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ROCKWOOD

SCHOOL
DISTRICT
ORCHESTRA
CURRICULUM 3-12

May, 2003 Orchestra Curriculum 4-12 Approved by Board of Education


May, 2004, Annual Review with Changes to Curriculum Advisory Committee
February, 2005, Annual Review with Changes to Curriculum Advisory Committee
January, 2006, Annual Review with Changes to Curriculum Advisory Committee
Winter, 2007-2008 Program Evaluation
In-Depth Review Draft to CAC December 6, 2008
In-Depth Review Draft to the Board of Education, March 12, 2009
September, 2011 Revised Draft to add 3rd Grade

ROCKWOOD
SCHOOL
DISTRICT
ORCHESTRA
CURRICULUM 3-12

Index
Rockwood School District Mission Statement ..............................................................4
Rockwood School District Learner Expectations ..........................................................5
Differentiation and Acceleration in Orchestra ...............................................................6
Basic and Essential Skills .............................................................................................6
Equity in Orchestra ........................................................................................................7
Data Driven Teaching Learning Model .........................................................................8
Rationale ........................................................................................................................9
Orchestra Goals for Graduates .......................................................................................9
Implementation Guidelines .........................................................................................10
Expectations for Orchestra Performance, Grades 3-12................................................11
Expectations for Care of Stringed Instruments, Grades 3-12 ......................................11
Expectations for Rehearsal ..........................................................................................12
Expectations for Independent Practice.........................................................................12
Core Conceptual Objectives for Orchestra 3-12 ..................13
Scope and Sequence of Orchestra Content and Skills .................................................14
Third Grade Violin.......................................................................................................26
Fourth Grade Orchestra................................................................................................54
Fifth Grade Orchestra ..................................................................................................86
Middle School Orchestra ...........................................................................................117
Middle School Orchestra Course Map .......................................................................118
Middle School Orchestra Course Description Guide.................................................119
Sixth Grade: Intermediate Orchestra ........................................................................120
Seventh Grade: Cadet Orchestra ...............................................................................151
Eighth Grade: Concert Orchestra ..............................................................................183
High School Orchestra ...............................................................................................215
High School Orchestra Course Map ..........................................................................216
High School Orchestra Course Description Guide ....................................................217
Chamber Orchestra ....................................................................................................219
Concert Orchestra ......................................................................................................251
Symphonic Orchestra .................................................................................................282
Appendix ....................................................................................................................313
Fine Arts Resource Selection Evaluation Checklist ..................................................314
Rockwood Writing Guidelines ..................................................................................316
Missouri Show-Me Standards ....................................................................................320
Graphic Organizers ....................................................................................................326
Procedures for New Rockwood String Teachers .......................................................338
Infinite Campus Report Cards for Grades 3, 4, and 5 ................................................347
Third Grade Learning Target Classroom Record Chart ............................................348
Fourth Grade Learning Target Classroom Record Chart ...........................................349
Fifth Grade Learning Target Classroom Record Chart..............................................350

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The writing team gratefully acknowledges those parents, patrons, students, teachers,
and administrators who provided direction and feedback to the document at every stage
of its development.

Elementary School Orchestra Writing Committee


Nicole Cramer, Linda McNair, Linda Rekas
Middle School Orchestra Writing Committee
Emily Huskey, Julia Lega, Judy Moss
High School Orchestra Writing Committee
Patti Fleer, Joe Gutowski, James Nacy, Steve Patton
Consultants
Dr. James Richards, Director of Music Education, University of Missouri St. Louis
Jan Korn, Librarian
Administrator Review Committee
Sharon Jackson, Lisa Kaczmarczyk, Mitch Lefkowitz, Dr. Kirti Mehrota, Gary Ujka

Parent and Student Review Committee


Amy and Emily Buatois, Roxie Klein, Shelly Palumbo,
Becky Sparling, Julie Walasinski
Department of Curriculum and School Leadership
Dr. Scott Spurgeon Associate Superintendent
Dr. Carrie Luttrell - Executive Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment
Dr. Cheryl Venet Coordinator of Fine Arts
Support Staff
June Wilhelm Fine Arts Department Secretary
Third Grade Draft Revision Committee
Nicole Cramer, Jennifer Coalson Husky, Linda Rekas, Darlene Lanser, Tracy Smith,
Carl Hoff, Steve Haney, Jenger Wollard, Laura Holzen, Joanna Metsker, Mary White,
Dr. Matt Frederickson, Mark McHale

ROCKWOOD SCHOOL DISTRICT MISSION STATEMENT

All students, with support from the community, parents, and staff, will be provided a
dynamic curriculum within a safe and caring environment so they will develop the skills,
abilities, and attitudes to be lifelong learners and citizens of good character who are
prepared to contribute to an ever-changing, global society.

ROCKWOOD SCHOOL DISTRICT LEARNER EXPECTATIONS

ROCKWOOD STUDENTS
ARE LEARNERS:

With positive self-worth

Who demonstrate critical thinking and


problem-solving skills in all areas.

Who demonstrate verbal,


quantitative, cultural, and
technical literacy.

Who demonstrate the


adaptability necessary for
life in a changing world.

Who can utilize community


resources to foster continual
growth and development.

Who think and express


themselves creatively and
appreciate the creativity of
others.

With skills and attitudes


necessary to become selfdirected, life-long learners.

Who have a broad


familiarity with the world
of work to develop and
enhance their career
potentials and opportunities.

Who understand the value of


effort in realizing their full
educational, vocational, civic,
and personal potential.

Who understand and


appreciate the elements
and principles of the arts
and their influence on all areas
of life.

Who understand the principles


of physical and emotional
health and the importance of
maintaining them.

Who understand and


demonstrate individual, social,
and civic responsibility, including
a global concern, tolerance, and
respect for others.

With effective skills in written


and oral communication.

Who demonstrate individual


and social ethics.

DIFFERENTIATION AND ORCHESTRA


The Orchestra Department in the Rockwood School District differentiates instruction
through a variety of facilitating activities that address students unique abilities. Teachers
should consider differences in learning styles, skill levels, and student interest when
planning instruction. Differentiation strategies are listed for each CCO.

ACCELERATION AND ORCHESTRA


Advanced students are accelerated in Orchestra in a variety of ways. Students in high
school are auditioned and placed in the appropriate orchestra. In all grades, advanced
students perform more challenging parts, have opportunities for solo performances, and
are provided opportunities for participation in extra-curricular orchestras.

BASIC AND ESSENTIAL SKILLS


All content and skills of a curriculum document are classified as either
BASIC or ESSENTIAL according to the definitions set forth by the Rockwood
Curriculum and Instruction Department.
BASIC SKILLS
Those skills which lay the basis/foundation for all future learning:
Reading
Writing
Math
Problem solving
Working with others
Analytical skills
Effective communication
ESSENTIAL SKILLS
Those skills which are vital to future learning (specific to each content area):
Specific skills listed by grade level/course
Scope/sequence
Critical to mastery of the course

EQUITY IN TEACHING ORCHESTRA


Orchestra teachers create a positive classroom environment in which all students are
accepted and taught mutual respect. Teachers model sensitivity to differences in race,
gender, ethnicity, and ability/disability. Teachers address individual and group needs of
students in Orchestra classes.
Racial/Ethnic Equity
Teachers use a variety of teaching styles consistent with the learning styles of racial,
cultural, and ethnic groups represented in their classrooms. Racial/ethnic equity is taught
in Orchestra through analysis and discussion of works that represent diverse composers
and performers.
Gender Equity
Gender equity is taught in Orchestra through study of musicians and composers.
Technology Skills
In Orchestra, students use computer technology to: improve performances; demonstrate
knowledge of music theory; compose music; and critique works and performances.
Technology integration is listed for each CCO.
Research/Information Processing
Students use research and information processing skills in Orchestra as part of music
analysis, critique, and historical/cultural study.

Data Driven Teaching Learning Model

Department of Curriculum and School Leadership


Rockwood School District 2004

ROCKWOOD ORCHESTRA RATIONALE

The Rockwood orchestra program helps students develop technical performance skills,
knowledge, and critical judgment. Orchestra helps students develop self-discipline, selfevaluation, and perseverance to meet high standards. These habits of mind support
achievement in other academic areas.
The orchestra program teaches students about the musical heritage from ancient to
contemporary times and from diverse cultures. Students appreciate the characteristics of
various styles and understand the contexts in which music is composed and performed.
In a global society, music functions as a universal language that can help people find
common ground across nations and languages.
Graduates of the Rockwood orchestra program can play an instrument in their families,
religious institutions, and/or community musical groups. If students choose to pursue a
career in music, they will be prepared to enter a college or conservatory. Aesthetic
education gained throughout all levels of participation in the program will enhance the
individuals appreciation of music throughout his/her life.
ROCKWOOD ORCHESTRA GOALS FOR GRADUATES

Graduates of the Rockwood Orchestra Program will:

Recognize through aesthetic awareness that music is a part of all humanity.

Acquire skills necessary for life-long music learning and application.

Prepare and present a musically proficient performance, alone or in an ensemble.

Make knowledgeable and discriminating judgments about music.

Understand the relationship of music to other arts and to non-arts disciplines.

Enjoy and appreciate musical performances within their historical and cultural
context.

IMPLEMENTATION GUIDELINES
Teachers are required to teach the Core Conceptual Objectives (CCOs) with the essential
content, vocabulary, and process skills specified at each grade level. This content is
aligned with the Show-Me Standards and Grade Level Expectations. They are also
required to use Application Level Assessments (ALAs) and scoring guides that describe
performance/production at various levels of quality. In the elementary violin and
orchestra classes, there is a minimal required repertoire that teachers enhance. At the
secondary level, teachers independently select music through which students demonstrate
the required content and skills.
Teachers are required to pre-assess, differentiate instruction, and create facilitating
activities however those listed in the document are suggestions or models. Teachers may
develop their own pre-assessments, and differentiated activities that meet the needs of
their students.
This is a living, changing, document that will be reviewed and revised annually. Teacher
feedback is essential to this process. Therefore, teachers are encouraged to record
observations and comments about the curriculum as well as ideas for additions and
deletions. Throughout the course of the year, teachers should document demonstrations
of each ALA to be used in the refinement of scoring guides.

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EXPECTATIONS
In Orchestra, there are common expectations, essential for student achievement that will
be assessed and reported as part of the Core Conceptual Objectives.
Expectations for Orchestra Performance for an Audience, Grades 4-12, CCO I

Students should:
Wear appropriate concert attire as prescribed by director.
Arrive promptly at designated time.
Bring instruments, music and any other required equipment.
Be seated and ready to play (without talking, chewing gum, etc.).
Follow conductors directions, cues, and baton.
Watch/listen to other players.
Demonstrate correct body posture and instrument position while playing and at
rest.
Demonstrate technical skills and musicianship in ensemble performance.

Expectations for Care of Stringed Instruments, Grades 3-12, CCO I

Students should:
Handle, clean, and store the instrument
Tighten and loosen the bow tension as needed.
Rosin and clean the bow.
Carefully remove and replace the instrument in its case.
Clean and polish the instrument.
Treat all instruments with respect and care.
Use a shoulder rest when playing the violin or viola.
Use a rock stop when playing the cello or bass.

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Expectations for Rehearsal, Grades 3-12, CCO I and CCO II

Students should:
Arrive at rehearsal on time.
Be prepared to play your part.
Be seated and ready to play (without talking, chewing gum, etc.).
Follow conductors directions, cues, and baton.
Watch/listen to other players.
Demonstrate correct body posture and instrument position while playing and at
rest.
Demonstrate technical skills and musicianship in ensemble performance.

Expectations for Independent Practice, Grades 4-12


CCO I A, CCO I B, CCO II B
Students should:
Practice daily and consistently.
Tune instrument carefully before practicing (grades 6-12).
Analyze problems to define components that can be solved one by one.
Decide on best method to solve each problem.
Organize practice time.
Practice both with and without instrument.
Repeat correct performance for reinforcement.
Practice different tempi, slow as well as fast.
Practice both left and right hands equally.
Practice difficult sections in context.
Practice performing skills.

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CORE CONCEPTUAL OBJECTIVES FOR GRADES 3-12 ORCHESTRA


Core Conceptual Objectives (CCOs) in the Orchestra curriculum are aligned with
Missouri Fine Arts Standards and grade level expectations. Codes after each CCO
indicate this alignment. The CCOs remain constant for grades 3-12 while content
knowledge and techniques spiral to provide continuous refinement of basic music skills.
Scoring Guides following each CCO indicate the level of proficiency.
Core Conceptual Objectives:
CCO I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas. (Tone production,
Position, Bowing skills, Musicianship: Repertoire, Improvisation, Ensemble playing)
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills (Melodic and Rhythmic Notation, Symbols of Expression,
Sight-reading, Intervals played and sung)
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
C. Composition
CCO III. Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music
A. Music Criticism
B. Form
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the Arts
B. Connections with Non-Arts Disciplines
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural
contexts.

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Scope and Sequence


of
Orchestra
Content and Skills
Content and skills are listed at the grade/course where students are expected to first master them. They
may be introduced in earlier grades/courses and will be reviewed in subsequent grades/courses.

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Content and skills are listed at the grade/course where students are expected to first master them. They
may be introduced in earlier grades/courses and will be reviewed in subsequent grades/courses.
CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Elementary School
Tone Production: bow weight, bow speed, contact point on A and E strings
Grade Three
Standing Position Feet, torso, and shoulders, feet shoulder width apart, knees
flexible, weight is centered or shifted to left foot, spine is straight, shoulders are
relaxed and level, left toe slightly forward
Violin Position: left shoulder seam covered, nose toward scroll, scroll/elbow over
left toe, left elbow under violin, violin horizontal with floor, jaw on jaw rest, violin
held by weight of head
Left Hand Position: base of first finger back toward nut, neck on base of first
knuckle, thumb on first tape with thumbnail facing G peg, finger tips on tape,
knuckles rounded, hand balanced on wrist, line from knuckles to elbow, elbow over
toe
Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and stick intersect to
make circle, middle fingers on frog with 2nd finder across from thumb, index
finger slightly spaced from 2nd finger, curved pinky above frog on top of stick,
fingers pronated toward tip, maintain flexible joints
Bowing Skills: staccato, legato, pizzicato with anchored thumb, bow lifts, bow
direction
Musicianship: Repertoire may include: Chicken on a Fence Post, Old Brass
Wagon, Im a Little Monkey, Twinkle and Variations, French Folk Song, A Scale;
Improvisation may include: improvise melody on E and new rhythms on the A
scale, Ensemble Playing: starting/stopping together; following established tempo.
Tone Production: bow weight - use natural arm weight, bow speed - vary to play
Grade Four
different note values, contact point - keep bow parallel to bridge on A and D strings
Violin & Viola Sitting Position: feet on floor, knees hip width apart, sitting rightfront corner of chair, back erect, left shoulder toward music
Violin & Viola Instrument Position: left shoulder seam covered, jaw on jaw rest,
violin horizontal with floor, violin held by weight of head
Violin & Viola Left Arm Position: base of first finger back toward nut, neck on
base of first knuckle, thumb on first tape with thumbnail facing G peg, finger tips
on tape, knuckles rounded, hand balanced on wrist, line from knuckles to elbow,
left elbow under instrument
Violin & Viola Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and
stick intersect to make circle, middle fingers on frog with 2nd finger across from
thumb, index finger slightly spaced from 2nd finger, curved pinky above frog on
top of stick, fingers pronated toward tip, maintain flexible joints
Cello Sitting Position: Front edge of chair, feet planted flat, cello square between
the knees, bouts high enough on leg to be comfortable, top of cello touches upper
chest, adjust endpin to make C peg behind left ear
Cello Left Arm Position: With left arm up and out to the side, wrist straight,
fingers curved creating a C shape, pad of the thumb on the back-center of neck
aligned with the second finger, finger tips on tapes
Cello Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and stick
intersect to make circle, middle finger on ferrule across from thumb, index finger
over stick at first joint, relaxed pinky over stick on frog, fingers slightly spaced,
flexible joints
Bowing Skills: slurs, accents, matched up/down , arco/pizzicato
Musicianship: Repertoire may include: See Saw, Twinkle, French Folk Song,
Lightly Row, Song of the Wind, Go Tell Aunt Rhody, Allegro, May Song, Long,
Long Ago, Perpetual Motion, Note reading skills on D and A with appropriate
literature while playing; Improvisation: Improvise melody using notes of at D
Major scale. Ensemble Playing: playing in unison and parts
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CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.


Elementary School
Tone Production: bow weight - use natural arm weight, bow speed - vary to play
Grade Five
different note values and dynamics, contact point - keep bow parallel to bridge on
all strings
Violin, Viola, and Cello Positions see Grade Four
Bass Standing Position: Adjust the length of the endpin so that the nut of the
bass is near the top of the forehead, stand with feet hip width apart, place left foot
slightly forward, position endpin in front of left foot one-arms-length away, turn
bass slightly to the right, lean against the body so that the upper bout rests against
the inside of the left pelvis
Bass Left Hand Position: wrist straight, fingers curved creating a "C" shape, pad
of the thumb on the back-center of neck aligned with the second finger, finger tips
on tapes
Bass Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and stick
intersect to make circle, middle finger on ferrule across from thumb, index finger
over stick at first joint, relaxed pinky over stick on frog, fingers slightly spaced,
flexible joints
Bowing Skills: slurs, ties, hooked, accents, arco/pizzicato, string crossings, bow
sections (whole bow, middle, upper half, lower half), bow lift (small motion), up
bow preparation starting in middle(pickup notes)
Musicianship: Perform on all strings in I position from written music for
students instrument. Introduction to 3rd position all strings for bass and 4th
position G, D, A for cello. Repertoire may include method book, supplemental
materials, and appropriate ensemble literature; Sing: major scale. Improvisation:
Improvise melody using notes of at G Major scale. Ensemble Playing: playing in
unison and parts

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CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.


Middle School
Tuning: open A and D string tuning with fine tuners
Grade Six Tone Production: clear resonant tone using grade one repertoire
Intermediate
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on one finger
Orchestra
Bowing Skills: legato, staccato, hooked bows
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 1
Improvisation: improvise using notes of D major scale above and below the tonic
and the octave;
Ensemble Playing: playing in five orchestral parts, (violin I, violin II, viola, cello,
bass)
Tuning: all open string tuning with fine tuners
Grade Seven Tone Production: clear resonant tone using grade two repertoire
Cadet Orchestra
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on one finger while bowing
Bowing Skills: tremolo, unanchored pizzicato
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 2
Improvisation: improvise using notes of G major scale with varied rhythms
Ensemble Playing: sectional rehearsal skills
Tuning: open string tuning with pegs using perfect fifths for violin, viola, cello;
Grade Eightharmonics for bass
Concert Orchestra
Tone Production: clear resonant tone using grade three repertoire
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on more than one finger while bowing
Bowing Skills: spiccato at balance point, marcato
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 3
Improvisation: improvise using notes of C major scale
Ensemble Playing: small ensemble playing
High School
Chamber Orchestra

Concert Orchestra

Symphonic
Orchestra

Bowing skills: Appropriate to repertoire; col legno, sul ponticello, sul tasto
Shifting skills: 3rd position for violin and viola; 4th position for cello; 4th position
for bass.
Musicianship: Repertoire: through grade 3; Improvisation: improvise melodies
in D major, two-octaves; Ensemble Playing: sectional rehearsal skills
Vibrato skills: variation of width and speed of vibrato appropriate to repertoire.
Bow skills: loure, various speeds of spiccato, 8-note slurs
Shifting skills: 2nd position for all instruments.
Musicianship: Repertoire: through grade 4; Improvisation: improvise melodies in
D and G major, two-octaves
Vibrato skills: variation of width and speed of vibrato appropriate to repertoire.
Bow skills: mixed slur patterns, multiple stops/chords,
Shifting skills: 4th and 5th positions for violin and viola. Thumb position for cello
and bass.
Musicianship: Repertoire through grade 5; Improvisation: improvise melodies in
various minor keys

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Content and skills are listed at the grade/course where students are expected to first master them. They
may be introduced in earlier grades/courses and will be reviewed in subsequent grades/courses.
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Elementary School
Grade Three

Grade Four

Grade Five

Middle School
Grade Six Intermediate
Orchestra

Grade Seven - Cadet


Orchestra

Grade EightConcert Orchestra

Students will play music using finger charts on E and A strings, finger numbers,
and pre-reading symbols.
Students will sing fingerings for third grade repertoire.
Students play music using a fingering chart. Students play music using standard
notation for D Major scale notes on the D and A string using note/rest values of
eighth, quarter, half, dotted half, and whole notes.
Students will sing fingerings and note names for fourth grade repertoire.
Reading Skills: Accents, allegro, andante, arco , bar line, bow lift, chromatic,
clef, da capo al fine (D.C al fine), dotted half note, divisi, down bow- up bow,
double bar, dynamics, extensions (cellos), forte, piano, mezzo forte, mezzo piano,
crescendo, diminuendo, eighth note, first and second endings, half note, half rest,
hooked bows, measure, moderato, music alphabet (pitch names), natural, octave,
pizzicato, quarter note, quarter rest, repeat sign, sharp, shifting, slur, staccato,
staff, tempo markings, tie, time signature: 2/4 , 4/4, C, perfect fifth, unison,
whole step-half step.
Sing major scale using note names.
Reading skills: accent, accidental, Allegro, Andante, crescendo, decrescendo,
diminuendo, dotted quarter note, dynamics, eighth rest, flat, fortissimo, Major,
mezzo forte, mezzo piano, Moderato, pick up notes, ritardando, sixteenth note,
sixteenth rest
Sight-reading: Students will review a piece of early Grade 1 literature, develop a
sight-reading plan, and play at sight from a written composition.
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Perfect fourth
Reading skills: 6/8 meter, arpeggio, chord, double stop, ensemble, fortissimo,
harmonic, interval, left-hand pizzicato, phrase, pianissimo, simile, solo,
syncopation, triplet
Sight-reading: Analyze piece prior to sight-reading; sight-read music at Grade 1
level
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Major third
Reading skills: 2/2 meter, a tempo, ascending, Baroque style, chromatic,
concerto, cut time, D.C. al Coda, D.S. al Coda, D.S. al Fine, descending, dotted
eighth, melodic minor, tremolo
Sight-reading: Analyze piece prior to sight-reading; sight-read music at Grade 2
level
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Major triad

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CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.


A. Reading Skills
High School
Chamber Orchestra

Concert Orchestra

Reading skills: adagio, con sordino, fortissimo, largo, marcato, martel,


pianissimo, ponticello, rallentando, sempre, senza, sordino, soli, sul, tutti
Sight-reading skills: Analyze piece prior to sight-reading; sight-read music up to
Grade 2.5 level.
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training):Octave
Reading skills: allegro, moderato, cantabile, dolce, grace note, grazioso, grave,
maestoso, meno, molto, pesante, poco, sostenuto, subito, tenuto
Sight-reading skills:
Key Signatures
Key Signatures will be limited to the following:
C, G, D Major, and relative natural minors.
There should be at least one key signature change per piece.
Meters
Meters will be limited to the following:
2/4, 3/4, 4/4, Cut Time
Tempo
Tempi will be no slower than 60 beats per minorute and no faster than 10 eightbeats per minorute.
For continuous pieces, there will be at least one tempo change, but no more than
two.
Clefs
Viola will use only alto clef.
Cello and Bass will use only bass clef.
Position Work
Minorimal 3rd position work used in the violin 1 part only.
Minorimal 4th position work used in the cello.
Minorimal half position work and 5th position work used in the bass.
Fingerings
All fingerings will be marked when position work (listed above) is used.
Divisi
There will be no divisi parts written.
Multiple Stops
Multiple stops will be limited to all open strings or open strings with one finger
used.
Repeats
1st and 2nd endings
D.C. and D.S.
Fine
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Major scales

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CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.


A. Reading Skills
Symphonic
Orchestra

Reading skills: allargando, agitato, attaca, cadenza, concertino, ripieno, dolore,


espressivo, fuoco, guisto, lento, ma non troppo, morendo, ossia, pi, quasi, rubato,
secco, stringendo, tacit.
Sight reading skills:
Key Signatures
Key Signatures will be limited to the following:
C, G, D, A, F, B-flat Major, and relative natural minors.
There should be at least one key signature change per piece.
Meters
Meters will be limited to the following:
2/4, 3/4, 4/4, Cut Time, 6/eight-, Mix Meters (7/eight- 3+2+2)
Tempo
Tempi will be no slower than 60 beats per minorute and no faster than 120 beats
per minorute.
For continuous pieces, there will be at least one tempo change, but no more than
two.
Clefs And Transpositions
Viola can have limited use of treble clef.
Cello can have limited use of tenor clef.
Bassoon and Trombone will use bass clef only.
All horns will be in F.
All clarinets will be in B-flat
All trumpets will be in B-flat
Position Work For Strings
3rd position and minorimal use of 5th position may be used in the violin 1 part
only.
Minorimal 3rd position work may be used in the violin 2 and viola part.
Half, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th position work may be used in the cello.
Half position to thumb position work may be used in the bass.
Divisi
Limited use of divisi parts may be written.
Repeats
1st and 2nd endings may be used.
D.C., and D.S. may be used.
Fine may be used.
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Melodic minor scales

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CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.


B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Elementary School
A Major scale one octave staring on open A;
Grade Three
Finger tips on tapes left-hand shape and position
Play a one octave major scale starting on open D string.
Grade Four
Read and play 4th grade level music repertoire.
Sing open strings and scale tones.
Violin C, G, D Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger. Accurately play all
Grade Five
notes on all strings in 1st position in these keys.
Viola - C, G, D Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger. Accurately play all
notes on all strings in 1st position in these keys.
Cello - C, G, D, Maj. One octave, 2nd finger, shifting to 4th position.
Bass C, G, D Maj. One octave; 2nd finger, shifting to 3rd position.
Middle School
Violin & Viola - A Major lower octave, F Major one octave, high 3 and low 1
Grade Six Cello - A, F Major one octave, forward extension, backward extension;
Intermediate
Bass - C, F Major one octave position and 2nd position
Orchestra
Grade Seven - Cadet
Orchestra

Grade EightConcert Orchestra

High School
Chamber Orchestra
Concert Orchestra
Symphonic
Orchestra

Violin - G, D, A Major two octaves, Bb Major, d minor. one octave, 3rd pos. low
4th finger, shift on same finger
Viola - C, G, D Major two octaves, Bb Major, d minor one octave, 3rd pos, low
4th finger, shift same finger
Cello - C, G, D Major two octave Bb Major, d minor one octave, 4th pos, shift
same finger
Bass - B-flat, C, G, D Major, one-octave; d minor one-octave
Violin - a, g minor one-octave, B-flat, C Major two octaves, 2nd position, trills,
double stops, shift different fingers
Viola - a, g minor one octave, C, F two octaves, 2nd position, trills, double stops,
shift different fingers
Cello - C, F, Major two-octave., a, g minor one-octave
Bass - a, g minor one octave, C, F Major two octaves, shifting different fingers
Two octave scales: Major: C, G, D, A, F; minor a, g, d, e
Two octave scales: B-flat Major, b minor
Three octave scales: Majors: C, G, D, A, E, F, B-flat; minors: a, e, b, f-sharp, csharp, a-flat, d, g, c, f

21

CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.


C. Composition
Elementary School
Write a composition in finger-chart style using the following parameters:
Grade Three
1) 2-4 measures 2) A string notes 3) 4 notes per measure
Write a composition in standard musical notation using the following parameters:
Grade Four
1) 2-4 measures
2) D major scale notes 3) 4 beats per measure
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters: 1) 4-8
Grade Five
measures 2) Starting/ending on open D for D Major or open G for G major 3)
Range of one octave 4) 4 beats per measure (use correct time signature) 5) Use
quarter notes, quarter rest, half notes, eighth notes
Middle School
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of D Major in 4/4 time signature using
Grade Six notes above and below the tonic and octave.
Intermediate
Orchestra
Grade Seven - Cadet Write an eight-measure melody in the key of G Major.
Orchestra
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of C Major.
Grade EightConcert Orchestra
High School
Chamber Orchestra Write an eight-measure melody in the key of F Major, in a simple duple or
quadruple meter, using bowing and shifting markings.
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of A Major, in a triple meter, using
Concert Orchestra
bowing and shifting markings.
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of A minor, in a compound duple or
Symphonic
triple meter, using bowing and shifting markings.
Orchestra

22

Content and skills are listed at the grade/course where students are expected to first master them. They
may be introduced in earlier grades/courses and will be reviewed in subsequent grades/courses.
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Elementary School
Grade Three

Grade Four

Grade Five

Middle School
Grade Six Intermediate
Orchestra
Grade Seven Cadet Orchestra
Grade EightConcert Orchestra
High School
Chamber Orchestra

Concert Orchestra

Symphonic
Orchestra

Respond to and critique a performance based on playing position, sound quality,


and pitch accuracy. Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical
responses to a given performance.
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, and tone production.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given
performance.
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, tone production, and
dynamics.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given
performance.
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 1 literature on posture, left hand
shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and
dynamics.
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 2 literature on posture, left hand
shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and
dynamics.
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 3 literature on posture, left hand
shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and
dynamics.
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Baroque period addressing
unity of mood, rhythmic characteristics, melodic characteristics, terraced
dynamics, textural characteristics, and instrumentation.
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Classical period addressing
contrast of mood, rhythmic characteristics, melodic characteristics, dynamics, and
instrumentation.
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Romantic period
addressing individuality of style and expression.

B. Form
Elementary School
Grade Three
Grade Four
Grade Five
Middle School
Grade Six Intermediate
Orchestra
Grade Seven Cadet Orchestra
Grade EightConcert Orchestra
High School
Chamber Orchestra
Concert Orchestra
Symphonic
Orchestra

ABA, Theme and Variations


ABCB, Through-Composed, repeated patterns of themes
Symphony, concerto
Rondo, ABA

Jig, Waltz
Concerto, Symphony

Baroque Suite, Fugue, Concerto Grosso


Compound Ternary, Theme and Variation
Programmatic Music, Sonata

Content and skills are listed at the grade/course where students are expected to first master them. They
may be introduced in earlier grades/courses and will be reviewed in subsequent grades/courses.
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Elementary School
Students will make connections between music and movement/dance.
Grade Three
Grade Four

Students will make connections between music and visual art.

Grade Five

Students will make connections between a selection from orchestra and visual art.

Middle School
Grade Six Intermediate
Orchestra
Grade Seven Cadet Orchestra
Grade EightConcert Orchestra
High School

Compare and contrast music and art of the Baroque period.

Students will compare and contrast Romantic music and dance.


Students will make connections between contemporary music and the use of music
to create mood in films/TV.

Chamber Orchestra

Students will compare and contrast Baroque music and architecture.

Concert Orchestra
Symphonic
Orchestra

Students will compare and contrast Classical music and Classical ballet.
Students will compare and contrast between Romantic music and drama.

B. Connections with non-arts disciplines


Elementary School
Grade Three
Grade Four
Grade Five
Middle School
Grade Six Intermediate
Orchestra
Grade Seven Cadet Orchestra
Grade EightConcert Orchestra
High School
Chamber Orchestra
Concert Orchestra
Symphonic
Orchestra

Students will make connections between the operation of a violin and science.
Students will make connections between the operation of stringed instruments and
operation of simple machines in science.
Students will make connections between music and language arts.
Compare and contrast team-building in orchestra and physical education.

Compare strategies for reading music with those for reading text.
Students will relate events in American history to American music.

Compare and contrast 17th century music and technological/scientific ideas.


Students make connections between the political/social revolutions of the late 18th
century and Classical period music.
Students will make connections between literary writing style and Romantic
music.

24

Content and skills are listed at the grade/course where students are expected to first master them. They
may be introduced in earlier grades/courses and will be reviewed in subsequent grades/courses.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Elementary School
Students will be able to understand how the Suzuki method has affected the
Grade Three
history of music education.
Students will be able to explain the evolution of string instruments in relation to
Grade Four
music.
Students will compare and contrast Bach and Beethoven in a historical context.
Grade Five
Middle School
Grade Six Intermediate
Orchestra
Grade Seven Cadet Orchestra
Grade EightConcert Orchestra
High School

Students will compare and contrast Baroque and Classical music.

Students will compare and contrast Classical and Romantic music.


Students will compare and contrast Romantic and Contemporary music.

Chamber Orchestra

Students will compare and contrast sacred and secular music in the Baroque era.

Concert Orchestra
Symphonic
Orchestra

Students will compare and contrast music of the Baroque and Classical periods.
Students will compare and contrast programmatic music of the Romantic era.

25

Third Grade Violin


Course Description
This is a required course for all third grade students. Students meet for 30 minutes twice
a week. Students will receive instruction on the violin. The course is taught using a
modification of the Suzuki style in which the focus is on learning the repertoire by rote
rather than reading notes from sheet music. The students perform repertoire taken from
the Suzuki book as well as other folk music.

26

Overview of Content and Skills for Third Grade Violin


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Tone Production: bow weight, bow speed, contact point on A and E strings
Standing Position Feet, torso, and shoulders, feet shoulder width apart, knees flexible, weight is centered or
shifted to left foot, spine is straight, shoulders are relaxed and level, left toe slightly forward
Violin Position: left shoulder seam covered, nose toward scroll, scroll/elbow over left toe, left elbow under
violin, violin horizontal with floor, jaw on jaw rest, violin held by weight of head
Left Hand Position: base of first finger back toward nut, neck on base of first knuckle, thumb on first tape
with thumbnail facing G peg, finger tips on tape, knuckles rounded, hand balanced on wrist, line from
knuckles to elbow, elbow over toe
Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and stick intersect to make circle, middle
fingers on frog with 2nd finder across from thumb, index finger slightly spaced from 2nd finger, curved
pinky above frog on top of stick, fingers pronated toward tip, maintain flexible joints
Bowing Skills: staccato, legato, pizzicato with anchored thumb, bow lifts, bow direction
Musicianship: Repertoire may include: Chicken on a Fence Post, Old Brass Wagon, Im a Little Monkey,
Twinkle and Variations, French Folk Song, A Scale; Improvisation may include: improvise melody on E and
new rhythms on the A scale, Ensemble Playing: starting/stopping together; following established tempo.
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading Skills: Finger charts, E and A strings, Finger numbers, Pre-reading rhythmic symbols
Intervals Sung (aural training): Sing repertoire fingerings
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
A major scale; one octave starting on open A
C. Composition
Write a composition in finger-chart style using the following parameters: 1) 2-4 measures 2) A string notes
3) 4 notes per measure
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Respond to and critique a performance based on playing position, sound quality, and pitch accuracy.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
B. Form
Compare and contrast ABA with Theme and Variation musical forms.
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will make connections between music and movement/dance.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines
Students will make connections between the operation of a violin and science.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will be able to understand how the Suzuki method has affected the history of music education.

