the manifest
world are known as Pritvi
or Bhumi (earth), Apas
or Jala (water), Tejas
or Agni (fire), Vayu (air),
and Akasha (ether or
space). Each of the
elements is related to
one of the five spinal
Chakras as well as the five sensory organs (Jnanendriya), and
the organs of action (Karmendriyas). Certain colorful shapes
known as Mandalas represents each of the elements, and these
Mandalas are used in the Mandala Dharana or concentration
practices of the higher Samyama Yoga. In the study of gems,
it is said that if the five elements are balanced in proportion
they keep the body healthy. Different gems represent these elements
in the following manner. There is the fire element in ruby and
coral, the water element in pearl and diamond, the earth element
in emerald, the sky element in yellow sapphire, and the air element
in Blue Sapphire.
PANCHA RINA
The five debts that we owe in our life to the various persons
and forces that have influenced us are known as the Pancha
Rina. These five debts are to our mother (Matru Rina), father
(Pithru Rina), the Gurus of the present and past (Rishi Rina),
the Gods (Deva Rina), and the Universal Self (Atma Rina). The
worst sin according to Indian Culture is ingratitude, and that is
why Indian culture has stressed upon not only the feeling of
gratitude, but also the expressing of it through thought, word,
and deed.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
95
SHAT - SIX
SHAT DHALA PADMA
Swadhisthana Chakra has six petals,
which are said to be like lightning.
The lower states or inclinations
(Vrittis) that are associated
wi th these si x petal s are
Prasraya (credulity), Avisvasa
(suspicion), Avajna (disdain),
Murchcha (del usi on or
disinclination), Sarvanasa (false
knowl edge), and Krurata
(pitilessness). These states
must be transcended for higher
awareness and evol uti on
through Laya Yoga.
SHAT RIPUS
The Shat Ripus, or six enemies of the spirit that lead to the destruction
of man, are Kama (passion), Krodha (anger), Lobha (greed), Moha
(infatuation), Mada
(pride), and Maatsarya
(malice or envy). Unless
these enemies are
vanquished, one can
have neither peace of
mind nor spiritual
evolution. The Yama and
Niyama, as well as the
development of Yogic
SWADHISTHANA CHAKRA
SHAT - SIX
110
system consists of eight limbs, steps or practical aspects that
lead the Sadhaka towards the Divine. These eight limbs are
Yama (moral restraints to leash the animal in us), Niyama (ethical
observances to unleash the Divine in us), Asana (steady and
comfortable posture, the real comfort zone), Pranayama (controlled
expansion of the vital life force, Prana), Pratyahara (restraint
of the senses), Dharana (one pointed concentration), Dhyana
(meditative state), and Samadhi (the state of Cosmic Consciousness).
The great Tamil Siddha Tirumoolar also mentions these eight
limbs in his Tirumantiram, which is the main classic Yoga text
of the Tamil people. Each one of the eight limbs is equally important
in the final analysis, but it is important that a firm foundation is
built up for the Yoga Life through a sincere effort at living the
Yama and Niyama.
ASHTANGA BHUMI SPARSHA
This is an Asana found in the Rishikesh Surya Namaskar, where
eight parts (Ashtanga) of the body are in touch (Sparsha) with
the earth (Bhumi). These eight body parts are the chin, two
palms, chest, two knees, and the two feet. This is a pose of
submission and reverence and a means for the Sadhaka to pay
obei sance to Mother Earth. Anci ent Yogi s were the i deal
environmentalists as they respected and had reverence for Mother
Nature and considered Her a Divinity. Once such a reverence
is developed, none will misuse the bounty of Nature. Modern
man has lost reverence for everything, and so misuses all that
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
115
NAVA - NINE
DHARMA SADHANA
Sage Yajnavalkya, along with Manu, was a major codifier of the
Dharma Shastra, or ways that men should live in accordance
with the Divine Law. Dharma is the disciplined living of ones
life and the following of social ethics. The ability to follow Dharma
is a measure of the stabilisation of ones inner life. Dharma
also provides a harmonisation of social life. The nine virtues of
Dharma whi ch must
be cultivated, according
to the Yajnavalkya
Smriti, are known as
the Dharma Sadhana.
These ni ne qual i ti es
are non-vi ol ence or
non-i nj ury (Ahi msa),
truthful ness (Satya),
honest y ( Ast eya) ,
cleanliness (Saucha),
s e n s o r y c o n t r o l
(Indriya Nigraha), charity
(Daana), self-restraint
(Dama), compassi on
(Daya), and forbearance
(Kshanta). It i s the
practice of Dharma that
ensures the happiness
and well being of the
individual, and holds up
the edifice of society.
DHARMA GIVES US A CHANCE TO
FIND OURSELF.
NAVA - NINE
116
NAVADHA PRANAYAMA
This is the nine-fold classification of Pranayama, according to
the Brihadyogi Yajnavalkya Smriti. In this text, Pranayama is
divided first into three parts, Mridu, Madhya and Adhimatra.
After this gross division of Pranayama, each part is then sub
classified into three as Mridu-Mridu, Mridu-Madhya, Mridu-Adhimatra,
Madhya-Mridu, Madhya-Madhya, Madhya-Adhimatra, Adhimatra-
Mridu, Adhimatra-Madhya, and Adhimatra-Adhimatra. Pujya Swamiji
Gitananda Giri gives a similar classification of Rishiculture Pranayamas
into the Adamas or Yoga Pranayamas, Madyamas or Samyama
Pranayamas, and Uttanas or Shakti Pranayamas, and details
120 Pranayamas under this major classification.
ANTARAYAS
The nine Antarayas, or obstacles to Yoga Sadhana according
to Patanjali, are Vyadhi (disease), Styaan (dullness), Samshya
(doubt), Pramada (procrastination), Alasya (laziness), Avirati
(worldly mindedness), Brantidarshan (illusion), Alabdhabhumikatva
(inability to attain any state of Yoga), and Anavasthitatwa (inability
to maintain a state of Yoga). These are the nine
disruptive forces of consciousness. Patanjali later
adds another four obstacles when he mentions
pain (Dukha), depression-
despai r (Daurmanasya),
tremors (Angamejayatva), and
disturbed-irregular breathing
(Swasha Praswasha). These
obstacles can be removed
by the practi ce of one-
pointedness, such as Pranava
Japa, cul ti vati on of ri ght VYADHI
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
108
known as the Samyama, and Maharishi Patanjali in his Yoga
Sutras lists many objects upon which this three-some Samyama
may be practised.
SAPTA RISHIS
Each age or Manvantara has seven great Rishis. The seven
great Rishis of the first Manvantara are said to be Marichi, Atri,
Angiras, Pulaha, Kratu, Pulastya, and Vashista. The
Sapta Rishis of the present Manvantara are the forefathers
of all present day Brahmanas. The Gotras that are
named after these Rishis are used to identify the
different families that have sprung from their
progeny. The seven great seers of this age
are Kashyapa Mahari shi , Atri Mahari shi ,
Jamadagni Maharishi, Bharatwaja Maharishi,
Vishwamitra Maharishi, Vashishta Maharishi
and Gauthama Maharishi. They have been
immortalized by a constellation of seven
stars, named the Sapta Rishi Mandalam
(constellation of seven Rishis).
SEVEN CHAPTERS OF GHERANDA SAMHITA
This Tantric Sanskrit text is in the form of a dialogue between
Maharishi Gheranda and his disciple Chanda Kapali. It contains
317 verses divided into seven chapters or lessons. These seven
chapters deal with purification of the body, Asanas, Mudras, Pratyahara,
Pranayama, Dhyana and Samadhi respectively. The term Sapta
Yoga has come into existence to describe this system of Yoga
where these seven limbs are followed without observance of the
Yama and Niyama of Patanjalis Ashtanga Yoga.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
117
attitudes, and by control of Prana. They can also be removed
by merging the mental consciousness into supersensory perception
(through practices such as Nada Yoga, Trataka, and Kechari
Mudra) or by inner illumination (Bhrumadhya Dharana or Nada
Dharana). Other methods given by Patanjali include Vairagya,
and developing the method of conscious dreaming and conscious
sleeping, as well as meditation
NAVARATHRI
The nine nights of Devi constitute a great religious festival all
over India. This is celebrated as Navarathri or Durga Puja, with
the tenth day being celebrated as Dasara. Navaratri is observed
in the month of Ashvini preceding Dasara. It commences with
the new moon of Ashvini, and terminates with Mahanavami on
the ninth lunar day of the bright half of the month. Dasara is
observed on the tenth day of
the bright half of the month
of Ashvini. The Dasara festival
held at Mysore is one of Indias
most colorful phenomena. The
spectacular procession taken
out on this day is a veritable
extravaganza. The Ramalila
at Varanasi, where the
battle between Lord
Rama and Ravana is
depicted, is one of
the most famous
attracti ons of
I n d i a t h a t
occurs during
t hi s per i od.
