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Teaching Guide

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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
Scholastic Inc. grants teachers permission to photocopy the designated reproducible pages for classroom use. No other
part of the publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, or stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any way or by
any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without written permission of the publisher. For
information, write to Scholastic Inc., 557 Broadway, New York, NY 10012.
Guide written by Pamela Chanko
Cover design by Maria Lilja
lnIericr ce:ign Ly Grcfcc, lnc.
ISBN-13: 978-0-545-08866-4 / ISBN-10: 0-545-28866-6
Copyright 2009 by Scholastic Inc.
All rights reserved.
Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
Iab|e of 0ooteots
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Using the Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Using the Storybooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Using the Mini-Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Vocabulary Games and Activities . . . . . . . . . 12
Grow-a-Word Reproducible . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Book-by-Book Reproducibles. . . . . . . . . . . . 18
One of a Kind! (all-about-me words) . . 43
Dinner Time! (family words) . . . . . . . 47
Emily and Mortimer (friendship words) . 51
Little Piggys Big Day
(neighborhood words) . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Bear Goes Shopping (shopping words) . 59
The Monster Chef (cooking words) . . . 63
Kit Visits Kat (transportation words). . . . 67
School Rules (school words) . . . . . . . 71
Safely Ever After (safety words) . . . . . 75
I Love Popcorn! (ve senses words) . . . 79
Squirrels Tree (seasonal words) . . . . . 83
Going to Grandmas (weather words) . . 87
A Plant of My Own (plant words) . . . . 91
I Think I Need a Pet (animal words) . . . 95
Katie the Caterpillar (insect words) . . . 99
Seymour the Scaredy-Shark
(ocean words). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Dinosaur Days (dinosaur words) . . . . . 107
Protect the Earth!
(environmental words) . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Grace in Space (space words) . . . . . . 115
Silly Monkey in the Science Lab
(science words) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
The Sandcastle Contest
(shape words). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
A Gift for Giraffe
(measurement words). . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Kitty Breaks the Bank
(money words) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Callie Stays Up Late (time words) . . . . 135
Tortoise Goes to Camp
(computer words) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Answers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources


Iotroduct|oo
I
f youre opening this book, youre already on the way to building a strong foundational
vocabulary for every student in your classroom. Welcome to Vocabulary Tales, the fun and
easy way to teach vocabulary in context!
Having a strong vocabulary is the key that opens not only the door to reading success, but
the doors to achievement in virtually every other area as well. Think about itno matter what
the subject is, words are what we use to teach it, understand it, and speak about it. A strong
vocabulary makes students not only better readers and speakers, but also better writers,
because they have the words they need to express what they want to. A strong vocabulary
even improves students social skills, because it allows them to better articulate their own
thoughts and those of others.
The research shows that the best way to build vocabulary is through repeated, direct
instruction. However, rote drilling of words and their denitions is unlikely to engage students
(or their teachers, for that matter), and facts learned out of context tend not to stick. Thats
where Vocabulary Tales comes in. Each of these 25 playful, character- and plot-driven stories
teaches eight new words in a natural context that makes sense.
Youll nd that the group of words featured in each story centers on a single theme, making
it easy for you to teach all of the words together. For instance, Bear Goes Shopping features
eight shopping words, including purchase, expensive, customer, and afford. Katie the
Caterpillar features eight insect words, including camouage, metamorphosis, emerge, and
hives. Other vocabulary themes include:
As you can see, the words featured in Vocabulary Tales are
not only essential for reading and writingthese are the kinds
of words children need in order to communicate effectively
about content areas across the curriculum. And they are
all taught in a lively, delightful context. Imagine teaching
a vocabulary lesson and hearing giggles instead of yawns.
Thats your classroom with the addition of Vocabulary Tales!
transportation words
five senses words
friendship words
weather words
school words
money words
measurement words
ocean words
environmental words
and many more!
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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
0s|og tbe Program
The bright and beautiful storybooks, along with this time-saving teaching guide, are all youll
need to put the Vocabulary Tales program to work in your classroom!
Storybooks
In the durable storage box, youll nd 25 of the most fun and engaging full-color storybooks
around! The Vocabulary Tales storybooks can be used for both whole-group read-alouds and
more intimate interactive reading. Each tale features eight vocabulary words that relate to
a central theme or topic, such as neighborhood words, ocean words, seasonal words, and so
on. Each topic is relevant to childrens lives, and to the subjects you teach. Plus, youll nd
that the target vocabulary words fall into context naturally you dont need to sacrice a good
story for an educational component! Instead, children will build ocean vocabulary as they
read about an unusually fearful ocean creature in Seymour the Scaredy-Shark. Theyll learn
cooking words as they watch a monster get loose in the kitchen in The Monster Chef. In short,
theyll have fun as they become word wizards! For tips on using the storybooks, see pages 67
of this guide.
Mini-Books
Included in the guide you will nd a reproducible version of all 25 storybooks. The mini-books
are unabridged duplicates of the stories, so each and every student can have his or her own
complete set of Vocabulary Tales! The mini-books are great for independent reading, home-
school connections, center work, and more. For terric tips on using the mini-books, see
pages 89 of this guide.
Activities and Games
When you involve children in word play, they can develop a love of language to last a lifetime!
Hands-on games and activities are an important component of any vocabulary program, and
youll nd loads of fun ideas right here in this guide. There are activities to benet many
learning styles, from visual to kinesthetic. See pages 1216.
Book-by-Book Reproducibles
Each book in the program comes with a matching vocabulary
worksheet for student practice and quick progress checks. Starting
on page 18, youll nd a reproducible for each storybook that
challenges children to match the target words from the book with
their denitions.
Assessment
While the book-by-book reproducibles provide you with a quick
and easy way to do spot checks, see pages 1011 for more in-depth
assessment. Here youll nd tips on interpreting childrens stages of
word knowledge, as well as a chart for tracking their development.
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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
0s|og tbe Storgbooks
The books in the Vocabulary Tales program are so charming and
colorful that theyre sure to become classroom favorites just for the
stories themselves. Here are some before, during, and after reading
tips for getting the most out of the educational opportunities
embedded in each book.
Before Reading
You might like to activate childrens prior knowledge and get the language owing by
starting an oral discussion on the vocabulary theme. For instance, before reading Going to
Grandmas, a story that teaches weather words, you might ask questions such as: What is
your favorite kind of weather? What kinds of things can you do in that weather? What is
the weather like today? What are some other words we use to describe the weather?
Display the cover of the book and read the title aloud. Invite children to make predictions
about the story or to share any personal connections evoked by the illustration. For
instance, when displaying I Think I Need a Pet, you might ask: What kind of pet do you
think the girl wants? Do you think she will get it? When looking at Tortoise Goes to Camp,
you might ask: Have you ever been to camp? If not, what do you think it would be like to
go? When previewing Safely Ever After, point to the picture of Humpty Dumpty and ask:
Does this character look familiar? Where have you seen him before?
Point out the oval in the upper right corner and read aloud the vocabulary theme. Explain
to children that in this story, they will be seeing some special words, and that all the words
have to do with the same topic. For instance, when reading Dinner Time!, you might tell
children there are eight special words in this book, and all of them have to do with family.
Tell children that the special words will be in boldface type and that later, you will be
talking about what the words mean.
During Reading
When you rst share the storybook, read it straight through so children can enjoy the
language and the illustrations. Invite them to ask questions and share comments about
the plot and the characters.
On your next reading, encourage children to pay special attention to the words in boldface
print. When you come to a vocabulary word, pause to discuss childrens initial ideas about
it. Have they seen or heard the word before? If the word is new to them, can they nd a