27

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question
How do musicians express ideas through performance?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Tone Production: bow weight, bow speed, contact


point on A and E strings

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1,G2.5, GLE: PP2A3, PP2C3,
PP2D3, PP2E3, AP2A4

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be
able to do:
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow
weight, speed, and contact point.

Standing Position: Feet, torso, and shoulders: feet


shoulder width apart, knees flexible, weight is
centered or shifted to left foot, spine is straight,
shoulders are relaxed and level, left toe slightly
forward

Maintain proper standing position while playing.

Violin Position: left shoulder seam covered, nose


toward scroll, scroll/elbow over left toe, violin
horizontal with floor, jaw on jaw rest, violin held by
weight of head

Maintain proper violin position while playing.

Left Hand Position: base of first finger back toward


nut, neck on base of first knuckle, thumb on first tape
with thumbnail facing G peg, finger tips on tape,
knuckles rounded, hand balanced on wrist, line from
knuckles to elbow, elbow over toe

Maintain proper left hand position while playing.

Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching


where frog and stick intersect to make circle, middle
fingers on frog with 2nd finder across from thumb,
index finger slightly spaced from 2nd finger, curved
pinky above frog on top of stick, fingers pronated
toward tip, maintain flexible joints

Maintain proper bow hold while playing.

Bowing Skills: staccato, legato, pizzicato with


anchored thumb, bow lifts, bow direction

Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.

Musicianship:
Repertoire: Chicken on a Fence Post, Old Brass
Wagon, Im a Little Monkey, Twinkle and Variations,
French Folk Song, A Scale;

Perform the required repertoire.

Improvise a melody on E string.


Improvise new rhythms on the A scale.

Improvisation: improvise melody on E and rhythms


on a single pitch,

Perform in a group following the leader.


Ensemble Playing: starting/stopping together;
following established tempo.

28

Unit Vocabulary:
Violin Parts: scroll, pegs, nut, fingerboard, neck, strings, upper bout, f-holes, bridge, tailpiece, fine tuners,
chin rest, end (tail) button, sound post
Bow Parts: tip, stick, horse hair, frog, screw, grip, ferrule
Tone Production: bow contact point, bow speed, bow weight
Bowing Terms: down bow, up bow, staccato, legato, pizzicato, bow lift
Musicianship: improvise, repertoire, tone
Pre-Assessment: Have students who have indicated prior violin experience demonstrate by playing a
song.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Students imitate teacher. Students will practice
Student-led discussion
Students critique models performing alone, in
on performance
of correct and incorrect
small groups, or with
techniques and then
posture/playing.
class
practice them.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
modeling
Assessment:
Demonstrate how to do
the following correctly:
tone production,
standing position, violin
position, bow hold, and
left hand position

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Create & perform
original rhythmic
variations for a piece.

Teaching Strategy:
Small group activities,

Teaching Strategy:
Simulate performance.

Teaching Strategy:
Iindividual consultation.

Assessment:
Explain how to do the
following correctly:
tone production,
standing position, violin
position, bow hold, and
left hand position

Assessment:
Assess how to do the
following correctly:
tone production,
standing position, violin
position, bow hold, and
left hand position

Assessment:
Critique performance of
newly created rhythmic
variation.

Technology Integration:
Not applicable
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students may be paired with a mentor student, have additional access to fingering charts, or use modified
repertoire. Students can do independent practice if facilities allow.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I
Student Task(s):
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Maintain proper standing position while playing.
Maintain proper violin position while playing.
Maintain proper left hand position while playing.
Maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform the required repertoire.
Improvise a melody on E string.
Improvise new rhythms on the A scale.
Perform in a group following the leader.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who continue to play violin will build upon these skills.
Students who play another instrument will apply skills to that instrument.
Students will appreciate the skill required to play an instrument when watching/listening to others playing.

29

Scoring Guide for


Third Grade Violin, CCO I
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Tone Production

Learning Target:
Standing Position

Learning Target:
Violin Position

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Student always performs with


appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point
Student always performs with:
Feet shoulder width apart
Knees flexible
Weight is centered or
shifted to left foot
Spine is straight
Shoulders are relaxed and
level
Left foot slightly forward

Student consistently performs


with appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point
Student consistently performs
with:
Feet shoulder width apart
Knees flexible
Weight is centered or
shifted to left foot
Spine is straight
Shoulders are relaxed and
level
Left foot slightly forward

Student always performs with:


Left shoulder seam
covered
Nose toward scroll
Scroll/elbow over left toe
Left elbow under violin
Violin horizontal with
floor
Jaw on jaw rest
Violin held by weight of
head

Student consistently performs


with:
Left shoulder seam
covered
Nose toward scroll
Left elbow under violin
Scroll/elbow over left toe
Violin horizontal with
floor
Jaw on jaw rest
Violin held by weight of
head

2
Basic
Student sometimes performs
with appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point
Student sometimes performs
with:
Feet shoulder width
apart
Knees flexible
Weight is centered or
shifted to left foot
Spine is straight
Shoulders are relaxed
and level
Left foot slightly
forward
Student sometimes performs
with:
Left shoulder seam covered
Nose toward scroll
Scroll/elbow over left toe
Left elbow under violin
Violin horizontal with floor
Jaw on jaw rest
Violin held by weight of
head

1
Below Basic
Student rarely performs with
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point
Student rarely performs with:
Feet shoulder width apart
Knees flexible
Weight is centered or
shifted to left foot
Spine is straight
Shoulders are relaxed and
level
Left foot slightly forward

Student rarely performs with:


Left shoulder seam
covered
Nose toward scroll
Scroll/elbow over left toe
Left elbow under violin
Violin horizontal with
floor
Jaw on jaw rest
Violin held by weight of
head

Learning Target:
Left Hand Position

Student always performs with:


Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first
knuckle
Thumb on first tape with
thumbnail facing G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to
elbow
Elbow is over toe

Student consistently performs


with:
Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first
knuckle
Thumb on first tape with
thumbnail facing G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to
elbow
Elbow is over toe

Student sometimes performs


with:
Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first
knuckle
Thumb on first tape
with thumbnail facing
G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to
elbow
Elbow is over toe

Student rarely performs with:


Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first
knuckle
Thumb on first tape with
thumbnail facing G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to
elbow
Elbow is over toe

Learning Target:
Bow Hold

Student always performs with:


Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle fingers on frog
with 2nd finger across
from thumb
Index finger slightly
spaced from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above frog
on top of stick
Fingers pronated toward
tip
Maintain flexible joints

Student consistently performs


with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle fingers on frog
with 2nd finger across
from thumb
Index finger slightly
spaced from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above frog
on top of stick
Fingers pronated toward
tip
Maintain flexible joints

Student sometimes performs


with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect
to make circle
Middle fingers on frog
with 2nd finger across
from thumb
Index finger slightly
spaced from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above
frog on top of stick
Fingers pronated
toward tip
Maintain flexible joints

Student rarely performs with:


Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle fingers on frog
with 2nd finger across
from thumb
Index finger slightly
spaced from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above frog
on top of stick
Fingers pronated toward
tip
Maintain flexible joints

31

Learning Target Bowing skills:


Staccato (quick,
separated bows)
Legato (smooth,
connected bows)
Pizzicato with
anchored
thumb(plucking the
string)
Bow lifts (circling the
bow off the string to
play two down bow
notes in a row)
Bow direction

Student always performs the


bowing skill being assessed.

Student consistently performs


the bowing skill being
assessed.

Student sometimes performs


the bowing skill being
assessed.

Student rarely performs the


bowing skill being assessed.

Learning Target:
Musicianship
Repertoire
Chicken on a Fence
Post
Old Brass Wagon
Im A Little Monkey
Twinkle Theme and
Variations
French Folk Song

Student always performs the


repertoire being assessed with:
Correct Notes
Correct Rhythm
Good Intonation

Student consistently performs


repertoire being assessed with:
Correct Notes
Correct Rhythm
Good Intonation

Student sometimes performs


repertoire being assessed
with:
Correct Notes
Correct Rhythm
Good Intonation

Student rarely performs the


repertoire being assessed with:
Correct Notes
Correct Rhythm
Good Intonation

Learning Target:
Musicianship
Melodic Improvisation

Learning Target:

Student played at least


two different pitches on
the E string
No more and no less than
four beats
Original melody

Student creates new a

Student played at least


two different pitches on
the E string
Played more or less than
four beats
Original melody

Student creates a new

32

Student played at least


two different pitches on
the E string
Played more or less than
four beats
Copied another example

Student does not create a new

Single pitch played


Incorrect number of
beats
Copied another
example

Student does not create an

MusicianshipRhythmic Improvisation

rhythmic pattern over a given


pulse

rhythmic pattern, but does not


play with the pulse

rhythmic pattern, but does


play with the pulse

new rhythmic pattern and


does not play with the pulse

Learning Target:
Musicianship- Ensemble
Playing
-starting and stopping
together
-following established
tempo

Student always :
Starts and stops with the
leader
Follows established
tempo

Student consistently:
Starts and stops with the
leader
Follows established
tempo

Student sometimes:
Starts and stops with the
leader
Follows established
tempo

Student rarely:
Starts and stops with the
leader
Follows established
tempo

33

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Reading Skills:
Finger charts:
E and A strings
Finger numbers
Pre-reading rhythmic symbols
Intervals Sung (aural training): Sing
repertoire fingerings

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G2.5, GLE: PP1A3, EP1A3

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students play music using a fingering chart.

Students will sing fingerings for third grade repertoire.

Unit Vocabulary: finger chart, string names


Pre-Assessment: Have students who have had prior experience on the violin play a song from a fingering
chart.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Repeat or sing finger
Read and play the finger Sight read Mystery Song
numbers from a chart
charts.
To draw a conclusion as
with the class.
to its title
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Chunking

Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction.

Assessment:
Fill in the blank test for
finger chart.

Assessment:
Playing test

Assessment:
Name and play /read a
familiar tune

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Create a finger chart for
a tune of the students
choice
Teaching Strategy:
Guided individual
instruction
Assessment:
Perform the finger chart
created by the student

Technology Integration:
If a computer is available, it can be used for written testing or creating finger charts.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Color code finger charts.
Provide standard notation for students who can already read music.
Adaptations to the finger charts:
-alternate fingers
-only reading strings
-note size
-harmony part
-advanced music

34

Application Level Assessment for CCO IIA


Student Tasks:
Students read and play music on the E and A string using finger charts.
Students read and play finger numbers using finger charts.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply note reading skills to other music disciplines should they continue studying music.
Students will independently perform notated music of their choice.
Students will apply their knowledge of reading music to communication arts in interpreting text features.

35

Scoring Guide for Third Grade Violin, CCO IIA


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students play music using
a fingering chart.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Student always reads and


plays using a finger chart with:
Correct string
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

Student consistently reads and


plays using a finger chart with:
Correct string
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

36

2
Basic
Student sometimes reads
and plays using a finger
chart with:
Correct string
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

1
Below Basic
Student rarely reads and plays
using a finger chart with:
Correct string
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
A major scale; one octave starting on
open A

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G2.5, GLE: PP2A5, PP2C3,
PP2D3

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Play a one octave scale starting on open A string.

Unit Vocabulary: Scale, octave, string names


Pre-Assessment: Have students with prior experience play the A major scale on the violin.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Singing the A major
Playing the A major
Use scale concept to
scale.
scale in varying group
construct D Major
sizes.
Scale.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Chunking
Modeling
Guided discussion
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Writing or verbalizing
Playing test
Write or verbalize the D
the A major scale.
Major scale.
Technology Integration: Not applicable
Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play multi-octave scales.
Play a scale using alternative fingerings.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I
Student Task:
Play a one octave scale starting on open A string.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply their knowledge of scales in a musical context.

37

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Apply the concept of the
D Major Scale to violin.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided instruction
Assessment:
Play D Major Scale

Scoring Guide for Third Grade Violin, CCO IIB


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Play a one octave scale
starting on open A string.

4
Advanced
Student always plays the A
major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Student consistently plays the


A major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student sometimes plays the


A major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

38

1
Below Basic
Student rarely plays the A
major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Third Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Finger chart format
A string notes

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A3, PP4A3,
HC1D3

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Write a composition in finger-chart style using the following
parameters: 1) 2-4 measures 2) A string notes 3) 4 notes per
measure

Unit Vocabulary: Measure, composition


Pre-Assessment: Have students write a brief composition in finger-chart style.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Draw the framework for Compose a 2-4 measure Critique other groups
a finger chart as a class.
melody in finger chart
compositions based on
style in small groups.
finger-chart format and
parameters.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Guided Practice
Guided instruction.
Assessment:
Draw the framework for
a finger chart.

Assessment:
Compose a 2-4 measure
melody in finger chart
style.

Assessment:
Observation

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Create and perform a
composition on the
violin
Teaching Strategy:
Independent
Consultation
Assessment:
Perform composition.

Technology Integration:
If applicable, students will use music writing software to produce compositions.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Adapt writing to complete assignment.
Advanced composition assignment will be given if applicable.
Use varying rhythms.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC:
Student Task:
Compose a melody in finger-chart style using the following parameters: 1) 2-4 measures 2) A string notes
3) 4 notes per measure 4) Perform for class
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply their knowledge of composition to text features found in communication arts.
Students will apply their knowledge of composition to other musical contexts.

39

Scoring Guide for Third Grade Violin, CCO IIC


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Write a composition in
finger-chart style using:

2-4 measures

A string notes
4 notes per
measure

4
Advanced
Student composes a melody
always using:
2-4 measures
A string notes
4 notes per measure

3
Proficient
Student composes a melody
consistently using:
2-4 measures
A string notes
4 notes per measure

40

2
Basic
Student composes a melody
sometimes using:
2-4 measures
A string notes
4 notes per
measure

1
Below Basic
Student composes a melody
rarely using:
2-4 measures
A string notes
4 notes per measure

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective CCOIII: Students will explain evaluations of and perceptions about
music. Students will describe personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Proper playing position
Quality of sound
Pitch and rhythmic accuracy

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA 1, FA2, FA3, G1.5, G4.1, GLE:
AP2A3

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Respond to and critique a performance based on playing
position, sound quality, and pitch accuracy.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical
responses to a given performance.

Unit Vocabulary: critique, pitch, tempo


Pre-Assessment: Knowledge of note accuracy and tone production.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Comment on the
Class discussion of a
Compare the affect that
qualities of a good
performance
proper technique has on
performance.
sound quality.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Assessment:
List individual qualities
of a good performance.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Discussion
Assessment:
Critique a performance
as to note accuracy and
tone production.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Modeling
Assessment:
Predict how sound
quality affects a good
performance.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Create a cause and
effect chart on sound
quality.
Teaching Strategy:
Discuss Variables
Assessment:
Determine if variables
are in proper proportion
for desired sound
quality.

Technology Integration:
If available, students will type critiques or charts on a computer.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Critique only one specific category.
Critique more extensively on sound quality, pitch accuracy, and playing position.
Utilize critique to improve performance.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA:
Respond to and critique a performance on playing position, pitch/rhythmic accuracy, and sound quality.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will use their experience with prediction, reflection, and analysis in the communication arts.
Students will use their critiquing skills as fine arts consumers.

41

3th Grade Scoring Guide for Third Grade Violin, CCO IIIA
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Critique a performance for:
playing position
sound quality
pitch/rhythmic
accuracy
emotional and/or
physical responses

4
Advanced
Critiques all 4 categories
Supports each statement

3
Proficient
Critiques 3 categories
Supports most statements

42

2
Basic
Critiques 2 categories
Supports some
statements

1
Below Basic
Does not critique any
category
No supporting statements

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective CCOIII: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of
music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How is music organized?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, FA 3, G1.5, G1.6, GLE: AP1A3,
AP1A5

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
ABA:
First and last sections are the same
Contrasting middle section
Theme and Variation:
Initial statement of theme
Multiple alterations of theme

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast ABA with Theme and Variation musical
forms.

Unit Vocabulary: ABA, Theme and Variation, form


Pre-Assessment: Students list characteristics of ABA, Theme and Variation forms.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student demonstrates
Group practice
Working in small
knowledge of forms
classifying the different
groups, create a song
through physical
forms.
using one of the two
responses.
forms
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Model examples of both Guided example and
Cooperative Learning
forms.
discussion
Assessment:
Identify ABA and
Theme and Variation
forms

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
ABA, Theme and
Variation forms.

Assessment:
Check for appropriate
elements of form.

Technology Integration:
If applicable, students will use available composition software.
If available, students will type the compare/contrast on the computer.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Introduce more complex forms for advanced students.
Use visual aids.
Focus on a single form instead of both.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast ABA, Theme and Variation

43

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a 6 measure
piece in 4/4 time,.ABA

Teaching Strategy:
Provide parameters for
composition.
Assessment:
Analyze composition for
proper form.

How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?


Students will use experience recognizing patterns and form in math and language arts.
Students will use experience recognizing form in other musical contexts.

44

Scoring Guide for Third Grade Violin, CCO IIIB


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast ABA
to Theme and Variation
forms.

4
Advanced
Student was able to list a
minimum of three qualities
in both the compare and
contrast categories.

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Student was able to list at


least two qualities in both
the compare and contrast
categories.

Student was able to list


one quality in either the
compare or contrast
categories.

Student was not able to list


qualities for any of the
forms.

45

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective CCOIV: Students will make connections among the arts and with nonarts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, HP4, G1.9, G2.4 GLE: AP1B3,
HC1C3

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Students will make connections
between music and movement/dance.

How music inspired the body to move.

Unit Vocabulary:
Pre-Assessment: Students talk about their experiences with dance and music.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Tell how music and
Demonstrate how music Investigate how music is
dance are related.
can inspire movement.
used in dance in
different cultures.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Discussion
Modeling
Guided Instruction
Direct Instruction
Individual Consultation

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Create a new dance to
music of students
choosing.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Instruction

Assessment:
Teacher observation and
feedback.

Assessment:
Present the dance to the
class.

Assessment:
Teacher observation and
feedback.

Assessment:
Present final project

Technology Integration:
If applicable, students will use the computer and library resources to research.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students can demonstrate an advanced dance to the class.

46

Students that have difficulty moving may adapt movement as needed.

Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:


Student Task:
Students will make connects between music and movement/dance.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students use their experience with making connections between music and movement in other musical
contexts.
Students will have a greater awareness of how music physically affects their body.

47

Scoring Guide for Third Grade Violin, CCO IVA


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will make
connections between music
and movement/dance.

4
Advanced
Student was able to
demonstrate movement to a
variety of styles of music.

3
Proficient
Student was able to
demonstrate movement to
some styles of music.

48

2
Basic
Student was able to
demonstrate limited
movement to music.

1
Below Basic
Student did not demonstrate
any movement to music.

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective CCOIV: Students will make connections among the arts and with nonarts disciplines.
B. Connection with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How pitch is affected by length,
thickness, and tension of strings.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.2, G1.6, GLE: IC1B4

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will make connections between science and music.

Unit Vocabulary: pitch, tension


Pre-Assessment: Class discussion about prior knowledge of how pitch changes.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Tell how pitch is
Explain the cause and
Differentiate higher or
affected by length,
effect of how adding or
lower pitches based on
thickness, and tension of removing fingers from
aural or visual cues.
strings.
the string affects pitch.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction
Guided Instruction
Assessment:
Teacher observation and
feedback

Assessment:
Teacher observation and
feedback

Assessment:
Teacher Feedback

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Apply concept to a
different instrument.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Instruction
Assessment:
Teacher feedback

Technology Integration:
If available, students will use computers for research and assignments.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students may observe the thickness and amplitude of vibrations of the strings.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Students will make connections between science and music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply connections between music and science to other musical instruments.

49

Scoring Guide for Third Grade, CCOIVB:


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will make
connections between music
and science.

4
Advanced
Student is able to make
extensive connections music
and sound production.

3
Proficient
Student is able to make
comprehensive connections
music and sound production.

50

2
Basic
Student is able to
make few
connections music
and sound
production.

1
Below Basic
Student is not able to make
any connections music and
sound production.

Third Grade Violin


Core Conceptual Objective V: Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and history/culture?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA5, G1.9, GLE: HC1C3

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Traditional Method
Older beginners
Fewer small instruments
No parents involvement in lessons
Listening not encouraged
Note reading driven
Play and read notes simultaneously
No consistent literature
Use exercises to learn technique

Suzuki Method/Mother Tongue Method


Beginners as young as two
Sizes for all ages
Suzuki triangle (parent, teacher, child)
Listening integral to learning
Ear before eye
Learn to plan before reading notes
Established set of literature
Use repertoire to learn technique

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Understand how the Suzuki has affected the history of music education.
Unit Vocabulary: Suzuki, instructional method, Suzuki triangle, Mother Tongue Method
Pre-Assessment: Class discussion about previous knowledge regarding the Suzuki method and
instruction.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Activity:
Tell how music
education is different
because of the Suzuki
method.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Activity:
Interpret how Suzuki
instruction differs from
traditional instruction.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Activity:
Investigate how many
Suzuki students go on to
play professionally.

Strategy:
Direct instruction

Strategy:
Teacher guided

Strategy:
Individual Consultation

Assessment:
Class discussion
Teacher Feedback

Assessment:
Teacher Feedback

Assessment:
Project demonstrating
the result of
investigation.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Activity:
Analyze professional
musicianship has been
impacted by the
introduction of the
Suzuki method.
Strategy:
Individual Consultation
Assessment:
Present analysis of
research.

Technology Integration:
Students could use computer-based and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students could present information to others using computer technology (e.g., written paper, power point
presentation).
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students can present information in a variety of ways (verbally, written, etc.)

51

Application Level Assessment for CCO V:


Student Task:
By the end of this grade students should be able to understand how the Suzuki method has affected music
education.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand how one person can have a significant impact on the course of history.

52

Scoring Guide for Third Grade, CCOV:

Learning Target
Learning Target:
Understand how the Suzuki
method has impacted the history
of music education.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Student is able to make


extensive connections between
the Suzuki method and the
history of music education.

Student is able to make


multiple connections between
the Suzuki method and the
history of music education.

53

2
Basic
Student is able to make few
connections between the
Suzuki method and the history
of music education.

1
Below Basic
Student is not able to make
any connections between the
Suzuki method and the history
of music education.

Fourth Grade
Orchestra
Course Description

This is an elective course offered to all fourth grade students. Students meet for 30
minutes twice a week in low string (cello) and high string (violin/viola) groups if
possible. The students may choose from violin, viola, and cello. Standard note-reading
skills are taught through the use of a strings method book as well as supplemental
materials.

54

Overview of Content and Skills for Fourth Grade Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Tone Production: bow weight - use natural arm weight, bow speed - vary to play different note values,
contact point - keep bow parallel to bridge on A and D strings
Violin & Viola Sitting Position: feet on floor, knees hip width apart, sitting right-front corner of chair, back
erect, left shoulder toward music
Violin & Viola Instrument Position: left shoulder seam covered, jaw on jaw rest, violin horizontal with
floor, violin held by weight of head
Violin & Viola Left Arm Position: base of first finger back toward nut, neck on base of first knuckle,
thumb on first tape with thumbnail facing G peg, finger tips on tape, knuckles rounded, hand balanced on
wrist, line from knuckles to elbow, left elbow under instrument
Violin & Viola Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and stick intersect to make
circle, middle fingers on frog with 2nd finger across from thumb, index finger slightly spaced from 2nd
finger, curved pinky above frog on top of stick, fingers pronated toward tip, maintain flexible joints
Cello Sitting Position: Front edge of chair, feet planted flat, cello square between the knees, bouts high
enough on leg to be comfortable, top of cello touches upper chest, adjust endpin to make C peg behind left
ear
Cello Left Arm Position: With left arm up and out to the side, wrist straight, fingers curved creating a C
shape, pad of the thumb on the back-center of neck aligned with the second finger, finger tips on tapes
Cello Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and stick intersect to make circle, middle
finger on ferrule across from thumb, index finger over stick at first joint, relaxed pinky over stick on frog,
fingers slightly spaced, flexible joints
Bowing Skills: slurs, accents, matched up/down , arco/pizzicato
Musicianship: Repertoire may include: See Saw, Twinkle, French Folk Song, Lightly Row, Song of the
Wind, Go Tell Aunt Rhody, Allegro, May Song, Long, Long Ago, Perpetual Motion, Note reading skills on
D and A with appropriate literature while playing; Improvisation: Improvise melody using notes of at D
Major scale. Ensemble Playing: playing in unison and parts
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Students play music using a fingering chart. Students play music using standard notation for D Major scale
notes on the D and A string using note/rest values of eighth, quarter, half, dotted half, and whole notes.
Students will sing fingerings and note names for fourth grade repertoire.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Play a one octave major scale starting on open D string.
Read and play 4th grade level music repertoire.
Sing open strings and scale tones.
C. Composition
Write a composition in standard musical notation using the following parameters: 1) 2-4 measures
2) D major scale notes 3) 4 beats per measure
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, and tone production.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
B. Form
Compare and contrast ABCB and through-composed musical forms. Be able to recognize repeated patterns
of themes within a piece.
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will make connections between music and visual art.

55

B. Connections with non-arts disciplines


Students will make connections between the operation of stringed instruments and operation of simple
machines in science.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will be able to explain the evolution of string instruments in relation to music.

56

4th Grade Learning Targets by Instrument


Violin/Viola
Perform Music, CCO I
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper violin/viola position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper left arm position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental material.
Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a leader.
Sing open strings.
Improvise a melody using the notes of the D Major scale.
Elements of Music, CCOII
Students will play the following scales:
o Violin -G, D, A Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger
o Viola - C, G, D Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger
Read and play 4th grade level music repertoire.
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters:
1) 4-8 measures
2) Starting/ending on open D
3) Range of D major, one octave
4) 4 beats per measure
Music Criticism, CCO III
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, and tone production.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
Compare and contrast ABCB and through-composed musical forms. Be able to recognize repeated
patterns of themes within a piece.
Making Connections among Arts and Non-Arts Disciplines, CCO IV
Students will make connections between music and visual art.
Students will make connections between the operation of stringed instruments and operation of simple
machines in science.
Knowledge of Music in a Historical and Cultural Context, CCO V
Students will be able to explain the evolution of string instruments in relation to music.

57

4th Grade Learning Targets by Instrument


Cello
Perform Music, CCO I
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Cellists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper cello position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper left arm position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental material.
Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a leader.
Sing open strings.
Improvise a melody using the notes of the D Major scale.
Elements of Music, CCOII
Students will play the following scales:
o Cello - C, G, D, Maj. One octave, 2nd finger
Read and play 4th grade level music repertoire.
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters:
1) 2-4 measures
2) Starting/ending on open D
3) Range of D major, one octave
4) 4 beats per measure
Music Criticism, CCO III
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, and tone production.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
Compare and contrast ABCB and through-composed musical forms. Be able to recognize repeated
patterns of themes within a piece.
Making Connections among Arts and Non-Arts Disciplines, CCO IV
Students will make connections between music and visual art.
Students will make connections between the operation of stringed instruments and operation of simple
machines in science.
Knowledge of Music in a Historical and Cultural Context, CCO V
Students will be able to explain the evolution of string instruments in relation to music.

58

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question
How do musicians express ideas through performance?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should
know:

Tone Production: bow weight-use natural arm


weight, bow speed-vary to play different note
values, contact point-keep bow parallel to
bridge on A and D strings
Violin & Viola Sitting Position:
feet on floor, knees hip width apart, sitting right
front corner of chair, back erect, left shoulder
toward music
Violin & Viola Instrument Position: left
shoulder seam covered, jaw on jaw rest, violin
horizontal with floor, violin held by weight of
head
Violin & Viola Left Arm Position: base of
first finger back toward nut, neck on base of
first knuckle, thumb on first tape with
thumbnail facing G peg, finger tips on tape,
knuckles rounded, hand balanced on wrist, line
from knuckles to elbow, left elbow under
instrument
Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb
touching where frog and stick intersect to make
circle, middle fingers on frog with 2nd finder
across from thumb, index finger slightly spaced
from 2nd finger, curved pinky above frog on
top of stick, fingers pronated toward tip,
maintain flexible joints

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A4, PP2C4,
PP2D4, PP2E4, AP2A4

Learning Targets
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to
do:
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight,
speed, and contact point.

Violinists/violists will maintain proper sitting position


while playing.

Violinists/violists will maintain proper violin position


while playing.

Violinists/violists will maintain proper left hand and arm


position while playing.

Violinists/violists will maintain proper bow hold while


playing.

59

Cello Sitting Position:


Front edge of chair, feet planted flat, cello
square between the knees, bouts high enough
on leg to be comfortable, top of cello touches
upper chest, adjust endpin to make C peg
behind left ear
Cello Left Hand Position:
With left arm up and out to the side,
Wrist straight, fingers curved creating a C
shape, pad of the thumb on the back-center of
neck aligned with the second finger, finger tips
on tapes
Cello Bow Hold:
Inside corner of right thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to make circle, middle
finger on ferrule across from thumb, index
finger over stick at first joint, relaxed pinky
over stick on frog, fingers slightly spaced,
flexible joints
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Repertoire may include: See Saw,
Twinkle, French Folk Song, Lightly Row, Song
of the Wind, Go Tell Aunt Rhody, Allegro,
May Song, Long, Long Ago, Perpetual Motion

Cellists will maintain proper sitting position with cello


while playing.

Cellists will maintain proper left hand and arm position


while playing.

Cellists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.

Apply appropriate bowing skills and instrument position


while playing with correct fingers.

Note reading skills on D and A with


appropriate literature;

Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental


material.

Improvisation: Improvise a melody using the


notes of the D Major scale.

Improvise a melody using the notes of the D Major scale.

Ensemble playing: playing in unison and parts,


following a leader, dynamics forte/piano

Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a


leader.

Examples of benchmark repertoire for 4th grade


orchestra: Perpetual Motion, Can Can, The
Bees
Unit Vocabulary:
Bowing terms: legato, staccato, up/ down bow, arco/pizzicato
Misc. terms: major scale, endpin, ensemble, improvise
Tone Production: bow contact point, bow speed, bow weight
Dynamic terms: forte, piano
Pre-Assessment:
Have students who have played the viola, cello or bass before perform a song.
Have students who have prior experience reading music on his or her instrument sight read a piece.

60

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Students identify the
fingerings & note
names on D & A
strings in their music
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
modeling
Assessment:
Students label their
own music with
fingerings and/or note
names

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will
demonstrate reading
skills by performing
their music on D & A
strings.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
modeling
Assessment:
Teacher observation
and feedback

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Students formulate
fingering plan for
new D major
repertoire

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Apply concepts of note
reading to other strings

Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
modeling
Assessment:
Peer critique of
fingering plan

Teaching Strategy:
Guided explorations
Assessment:
Teacher observation and
feedback

Technology Integration: Possible application of music-related computer software where facilities allow.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Simplification of parts for students having difficulties
Write in note names on parts
Weaker students paired with more advanced
Give advanced students more challenging parts to the same piece
Allow for independent work on additional pieces
Have advanced students play Suzuki pieces in different octaves or positions.
Violinists/violists start using 4th finger where appropriate.

Application Level Assessment for CCO I A


Student Task:
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper violin position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper left hand position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper (instrument) position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper left hand position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform chosen Suzuki repertoire.
Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental material.
Improvise a melody using the notes of the D Major scale.
Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a leader.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students demonstrate the transfer of note-reading skills to text features as used in language arts.
Ensemble playing encourages team work.
Following directions as given by the group leader would carry over to all areas.
Performing selections in a concert setting brings together multiple high level tasks.