GODDESS DURGA
NAVA - NINE
107
Tamil Siddha Saint Tirumoolar, it is the seat of Shivaloka, and the
Panchakshara Japa of Om Nama Shivaya is the means to attain
it. Though it is usually depicted as a thousand petalled lotus drooping
down over the head, Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri was
adamant in his Dakshina Marga Tantric teachings that the lotus
was a blooming, upward facing lotus of life. He explained that the
drooping lotus was the one that is experienced before Kundalini
arousal, and that as the Shakti moves up through the Chakric
pathway, the lotus is given life and blooms upwards towards the
Divine.
DHYANA
Dhyana, the seventh l i mb of
Patanjalis Ashtanga Yoga, may
be defined as the meditative
state of bei ng. There i s
tremendous mi sconcepti on
about the word meditation,
and many thi nk that i t i s
merely sitting quietly.
The real medi tati ve
state may be attained
only when the Sadhaka
has prepared himself
or hersel f through
a dedi cated and
determined practice of the previous limbs namely the Yama,
Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, Pratyahara, and Dharana. Dhyana
occurs when Dharana or the one-pointed concentrated state is
perfected, and perfection in Dhyana leads us into the exalted
state of Samadhi, or oneness with the Divine. As Dharana, Dhyana
and Samadhi flow seamlessly from one into the other, they are
CHAKRA DHYANA
SAPTA - SEVEN
118
Navarathri usually occurs during the months of September -
October of each year. The first three nights are celebrated with
worship for Durga (Goddess of valour), the next three for Lakshmi
(Goddess of prosperity), and the last three for Saraswati (Goddess
of knowledge and the fine arts). Young girls are worshipped as
forms of the goddess on each of these nights, and many ceremonies
and fine art festivals are conducted in a joyous manner. The
last day is celebrated as the Ayudha Puja, or worship of implements
and all the implements of trade and education are worshipped.
The tenth day is celebrated as Vijaya Dasami, and students go
to their teachers to learn new lessons in their respective arts.
NAVA RASA
Nava Rasas are the nine emotions that are depicted in Indian
Dance. These are Sringara (love), Hasya (laughter), Karuna
(compassion), Roudra (anger), Veera (heroism), Bhaya (fear),
Bhibadsa (disgust), Adbhuta (wonder-awe), and Shanta (peacefulness).
The Nava Rasas are a major form of emotional catharsis. Even
negative emotions such as fear and disgust, are expressed in
a dignified, refined manner and the emotions
are used consciously. Thus, Natya (dance)
helps cleanse the negative aspects
of human emotions and sublimate
them, making way for the higher
emotions of Divine Bhakti. The
Nava Rasa are also a great
means of psychological
preventive therapy.
BHAYA, ONE OF THE NAVARASAS
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
106
It is believed that below the Patala resides Shesha or Ananta,
who bears the entire world on his head and is accompanied by
his Shakti, known as Varuni. It is traditionally taught that Maharishi
Patanjali was an Avatar of Shesha Naga.
SAPTA SWARA
The seven notes of Indian classical music are known
as the Sapta Swara. These seven notes may be
correlated with the seven Chakras, as well as with
the seven planes of consciousness or Lokas. Music
in the form of Nada Yoga can help us to achieve
higher states of consciousness. The sapta swaras
are Sadjama (Sa), Rishabha (Ri), Gandhara
(Ga), Madyama (Ma), Panchama (Pa), Daivata
(Da), and Nishada (Ni). The permutation
and combination of these notes and their
variations make up the various melodies
(Ragas) of Indian Classical Music. According to Yogamaharishi
Dr Swami Gitananda Giri, there are 729 vibratory sounds (Nada)
that activate as well as control the energies of various body
parts, and these sounds are an essential component of Laya
Yoga and Kundalini Yoga.
SAHASRARA
The Seventh Chakra of the subtle
body is the Sahasrara Chakra, which
is depicted as a thousand petalled
lotus. This is said to be the location
of the Divine Union between Shiva
(Shakta) and Shakti (Kundalini) in the
supreme Yoga. According to the ancient
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
119
Most modern societies give little or no scope for expression of
these emotions in a proper, dignified, controlled manner whereas
the Nava Rasas enable youngsters to experience these emotions
with detachment. This detached expression produces a balanced,
wholesome personality and an embodiment of Sama Bhava, or
equal mindedness.
NAVA GRAHA
The ni ne cel est i al abodes, accordi ng t o I ndi an ast rol ogy,
are known as the Nava Graha. They are sai d t o have a great
i nf l uence on human l i ves, and so t here i s great emphasi s
put on horoscopes and other astrol ogi cal practi ces for human
wel f are. The Nava Graha are Surya (Sun), Chandra (Moon),
Mangala (Mars), Buddh (Mercury), Guru or Brihaspati (Jupiter),
Sukra (Venus), Shani (Saturn), Rahu (north node of the moon),
and Ket u (sout h node of t he moon). The movement of t hese
abodes i s observed wi t h great i nt erest and f anf are al l over
I ndi a, and a l ot of good
and bad happenings are
often i nterpreted as
event s due t o t he
benevol ent or
m a l e v o l e n t
i nf l uences of
t hese Gr aha.
T h e m o s t
visible influence
of these Grahas
can be seen i n
the observance of
Rahu Kal am, by
South Indians. No event
NAVA - NINE
105
SEVEN DHATUS
The Sapta Dhatus, or seven substances that make up the human
body, according to Indian systems of Medicine are Rasa (chyle,
plasma, interstitial fluid), Rakta (blood, erythrocytes), Maamsa
(flesh, muscle-tissue), Medas (fat, adipose tissue), Asthi (bone
tissue), Majjaa (bone marrow), and Sukra (semen and glandular
secretions).
SAPTA LOKA
The seven worlds, or
Hi gher Pl anes of
Consci ousness, are
Bhuh Loka (earth),
Bhuvah Loka (sky, space),
Svar Loka (heaven), Mahah Loka
(the middle region), Janah Loka (the
place of births), Tapah Loka (the mansion
of the blessed), and the Satya
Loka (the abode of the
Ultimate Reality, Truth).
All of these worlds are
invoked in the chanting
of the sacred Gayatri
Mantra Japa.
SAPTA NARAKA
The Seven Hells, or Lower Planes of Consciousness, are Satala,
Vitala, Mahatala, Rasatala, Talatala, Atala, and Patala. They
are inhabited by the Naga serpent divinities that have crest jewels
on their heads, and also the Danavas, or a minor type of Asura.
SAPTA - SEVEN
wi l l ever t ake pl ace i n t hi s Rahu Kal am f or i t i s consi dered
an i nauspi ci ous t i me t o do any act i vi t y. Thi s peri od of one
and hal f hours t hat occurs i n a cert ai n pat t ern on di f f erent
days of t he week di ct at es t he t i mi ngs of many j ourneys,
weddi ngs, l and regi st rat i ons and even t he t i mi ng of off i ci al
work. One of t he f i rst t hi ngs t hat a f ami l y does when a chi l d
is born is to chart its Kundali or Jatakam, which is a representation
of t he Nava Grahas i n rel at i on t o t he chi l d s bi rt h. Yoga
appreci at es t he i nf l uences of t hese Grahas but emphasi es
that a di sci pl i ned Yoga Sadhana can overcome or amel i orate
most obst acl es, even t hose produced by unl ucky st ars, i n
our spi ri t ual j ourney f rom t he sel f t o t he SELF.
The different planets are represented in the human body in the
following manner. The Sun represents the soul, Moon the mind,
Mars our perseverance, Mercury, the voice, Jupiter, our wisdom
(learning), Venus, our Love, and Saturn, our sobriety and thoughtfulness.
These planets influence human life and the body continuously.
In addition to these planets, there are two shadow planets (Rahu
and Ketu), whose effects are also seen in our day-to-day life.