context clue in the story to help determine its meaning? For instance, when reading Emily
and Mortimer, children may nd a clue to the word honest right in the next sentence:
Emily always told him the truth.
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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
During subsequent readings, pause at the target words to read the denitions and sample
sentences aloud. Compare how the target word is used in the story to how it is used in
the sample sentence, and then invite children to use the word in their own sentence. For
instance, in the story School Rules, the word silent is used to describe students, while in
the sample sentence it is used to describe a house. After reading this page, you might ask
children: What is something else that might be silent?
As children grow progressively more familiar with each story, they will be able to chime
in on more of the reading. You can encourage this by using sticky notes to create cloze
reading activitiesthat is, cover one or more words in the text and allow children to
provide the words themselves. As they master more of the text, children can participate in
whole-group, partial-group, and even partnered reading in front of the class.
After Reading
Encourage children to respond to the story and share their own personal reactions. If you
need to spark ideas or get the conversation owing, you can ask questions such as: Did the
story end up the way you thought it would, or was there a part that surprised you? Who
was your favorite character? Which illustration did you enjoy most? Why?
Use the Meaning Match activity on page 14 of the storybook to review the denitions of the
words from the story. Read each denition aloud and ask children to match it to a word in
the word chest. Depending on childrens skill level, you might limit their choices and ask
them to pick from two, three, or four words before revealing all eight.
The Vocabulary Fill-ins on page 15 of the storybook ask children to use their knowledge
of the target words from the story and apply them to a different context. Read each ll-in
sentence aloud, and then ask children to choose the word from the word box that makes
the most sense in the blank.
The open-ended questions on page 16 of the storybook help you explore the target words
more deeply with children by asking questions that tap into their personal experiences,
opinions, and prior knowledge while encouraging them to make connections to newly
acquired vocabulary. Keeping these conversations free and easygoing is
probably the best way to encourage new discoveries about words.
Last but not least, youll nd an Extra activity at the bottom of page 16
of the storybook challenging children to think of more words connected
to the theme (such as cooking words, animal words, and so on). This
is the time to brainstorm! You can do the activity as a whole group, in
small groups, with partners, or independently, and you can do it with
the same theme more than once. As childrens vocabularies increase and
they begin to make new associations, you never know what new words
might come up!
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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
0s|og tbe M|o|-8ooks
Since each reproducible mini-book is an exact replica of the companion storybook, each child
in your classroom can own a complete set of all 25 Vocabulary Tales! Naturally, the mini-books
reinforce the vocabulary taught in the storybooks, but thats not alltheyre great for both
classroom and take-home activities alike! Use the tips below to make the most of the learning
opportunities provided by the Vocabulary Tales mini-books.
Follow Me! After youve read a Vocabulary Tale several times, give each child a copy of the
companion mini-book pages and show children how to put the book together (see page 9 of
this guide). As you read the story once more, children will be able to follow along in their very
own copies! The mini-books are great for choral reading, guided reading, Readers Theater, and
mini-lessons.
Vocabulary Central The mini-books make a great starting point for a learning center. After
teaching a group of target words, place several copies of the mini-book at the center, along
with copies of the matching reproducible (see pages 1842). After children read the book and
complete the sheet, they can work with the words in a variety of other ways, depending on
their skill level. You might have children draw a picture to represent each word, come up with
synonyms or antonyms, or even challenge children to extend the storybook or write their own
original story using the words. You can also use the mini-books to create a listening center.
Simply make a recording of yourself reading a story aloud and place copies of the mini-books
in the center for children to follow along with your reading.
My Vocabulary Tales To make childrens personal libraries of Vocabulary Tales special, get a
clean, empty shoebox for each child (or ask parents to bring one in from home) for children to
decorate. Set out old magazines, gift wrap, stickers, and cut sentence strips. Then let children
use pictures, print, or both to represent their favorite words and glue them on the box! If
children cant nd a particular word, they can print it on a sentence strip. Label childrens
boxes with their names and let children use them to store their collection of Vocabulary Tales
mini-books.
From School to Home Use the mini-books to forge
home-school connections and involve family members
in childrens learning. After youve read a story in
class, copy the mini-book and send it home with each
child. You can use the pendant on the following page
as an invitation for parents to snuggle up and read the
mini-book with their children.
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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
Mak|og tbe M|o|-8ooks
|. Make double-
sided copies of
the mini-book
pages. (You
should have two
double-sided
copies for each
one.)
J. Position the pages
with lettered spreads
(A, B, C, D) faceup.
Place the B spread
on top of the A
spread. Then, place
the C and D spreads
on top of those in
sequence.
4. Fold the pages in half
along the solid line. Make
sure all the pages are in
the correct order. Then
staple them together
along the books spine.
Z. Stack the
pages and cut
them across the
horizontal dotted
line. Do not cut
along the solid line.
A
B
C
D
Ask me about the
___________________________________
words Im learning!
Then we can read the Vocabulary Tales
mini-book together.
Mak|og tbe Peodaot
The same day you send home a mini-book, make one copy of the pendant for each child.
Simply write the vocabulary theme on the line, cut it out, punch a hole in the top, and thread
with yarn to create a necklace children can wear home.
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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
Assessmeot
While the reproducible sheets in this guide give you some information about childrens
progress, its important to note that true word knowledge goes beyond matching words with