61

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCO IA: Performance Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Learning Target:
Tone Production

Student always performs with


appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural arm
weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A and D
strings

Student consistently performs


with appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural
arm weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A
and D strings

Student sometimes performs


with appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural
arm weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A
and D strings

Student rarely performs with


appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural
arm weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A
and D strings

Learning Target:
Violin/Viola Sitting
Position

Student always performs with:


Feet on floor
Knees hip width apart
Sitting right front corner of
chair and back erect
Left shoulder toward music

Student consistently performs


with:
Feet on floor
Knees hip width apart
Sitting right front corner
of chair and back erect
Left shoulder toward
music

Student sometimes performs


with:
Feet on floor
Knees hip width apart
Sitting right front
corner of chair and back
erect
Left shoulder toward
music

Student rarely performs with:


Feet on floor
Knees hip width apart
Sitting right front corner
of chair and back erect
Left shoulder toward
music

62

Learning Target:
Violin/Viola
Instrument Position

Student always performs with:


left shoulder seam covered
jaw on jaw rest
violin horizontal with floor
violin held by weight of head

Student consistently performs


with:
left shoulder seam
covered
jaw on jaw rest
violin horizontal with
floor
violin held by weight of
head

Student sometimes performs


with:
left shoulder seam
covered
jaw on jaw rest
violin horizontal with
floor
violin held by weight of
head

Student rarely performs with:


left shoulder seam
covered
jaw on jaw rest
violin horizontal with
floor
violin held by weight of
head

Learning Target:
Violin/Viola Left
Arm Position

Student always performs with:


Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first knuckle
Thumb on first tape with
thumbnail facing G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to elbow
Left elbow under instrument

Student consistently performs


with:
Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first
knuckle
Thumb on first tape with
thumbnail facing G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to
elbow
Left elbow under
instrument

Student sometimes performs


with:
Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first
knuckle
Thumb on first tape
with thumbnail facing
G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to
elbow
Left elbow under
instrument

Student rarely performs with:


Base of first finger back
toward nut
Neck on base of first
knuckle
Thumb on first tape with
thumbnail facing G peg
Finger tips on tape
Knuckles rounded
Hand balanced on wrist
Line from knuckles to
elbow
Left elbow under
instrument

63

Learning Target:
Violin/Viola Bow
Hold

Student always performs with:


Inside corner of right thumb
touching where frog and stick
intersect to make circle
Middle fingers on frog with
2nd finger across from thumb
Index finger slightly spaced
from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above frog on
top of stick
Fingers pronated toward tip
Maintain flexible joints

Student consistently performs


with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle fingers on frog
with 2nd finger across
from thumb
Index finger slightly
spaced from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above frog
on top of stick
Fingers pronated toward
tip
Maintain flexible joints

Student sometimes performs


with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect
to make circle
Middle fingers on frog
with 2nd finger across
from thumb
Index finger slightly
spaced from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above
frog on top of stick
Fingers pronated
toward tip
Maintain flexible joints

Student rarely performs with:


Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle fingers on frog
with 2nd finger across
from thumb
Index finger slightly
spaced from 2nd finger
Curved pinky above frog
on top of stick
Fingers pronated toward
tip
Maintain flexible joints

Learning Target:
Cello
Sitting/Instrument
Position

Student always:
sits on front edge of chair
feet planted flat
cello square between the knees
bouts high enough on leg to be
comfortable
top of cello touches upper
chest
adjust endpin to make C peg
behind left ear

Student consistently:
sits on front edge of chair
feet planted flat
cello square between the
knees
bouts high enough on leg
to be comfortable
top of cello touches upper
chest
adjust endpin to make C
peg behind left ear

Student sometimes:
sits on front edge of
chair
feet planted flat
cello square between
the knees
bouts high enough on
leg to be comfortable
top of cello touches
upper chest
adjust endpin to make
C peg behind left ear

Student rarely:
sits on front edge of chair
feet planted flat
cello square between the
knees
bouts high enough on leg
to be comfortable
top of cello touches upper
chest
adjust endpin to make C
peg behind left ear

64

Learning Target:
Cello Left Hand
Position

Student always holds left hand:


With left arm up and out to the
side
With wrist straight
With fingers curved creating a
C shape
With pad of the thumb on the
back-center of neck aligned
with the second finger
With finger tips on tapes

Student consistently holds left


hand:
With left arm up and out to
the side
With wrist straight
With fingers curved
creating a C shape
With pad of the thumb on
the back-center of neck
aligned with the second
finger
With finger tips on tapes

Student sometimes holds


left hand:
With left arm up and
out to the side
With wrist straight
With fingers curved
creating a C shape
With pad of the thumb
on the back-center of
neck aligned with the
second finger
With finger tips on
tapes

Student rarely holds left hand:


With left arm up and out to
the side
With wrist straight
With fingers curved
creating a C shape
With pad of the thumb on
the back-center of neck
aligned with the second
finger
With finger tips on tapes

Learning Target:
Cello Bow Hold

Student always holds the bow


with:
Inside corner of right thumb
touching where frog and stick
intersect to make circle
Middle finger on ferrule
across from thumb
Index finger over stick at first
joint
Relaxed pinky over stick on
frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

Student consistently holds the


bow with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle finger on ferrule
across from thumb
Index finger over stick at
first joint
Relaxed pinky over stick
on frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

Student sometimes holds the


bow with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect
to make circle
Middle finger on ferrule
across from thumb
Index finger over stick
at first joint
Relaxed pinky over
stick on frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

Student rarely holds the bow


with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle finger on ferrule
across from thumb
Index finger over stick at
first joint
Relaxed pinky over stick
on frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

65

Learning Target:
Improvisation
Using the notes of the
D Major scale

Student creates a melody using a


minimum of 4 pitches of the D
Major scale over a given pulse.

Learning Target:
Musicianship
Repertoire

Student always performs the


repertoire being assessed with:
Correct Notes
Correct Rhythm
Good Intonation

Good Tone

Learning Target:
Ensemble Playing

Student always:
Starts/stops with leader
Follows the established
tempo
Matches bow directions
Matches dynamic levels

Student creates a melody


using 3 pitches of the D
Major scale over a given
pulse.

Student creates a melody


using only 2 of the pitches
of the D Major scale over
a given pulse.

Student does not create a


melody using the pitches
of the D Major scale, or
uses only a single pitch.

Student consistently performs


repertoire being assessed with:

Correct Notes

Correct Rhythm

Good Intonation

Good Tone

Student sometimes performs


repertoire being assessed
with:

Correct Notes

Correct Rhythm

Good Intonation

Good Tone

Student rarely performs the


repertoire being assessed with:

Correct Notes

Correct Rhythm

Good Intonation

Good Tone

Student consistently:
Starts/stops with leader
Follows the established
tempo
Matches bow directions
Matches dynamic levels

Student sometimes:
Starts/stops with leader
Follows the established
tempo
Matches bow directions
Matches dynamic levels

Student rarely:
Starts/stops with leader
Follows the established
tempo
Matches bow directions
Matches dynamic levels

66

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Reading Skills:
Finger charts from Suzuki repertoire
listed in CCO I.
Standard musical notation for the D and
A string notes.
Note/rest values of eighth, quarter, half,
dotted half, and whole notes and rests.
Finger numbers
Intervals Sung (aural training): Sing
repertoire fingerings and note names.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G1.6, G2.5, GLE: EP1A4, EP1B4

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students play music using a fingering chart.
Students play music using standard notation for D Major scale
notes on the D and A string.

Students will sing fingerings and note names for fourth grade
repertoire.

Unit Vocabulary: Arco, pizzicato, octave, staff, bar line, measure, repeat sign, double bar, quarter rest,
sharp, time signature, finger chart, note values (eighth, quarter, half, dotted half), note names from D major
scale, string names

Pre-Assessment: Have students who have had prior experience on the violin play a song from a fingering
chart.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Repeat or sing finger
Read and play works
Sight read Mystery Song
numbers and note names from standard musical
in standard music
from standard musical
notation.
notation to solve finding
notation with the class.
its title
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Chunking

Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction.

Assessment:
Fill in the blank test for
note names and finger
numbers.

Assessment:
Playing test

Assessment:
Read/play the now
familiar tune

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Create a musical
composition in standard
music notation for a
tune of the students
choice
Teaching Strategy:
Guided individual
instruction
Assessment:
Perform the composition
created by the student

Technology Integration:
If a computer is available, it can be used for written testing or creating finger charts.

67

Differentiation Suggestions:
Color code finger charts.
Provide harmony parts or advanced parts for students who can already read music.
Adaptations to the finger charts:
-only reading strings
-note size
-harmony part
-advanced music
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIA
Student Tasks:
Students read and play music on the D and A string using finger charts.
Students read and play finger numbers using finger charts.
Students read and play from standard musical notation in the key of D major on the D and A string
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply note reading skills to other music disciplines should they continue studying music.
Students will independently perform notated music of their choice.
Students will apply their knowledge of reading music to communication arts in interpreting text features.

68

l
Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra: CCO IIA
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students play music using
a notation.

4
Advanced
Student always reads and
plays using notation with:
Correct string
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

3
Proficient
Student consistently reads and
plays using notation with:
Correct string
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

69

2
Basic
Student sometimes reads
and plays using notation
with:
Correct
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

1
Below Basic
Student rarely reads and plays
using notation with:
Correct string
Correct fingers
Correct rhythm

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
D major scale; one octave starting on
open D
Musical alphabet pitch names in D
major.
Intervals sung (Aural training):
Seconds
Fifths.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G1.6, GLE: PP1A4, PP2A4,
PP2D4, EP1B4,

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Play a one octave major scale starting on open D string.
Read and play 4th grade level music repertoire.
Sing open strings and scale tones.

Unit Vocabulary: scale, musical alphabet pitch names in D major.


Pre-Assessment: Have students with prior experience play the D major scale on the violin.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Singing the D major
Playing the D major
Use scale concept to
scale.
scale in varying group
construct G Major
sizes.
Scale.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Chunking
Modeling
Guided discussion
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Writing or verbalizing
Playing test
Write or verbalize the G
the D major scale.
Major scale.
Technology Integration: Not applicable

Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play multi-octave scales.
Play G Major (or C Major for viola or cello) scales.
Play a scale using alternative fingerings.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I
Student Task:
Play a one octave scale starting on open A string.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply their knowledge of scales in a musical context.

70

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Apply the concept of the
G Major Scale to violin.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided instruction
Assessment:
Play G Major Scale

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIB


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Play a one octave scale
starting on open D string.

4
Advanced
Student always plays the D
major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Student consistently plays the


D major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student sometimes plays the


D major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

71

1
Below Basic
Student rarely plays the D
major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
Missouri State Standards & GLEs
How do people compose music?
FA1, FA3, G1.5, G2.5 GLE: PP4A4,
EP1A4, EP1B4, EP1D4
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Music notation format:
Standard musical notation in D major on
the D and A strings.

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Write a composition in standard musical notation using the
following parameters:
1) 2-4 measures
2) D major scale notes
3) 4 beats per measure

Unit Vocabulary: Measure, composition, D major scale notes, clef sign, time signature, bar line, double
bar line.
Pre-Assessment: Have students write a brief composition using standard musical notation.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Draw the staff with a
Compose a 2-4 measure Critique other groups
correct clef sign, time
melody in on the staff.
compositions based on
signature and double bar
the parameters.
line.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Guided Practice
Guided instruction.
Assessment:
Draw the staff with a
correct clef sign, time
signature and double bar
line.

Assessment:
Compose a 2-4 measure
melody in standard
notation.

Assessment:
Observation

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Sight read other
students compositions.

Teaching Strategy:
Independent
Consultation
Assessment:
Peer critique

Technology Integration:
If applicable, students will use music writing software to produce compositions.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Adapt writing to complete assignment.
Advanced composition assignment will be given if applicable.
Use varying rhythms.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC:
Student Task:
Compose a melody using standard notation using the following parameters: 1) 2-4 measures 2) D major
scale notes 3) 4 beats per measure 4) Perform for class
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply their knowledge of composition to text features found in communication arts.
Students will apply their knowledge of composition to other musical contexts.

72

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIC


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Write a composition in
finger-chart style using:

2-4 measures

D and A string
notes
4 beats per
measure

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Student composes a melody


always using:
2-4 measures
D and A string notes
4 beats per measure

Student composes a melody


consistently using:
2-4 measures
D and A string notes
4 beats per measure

Student composes a melody


sometimes using:
2-4 measures
D and A string
notes
4 beats per measure

Student composes a melody


rarely using:
2-4 measures
D and A string notes
4 beats per measure

73

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Playing position, pitch/rhythmic
accuracy, and tone production.
Emotional and physical response.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, FA3, G1.5, G2.4, GLE: AP2A4,
AP2B4

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, and
tone production.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical
responses to a given performance.

Unit Vocabulary: musical style, texture, intonation


Pre-Assessment: Students will critique a performance by the teacher.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Discuss qualities of a
Create a cause and
Class discussion of a
good performance as a
effect chart using
performance.
class.
playing position as the
focus.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction
Teacher-led discussion
Assessment:
List individual qualities
of a good performance.

Assessment:
Predict how playing
position affects tone and
note accuracy.

Assessment:
Critique a performance
for playing position,
note accuracy and tone
production.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Use critiquing
techniques for selfevaluation and
improvement.
Teaching Strategy:
Individualized
consultation
Assessment:
Teacher feedback

Technology Integration:
If available, students will make use of computers to write their critiques.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students will critique a performance focusing on only one component.
Students will critique a performance for additional components.
Students will critique an ensemble performance (instead of an individual).
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA
Student Task(s):
Critique a performance on playing position, pitch/rhythmic accuracy, and tone production.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will utilize their observational skills to express emotional and physical responses to other art
forms (i.e. plays, poetry, and movies).

74

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCOIIIA


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Critique a performance for:
playing position
pitch/rhythmic
accuracy
tone production
emotional and/or
physical responses

Can offer critique on all 4


categories of a performance
Supports each statement of
critique with detailed
description.

Can offer critique on 3


categories of a performance
Supports most statements

75

2
Basic
Can offer critique on 2
categories of a
performance.
Supports some
statements

1
Below Basic
Can offer critique on one
category
No supporting statements

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Through-composed:
Continuous, non-repeating melody
ABCB:
Multiple sections arranged thematically
within a form.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, FA3, G1.9, G2.4, G2.5, GLE:
AP1A4

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast ABCB and through-composed musical
forms. Be able to recognize repeated patterns of themes within
a piece.

Unit Vocabulary: ABCB, through-composed


Pre-Assessment: Students will list the characteristics of ABCB and through-composed forms.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
List the characteristics
Create a Venn diagram
In small groups, arrange
of ABCB and throughto compare/contrast
sections of familiar
composed forms
Lightly Row
pieces to create a new
(ABCB)and Song of the song in either ABCB or
Wind (throughthrough-composed form.
composed)
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction
Direct instruction
Cooperative learning
Assessment:
Identify the
characteristics
of ABCB and throughcomposed forms

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
ABCB and ThroughComposed musical
forms.

Assessment:
Construct a new song in
either ABCB or
through-composed form.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently create an
eight measure
composition in either
ABCB or throughcomposed form.
Teaching Strategy:
Independent
consultation
Assessment:
Student will present an
independently created
composition in either
ABCB or throughcomposed form.

Technology Integration:
If available, students will make use of computers to write their comparisons of ABCB and throughcomposed musical forms. Students are given introduction to music-based software programs.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Identify characteristics of only one of the two forms.
Introduce more complex forms to compare and contrast.
Discuss the form of Rounds and what it takes for a song to work as a Round.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast ABCB and through-composed musical forms.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will use experience recognizing patterns and form in math, visual and language arts.
Students will use experience recognizing patterns and form in other musical contexts.
76

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIIB


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
ABCB with throughcomposed forms.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Student was able to apply


listening skills to describe
at least three qualities of
the compare and contrast
categories.

Student was able to list at


least two qualities in both
the compare and contrast
categories.

Student was able to


distinguish one quality in
either the compare or
contrast category.

Student was not able to list


qualities for either form.

77

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOIV: Students will make connections among the arts and with nonarts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.9, G2.4, GLE: IC1A4,
IC1B4

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Students will draw a picture to illustrate
a piece of music.

How music can be expressed visually.

Unit Vocabulary: Ascending, Descending, Tempo, Piano, Forte, Major, Minor


Pre-Assessment: Students will listen to excerpts and identify ascending and descending patterns, fast and
slow tempos, piano and forte dynamics, and major/minor modalities.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Class discussion of how Draw a picture to
Compare how music in
music can be
interpret a given piece
movies is used to
represented visually.
of music.
illustrate the movie.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Discussion
Guided Instruction
Discussion
Direct Instruction
Assessment:
Teacher feedback

Assessment:
Individual teacher
feedback

Assessment:
Cite evidence of how
music is used in movies.

Technology Integration:
Students can research connections between music and the arts.
Students can use a computer to animate a piece of music.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Provide opportunities for students to research visual arts and music.
Provide opportunities for students to create various pieces of artwork.
Students can be given choice of various art forms to adapt to individual needs.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:
Student Task:
Students will draw a picture to illustrate a piece of music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students use their experience with making connections in other visual art forms.

78

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Apply concepts to other
visual arts.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Instruction

Assessment:
Create a piece of
artwork depicting a
chosen piece of music.

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCO IVA


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will draw a
picture to illustrate a piece
of music.

4
Advanced
Student was able to capture
the spirit of the music in
multiple art forms.

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Student was able to capture


the spirit of the music in their
picture.

Student was able to


somewhat capture the spirit
of the music in their picture.

Student was not able to


capture the spirit of the music
in any art form

79

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOIV: Students will make connections among the arts and with nonarts disciplines.
B. Connection with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Simple machines on the violin:
Screw: fine tuners, bow screw
Lever: head on chin rest
Wedge: bridge
Wheel and Axle: Peg
How simple machines work:
Screw: used to raise or lower things or
hold objects together
Lever: object that rests on a support
called a fulcrum, which lifts or moves
loads
Wedge: used to push two objects apart

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


SC2, FA4, G1.9, G2.4, GLE:IC1A4,
IC1B4

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will make connections between the operation of
stringed instruments and operation of simple machines in
science.

Unit Vocabulary:
Simple machines (lever, inclined plane, wheel and axle, screw, wedge, pulley)
Screw: fine tuners, bow screw
Lever: head on chin rest
Wedge: bridge
Wheel and Axle: peg
Pre-Assessment: Students will list parts of the violin and of a simple machine.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Using a worksheet, the
Experiment with the
Compare and contrast
student will label the
simple machines on a
the screw or the fine
simple machines on a
violin or a bow.
tuner with the peg.
violin.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Modeling
Guided instruction
Assessment:
List the simple machines
on a violin.

Assessment:
Demonstrate a simple
machine on the violin or
bow.

Assessment:
Create a Venn diagram
comparing and
contrasting the peg and
fine tuner.

Technology Integration:
If available, student will use computers for research and assignments.

80

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Using a different simple
machine, design a new
way to tighten the bow
hair.
Teaching Strategy:
Independent
consultation
Assessment:
Prove how the simple
machine works.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Student will show the various simple machines instead of listing them on a worksheet.
Student will find simple machines on a different instrument.
Create a new instrument making use of simple machines.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Students will make connections between the operation of a violin and the operation of a simple machine in
science.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will make observations about simple machines in everyday life.

81

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCOIVB:


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will make
connections between the
operation of stringed
instruments and operation
of simple machines in
science.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Student identifies and explains


at least one example of each
of the following simple
machines:
Screw (fine tuners,
bow screw)
Lever (chin rest)
Wedge (bridge)
Wheel and Axle
(peg)

Student identifies and explains


at least one example of two of
the following simple
machines:
Screw (fine tuners,
bow screw)
Lever (chin rest)
Wedge (bridge)

82

2
Basic
Student identifies and explains
at least one example of one of
the following simple
machines:
Screw (fine tuners,
bow screw)
Lever (chin rest)
Wedge (bridge)

1
Below Basic
Student is not able to identify
or explain any examples of
the following simple
machines:
Screw ( fine tuners,
bow screw)
Lever (chin rest)
Wedge (bridge)

Fourth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective V: Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and history/culture?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA5, G1.9, G2.4, GLE: HC1A4, HC1B4,
HC1C4, HC1D4

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Explain the evolution of string instruments in relation to music.
Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:

History

Composers

Concert Artists
Eclectic Artists

Violin
Modern instruments
originated in
Italy in 16th
century
Evolved from from
lira de braccio
Started as a folk
instrument and
then gained
acceptance as a
concert
instrument.

Viola
Modern instruments
originated in
Italy in 16th
century
Evolved from from
lira de braccio
Started as a folk
instrument and
then gained
acceptance as a
concert
instrument.

Cello
Modern instruments
originated in
Italy in 16th
century
Evolved from from
lira de braccio
Started as a folk
instrument and
then gained
acceptance as a
concert
instrument.

Johann Sebastian Bach,


Antonio Vivaldi,
Wolfgang Mozart
Fritz Kreisler, Izthak
Perlman, Hilary Hahn

Georg Phillip Telemann,


Ernest Bloch, Paul
Hindemith
William Primrose, Yuri
Bashmet, Nijel Kennedy

Johann Sebastian Bach,


Luigi Boccherini, Camille
Saint-Saens
Pablo Casals, Jacqueline du
Pr, Mstislav Rostropovich

Stephane Grappelli, Mark


Wood, Mark OConnor,
Rachel Barton Pine

Nijel Kennedy, Jeremy


Kittel, Richard Maximoff

Natalie Haas, Mark


Summer, Yo Yo Ma

Unit Vocabulary: lira de braccio, eclectic, musical artist, Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi,
Wolfgang Mozart, Georg Phillip Telemann, Ernest Bloch, Paul Hindemith, Luigi Boccherini, Camille
Saint-Saens, Fritz Kreisler, Izthak Perlman, Hilary Hahn, William Primrose, Yuri Bashmet, Nijel Kennedy,
Pablo Casals, Jacqueline du Pr, Mstislav Rostropovich, Stephane Grappelli, Mark Wood, Mark OConnor,
Rachel Barton Pine, Jeremy Kittel, Richard Maximoff, Natalie Haas, Mark Summer
Pre-Assessment: Class discussion regarding prior knowledge of string instruments and performers.

83

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Recall
Activity:
List historical
information about
strings instruments.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Activity:
Categorize information
about string instruments
and performers.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Activity:
Analyze technique for
various different
musical styles.

Strategy:
Guided Instruction

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Activity:
Compare the similarities
and differences between
eclectic and concert
artists.
Strategy:
Guided Instruction

Strategy:
Direct instruction
Assessment:
Written document

Assessment:
Written document and
teacher feedback

Assessment:
Present comparison for
teacher feedback

Assessment:
Present analysis for
teacher evaluation

Strategy:
Teacher consultation

Technology Integration:
Students use computer-based and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students present information to others using computer technology (e.g., written paper, power point
presentation).
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students may present information in a variety of ways.
Extend lesson to investigate the history of the string bass.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Explain the evolution of string instruments in relation to music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will transfer knowledge of string instrument evolution and musical styles to other musical and
cultural contexts.

84

Scoring Guide for Fourth Grade Orchestra, CCOV:

Learning Target
Learning Target:
Explain the evolution of string
instruments in relation to music.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Student makes extensive


connections between the
evolution of string instruments
and music history

Student makes comprehensive


connections between the
evolution of string instruments
and music history.

85

2
Basic
Student makes few
connections between the
evolution of string instruments
and music history.

1
Below Basic
Student cannot make any
connections between the
evolution of string instruments
and music history.

Fifth Grade
Orchestra
Course Description

This is an elective course offered to all fifth grade students who participated in fourth
grade orchestra. Students meet for 30 minutes twice a week. Students will continue
instruction on the violin, viola, and cello from fourth grade. This will be the first year of
instruction on bass for students. Standard note-reading skills are taught through the use
of a orchestra method book as well as supplemental materials.

86

Overview of Content and Skills for Fifth Grade Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Tone Production: bow weight - use natural arm weight, bow speed - vary to play different note values and
dynamics, contact point - keep bow parallel to bridge on all strings
Violin, Viola, and Cello Positions see Grade Four
Bass Standing Position: Adjust the length of the endpin so that the nut of the bass is near the top of the
forehead, stand with feet hip width apart, place left foot slightly forward, position endpin in front of left foot
one-arms-length away, turn bass slightly to the right, lean against the body so that the upper bout rests
against the inside of the left pelvis
Bass Left Hand Position: wrist straight, fingers curved creating a "C" shape, pad of the thumb on the backcenter of neck aligned with the second finger, finger tips on tapes
Bass Bow Hold: inside corner of right thumb touching where frog and stick intersect to make circle, middle
finger on ferrule across from thumb, index finger over stick at first joint, relaxed pinky over stick on frog,
fingers slightly spaced, flexible joints
Bowing Skills: slurs, ties, hooked, accents, arco/pizzicato, string crossings, bow sections (whole bow,
middle, upper half, lower half), bow lift (small motion), up bow preparation starting in middle(pickup notes)
Musicianship: Perform on all strings in I position from written music for students instrument. Introduction
to 3rd position all strings for bass and 4th position G, D, A for cello. Repertoire may include method book,
supplemental materials, and appropriate ensemble literature; Sing: major scale. Improvisation: Improvise
melody using notes of at G Major scale. Ensemble Playing: playing in unison and parts
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading Skills: Accents, allegro, andante, arco , bar line, bow lift, chromatic, clef, da capo al fine (D.C al
fine), dotted half note, divisi, down bow- up bow, double bar, dynamics, extensions (cellos), forte, piano,
mezzo forte, mezzo piano, crescendo, diminuendo, eighth note, first and second endings, half note, half rest,
hooked bows, measure, moderato, music alphabet (pitch names), natural, octave, pizzicato, quarter note,
quarter rest, repeat sign, sharp, shifting, slur, staccato, staff, tempo markings, tie, time signature: 2/4 , 4/4,
C, perfect fifth, unison, whole step-half step.
Sing major scale using note names.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Violin C, G, D Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger. Accurately play all notes on all strings in 1st
position in these keys.
Viola - C, G, D Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger. Accurately play all notes on all strings in 1st
position in these keys.
Cello - C, G, D, Maj. One octave, 2nd finger, shifting to 4th position.
Bass C, G, D Maj. One octave; 2nd finger, shifting to 3rd position.
C. Composition
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters: 1) 4-8 measures 2) Starting/ending on
open D for D Major or open G for G major 3) Range of one octave 4) 4 beats per measure (use correct time
signature) 5) Use quarter notes, quarter rest, half notes, eighth notes
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, tone production, and dynamics.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
B. Form
Symphony, concerto
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will make connections between a selection from orchestra and visual art.

87

B. Connections with non-arts disciplines


Students will make connections between music and language arts.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will compare and contrast Bach and Beethoven in a historical context.

88

5th Grade Learning Targets by Instrument


Violin/Viola
Perform Music, CCO I
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper instrument position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper left hand and arm position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental material.
Violinists/violists will use low 2 finger pattern on E (for violins only), D, and A strings.
Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a leader playing in unison and independent parts.
Sing major scale.
Improvise a melody using the notes of the G Major scale.
Elements of Music, CCOII
Students will play the following scales:
o Violin D, G, C Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger
o Viola D, G, C Maj. One octave; low 2nd finger; 4th finger
Read and play 5th grade level music repertoire.
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters:
1) 4-8 measures
2) Starting/ending on open D for D Major or G of G Major
3) Range of one octave
4) 4 beats per measure (using correct time signature)
5) Use quarter notes, quarter rest, half notes, and eighth notes
Music Criticism, CCO III
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, tone production, and dynamics.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
Compare and contrast Symphony and Concerto forms.
Making Connections among Arts and Non-Arts Disciplines, CCO IV
Students will make connections between a selection from orchestra and visual art.
Students will make connections between music and language arts.
Knowledge of Music in a Historical and Cultural Context, CCO V
Students will compare and contrast Bach and Beethoven in a historical context.

89

5th Grade Learning Targets by Instrument


Cello
Perform Music, CCO I
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Cellists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper cello position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper left hand and arm position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental material.
Cellists will explore shifting into 4th position on the A, D, and G strings.
Cellists will use extended finger pattern on G and C strings.
Cellists will use 2nd finger in 1st position on A and D strings.
Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a leader playing in unison and independent parts.
Sing major scale.
Improvise a melody using the notes of the G Major scale.
Elements of Music, CCOII
Students will play the following scales:
o Cello - C, G, D, Maj. One octave, 2nd finger
Read and play 5th grade level music repertoire.
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters:
1) 4-8 measures
2) Starting/ending on open D for D Major or G of G Major
3) Range of one octave
4) 4 beats per measure (using correct time signature)
5) Use quarter notes, quarter rest, half notes, and eighth notes
Music Criticism, CCO III
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, tone production, and dynamics.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
Compare and contrast Symphony and Concerto forms.
Making Connections among Arts and Non-Arts Disciplines, CCO IV
Students will make connections between a selection from orchestra and visual art.
Students will make connections between music and language arts.
Knowledge of Music in a Historical and Cultural Context, CCO V
Students will compare and contrast Bach and Beethoven in a historical context.

90

5th Grade Learning Targets by Instrument


Bass
Perform Music, CCO I
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Bass players will maintain proper standing position while playing.
Bass players will maintain proper instrument position while playing.
Bass players will maintain proper left hand and arm position while playing.
Bass players will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental material.
Bassists will shift into 3rd position on all strings.
Basses will use 2nd finger in 1st position on D, A, and E strings.
Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a leader playing in unison and independent parts.
Sing major scale.
Improvise a melody using the notes of the G Major scale.
Elements of Music, CCOII
Students will play the following scales:
o Bass D, G, and C Maj. One octave; shifting to 3rd position
Read and play 5th grade level music repertoire.
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters:
1) 4-8 measures
2) Starting/ending on open D for D Major or G of G Major
3) Range of one octave
4) 4 beats per measure (using correct time signature)
5) Use quarter notes, quarter rest, half notes, and eighth notes
Music Criticism, CCO III
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, tone production, and dynamics.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
Compare and contrast Symphony and Concerto forms.
Making Connections among Arts and Non-Arts Disciplines, CCO IV
Students will make connections between a selection from orchestra and visual art.
Students will make connections between music and language arts.
Knowledge of Music in a Historical and Cultural Context, CCO V
Students will compare and contrast Bach and Beethoven in a historical context.

91

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question
How do musicians express ideas through performance?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should
know:

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A5, PP2C5,
PP2D5, PP2E5, PP3A5, AP2A5

Learning Targets
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to
do:

Tone Production: bow weight-use natural arm


weight, bow speed-vary to play different note
values, contact point-keep bow parallel to
bridge on A and D strings
Violin, Viola, and Cello Positions: see Grade
Four

Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight,


speed, and contact point.

Bass Standing Position:


Adjust the length of the endpin so that the nut
of the bass is near the top of the forehead, stand
with feet hip width apart, place left foot slightly
forward, position endpin in front of left foot
one-arms-length away, turn bass slightly to the
right, balance and lean against the body so that
the upper bout rest against the inside of the left
pelvis
Bass Left Hand Position:
Wrists straight, fingers curved creating a C
shape, pad of the thumb on the back-center of
neck aligned with the second finger, finger tips
on tape
Bass Bow Hold:
Inside corner of right thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to make circle, middle
finger on ferrule across from thumb, index
finger over stick at first joint, relaxed pinky
over stick on frog, fingers slightly spaced,
flexible joints

Bass players will maintain proper standing position while


playing.

Violin, viola, and cello players will maintain proper


sitting position, instrument position, and bow holds while
playing.

Bass players will maintain proper left hand and arm


position while playing.

Bass players will maintain proper bow hold while


playing.

92

Bowing Skills:
slurs, ties, hooked, accents, arco/pizzicato,
string crossings, bow sections (whole bow,
middle, upper half, lower half), bow lift (small
motion), up bow preparation starting in middle

Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.

Musicianship:
Note reading skills on all strings in 1st position
for all instruments.

Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental


material.

Introduction to 3rd position all strings for bass,


IV position G, D, A for cello.

Cellos and Basses perform using finger positions other


than I position to expand note options.

Sing: Major scale

Sing major scale.

Improvisation: Improvise melody using notes


of at G Major scale.

Improvise a melody using the notes of the G Major scale.

Ensemble Playing: playing in unison and parts

Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a


leader.

Repertoire may include method book,


supplemental materials, and appropriate
ensemble literature;
Examples of benchmark repertoire for 5th grade
orchestra end of 1st semester: #65 Its the Blues
Man!, #90 Johnny Works With One Hammer,
#91 The Clocks (Round)
Examples of benchmark repertoire for 5th grade
orchestra end of 2nd semester: #135 Chromatic
Calisthenics 2, #140 Wipe Out, #180 Music for
Royal Fireworks
Unit Vocabulary:
Bowing terms: slurs, ties, hooked, accents, up/down bow, arco/pizzicato, legato, staccato
Tone Production: bow contact point, bow speed, bow weight
Misc. terms: major scale, endpin, ensemble, tone, improvise
Pre-Assessment:
Have students who have prior experience reading music on his or her instrument sight read a piece in D
major or play a song they know to demonstrate position.

93

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Identify from looking
at music which notes
are tied, slurred, or
hooked.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Perform ties, slurs,
and hooks as written
in music.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
clear definitions,
modeling
Assessment:
Students match
examples in music
with the term (tie, slur,
or hook).

Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
modeling, practice
Assessment:
Teacher observation
and feedback or peer
critique.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Given a section of
music with premarked bowing
directions at the
beginning and end,
have students
formulate a bowing
plan using ties, slurs,
and/or hooks.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided problem
solving example

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Students create short
composition using at least
one tie, slur, and hooked
bowing.

Assessment:
Peer critique of
bowing plan

Assessment:
Peer critique and individual
consultation with teacher.

Teaching Strategy:
Teacher provides structure
for composition. Model.

Technology Integration: Possible application of music-related computer software where facilities allow.
Possible use of projector or Smartboard to demonstrate concepts. Possibly record student performances for
self-evaluation. Possible use Smartmusic to provide accompaniment and feedback on performance.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Simplification of parts for students having difficulties
Write in note names on parts
Weaker students paired with more advanced
Give advanced students more challenging parts to the same piece
Allow for independent work on additional pieces
Violinist/violists can explore shifting into III position on the E, A, and/or D strings.
For advanced students play in different octaves or positions.

94

Application Level Assessment for CCO I A


Student Task:
Perform a given piece using appropriate bow weight, speed, and contact point.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper violin position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper left hand position while playing.
Violinists/violists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper sitting position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper (instrument) position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper left hand position while playing.
Cellists will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Bass players will maintain proper standing position while playing.
Bass players will maintain proper left hand position while playing.
Bass players will maintain proper bow hold while playing.
Apply appropriate bowing skills while playing.
Perform from the chosen method book and supplemental material.
Perform in an ensemble, starting and stopping with a leader playing in unison and independent parts.
Sing major scale.
Improvise a melody using the notes of the G Major scale.

How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?


Students demonstrate the transfer of note-reading skills to text features as used in language arts.
Ensemble playing encourages team work.
Following directions as given by the group leader would carry over to all areas.
Performing selections in a concert setting brings together multiple high level tasks.