NAVA RATNAS
There are innumerable gemstones in existence, but of these,
only nine distinct gemstones are considered Precious Gems
by Vedic or Jyotish astrologers since ancient times. These are,
Mukta or Motthu (white pearl), Manikya (ruby), Vaidoorya (chrysoprasus
or cats eye), Gomeda (beryl, cinnamon stone or hessonite),
Vajra or Vairam (diamond), Vidruma or Pavazham (red coral),
Padmarago or Pushparagam (jacinth, yellow sapphire or hyacinth),
Marakatam (emerald), and Neela (blue sapphire). The Navaratna
ornament with nine gemstones is also considered a Kavacha,
a talisman, armour, or body guard.
120
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
104
It influences the actions of the pituitary gland, and corresponds
to the cavernous plexus.
Sahasrara (Lotus of a Thousand Petals): It is situated at the
top of the head and influences the actions of the pineal gland.
It is related to the hypothalamus and forebrain.
The Psychic Centres beyond this are referred to collectively as
Mahakarana, or the Great Casual Centres. They are all
linked together by the Sushumna Nadi, an ethereal nerve inside
the hollow opening of the spinal cord, the Canalis Centralis.
The nervous system is dependent upon Prana received through
respiration in order to control every function of body activity.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
121
NAVA - NINE
In Tantra Sara, a famous Tantric scripture, the human body is
stated to be an island of nine gems. These nine gems correspond
with the nine constituents (Dhatus) of the human body. The gems
are related to the nine ingredients (Dhatus) as follows. Yellow
Sapphire (flesh), Blue Sapphire (hair), Cats Eye (skin), Red
Coral (blood), White Pearl (bone), Emerald (marrow), Hessonite
(fat), Diamond (semen and glandular secretion), and Ruby (Prana,
vitality, or the Life Force).
The nine gems are also related to the Nava Grahas, and are
said to manifest special powers and qualities through them.
Ruby (Surya - Sun) bestows name, fame, vigor, virtue, warmth,
and capacity to command. It can raise an individual above the
status into which he/she was born, and historically has been
symbolic of love and passion.
White Pearl (Chandra - Moon) strengthens mental faculties,
calms emotions, and increases peace of mind. It also provides
vitality and wisdom.
Red Coral (Mangala - Mars) enhances courageousness, and is
claimed to help cure diseases of the blood.
Emerald (Buddha - Mercury) improves memory, communication,
and intuition, and it sharpens the intellect and ability to learn.
It also bestows sufficient wealth.
Yellow Sapphire (Guru - Jupiter) is most widely used to enhance
financial status, and the wearer is said to get wealth, good health,
name, honour, and fame.
Diamond (Sukra - Venus) bestows a luxurious life, enhances
ones name, fame, and artistic qualities, and is said to improve
sexual power.
103
SAPTA - SEVEN
CHAKRAS
Prana sets up great vortexes of energy in certain parts of the
nervous system, creating Psychic Centres, which are called
Chakras (wheel s), or Padmas (l otuses). Accordi ng to
Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri, these Chakras or Padmas
are twelve in number, but for the purpose of Hatha Yoga, only
seven are considered. There are five centres which correspond
to areas along the spinal area, and two cranial centres. The
following are correlated locations in the physical body for these
subtle body centres of cosmic energy.
Mooladhara (Root- Support Centre): This is a four-petalled
lotus at the base of the spine (actually, at the junction of the
4th and 5th sacral vertebrae), where the Kundalini Shakti or
Serpent Firepower of Life resides. This corresponds with the
sacral plexus of Western neurology.
Swadhisthana (Lotus of Ones Own Self): This is a six-petalled
lotus rooted near the 1st lumbar vertebra, and corresponds to
the hypogastric plexus.
Manipura (Gem City Lotus): Rooted at the eighth thoracic or
dorsal vertebra, this Chakra corresponds to the solar plexus.
Anahata (Lotus of Unstruck Sound): This Chakra of twelve
petals is rooted near the 7th cervical vertebra, and corresponds
to the cardiac plexus.
Vishuddha (Lotus of Great Purity): It is a sixteen petalled lotus
rooted near the 3rd cervical vertebra, and corresponds to the
pharyngeal plexus.
Ajna (Lotus of Revelation): This is a two petalled lotus situated
in the space a little above the mid point between the eyebrows.
SAPTA - SEVEN
122
Blue Sapphire (Shani - Saturn) counteracts envy from others
and dispels evil. It is said to eliminate long-term misfortune,
and restore lost wealth and property.
Gomeda (Rahu North node of the moon) assists in speedy
transactions or transitions in lesser time than anticipated. Rahu
is responsible for all sorts of delays in the fulfillment of ambitions,
and this gem counteracts those qualities.
Cats Eye (Ketu South node of the moon) protects the wearer
from hidden enemies, mysterious dangers, and diseases. It
also protects one from drowning, intoxication, and detrimental
government actions.
NAVA DHANIYAM
The nine grains and pulses that are used in Pujas to propitiate
the nine celestial bodies (Nava Graha) are the Nava Dhaniyam.
These are Godumai (wheat for Surya), Nel (paddy for Chandra),
Thuvarai (red gram for Mangala), Pacchaippayiru (green gram
for Buddh), Kadalai (Bengal gram for Guru), Mocchai (hyacinth
bean for Shukra), Ellu (sesame for Shani), Ulundu (black gram
for Rahu) and Kollu (horse gram for Ketu). As the different planets
also have a relationship to the nine Dhatus, we can assume
that the different grains that are used in the Puja, as well as in
cooking, have an effect on the body through the Dhatus.
NAVA DWARA IN MALES
The nine gateways or openings in the male according to Tantra,
are the two eyes, two ears, two nostrils, mouth, urethra, and
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
123
anus. When performing the higher practices of Samyama Yoga,
it is important that all these orifices are closed. Physical Pratyahara
techniques such as Shanmuki or Yoni Mudra, and Padma Asana,
are useful to help one physically close all these orifices and
lock up the senses in order to concentrate on the object of contemplation
without any deviation. It is said that the orifices above the navel
are clean and those below it are unclean. As all orifices are a
means for different entities or spirits to enter the human body,
Indian culture placed great importance on the cleanliness of
these entrances. Various techniques were cultivated in order
to attain purification such as the Dhauti, Bhasti, Karna Mala
Dhauti, Anunasika, Vajroli Mudra and Ganesha Kriya.
BHAKTI NAVA ANGA
The nine limbs of Bhakti are Sravanam (hearing the tales of
the Lord), Kirtanam (singing hymns in His praise), Smaranam
(contemplation and
remembrance of
Him), Pada Sevanam
(service to the world
as the feet of the
Divine), Archanam
(worship), Vandanam
(obeisance), Dasyam
( s e r v a n t s h i p ) ,
Sakhyam (intimacy)
and Atma Nivedhanam
(self-surrender). The
devotee may cultivate
any or all of these in
order to become one
with the Lord.
NARADHA, A GREAT BAKTHA
NAVA - NINE
124
NAVA DHATUS OF YOGA
The Nava Dhatus (Nava Dhushya), or nine substances that make
up the human body according to Yoga, are Asthi (bone tissue),
Maamsa (muscle-tissue), Nadi (Nerve), Rasa-Rakta (circulating
components), Indriya (the vital organs), Granthi (endocrine glands),
Medas (fat, adipose tissue), Majjaa (bone marrow), and Soma
(glandular secretions). In the higher aspects of Yoga, three more
systems are inherent. They are Prana (the cosmic catalyst associated
with emotions), Chitta-Manas-Buddhi (the mental factors of sub-
consciousness, consciousness, and super-consciousness), and
the Chakras (etheric energy nature of man associated with the
psycho-neuro-immuno-endocrine system of the physical body).
In the consideration of Prana, the concept of Nadis or energy
flows affected by Prana Vayu (nerve currents), Prana Vahaka
(nerve impulses), Prana Vahana (nerve fluids), and Prana Vana
(the psychic vortexes)
associ ated wi th the
Chakras must be
considered. In the Yogic
concept of mind, a further
amplification is to be
found in the Bindus (foci
of higher mental energy),
Mandal as ( et her i c
mental and el ectri cal
fi el ds and energy
patterns), and the Sapta
Loka (seven planes of
mind). In considering
Chakras, the psychic
nature associated with
the Higher Self or Atman
must be understood.