denitions. Firstly, there are different kinds of vocabulary: speaking vocabulary is different
from listening vocabulary (that is, being able to understand a word spoken in context is
different from feeling comfortable enough with that word to use it freely oneself). Word
knowledge also develops along a continuum; it is not an all-or-nothing concept. In their book
Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction (Guilford Press, 2002), experts Isabel
Beck, Margaret McKeown, and Linda Kucan identify four main degrees of word knowledge, as
shown below.
Multiple-choice vocabulary tests and exercises that ask children to use the word in a sentence
are limited because a child can get correct answers with very little knowledge of a word. For
example, a child may know that the word humongous can be used to describe an elephant,
but still not know what the word means. A child who can use the word conductor in the
sentence I saw a conductor is proving that he knows conductor is a noun, and nothing else.
Some of the best ways to assess childrens word knowledge involve getting them to interact
with the words. For instance, to see if a child knows the word emergency after reading Safely
Ever After, you might ask: What is an emergency that we practice for at school? What kind of
emergency could happen at home? After reading One of a Kind!, you might ask: If you were
curious about a book, would you take it off the shelf, or leave it there? Why? You can also
encourage children to connect target words to personal experiences with questions such as:
When have you felt grateful to someone? What did the person do to make you feel that way? A
childs ability (or inability) to use a word across contexts gives you a more accurate picture of
his or her true word knowledge.
The assessment sheet on the next page can be used to track childrens progress. Simply copy
a class set and write each childs name at the top. After nishing a book, write the date and
the eight vocabulary words in the spaces provided. Then have a conversation with each child
to assess their knowledge of the target words using the guidelines above, and place a check
mark in the appropriate box to note the childs learning stage for each word. Its not an exact
science; just use your best judgment. Six dated assessments will t on each sheet; make
multiple copies to follow each childs progress throughout the program.
Four Stages of Knowing a Word
Stage 1: Does not know the word at all; has never seen or heard it
before.
Stage 2: Has heard or seen the word before, but does not know what
it means.
Stage 3: Has vague knowledge of the word; can recognize it in one
context, but cannot apply it across a variety of situations.
Stage 4: Knows the word well; can explain its meaning and use it in
many contexts.
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Vocabulary Tales 2009 Liza Charlesworth, Scholastic Teaching Resources
Assessmeot
While the reproducible sheets in this guide give you some information about childrens
progress, its important to note that true word knowledge goes beyond matching words with
denitions. Firstly, there are different kinds of vocabulary: speaking vocabulary is different
from listening vocabulary (that is, being able to understand a word spoken in context is
different from feeling comfortable enough with that word to use it freely oneself). Word
knowledge also develops along a continuum; it is not an all-or-nothing concept. In their book
Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction (Guilford Press, 2002), experts Isabel
Beck, Margaret McKeown, and Linda Kucan identify four main degrees of word knowledge, as
shown below.
Multiple-choice vocabulary tests and exercises that ask children to use the word in a sentence
are limited because a child can get correct answers with very little knowledge of a word. For
example, a child may know that the word humongous can be used to describe an elephant,
but still not know what the word means. A child who can use the word conductor in the
sentence I saw a conductor is proving that he knows conductor is a noun, and nothing else.
Some of the best ways to assess childrens word knowledge involve getting them to interact
with the words. For instance, to see if a child knows the word emergency after reading Safely
Ever After, you might ask: What is an emergency that we practice for at school? What kind of
emergency could happen at home? After reading One of a Kind!, you might ask: If you were
curious about a book, would you take it off the shelf, or leave it there? Why? You can also
encourage children to connect target words to personal experiences with questions such as:
When have you felt grateful to someone? What did the person do to make you feel that way? A
childs ability (or inability) to use a word across contexts gives you a more accurate picture of
his or her true word knowledge.
The assessment sheet on the next page can be used to track childrens progress. Simply copy
a class set and write each childs name at the top. After nishing a book, write the date and
the eight vocabulary words in the spaces provided. Then have a conversation with each child
to assess their knowledge of the target words using the guidelines above, and place a check
mark in the appropriate box to note the childs learning stage for each word. Its not an exact
science; just use your best judgment. Six dated assessments will t on each sheet; make
multiple copies to follow each childs progress throughout the program.
Four Stages of Knowing a Word
Stage 1: Does not know the word at all; has never seen or heard it
before.
Stage 2: Has heard or seen the word before, but does not know what
it means.
Stage 3: Has vague knowledge of the word; can recognize it in one
context, but cannot apply it across a variety of situations.
Stage 4: Knows the word well; can explain its meaning and use it in
many contexts.
10 10
ocabu|arg Assessmeot
Name _______________________________________________________________________
Date: Stage
Words 1 2 3 4
Date: Stage
Words 1 2 3 4
Date: Stage
Words 1 2 3 4
Date: Stage
Words 1 2 3 4
Date: Stage
Words 1 2 3 4
Date: Stage
Words 1 2 3 4
11 11
ocabu|arg 0ames aod Act|v|t|es
These hands-on, open-ended activities are great for exploring words children learn through
the Vocabulary Tales program, or any target words of your choice.
Word Detectives
As children learn new words at school, encourage them to be on the lookout for the words
in real-world situations. Any non-academic context should be considered real world, from
a newspaper clipping to an overheard conversation. Reserve a bulletin board or wall for the
Word Detective station and encourage children to ll it up by posting records of their ndings!
For instance, after reading Protect the Earth!, a child might see the word healthy on a cereal
box and attach that piece of the box to the wall; another child might hear the word recycle on
a television commercial and post a drawing of a TV with recycle in a speech bubble; and so
on. This is a great way to show children that having a good vocabulary is not only useful at
schoolit helps them everywhere they go!