95

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCO IA: Performance Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Learning Target:
Tone Production

Student always performs with


appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural arm
weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A and D
strings

Student consistently performs


with appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural
arm weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A
and D strings

Student sometimes performs


with appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural
arm weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A
and D strings

Learning Target:
Bass Standing
Position

Student always stands with:


The length of the endpin
adjusted so that the nut of the
bass is near the top of the
forehead
Feet hip width apart
Left foot placed slightly
forward
Endpin positioned in front of
left foot one-arms-length away
Bass turned slightly to the
right
Bass balanced and leaning
against the body so that the
upper bout rests against the
inside of the left pelvis

Student consistently stands


with:
The length of the endpin
adjusted so that the nut of
the bass is near the top of
the forehead
Feet hip width apart
Left foot placed slightly
forward
Endpin positioned in front
of left foot one-armslength away
Bass turned slightly to the
right
Bass balanced and leaning
against the body so that
the upper bout rests
against the inside of the
left pelvis

Student sometimes stands


with:
The length of the endpin
adjusted so that the nut
of the bass is near the top
of the forehead
Feet hip width apart
Left foot placed slightly
forward
Endpin positioned in
front of left foot onearms-length away
Bass turned slightly to
the right
Bass balanced and
leaning against the body
so that the upper bout
rests against the inside of
the left pelvis

96

1
Below Basic
Student rarely performs with
appropriate:
Bow weight-use natural
arm weight
Bow speed-vary to play
different note values
Contact point-keep bow
parallel to bridge on A
and D strings

Student rarely stands with:


The length of the endpin
adjusted so that the nut
of the bass is near the top
of the forehead
Feet hip width apart
Left foot placed slightly
forward
Endpin positioned in
front of left foot onearms-length away
Bass turned slightly to
the right
Bass balanced and
leaning against the body
so that the upper bout
rests against the inside of
the left pelvis

Learning Target:
Bass Left Hand
Position

Student always holds left hand


with:
Wrist straight
Fingers curved creating a C
shape
Pad of the thumb on the backcenter of neck aligned with the
second finger
Finger tips on tape

Student consistently holds left


hand with:
Wrist straight
Fingers curved creating a
C shape
Pad of the thumb on the
back-center of neck
aligned with the second
finger
Finger tips on tape

Student sometimes holds


left hand with:
Wrist straight
Fingers curved creating
a C shape
Pad of the thumb on the
back-center of neck
aligned with the second
finger
Finger tips on tape

Student rarely holds left hand


with:
Wrist straight
Fingers curved creating a
C shape
Pad of the thumb on the
back-center of neck
aligned with the second
finger
Finger tips on tape

Learning Target:
Bass Bow Hold

Student always holds the bow


with:
Inside corner of right thumb
touching where frog and stick
intersect to make circle
Middle finger on ferrule
across from thumb
Index finger over stick at first
joint
Relaxed pinky over stick on
frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

Student consistently holds the


bow with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect to
make circle
Middle finger on ferrule
across from thumb
Index finger over stick at
first joint
Relaxed pinky over stick
on frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

Student sometimes holds


the bow with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where
frog and stick intersect
to make circle
Middle finger on
ferrule across from
thumb
Index finger over stick
at first joint
Relaxed pinky over
stick on frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

Student rarely holds the bow


with:
Inside corner of right
thumb touching where frog
and stick intersect to make
circle
Middle finger on ferrule
across from thumb
Index finger over stick at
first joint
Relaxed pinky over stick
on frog
Fingers slightly spaced
Flexible joints

Learning Target:
Improvisation
Using the notes of the
G Major scale

Student creates a melody using a


minimum of 4 pitches of the G
Major scale over a given pulse.

Student creates a melody


using 3 pitches of the G
Major scale over a given
pulse.

97

Student creates a melody


using only 2 of the pitches
of the G Major scale over
a given pulse.

Student does not create a


melody using the pitches
of the G Major scale, or
uses only a single pitch.

Learning Target:
Musicianship
Repertoire

Learning Target:
Ensemble Playing

Student always performs the


repertoire being assessed with:
Correct Notes
Correct Rhythm
Good Intonation
Good Tone

Student always:
Starts/stops with leader
Follows the established
tempo
Matches bow directions

Student consistently performs


repertoire being assessed with:

Correct Notes

Correct Rhythm

Good Intonation

Good Tone

Student consistently:
Starts/stops with
leader
Follows the
established tempo
Matches bow
directions

98

Student sometimes performs


repertoire being assessed
with:

Correct Notes

Correct Rhythm

Good Intonation

Good Tone

Student sometimes:
Starts/stops with
leader
Follows the
established tempo
Matches bow
directions

Student rarely performs the


repertoire being assessed with:

Correct Notes

Correct Rhythm

Good Intonation

Good Tone

Student rarely:
Starts/stops with
leader
Follows the
established tempo
Matches bow
directions

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Reading Skills:
Accents
Arco
Bar line
Bow lift
Clef
Crescendo
D.C. al fine
Diminuendo
Divisi
Dotted half note
Down bow, up bow
Double bar line
Dynamics: f, p, mf, mp, <, >
Eighth note
First and second endings
Half note
Half rest
Hooked bows
Measure
Music alphabet (Pitch Names)
Natural
Pizzicato
Quarter note
Quarter rest
Repeat sign
Sharp
Slur
Staccato
Staff
Tempo markings: allegro, andante,
moderato
Tie
Time signature: 2/4 , 4/4, C
Intervals Sung (aural training):
Major scale

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2;FA3; G2.4; G2.5; GLE: PP2A5,
PP2B5,PP2E5, PP4A5, EP1A5,
EP1B5, EP1C5, EP1D5, EP1E5

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Read and play 5th grade level music repertoire.

Sing scale with note names

99

Unit Vocabulary:
Accents, allegro, andante, arco , bar line, bow lift, chromatic, clef, da capo al fine (D.C al fine), dotted half
note, divisi, down bow- up bow, double bar, dynamics, extensions (cellos), forte, piano, mezzo forte,
mezzo piano, crescendo, diminuendo, eighth note, first and second endings, half note, half rest, hooked
bows, measure, moderato, music alphabet (pitch names), natural, octave, pizzicato, quarter note, quarter
rest, repeat sign, sharp, shifting, slur, staccato, staff, tempo markings, tie, time signature: 2/4 , 4/4, C,
perfect fifth, unison, whole step-half step.
Pre-Assessment:
Students will use prior reading experience to play examples using reading skills from D Major repertoire.
Written pre-test on music terms and symbols from 4th grade level.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash card games with
Flash card games by
Sight read Name That
oral recall.
playing the notes.
Tune songs.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Assessment:
Written vocabulary and
fill in the blank test

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Assessment:
Playing test.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Sight reading playing
test.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a song.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided instruction
Assessment:
Perform the song.

Technology Integration:
If computers are available, students can play online note identification games.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Write in fingerings.
Adaptations:
-alternate fingers
-only reading strings
-note size
-harmony part
-advanced music
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIA:
Student Task:
Read and play fifth grade level music repertoire.
Sing perfect fifth, sing scale tones.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply note reading skills to other music disciplines should they continue studying music.
Students will independently perform notated music of their choice.
Students will apply their knowledge of reading music to language arts in interpreting text features.

100

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIA


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Read and play a selection
from 5th grade level
repertoire

Learning Target:
Students will sing a perfect
fifth.

4
Advanced
Student always plays the
selection with accurate:
Notes/Pitch
Note/Rest Value
Time signature
Bowings
Matches both pitches in
appropriate range.

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Student sometimes plays the


selection with accurate:
Notes/Pitch
Note/Rest Value
Time signature
Bowings

Student sometimes plays the


selection with accurate:
Notes/Pitch
Note/Rest Value
Time signature
Bowings

Student rarely plays the


selection with accurate:
Notes/Pitch
Note/Rest Value
Time signature
Bowings

Approximately matches both


pitches.

Matches one pitch.

Does not match either pitch.

101

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Essential Question
Missouri State Standards & GLEs
How are scales the foundation of music?
FA2, G1.6, G2.5, GLE: PP2A5,
PP2D5, EP1B5
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to
play:
Play one octave scales that are appropriate to the instrument.

Violin C, G, D Maj. One octave; low 2nd


finger; 4th finger. Accurately play all notes
on all strings in 1st position in these keys.
Play targeted finger pattern/fingering
Viola - C, G, D Maj. One octave; low 2nd
Violin/Viola: low 2nd finger; 4th finger with
finger; 4th finger. Accurately play all notes
accuracy and appropriate use
on all strings in 1st position in these keys.
Cello: 2nd finger, shift to 4th position
Cello - C, G, D, Maj. One octave, 2nd finger,
Bass: 2nd finger, shift to 3rd position
shifting to 4th position.
Bass C, G, D Maj. One octave; 2nd finger,
shifting to 3rd position.
Unit Vocabulary: Scale, octave, major, shifting, position
Pre-Assessment: Students play scales.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Sing the scale.
Play the targeted scale
Construct a different major
in varying group
scale starting on new pitch
configurations.
based on previous scale
knowledge
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Chunking
Modeling
Guided instruction
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Writing or verbalizing
Playing test
Observation
the targeted scale
Technology Integration:
Not applicable

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Prove that the different
major scale is correct by
performing and listening
to the scale.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided instruction
Assessment:
Observation

Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Explore high 3rd fingers for violin/viola, extensions for cellos, half and 2nd position for basses.
Play multi-octave scales
Explore 3rd position for violins/violas
Play a scale using alternate fingerings.
Explore all notes in the chromatic scale in 1st position.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIB:
Student Task:
Play one octave scales that are appropriate to the instrument.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply their knowledge of scales to playing a piece of music.

102

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCOIIB


Learning Target

Learning Target: 1 octave


scale
Violin C, G, D Major
Viola - C, G, D Major
Cello - C, G, D, Major
Bass C, G, D Major
Learning Target:
Finger pattern
Violin/Viola: low 2nd
finger, 4th finger
Cello: 2nd finger, 4th
position
Bass: 2nd finger, shifting
to 3rd position

4
Advanced
Student always plays the
targeted major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student always plays the


targeted finger
pattern/fingering with:
correct fingers
correct pitch
correct location on
fingerboard

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Student consistently plays the


targeted major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student sometimes plays the


targeted major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student consistently plays the


targeted finger
pattern/fingering with:
correct fingers
correct pitch
correct location on
fingerboard

Student sometimes plays the


targeted finger
pattern/fingering with:
correct fingers
correct pitch
correct location on
fingerboard

103

1
Below Basic
Student rarely plays the
targeted major scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student rarely plays the


targeted finger
pattern/fingering with:
correct fingers
correct pitch
correct location on
fingerboard

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective CCOII: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Format for writing music on a staff.

Compose a 4-8 measure melody.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1,G2.1, G2.5, GLE: PP3A, PP4A5,
EP1B5, EP1D5, AP1A5

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to:
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following
parameters: 1) 4-8 measures 2) Starting/ending on open D for D
Major or open G for G major 3) Range of one octave 4) 4 beats
per measure (use correct time signature) 5) Use quarter notes,
quarter rest, half notes, eighth notes

Unit Vocabulary: composition, range, beats, staff, clef (treble, alto, bass) time signature, bar lines, sharp,
double bar, melody.
Pre-Assessment: Students will compose a two measure composition.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash cards.
Shuffle flash cards to
Working with a
create new melodies.
partner to compose a
melody.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction.
Guided practice.
Guided practice.
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Written test of symbol
Notate a melody using
Compose a 4-8
recall.
randomly selected
measure melody and
pitches.
notate it on a staff.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Analyze other examples of
compositions to determine
if they fit parameters.
Teaching Strategy:
Teacher guided
Assessment:
Observation/
Perform the compositions.

Technology Integration:
If available, use music notation software to compose a melody.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Adapt writing (finger charts instead of standard music notation; dictate rather than write) to complete
assignment.
Assign multi-level composition (melody/harmony, two different instruments.)
Use varying rhythms.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC:
Student Task:
Compose a melody on a single staff using the following parameters: 4-8 measures; range of D major, one
octave; 4 beats per measure; use quarter notes, quarter rest, half notes, eighth notes.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply their knowledge of composition to text features found in language arts.
Students will apply their knowledge of composition to other musical contexts.

104

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCOIIC


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Learning Target:
Compose a melody with:
4-8 measures
Starting and
ending on open D
for D Major or
open G for G
Major
Range of one
octave
4 beats per
measure
Quarter
notes/rests, half
notes, eighth notes

Student uses all of the


following parameters:
4-8 measures
Starting and ending
on appropriate open
string
Range of one octave
4 beats per measure
Quarter notes/rests,
half notes, eighth
notes

Student uses four of the


following parameters:
4-8 measures
Starting and ending
on appropriate open
strings
Range of one octave
4 beats per measure
Quarter notes/rests,
half notes, eighth
notes

Student uses three of the


following parameters:
4-8 measures
Starting and ending
on appropriate
open string
Range of one
octave
4 beats per measure
Quarter notes/rests,
half notes, eighth
notes

Student uses two or fewer of


the following parameters:
4-8 measures
Starting and ending
on appropriate open
string
Range of one octave
4 beats per measure
Quarter notes/rests,
half notes, eighth
notes

105

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Playing position, pitch/rhythmic
accuracy, tone production, dynamics,
and elements of musicality.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, FA2, FA3, G1.5 G2.5, GLE:
AP1B5, AP2A5, AP2B5

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Critique a performance on playing position, note accuracy, tone
production, and dynamics.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical
responses to a given performance.

Unit Vocabulary: musical style, texture, intonation, articulation, dynamics


Pre-Assessment: Students will critique a performance by the teacher.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Discuss qualities of a
Create a cause and
Class discussion of a
good performance as a
effect chart using
performance.
class.
playing position as the
focus.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction
Teacher-led discussion
Assessment:
List individual qualities
of a good performance.

Assessment:
Predict how playing
position affects tone and
note accuracy.

Assessment:
Critique a performance
for playing position,
note accuracy and tone
production.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Use critiquing
techniques for selfevaluation and
improvement.
Teaching Strategy:
Individualized
consultation
Assessment:
Teacher feedback

Technology Integration:
If available, students will make use of computers to write their critiques.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students will critique a performance focusing on only one component.
Students will critique a performance for additional components.
Students will critique an ensemble performance (instead of an individual).
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA
Student Task(s):
Critique a performance on playing position, pitch/rhythmic accuracy, tone production, and dynamics.
Make observations regarding emotional and/or physical responses to a given performance.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will utilize their observational skills to express emotional and physical responses to other art
forms (i.e. plays, poetry, and movies).

106

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCOIIIA


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Learning Target:
Critique a performance for:
playing position
pitch/rhythmic
accuracy
tone production
dynamics
emotional and/or
physical responses

Can offer critique on all 5


categories of a performance
Supports each statement of
critique with detailed
description.

Can offer critique on 4


categories of a performance
Supports most statements

Can offer critique on 2-3


categories of a
performance.
Supports some
statements

Can offer critique on1


category
No supporting statements

107

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Concerto:
A multi-movement work for orchestra
that usually features one or more solo
instruments.
Symphony:
A large- scale work for orchestra usually
made of four distinct movements

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, FA3, G1.5 GLE: AP1A5, AP1B5

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast concerto and symphonic forms.

Unit Vocabulary: concerto, symphony


Pre-Assessment: Students will list the characteristics of concerto and symphonic forms.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
List the
Create a Venn diagram In small groups, listen to
characteristics
to compare/contrast
and discuss recorded
of concerto and
characteristics of
excerpts. Draw
symphonic forms
concerti and
conclusions whether the
symphonies.
selection is concerto or
symphonic form.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction
Direct instruction
Cooperative learning
Assessment:
Identify the
characteristics
of concerto and
symphony.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
the characteristics of
concerto and
symphony.

Assessment:
Differentiate between
concerto and symphonic
forms.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will independently
create an eight measure
piece in concerto or
symphonic form.

Teaching Strategy:
Independent consultation
Assessment:
Student will present an
independently created
composition in either
concerto or symphonic form.

Technology Integration:
If available, students will make use of computers to write their comparisons of concerto and symphonic
forms. Students are given introduction to music-based software programs.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Identify characteristics of only one of the two forms.
Create a 16 measure composition in concerto or symphonic forms.
Perform a composition in concerto or symphonic form.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast concerto and symphonic forms.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will use experience recognizing patterns and form in math, visual and language arts.
Students will use experience recognizing patterns and form in other musical contexts.
108

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIIB


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
concerto and symphonic
forms.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Student was able to apply


listening skills to describe
at least three qualities of
the compare and contrast
categories.

Student was able to list at


least two qualities in both
the compare and contrast
categories.

Student was able to


distinguish one quality in
either the compare or
contrast category.

Student was not able to list


qualities for either form.

109

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective IVA: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should
know:

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, FA5, G1.9, G2.4, GLE:
IC1A5,IC1B5, HC1A5, HC1B5,
HC1C5

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be
able to do:
Students will make connections between music and
visual art.

Characteristics

Unit Vocabulary: line, shape, color, form, texture, rhythm/pattern, contrast, space, balance, proportion
Pre-Assessment: Ask students to describe the elements they could look for when looking at a picture.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Recognize similar
Classify
Develop a logical
characteristics between
complimentary pieces argument why a
pieces of music and
of music and artwork. particular piece of art to
artwork.
illustrate a given piece
of music.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Guided Instruction
Guided Instruction
Assessment:
Identify characteristics
relating artwork to
music.

Assessment:
Given several
examples of artwork,
students will interpret
which relate best to
one piece of music.

Assessment:
Present argument to
class.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student analyzes a chosen
piece of music and
connects it to an artwork of
their choice.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Instruction
Assessment:
Student justifies choice of
artwork and music.

Technology Integration:
If applicable, students will use the computer and library resources to research art and music.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Adapt music and artwork to the abilities of the student.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA
Student Task:
Students will make connections between music and visual art.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students develop a better awareness of how the arts impact each other.

110

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCO IVA


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will make
connections between music
and visual art.

4
Advanced
Student was able to
make strong connections
between art and music.

3
Proficient
Student was able to
logical connections
between art and music.

111

2
Basic
Student was able to
make few connections
between music and art.

1
Below Basic
Student was not able
make connections
between artwork and
music.

Fifth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, FA5, G1.9, G2.4 GLE: IC1A5,
IC1B5, HC1C5

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Music:
Ideas are communicated through music
There are different musical forms such as ABA and throughcomposed
The language is composed of notes on a staff

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course
students should be able to do:
Students will make connections
between music and language arts
forms.

Language Arts:
Ideas are communicated through text
There are different literature forms such as prose and poetry.
The language is composed of letters of the alphabet

Unit Vocabulary: staff, prose, poetry, ABA form, through-composed


Pre-Assessment: Students will list characteristics of an ABA musical form and a rhyming poem.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Learn the words to Song Student will construct a
In small groups,
of the Wind and
T chart comparing and
students will compare
compare the form to
contrasting a poem and
and contrast ABA
Twinkle.
a song.
musical form and
rhyming poetry
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction
Direct instruction
Guided discussion
Assessment:
List characteristics of an
ABA/Rhyming poem
and through
composed/prose.

Assessment:
Student will identify
patterns between a poem
and a song from the 5th
grade method book.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
the musical form and
words of Go Tell Aunt
Rhody

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will create lyrics
to either a through
composed song or an
ABA form song.
Teaching Strategy:
Independent
consultation
Assessment:
Present lyrics to the
class and explain how
the words fit the form.

Technology Integration: if available, students will use computers to research lyrics to various folk songs.
Differentiation Suggestions:
List characteristics of only one form (ABA musical form or a rhyming poem.)
Students will create lyrics to additional forms.

112

Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:


Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast music and language arts forms.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will use their experience to make connections between composing music and expressive language.

113

Scoring Guide for Fifth Grade Orchestra, CCOIVB


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will make connections
between music and language arts
forms.

4
Advanced

Compare ABA and


poetry.
Supports statements
All information is correct
and complete

3
Proficient

Compare ABA and poetry


Supports statements
Most information is
correct and specific

114

2
Basic

Compares ABA and


poetry
Some information is
correct

1
Below Basic

Lists characteristics of
one of the forms
Information is incomplete
or incorrect

Fifth Grade Orchestra CCOV


Core Conceptual Objective V: Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and history/culture?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA5, G1.9, G2.4, GLE: HC1A5,
HC1B5, HC1C5

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Style/Genre/Period/Title
Baroque
Classical
1600-1750
1750-1825
Time/Place when composed
Germany
Germany
Composer(s)
Bach
Beethoven
Characteristics of Music
Highly ornamented
Simpler, less ornate
(clues used to identify it)
Long, flowing melodies
Shorter melodic ideas
Less structured
Highly structured
Function in society
Entertainment (dances)
Entertainment (operas)
Church music
What was happening:
What was happening:
Historical Context
What was happening at the time
Government: Monarch
Government: Monarch
and place when/where the music
Arts/Science: Age of Reason; Arts/Science: Age of
was composed?
beginning of modern
Enlightenment; reasoning
(war/peace, science, technology,
philosophy
highly valued
type of government, other arts) Trained musicians
Trained musicians
Who were the musicians?
Audience could include both Audience could include both
What training did they have?
aristocracy and everyday
aristocracy and everyday
Who were audience members?
people
people
Contemporary Context
When/where is this music played
today?
How did this music influence
current musicians/composers?

Played in concert halls


Still used as a reference for
modern composition
Still played and revised
today

Played in concert halls


Still used as a reference for
modern composition
Still played and revised
today

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will compare and contrast Bach and Beethoven in a historical context.
Unit Vocabulary:
Baroque, classical, ornamented, aristocracy, opera
Pre-Assessment:
Students will list the musical and historical traits of Bach and Beethoven.

115

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Recall
Activity:
Identify musical and
historical traits of Bach
and Beethoven.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Activity:
Divide into two groups
and have each group
classify the musical and
historical traits of either
Bach or Beethoven.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Activity:
Research the historical
significance of a
composition by either
Bach or Beethoven
using online and library
resources..
Strategy:
Guided instruction.

Strategy:
Class discussion.

Strategy:
Direct instruction

Assessment:
List the musical and
historical traits of Bach
and Beethoven.

Assessment:
Classify the musical and
historical traits of Bach
and Beethoven.

Assessment:
Apprise the reader of the
historical significance of
a composition by either
Bach or Beethoven.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Activity: Independently
research a composer of
the same time period as
either Bach or
Beethoven using online
and library resources.
Strategy:
Independent
consultation
Assessment:
Present research on a
composer of the same
time period as either
Bach or Beethoven.

Technology Integration:
Students use computer-based and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students will present information to others using computer technology (e.g., written paper, power point
presentation).
Differentiation Suggestions:
Identify the musical and historical traits of either Bach or Beethoven.
Independently research another composer of the same time period as either Bach or Beethoven.
Independently research art of the same time period as either Bach or Beethoven.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast Bach and Beethoven in a historical context.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will apply skills used in comparing and contrasting musical and historical traits to other art forms.
Students will apply skills gained in comparing and contrasting traits to language arts.

116

Middle School
Orchestra

117

MIDDLE SCHOOL
ORCHESTRA COURSE MAP

Grade 6
Intermediate Orchestra

Grade 7
Cadet Orchestra

118

Grade 8
Concert Orchestra

Middle School Course Descriptions

INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA

(full year)

Grade level: 6
Prerequisite: Fifth Grade Orchestra or evidence of equivalent training satisfactory to the instructor.
The training provided in Fifth Grade Orchestra continues in this course. Students receive instruction in
music reading skills, production of a good tone, bowing, and left-hand techniques. Attendance at scheduled
performances is mandatory and part of the required class work. This course meets every day for one middle
school class period. It is a full year course.
Students must provide their own instruments and books.

CADET ORCHESTRA

(full year)

Grade level: 7
Prerequisite: 5th Grade Strings, Intermediate Orchestra or evidence of equivalent training
satisfactory to the instructor.
This is a performance-oriented course. Students continue to receive instruction in production of a good
tone, music reading skills, bowing, and left-hand techniques. The fundamentals of performance within an
orchestral ensemble will be developed. Students are prepared for the demands of the more advanced
orchestral literature performed in the Concert Orchestra. Orchestral literature in a variety of different styles
will be rehearsed and performed. Attendance at scheduled performances is mandatory and part of the
required class work.
Students are encouraged to participate in appropriate enrichment opportunities, such as private lessons, AllSuburban Honors Orchestra, All-District Honor Orchestra, Solo and Ensemble Festival, and the
Community Music School Youth Orchestra Program.
Students must provide their own instruments and books.

CONCERT ORCHESTRA

(full year)

Grade level: 8
Prerequisite: Cadet Orchestra or evidence of equivalent training satisfactory to the instructor.
This is a performance-oriented course. Training is provided in technical skills, music reading and in the
performance of a broad range of musical styles. More advanced orchestral literature is performed. Students
are prepared for the demands of the literature that will be performed in the high school orchestra.
Attendance at scheduled performances is mandatory and part of the required class work.
Students are encouraged to participate in appropriate enrichment opportunities, such as private lessons, AllSuburban Honors Orchestra, All-District Honor Orchestra, Solo and Ensemble Festival, and the
Community Music School Youth Orchestra.
Students must provide their own instruments and books.

119

Sixth Grade
Intermediate
Orchestra

120

Overview of Content and Skills for Sixth Grade Intermediate Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Tuning: open A and D string tuning with fine tuners
Tone Production: clear resonant tone using grade one repertoire
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on one finger
Bowing Skills: legato, staccato, hooked bows
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 1
Improvisation: improvise using notes of D major scale above and below the tonic and the octave;
Ensemble Playing: playing in five orchestral parts, (violin I, violin II, viola, cello, bass)
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading skills: accent, accidental, Allegro, Andante, crescendo, decrescendo, diminuendo, dotted quarter
note, dynamics, eighth rest, flat, fortissimo, Major, mezzo forte, mezzo piano, Moderato, pick up notes,
ritardando, sixteenth note, sixteenth rest
Sight-reading: Students will review a piece of early Grade 1 literature, develop a sight-reading plan, and
play at sight from a written composition.
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Perfect fourth
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Violin & Viola - A Major lower octave, F Major one octave, high 3 and low 1
Cello - A, F Major one octave, forward extension, backward extension;
Bass - C, F Major one octave position and 2nd position
C. Composition
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of D Major in 4/4 time signature using notes above and below the
tonic and octave.
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 1 literature on posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone
quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.
B. Form
Rondo, ABA
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Compare and contrast music and art of the Baroque period.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines
Compare and contrast team-building in orchestra and physical education.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will compare and contrast Baroque and Classical music.

121

Sixth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question

Missouri State Standards; Grade Level


Expectations
FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A6-8, PP2B6-8, PP2C6-8,
PP2E6-8

How do musicians express ideas through


performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Tuning: open A and D string tuning
with fine tuners
Tone Production: clear resonant tone
using grade one repertoire
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on one
finger
Bowing Skills: legato, staccato, hooked
bows
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 1
Improvisation: improvise using notes of
D major scale above and below the tonic
and the octave;
Ensemble Playing: playing in five
orchestral parts (violin I, violin II, viola,
cello, bass)

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will tune D and A strings using fine tuners.
Students will produce a clear resonant tone using grade one
repertoire.
Students will demonstrate vibrato motion on one finger.
Students will demonstrate legato, staccato, and hooked bows as
appropriate to Grade 1 repertoire.
Students will perform Grade 1 repertoire.
Students will improvise using notes of D major scale above and
below the tonic and the octave.
Students will play in ensembles with five orchestral parts.

Unit Vocabulary:
Legato, staccato, hooked bows, vibrato, improvise, tonic, octave, resonant, repertoire, fine tuner, tone,
weight, speed, and contact point, scale
Pre-Assessment:
Students will take playing tests to demonstrate readiness.
Students will play short passages of previous repertoire.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Students will complete
a diagram showing the
seating arrangement of
an ensemble.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their own part.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their own part
with their section.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their solo
with accompaniment.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling

Teaching Strategy:
Directing rehearsal

Teaching Strategy:
Guided practice

Assessment:
Students will explain
how an ensemble
functions.

Assessment:
Students will play their own
part for the teacher.

Assessment:
Students will play in
ensembles with five
orchestral parts.

Assessment:
Students will play a
solo as part of an
ensemble
performance.

122

Technology Integration:
Students record their performances for self-evaluation.
Students use music theory software on the computer.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students may be paired with less proficient students.
Advanced students may be given or may select solo or small ensemble pieces in addition to class repertoire.
Students are encouraged to take private lessons and participate in extracurricular performing groups.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I:
Student Tasks:
Students will tune D and A strings using fine tuners.
Students will produce a clear resonant tone using Grade 1 repertoire.
Students will demonstrate vibrato motion on one finger.
Students will demonstrate legato, staccato, and hooked bows as appropriate to Grade 1 repertoire.
Students will perform Grade 1 repertoire.
Students will improvise using notes of D major scale above and below the tonic and the octave.
Students will play in ensembles with five orchestral parts.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who choose to continue playing an instrument will build upon skills learned in this class.
Ensemble playing encourages team work.
Students learn self-discipline.
Students learn leadership skills.
Students learn to evaluate the quality of musical performances.
Students learn social skills.

123

Scoring Guide for Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO I: Performance Skills


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Promptly matches pitch

Matches pitch

Approximates pitch

Unable to match pitch

Produces a clear and resonant


tone

Produces a clear and resonant


tone

Produces an inconsistent
tone

Unclear tone

Bows using piano dynamic


while tuning

Bows using piano dynamic


while tuning

Bows too softly or too


loudly

Learning Target
Students will produce a
clear resonant tone using
grade one repertoire.

Always demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Consistently demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Sometimes demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
vibrato motion on one
finger.

Always demonstrates
appropriate:

Consistently demonstrates
appropriate:

Sometimes demonstrates
appropriate:

Rarely demonstrates
appropriate:

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion parallel


to fingerboard/strings

Learning Target
Students will tune D and A
strings using fine tuners.

124

Does not use bow while


turning fine tuners
Rarely demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
legato bowing style in
grade 1 repertoire.

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
staccato bowing style in
grade 1 repertoire.

Always demonstrates:

Consistently demonstrates:

Sometimes demonstrates:

Rarely demonstrates:

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow changes are smooth

Bow changes are smooth

Bow changes are smooth

Bow changes are smooth

Always demonstrates:

Consistently demonstrates:

Sometimes demonstrates:

Rarely demonstrates:

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow strokes are short and


separated

Bow strokes are short and


separated

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge
Bow strokes are short and
separated

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
hooked bowing style in
grade 1 repertoire.

Learning Target
Students will improvise
using notes of D major
scale above and below the
tonic and the octave.

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge
Bow strokes are short and
separated

Always demonstrates:

Consistently demonstrates:

Sometimes demonstrates:

Rarely demonstrates:

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow strokes are short and


separated

Bow strokes are short and


separated

Bow strokes are short and


separated

Bow strokes are short and


separated

Notes are played on the same


bow stroke

Notes are played on the same


bow stroke

Notes are played on the


same bow stroke

Notes are played on the same


bow stroke

Create a melodic and rhythmic


line.

Create a melodic line.

Modifies an existing melodic


line.

Copies anothers melodic


line.

Pitches remain within the key


of D Major

Pitches remain within the key


of D Major

Pitches remain within the key


of D Major

Pitches outside of the key of


D Major

125

Learning Target
Students will play in
ensembles with five
orchestral parts.

Follows teachers cues and


directions

Follows teachers cues and


directions

Follows teachers cues and


directions

Plays own part while


blending sound with section

Plays own part while


blending sound with section

Plays own part while


blending sound with section

Plays own part while


blending sound with section

Plays own part while


harmonizing with entire
group

Plays own part while


harmonizing with entire
group

Plays own part while


harmonizing with entire
group

Plays own part while


harmonizing with entire
group

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Models accurate playing


techniques for others

126

Learning Target
Students will perform Grade
1 repertoire.

Always Demonstrates:

Consistently Demonstrates:

Sometimes Demonstrates:

Rarely Demonstrates:

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively
according to composers
markings and style

127

Sixth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music. A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?
How do performers interpret the composers musical intentions?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Reading skills: accent, accidental,
Allegro, Andante, crescendo,
decrescendo, diminuendo, dotted quarter
note, dynamics, eighth rest, flat,
fortissimo, major, mezzo forte, mezzo
piano, Moderato, pick up notes,
ritardando, sixteenth note, sixteenth rest
Sight-reading: Analyze piece prior to
sight reading; sight-read music at early
Grade 1 level
Intervals Played and Sung (aural
training): Perfect fourth

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: PP1A6-8, EP1B6-8,
EP1C6-8, EP1E6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate
expression.

Students will review a piece of early Grade 1 literature, develop


a sight-reading plan, and play at sight from a written
composition.
Students will play and sing a perfect fourth.

Unit Vocabulary:
accent, accidental, Allegro, Andante, crescendo, decrescendo, diminuendo, dotted quarter note, dynamics,
eighth rest, flat, fortissimo, major, mezzo forte, mezzo piano, Moderato, pick up notes, ritardando, sixteenth
note, sixteenth rest
Pre-Assessment:
Students define symbols and terms.
Students perform playing tests from sight.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes. Use
flashcards to practice
identifying symbols and
terminology.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Demonstration

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Practice performing
symbols and terms.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice planning and
playing multiple pieces
at sight.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Identify symbols and
terminology of
expression.

Assessment:
Demonstrate each
symbol and expressive
term.

Assessment:
Students will review a
piece of early Grade 1
literature, develop a
sight-reading plan, and
play at sight from a
written composition.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

128

Technology Integration:
Use music theory software.
Use internet websites.
Use a metronome.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who know terms can teach them to others.
Students can create flash cards for use in memorizing terms.
Students create posters that teach the terms.
Students can read music and listen to a partner as he/she sight-reads.
Application Level Assessment for CCO II A:
Student Task(s):
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate expression.
Students will review a piece of early Grade 1 literature, develop a sight-reading plan, and play at sight from
a written composition.
Students will play and sing a perfect fourth.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who continue in music will use reading skills to play more advanced literature.
Students will be able to read a new piece of music and understand the composers musical intentions.
Students will be able to perform expressively.

129

Scoring Guide for Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIA, Music Reading Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Students will perform
repertoire using grade level
appropriate expression.

Performs all of the expressive


symbols and markings in
repertoire.

Performs most of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs some of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs few of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Learning Target:
Students will review a
piece of early Grade 1
literature, develop a sightreading plan, and play at
sight from a written
composition.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Ineffective review.

Performs with accurate:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with few errors in:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with many errors


in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performance addresses few


categories and makes many
errors in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Learning Target:
Students will play and sing
a perfect fourth.

Not applicable

Matches both pitches in


appropriate range

Matches one pitch and


approximately matches the
other pitch

Approximately matches both


pitch

130

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Sixth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Violin & Viola - A Major lower octave,
F Major one octave, high 3 and low 1

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: EP1B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to play:
Violin and viola students will play scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger patterns: A Major lower octave, F Major
one octave, high 3 and low 1.

Cello - A, F Major one octave, forward


extension, backward extension;

Cello students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and


finger patterns: A, F Major one octave, forward extension, and
backward extension.

Bass - C, F Major one octave position


and 2nd position

Bass students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and


finger patterns: C, F Major one octave position, and 2nd
position.

Unit Vocabulary:
Major scale, position, extension, octave, fingering, patterns
Pre-Assessment:
Students play one octave scales in each key.
Students write out the scales.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash cards
Practice scale fingerings Practice pieces.
and finger patterns.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Guided Practice
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Identify the key
Play F Major scale using Perform pieces in key of
signature and scale on
appropriate fingerings
F Major.
paper.
and finger patterns.
Technology Integration:
Students practice using internet-based software.
Students use music theory software to compose.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play two-octave scales.
Play a scale using alternate fingerings.