CHAKRAS AND MANDALAS
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
A FINAL WORD
OM PURNAMADHAH PURNAMIDAM
PURNAT, PURNAM UDACHYATE
PURNASYA PURNAM ADAYA
PURNAM EVA AVASHISYATE. OM
The above verse from the
Isavasya and Brihadaranyaka
Upanishads tells us that the
Absolute Pure Consciousness
is full (complete) and that this
Manifest Universe is also full
(complete). They also tell us
that after manifesting this Full
Universe, that Perfect Absolute
veri l y sti l l remai ns ful l
(complete).
This is why this book in the real sense cannot be termed complete,
as a complete study in this regard would have to be a study
using the numbers ranging from Zero to Infinite!
The codification of concepts in tune with numbers is typically
Indian and examples of ten of these and twenty of those
abound in Indian traditions of Yoga, philosophy and art.
I have limited this work to the numbers 1 to 10 but would like
to remind those readers who are still with me that there still
exist many concepts that lie beyond this numerical codification
of 1 to 10.
A FINAL WORD
135
There are 196 verses in Patanjalis Yoga Sutras that
are arranged in four chapters.
The Tami l Veda, the Tirukkural i s a comprehensi ve
guide to righteous living and has 1330 verses arranged
in 133 groups of ten verses each.
Hatha Ratnaavali of Srinivasa Bhatta describes 84 asanas.
The Sahasrara Chakra has 1000 petals that are represented
by a 20-fold repetition of the 50 Bhija Mantras.
There are 3000 verses in Tirumoolars monumental Tamil
Yoga scripture, the Tirumantiram. It is believed that Tirumoolar
mediated for 3000 years and used to come out of his
meditation and write one verse every year.
There are 3000 Dikshitars in the Shiva tradition at Chidambaram
and this includes 2999 priests plus Lord Shiva himself.
Nadis or energy conduits in the subtle body are said to
number 72,000, 300,000 or 720,000 according to different
Yogic and Tantric traditions.
There are said to be 84,00,000 Asanas taught by Lord
Shiva of which 84 are said to be important and the Gheranda
Samhita describes 32.
This list can go on and on and on. forever, as there is so
much to learn, but I shall keep the discussion of these concepts
for another day and another time when we are all ready for them.
Till then, I wish you a wonderful time in the contemplation of
the beauty inherent in numbers and the cultural and Yogic relationships
with these agents of quality and quantity.
HARI OM TAT SAT
138
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
Some examples for starters are:
The 11 senses consisting of the Dasa Indriyas (five Jnanendriyas
and five Karmendriyas) plus Manas, the mind.
Ekadasi, the eleventh day after a new moon, which is
sacred to worshipers of Lord Vishnu. There is also an
excellent psychotherapeutic Yogic breathing technique
that carries this name.
11 Asanas are mentioned by name in the Yoga Bhashya,
an important commentary on Patanjalis Yoga Sutras.
In the Gitananda Yoga tradition of the Rishiculture Ashtanga
Yoga Paramparai it is taught that there are 12 Chakras
existing in the Sukshma and Karana Sharira.
There are 12 petals in the Anahata Chakra, the heart
centre and each has its own respective Bhija Mantra.
There are the 12 Rasis or signs of the Zodiac in both
western and eastern astrology.
Of the numerous Upanishads 12 are said to be important.
Dwadasha Krama are the twelve physical and non-physical
components of the human bei ng as enunci ated by
Yogamaharishi Swami Gitananda Giri.
There are 14 Lokas or planes of existence that consist
of the 7 lower and the 7 higher states of the mind.
15 Asanas are mentioned by Swatmarama in the Hatha
Yoga Pradipika.
16 petals are existent in the Vishuddha Chakra, the throat
centre of great purity.
There are 18 chapters in the Bhagavad Gita and each
is described as a Yoga.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
136
Of the 18 Puranas written by Veda Vyasa, there are six
each for Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva.
Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri has elucidated
18 senses that include the normal as well as para-sensory
aspects of the Indriyas.
There are 25 Mudras mentioned in the Gheranda Samhita.
Tattvas (the manifestations of Truth or Reality) are said
to number 24, 36, 72 or 96 according to various Yogic,
Samkya and Tantric traditions.
Tirumoolar mentions 28 Agamas or Tantras while others
talk of 64 .
There are 52 elements of Yoga Chikitsa, Yoga therapy
according to Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri.
The numbers 54, 108 and 1008 are sacred for the purpose
of Japa and a Rudraksha Mal a typi cal l y has these
combinations of beads.
There are 63 Nayanmars or Shaiva saints in the South
Indian tradition while there are 12 Alwars or Vaishnava
Saints.
Sage Vashi shta i s sai d to have done Tapasya i n the
Vashi shta Asana for 99 years whi l e Lord Kri shna
forgave the i mperti nent Si supal a 99 ti mes before
beheading him with the Sudharshan Chakra.
The number 108 is held sacred and most Hindu Deities
have at least 108 names based on their different qualities.
Some of the Gods have even 1008 names that are chanted
in the different Pujas for propitiating them.
Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri has taught 120
Pranayamas in the Rishiculture Ashtanga Yoga Paramparai
of Swami Kanakananda Brighu.
A FINAL WORD
137
Some examples for starters are:
The 11 senses consisting of the Dasa Indriyas (five Jnanendriyas
and five Karmendriyas) plus Manas, the mind.
Ekadasi, the eleventh day after a new moon, which is
sacred to worshipers of Lord Vishnu. There is also an
excellent psychotherapeutic Yogic breathing technique
that carries this name.
11 Asanas are mentioned by name in the Yoga Bhashya,
an important commentary on Patanjalis Yoga Sutras.
In the Gitananda Yoga tradition of the Rishiculture Ashtanga
Yoga Paramparai it is taught that there are 12 Chakras
existing in the Sukshma and Karana Sharira.
There are 12 petals in the Anahata Chakra, the heart
centre and each has its own respective Bhija Mantra.
There are the 12 Rasis or signs of the Zodiac in both
western and eastern astrology.
Of the numerous Upanishads 12 are said to be important.
Dwadasha Krama are the twelve physical and non-physical
components of the human bei ng as enunci ated by
Yogamaharishi Swami Gitananda Giri.
There are 14 Lokas or planes of existence that consist
of the 7 lower and the 7 higher states of the mind.
15 Asanas are mentioned by Swatmarama in the Hatha
Yoga Pradipika.
16 petals are existent in the Vishuddha Chakra, the throat
centre of great purity.
There are 18 chapters in the Bhagavad Gita and each
is described as a Yoga.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
136
Of the 18 Puranas written by Veda Vyasa, there are six
each for Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva.
Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri has elucidated
18 senses that include the normal as well as para-sensory
aspects of the Indriyas.
There are 25 Mudras mentioned in the Gheranda Samhita.
Tattvas (the manifestations of Truth or Reality) are said
to number 24, 36, 72 or 96 according to various Yogic,
Samkya and Tantric traditions.
Tirumoolar mentions 28 Agamas or Tantras while others
talk of 64 .
There are 52 elements of Yoga Chikitsa, Yoga therapy
according to Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri.
The numbers 54, 108 and 1008 are sacred for the purpose
of Japa and a Rudraksha Mal a typi cal l y has these
combinations of beads.
There are 63 Nayanmars or Shaiva saints in the South
Indian tradition while there are 12 Alwars or Vaishnava
Saints.
Sage Vashi shta i s sai d to have done Tapasya i n the
Vashi shta Asana for 99 years whi l e Lord Kri shna
forgave the i mperti nent Si supal a 99 ti mes before
beheading him with the Sudharshan Chakra.
The number 108 is held sacred and most Hindu Deities
have at least 108 names based on their different qualities.
Some of the Gods have even 1008 names that are chanted
in the different Pujas for propitiating them.
Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda Giri has taught 120
Pranayamas in the Rishiculture Ashtanga Yoga Paramparai
of Swami Kanakananda Brighu.
A FINAL WORD
137
A FINAL WORD
OM PURNAMADHAH PURNAMIDAM
PURNAT, PURNAM UDACHYATE
PURNASYA PURNAM ADAYA
PURNAM EVA AVASHISYATE. OM
The above verse from the
Isavasya and Brihadaranyaka
Upanishads tells us that the
Absolute Pure Consciousness
is full (complete) and that this
Manifest Universe is also full
(complete). They also tell us
that after manifesting this Full
Universe, that Perfect Absolute
veri l y sti l l remai ns ful l
(complete).