Password
You can adapt this famous TV game show into a fun game for the classroom. Prepare by
writing several secret passwords (that is, target vocabulary words) on sentence strips or
construction paperjust make sure they will be large enough for the rest of the
class to see. Then invite two students up to the front of the room to be the rst
contestants, and have them sit in chairs facing the audience. Stand between
the two students and hold up the secret password for the audience to seeit will
be their job to volunteer one-word clues that will help the contestants guess the
secret word. For instance, clues to the word kind might include friendly, good,
sweet, caring, and so on. Have the two contestants take turns calling on members
of the audience for clues and taking guesses until one of them guesses the password.
The student who guessed the word gets to stay for another round, and the student
who gave the nal clue replaces the other contestant.
Categories
This old favorite will get children thinking about how words are
related, and how they can be sorted. Help each student create a
simple grid of three-by-three or four-by-four squares, depending
on the childrens skill level. Across the top, have children write
three or four categories of words, for example, school words,
shape words, and ocean words. Down the side, have children
spell a three- or four-letter word, for instance, SAT. Children ll
in the squares with words that t each category and start with
the appropriate letter (for these categories, the s words might be
students, square, and sea). Of course, children can use words
outside the program to ll in their gridsthinking about words is
whats important.
12 12
Whats My Word?
In this game, each child gets a secret wordbut everyone else is in on the secret! Write
target vocabulary words on large sticky notes and attach one to each childs back, making
sure children do not see their own words. Then have children mill around and give clues to
one another. The clues might be denitions, synonyms, words that are close to the word, and
so on. For instance, a child giving a clue to a child with noisy on her back might say, Your
word means the same as loud. A child talking to the child with humongous on his back
might say, Your word is close to enormous. Children can also ask others about their own
words, for example: Is my word a computer word? Does my word have to do with insects? and
so on. Let children ask questions and give clues until everyone has guessed his or her secret
word.
Word Wall Activities
As childrens vocabularies grow larger and larger, you will probably want to put up a word wall
to track all the new words students are learning! Word walls allow children to explore words in
varied ways. Plus, the activities you can do with word walls are lots of fun, and require almost
no set up! To create your word wall, simply set aside a bulletin board or wall at childrens eye
level and keep a stack of note cards close by. Then, each time you study a new vocabulary
word with children, write it on a note card and attach it to the wall. Its that easy! Here are
just a few ideas for vocabulary fun with a word wall.
Vocabulary Basketball For this game, create a masking tape fault line in front of
your word wall and place a clean, empty trash can at a short distance to serve as your
basketball hoop. You can use a plush ball or beanbag for a basketball. Line up two teams
of children and have the rst child on each team take turns standing behind the fault line.
Choose a secret word from the wall and give the child a clue in the form of a synonym,
antonym, or denition. For instance, if you choose the word scrumptious, you might say,
Show me the word that means very delicious. If the child identies the word correctly,
he or she earns one point for the team, plus the chance to earn an extra point by shooting
a basket. Play continues until each child has had a turn, or as time permits. For a fun
variation, you can write the clues on scrap paper and use your recycling bin as the hoop.
Children can read the clue, crumple the paper, and shootthe clue itself becomes the
basketball!
Vocabulary Swat Team For this game, divide the group into
two teams, have them each line up in front of the word wall,
and give the rst child in each line a y swatter. Then say a
cloze sentence for one of the words on the wall. For instance, if
you choose the word tradition, you might say, In my family, it
is a ___ to eat turkey on Thanksgiving. The rst child to swat
the word that ts earns a point for his or her team. Players
then move to the back of the line. Continue until each child has
had a turn, or for as long as time permits.
13 13
Mystery Word In this game, you choose a mystery
word from the wall that children solve with ve
successive clues, each of which narrows the choices
from the clue before. Have children number their papers
from one to ve; as you give each clue, children should
write a word from the wall that matches all the clues
given so far. The last clue should lead children directly
to the mystery word. Heres an example for the word
blizzard:
Clue 1: The mystery word is on the word wall.
Clue 2: The mystery word has two syllables.
Clue 3: The mystery word has to do with weather.
Clue 4: The mystery word is a kind of storm.
Clue 5: The mystery word completes this sentence: After the ___, the snow was piled five inches high.
Round-Robin Storytelling Heres a fun, silly way to use vocabulary words in context.
Take down random words from the word wall, one for each child and yourself. Pass out
the cards, keeping one for yourself, and sit in a circle with children for a round-robin
story. The trick? Each part of the story must include the word that the speaker is holding!
Start the story yourself, showing children your word and modeling how you include it. For
instance, if you have the word generous, you might begin, Once there was a very generous
king. But he may have been too generous, because he gave away almost all he had. Then
pass the story on to the next child in the circle. If children need help with ideas, a few well-
placed questions might help. For instance, if the next child had the word backpack, you
might ask, What if the king only had a few things left? What would he carry them in?
Just make sure children know theres no pressurethe sillier the story, the better!
14 14
Quick-Draw
A Pictionary-style drawing game will be fun for all students, but might be especially benecial for
visual learners. Prepare the game by writing target vocabulary words on note cards and gathering
two groups of players. To begin, the rst illustrator from Team 1 picks a random card, reads the word
(without showing it to anyone else), and attempts to draw a representation of the word on the board
or chart paper for his or her team to guess. No letters or talking is allowed, but players are allowed
to interact with their pictures. For instance, a child who picked the word neighbor might draw two
houses with a person in front of one of them, and then point to the person. The drawing period
should be about one minute (you can time it with a stopwatch or a sand timer). If Team 1 guesses the
word correctly, they earn a point. If Team 1 cannot guess the word in the time allotted, Team 2 has
one chancebut only oneto guess the word from the illustrations that have already been created.
If they are correct, they earn the point. If not, the point goes unearned.
In either case, it is then Team 2s turn. Play continues (giving different