131

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a short melody
in the key of F Major.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Use a scoring guide to
assess an original
composition.

Application Level Assessment for CCO IIB


Student Task(s):
Violin and viola students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: A Major lower
octave, F Major one octave, high 3 and low 1.
Cello students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: A, F Major one octave,
forward extension, and backward extension.
Bass students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: C, F Major one octave
position, and 2nd position.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to sight-read passages with greater fluency.
Students will improve intonation.
Students will be better able to play in various key signatures.

132

Scoring Guide for Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCOIIB: Finger Patterns and Scales
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Learning Target:
Violin and viola students
will play scales using
appropriate fingerings and
finger patterns: A Major
lower octave, F Major one
octave, high 3 and low 1.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Learning Target:
Cello students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: A, F Major one
octave, forward extension,
and backward extension.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Learning Target:
Bass students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: C, F Major one
octave position, and 2nd
position.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

133

Sixth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to compose a melody in the key of
D Major using notes above and below
the tonic and octave.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, PP4A6-8, EP1B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of D Major in 4/4
time signature using notes above and below the tonic and
octave.

Unit Vocabulary: tonic, octave, clef sign, measure, bar lines, key signature, time signature, whole note,
half note, quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note, note names, staff
Pre-Assessment: Students compose two measures in D Major.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, read a
Take notes, read a
Practice composing and
handout or article that
handout or article that
sharing feedback with
describes characteristics describes characteristics peers.
of a good melody.
of a good melody.
Discuss examples.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Describe the qualities of Critique a melody using Write an eight-measure
a good melody.
qualities of a good
melody in the key of D
melody.
Major in 4/4 time
signature using notes
above and below the
tonic and octave.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research compositions.
Practice composing and
sharing feedback with
peers.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Write an extended
composition with a
harmonized melody.

Technology Integration: Students will use a music notation program such as Finale or Sibelius.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students may write in two parts or write a longer composition.
Students with less readiness may write a shorter piece or a piece with limited pitch range.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC
Student Task(s):
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of D Major in 4/4 time signature using notes above and below
the tonic and octave.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that composing is a career option.
Students will better appreciate the work of composers.
Musical composition skills will lead to better music reading skills.

134

Scoring Guide for Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIC: Composition


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Write an eight-measure
melody in the key of D
Major in 4/4 time signature
using notes above and
below the tonic and octave.

4
Advanced
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Four beats in a measure
Eight or more measures
Melodic line in the key of D
Expressive symbols
Bowing

3
Proficient
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Four beats in a measure
Eight measures
Melodic line in the key of D
Bowing

135

2
Basic
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Four beats in a measure
Less than eight measures
Melodic line in the key of D

1
Below Basic
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Melodic line

Sixth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to evaluate performance.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G1.5, AP2A6-8, AP2B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Respond to and critique a performance on posture, left hand shape,
bow hold, tone quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm,
and dynamics.

Unit Vocabulary: music criticism, posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics
Pre-Assessment: Respond to and critique a short excerpt.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Listen to and watch
Reflect upon and discuss
excerpts of two
performances in class.
performances of the
same work.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion,
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Define criteria used to
evaluate musical
performance.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
two performances on
aspects of quality.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion on
personal responses to
music, Guided Practice
Assessment:
Respond to and critique a
performance on posture,
left hand shape, bow hold,
tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing),
rhythm, and dynamics.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research a piece of
music prior to attending
a live performance of the
work. Take notes during
the performance.
Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided
Practice

Assessment:
Write an in-depth
critique and present it to
a group.

Technology Integration:
Watch and listen to performance on-line.
Use audio-visual resources.
Type critiques on the computer.
Audio or videotape and then critique students performances.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who need more structure could complete a graphic organizer.
Students with advanced writing skills could write a performance critique for a newspaper.
Students could work alone or with a partner to critique a performance.

136

Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA:


Student Task(s):
Respond to and critique a performance on posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to apply analytical skills to other subjects.
Students who continue to study music will apply critique skills to musical works.
Students will have a life-long appreciation of music.

137

Music Criticism Scoring Guide


Criteria

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Introduction
Tells plan to critique. Gives
information about the work:
composers name,
musicians name, title of
piece, when and where it
was created, how it was
used, time period, style, or
culture.
Description
Sentences that list
everything heard or seen in
the performance, including
names of instruments
Analysis
Analyzes work to determine
how each applies: posture,
left hand shape, bow hold,
tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing),
rhythm, and dynamics.

Clearly states plan to


critique another artists
work. All available
information is given.

States plan to critique


another artists work.
Most available
information is given.

Artists work is
mentioned. Tells
artists name and
title.

Artists name or
title of work
listed.

Logical, coherent,
complete, detailed
description of what is
seen/heard in the
performance.
Considers each element to
determine which are most
important in the work.
Explains, in detail, how
and where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.

Complete description of
what is seen/heard in
the work.

Complete description
of what is seen/heard
in the work but
slightly unorganized.
Lists elements used.
Tells how or where
some elements and
principles are used in
the work.

Interpretation
Relates personal, cultural,
and emotional responses to
the piece.
Justifies statements with
reference to the work.

Clearly infers meaning of


work based upon analysis
and personal response.
Clearly supports
statements with detailed,
specific reference to all
musical elements.

Considers elements to
determine which are
most important in the
work. Explains how
and where each
important element and
principle is used in the
work.
Interprets the meaning
of work based upon
analysis and personal
response.
Supports statements
with reference to most
musical elements.

Random
mention of one
or two details
seen/heard in the
work.
Partially lists
elements.

Judgment
Evaluates the quality of the
performance.

Evaluates the quality of


the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation, technique
articulation, and
expression or
musicianship. Supports
all statements with
specific, detailed reference
to the work.
Free of errors.
Consistently uses third
person. Uses
sophisticated sentence
variety, precise
vocabulary. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

Evaluates the quality of


the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
and expression or
musicianship. Supports
most statements with
reference to the work.

Discusses the
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique
articulation, or
expression/musicians
hip. Few references
to the work to
support statements.

Few minor errors in


spelling or grammar.
Uses third person.
Some sentence variety,
appropriate vocabulary.
All steps of critique
model in correct order.

Errors in grammar
and spelling without
affecting clarity.
Some use of first
person. Little
sentence variety.
All steps of critique
model present but out
of order.

Mechanics
Grammar, Style, Form

138

Suggests a meaning
of the work.
Supports statements
with reference to
some musical
elements.

Suggests
meaning of the
work.
Supports
statements with
reference to few
musical
elements.
States personal
opinion.

Multiple
grammatical
errors interfere
with content and
readability.
Doesnt use
third person.

Sixth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Characteristics of forms

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA3, G1.5, AP1A6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast rondo and ABA forms.

Rondo
ABACA
Repeats musical sections with
contrasting sections in between
ABA
First and last sections are the same
Contrasting middle section
Unit Vocabulary: rondo, ABA, form
Pre-Assessment: Students list characteristics of rondo and ABA forms.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Write definitions
Discuss examples of
Create melodic lines in
rondo and ABA forms.
small groups.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction, Class Guided Practice
discussion
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of
Compare and contrast
Compose a short piece
rondo and ABA forms.
rondo and ABA forms.
in rondo or ABA form.
Technology Integration:
Use notation software to compose.
Use online and library sources to research rondo and ABA forms.
Use word processing software to compare and contrast.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a chart/poster that visually compares and contrasts rondo and ABA forms.
Compose a shorter or longer piece in rondo or ABA form.
Compose a two-part piece in rondo or ABA form.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast rondo and ABA forms.

139

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not applicable.
Teaching Strategy:
Not applicable.
Assessment:
Not applicable.

How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?


Students will understand that music is organized sound.
Students will apply organization of ideas in music to other disciplines.
Students as audience members will better understand musical ideas through knowledge of musical forms.

140

Scoring Guide for Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIIB Form


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
rondo and ABA forms.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates characteristics of
rondo and ABA forms using
examples.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
characteristics of rondo and
ABA forms using examples.

141

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
rondo and ABA forms using
examples.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of rondo
and ABA forms.

Sixth Grade Orchestra, 6-19-08


Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Baroque Music:
Complex composition, technical difficulty
Ornamentation
Contrast of dynamics and textures
Communicates moods and emotions
Functions are sacred and secular
Influenced by dance styles
Form is organization of musical ideas

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, IC1A6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should
be able to do:
Compare and contrast Baroque music and art.

Baroque Art:
Complex composition, has many shapes
Ornamentation, decorative
Contrast of light and dark in art
Communicates moods and emotions
Functions: Decorate buildings and homes of
aristocracy
Form means real or illusion of depth
Unit Vocabulary: imitation, symmetry, ornamentation
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Baroque music and art.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will
Student will independently
investigate
research Baroque music and
Baroque music and art using online and library
art in cooperative
resources. Student will give
groups.
an audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching
Teaching Strategy: Teaching Strategy:
Strategy:
Cooperative
Guided Practice
Direct Instruction
Learning
Model
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics Compare and
Audio-visual presentation to
of both Baroque
contrast Baroque
class.
music and art.
music and art.

142

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will independently
research Baroque music and art
using online and library
resources.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Collaboration with
Art teachers, Guided Practice
Assessment:
Compose a piece of music in
the Baroque style and select
artworks that would decorate a
concert hall in which it would
be performed.

Technology Integration:
Students will use the computer and library resources to research Baroque music and art.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Baroque music and art.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Baroque music and art.
Create examples of Baroque music and art.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast Baroque music and art.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and art created in the same time and place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different art forms.

143

Scoring Guide Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO IVA: Connections between Baroque music and art
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
Baroque music and art.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Baroque music and
art.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Baroque music and art.

144

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Baroque music and art.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Baroque music or art.

Sixth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Team-Building in Music
Cooperative play (ensemble
playing)
Problem-solving
Decision-making
Leadership
Team strategies
Risk-taking
Self-Control
Respect

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.10, IC1B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast team-building in orchestra and physical
education.

Team-Building in Physical Education


Cooperative play (sports)
Problem-solving
Decision-making
Leadership
Team strategies
Risk-taking
Self-Control
Respect
Unit Vocabulary: cooperative play, problem-solving, decision-making, leadership, team strategies, risktaking, self-control, respect
Pre-Assessment: Define terms.

145

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will participate Identify problems in the
in team-building
ensemble and then use
exercises. Discuss how
team-building strategies
they apply concepts (ie.
to develop solutions.
Leadership) in both
music and physical
education classes.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Assessment:
Write definitions for
characteristics of teambuilding in music and
physical education.

Teaching Strategy:
Facilitating teambuilding exercises.
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
team-building in music
and physical education.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
team-building strategies
using online and library
resources.
Prepare a lesson plan for
teaching another student
how team-building is
used in both music and
physical education
classes.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Present several
alternative solutions to
the problem.

Assessment:
Facilitate a group teambuilding exercise in
music class.

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research team-building.
Write comparisons using word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts team-building in music and physical education.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting team-building in music and physical education.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast team-building in orchestra and physical education.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and physical education use similar team-building strategies.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different disciplines.

146

Scoring Guide for Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO IVB: Compare and contrast team-building in orchestra and health/physical education.
Learning Target
Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
team-building in orchestra
and physical education.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates strategies for teambuilding in music and physical
education.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
strategies for team-building in
music and physical education.

147

2
Basic
Explains strategies for teambuilding in music and
physical education.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
strategies for team-building in
music or physical education.

Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO V


Core Conceptual Objective V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and historical events?

Missouri State Standards


FA5, G1.9, HC1A6-8,
HC1B6-8, HC1C6-8,
HC1D6-8

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Style/Genre/Period
Baroque Period
Classical Period
Time/Place when composed

1600-1750, Europe

1775-1825, Europe & America

Composer(s)

Bach

Beethoven

Form

Concerto

Theme and Variation

Characteristics of Music (clues


used to identify it)

Complex composition, technical


difficulty
Ornamentation
Contrast of dynamics and textures
Communicates moods and
emotions
Influenced by dance styles

Function in society
Historical Context
What was happening at that time
and place? (war/peace, science,
technology, type of
government)
Who were the musicians?
What training did they have?
Who were audience members?

Sacred
Some secular entertainment
Conflict between church and
scientific innovation and
discovery
Musicians employed by church
and aristocracy
Musicians trained through
apprenticeship
Audience: parish and courts

Contemporary Context
When/where is this music played
today?
How did this music influence
current musicians/composers?

Performed in secular venues and


churches
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

Formal structure
Symmetrical
Simple melody line
Ornamentation
Gradual dynamic changes
Communicates moods and
emotions
Syncopation
Secular entertainment
Some sacred
Sacred music becomes less
prominent
Musicians still employed by
church and aristocracy but they
become entrepreneurs who earn
money from publications of their
music and ticket sales to their
performances
Musicians trained through
apprenticeship
Audience: primarily aristocracy
and church, but middle class is
emerging
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

148

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will compare and contrast Baroque and Classical music.
Unit Vocabulary: ornamentation, parish, Baroque, Classical, entrepreneurs, texture, syncopation,
dynamics, secular, sacred, apprenticeship, aristocracy
Pre-Assessment: List the characteristics of Baroque and Classical music.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will investigate
Baroque and Classical
music in cooperative
groups.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
Baroque and Classical
music.

Assessment:
List characteristics of
Baroque and Classical
music.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
the Baroque and
Classical periods using
computer-based and
library resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Students will give a
presentation.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Students use online and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students use word processing software to write comparison.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Baroque and Classical music.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Baroque and Classical music.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast Baroque and Classical music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music serves many functions/purposes in historical context.
Students will understand that contemporary music is influenced by music from the Baroque and Classical
periods.

149

Scoring Guide for Sixth Grade Orchestra, CCO V: Music in historical and cultural context
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will compare and
contrast Baroque and
Classical music.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Baroque and
Classical music.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Baroque and Classical music.

150

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Baroque and Classical
music.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Baroque and Classical music.

Seventh Grade
Cadet Orchestra

151

Overview of Content and Skills for Seventh Grade Cadet Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Tuning: all open string tuning with fine tuners
Tone Production: clear resonant tone using grade two repertoire
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on one finger while bowing
Bowing Skills: tremolo, unanchored pizzicato
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 2
Improvisation: improvise using notes of G major scale with varied rhythms
Ensemble Playing: sectional rehearsal skills
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading skills: 6/8 meter, arpeggio, chord, double stop, ensemble, fortissimo, harmonic, interval, left-hand
pizzicato, phrase, pianissimo, simile, solo, syncopation, triplet
Sight-reading: Analyze piece prior to sight-reading; sight-read music at Grade 1 level
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Major third
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Violin - G, D, A Major two octaves, Bb Major, d minor, one octave, 3rd pos. low 4th finger, shift on same
finger
Viola - C, G, D Major two octaves, Bb Major, d minor one octave, 3rd pos, low 4th finger, shift same finger
Cello - C, G, D Major two octave Bb Major, d minor one octave, 4th pos, shift same finger
Bass - B-flat, C, G, D Major, one-octave; d minor one-octave
C. Composition
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of G Major.
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 2 literature on posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone
quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.
B. Form
Jig, Waltz
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will compare and contrast Romantic music and dance.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines
Compare strategies for reading music with those for reading text.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will compare and contrast Classical and Romantic music.

152

Seventh Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question

Missouri State Standards; Grade Level


Expectations
FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A6-8, PP2B6-8, PP2C6-8,
PP2E6-8

How do musicians express ideas through


performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Tuning: all open string tuning with fine
tuners
Tone Production: clear resonant tone
using grade two repertoire
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on one
finger while bowing
Bowing Skills: tremolo, unanchored
pizzicato
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 2
Improvisation: improvise using notes of
G major scale with varied rhythms
Ensemble Playing: sectional rehearsal
skills

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will tune all strings using fine tuners.
Students will produce a clear resonant tone using grade two
repertoire.
Students will demonstrate vibrato motion on one finger while
bowing.
Students will demonstrate tremolo and unanchored pizzicato as
appropriate to Grade 2 repertoire.
Students will perform Grade 2 repertoire.
Students will improvise using notes of G major scale with
varied rhythms.
Students will play in sectional rehearsals.

Unit Vocabulary: tremolo, unanchored pizzicato, vibrato, improvise, tonic, octave, resonant, repertoire,
fine tuner, tone, weight, speed, and contact point, scale, sectional
Pre-Assessment:
Students will take playing tests to demonstrate readiness.
Students will play short passages of previous repertoire.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Students will complete
a diagram showing the
seating arrangement of
a section.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their own part.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their own part
with their section.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their solo
with accompaniment.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling

Teaching Strategy:
Directing sectional

Teaching Strategy:
Guided practice

Assessment:
Students will explain
how a section
functions.

Assessment:
Students will play their own
part for the teacher.

Assessment:
Students will play in
sectional rehearsals.

Assessment:
Students will play a
solo as part of a
sectional rehearsal.

Technology Integration:
Students record their performances for self-evaluation.
Students use music theory software on the computer.

153

Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students may be paired with less proficient students.
Advanced students may be given the opportunity to lead the sectional.
Students are encouraged to take private lessons and participate in extracurricular performing groups.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I:
Student Tasks:
Students will tune all strings using fine tuners.
Students will produce a clear resonant tone using grade two repertoire.
Students will demonstrate vibrato motion on one finger while bowing.
Students will demonstrate tremolo and unanchored pizzicato as appropriate to Grade 2 repertoire.
Students will perform Grade 2 repertoire.
Students will improvise using notes of G major scale with varied rhythms.
Students will play in sectional rehearsals.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who choose to continue playing an instrument will build upon skills learned in this class.
Sectional playing encourages team work.
Students learn self-discipline.
Students learn leadership skills.
Students learn to evaluate the quality of musical performances.
Students learn social skills.

154

Scoring Guide for Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO I: Performance Skills


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Promptly matches pitch

Matches pitch

Approximates pitch

Unable to match pitch

Produces a clear and resonant


tone

Produces a clear and resonant


tone

Produces an inconsistent
tone

Unclear tone

Bows using piano dynamic


while tuning

Bows using piano dynamic


while tuning

Bows too softly or too


loudly

Learning Target
Students will produce a
clear resonant tone using
grade two repertoire.

Always demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Consistently demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Sometimes demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Rarely demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
tremolo as appropriate to
Grade 2 repertoire.

Always demonstrates:

Consistently demonstrates:

Sometimes demonstrates:

Rarely demonstrates:

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Tremolo in upper half of bow

Tremolo in upper half of bow

Tremolo in upper half of


bow

Tremolo in upper half of bow

Flexible right wrist

Flexible right wrist

Learning Target
Students will tune all
strings using fine tuners.

Does not use bow while


turning fine tuners

Flexible right wrist


Flexible right wrist

Small, quick motions with


bow

Small, quick motions with


bow

155

Small, quick motions with


bow

Small, quick motions with


bow

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
vibrato motion on one
finger while bowing.

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
unanchored pizzicato as
appropriate to Grade 2
repertoire.

Always demonstrates
appropriate:

Consistently demonstrates
appropriate:

Sometimes demonstrates
appropriate:

Rarely demonstrates
appropriate:

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion parallel


to fingerboard/strings

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Always demonstrates:

Consistently demonstrates:

Sometimes demonstrates:

Rarely demonstrates:

Solid hold on bow with three


fingers and thumb

Solid hold on bow with three


fingers and thumb

Solid hold on bow with


three fingers and thumb

Solid hold on bow with three


fingers and thumb

Index finger as pizzicato


finger

Index finger as pizzicato


finger

Index finger as pizzicato


finger

Index finger as pizzicato


finger

Pizzicato over the fingerboard

Pizzicato over the fingerboard

Pizzicato over the


fingerboard

Pizzicato over the fingerboard

156

Learning Target
Students will improvise
using notes of G major
scale with varied rhythms.

Creates a melodic and


rhythmic line.
Pitches remain within the key
of G Major

Creates a melodic line.


Pitches remain within the key
of G Major

Modifies an existing melodic


line.

Copies anothers melodic


line.

Pitches remain within the key


of G Major

Pitches outside of the key of


G Major

Rhythms are varied

Rhythms are the same


Plays own part while
blending sound with section

Rhythms are varied


Rhythms are varied
Learning Target
Students will play in sectional
rehearsals.

Follows teachers cues and


directions

Follows teachers cues and


directions

Follows teachers cues and


directions

Plays own part while


blending sound with section

Plays own part while


blending sound with section

Plays own part while


blending sound with section

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Models accurate playing


techniques for others

157

Learning Target
Students will perform Grade
2 repertoire.

Always Demonstrates:

Consistently Demonstrates:

Sometimes Demonstrates:

Rarely Demonstrates:

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively
according to composers
markings and style

158

Seventh Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music. A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?
How do performers interpret the composers musical intentions?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Reading skills: 6/8 meter, arpeggio,
chord, double stop, ensemble, fortissimo,
harmonic, interval, left-hand pizzicato,
phrase, pianissimo, simile, solo,
syncopation, triplet
Sight-reading: Analyze piece prior to
sight-reading; sight-read music at Grade
1 level
Intervals Played and Sung (aural
training): Major third

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: PP1A6-8, EP1B6-8,
EP1C6-8, EP1E6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate
expression.

Students will review a piece of Grade 1 literature, develop a


sight-reading plan, and play at sight from a written composition.
Students will play and sing a major third.

Unit Vocabulary: 6/8 meter, arpeggio, chord, double stop, ensemble, fortissimo, harmonic, interval, lefthand pizzicato, major third, phrase, pianissimo, simile, solo, syncopation, triplet
Pre-Assessment:
Students define symbols and terms.
Students perform playing tests from sight.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes. Use
flashcards to practice
identifying symbols and
terminology.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Demonstration

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Practice performing
symbols and terms.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice planning and
playing multiple pieces
at sight.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Identify symbols and
terminology of
expression.

Assessment:
Demonstrate each
symbol and expressive
term.

Assessment:
Students will review a
piece of Grade 1
literature, develop a
sight-reading plan, and
play at sight from a
written composition.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Use music theory software.
Use internet websites.
Use a metronome.

159

Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who know terms can teach them to others.
Students can create flash cards for use in memorizing terms.
Students create posters that teach the terms.
Students can read music and listen to a partner as he/she sight-reads.
Application Level Assessment for CCO II A:
Student Task(s):
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate expression.
Students will review a piece of Grade 1 literature, develop a sight-reading plan, and play at sight from a
written composition.
Students will play and sing a major third.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who continue in music will use reading skills to play more advanced literature.
Students will be able to read a new piece of music and understand the composers musical intentions.
Students will be able to perform expressively.

160

Scoring Guide for Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO IIA, Music Reading Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Students will perform
repertoire using grade level
appropriate expression.

Performs all of the expressive


symbols and markings in
repertoire.

Performs most of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs some of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs few of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Learning Target:
Students will review a
piece of Grade 1 literature,
develop a sight-reading
plan, and play at sight from
a written composition.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Ineffective review.

Performs with accurate:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with few errors in:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with many errors


in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performance addresses few


categories and makes many
errors in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Learning Target:
Students will play and sing
a major third.

Not applicable

Matches both pitches in


appropriate range

Matches one pitch and


approximately matches the
other pitch

Approximately matches both


pitches

161

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Seventh Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: EP1B6-8

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Violin - G, D, A Major two octaves; Bb
Major, d minor one octave, 3rd position,
low 4th finger, shift on same finger

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to play:
Violin students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and
finger patterns: G, D, A Major two octaves; Bb Major, d minor
one octave, 3rd position, low 4th finger, shifting on same finger.

Viola - C, G, D Major two octaves; Bb


Major, d minor one octave, 3rd position,
low 4th finger, shift on same finger

Viola students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and


finger patterns: C, G, D Major two octaves; Bb Major, d minor
one octave, 3rd position, low 4th finger, shifting on same finger.

Cello - C, G, D Major two octaves; Bb


Major, d minor one octave, 4th position,
shift on same finger

Cello students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and


finger patterns: C, G, D Major two octaves; Bb Major, d minor
one octave, 4th position, shifting on same finger.

Bass - Bb, C, G, D Major, one-octave; d


minor one-octave

Bass students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and


finger patterns: Bb, C, G, D Major, one-octave; d minor oneoctave.

Unit Vocabulary: Major scale, minor scale, position, extension, octave, fingering, patterns, flat, shifting
Pre-Assessment:
Students play one octave scales in each key.
Students write out the scales.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash cards
Practice scale fingerings Practice pieces.
and finger patterns.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Guided Practice
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Identify the key
Play Bb Major scale
Perform pieces in key of
signature and scale on
using appropriate
Bb Major.
paper.
fingerings and finger
patterns.
Technology Integration:
Students practice using internet-based software.
Students use music theory software to compose.

162

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a short melody
in the key of Bb Major.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Use a scoring guide to
assess an original
composition.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play two-octave scales.
Play a scale using alternate fingerings.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIB
Student Task(s):
Violin students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: G, D, A Major two
octaves; Bb Major, d minor one octave, 3rd position, low 4th finger, shifting on same finger.
Viola students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: C, G, D Major two
octaves; Bb Major, d minor one octave, 3rd position, low 4th finger, shifting on same finger.
Cello students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: C, G, D Major two
octaves; Bb Major, d minor one octave, 4th position, shifting on same finger.
Bass students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: Bb, C, G, D Major, oneoctave; d minor one-octave.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to sight-read passages with greater fluency.
Students will improve intonation.
Students will be better able to play in various key signatures.

163

Scoring Guide for Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCOIIB: Finger Patterns and Scales
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Learning Target:
Violin students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: G, D, A Major
two octaves; Bb Major, d
minor one octave, 3rd
position, low 4th finger,
shifting on same finger.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Learning Target:
Viola students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: C, G, D Major
two octaves; Bb Major, d
minor one octave, 3rd
position, low 4th finger,
shifting on same finger.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Learning Target:
Cello students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: C, G, D Major
two octaves; Bb Major, d
minor one octave, 4th
position, shifting on same
finger.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

164

Learning Target:
Bass students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: Bb, C, G, D
Major, one-octave; d minor
one-octave.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

165

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Seventh Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to compose an eight-measure
melody in the key of G Major.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, PP4A6-8, EP1B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will write an eight-measure melody in the key of G
Major in 3/4 time signature.

Unit Vocabulary: Clef sign, measure, bar lines, key signature, time signature, whole note, half note,
quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note, note names, staff
Pre-Assessment: Students compose two measures in G Major.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, read a
Take notes, read a
Practice composing and
handout or article that
handout or article that
sharing feedback with
describes characteristics describes characteristics peers.
of a good melody.
of a good melody.
Discuss examples.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research compositions.
Practice composing and
sharing feedback with
peers.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction,
Modeling

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Describe the qualities of
a good melody.

Assessment:
Critique a melody using
qualities of a good
melody.

Assessment:
Write an eight-measure
melody in the key of G
Major in 3/4 time
signature.

Assessment:
Write an extended
composition with a
harmonized melody.

Technology Integration:
Students will use a music notation program such as Finale or Sibelius.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students may write in two parts or write a longer composition.
Students with less readiness may write a shorter piece or a piece with limited pitch range.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC
Student Task(s):
Students will write an eight-measure melody in the key of G Major in 3/4 time signature.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that composing is a career option.
Students will better appreciate the work of composers.
Musical composition skills will lead to better music reading skills.

166

Scoring Guide for Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO IIC: Composition


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will write an
eight-measure melody in
the key of G Major in 3/4
time signature.

4
Advanced
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Three beats in a measure
Eight or more measures
Melodic line in the key of G
Expressive symbols
Bowing

3
Proficient
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Three beats in a measure
Eight measures
Melodic line in the key of G
Bowing

167

2
Basic
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Three beats in a measure
Less than eight measures
Melodic line in the key of G

1
Below Basic
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Melodic line

Seventh Grade Orchestra 6-20-08


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to evaluate performance.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G1.5, AP2A6-8, AP2B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 2 literature on
posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.

Unit Vocabulary:
Music criticism, posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm,
and dynamics
Pre-Assessment:
Respond to and critique a short excerpt.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Listen to and watch
Reflect upon and discuss
excerpts of two
performances in class.
performances of the
same work.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion, Guided
Practice

Assessment:
Define criteria used to
evaluate musical
performance.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
two performances on
aspects of quality.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion on
personal responses to
music, Guided Practice
Assessment:
Respond to and critique
a performance on
posture, left hand shape,
bow hold, tone quality,
intonation, articulation
(bowing), rhythm, and
dynamics.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research a piece of
music prior to attending
a live performance of
the work. Take notes
during the performance.
Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided
Practice

Assessment:
Write an in-depth
critique and present it to
a group.

Technology Integration:
Watch and listen to performance on-line.
Use audio-visual resources.
Type critiques on the computer.
Audio or videotape and then critique students performances.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who need more structure could complete a graphic organizer.
Students with advanced writing skills could write a performance critique for a newspaper.
Students could work alone or with a partner to critique a performance.

168

Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA:


Student Task(s):
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 2 literature on posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone
quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to apply analytical skills to other subjects.
Students who continue to study music will apply critique skills to musical works.
Students will have a life-long appreciation of music.

169

Music Criticism Scoring Guide


Criteria
4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Introduction
Tells plan to critique. Gives
information about the work:
composers name,
musicians name, title of
piece, when and where it was
created, how it was used,
time period, style, or culture.
Description
Sentences that list everything
heard or seen in the
performance, including
names of instruments
Analysis
Analyzes work to determine
how each applies: posture,
left hand shape, bow hold,
tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing),
rhythm, and dynamics.

Clearly states plan to


critique another artists
work. All available
information is given.

States plan to critique


another artists work.
Most available
information is given.

Artists work is
mentioned. Tells
artists name and title.

Artists name or
title of work
listed.

Logical, coherent,
complete, detailed
description of what is
seen/heard in the
performance.
Considers each element to
determine which are most
important in the work.
Explains, in detail, how
and where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.

Complete description of
what is seen/heard in
the work.

Complete description
of what is seen/heard
in the work but
slightly unorganized.

Random mention
of one or two
details seen/heard
in the work.

Lists elements used.


Tells how or where
some elements and
principles are used in
the work.

Partially lists
elements.

Interpretation
Relates personal, cultural,
and emotional responses to
the piece.
Justifies statements with
reference to the work.

Clearly infers meaning of


work based upon analysis
and personal response.
Clearly supports
statements with detailed,
specific reference to all
musical elements.
Evaluates the quality of
the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation, technique
articulation, and
expression or
musicianship. Supports
all statements with
specific, detailed reference
to the work.
Free of errors.
Consistently uses third
person. Uses
sophisticated sentence
variety, precise
vocabulary. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

Considers elements to
determine which are
most important in the
work. Explains how
and where each
important element and
principle is used in the
work.
Interprets the meaning
of work based upon
analysis and personal
response.
Supports statements
with reference to most
musical elements.
Evaluates the quality of
the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
and expression or
musicianship. Supports
most statements with
reference to the work.

Suggests a meaning of
the work.
Supports statements
with reference to
some musical
elements.

Suggests meaning
of the work.
Supports
statements with
reference to few
musical elements.

Discusses the
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
or
expression/musiciansh
ip. Few references to
the work to support
statements.

States personal
opinion.

Few minor errors in


spelling or grammar.
Uses third person.
Some sentence variety,
appropriate vocabulary.
All steps of critique
model in correct order.

Errors in grammar and


spelling without
affecting clarity.
Some use of first
person. Little
sentence variety. All
steps of critique
model present but out
of order.

Multiple
grammatical
errors interfere
with content and
readability.
Doesnt use third
person.

Judgment
Evaluates the quality of the
performance.

Mechanics
Grammar, Style, Form

170

Seventh Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Characteristics of forms
Jig

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA3, G1.5, AP1A6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast jig and waltz forms.

Type of folk dance


Time signature 6/8
Fast tempo
Strong, clear tune
Simple harmony
Structure: Two 8-bar sections
Originated in Ireland

Waltz
Type of ballroom dance
Time signature 3/4
Fast tempo
Oom cha cha accompaniment
Strong, clear tune
Simple harmony
Originated in Austria
Unit Vocabulary: jig, dance, harmony, triple meter, waltz, form
Pre-Assessment: Students list characteristics of jig and waltz forms.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Write definitions
Discuss examples of jig
Create melodic lines in
and waltz forms.
small groups.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction, Class Guided Practice
discussion
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of jig Compare and contrast
Compose a short piece
and waltz forms.
jig and waltz forms.
in jig or waltz form.

Technology Integration:
Use notation software to compose.
Complete a Venn diagram.
Use online and library sources to research jig and waltz forms.
Use word processing software to compare and contrast.

171

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not applicable.
Teaching Strategy:
Not applicable.
Assessment:
Not applicable.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a chart/poster that visually compares and contrasts jig and waltz forms.
Compose a shorter or longer piece in jig and waltz form.
Compose a two-part piece in jig and waltz form.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast jig and waltz forms.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music is organized sound.
Students will apply organization of ideas in music to other disciplines.
Students as audience members will better understand musical ideas through knowledge of musical forms.

172

Scoring Guide for Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO IIIB Form


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast jig
and waltz forms.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Compares, contrasts, and


evaluates characteristics of jig
and waltz forms using
examples.

Compares and contrasts


characteristics of jig and waltz
forms using examples.

173

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
jig and waltz forms using
examples.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of jig and
waltz forms

Seventh Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Romantic Music:
Concert music
Expansion of formal structures
Asymmetrical melodies
Intense, lyrical melodies
Heavy, powerful texture
Wide range of pitch, dynamics, and tone color
Communicates moods and emotions
Heavier brass section
Syncopation and complex rhythms
Nationalism/patriotism
Audiences are all classes of society
Academically trained musicians

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, IC1A6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should
be able to do:
Compare and contrast Romantic music and
dance.

Romantic Dance:
Concert dance - Ballet
Formal structure
Introduction of dancing on point (on toes)
Communicates moods and emotions
Graceful movements
Nationalism/patriotism
Social dance waltz was considered inappropriate
since partners had a closed embrace
Academically trained dancers
Unit Vocabulary: Romantic, expression, formal structure, composition, musical idea, virtuoso, ballet,
nationalism, patriotism, syncopation, asymmetrical melody
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Romantic music and dance.