This is why this book in the real sense cannot be termed complete,
as a complete study in this regard would have to be a study
using the numbers ranging from Zero to Infinite!
The codification of concepts in tune with numbers is typically
Indian and examples of ten of these and twenty of those
abound in Indian traditions of Yoga, philosophy and art.
I have limited this work to the numbers 1 to 10 but would like
to remind those readers who are still with me that there still
exist many concepts that lie beyond this numerical codification
of 1 to 10.
A FINAL WORD
135
There are 196 verses in Patanjalis Yoga Sutras that
are arranged in four chapters.
The Tami l Veda, the Tirukkural i s a comprehensi ve
guide to righteous living and has 1330 verses arranged
in 133 groups of ten verses each.
Hatha Ratnaavali of Srinivasa Bhatta describes 84 asanas.
The Sahasrara Chakra has 1000 petals that are represented
by a 20-fold repetition of the 50 Bhija Mantras.
There are 3000 verses in Tirumoolars monumental Tamil
Yoga scripture, the Tirumantiram. It is believed that Tirumoolar
mediated for 3000 years and used to come out of his
meditation and write one verse every year.
There are 3000 Dikshitars in the Shiva tradition at Chidambaram
and this includes 2999 priests plus Lord Shiva himself.
Nadis or energy conduits in the subtle body are said to
number 72,000, 300,000 or 720,000 according to different
Yogic and Tantric traditions.
There are said to be 84,00,000 Asanas taught by Lord
Shiva of which 84 are said to be important and the Gheranda
Samhita describes 32.
This list can go on and on and on. forever, as there is so
much to learn, but I shall keep the discussion of these concepts
for another day and another time when we are all ready for them.
Till then, I wish you a wonderful time in the contemplation of
the beauty inherent in numbers and the cultural and Yogic relationships
with these agents of quality and quantity.
HARI OM TAT SAT
138
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
134
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
Shankhini. According to Goraksha, the Ida is on the left side,
the Pingala on the right, and the Sushumna in the centre. Gandhari
is in the left eye and Hastijihva in the right. Pusha is in the right
ear, while Yashawini is in the left. Alambusha is in the mouth,
Kuhu at the generative organ, and Shankhini at the anus.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Yo g a V i b h u s h a n Yo g a c h a r y a
Dr. Ananda Bal ayogi Bhavanani was
born t o t he worl d f amous Yoga t eam of
Yogamahari shi Dr. Swami Gi tananda
Gi ri Gur u Mahar aj and Puduvai
Kal ai mamani , Yogamani , Yogachari ni ,
Smt. Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani on April
16, 1972, i n Pondi cherry, Sout h I ndi a.
He was reared in the Gurukula atmosphere of Ananda Ashram,
f i rst at Lawspet and t hen at Sri Kambl i swamy Madam i n
Thattanchavady, Pondicherry where the Yoga Vidya (Knowledge
of t he Art and Sci ence of Yoga) was i mbi bed as a 24-hour-
a-day Sadhana and not j ust a f ew cl asses now and t hen.
Nomi nat ed as hi s Guru-Fat her s successor on hi s f ourt h
bi rt hday as Madathi apathy of Sri Kambl i swamy Madam,
Ananda took great i nterest i n Hi ndu Ri tes and Ri tual s, Mantra,
Yoga and Carnat i c Fi ne Art s f rom a young age. He has been
t rai ned i n Ri shi cul ture Ashtanga (Gi tananda) Yoga f rom
t hat t ender age and has assi st ed hi s i l l ust ri ous parent s i n
the Yoga training imparted at Ananda Ashram, Sri Kambaliswamy
Madam and I CYER f rom t hat t i me onwards.
He began hi s st udi es i n cl assi cal Carnati c Vocal Musi c at
the age of four years under Puduvai Kalaimamani V. Mannikanan.
At t he age of seven years he began arduous t rai ni ng i n
Carnati c Musi c under the tutorage of Kal ai mamani Sri rengam
R. Ranganat han of Pondi cherry, one of t he most f amous
Carnat i c Vocal i st s of Sout h I ndi a. He cont i nued hi s t rai ni ng
f or t went y years unt i l hi s Guru s deat h i n 2002. He has
st udi ed Mri dungam si nce t he age of f i ve, begi nni ng wi t h
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
139
133
to this Padma. It is interesting that the arrangement of the nerves
in the solar plexus from a medical, physiological standpoint does
resemble a ten petalled lotus, as well as the rays emanating
from the sun. Manipura is often called Mani Padme, as in the
Mantra Om Mani Padme Om.
TEN YAMAS
The ten rules of conduct (Yamas) according to Swatmarama in
the Hatha Yoga Pradipika are non-violence, truthfulness, non-
stealing, continence, forgiveness, endurance, compassion, meekness,
controlled diet and cleanliness. He doesnt describe these in
detail, however as Patanjali does in his delineation of the Yamas
and Niyamas in the Yoga Sutra. Swatmarama makes only a
passing reference to these rules.
TEN NIYAMAS
The ten rules (Niyamas) mentioned in the Hatha Yoga Pradipika
are discipline, patience, belief in God, charity, adoration of God,
hearing discourses on the principles of religion, shame, intellect,
austerity, and sacrificial offerings. Unlike Patanjali, Swatmarama
doesnt describe these rules in detail. Rather, he simply lists
them before describing Asana as the first accessory of Hatha
Yoga.
DASA NADI
Though there are thousands of Nadis (some say 72,000, some
say, 300,000, and others 720,000) Maharishi Goraksha in the
Goraksha Paddhati mentions ten primary Nadis or conduits
for the flow of energy. These are the Ida, Pingala, Sushumna,
Gandhari, Hastijihva, Pusha, Vyashaswini, Alambusha, Kuhu and
DASHA - TEN
worl d-famous Master Shri K.M. Vai dyanathan i n 1979. Later,
he was accepted as a disciple by Thiruvarur Shri R. Krishnamurthy,
one of t he most respect ed cl assi cal Mri dungi st s of modern
t i mes. He began t he st udy of Bharata Natyam under hi s
mot her Puduvai Kal ai mamani Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani
i n t he Kal akshetra t radi t i on of Rukmani Arundal e when he
was fi ve years of age. At the age of ei ght, the worl d- famous
Bharat a Nat yam mast er Padmashri Adyar K. Lakshman of
Chennai accept ed hi m as a di sci pl e.
Hi s i ni t i al t rai ni ng i n schol ast i c work was i n t he Ashram
i t sel f and onl y when he was t hi rt een years of age was he
sent t o Bhavans Gandhi Vi dyashram, Kodai kanal , t o do
hi s f ormal school i ng. At school , i n addi t i on t o hi s academi c
prof i ci ency, he was one of t he cri cket t eam s maj or st ars
and the all-round Athletic Champion. At school he was awarded
t he K. S. Jayarama I yer Award for Best I nstrumental i st
f or t hree successi ve years. I n hi s f i nal year he served as
t he School Captai n.
He wrot e a book on YOGA FOR CHI LDREN at t he age of
12 years and has wri t t en t hree ot her books i ncl udi ng YOGA
AND MODERN MAN , whi ch t akes a l ook at vari ous Yogi c
concepts with humorous cartoons and line drawings, A YOGIC
APPROACH TO STRESS, whi ch i l l ust rat es t he t heory as
wel l as practi cal appl i cati ons of Yoga to the modern epi demi c
of st ress, and A PRI MER OF YOGA THEORY, whi ch i s
a compi l at i on of Yogi c t heoret i cal aspect s f or t he benef i t
of pract i t i oners of Yoga Sport , Yoga t eachers as wel l as
students wanti ng to understand more of the theoreti cal basi s
of Yoga. He has had 12 sci enti fi c research papers and
14 sci enti fi c abstracts on Yoga research and numerous
general art i cl es on Yoga publ i shed i n Engl i sh and Tami l
j ournal s. Three more sci ent i f i c papers are i n press.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
140
132
are under the control of the eleventh sense, which is Manas
(mind). They are all dependent on the mind for their very existence,
and that is why mind is often referred to as the super sense.
The goal of Yoga Abhyasa is to perfect these senses and then
rise above them through Pratyahara. The mind is then free of
sensual disturbances and is able to flow naturally into the Samyama
practices of Dharana, Dhyana, and Samadhi.