team members a chance to draw) until all cards have been used.
Mix and Mingle
Use this activity when children need to form partners or groups, or just
for fun. If possible, laminate a note card for each child in the class. If
not, you can use plain note cards. (Laminated cards will create a write-
on/wipe-off surface, so you can use them over and over again with a
water-based marker.) Punch holes in the upper corners of the cards
and string with yarn to make a necklace. To form partners, write a
vocabulary word on one card and a denition on another, making sure
each child will have a match. Then place all the necklaces in a paper
bag and let children pick one at random. Children can mix and mingle,
milling about and looking at each others necklaces until they nd
their matching partner! This can also be done with synonyms. To form
small groups, you can make necklaces with categories of words that go
together, such as family words (grandparents, nephew, aunt, uncle) or time words (week, minute,
second, hour).
Pass It On!
This fun game is based on Pass the Chicken, but you dont need a rubber chicken to play it! You
can pass anything, such as a beanbag. Seat children in a circle, ask a volunteer to be It, and
explain that the object of the game is to never get caught holding the beanbag. To begin, give the
beanbag to It and give the child a challenge, such as, Name three computer words. Pass it on! As
soon as you say Pass it on, It passes the beanbag to the child on his right, and children quickly
pass the beanbag around the circle. If the beanbag comes back to the original holder before the child
can name three computer words, that child is still It. Otherwise, the child holding the beanbag
when It completes the task becomes the new It. For variation, you can incorporate different kinds of
challenges, such as saying three sentences using a particular target word, naming two synonyms or
antonyms of a target word, and so on.
15 15
Pyramid
Remember the $25,000 Pyramid game show? Well, its a great way to teach vocabulary
and word relationshipsand its loads of fun! You can easily adapt it for use in the
classroom. Divide the class into two teams and have the rst child from each team
come to the front of the room. These children are the rst contestants; they should sit
in chairs facing the class, away from the board. Choose one contestant to go rst and
write a word category or theme (such as shopping words) on the board behind her.
During a timed period (such as one minute), volunteers from her team should call out
words that will help her guess the category (such as expensive, customer, and so on).
If she guesses the category correctly within the allotted time, her team earns a point. If
not, the other contestant is allowed one guess to earn the point for his team. Whether
he earns the point or not, it is then his teams turn with a new category. After that,
bring up the next pair. Play as long as time permits.
Grow-a-Word
Use the reproducible on page 17 to build critical thinking skills and encourage children
to delve more deeply into word relationships. The reproducible can be used with any
word children are learningit helps grow their ideas about the word! First, have
children write the target word in the center of the ower. On the petals, children can
either write words or draw images that the target word reminds them of. These can be
examples, related words, descriptions, or synonyms. For example, if the target word is
mother, a childs activity sheet might be very personal and contain adjectives such as
funny, kind, beautiful, loving, and family.
16 16
0row-a-word
Name ___________________________________________________________
Word
17 17
0oe of a k|od|
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = able to do things all by yourself
2. __________________ = to pretend
3. __________________ = extra special
4. __________________ = feeling good about what you have done
5. __________________ = strong feelings
6. __________________ = to want to nd out more about something
7. __________________ = without any mistakes
8. __________________ = able to wait without getting upset
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
all-about-me wordr
emotions
proud
patient
independent
curious
extraordinary
perfect
imagine
18 18
0|ooer I|me|
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a mother or fathers parents
2. __________________ = a brother or sisters son
3. __________________ = the people in your family
4. __________________ = an aunt or uncles child
5. __________________ = a mother or fathers brother,
or the husband of your aunt
6. __________________ = a large meal
7. __________________ = something special you do regularly
8. __________________ = a mother or fathers sister, or the wife of your uncle
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
family wordr
feast
tradition
aunt
nephew
relatives
grandparents
cousin
uncle
r
19 19
m||g aod Mort|mer
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = happy to give your things to others
2. __________________ = being nice to others
3. __________________ = to be thankful for something
4. __________________ = never lying, cheating, or stealing
5. __________________ = to have the same idea or opinion
about something
6. __________________ = to rely on someone or something
7. __________________ = disagreements or ghts between people
8. __________________ = showing strong friendship or support for someone
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
friendrhip wordr
depend
loyal
generous
honest
grateful
arguments
kind
agree
dr
20 20
neighborhood wordr
||tt|e P|ggg's 8|g 0ag
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a building where movies or plays are shown
2. __________________ = to look at a lot of different things
3. __________________ = a restaurant that has all kinds of food
4. __________________ = someone who lives nearby
5. __________________ = a place where art, history, or science objects
are displayed
6. __________________ = using something that doesnt belong to you,
then giving it back
7. __________________ = the leader of a town or city
8. __________________ = a drugstore
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
browse
pharmacy
mayor
diner
neighbor
theater
borrow
museum
dr
21 21
8ear 0oes Sbopp|og
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = to buy something
2. __________________ = a small case for holding money
3. __________________ = to have enough money to buy something
4. __________________ = people who buy things
5. __________________ = a group of different things
6. __________________ = to hold something close in a loving way
7. __________________ = to pick out something from a group
8. __________________ = costing a lot of money
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
rhopping wordr
wallet
choose
snuggle
variety
expensive
purchase
customers
afford
dr
22 22
cooking wordr
Ibe Mooster 0bef
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = instructions for cooking food
2. __________________ = the main cook in a restaurant
3. __________________ = a list of foods served in a restaurant
4. __________________ = foods and spices used in a recipe
5. __________________ = something you wear to protect your clothes
when you are cooking
6. __________________ = a small amount of something
7. __________________ = very delicious
8. __________________ = to heat something until it starts to bubble
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
apron
ingredients
boil
menu
chef
recipe
scrumptious
pinch
dr
ant
23 23

Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = something that carries people
from one place to another
2. __________________ = to give an idea
3. __________________ = walking slowly
4. __________________ = going to see people or places
5. __________________ = someone who walks
6. __________________ = the amount of space between two places
7. __________________ = people who ride in vehicles
8. __________________ = cars, vans, trucks, and motorcycles on the road
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
tranrportation wordr
passengers
strolling
visit
distance
suggest
pedestrian
trafc
vehicle
dr
24 24
rchool wordr
Scboo| ku|es
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a large bag that you wear on your back
2. __________________ = school work to do at home
3. __________________ = absolutely quiet
4. __________________ = to work together
5. __________________ = what you should or should not do
6. __________________ = to try to do something that is hard
7. __________________ = people who learn at a school
8. __________________ = to give your attention to something
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
rule
challenge
students
homework
silent
backpack
concentrate
cooperate
dr
25 25
Safe|g ver After
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = something that happens suddenly and puts
someone in danger
2. __________________ = to watch out for something that could hurt you
3. __________________ = a hard hat that keeps your head safe
4. __________________ = signs that tell you what to do
5. __________________ = to keep something from happening
6. __________________ = to pay no attention to something
7. __________________ = doing something very carefully so you
dont get hurt
8. __________________ = information or a skill you need to learn or study
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
rafety wordr
lesson
caution
emergency
prevent
signals
helmet
ignore
beware
dr
26 26
hve renrer wordr
I |ove Popcoro|
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = to look at something with wonder
2. __________________ = the way something smells
3. __________________ = loud
4. __________________ = bumpy
5. __________________ = to break open or explode
6. __________________ = what our bodies use to nd out about the world
7. __________________ = to smell something
8. __________________ = the way something tastes
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
senses
burst
avor
scent
sniff
noisy
rough
gaze
dr
er
27 27
Squ|rre|'s Iree
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = to collect or pick things
2. __________________ = one of the four natural parts of the year
3. __________________ = to shake with cold or fear
4. __________________ = not wanting to work or be active
5. __________________ = the season between summer
and winter, also called fall
6. __________________ = when owers appear on plants and trees
7. __________________ = a cool, dark area away from
the suns bright light
8. __________________ = to run lightly and quickly
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
rearonal wordr
autumn
scamper
gather
shiver
season
lazy
bloom
shade
dr
28 28
weather wordr
0o|og to 0raodma's
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a big snowstorm
2. __________________ = damp and moist
3. __________________ = gently and pleasantly windy
4. __________________ = to become ice
5. __________________ = a prediction or guess about the future,
especially about what the weather will be
6. __________________ = a little cold
7. __________________ = a big, wet storm with very strong winds
8. __________________ = to rain lightly
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
chilly
hurricane
forecast
breezy
freeze
drizzle
humid
blizzard
dr
29 29
A P|aot of Mg 0wo
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a small growth on a plant that will later become
a leaf or a ower
2. __________________ = the colored part of a plant that makes seeds
or fruit
3. __________________ = the dirt in which plants grow
4. __________________ = the parts of a plant or tree that grow under
the ground
5. __________________ = the invisible mixture of gases around you that
you breathe
6. __________________ = a young plant that has just come up above
the soil
7. __________________ = the brightly colored outer parts of a ower
8. __________________ = the tiny part of a plant that you put in the ground
so a new plant can grow
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
plant wordr
ower
shoot
seed
roots
bud
air
soil
petals
dr
30 30
animal wordr
I Ib|ok I Need a Pet
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a doctor who takes care of animals
2. __________________ = very, very, very big
3. __________________ = to take an animal from the wild and train it to
live with people
4. __________________ = the place where a plant or animal normally lives
5. __________________ = to run very fast
6. __________________ = living in nature; not taken care of by humans
7. __________________ = strong and dangerous
8. __________________ = the long nose of an elephant
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
wild
trunk
habitat
humongous
tame
gallop
veterinarian
fierce
dr
31 31
kat|e tbe 0aterp|||ar
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a big change
2. __________________ = the high sound that an insect or bird makes
3. __________________ = to come out into the open
4. __________________ = a home for bees
5. __________________ = to give off a low light
6. __________________ = a coloring or covering that makes
an animal look like its surroundings
7. __________________ = to move slowly and quietly
8. __________________ = to carry
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
inrect wordr
camouage
emerge
chirp
cart
hive
glow
creep
metamorphosis
dr
32 32
Segmour tbe Scaredg-Sbark
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = the ocean
2. __________________ = shells of sea animals
3. __________________ = the small pieces of hard skin that cover the
body of a sh, snake, or other reptile
4. __________________ = a plant that grows in the sea
5. __________________ = the land along the edge of
an ocean, river, or lake
6. __________________ = a raised part of the water that moves and rolls
7. __________________ = parts on the body of a sh that ap and are
used for moving through the water
8. __________________ = to go headrst into the water
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
ocean wordr
Name ___________________________________________________________
shore
sea
scales
dive
seashells
ns
seaweed
wave
dr
33 33
0|oosaur 0ags
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a group of animals with the same features
2. __________________ = animals that eat plants
3. __________________ = the rocklike remains of a dinosaur,
animal, or plant
4. __________________ = huge
5. __________________ = a helmetlike lump on top of a dinosaurs head
6. __________________ = when a type of animal has died out
7. __________________ = very, very old
8. __________________ = animals that eat meat
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
dinoraur wordr
ancient
fossils
enormous
extinct
carnivores
crest
species
herbivores
dr
e features
ur,
34 34
environmental wordr
Protect tbe artb|
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = to make something smaller or less
2. __________________ = strong and well
3. __________________ = to turn old items into new products
4. __________________ = garbage that harms the earths air, water, or soil
5. __________________ = the power we get from electricity, gas, or other
sources
6. __________________ = to use something carelessly
7. __________________ = to keep something safe from harm
8. __________________ = to use again
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
reuse
pollution
energy
healthy
waste
recycle
protect
reduce
dr
35 35
0race |o Space
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a person who travels in space
2. __________________ = our neighborhood in space
3. __________________ = to travel around the sun or a planet
4. __________________ = a smell