174

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will investigate Student will
Romantic music and
independently research
dance in cooperative
Romantic music and
groups.
dance using online and
library resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Cooperative Learning
Guided Practice
Model
Assessment:
List characteristics of
both Romantic music
and dance.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
Romantic music and
dance.

Assessment:
Audio-visual
presentation to class.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
Romantic music and
dance using online and
library resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Collaboration
with Art teachers,
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Compose a piece of
music in the Romantic
style and choreograph a
dance in the Romantic
style.

Technology Integration:
Students will use online and library resources to research Romantic music and dance.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Romantic music and dance.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Romantic music and dance.
Create examples of Romantic music and dance.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast Romantic music and dance.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and art created in the same time and place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different art forms.

175

Scoring Guide Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO IVA: Connections between Romantic music and dance
Learning Target

4
Advanced

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
Romantic music and dance.

Compares, contrasts, and


evaluates Romantic music and
dance.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Romantic music and dance.

176

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Romantic music and dance.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Romantic music or dance.

Seventh Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Music
Analyze music text to determine:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Tempo
Accidentals
Rhythm
Symbols and Signs
Listen in your mind as you read to predict what it will
sound like (aural memory)

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.10, IC1B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Compare strategies for reading music
with those for reading text.

Language Arts:
Analyze written text:
Structure and Format (How is text organized and
arranged? Look at title, headings, and captions.)
Decoding and Phonics (Look for familiar spelling patterns
and word parts to help decode longer words.)
Predict (Think about what might come next as you read.)
Create Mental Images
Unit Vocabulary: key signature, time signature, tempo, accidentals, rhythm, symbols and signs, aural
memory, structure, format, decoding, phonics, prediction
Pre-Assessment: List strategies for reading music and written text.

177

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will practice
Student will
applying music and text
independently research
reading strategies in
music and text reading
cooperative groups.
strategies using online
and library resources.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Assessment:
List characteristics of
both music and text
reading strategies.

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
music and text reading
strategies.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
music and text reading
strategies using online
and library resources.
Prepare a lesson plan for
teaching another
student.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Students will give a
presentation.

Assessment:
Teach another student
how to read music.

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research music and text reading strategies.
Write comparisons using word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts music and text reading strategies.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting music and text reading strategies.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Compare strategies for reading music with those for reading text.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and reading use similar strategies to decode text.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different disciplines.
Students will read text better as a result of reading music.

178

Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO IVB: Compare strategies for reading music and written text.
Learning Target
Learning Target:
Compare strategies for
reading music and written
text.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates strategies for reading
music with strategies for
reading written text.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
strategies for reading music
with strategies for reading
written text.

179

2
Basic
Explains strategies for
reading music or strategies
for reading written text.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
strategies for reading music or
strategies for reading written
text.

Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO V


Core Conceptual Objective V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and historical events?

Missouri State Standards


FA5, G1.9, HC1A6-8,
HC1B6-8, HC1C6-8,
HC1D6-8

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Style/Genre/Period
Classical Period
Romantic Period
Time/Place when composed

1775-1825, Europe & America

1825-1900, Europe & America

Composer(s)

Beethoven

Tchaikovsky

Form

Theme and Variation

Ballet suite

Characteristics of Music (clues


used to identify it)

Formal structure
Symmetrical
Simple melody line
Ornamentation
Gradual dynamic changes
Communicates moods and
emotions
Syncopation

Function in society

Secular entertainment
Some sacred
Sacred music becomes less
prominent
Musicians still employed by
church and aristocracy but they
become entrepreneurs who earn
money from publications of their
music and ticket sales to their
performances
Musicians trained through
apprenticeship
Audience: primarily aristocracy
and church, but middle class is
emerging
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

Expansion of formal structures


Asymmetrical melodies
Intense, lyrical melodies
Heavy, powerful texture
Wide range of pitch, dynamics,
and tone color
Communicates moods and
emotions
Heavier brass section
Syncopation and complex
rhythms
Secular entertainment

Historical Context
What was happening at that time
and place? (war/peace, science,
technology, type of
government)
Who were the musicians?
What training did they have?
Who were audience members?

Contemporary Context
When/where is this music played
today?
How did this music influence
current musicians/composers?

Secular music becomes the norm


Nationalism/Patriotism inspired
composers to write music that
reflected the native culture of
their country
Musicians no longer employed by
church; earned money by selling
tickets to performances, by
writing dance music, and by
teaching at schools of music
Musicians trained through
schools of music
Audience: All classes of society
Played today in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works,
especially TV/film music

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will compare and contrast Classical and Romantic music.

180

Unit Vocabulary: ornamentation, Classical, entrepreneurs, texture, syncopation, dynamics, secular,


sacred, apprenticeship, aristocracy, symmetrical, asymmetrical, Nationalism, Patriotism
Pre-Assessment: List the characteristics of Classical and Romantic music.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will investigate
Classical and Romantic
music in cooperative
groups.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
Classical and Romantic
music.

Assessment:
List characteristics of
Classical and Romantic
music.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
the Classical and
Romantic periods using
online and library
resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Students will give a
presentation.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Students use online and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students use word processing software to write comparison.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Classical and Romantic music.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Classical and Romantic music.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast Classical and Romantic music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music serves many functions/purposes in historical context.
Students will understand that contemporary music is influenced by music from the Classical and Romantic
periods.

181

Scoring Guide for Seventh Grade Orchestra, CCO V: Music in historical and cultural context
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will compare and
contrast Classical and
Romantic music.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Classical and
Romantic music.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Classical and Romantic music.

182

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Classical and Romantic
music.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Classical and Romantic music.

Eighth Grade
Concert Orchestra

183

Overview of Content and Skills for Eighth Grade Concert Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Tuning: open string tuning with pegs using perfect fifths for violin, viola, cello; harmonics for bass
Tone Production: clear resonant tone using grade three repertoire
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on more than one finger while bowing
Bowing Skills: spiccato at balance point, marcato
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 3
Improvisation: improvise using notes of C major scale
Ensemble Playing: small ensemble playing
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading skills: 2/2 meter, a tempo, ascending, Baroque style, chromatic, concerto, cut time, D.C. al Coda,
D.S. al Coda, D.S. al Fine, descending, dotted eighth, melodic minor, tremolo
Sight-reading: Analyze piece prior to sight-reading; sight-read music at Grade 2 level
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Major triad
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Violin - a, g minor one-octave, B-flat, C Major two octaves, 2nd position, trills, double stops, shift different
fingers
Viola - a, g minor one octave, C, F two octaves, 2nd position, trills, double stops, shift different fingers
Cello - C, F, Major two-octave., a, g minor one-octave
Bass - a, g minor one octave, C, F Major two octaves, shifting different fingers
C. Composition
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of C Major.
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 3 literature on posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone
quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.
B. Form
Concerto, Symphony
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will make connections between contemporary music and the use of music to create mood in
films/TV.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines
Students will relate events in American history to American music.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will compare and contrast Romantic and Contemporary music.

184

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question

Missouri State Standards; Grade Level


Expectations
FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A6-8, PP2B6-8, PP2C6-8,
PP2E6-8

How do musicians express ideas through


performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Tuning: open string tuning with pegs
using perfect fifths for violin, viola,
cello; harmonics for bass
Tone Production: clear resonant tone
using grade three repertoire
Left Hand Skill: vibrato motion on
more than one finger while bowing
Bowing Skills: spiccato at balance point,
marcato
Musicianship:
Repertoire: Grade 3
Improvisation: improvise using notes of
C major scale
Ensemble Playing: small ensemble
playing

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will tune all strings with pegs using perfect fifths for
violin, viola, cello; harmonics for bass.
Students will produce a clear resonant tone using grade three
repertoire.
Students will demonstrate vibrato motion on more than one
finger while bowing.
Students will demonstrate spiccato at the balance point and
marcato as appropriate to Grade 2 repertoire.
Students will perform Grade 3 repertoire.
Students will improvise using notes of C major scale.
Students will play in small ensembles.

Unit Vocabulary: siccato, balance point, marcato, vibrato, improvise, resonant, repertoire, pegs, perfect
fifths, harmonics, tone, weight, speed, and contact point, scale, ensemble.
Pre-Assessment:
Students will take playing tests to demonstrate readiness.
Students will play short passages of previous repertoire.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Students will complete
a diagram showing the
seating arrangement of
a small ensemble.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their own part.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their own part
with their small ensemble.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Students will practice
playing their solo
with accompaniment.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling

Teaching Strategy:
Guided practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided practice

Assessment:
Students will explain
how a small ensemble
functions.

Assessment:
Students will play their own
part for the teacher.

Assessment:
Students will play in
small ensembles.

Assessment:
Students will play a
solo as part of a small
ensemble.

185

Technology Integration:
Students record their performances for self-evaluation.
Students use music theory software on the computer.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students may be paired with less proficient students.
Advanced students may be given the opportunity to lead their own small ensemble.
Students are encouraged to take private lessons and participate in extracurricular performing groups.
Students may play in small ensembles with at different levels of difficulty.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I:
Student Tasks:
Students will tune all strings with pegs using perfect fifths for violin, viola, cello; harmonics for bass.
Students will produce a clear resonant tone using grade three repertoire.
Students will demonstrate vibrato motion on more than one finger while bowing.
Students will demonstrate spiccato at the balance point and marcato as appropriate to Grade 2 repertoire.
Students will perform Grade 3 repertoire.
Students will improvise using notes of C major scale.
Students will play in small ensembles.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who choose to continue playing an instrument will build upon skills learned in this class.
Small ensemble playing encourages team work.
Students learn self-discipline.
Students learn leadership skills.
Students learn to evaluate the quality of musical performances.
Students learn social skills.

186

Scoring Guide for Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO I: Performance Skills


Learning Target

Learning Target
Students will tune all
strings with pegs using
perfect fifths for violin,
viola, cello; harmonics for
bass.

Learning Target
Students will produce a
clear resonant tone using
grade three repertoire.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Promptly matches pitch for


perfect fifths (violin, viola,
cello) or harmonics (bass)

Matches pitch for perfect


fifths (violin, viola, cello) or
harmonics (bass)

Approximates pitch for


perfect fifths (violin, viola,
cello) or harmonics (bass)

Produces a clear and resonant


tone

Produces a clear and resonant


tone

Produces an inconsistent
tone

Bows using piano dynamic


while tuning

Bows using piano dynamic


while tuning

Bows too softly or too


loudly

Always demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Consistently demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Sometimes demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

187

1
Below Basic
Unable to match pitch
Unclear tone

Does not use bow while


turning fine tuners

Rarely demonstrates
appropriate:
weight
speed
contact point

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
vibrato motion on more
than one finger while
bowing.

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
spiccato at the balance
point as appropriate to
Grade 2 repertoire.

Always demonstrates
appropriate:

Consistently demonstrates
appropriate:

Sometimes demonstrates
appropriate:

Rarely demonstrates
appropriate:

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain left hand position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Maintain instrument position

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Consistent vibration
movement with flexible wrist

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Motion begins from the pitch


center

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion


parallel to fingerboard/strings

Back and forth motion parallel


to fingerboard/strings

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Bow speed, weight, and


contact point

Always demonstrates:

Consistently demonstrates:

Sometimes demonstrates:

Rarely demonstrates:

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow perpendicular to the


strings; parallel to the bridge

Bow at balance point

Bow at balance point

Bow at balance point

Bow at balance point

Bouncing bow

Bouncing bow

Bouncing bow

Bouncing bow

Flexible bow wrist

Flexible bow wrist

Flexible bow wrist

Bow strokes in the shape of an


arc

Bow strokes in the shape of an


arc

Clear and resonant tone

188

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
marcato as appropriate to
Grade 2 repertoire.

Learning Target
Students will improvise
using notes of C major
scale.

Learning Target
Students will play in small
ensembles.

Always demonstrates:

Consistently demonstrates:

Sometimes demonstrates:

Rarely demonstrates:

Attack at the beginning of


each note

Attack at the beginning of


each note

Attack at the beginning of


each note

Attack at the beginning of


each note

Attack at the end of each note

Attack at the end of each note

Attack at the end of each


note

Attack at the end of each note

Continuous motion of the bow


from one note to the next

Continuous motion of the bow


from one note to the next

Creates a melodic and


rhythmic line.

Creates a melodic line.

Pitches remain within the key


of C Major

Pitches remain within the key


of C Major

Continuous motion of the


bow from one note to the
next
Modifies an existing melodic
line.

Copies anothers melodic


line.

Pitches remain within the key


of C Major

Pitches remain within the


key of C Major

Plays own part while


blending sound with small
ensemble

Plays own part while


blending sound with small
ensemble

Plays own part while


blending sound with small
ensemble

Plays own part while


blending sound with small
ensemble

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Models accurate playing


techniques for others

Models accurate playing


techniques for others

Follows non-verbal cues from


other ensemble members

189

Continuous motion of the bow


from one note to the next

Learning Target
Students will perform Grade
3 repertoire.

Always Demonstrates:

Consistently Demonstrates:

Sometimes Demonstrates:

Rarely Demonstrates:

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Body Posture:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Instrument Position:
Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Left Hand Shape:


Appropriate to instrument

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Intonation:
Accurate pitch

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Rhythmic Accuracy

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively according
to composers markings and
style

Musicianship:
Plays expressively
according to composers
markings and style

190

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music. A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?
How do performers interpret the composers musical intentions?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Reading skills: 2/2 meter, a tempo,
ascending, Baroque style, chromatic,
concerto, cut time, D.C. al Coda, D.S. al
Coda, D.S. al Fine, descending, dotted
eighth, melodic minor, tremolo
Sight-reading: Analyze piece prior to
sight-reading; sight-read music at Grade
2 level
Intervals Played and Sung (aural
training): Major triad

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: PP1A6-8, EP1B6-8,
EP1C6-8, EP1E6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate
expression.

Students will review a piece of Grade 2 literature, develop a


sight-reading plan, and play at sight from a written composition.
Students will play and sing a major triad.

Unit Vocabulary: 2/2 meter, a tempo, ascending, Baroque style, chromatic, concerto, cut time, D.C. al
Coda, D.S. al Coda, D.S. al Fine, descending, dotted eighth, melodic minor, tremolo
Pre-Assessment:
Students define symbols and terms.
Students perform playing tests from sight.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes. Use
flashcards to practice
identifying symbols and
terminology.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Demonstration

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Practice performing
symbols and terms.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice planning and
playing multiple pieces
at sight.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Identify symbols and
terminology of
expression.

Assessment:
Demonstrate each
symbol and expressive
term.

Assessment:
Students will review a
piece of Grade 2
literature, develop a
sight-reading plan, and
play at sight from a
written composition.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Use music theory software.
Use internet websites.
Use a metronome.

191

Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who know terms can teach them to others.
Students can create flash cards for use in memorizing terms.
Students create posters that teach the terms.
Students can read music and listen to a partner as he/she sight-reads.
Application Level Assessment for CCO II A:
Student Task(s):
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate expression.
Students will review a piece of Grade 2 literature, develop a sight-reading plan, and play at sight from a
written composition.
Students will play and sing a major triad.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who continue in music will use reading skills to play more advanced literature.
Students will be able to read a new piece of music and understand the composers musical intentions.
Students will be able to perform expressively.

192

Scoring Guide for Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIA, Music Reading Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Students will perform
repertoire using grade level
appropriate expression.

Performs all of the expressive


symbols and markings in
repertoire.

Performs most of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs some of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs few of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Learning Target:
Students will review a
piece of Grade 2 literature,
develop a sight-reading
plan, and play at sight from
a written composition.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Ineffective review.

Performs with accurate:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with few errors in:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with many errors


in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performance addresses few


categories and makes many
errors in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Learning Target:
Students will play and sing
a major triad.

Not applicable

Matches three pitches in


appropriate range

Matches two pitches and


approximately matches the
other pitch

Approximately matches one


pitch

193

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Violin - a, g minor one-octave, Bb, C
Major two octaves, 2nd position, trills,
double stops, shifting on different fingers

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: EP1B6-8

Viola - a, g minor one octave, C, F two


octaves, 2nd position, trills, double
stops, shifting on different fingers

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to play:
Violin students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and
finger patterns: a, g minor one-octave, B-flat, C Major two
octaves, 2nd position, trills, double stops, shifting on different
fingers.
Viola students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and
finger patterns: a, g minor one octave, C, F two octaves, 2nd
position, trills, double stops, shifting on different fingers.

Cello - C, F, Major two-octave., a, g


minor one-octave, shifting on different
fingers

Cello students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and


finger patterns: C, F, Major two-octave., a, g minor one-octave,
shifting on different fingers.

Bass - a, g minor one octave, C, F Major


two octaves, shifting on different fingers

Bass students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and


finger patterns: a, g minor one octave, C, F Major two octaves,
shifting on different fingers.

Unit Vocabulary: Major scale, minor scale, position, trill, octave, fingering, patterns, flat, shifting, double
stops
Pre-Assessment:
Students play one octave scales in each key.
Students write out the scales.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash cards
Practice scale fingerings Practice pieces.
and finger patterns.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Guided Practice
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Identify the key
Play the a minor scale
Perform pieces in key of
signature and scale on
using appropriate
a minor.
paper.
fingerings and finger
patterns.
Technology Integration:
Students practice using internet-based software.
Students use music theory software to compose.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a short melody
in the key of a minor.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Use a scoring guide to
assess an original
composition.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play two-octave scales.
Play a scale using alternate fingerings.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIB
Student Task(s):
Violin students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: a, g minor one-octave, Bflat, C Major two octaves, 2nd position, trills, double stops, shifting on different fingers.
Viola students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: a, g minor one octave, C, F
two octaves, 2nd position, trills, double stops, shifting on different fingers.
Cello students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: C, F, Major two-octave., a,
g minor one-octave, shifting on different fingers.
Bass students will play scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: a, g minor one octave, C, F
Major two octaves, shifting on different fingers.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to sight-read passages with greater fluency.
Students will improve intonation.
Students will be better able to play in various key signatures.

195

Scoring Guide for Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCOIIB: Finger Patterns and Scales
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Learning Target:
Violin students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: a, g minor oneoctave, B-flat, C Major two
octaves, 2nd position, trills,
double stops, shifting on
different fingers.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Learning Target:
Viola students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: a, g minor one
octave, C, F two octaves,
2nd position, trills, double
stops, shifting on different
fingers.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Learning Target:
Cello students will play
scales using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: C, F, Major twooctave., a, g minor oneoctave, shifting on different
fingers.

Student always plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

Student rarely plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps
and whole steps)

196

Learning Target:
Bass students will play scales using
appropriate fingerings and finger
patterns: a, g minor one octave, C,
F Major two octaves, shifting on
different fingers.

Student always plays the targeted scale


with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps and whole
steps)

Student consistently plays the targeted


scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps and whole
steps)

197

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch (half steps and
whole steps)

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Write an eight-measure melody in the
key of C Major.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, PP4A6-8, EP1B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will write an eight-measure melody in the key of C
Major in 6/8 time signature.

Unit Vocabulary: clef sign, measure, bar lines, key signature, time signature, whole note, half note,
quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note, note names, staff
Pre-Assessment: Students compose two measures in C Major.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, read a
Take notes, read a
Practice composing and
handout or article that
handout or article that
sharing feedback with
describes characteristics describes characteristics peers.
of a good melody.
of a good melody.
Discuss examples.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Describe the qualities of Critique a melody using Write an eight-measure
a good melody.
qualities of a good
melody in the key of C
melody.
Major in 6/8 time
signature.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research compositions.
Practice composing and
sharing feedback with
peers.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Write an extended
composition with a
harmonized melody.

Technology Integration:
Students will use a music notation program such as Finale or Sibelius.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students may write in two parts or write a longer composition.
Students with less readiness may write a shorter piece or a piece with limited pitch range.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC
Student Task(s):
Students will write an eight-measure melody in the key of C Major in 6/8 time signature.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that composing is a career option.
Students will better appreciate the work of composers.
Musical composition skills will lead to better music reading skills.

198

Scoring Guide for Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIC: Composition


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will write an
eight-measure melody in
the key of C Major in 6/8
time signature.

4
Advanced
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Six beats in a measure
Eight or more measures
Melodic line in the key of C
Expressive symbols
Bowing

3
Proficient
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Six beats in a measure
Eight measures
Melodic line in the key of C
Bowing

199

2
Basic
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Six beats in a measure
Less than eight measures
Melodic line in the key of C

1
Below Basic
Composition includes:
Clef sign
Key signature
Time signature
Melodic line

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to evaluate performance.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G1.5, AP2A6-8, AP2B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 3 literature on
posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.

Unit Vocabulary: Music criticism, posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone quality, intonation,
articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics
Pre-Assessment: Respond to and critique a short excerpt.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Listen to and watch
Reflect upon and discuss
excerpts of two
performances in class.
performances of the
same work.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion, Guided
Practice

Assessment:
Define criteria used to
evaluate musical
performance.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
two performances on
aspects of quality.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion on
personal responses to
music, Guided Practice
Assessment:
Respond to and critique
a performance on
posture, left hand shape,
bow hold, tone quality,
intonation, articulation
(bowing), rhythm, and
dynamics.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research a piece of
music prior to attending
a live performance of
the work. Take notes
during the performance.
Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided
Practice

Assessment:
Write an in-depth
critique and present it to
a group.

Technology Integration:
Watch and listen to performance on-line.
Use audio-visual resources.
Type critiques on the computer.
Audio or videotape and then critique students performances.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who need more structure could complete a graphic organizer.
Students with advanced writing skills could write a performance critique for a newspaper.
Students could work alone or with a partner to critique a performance.

200

Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA:


Student Task(s):
Respond to and critique a performance of Grade 3 literature on posture, left hand shape, bow hold, tone
quality, intonation, articulation (bowing), rhythm, and dynamics.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to apply analytical skills to other subjects.
Students who continue to study music will apply critique skills to musical works.
Students will have a life-long appreciation of music.

201

Music Criticism Scoring Guide


Criteria

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Introduction
Tells plan to critique. Gives
information about the work:
composers name, musicians
name, title of piece, when and
where it was created, how it
was used, time period, style, or
culture.
Description
Sentences that list everything
heard or seen in the
performance, including names
of instruments

Clearly states plan to


critique another artists
work. All available
information is given.

States plan to critique


another artists work.
Most available
information is given.

Artists work is
mentioned. Tells
artists name and
title.

Artists name
or title of
work listed.

Logical, coherent, complete,


detailed description of what
is seen/heard in the
performance.

Complete description of
what is seen/heard in the
work.

Complete
description of what
is seen/heard in the
work but slightly
unorganized.

Analysis
Analyzes work to determine
how each applies: posture, left
hand shape, bow hold, tone
quality, intonation, articulation
(bowing), rhythm, and
dynamics.
Interpretation
Relates personal, cultural, and
emotional responses to the
piece.
Justifies statements with
reference to the work.

Considers each element to


determine which are most
important in the work.
Explains, in detail, how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Clearly infers meaning of
work based upon analysis
and personal response.
Clearly supports statements
with detailed, specific
reference to all musical
elements.

Considers elements to
determine which are
most important in the
work. Explains how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Interprets the meaning of
work based upon
analysis and personal
response.
Supports statements with
reference to most
musical elements.

Lists elements used.


Tells how or where
some elements and
principles are used
in the work.

Random
mention of
one or two
details
seen/heard in
the work.
Partially lists
elements.

Judgment
Evaluates the quality of the
performance.

Evaluates the quality of the


performance on musicians
tone/intonation, technique
articulation, and expression
or musicianship. Supports
all statements with specific,
detailed reference to the
work.

Evaluates the quality of


the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
and expression or
musicianship. Supports
most statements with
reference to the work.

Mechanics
Grammar, Style, Form

Free of errors. Consistently


uses third person. Uses
sophisticated sentence
variety, precise vocabulary.
All steps of critique model
in correct order.

Few minor errors in


spelling or grammar.
Uses third person. Some
sentence variety,
appropriate vocabulary.
All steps of critique
model in correct order.

Discusses the
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique
articulation, or
expression/musician
ship. Few
references to the
work to support
statements.
Errors in grammar
and spelling without
affecting clarity.
Some use of first
person. Little
sentence variety.
All steps of critique
model present but
out of order.

202

Suggests a meaning
of the work.
Supports statements
with reference to
some musical
elements.

Suggests
meaning of
the work.
Supports
statements
with reference
to few
musical
elements.
States
personal
opinion.

Multiple
grammatical
errors
interfere with
content and
readability.
Doesnt use
third person.

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA3, G1.5, AP1A6-8

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Compare and contrast concerto and symphony
forms.

Characteristics of forms
Concerto
Arose in Baroque period
Multi-movement work with contrasting tempi
Often contains fast first and final movements, and a
slow second movement
Solo instrument accompanied by orchestra
Most influential composers: Johann Sebastian Bach,
Antonio Vivaldi

Symphony
Arose in the Classical period
Multi-movement work with contrasting tempi
Often contains fast first and final movements, slow
second movement, and third movement in 3/4 meter
String or full orchestra; can feature soloists
Most influential composers: Wolfgang Amadeus
Mozart, Ludwig von Beethoven, Johannes Brahms
Unit Vocabulary: concerto, symphony, form, Baroque, Classical, solo, accompany, multi-movement,
tempi
Pre-Assessment: Students list characteristics of concerto and symphony forms.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Write definitions
Discuss examples of
Research Baroque
concerto and symphony
concerti and symphonies
forms.
using online and library
sources.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction, Class Guided Practice
discussion
Assessment:
List characteristics of
concerto and symphony
forms.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
concerto and symphony
forms.

Assessment:
Presentation.

203

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not applicable.

Teaching Strategy:
Not applicable.

Assessment:
Not applicable.

Technology Integration:
Complete a Venn diagram.
Use online and library sources to research concerto and symphony forms.
Use word processing software to compare and contrast.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a chart/poster that visually compares and contrasts concerto and symphony forms.
Compose a shorter or longer piece in concerto and symphony forms.
Compose a two-part piece in concerto and symphony forms.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast concerto and symphony forms.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music is organized sound.
Students will apply organization of ideas in music to other disciplines.
Students as audience members will better understand musical ideas through knowledge of musical forms.

204

Scoring Guide for Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO IIIB Form


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
concerto and symphony
forms.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Compares, contrasts, and


evaluates characteristics of
concerto and symphony forms
using examples.

Compares and contrasts


characteristics of concerto and
symphony forms using
examples.

205

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
concerto and symphony
forms using examples.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
concerto and symphony forms.

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Contemporary Music:
Freedom of structure
Asymmetrical, repetitive melodies
Melodies had wide pitch ranges
Tone color varied
Atonality
Impressionistic
Experimentation of styles
Invention of electronic instruments
Complex, repetitive rhythms
Changing meters
Contrast of dynamics and textures
Communicates moods and emotions
Influenced by historical events, new ideas, existing
repertoire

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, IC1A6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should
be able to do:
Make connections between Contemporary music
and the use of music to create mood in
contemporary films.

Functions of Contemporary Music in Films:


Focus audience attention
Establish mood
Represent characters and settings
Emphasize storyline
Serve as background
Influenced by historical events, new ideas, existing
repertoire
Unit Vocabulary: atonality, asymmetrical, contemporary, composition, function, mood, characters,
settings, storyline, background, rhythmic/melodic line, textures, tone color, Impressionistic, meter, pitch
range
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Contemporary music and functions of music in films.

206

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will investigate Student will
Contemporary music
independently research
and film in cooperative
Contemporary music
groups.
and film using online
and library resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Cooperative Learning
Guided Practice
Model
Assessment:
List characteristics of
both Contemporary
music and function of
music in contemporary
films.

Assessment:
Make connections
between Contemporary
music and the use of
music to create mood in
films.

Assessment:
Audio-visual
presentation to class.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
Contemporary music
and film using online
and library resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Collaboration
with Art teachers,
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Select a scene from a
film and compose a
piece of music in
Contemporary style to
accompany the scene.

Technology Integration:
Students will use online and library resources to research Contemporary music and film.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that shows the function of Contemporary music in film.
Complete a Venn diagram showing connections between Contemporary music and film.
Create examples of Contemporary music and film.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:
Student Task:
Make connections between Contemporary music and film.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and film created in the same time and place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different art forms.

207

Scoring Guide Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO IVA: Connections between Contemporary music and film
Learning Target

Make connections between


Contemporary music and
film.

4
Advanced
Evaluates function of
Contemporary music in film.

3
Proficient
Make connections between
Contemporary music in film.

208

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Contemporary music in
film.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Contemporary music in film.

Eighth Grade Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

American music:
Syncopation
Asymmetrical rhythms
Long, irregular melodies
Reflects the wide open geography of the American
landscape
Reflects sense of personal freedom
Influenced by African-American, European, and Native
American styles

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.10, IC1B6-8

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Students will relate events in American
history to American music.

American history:
Colonial settlement
Institution of slavery
Revolutionary War and American Independence
Westward expansion and Manifest Destiny
Industrial Revolution
Civil War and the end of slavery
World Wars I and II
Depression
Korean War
Civil Rights
Vietnam
September 11, 2001
Unit Vocabulary: syncopation, asymmetrical
Pre-Assessment: List events in American history and characteristics of American music.

209

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will investigate Student will
American history and
independently research
American music in
music from the Civil
cooperative groups.
War using online and
library resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Cooperative Learning
Guided Practice
Model
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of
Students will compare
Students will give a
both American history
and contrast American
presentation.
and American music.
history and American
music.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
music from the Civil
War using online and
library resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Teach another student
how to play a piece of
music from the Civil
War.

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research American history and American music.
Write comparisons using word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts American history and American music.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting American history and American music.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Students will relate events in American history to American music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music serves many functions/purposes in historical context.
Students will understand that American music is influenced by American history.

210

Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO IVB: Compare strategies for reading music and written text.
Learning Target
Learning Target:
Students will relate events
in American history to
American music.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
investigates events in
American history with
American music.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts events
in American history with
American music.

211

2
Basic
Explains the characteristics
of American history and
American music.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
American history and
American music.

Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO V


Core Conceptual Objective V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and historical events?

Missouri State Standards


FA5, G1.9, HC1A6-8, HC1B6-8, HC1C68, HC1D6-8

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Style/Genre/Period
Romantic Period
Contemporary Period
Time/Place when
composed

1825-1900, Europe & America

1900-present

Composer(s)

Tchaikovsky

Aaron Copland

Form

Ballet suite

Varied

Characteristics of Music
(clues used to identify it)

Freedom of structure
Asymmetrical melodies
Intense, lyrical melodies
Heavy, powerful texture
Wide range of pitch, dynamics,
and tone color
Communicates moods and
emotions
Heavier brass section
Syncopation and complex
rhythms

Function in society

Secular entertainment

Freedom of structure
Asymmetrical repetitive melodies
Melodies had wide pitch ranges
Tone color varied
Atonality
Impressionism as a response to
Romanticism
Experimentation of styles
Invention of electronic instruments
Complex, repetitive rhythms
Changing meters
Contrasts of dynamics and textures
Communicates moods and emotions
Influenced by historical events, new
ideas, existing repertoire
Secular entertainment

Historical Context
What was happening at that
time and place? (war/peace,
science, technology, type
of government)
Who were the musicians?
What training did they
have?
Who were audience
members?

Secular music becomes the norm


Nationalism/Patriotism inspired
composers to write music that
reflected the native culture of
their country
Musicians no longer employed
by church; earned money by
selling tickets to performances,
by writing dance music, and by
teaching at schools of music
Musicians trained through
schools of music
Audience: All classes of society
Played today in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works,
especially TV/film music

Contemporary Context
When/where is this music
played today?
How did this music
influence current
musicians/composers?

212

World Wars influenced composers


Recording and listening devices invented
Copyright laws strengthened, as did
technology to copy music
Musicians from all classes of society
Musicians trained through schools of
music
Audience: All classes of society

Played today in concerts, or through


video/audio recordings
Played in TV/film music

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will compare and contrast Romantic and Contemporary music.
Unit Vocabulary: Romantic, Contemporary, texture, rhythm, syncopation, dynamics, secular,
Nationalism, Patriotism, asymmetrical, atonality, Impressionism, copyright
Pre-Assessment: List the characteristics of Romantic and Contemporary music.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will investigate
Romantic and
Contemporary music in
cooperative groups.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
Romantic and
Contemporary music.

Assessment:
List characteristics of
Romantic and
Contemporary music.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
the Romantic and
Contemporary periods
using online and library
resources.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Students will give a
presentation.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Students use online and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students use word processing software to write comparison.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Romantic and Contemporary music.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Romantic and Contemporary music.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast Romantic and Contemporary music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music serves many functions/purposes in historical context.
Students will understand that contemporary music is influenced by music from the Romantic and
Contemporary periods.

213

Scoring Guide for Eighth Grade Orchestra, CCO V: Music in historical and cultural context
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will compare and
contrast Romantic and
Contemporary music.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Romantic and
Contemporary music.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Romantic and Contemporary
music.

214

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Romantic and
Contemporary music.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Romantic and Contemporary
music.

High School
Orchestra Courses

215

HIGH SCHOOL
ORCHESTRA COURSE MAP

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

Orchestra I: Chamber Orchestra


Orchestra II: Concert Orchestra
Orchestra III: Symphonic Orchestra

216

GRADE 12

High School Orchestra Course Descriptions


I: Chamber Orchestra (9, 10, 11, 12)

1 Unit, Full Year

Prerequisite: Eighth Grade Concert Orchestra or evidence of equivalent training satisfactory to the
instructor.
This is a performing orchestra. Training is provided in the technical skills and music reading skills needed
to perform standard string orchestra literature. Students will perform music from a broad range of musical
styles. Attendance at scheduled performances and after school rehearsals is mandatory and part of the
required class work. Training is provided to prepare students to perform the more demanding literature
performed by the Concert Orchestra and/or Symphonic Orchestra.
Students are encouraged to participate in appropriate enrichment opportunities, such as private lessons, AllSuburban Honors Orchestra, Solo and Ensemble Festival, Community Music School Youth Orchestra
Program, and other various community orchestras.
Students must provide their own instruments.
This course may be repeated for elective credit.