DASA DHALA PADMA
The Ten Petalled Chakra is Manipura Chakra and each petal
has its own Dhala Bhija or petal seed sound, which helps to
activate the potential energies latent within it. The ten petals
are cloud coloured, and each of the petals is associated with a
specific lower inclination, according to Tantra, that must be transcended
through Laya Yoga. These Vrittis are Lajja (shame), Pishunata
(fickleness), Irsa
(jealousy), Trasna
(desire), Susupti
(laziness), Vishada
(deep sadness),
Kashaya (dul l -
n e s s ) , Mo h a
(ignorance), Ghrna
( a v e r s i o n o r
di sgust ) , and
Bhaya (fear). The
solar plexus in the
upper part of the
abdomen as well
as Samana (one
of the Prana
Vayus), are related
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
MANIPURA CHAKRA
He undertook two years of formal ful l ti me resi denti al trai ni ng
i n Yoga i n t he Di pl oma and Advanced Di pl oma Courses
i n Yoga at I CYER under t he gui dance of hi s Guru-f at her
Yogamahari shi Dr. Swami Gi t ananda Gi ri i n 1990 and 1991,
and upon compl et i on of t hese courses, he j oi ned medi cal
col l ege i n order t o combi ne t he best of East ern wi sdom wi t h
t he best of West ern sci ence.
Duri ng hi s Medi cal St udi es at J. N. Medi cal Col l ege, Wardha
(Nagpur Uni versi t y), Maharasht ra, he was t he t op st udent
i n a cl ass of one hundred. He secured Distinction in Surgery
and a Gol d Medal i n Communi ty Medi ci ne i n hi s f i nal year,
t oppi ng about 500 st udent s f rom t he f i ve Medi cal Col l eges
af f i l i at ed t o Nagpur Uni versi ty. He was al so t he Student
Representative at Nagpur University for J.N. Medical College.
Lat er, he compl et ed hi s i nt er nshi p at JI PMER Hospi t al ,
Pondi cherry, I ndi a.
He has compl eted wi th di sti ncti on a two-year, Post Graduate
Di pl oma i n Fami l y Heal th (PGDFH) f rom Sri Ramachandra
Medi cal Col l ege (Deemed Uni versi t y), Chennai (2003) and
has also completed the Diploma in Psychological Counseling
and t he Di pl oma i n Stress Management f rom t he I nst i t ut e
f or Heal t h Care Admi ni st rat i on, Chennai .
He was one of t he St ar Perf ormers and Yoga demonst rat ors
i n t he t el evi si on seri al YOGA FOR YOUTH, whi ch was f i rst
broadcast over New Del hi Doordarshan i n November 1989.
Thi s seri es of t went y-f i ve epi sodes i s regul arl y re-broadcast
on t he Nat i onal Doordarshan Channel , even t o dat e. Hi s
musical concerts and Mridungam have been regularly broadcast
over Pondi cherry tel evi si on. He al so anchored an i nteracti ve
TV programme on Yoga for Sl eep Di sorders on t he Sky
Sat l ocal cabl e net work i n 2004.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
141
131
or Prana is then subservient to the mind-body actions, and alters
in form from the Divine Positive to a Mortal Negative or reflex
energy, and is used for specific body functions. Yoga teaches
us that these functions may be understood as Prana Vayu, or
the energies of the Vital Life Force. These energies are discharged
through the nervous system, through Prana Vahaka, or nerve
impulses. These Vayus or Vital Airs are ten in number. The five
major ones are called Pancha Prana Vayus, or Pranadi (inner
ones that commence with Prana), and the five minor Pranas
are called Upa Prana Vayus (lesser Vital Airs) or Nagadi (outer
ones that commence with Naga). Thus the Dasa Vayu are Prana,
Apana, Samana, Vyana, Udana, Naga, Kurma, Krikara, Devadutta,
and Dhananjaya. These airs are all manifestations of the Vital
Energy (Mukhya or Maha Prana) in the human body. The ten
Vayus may be equated with the autonomic functions of the nervous
system that move through the thousands of Nadis.
DASA INDRIYAS
The five Jnanendriyas (organs
of sensory perception) and five
Karmendriyas (functions of
the action organs) are together
classified as the Dasendriya,
or ten senses in Yoga. These
are Shotra (ears), Chakshu
(eyes), Grahna (nose), Jihva
(tongue), Tvak (skin), Pada
(locomotion), Pani (dexterity),
Payu (excreti on), Upastha
(reproducti on), and Vak
(speech). All of these senses
DASHA - TEN
CONTROLLING THE SENSES
He was a perf ormer of Bharat a Nat yam and has perf ormed
al l over I ndi a and not abl y at t he ABHAI Nati onal Dance
Festi val i n Chennai i n 1992. Fol l owi ng hi s f at her s Maha
Samadhi on Dec. 29-1993 he stopped his dance performances
and i nst ead, f ocused hi s at t ent i on on Dance Choreography,
especi al l y i n the rhythmi c aspect, for Yoganjali Natyalayam.
He has hel ped t o choreograph 6 Maj or Dance Dramas and
more t han 10 Mi ni Dance Dramas f or Yoganj al i Nat yal ayam
i n the l ast seven years. He al so composed the musi cal notes
and rhyt hmi c aspect s f or al l of t hese dance dramas. He
recent l y was Co-di rect or of t he Pancha Maha Bhuta dance
drama for the 98
th
Jayanthi of Yogamaharishi Dr Swami Gitananda
Giri and the 36
th
Anniversary celebrations of Ananda Ashram
i n 2004.
As a wel l -known Carnati c Vocal i st he has rel eased t wo
al bums of whi ch THE YOGA OF SOUND has t he uni que
bl end of Engl i sh l yri cs wi t h Carnat i c Raga and Tal a i n an
at t empt t o bri dge t he gap bet ween East and West . The
second Al bum TAMI L I NBAM i s a col l ect i on of Tami l
Composi t i ons i n Carnat i c Musi c. As a Mri dungi st as wel l
as Carnati c Vocal i st he i s a regul ar performer at programmes
i n and around Pondy. He has performed at the International
Yoga Festi val , Government Musi c Festi val , Mi l l enni um
Sunri se Festi val , Thi agaraj a Festi val , Puduvai Tami l I sai
Sangam and Eswaran Koil Kumbabhishekam amongst many
ot hers i n Pondi cherry. He i s wel l known f or hi s spont aneous
i magi nat i on i n t he concert s and f or hi s expl anat i ons on t he
Yogic aspects of Carnatic Music. He has performed innumerable
vocal and i nst rument al reci t al s al l over I ndi a, i ncl udi ng i n
Bombay, Dehra Dun, Chennai , Cochi n, Lonavl a (Pune),
Bangalore and Pondicherry. It is notable that he has performed
t hree t i mes i n t he I sai Vi zha (Musi c Fest i val ) conduct ed
by t he Govt of Pondi cherry i n 1998, 2000 and 2003.
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
142
130
is followed by Krishna, the one endowed with cosmic consciousness.
The Buddha or enlightened one is the ninth Avatara. Some authorities
replace Buddha with Balarama, the elder brother of Krishna.
The destroyer or Kalki is yet awaited with trepidation. Lord Krishna
says, Whenever righteousness dims and the unrighteous
rule, then I will come again taking on worldly form to restore
righteousness.
TEN MAJOR UPANISHADS
The Upanishads are the mystic treatises that are an important
part of the Vedas and reveal the most profound
spi ri tual truths. They al so suggest ways
to real i ze them. There are numerous
Upani shads, of whi ch t wel ve ar e
considered most important, and of those,
the maj or ten are the Isa, Kena,
Katha, Prasna, Chandogya,
Mundaka, Mandookya,
Eitareya, Taittriya, and
Brihadaranyaka. As the
Upanishads contai n the
essence of the Vedas and
also form the end portions
(anta) of the Vedas, their
study is known as Vedanta
(Veda + anta).
DASA VAYU
The Universal Prana picked up by the various nerve terminals
of the body is carried to storehouses in divergent areas of the
body, but principally to the solar plexus. This Universal Force
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
He has been a featured speaker at many Yoga Conferences
i ncl udi ng t he I nt er nat i onal Yoga Fest i val conduct ed by
t he Gover nment of Pondi cher r y each year si nce 1993.