5. __________________ = a large hole in the ground
6. __________________ = a happy dream that you have
while you are awake
7. __________________ = a lumpy rock that travels around the sun
8. __________________ = very important and in need of attention
right away
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
rpace wordr
odor
asteroid
crater
urgent
daydream
astronaut
solar system
orbit
dr
ce
orbit
36 36
rcience wordr
S|||g Mookeg |o tbe Sc|eoce |ab
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a piece of metal that attracts other metal
2. __________________ = a scientic test to see what happens
3. __________________ = a special room for doing scientic work
4. __________________ = a guess about what will happen
5. __________________ = special glasses that t tightly around
your eyes to protect them
6. __________________ = a device that makes tiny things look
large enough to see
7. __________________ = a substance that is dry and hard
8. __________________ = a substance, such as oxygen, that will spread to
ll any space that contains it
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
gas
magnet
microscope
laboratory
prediction
experiment
goggles
solid
dr
en
round
gs look
37 37
Ibe Saodcast|e 0ootest
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a shape with three sides
2. __________________ = a perfectly round shape
3. __________________ = very beautiful
4. __________________ = a shape with four straight sides in which the
opposite sides are equal in length
5. __________________ = half of a circle
6. __________________ = a shape like an egg
7. __________________ = a shape with four equal sides
8. __________________ = to bend or turn gently
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
rhape wordr
circle
oval
curve
semicircle
magnicent
triangle
rectangle
square
dr
des
38 38
mearurement wordr
A 0|ft for 0|raffe
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = a unit of length equal to 5,280 feet
2. __________________ = a device used for weighing things
3. __________________ = to nd out the size, weight,
or amount of something
4. __________________ = extremely large
5. __________________ = a unit of length equal to 1/12 of a foot
6. __________________ = how heavy something is
7. __________________ = how large something is from side to side
8. __________________ = a long, at stick used for measuring
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
measure
weight
mile
ruler
wide
inch
huge
scale
dr
eet
gs
39 39
k|ttg 8reaks tbe 8aok
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = the smallest unit of money;
the value of a penny
2. __________________ = not costing any money
3. __________________ = a coin that is equal to ten cents
4. __________________ = the amount that you have to pay for something
5. __________________ = the main unit of money;
one is equal to 100 cents
6. __________________ = money that is given to someone regularly
7. __________________ = a coin that is equal to 25 cents
8. __________________ = something that you buy for less
than the usual price
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
money wordr
dollar
quarter
bargain
dime
free
price
allowance
cent
dr
40 40
time wordr
0a|||e Stags 0p |ate
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = the smallest unit of time
2. __________________ = sixty minutes
3. __________________ = twelve oclock at night
4. __________________ = sleepy
5. __________________ = the very beginning of the day
6. __________________ = sixty seconds
7. __________________ = awake and busy at night
8. __________________ = seven days
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
drowsy
week
nocturnal
dawn
minute
midnight
second
hour
dr
41 41
Iorto|se 0oes to 0amp
Read each denition. Then write the word next to the denition that matches it.
WORD DEFINITION
1. __________________ = an online group of pages created
by a person or company
2. __________________ = the system that connects computers
all over the world
3. __________________ = the set of keys used for typing on a computer
4. __________________ = a secret word or code
5. __________________ = the part of a computer or television
where the pictures and words appear
6. __________________ = an electronic message sent between computers
7. __________________ = connected to a system of computers
8. __________________ = a hand tool used to control
what happens on a computer screen
X7kA! Use your favorite new vocabulary word from the book in a sentence.
_______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
Name ___________________________________________________________
computer wordr
password
mouse
online
Internet
E-mail
Web site
screen
keyboard
dr

42 42
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a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


5
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


5
6
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


5
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


5
8
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


5
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
0
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
2
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
4
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
6
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
8
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


6
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
0
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
2
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
4
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
6
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
8
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


7
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
0
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
2
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
4
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
6
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
8
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


8
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
0
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
2
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
4
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
6
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
8
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


9
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
0
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
2
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
4
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
6
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
8
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
0
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
0
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
2
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
4
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
6
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
8
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
1
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
0
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
2
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
4
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
6
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
8
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
2
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
0
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
2
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
3
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
4
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
5
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
6
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
7
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
8
C
D
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
3
9
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
4
0
A
B
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
y

T
a
l
e
s

T
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

G
u
i
d
e


1
4
1
V
o
c
a
b
u
l
a
r
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