II: Concert Orchestra (9, 10, 11, 12)

1 Unit, Full Year

Prerequisite: Students are accepted by audition only to this more advanced performing group.
Students must exhibit the technical and music reading skills necessary to perform standard
orchestral literature, as established in audition requirements.
This is a performing orchestra. Further training is provided both in technical skills and in music reading.
Advanced string orchestra literature is performed. Students will perform music from a broad range of
musical styles. Attendance at scheduled performances and after school rehearsals is mandatory and part of
the required class work. Training is provided to prepare students to perform the more demanding literature
performed by the Symphonic Orchestra.
Students are encouraged to participate in appropriate enrichment opportunities, such as private lessons, AllSuburban Honors Orchestra, Solo and Ensemble Festival, Community Music School Youth Orchestra
Program, and other various community orchestras.
Students must provide their own instruments.
This course may be repeated for elective credit.

217

III. SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA

(9, 10, 11, 12)

1 Unit, Full Year

Prerequisite: Students are accepted by audition only. Symphonic Orchestra is the most advanced
performing group. Students must exhibit the technical and music reading skills necessary to perform
advanced orchestra literature, as established in audition requirements.
This is a major performing orchestra. Further training is provided both in technical skills and in music
reading. Advanced string orchestra literature is performed. Students will perform music from a broad range
of musical styles. Attendance at scheduled performances and after school rehearsals is part of the required
class work and is mandatory. Training is provided which will enable the student to continue music training
and/or performance beyond the high school level.
Students are encouraged to participate in appropriate enrichment opportunities, such as private lessons, AllState Orchestra, All-Suburban Honors Orchestra, Solo and Ensemble Festival, St. Louis Symphony
Community Music School Youth Orchestra Program, and other various community orchestras.
Students must provide their own instruments.
This course may be repeated for elective credit.

218

Chamber Orchestra

219

Overview of Content and Skills for Chamber Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Bowing skills: Appropriate to repertoire; col legno, sul ponticello, sul tasto
Shifting skills: 3rd position for violin and viola; 4th position for cello; 4th position for bass.
Musicianship: Repertoire: through grade 3; Improvisation: improvise melodies in D major, two-octaves;
Ensemble Playing: sectional rehearsal skills
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading skills: adagio, con sordino, fortissimo, largo, marcato, martel, pianissimo, ponticello, rallentando,
sempre, senza, sordino, soli, sul, tutti
Sight-reading skills: Analyze piece prior to sight-reading; sight-read music up to Grade 2.5 level.
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training):Octave
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Two octave scales: Major: C, G, D, A, F; minor a, g, d, e
C. Composition
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of F Major, in a simple duple or quadruple meter, using bowing
and shifting markings.
CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Baroque period addressing unity of mood, rhythmic
characteristics, melodic characteristics, terraced dynamics, textural characteristics, and instrumentation.
B. Form
Baroque Suite, Fugue, Concerto Grosso
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will compare and contrast Baroque music and architecture.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines
Compare and contrast 17th century music and technological/scientific ideas.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will compare and contrast sacred and secular music in the Baroque era.

220

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question

Missouri State Standards; Grade Level


Expectations
FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A9-12, PP2B9-12, PP2C912, PP2D9-12, PP2E9-12

How do musicians express ideas through


performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:

Bowing skills: Appropriate to


repertoire; col legno, sul ponticello, sul
tasto

Students will perform repertoire that require col legno, sul


ponticello, and sul tasto bowing styles.

Shifting skills: 3rd position for violin


and viola; 4th position for cello; 4th
position for bass.

Students will perform repertoire that requires 3rd position for


violin and viola, 4th position for cello and 4th position for bass.

Musicianship:
Repertoire: through grade 3
Improvisation: improvise melodies in D
major, two octaves
Ensemble Playing: sectional rehearsal
skills

Students will perform grade 3 repertoire.


Students will improvise in a two-octave range using the key of
D Major.
Students will demonstrate sectional rehearsal skills.

Unit Vocabulary: improvisation, col legno, sul ponticello, sul tasto


Pre-Assessment: Students will take playing tests to demonstrate readiness.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Listen to examples of
others improvisations.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction,
Demonstration
Assessment:
Define improvisation.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Imitate teachers examples
of 3-6 note improvisations.
Teaching Strategy:
Modeling
Assessment:
Respond to another persons
call with an improvised 36 note response.

Technology Integration:
Students record their performances for self-evaluation.
Students use notation software on the computer.
Students use SmartMusic software.

221

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice improvising with
a partner in a given key.
Teaching Strategy:
Model improvising within
a set of parameters.
Assessment:
Improvise in a two-octave
range using the key of D
Major.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research a style and
plan the cadenza.
Teaching Strategy:
Coaching
Assessment:
Improvise a complete
cadenza.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Pair weaker students with more advanced students.
Advanced students may be given or may select solo or small ensemble pieces in addition to whole class
work.
Students are encouraged to take private lessons and participate in outside performing groups.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I:
Student Tasks:
Students will perform repertoire that require col legno, sul ponticello, and sul tasto bowing styles.
Students will perform repertoire that requires 3rd position for violin and viola, 4th position for cello and 4th
position for bass.
Students will perform grade 3 repertoire.
Students will improvise in a two-octave range using the key of D Major.
Students will demonstrate sectional rehearsal skills.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who choose to continue playing an instrument will build upon skills learned in this class.
Ensemble playing encourages team work.
Students learn self-discipline.
Students learn leadership skills.
Students learn to evaluate the quality of musical performances.
Students learn social skills.

222

Scoring Guide for Chamber Orchestra, CCO I: Performance Skills


Learning Target

Learning Target
Students will perform col
legno bowing style.

Learning Target
Students will perform sul
ponticello bowing style.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic
Bow hold for upper strings:
Tilt bow stick toward player

Bow hold for upper strings:


Tilt bow stick away from
player

Bow hold for upper strings:


Tilt bow stick away from
player

Bow hold for upper strings:


Tilt bow stick away from
player

Bow hold for lower strings:


Tilt bow stick toward player

Bow hold for lower strings:


Tilt bow stick toward player

Bow hold for lower strings:


Tilt bow stick toward
player

Placement: upper half of


bow

Placement: upper half of


bow

Wrist motion instead of arm


motion

Wrist motion instead of arm


motion

Stick remains near strings

Stick bounces away from


strings causing irregular pulse

Placement: middle or
lower half of bow
Wrist motion instead of
arm motion
Stick bounces away from
strings so that player loses
control

Bow hold for lower strings:


Tilt bow stick away from
player
Placement: middle or lower
half of bow
Arm motion instead of wrist
motion
Player strikes hair instead of
stick.

Placement: bow next to


bridge

Placement: bow next to


bridge

Placement: bow next to


bridge

Placement: bow is not near


bridge

Hair on string(s) appropriate


to dynamic markings

Hair on string(s) appropriate


to dynamic markings

Hair on string(s)
inappropriate to dynamic
markings

Hair on string(s)
inappropriate to dynamic
markings

Consistent tone color


throughout stroke

Inconsistent tone color


throughout stroke

Inconsistent tone color


throughout stroke

Inconsistent tone color


throughout stroke

223

Learning Target
Students will perform sul
tasto (sur la touche)
bowing style.

Learning Target
Students will perform
repertoire that requires 3rd
position for violin and
viola, 4th position for cello
and 4th position for bass.

Learning Target
Students will improvise in
a two-octave range using
the key of D Major.

Placement: bow is over the


edge of the fingerboard

Placement: bow is over the


edge of the fingerboard

Placement: bow is over the


edge of the fingerboard

Placement: bow is not over


the edge of the fingerboard

Adjusts speed and weight


appropriate to dynamic
markings

Adjusts speed and weight


appropriate to dynamic
markings

Speed and weight


inappropriate to dynamic
markings

Speed and weight


inappropriate to dynamic
markings

Consistent tone color


throughout stroke

Inconsistent tone color


throughout stroke

Inconsistent tone color


throughout stroke

Inconsistent tone color


throughout stroke

Shifts with a smooth, gliding


motion

Shifts with a smooth, gliding


motion

Shifts with a smooth,


gliding motion

Shifts with a rough motion,


lifts fingers from strings

Accurate intonation

Accurate intonation

Inaccurate intonation

Inaccurate intonation

Hand position remains


consistent while shifting

Hand position remains


consistent while shifting

Hand position inconsistent


while shifting

Hand position inconsistent


while shifting

Appropriate adjustments to
bow speed and weight during
shift

Bow speed and weight are not


appropriately adjusted during
shift

Bow speed and weight are


not appropriately adjusted
during shift

Bow speed and weight are not


appropriately adjusted during
shift

Pitches remain within the key


of D Major

Pitches remain within the key


of D Major

Pitches remain within the key


of D Major

Pitches outside of the key of


D Major

Rhythms consistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms consistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms inconsistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms inconsistent with


chosen meter

Utilizes two-octave range

Utilizes two-octave range

Utilizes less than two-octave


range

Utilizes less than two-octave


range

Single focal point

Multiple focal points


Multiple focal points

Multiple focal points

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Learning Target
Students will demonstrate
sectional rehearsal skills.

Follows rehearsal plan


(addressing specific
techniques as applies to
repertoire)

Follows rehearsal plan


(addressing specific
techniques as applies to
repertoire)

Follows rehearsal plan


(addressing specific
techniques as applies to
repertoire)

Uses effective practice


strategies

Uses effective practice


strategies

Limited use of effective


practice strategies

Maintains decorum

Maintains decorum

Maintains decorum

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Continuous self-evaluation
and improvement

Models accurate playing


techniques for others

225

Does not follow rehearsal


plan
Ineffective practice
strategies
Lacks focus, distracts others

Learning Target
Students will perform grade 3
repertoire.

Always Demonstrates:

Consistently Demonstrates:

Sometimes Demonstrates:

Rarely Demonstrates:

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Tone Quality:
Clear and resonant in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout
all registers and ranges

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

226

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music. A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?
How do performers interpret the composers musical intentions?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Reading skills: adagio, con sordino,
fortissimo, largo, marcato, martel,
pianissimo, ponticello, rallentando,
sempre, senza, sordino, soli, sul, tutti

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: PP1A9-12, EP1C9-12,
EP1D9-12, EP1E9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate
expression.

Sight-reading skills: Analyze piece


prior to sight-reading and then sight-read
music up to Grade 2.5 literature.

Students will review a piece of grade 2.5 literature, develop a


plan, and play at sight from a written composition.

Intervals Played and Sung (aural


training): Octave

Students will play and sing an octave.

Unit Vocabulary: adagio, con sordino, fortissimo, largo, marcato, martel, pianissimo, ponticello,
rallentando, sempre, senza, sordino, soli, sul, tutti
Pre-Assessment:
Students define symbols and terms.
Students perform playing tests from sight.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Use dictionaries to
translate terms from
other languages to
English. Use flashcards
to practice identifying
symbols and
terminology.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Demonstration

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Practice performing
symbols and terms.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice planning and
playing multiple pieces
at sight.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Identify symbols and
terminology of
expression.

Assessment:
Demonstrate each
symbol and expressive
term.

Assessment:
Students will review a
piece of grade 2.5
literature, develop a
plan, and play at sight
from a written
composition.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

227

Technology Integration:
Use music theory software.
Use internet websites.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who know terms can teach them to others.
Students create posters that teach the terms.
Application Level Assessment for CCO II A:
Student Task(s):
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate expression.
Students will review a piece of grade 2.5 literature, develop a plan, and play at sight from a written
composition.
Students will play and sing an octave.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who continue in music will use reading skills to play more advanced literature.
Students will be able to read a new piece of music and understand the composers musical intentions.
Students will be able to perform expressively.

228

Scoring Guide for Chamber Orchestra, CCO IIA, Music Reading Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Students will perform
repertoire using grade level
appropriate expression.

Performs all of the expressive


symbols and markings in
repertoire.

Performs most of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs some of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs few of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Learning Target:
Students will review a
piece of grade 2.5
literature, develop a plan,
and play at sight from a
written composition.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Ineffective review.

Performs with accurate:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with few errors in:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with many errors


in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performance addresses few


categories and makes many
errors in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Learning Target:
Students will play and sing
an octave

Matches both pitches in


appropriate range.

Matches both pitches in


appropriate range.

Approximately matches
both pitches.

Does not match either pitch.

229

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Two-octave scales, fingerings, and finger
patterns for: Major: C, G, D, A, F;
Minor: a, g, d, and e

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: EP1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to play:
Play two-octave scales using appropriate fingerings and finger
patterns for: Major: C, G, D, A, F; Minor: a, g, d, and e.

Unit Vocabulary: tonic, whole step, half step, diatonic, melodic minor, harmonic minor, natural minor
Pre-Assessment:
Students play two octave scales in each key.
Students write out the scales.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash cards
Practice scale fingerings Practice pieces.
and finger patterns.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Modeling
Assessment:
Identify the key
signature and scale on
paper.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Play two-octave scales
using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: Major C, G,
D, A, F; Minor a, g, d,
and e.

Assessment:
Perform pieces that
require a two-octave
range in the following
keys: Major C, G, D, A,
F; Minor a, g, d, and e.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a short melody
that includes a twooctave range in one of
the following keys:
Major C, G, D, A, F;
Minor a, g, d, and e.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Use a scoring guide to
assess an original
composition.

Technology Integration:
Students practice using internet-based software and SmartMusic.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play multi-octave scales.
Play a scale using alternate fingerings.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIB
Student Task(s):
Play two-octave scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: Major C, G, D, A, F; Minor a, g,
d, and e.

230

How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?


Students will be able to sight-read passages with greater fluency.
Students will improve sense of tonality.
Students will be better able to play in various key signatures.

231

Scoring Guide for Chamber Orchestra, CCOIIB: Finger Patterns and Scales
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Play two-octave scales
using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: Major C, G, D,
A, F; Minor a, g, d, and e.

4
Advanced
Student always plays the
targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

232

1
Below Basic
Student rarely plays the
targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to compose an eight-measure
melody in the key of F Major, in a
simple duple or quadruple meter, using
bowing and shifting skills.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, PP2A9-12, PP4A9-12, EP1A912, EP1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of F Major, in a
simple duple or quadruple meter, using bowing and shifting
markings.

Unit Vocabulary: meter, duple meter, quadruple meter, simple meter, compound meter
Pre-Assessment: Students compose a short phrase in F Major.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, read a
Take notes, read a
Practice composing and
handout or article that
handout or article that
sharing feedback with
describes characteristics describes characteristics peers.
of a good melody.
of a good melody.
Discuss examples.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Describe the qualities of Critique a melody using Write an eight-measure
a good melody.
qualities of a good
melody in the key of F
melody.
Major, in a simple duple
or quadruple meter,
using bowing and
shifting markings.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research compositions.
Practice composing and
sharing feedback with
peers.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Write an extended
composition with a
harmonized melody.

Technology Integration:
Students will use a music notation program such as Finale or Sibelius.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students may write in two parts or write a longer composition.
Advanced students may modulate to another key within their melody.
Students with less readiness may write a shorter piece or a piece with limited pitch range.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC
Student Task(s):
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of F Major, in a simple duple or quadruple meter, using bowing
and shifting markings.

233

How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?


Students will understand that composing is a career option.
Students will better appreciate the work of composers.
Musical composition skills will lead to better music reading skills.

234

Scoring Guide for Chamber Orchestra, CCO IIC: Composition


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Write an eight-measure
melody in the key of F
Major, in a simple duple or
quadruple meter, using
bowing and shifting
markings.

Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of F Major
Complete phrases
Single focal point
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing
Dynamic markings
Expressive symbols

Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of F Major
Complete phrases
Single focal point
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing

235

2
Basic
Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of F
Major
Incomplete phrases
Multiple focal points
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing

1
Below Basic
Composition includes:
Less than eight-measures
Lacks F Major tonal center
Incomplete phrases
Multiple focal points
Inconsistent meter

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to critique musical performance
addressing: unity of mood, rhythmic
characteristics, melodic characteristics,
terraced dynamics, textural
characteristics, and instrumentation.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, G1.5, AP2A9-12, AP2B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Baroque
period addressing unity of mood, rhythmic characteristics,
melodic characteristics, terraced dynamics, textural
characteristics, and instrumentation.

Unit Vocabulary: terraced dynamics, fugue, suite, concerto grosso, basso continuo, ornamentation,
monophonic, polyphonic, homophonic, gut strings, Baroque bows, endpin, shoulder rest, instrumentation
Pre-Assessment: Students will critique a recording or live performance of Baroque repertoire.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Look up definitions,
Listen to and/or watch a Listen to and/or watch a
take notes
performance of Baroque performance of Baroque
music. Group
music. Group
discussion of attributes.
discussion of attributes.
Practice writing a
Discuss personal
critique.
responses referencing
vocabulary and
characteristics of the
music.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Modeling, Facilitate a
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion, Guided class discussion on
Practice
personal responses to
music, Guided Practice
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Vocabulary test over
Critique a performance
Respond to and critique
Baroque terminology.
of music of the Baroque a performance of music
period addressing unity
of the Baroque period
of mood, rhythmic
addressing unity of
characteristics, melodic
mood, rhythmic
characteristics, terraced
characteristics, melodic
dynamics, textural
characteristics, terraced
characteristics, and
dynamics, textural
instrumentation.
characteristics, and
instrumentation.

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research Baroque music.
Use audio-visual resources.
236

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Independent research
using online and library
resources. Analysis of
works. Prepare a
presentation.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided
Practice

Assessment:
Research Baroque
music. Select works.
Respond to and critique
a performance of music
of the Baroque period
addressing unity of
mood, rhythmic
characteristics, melodic
characteristics, terraced
dynamics, textural
characteristics, and
instrumentation. Present
the results to the class.

Type critiques on the computer.


Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students research and compare Baroque music to another genre.
Worksheets that break criticism into parts can be provided to students who need more structure.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA:
Student Task(s):
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Baroque period addressing unity of mood, rhythmic
characteristics, melodic characteristics, terraced dynamics, textural characteristics, and instrumentation.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to apply analytical skills to other subjects.
Students will be able to critique other genres of music.
Students who continue to study music will apply critique skills to musical works.
The understanding of Baroque style will help students play with more stylistic accuracy.
Students will have a life-long appreciation of music.

237

Music Criticism Scoring Guide


Criteria

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Introduction
Tells plan to critique. Gives
information about the work:
composers name, musicians
name, title of piece, when and
where it was created, how it
was used, time period, style, or
culture.
Description
Sentences that list everything
heard or seen in the
performance, including names
of instruments

Clearly states plan to


critique another artists
work. All available
information is given.

States plan to critique


another artists work.
Most available
information is given.

Artists work is
mentioned. Tells
artists name and title.

Artists name
or title of
work listed.

Logical, coherent, complete,


detailed description of what
is seen/heard in the
performance.

Complete description of
what is seen/heard in the
work.

Complete description
of what is seen/heard
in the work but slightly
unorganized.

Analysis
Analyzes work to determine
how each applies: position,
phrasing, tone quality, bowing
style, intonation, articulation,
rhythm, and expressive
qualities.
Interpretation
Explains the artists use of
style, emotional mood or
attitude toward the subject, and
purpose of the work

Considers each element to


determine which are most
important in the work.
Explains, in detail, how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Clearly infers meaning of
work based upon analysis.
Clearly supports all
statements with detailed,
specific, reference to
musical elements. Relates
the performers choices to
personal interpretation of
the composers work.

Lists elements used.


Tells how or where
some elements and
principles are used in
the work.

Judgment
Evaluates the quality of the
composition

Evaluates the composition


on the basis of information
about the composers life,
times, and intentions.
Evaluates the quality of the
performance on musicians
tone/intonation, technique
articulation, and expression
or musicianship. Supports
all statements with specific,
detailed reference to the
work.

Considers elements to
determine which are
most important in the
work. Explains how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Interprets the meaning of
work based upon
analysis. Supports
statements with
reference to musical
elements. Connects
most of the performers
choices to a general
interpretation of the
composers work.
Evaluates the
composition on the basis
of information about the
composers intentions.
Evaluates the quality of
the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
and expression or
musicianship. Supports
most statements with
reference to the work.

Random
mention of
one or two
details
seen/heard in
the work.
Partially lists
elements.

Mechanics
Grammar, Style, Form

Free of errors. Consistently


uses third person. Uses
sophisticated sentence
variety, precise vocabulary.
References last name only
after introductory
paragraph. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

Few minor errors in


spelling or grammar.
Uses third person. Some
sentence variety,
appropriate vocabulary.
References last name
only after introductory
paragraph. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

238

Suggests a meaning of
the work. Supports
statement with
reference to some
musical elements.

Suggests
meaning of
the work.

Explains information
about the composers
life without connecting
it to the meaning of the
composition.
Discusses the
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
or
expression/musicianshi
p. Few references to
the work to support
statements.
Errors in grammar and
spelling without
affecting clarity. Some
use of first person.
Little sentence variety.
First and/or last name
of artist used
throughout writing.
All steps of critique
model present but out
of order.

States
personal
opinion.

Multiple
grammatical
errors
interfere with
content and
readability.
Uses first,
second,
and/or third
person. First
and/or last
name of artist
used
throughout
essay.

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should
know:
Characteristics of Baroque forms

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA3, G1.5, AP1A9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be
able to do:
Compare and contrast Baroque suite, fugue, and
concerto grosso forms.

Baroque Suite
Multi-movement
Overture/Prelude (polyphonic)
Dance-based movements (homophonic)
Binary form
Compound ternary
Concerto Grosso
Multi-movement (varying textures)
Concertino/Ripieno
Basso continuo
Fugue Can be used as one movement in Baroque
Suite or Concerto Gross or as a stand-alone form
Single movement
Polyphonic texture
Statement
Antecedent & Consequence
Unit Vocabulary: terraced dynamics, fugue, suite, concerto grosso, basso continuo, ornamentation,
monophonic, polyphonic, homophonic, instrumentation
Pre-Assessment: Vocabulary test
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, look up
Listen and/or watch
Practice composing
definitions
performances. Score
eight-measure melodies.
analysis.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Direct Instruction,
Modeling
Modeling, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of
Compare and contrast
Compose an eightBaroque suite, fugue,
Baroque suite, fugue,
measure melody in the
and concerto grosso
and concerto grosso
Baroque style.
forms.
forms.

239

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research. Practice
composing.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction,
Modeling, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Compose a single
movement in the
Baroque style.

Technology Integration:
Use notation software to compose.
Use online and library sources to research Baroque forms.
Use word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a chart/poster that visually compares and contrasts the forms.
Compose an eight-measure melody in the Baroque style.
Compose a single movement in the Baroque style.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast Baroque suite, fugue, and concerto grosso forms.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music is organized sound.
Students will apply organization of ideas in music to other disciplines.
Audience members will better understand musical ideas through knowledge of musical forms.

240

Scoring Guide for Chamber Orchestra, CCO IIIB Form


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
Baroque suite, fugue, and
concerto grosso forms.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates characteristics of
Baroque suite, fugue, and
concerto grosso forms.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
characteristics of Baroque
suite, fugue, and concerto
grosso forms.

241

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Baroque suite, fugue, or
concerto grosso forms.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Baroque suite, fugue, or
concerto grosso forms.

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, IC1A9-12

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Characteristics of Baroque Music


Imitation (thematic pitch repetition, rhythmic repetition)
Symmetry of Form
Ornamentation (heavy decoration)
Played in churches and palaces

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course
students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast Baroque
music and architecture.

Characteristics of Baroque Architecture


Imitation (themes from nature, figure sculptures)
Symmetry of Form
Ornamentation (heavy decoration)
Used for churches and palaces
Unit Vocabulary: imitation, symmetry, ornamentation
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Baroque music and architecture.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will investigate Student will
Baroque music and
independently research
architecture in
Baroque music and
cooperative groups.
architecture using online
and library resources.
Student will give an
audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Cooperative Learning
Guided Practice
Model

Assessment:
List characteristics of
both Baroque music and
architecture.

Assessment:
Compare and contrast
Baroque music and
architecture.

Assessment:
Audio-visual
presentation to class.

Technology Integration:

242

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
Baroque music and
architecture using online
and library resources.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Collaboration
with Art/Industrial Tech
teachers, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Compose a piece of
music in the Baroque
style and design the
faade of a concert hall
in which it would be
performed.

Students will use online and library resources to research Baroque music and architecture.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Baroque music and architecture.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Baroque music and architecture.
Create examples of Baroque music and architecture.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast Baroque music and architecture.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and architecture created in the same time and place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different art forms.

243

Scoring Guide Chamber Orchestra, CCO IVA: Connections between Baroque music and architecture
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
Baroque music and
architecture.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Baroque music and
architecture.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Baroque music and
architecture.

244

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Baroque music or
architecture.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Baroque music or architecture.

Chamber Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:
17th Century Music
Increasing complexity
Establishment of common practice music theory principles
Advancement of keyboard instruments (harpsichord, pipe
organ)
Violin family established

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.10, IC1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course
students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast 17th century
music and technological/scientific
ideas.

17th Century Technological/Scientific ideas


Union of mathematics and experimentation
Improvements in medicine, mining, and navigation and
industry
Unit Vocabulary: harpsichord, pipe organ
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of 17th century innovations in music and technology/science.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will investigate Student will
17th century music and
independently research
technology/science in
17th century music and
technology/science
cooperative groups.
using online and library
resources. Student will
give an audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Cooperative Learning
Guided Practice
Model
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of
Compare and contrast
Audio-visual
both 17th century music
17th century music and
presentation to class.
and technology/science. technological/scientific
ideas.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable
Assessment:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research 17th century music and technologic/scientific ideas.
Write comparisons using word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:

245

Create a poster that compares and contrasts 17th century music and technologic/scientific ideas.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting 17th century music and technologic/scientific ideas.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast 17th century music and technological/scientific ideas.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and technology/science created in the same time and place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different disciplines.

246

Chamber Orchestra, CCO IVB: Connections between 17th Century music and technologic/scientific ideas.
Learning Target
Learning Target:
Compare and contrast 17th
century music and
technological/scientific
ideas.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates 17th century music
and technological/scientific
ideas

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts 17th
century music and
technological/scientific ideas

247

2
Basic
Explains characteristics 17th
century music or
technological/scientific
ideas.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of 17th
century music or
technological/scientific ideas.

Chamber Orchestra, CCO V


Core Conceptual Objective V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and historical events?

Missouri State Standards; Grade


Level Expectations
FA5, G1.9, HC1A9-12, HC1B9-12,
HC1C9-12, HC1D9-12

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Style/Genre/Period
Baroque Sacred Music
Baroque Secular Music
Time/Place when composed

1600-1750, Europe

1600-1750, Europe

Composer(s)

Bach, Vivaldi, Handel

Bach, Vivaldi, Handel

Form

Cantata, Mass, Oratorio

Characteristics of Music (clues


used to identify it)

Most works in Latin


Mostly vocal and organ repertoire

Baroque Suite, Opera, Concerto


Grosso, Fugue
Most works in vernacular
Mostly instrumental repertoire

Function in society

Worship

Entertainment

Historical Context
What was happening at that time
and place? (war, peace, science,
technology, type of
government)
Who were the musicians?
What training did they have?
Who were audience members?

Conflict between church and


scientific innovation and
discovery
Church becomes less important in
government
Musicians employed by church
Musicians trained through
apprenticeship
Audience: parish

Contemporary Context
When/where is this music played
today?
How did this music influence
current musicians/composers?

Played today in religious settings,


Now performed in secular venues
as well as in churches
Foundation for later works

Conflict between church and


scientific innovation and
discovery
Influenced by dance styles
Aristocracy becomes more
important in government
Musicians employed by
monarch/aristocrats
Musicians trained through
apprenticeship
Audience: court
Folk music musicians trained
by rote one generation to the next
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will compare and contrast sacred and secular music in the Baroque era.
Unit Vocabulary: Latin, clergy, aristocrat, vernacular, secular, sacred, mass, oratorio, hymn, chorale,
opera
Pre-Assessment: List the characteristics of Baroque secular and sacred music.

248

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will investigate
sacred and secular music
of the Baroque period in
cooperative groups.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
sacred and secular music
of the Baroque period.

Assessment:
List characteristics of
sacred and secular music
of the Baroque period.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
sacred and secular music
of the Baroque period
using online and library
resources. Student will
give an audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Audio-visual
presentation to class.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Students use online and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students present information to others using computer technology (e.g., written paper, power point
presentation).
Students use word processing software to write comparison.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts sacred and secular music of the Baroque period.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting sacred and secular music of the Baroque period.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast sacred and secular music in the Baroque era.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music serves many functions/purposes in historical context.
Students will understand that contemporary music is influenced by music from the Baroque period.

249

Scoring Guide for Chamber Orchestra, CCO V: Music in historical and cultural context
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will compare and
contrast sacred and secular
music in the Baroque era.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Baroque sacred and
secular music.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Baroque sacred and secular
music.

250

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Baroque sacred or secular
music.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Baroque sacred or secular
music.

Concert Orchestra

251

Overview of Content and Skills for Concert Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Vibrato skills: variation of width and speed of vibrato appropriate to repertoire.
Bow skills: loure, various speeds of spiccato, 8-note slurs
Shifting skills: 2nd position for all instruments.
Musicianship: Repertoire: through grade 4; Improvisation: improvise melodies in D and G major, twooctaves
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading skills: allegro, moderato, cantabile, dolce, grace note, grazioso, grave, maestoso, meno, molto,
pesante, poco, sostenuto, subito, tenuto
Sight-reading skills:
Key Signatures
Key Signatures will be limited to the following:
C, G, D Major, and relative natural minors.
There should be at least one key signature change per piece.
Meters
Meters will be limited to the following:
2/4, , 4/4, Cut Time
Tempo
Tempi will be no slower than 60 beats per minorute and no faster than 10 eight- beats per minorute.
For continuous pieces, there will be at least one tempo change, but no more than two.
Clefs
Viola will use only alto clef.
Cello and Bass will use only bass clef.
Position Work
Minorimal 3rd position work used in the violin 1 part only.
Minorimal 4th position work used in the cello.
Minorimal half position work and 5th position work used in the bass.
Fingerings
All fingerings will be marked when position work (listed above) is used.
Divisi
There will be no divisi parts written.
Multiple Stops
Multiple stops will be limited to all open strings or open strings with one finger used.
Repeats
1st and 2nd endings
D.C. and D.S.
Fine
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Major scales
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Two octave scales: B-flat Major, b minor
C. Composition
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of A Major, in a triple meter, using bowing and shifting markings.

252

Overview of Content and Skills for Concert Orchestra


CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Classical period addressing contrast of mood,
rhythmic characteristics, melodic characteristics, dynamics, and instrumentation.
B. Form
Compound Ternary, Theme and Variation
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will compare and contrast Classical music and Classical ballet.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines
Students make connections between the political/social revolutions of the late 18th century and Classical
period music.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will compare and contrast music of the Baroque and Classical periods.

253

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question
How do musicians express ideas through performance?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:

Missouri State Standards; Grade Level


Expectations
FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A9-12, PP2B9-12,
PP2C9-12, PP2D9-12, PP2E9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:

Vibrato skills: variation of width and


speed of vibrato appropriate to
repertoire.

Students will apply use of vibrato with speed and width


appropriate to repertoire.

Bow skills: loure, various speeds of


spiccato, eight-note slurs

Students will perform repertoire that require loure, various


speeds of spiccato, and eight-note slurs.

Shifting skills: 2nd position for all


instruments.

Students will perform repertoire that requires 2nd position for all
instruments.

Musicianship:
Repertoire: through grade 4;
Improvisation: improvise melodies in D
and G major, two octaves

Students will perform repertoire through grade 4.


Students will improvise melodies in a two-octave range using
the keys of D and G Major.

Unit Vocabulary: improvisation, loure, spiccato, slurs


Pre-Assessment: Students will take playing tests to demonstrate readiness.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Listen to examples of
others improvisations.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction,
Demonstration
Assessment:
Define improvisation.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Imitate teachers examples
of 3-6 note improvisations.
Teaching Strategy:
Modeling
Assessment:
Respond to another persons
call with an improvised 36 note response.

Technology Integration:
Students record their performances for self-evaluation.
Students use notation software on the computer.
Students use SmartMusic software.

254

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice improvising with a
partner in a given key
Teaching Strategy:
Model improvising within a
set of parameters
Assessment:
Students will improvise
melodies in a two-octave
range using the keys of D
and G Major.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research a style and plan
the cadenza.
Teaching Strategy:
Coaching.
Assessment:
Improvise a complete
cadenza.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Pair weaker students with more advanced students.
Advanced students may be given or may select solo or small ensemble pieces in addition to whole class
work.
Students are encouraged to take private lessons and participate in outside performing groups.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I:
Student Tasks:
Students will apply use of vibrato with speed and width appropriate to repertoire.
Students will perform repertoire that require loure, various speeds of spiccato, and eight-note slurs.
Students will perform repertoire that requires 2nd position for all instruments.
Students will perform repertoire through grade 4.
Students will improvise melodies in a two-octave range using the keys of D and G Major.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who choose to continue playing an instrument will build upon skills learned in this class.
Students learn self-discipline.
Students learn leadership skills.
Students learn to evaluate the quality of musical performances.
Students learn social skills.

255

Scoring Guide for Concert Orchestra CCO I: Performance Skills


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will perform
loure bowing style.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Smooth bowing with


consistent rhythm

Smooth bowing with


consistent rhythm

Relaxed bow hold with


flexible fingers and wrist

Relaxed bow hold with


flexible fingers and wrist

Consistent tone throughout


stroke

Inconsistent tone throughout


stroke

Adjusts speed and weight


appropriate to dynamic
markings

Adjusts speed and weight


appropriate to dynamic
markings

256

2
Basic
Mostly smooth bowing
with inconsistencies in
rhythm
Mostly relaxed bow hold
lacking flexible fingers and
wrist
Inconsistent tone
throughout stroke
Speed and weight
inappropriate to dynamic
markings

1
Below Basic
Bowing is not smooth or
consistent in rhythm
Tense bow hold lacking
flexibility
Inconsistent tone throughout
stroke
Speed and weight
inappropriate to dynamic
markings

Learning Target:
Students will perform
various speeds of spiccato.