He has al so been t he Co- Or di nat or and a member of
the Jury at t he I nternati onal Yogasana Competi ti on hel d
at t he I nt er nat i onal Yoga Fest i val Pondi cher r y annual l y
and is responsible for organizing the more than 500 contestants
who come f rom al l over I ndi a t o part i ci pat e. I n hi s capaci t y
as Hi mal aya St at e Coor di nat or, he al so or gani sed t he
HI MALAYA YOGA OLYMPI AD i n Pondi cher r y ( 2001) and
l ed t he Pondy t eam t o t he Nat i onal Hi mal aya Yoga Ol ympi ad
at Bangal or e i n November 2001.
He i s r esponsi bl e f or r evi vi ng t he Pondi cherry Yogasana
Associ at i on ( 2000) f ounded by Yogamahar i shi Dr Swami
Gi t ananda Gi r i i n 1975. He i s cur r ent l y General Secret ary
of t he Pondi cher r y Yogasana Associ at i on, Advi sor t o
the World Yoga Council and a Member of the International
Council for Yoga Sport in the International Yoga Federation,
Sout h Amer i ca. He has r ecent l y been nomi nat ed as Vi ce
Presi dent of t he Asi an Uni on of Yoga, New Del hi , whi ch
i s af f i l i at ed wi t h t he I nt er nat i onal Yoga Feder at i on.
The International Yoga Federation honoured him in September
2004 by nomi nat i ng hi m as t he WORLD CULTURAL YOGA
AMBASSADOR of t he Wor l d Yoga Communi t y and t he
Worl d Governi ng Body of t he I nt ernat i onal Yoga Federat i on
of Buenos Ai r es, Ar gent i na.
Yoga f or hi m i s not j ust t he per f or mance of a f ew Asanas
or Pr anayamas but i s a means f or t he evol ut i on of t he
human mi nd i nt o hi gher st at es of consci ousness and
awar eness.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
143
129
KSHAMA - FORGIVENESS
life of dynamic spirituality. The ten attributes
of Dharma are Dhruti (fortitude or forbearance),
Kshama (forgiveness or the ability to
cheerful l y endure), Dama (sel f
restraint), Asteya (non stealing or
restrai ni ng from theft), Soucha
(cleanliness and purity of mind and
heart), Indriya Nigraha (self restraint, self-control over sensual
gratification by mastery over organs of perception), Dhi (spiritual
knowledge of discrimination between right and wrong), Vidya
(learning-knowledge of worldly affairs), Satya (truthfulness), and
Akhroda (absence or conquest of anger). These are the imperatives
of righteousness for the self-development of an individual as
well as for the transformation of society towards a better quality
of life. It is said that those who study these ten attributes and
follow them will progress to the highest level of existence. When
man has fulfilled his ten-point duty with concentration, learnt
Vedanta according to rules and paid his three debts (to the Rishis,
his ancestors, and the Gods), he may then become a renouncer
(Sanyasi).
DASA AVATARA
The Dasa Avatara of Lord Vishnu is often
used as an allegory for the evolution of
the species. While the first incarnation was
the aquatic fish (Matsya), the reptilian tortoise
(Kurma) followed it and then the mammalian
boar (Varaha) appeared. The half-animal,
half-man (Narasimha) is followed by the
dwarf man (Vamana), and then the violent
warrior (Parasurama with his axe). Lord
Rama of Ayodhya, the embodiment of virtue, LORD KRISHNA
DASHA - TEN
He has been i nstrumental i n devel opi ng the concept of Yoga
Asana Tableaus as a performing art and has trained hundreds
of young peopl e i n t he di ff i cul t art of acrobat i c Yoga Asanas.
The Yoga-Asana Tabl eau Concept has been devel oped by
Dr. Ananda as a vi t al t ool f or i ncul cat i ng a sense of t eam
spirit and mutual cooperation into youngsters. His pioneering
ef f ort s i n t hi s f i el d have been wi del y appl auded. As wel l ,
Dr. Ananda has been a pi oneer i n t he revi val of t he use of
t he acrobat i c Natya Karnas (di ff i cul t , at hl et i c and acrobat i c
poses of Bharat a Nat yam) i nt o t he modern dance repert oi re.
With his finely developed aesthetic sense, he tastefully weaves
these acrobati c poses i nto hi s cl assi cal dance choreography
and product i ons.
As Chairperson of Yoganjali Natyalayam, Pondicherrys Premier
I nst i t ut e of Yoga, Bharat a Nat yam and Carnat i c Musi c, he
has coordi nat ed many prest i gi ous programmes i n Bangal ore
(sVYASA), Chennai (Arkaya Foundati on), Al angudi (Guru
Stalam), Kodaikanal (Bhavans Gandhi Vidyashram), Tanjore
(Sal angai Natham 2004 f or t he Sout h Zone Cul t ural Cent re)
and Mahe (Varnam 2004 f or t he Dept of Art and Cul t ure).
He has at t ended vari ous Yoga Conf erences and semi nars
in New Delhi, Bombay, Lonavla, Bhopal, Chennai, Kancheepuram,
Madurai and ot her pl aces al ong wi t h hi s parent s. He has
assi st ed i n t he co-ordi nat i on of t hree I nternati onal Yoga
Conferences conduct ed i n Pondi cherry at Ananda Ashram
by Dr. Swami Gi tananda and Smt Meenakshi Devi Bhavanani .
He has had t he good f ort une of meet i ng and recei vi ng t he
bl essi ngs of numerous Great Yoga Mast ers such as Swami
Chi danada, Swami Chi nmayananda, Swami Sat chi dananda,
Swami Dayananda, Swami Digambarji, BKS Iyengar, Sri Yogendra
Desai , Sri TK Desi kachar, Sant Keshav Das, Sri Amri t Desai ,
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
144
128
in the olden days when the whole lobe or whole lung was removed.
The Yogic concept of sectional breathing (Vibhaga Pranayama)
is similar in that we breathe into nine sections of each lung
(front, side and back segments of each of the three lobes). Though
the left lung has only two lobes anatomically, the physiological
function of the lingula is similar to the middle lobe of the right
lung. There are three segments in the upper lobe of the right
lung, two in the middle lobe, and five in the lower lobe. In the
left lung there are five segments in the upper lobe and five in
the lower lobe.
TENTH STATE
The tenth Avastha, or Tenth State, is said
to be the state where Anava or
self-consciousness (one of the three
Malas, or human imperfections) is shed,
and oneness with the Universal Divine
Self is attained. Tirumoolar calls this
state the Upasanta, and says that
in it the Jiva merges into Shiva and
enjoys supreme bliss. According to the
Yogasikhopanishad, this is Dasapratyaya,
or the tenth experience. According to Upanisadbrahmayogi, i t
means, I am Brahman. The tenth is the one, that is generally
forgotten, but is shown to the competent Sadhaka by a perfect
Guru.
DASA DHARMA LAKSHANA
These are the ten attributes (Lakshana) of Dharma, according
to Manu Smriti. Only if we constantly and carefully fulfill this
ten-point duty at all stages of our life can we live a qualitative
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
Sri Di rendra Brahmachari and Sri Yogeshwar. He has al so
been pri vi l eged to recei ve the bl essi ngs of emi nent Sci enti st
Yogi s such as Shri R. R Di wakar, Dr B Ramamurt hy, Prof
TR Anantaraman, Dr W Selvamurthy, Dr Nagendra, Dr Nagaratna,
Dr MV Bhol e, Dr SV Rao, Dr RP Pandey, Dr Khapre, Dr SR
Joharapurkar and Dr Madanmohan. He al so recei ved t he
benevol ent bl essi ngs and speci al Ponnadi honours f rom t he
Kanchi Kamakoti Paramacharya of Kanchipuram Shri Jayendra
Saraswat i Swami gal when he was t en years ol d.
As a Mri dungi st, he has accompani ed great arti sts l i ke Padma
Bhushan T. V. Shankaranarayanan, Kal ai mamani Sri rengam
Ranganat han, Kal ai mamani Kul i kkarai S. P. Vi shval i ngam,
Kumbakonam M. R. Gopi nat h et c. on t he Mri dungam. Dr.
Ananda i s a B Grade Mri dungi st recogni sed by Al l I ndi a
Radi o and regul arl y pl ays f or Yoganj al i Nat yal ayam dance
performances. He has played Mridungam for Sendhen Tamilisai,
a Musi c Al bum by Kal ai mamani Pul avar I Pat t abhi raman
as wel l as Bhakti Mani Mal a, a musi c al bum sung by Smt
Jyothirmayi. He has also provided Mridungam accompaniment
f or a CD on Musi c Therapy by Dr Hari haran PhD.
He i s a l i f e member of t he I NDI AN MEDI CAL ASSOCI ATI ON;
ABHAI (Associ at i on of Bharat a Nat yam Art i st s of I ndi a);
Chennai , IAYT (Internati onal Associ ati on of Yoga Therapi sts,
based i n U. S. A); I YA (I nt ernat i onal Yogat herapy Associ at i on
of the Internati onal Yoga Federati on based i n South Ameri ca),
APPI (Associ at i on of Physi ol ogi st s and Pharmacol ogi st s of
I ndi a), I NDI AN ACADEMY OF YOGA, BHU, Varanasi and
t he Pondi cherry Psychol ogy Associ at i on.
He i s t he Pat ron of t he SANATHANA DHARMA SANGHA,
t he Hi ndu Movement i n I t al y and Europe, as wel l as more
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
145
127
Indian Culture has stressed the importance of personal hygienic
measures and utilizes of various cleansing techniques in order
to purify the body to become a pure and fit receptacle of the
Divine Spirit.
TEN LUNG SEGMENTS
There are ten broncho-pulmonary segments in each of the two
lungs. Each segment is virtually a separate unit with its own air
supply, nervous innervation, as well as blood supply and drainage
systems. This is very important in lung resection surgeries, as
only the diseased part of the lung needs to be removed, unlike
DASHA - TEN
t han a hundred Ri shi cul ture Ashtanga (Gi tananda) Yoga
centres al l over the worl d. He i s al so Patron of the Gitananda
Yoga Associ ati ons of Aust ral i a, Spai n, Germany, U. S. A.
and I t al y.
He i s the staff arti st of Yoga Life, the Internati onal monthl y
j ournal and i s wel l known f or hi s Yoga Cartoons on Yogi c
concept s and modern day Yogi s.
Dr. Ananda i s a Seni or Lecturer i n Mantra, Yantra, Yoga
History and Philosophy and Yoga Physiology and Anatomy
for the fully residential Yoga Training Courses at the International
Centre for Yoga Education and Research (ICYER) in Kottakuppam,
Tami l Nadu. These f ul l t i me resi dent i al courses, t he Si x
Mont h I nt ernat i onal Yoga Trai ni ng Course and t he One Year
Advanced Diploma Course are well established and presented
t o an i nt ernat i onal prof essi onal st andard. These courses
have been hel d annual l y si nce 1968 and st udent s f rom al l
over the world attend. He also lectures at Pondicherry University,
as wel l as at t he MGR Uni versi t y, Chennai on t he subj ect
of Sci ent i f i c basi s of Yoga and Yoga t herapy.
Dr. Ananda i s Chai rman of t he I nternati onal Centre for
Yoga Educati on and Research (I CYER) i n Kot t akuppam,
Tamil Nadu, an internationally acclaimed Yoga Institute established
as Ananda Ashram i n 1968. He i s Chai rman of Yoganj al i
Natyalayam, a world famous Institute of Yoga, Bharata Natyam,
and Carnat i c Musi c est abl i shed i n Pondi cherry i n 1993. He
i s al so Di rect or of St udi es f or bot h t hese I nst i t ut es.
He recei ved t he Marudha Ramal i nganar OUTSTANDI NG
YOUNG PERSON AWARD and Rol l i ng Shi el d for the year
2002 f rom t he Yout h Peace Cent re, Pondi cherry, and t he
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
146
126
are the most highly evolved souls, who are no longer affected
by Karma or Maya, but are still amenable to self-consciousness
(Anava). Pralayakalars are those who are still affected by self-
consciousness and experience Karma in different gradations
of intensity. Sakalars are the lowest of the three and are encumbered
by all three impurities. They posses self-consciousness, are affected
by Karma in different gradations, and are involved with the illusionary
world of Maya. The four classes of Vignanakalars, or highest
souls, include those who are in the quiescent state of inaction,
those who are self-realised, those who have reached the state
of the eight Vidyeshwars, and those who rank as the seven crore
Mantra Nayakas. The three classes of Pralayakalars are those
who will attain Mukti in their next life, the Jivanmuktas, and the
108 Rudras. The three sub classes of the Sakalars are those
who have attained Siddhis and are trying to reach God realization,
those who have Siddhis and are contented with them, and those
not performing Yoga Sadhana and simply immersed in the world
of sensory experience. The above are the ten classes of Jivas
according to Tirumoolar in his Tirumandiram.
DASA DWARA IN FEMALES
The ten gateways or openings in the female, according to Tantra,
are the two eyes, two ears, two nostrils, mouth, vagina, urethra
and anus. When performing Pratyahara and Samyama Yoga, it
is important that all these openings are closed. Physical Pratyahara
techniques, such as Shanmuki or Yoni Mudra, and Padma Asana,
are useful to help one physically close all these orifices and
lock up the senses in order to concentrate on the object of contemplation
without any distraction. Some scriptures also include the umbilicus
and fontanels that are open in neonates and infants as orifices,
and increase the number of entrances into the body. All entrances
must be kept clean in order to avoid possession by evil spirits
YOGA: 1 TO 10 BY DR ANANDA BALAYOGI BHAVANANI
t i t l e award of Yoga Vi bhushan f rom t he Tami l Nadu St at e
Yoga Associ at i on and t he Sport s Devel opment Aut hori t y of
Tamil Nadu (Tuticorin) in August 2003. Other titles and awards
received by him are Palkalai Chemmal, Sagala Kala Vallavan,
Isai Sevagan, Puduvai Manni n Mai ndhan, Achi ever Award
2003 and Jnana Vruddha.
He i s, at present , a SENI OR RESEARCH FELLOW i n t he
Yoga Research Proj ect conduct ed by t he Depart ment of
Physiology, JIPMER under the auspices of the Union of Health
as wel l as t he Def ense Mi ni st ri es, New Del hi . He i s i nvol ved
i n vari ous research st udi es at JI PMER and has publ i shed
numerous sci ent i f i c papers on t hese f i ndi ngs.
He i s happi l y marri ed t o Yogachari ni Devasena Bhavanani
who has a Mast ers degree i n Sanskri t i n addi t i on t o bei ng
an emi nent Yoga Expert, and a Carnati c Vocal i st and Bharata
Natyam Dancer, Teacher and Composer. They have one daughter
Dhi vya Pri ya Bhavanani .
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
147
125
DASHA - TEN
VIJAYADASAMI
This is the tenth day after the nine-night celebration (Navarathri)
of Devi worship in the months of September-
October. Indian mythology- history-legend explains
that it is on this tenth day that the Goddess
Durga as Maheshasura Mardini defeats the
demon Maheshasura. Durga, the beautiful
but fierce goddess, rides her mount the
lion, killing the demon. In each of her
ten arms she holds one of the Gods special
weapons: Vishnus discus, Shivas trident,
Varunas conch shell, Agnis flaming dart,
Vayus bow, Suryas quiver, Indras thunderbolt, and Kuberas
club as well as a garland of snakes from Adi Shesha, and riding
as her charger, a lion from the Himalayas. The defeat of the
Asura by the Devi symbolizes the triumph of light (wisdom) over
darkness (ignorance) and is celebrated all over India. Students
of the fine arts like dancing and music receive new lessons from
their Gurus in their respective fields on this day, symbolically
starting a New Year together.
TEN CLASSES OF JIVAS
Ji vas (soul s), who are eternal , are gi ven l i fe and body by
Shiva-Shakti so that they may rid themselves of their primordial
impurities and become truly free and pure. These Jivas are classified
into three basic categories according to the degree of impurities
they posses. These are further divided in sub-classes, thus
making up the ten classes of Jivas. The major three classes
are the Vignanakalars, Pralayakalars, and Sakalars. Vignanakalars
DURGA
DASHA - TEN
This doodle was drawn by Dr. Ananda as Dr. John Mumford gave a
symbolic visual to each number, to aid students in remembering the
psychic and spiritual value to each number. The numbers 1 to 9, are
represented respectively as: 1. Nail or Flag Pole, 2. Pair of Swans, 3. A Trident,
4. Sail Boat, 5. Unicycle, 6. Golf Club, 7. A Cliff, 8. An Hourglass, 9. A Balloon.