Fast Spiccato:
Bow is placed above balance
point as appropriate to tempo
and repertoire

Fast Spiccato:
Bow is placed above balance
point as appropriate to tempo
and repertoire

Fast Spiccato:
Bow placement is
inappropriate to tempo and
repertoire

Relaxed bow hold with


flexible fingers and wrist

Relaxed bow hold with


flexible fingers and wrist

Mostly relaxed bow hold


lacking flexible fingers and
wrist

Bow stick tilt toward


fingerboard

Bow stick not tilted (flat bow


hair)

Bounce height is close to


strings and bow stroke is
even

Bounce height is close to


strings and bow stroke is
even

Moderate Spiccato:
Bow is placed at balance
point or below as appropriate
to tempo and repertoire

Moderate Spiccato:
Bow is placed at balance
point or below as appropriate
to tempo and repertoire

Moderate Spiccato:
Bow placement is
inappropriate to tempo and
repertoire

Relaxed bow hold with


flexible fingers and wrist

Relaxed bow hold with


flexible fingers and wrist

Mostly relaxed bow hold


lacking flexible fingers and
wrist

Bow stick tilt toward


fingerboard

Bow stick not tilted (flat bow


hair)

Bounce height is close to


strings and bow stroke is
even

Bounce height is close to


strings and bow stroke is
even

257

Bow stick not tilted (flat


bow hair)
Bounce height is
inconsistent and bow stroke
is uneven

Bow stick not tilted (flat


bow hair)
Bounce height is
inconsistent and bow stroke
is uneven

Fast Spiccato:
Bow placement is
inappropriate to tempo and
repertoire
Tense bow hold lacking
flexibility
Bow stick not tilted (flat bow
hair)
Loss of control due to
inconsistent bow stroke

Moderate Spiccato:
Bow placement is
inappropriate to tempo and
repertoire
Tense bow hold lacking
flexibility
Bow stick not tilted (flat bow
hair)
Loss of control due to
inconsistent bow stroke

Learning Target:
Students will perform
eight-note slurs.

Learning Target:
Students will perform
repertoire that requires 2nd
position for all instruments.

Learning Target:
Students will improvise
melodies in a two-octave
range using the keys of D
and G Major.

Always performs music with


correct technique for eightnote slurs.

Consistently performs music


with correct technique for
eight-note slurs.

Sometimes performs music


with correct technique for
eight-note slurs.

Shifts with a smooth, gliding


motion

Shifts with a smooth, gliding


motion

Shifts with a smooth, gliding


motion

Shifts with a rough motion,


lifts fingers from strings

Accurate intonation

Accurate intonation

Inaccurate intonation

Inaccurate intonation

Hand position remains


consistent while shifting

Hand position remains


consistent while shifting

Hand position inconsistent


while shifting

Hand position inconsistent


while shifting

Appropriate adjustments to
bow speed and weight during
shift

Bow speed and weight are not


appropriately adjusted during
shift

Bow speed and weight are not


appropriately adjusted during
shift

Bow speed and weight are not


appropriately adjusted during
shift

Pitches remain within the


given key

Pitches remain within the given


key

Pitches remain within the


given key

Pitches outside the given


key

Rhythms consistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms consistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms inconsistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms inconsistent with


chosen meter

Utilizes two-octave range

Utilizes two-octave range

Utilizes less than two-octave


range

Utilizes less than two-octave


range

Single focal point

Multiple focal points


Multiple focal points

Multiple focal points

258

Rarely performs music with


correct technique for eightnote slurs.

Learning Target:
Students will perform
grade 4 repertoire.

Always Demonstrates:

Consistently Demonstrates:

Sometimes Demonstrates:

Rarely Demonstrates:

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all registers
and ranges, appropriate to
literature

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all registers
and ranges, appropriate to
literature

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout
all registers and ranges

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement as
instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

259

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?
How do performers interpret the composers musical intentions?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Reading skills: allegro, moderato, cantabile, dolce, grace note,


grazioso, grave, maestoso, meno, molto, pesante, poco,
sostenuto, subito, tenuto.
Sight-reading skills:
Key Signatures
Key Signatures will be limited to the following:
C, G, D major, and relative natural minors.
There should be at least one key signature change per piece.
Meters
Meters will be limited to the following:
2/4, 3/4, 4/4, Cut Time
Tempo
Tempi will be no slower than 60 beats per minute and no
faster than 108 beats per minute.
For continuous pieces, there will be at least one tempo
change, but no more than two.
Clefs
Viola will use only alto clef.
Cello and Bass will use only bass clef.
Position Work
Minimal 3rd position work used in the violin 1 part only.
Minimal 4th position work used in the cello.
Minimal half position work and 5th position work used in the
bass.
Fingerings
All fingerings will be marked when position work (listed
above) is used.
Divisi
There will be no divisi parts written.
Multiple Stops
Multiple stops will be limited to all open strings or open
strings with one finger used.
Repeats
1st and 2nd endings
D.C. and D.S.
Fine
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Major scale

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: PP1A9-12, EP1C9-12,
EP1D9-12, EP1E9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Students will perform repertoire using
grade level appropriate expression.

Students will review a piece of grade 3


literature, develop a plan, and play at
sight from a written composition.

Students will play and sing a Major scale.

Unit Vocabulary: allegro, moderato, cantabile, dolce, grace note, grazioso, grave, maestoso, meno, molto,
pesante, poco, sostenuto, subito, tenuto

260

Pre-Assessment:
Students define symbols and terms.
Students perform playing tests from sight.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Use dictionaries to
translate terms from
other languages to
English. Use flashcards
to practice identifying
symbols and
terminology.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Demonstration

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Practice performing
symbols and terms.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice planning and
playing multiple pieces
at sight.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Identify symbols and
terminology of
expression.

Assessment:
Demonstrate each
symbol and expressive
term.

Assessment:
Students will review a
piece of grade 3
literature, develop a
plan, and play at sight
from a written
composition.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Use music theory software.
Use internet websites.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who know terms can teach them to others.
Students create posters that teach the terms.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIA:
Student Task(s):
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate expression.
Students will review a piece of grade 3 literature, develop a plan, and play at sight from a written
composition.
Students will play and sing a Major scale.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who continue in music will use reading skills to play more advanced literature.
Students will be able to read a new piece of music and understand the composers musical intentions.
Students will be able to perform expressively.

261

Scoring Guide for Concert Orchestra, CCO IIA, Music Reading Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Students will perform
repertoire using grade level
appropriate expression.

Performs all of the expressive


symbols and markings in
repertoire.

Performs most of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs some of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs few of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Learning Target:
Students will review a
piece of grade 3 literature,
develop a plan, and play at
sight from a written
composition.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Ineffective review.

Performs with accurate:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with few errors in:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with many errors


in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performance addresses few


categories and makes many
errors in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Learning Target:
Students will play and sing
a Major scale.

Matches all pitches in


appropriate range.

Matches all pitches in


appropriate range.

Matches most pitches in


appropriate range.

Matches few pitches in


appropriate range.

262

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Two-octave scales: B-flat Major, b
minor

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: EP1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to play:
Play two-octave scales using appropriate fingerings and finger
patterns: B-flat Major, b minor

Unit Vocabulary: tonic, whole step, half step, diatonic, melodic minor, harmonic minor, natural minor
Pre-Assessment:
Students play two-octave scales in each key.
Students write out the scales.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash cards
Practice scale fingerings and Practice pieces.
finger patterns.

Teaching
Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Modeling
Assessment:
Identify the key
signature and
scale on paper.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Play two-octave scales
using appropriate fingerings
and finger patterns: B-flat
Major, b minor

Assessment:
Perform pieces that require
a two-octave range in the
following keys: B-flat
Major, b minor

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a short melody
that includes a twooctave range in one of
the following keys: Bflat Major, b minor
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Use a scoring guide to
assess an original
composition.

Technology Integration: Students practice using internet-based software and SmartMusic.


Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play multi-octave scales.
Play a scale using alternate fingerings.
Play additional scales beyond designated keys.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIB:
Student Task(s):
Play two-octave scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: B-flat Major, b minor
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to sight-read passages with greater fluency.
Students will improve sense of tonality.
Students will be better able to play in various key signatures.

263

Scoring Guide for Concert Orchestra, CCOIIB: Finger Patterns and Scales
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Play two-octave scales
using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: B-flat Major, b
minor.

4
Advanced
Student always plays the
targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

264

1
Below Basic
Student rarely plays the
targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to compose an eight-measure
melody in the key of A Major, in a triple
meter, using a variety of bowing and
shifting markings.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, PP2A9-12, PP4A9-12, EP1A9-12, EP1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of A Major, in a triple
meter, using a variety of bowing and shifting markings.

Unit Vocabulary: Meter, triple meter, simple meter, compound meter


Pre-Assessment: Students write a short phrase in A Major.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, read a
Take notes, read a
Practice composing and
handout or article that
handout or article that
sharing feedback with peers.
describes characteristics describes characteristics
of a good melody.
of a good melody.
Discuss examples.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Describe the qualities of Critique a melody using Write an eight-measure
a good melody.
qualities of a good
melody in the key of A
melody.
Major, in a triple meter,
using a variety of bowing
and shifting markings.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research
compositions.
Practice composing
and sharing
feedback with peers.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Write an extended
composition with a
harmonized melody.

Technology Integration: Students will use a music notation program such as Finale or Sibelius.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students could write in two parts or write a longer composition.
Advanced students could modulate to another key within their melody.
Students with less readiness could write shorter pieces or pieces with limited pitch range.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC:
Student Task(s):
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of A Major, in a triple meter, using a variety of bowing and
shifting markings.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that composing is a career option.
Students will better appreciate the work of composers.
Musical composition skills will lead to better music reading skills.

265

Scoring Guide for Concert Orchestra, CCO IIC: Composition


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Write an eight-measure
melody in the key of A
Major, in a triple meter,
using a variety of bowing
and shifting markings.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of A Major
Complete phrases
Single focal point
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing
Dynamic markings
Expressive symbols

Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of A Major
Complete phrases
Single focal point
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing

266

2
Basic
Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of A
Major
Incomplete phrases
Multiple focal points
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing

1
Below Basic
Composition includes:
Less than eight-measures
Lacks A Major tonal center
Incomplete phrases
Multiple focal points
Inconsistent meter

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to critique a performance of music
of the Classical period addressing
contrast of mood, rhythmic
characteristics, melodic characteristics,
dynamics, and instrumentation.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs,


FA2, G1.5, AP2A9-12, AP2B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Classical
period addressing contrast of mood, rhythmic characteristics,
melodic characteristics, dynamics, and instrumentation.

Unit Vocabulary: sonata, ornamentation, instrumentation, homophonic, phrasing, antecedent,


consequence
Pre-Assessment: Students will critique a recording or live performance of Classical repertoire.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Look up
Listen to and/or watch a Listen to and/or watch a
definitions, take
performance of
performance of Classical
notes
Classical period music.
period music. Group
Group discussion of
discussion of attributes.
attributes. Practice
Discuss personal responses
writing a critique.
referencing vocabulary and
characteristics of the music.
Teaching
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Strategy:
Modeling, Facilitate a
Modeling, Facilitate a class
Direct Instruction
class discussion,
discussion on personal
Guided Practice
responses to music, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Vocabulary test
Critique a performance
Respond to and critique a
over Classical
of music of the
performance of music of the
period
Classical period
Classical period addressing
terminology.
addressing contrast of
contrast of mood, rhythmic
mood, rhythmic
characteristics, melodic
characteristics, melodic characteristics, dynamics,
characteristics,
and instrumentation.
dynamics, and
instrumentation.

267

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Independent research using
online and library
resources. Analysis of
works. Prepare a
presentation.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided Practice

Assessment:
Research Classical period
music. Select works.
Respond to and critique a
performance of music of
the Classical period
addressing contrast of
mood, rhythmic
characteristics, melodic
characteristics, dynamics,
and instrumentation
characteristics, and
instrumentation. Present
the results to the class.

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research Classical music.
Use audio-visual resources.
Type critiques on the computer.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students research and compare Classical music to another genre.
Worksheets that break criticism into parts can be provided to students who need more structure.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA:
Student Task(s):
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Classical period addressing contrast of mood,
rhythmic characteristics, melodic characteristics, dynamics, and instrumentation.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to apply analytical skills to other subjects.
Students will be able to critique other genres of music.
Students who continue to study music will apply critique skills to musical works.
The understanding of the Classical style will help students play with more stylistic accuracy.
Students will have a life-long appreciation of music.

268

Music Criticism Scoring Guide


Criteria
Introduction
Tells plan to critique. Gives
information about the work:
composers name, musicians
name, title of piece, when and
where it was created, how it
was used, time period, style, or
culture
Description
Sentences that list everything
heard or seen in the
performance, including names
of instruments
Analysis
Describes pitch, tempo, and
dynamics

Interpretation
Explains the artists use of
style, emotional mood or
attitude toward the subject, and
purpose of the work

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Clearly states plan to


critique another artists
work. All available
information is given.

States plan to critique


another artists work.
Most available
information is given.

Artists work is
mentioned. Tells
artists name and title.

Artists name or
title of work
listed.

Logical, coherent, complete,


detailed description of what
is seen/heard in the
performance.

Logical, coherent,
complete description of
what is seen/heard in the
work.

Complete description
of what is seen/heard
in the work but slightly
unorganized.

Considers each element to


determine which are most
important in the work.
Explains, in detail, how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Clearly infers meaning of
work based upon analysis.
Clearly supports all
statements with detailed,
specific, reference to
musical elements. Relates
the performers choices to
personal interpretation of
the composers work.

Considers elements to
determine which are
most important in the
work. Explains how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Interprets the meaning of
work based upon
analysis. Supports
statements with
reference to musical
elements. Connects
most of the performers
choices to a general
interpretation of the
composers work.
Evaluates the
composition on the basis
of information about the
composers intentions.
Evaluates the quality of
the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
and expression or
musicianship. Supports
most statements with
reference to the work.
Few minor errors in
spelling or grammar.
Uses third person. Some
sentence variety,
appropriate vocabulary.
References last name
only after introductory
paragraph. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

Lists elements used.


Tells how or where
some elements and
principles are used in
the work.

Random
mention of one
or two details
seen/heard in the
work.
Partially lists
elements.

Judgment
Evaluates the quality of the
composition

Evaluates the composition


on the basis of information
about the composers life,
times, and intentions.
Evaluates the quality of the
performance on musicians
tone/intonation, technique
articulation, and expression
or musicianship. Supports
all statements with specific,
detailed reference to the
work.

Mechanics
Grammar, Style, Form

Free of errors. Consistently


uses third person. Uses
sophisticated sentence
variety, precise vocabulary.
References last name only
after introductory
paragraph. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

269

Suggests a meaning of
the work. Supports
statement with
reference to some
musical elements.

Suggests
meaning of the
work.

Explains information
about the composers
life without connecting
it to the meaning of the
composition.
Discusses the
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
or expression
/musicianship. Few
references to the work
to support statements.
Errors in grammar and
spelling without
affecting clarity. Some
use of first person.
Little sentence variety.
First and/or last name
of artist used
throughout writing.
All steps of critique
model present but out
of order.

States personal
opinion.

Multiple
grammatical
errors interfere
with content and
readability.
Uses first,
second, and/or
third person.
First and/or last
name of artist
used throughout
essay.

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA3, G1.5, AP1A9-12

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Characteristics of Classical period forms

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course
students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast compound
ternary with theme and variation.

Compound Ternary
Three sections (ABA)
Key relationship: Tonic -> New Key -> Tonic
Melodic, harmonic, and textural contrasts between A and B
A and B could be stand-alone forms, but are not intended to
be performed individually
Theme and Variation
Endless number of sections possible after original theme is
presented
No distinct key relationships between sections (variations)
Melodic, harmonic, textural, and timbral modifications of the
theme
Each variation is a complete musical thought, but are not
intended to be performed individually
Unit Vocabulary: minuet and trio, binary, compound ternary, tonic, relative major, dominant, texture,
melody, harmony, theme, variation, counterpoint, timbre, orchestration
Pre-Assessment: Vocabulary test
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, look up
Listen and/or watch
Practice composing
definitions
performances. Score
eight-measure melodies.
analysis.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Direct Instruction,
Modeling
Modeling, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of
Compare and contrast
Compose an eightcompound ternary and
compound ternary with
measure melody in the
theme and variation.
theme and variation.
Classical style.

270

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research. Practice
composing.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction,
Modeling, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Compose a single
movement in the
Classical style.

Technology Integration:
Use notation software to compose.
Use online and library sources to research Classical forms.
Use word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a chart/poster that visually compares and contrasts the forms.
Compose an eight-measure melody in the Classical style.
Compose a single movement in the Classical style.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast compound ternary with theme and variation.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music is organized sound.
Students will apply organization of ideas in music to other disciplines.
Audience members will better understand musical ideas through knowledge of musical forms.

271

Scoring Guide for Concert Orchestra, CCO IIIB: Form


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
compound ternary with
theme and variation.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates characteristics of
compound ternary and theme
and variation.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
characteristics of compound
ternary and theme and
variation.

272

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
compound ternary and
theme and variation.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
compound ternary and theme
and variation.

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Characteristics of Classical Music


Formal structure
Aristocratic audience
Importance of melody and phrasing with a
flowing style
Mood consistent within a movement, changes
with change of movement
Characteristics of Classical ballet
Formal structure
Aristocratic audience
Graceful, flowing, precise movements
Mood consistent within a movement, changes
with change of movement

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, IC1A9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Students will make connections between
Classical music and Classical ballet.

Unit Vocabulary: ballet, adagio (musical term and ballet term), allegro (musical term and ballet term)
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Classical music and ballet.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes.
Students will investigate Student will
Classical music and
independently research
ballet in cooperative
Classical music and
groups.
ballet using online and
library resources.
Student will give an
audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Cooperative Learning
Guided Practice
Model
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of
Compare and contrast
Audio-visual
Classical music and
Classical music and
presentation to class.
ballet.
ballet.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
Classical music and
ballet using online and
library resources.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Compose music for a
short dance sequence.

Technology Integration:
Students will use online and library resources to research Classical music and ballet.

273

Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Classical music and ballet.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Classical music and ballet.
Create examples of Classical music and ballet.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast Classical music and ballet.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music and ballet created in the same time and place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different art forms.

274

Scoring Guide Chamber Orchestra, CCO IVA: Connections between Classical music and Classical ballet
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
Classical music and
Classical ballet.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Classical music and
ballet.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Classical music and ballet.

275

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Classical music and ballet.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Classical music and ballet.

Concert Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Classical music:
Music is starting to become accessible to the newly emerging
middle class
Exploration outside of Baroque compositional customs:
melody gains prominence, established rules for musical
forms, pieces become longer and more developed
Musicians begin to become independent from aristocratic
and church patronage

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.10, IC1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Make connections between the
political/social revolutions of the late
18th century and Classical period music.

Political and social revolution:


American and French revolutions are direct results of an
emerging middle class attacking the privileges of the
aristocracy and clergy
Reason, not tradition or custom, is a guiding force in human
decision
Unit Vocabulary: aristocrat, clergy, middle class, reason
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of social and political revolutions and music in the Classical era.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Student Activity:
Students will investigate
Classical era music and
the political/social
revolutions in
cooperative groups.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Makes connections
between the
political/social
revolutions of the late
18th century and
Classical period music.

Assessment:
List characteristics of
both Classical era music
and the political/social
revolutions.

Student Activity:
Student will independently
research Classical era music and
the political/social revolutions
using online and library
resources. Student will give an
audio-visual presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Audio-visual presentation to
class.

276

Level 4
Extended
Thinking
Student
Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching
Strategy:
Not Applicable
Assessment:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research Classical era music and the political/social revolutions.
Write comparisons using word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Classical era music and the political/social revolutions.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Classical era music and the political/social
revolutions.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Students will make connections between the political/social revolutions of the late 18th century and
Classical period music.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music created during political and social revolutions in the same time and
place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different disciplines.

277

Chamber Orchestra, CCO IVB: Connections between music and social studies.
Learning Target
Learning Target:
Makes connections
between the political/social
revolutions of the late 18th
century and Classical
period music.

4
Advanced
Makes connections between
the political/social revolutions
of the late 18th century and
Classical period music using
relevant examples. Defends
position with fact-based
information.

3
Proficient
Makes connections between
the political/social revolutions
of the late 18th century and
Classical period music using
relevant examples.

278

2
Basic
Explains the political/social
revolutions of the late 18th
century or Classical period
music.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Classical period music.

Concert Orchestra, CCO V


Core Conceptual Objective V: Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and historical events?

Missouri State Standards


FA5, G1.9, HC1A9-12, HC1B9-12,
HC1C9-12, HC1D9-12

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Style/Genre/Period
Baroque Period
Classical Period
Time/Place when
composed

1600-1750, Europe

1775-1825, Europe & America

Composer(s)

Bach, Handel, Vivaldi

Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven

Form

Sonata, Baroque Suite, Fugue

Sonata, Theme and Variation

Characteristics of Music
(clues used to identify it)

Formal structure
Highly ornamented
Homophonic and polyphonic
textures
Sacred
Secular entertainment
Conflict between church and
scientific innovation and discovery
Musicians employed by church and
aristocracy
Musicians trained through
apprenticeship
Audience: parish and courts

Formal structure
Simple lines
Homophonic texture

Function in society
Historical Context
What was happening at that
time and place? (war/peace,
science, technology, type of
government)
Who were the musicians?
What training did they have?
Who were audience
members?

Contemporary Context
When/where is this music
played today?
How did this music
influence current
musicians/composers?

Performed in secular venues and


churches
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

Secular entertainment
Sacred
Sacred music becomes less
prominent
Musicians still employed by church
and aristocracy but they become
entrepreneurs who earn money from
publications of their music and ticket
sales to their performances
Musicians trained through
apprenticeship
Audience: primarily aristocracy and
church, but middle class is emerging
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will compare and contrast music of the Baroque and Classical periods.
Unit Vocabulary: monarchy, democracy, revolution, homophonic, compound ternary, theme, variations,
ideology
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Baroque and Classical period music.

279

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will investigate
Baroque and Classical
period music in
cooperative groups.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Students will compare
and contrast music of
the Baroque and
Classical periods.

Assessment:
List characteristics of
Baroque and Classical
period music.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
Baroque and Classical
period music using
online and library
resources. Student will
give an audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Audio-visual
presentation to class.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Students use online and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students present information to others using computer technology (e.g., written paper, power point
presentation).
Students use word processing software to write comparison.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compare and contrast music in the Baroque and Classical periods.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting music in the Baroque and Classical periods.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast music of the Baroque and Classical periods.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music serves many functions/purposes in historical context.
Students will understand that contemporary music is influenced by music from the Baroque and Classical
periods.

280

Scoring Guide for Concert Orchestra, CCO V: Music in historical and cultural context
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will compare and
contrast music of the
Baroque and Classical
periods.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Compares, contrasts, and


evaluates music of the
Baroque and Classical periods.

Compares and contrasts music


of the Baroque and Classical
periods.

281

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
music of the Baroque or
Classical periods.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of music
of the Baroque or Classical
periods.

Symphonic
Orchestra

282

Overview of Content and Skills for Symphonic Orchestra


CCO I. Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Vibrato skills: variation of width and speed of vibrato appropriate to repertoire.
Bow skills: mixed slur patterns, multiple stops/chords,
Shifting skills: 4th and 5th positions for violin and viola. Thumb position for cello and bass.
Musicianship: Repertoire through grade 5; Improvisation: improvise melodies in various minor keys
CCO II. Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Reading skills: allargando, agitato, attaca, cadenza, concertino, ripieno, dolore, espressivo, fuoco, guisto,
lento, ma non troppo, morendo, ossia, pi, quasi, rubato, secco, stringendo, tacit.
Sight reading skills:
Key Signatures
Key Signatures will be limited to the following:
C, G, D, A, F, B-flat Major, and relative natural minors.
There should be at least one key signature change per piece.
Meters
Meters will be limited to the following:
2/4, 3/4, 4/4, Cut Time, 6/eight-, Mix Meters (7/eight- 3+2+2)
Tempo
Tempi will be no slower than 60 beats per minorute and no faster than 120 beats per minorute.
For continuous pieces, there will be at least one tempo change, but no more than two.
Clefs And Transpositions
Viola can have limited use of treble clef.
Cello can have limited use of tenor clef.
Bassoon and Trombone will use bass clef only.
All horns will be in F.
All clarinets will be in B-flat
All trumpets will be in B-flat
Position Work For Strings
3rd position and minorimal use of 5th position may be used in the violin 1 part only.
Minorimal 3rd position work may be used in the violin 2 and viola part.
Half, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th position work may be used in the cello.
Half position to thumb position work may be used in the bass.
Divisi
Limited use of divisi parts may be written.
Repeats
1st and 2nd endings may be used.
D.C. and D.S. may be used.
Fine may be used.
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): Melodic minor scales
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Three octave scales: Majors: C, G, D, A, E, F, B-flat; minors: a, e, b, f-sharp, c-sharp, a-flat, d, g, c, f
C. Composition
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of A minor, in a compound duple or triple meter, using bowing
and shifting markings.

283

Overview of Content and Skills for Symphonic Orchestra


CCO III. Students will analyze, critique, and compare and contrast music. Students will describe
personal responses to music.
A. Music Criticism
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Romantic period addressing individuality of style and
expression.
B. Form
Programmatic Music, Sonata
CCO IV. Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts
Students will compare and contrast between Romantic music and drama.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines
Students will make connections between literary writing style and Romantic music.
CCO V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and cultural contexts.
Students will compare and contrast programmatic music of the Romantic era.

284

Symphonic Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective I: Students will use performance skills to express musical ideas.
Essential Question
How do musicians express ideas through
performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:

Missouri State Standards


FA1, G2.5, GLE: PP2A9-12, PP2B9-12, PP2C912, PP2D9-12, PP2E9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:

Vibrato skills: variation of width and


speed of vibrato appropriate to
repertoire.

Vary the width and speed of vibrato.

Bow skills: mixed slur patterns,


multiple stops/chords,

Perform mixed slur patterns.


Perform multiple stops and chords.

Shifting skills: 4th and 5th positions for


violin and viola. Thumb position for
cello and bass.

Violinists and violists will shift into 4th and 5th positions.
Cellists and bassists will shift into thumb position.

Musicianship: Repertoire through


grade 5; Improvisation: improvise
melodies in various minor keys

Students will perform literature through grade 5.


Students will improvise melodies in various minor keys.

Unit Vocabulary: vibrato, slur, double-stop, chord, thumb position


Pre-Assessment: Students will perform a playing test.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Listen to examples
of vibrato, doublestops, chords, shifts
and slurs.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Practice vibrato,
double-stops, chords,
shifts and slurs.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Direct
instruction
Assessment:
Define definitions of
vibrato, doublestops, chords, shifts
and slurs.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided
practice
Assessment:
Perform vibrato,
double-stops, chords,
shifts and slurs.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will improvise a
melody in a minor key,
making use of vary widths of
vibrato, double-stops, chords,
shifts and slurs in a given
piece of music.
Teaching Strategy:
Coaching, Guided practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will research the
historical context of vibrato,
double-stops, chords, shifts
and slurs in a given piece of
music.

Assessment:
Student will record an
improvised melody in a minor
key, making use of vary
widths of vibrato, doublestops, chords, shifts and slurs
in a given piece of music

Assessment:
With a given piece of music,
the student will decide where
to edit and apply vibrato,
double-stops, chords, shifts
and slurs.

Technology Integration:
Students record their performances for self-evaluation.

285

Teaching Strategy:
Coaching, Guided practice

Differentiation Suggestions:
Pair weaker students with more advanced students.
Advanced students may be given or may select solo or small ensemble pieces in addition to whole class
work.
Students are encouraged to take private lessons and participate in outside performing groups.
Application Level Assessment for CCO I:
Student Tasks:
Students will perform repertoire that require vibrato, double-stops, chords, shifts and slurs.
Students will perform repertoire that requires 4th and 5th positions for violin and viola, and thumb position
for cello and bass.
Students will perform grade 5 repertoire.
Students will improvise melodies in a minor key.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who choose to continue playing an instrument will build upon skills learned in this class.
Students learn to create variety of colors in music through vibrato, shifting and slurs.
Students increase technical facility through the practice of double-stops, chords and shifting
Students will develop creative prowess through improvisational skills.

286

Scoring Guide for Symphonic Orchestra CCO I: Performance Skills


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Learning Target:
Vary the width and speed
of vibrato

Vibrate in a variety of speeds


and widths with control of
gradation.

Vibrate in a variety of speeds


and widths.

Vibrate with no variation in


speed and width.

No vibrato

Learning Target:
Perform mixed slur
patterns

Slur multiple notes on a


variety of pitches, mixed
strings. rhythms, and
positions

Slur multiple notes on variety


of pitches and mixed strings.

Slur multiple notes on


variety of pitches.

Slur two notes.

Learning Target:
Perform multiple stops and
chords

Perform double stops and


chords with pitch accuracy,
correct fingering on required
strings with correct bow
technique

Perform double stops and


chords with pitch accuracy,
correct fingering on required
strings.

Perform double stops and


chords with correct
fingering.

Shifts with a smooth, gliding


motion

Shifts with a smooth, gliding


motion

Shifts with a smooth,


gliding motion

Shifts with a rough motion,


lifts fingers from strings

Accurate intonation

Accurate intonation

Inaccurate intonation

Inaccurate intonation

Hand position remains


consistent while shifting

Hand position remains


consistent while shifting

Hand position inconsistent


while shifting

Hand position inconsistent


while shifting

Appropriate adjustments to
bow speed and weight during
shift

Bow speed and weight are not


appropriately adjusted during
shift

Bow speed and weight are


not appropriately adjusted
during shift

Bow speed and weight are not


appropriately adjusted during
shift

Learning Target:
Violinists and violists will
shift into 4th and 5th
positions
Cellists and bassists will
shift into thumb position
.

287

1
Below Basic

Attempts to perform double


stops and chords.

Learning Target:
Students will perform
literature through grade 5

Learning Target:
Students will improvise
melodies in various minor
keys

Always Demonstrates:

Consistently Demonstrates:

Sometimes Demonstrates:

Rarely Demonstrates:

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Tone Quality:
Clear, resonant, in all
registers and ranges,
appropriate to literature

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Intonation:
Accurate pitch throughout all
registers and ranges

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Note Accuracy

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Articulation (Bowing):
Bowing style and placement
as instructed by teacher

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Rhythm:
Precisely, mathematically
divided within pulse

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Musicianship:
Phrasing, style, plays
expressively according to
composers markings

Pitches remain within a given


minor key

Pitches remain within a given


minor key

Pitches remain within a given


minor key

Pitches do not remain within


a given minor key

Rhythms consistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms consistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms inconsistent with


chosen meter

Rhythms inconsistent with


chosen meter

Single focal point

Multiple focal points

Multiple focal points

Multiple focal points

288

CCO IIA--Symphonic Orchestra


Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
A. Reading Skills
Essential Question
How do composers express ideas through their compositions?
How do performers interpret the composers musical intentions?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should know:

Reading skills: allargando, agitato, attaca, cadenza, concertino,


ripieno, dolore, espressivo, fuoco, guisto, lento, ma non troppo,
morendo, ossia, pi, quasi, rubato, secco, stringendo, tacit.
Sight reading skills:
Key Signatures
Key Signatures will be limited to the following:
C, G, D, A, F, B-flat major, and relative natural minors.
There should be at least one key signature change per piece.
Meters
Meters will be limited to the following:
2/4, 3/4, 4/4, Cut Time, 6/8, Mix Meters (7/8 3+2+2)
Tempo
Tempi will be no slower than 60 beats per minute and no faster
than 120 beats per minute.
For continuous pieces, there will be at least one tempo change,
but no more than two.
Clefs And Transpositions
Viola can have limited use of treble clef.
Cello can have limited use of tenor clef.
Bassoon and Trombone will use bass clef only.
All horns will be in F.
All clarinets will be in B-flat
All trumpets will be in B-flat
Position Work For Strings
3rd position and minimal use of 5th position may be used in the
violin 1 part only.
Minimal 3rd position work may be used in the violin 2 and viola
part.
Half, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th position work may be used in the cello.
Half position to thumb position work may be used in the bass.
Divisi
Limited use of divisi parts may be written.
Repeats
1st and 2nd endings may be used.
D.C., and D.S. may be used.
Fine may be used.
Intervals Played and Sung (aural training): melodic minor
scale

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: PP1A9-12, EP1C9-12,
EP1D9-12, EP1E9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students
should be able to do:
Students will perform repertoire using
grade level appropriate expression.

Students will review a piece of grade 4


literature, develop a plan, and play at
sight from a written composition.

Students will play and sing a melodic


minor scale.

Unit Vocabulary: allargando, agitato, attaca, cadenza, concertino, ripieno, dolore, espressivo, fuoco,
guisto, lento, ma non troppo, morendo, ossia, pi, quasi, rubato, secco, stringendo, tacit, divisi

289

Pre-Assessment:
Students define symbols and terms.
Students perform playing tests from sight.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Use dictionaries to
translate terms from
other languages to
English. Use flashcards
to practice identifying
symbols and
terminology.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Demonstration

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Practice performing
symbols and terms.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Practice planning and
playing multiple pieces
at sight.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Identify symbols and
terminology of
expression.

Assessment:
Demonstrate each
symbol and expressive
term.

Assessment:
Students will review a
piece of grade 4
literature, develop a
plan, and play at sight
from a written
composition.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Use music theory software.
Use internet websites.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Students who know terms can teach them to others.
Students create posters that teach the terms.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIA:
Student Task(s):
Students will perform repertoire using grade level appropriate expression.
Students will review a piece of grade 4 literature, develop a plan, and play at sight from a written
composition.
Students will play and sing a melodic minor scale.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students who continue in music will use reading skills to play more advanced literature.
Students will be able to read a new piece of music and understand the composers musical intentions.
Students will be able to perform expressively.

290

Scoring Guide for Symphonic Orchestra, CCO IIA, Music Reading Skills
Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Students will perform
repertoire using grade level
appropriate expression.

Performs all of the expressive


symbols and markings in
repertoire.

Performs most of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs some of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Performs few of the


expressive symbols and
markings in repertoire.

Learning Target:
Students will review a
piece of grade 4 literature,
develop a plan, and play at
sight from a written
composition.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Reviews music analytically.

Ineffective review.

Performs with accurate:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with few errors in:


Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performs with many errors


in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Performance addresses few


categories and makes many
errors in:
Key Signature
Time Signature
Accidentals
Rhythms
Signs and Symbols

Learning Target:
Students will play and sing
a melodic minor scale.

Matches all pitches in


appropriate range.

Matches all pitches in


appropriate range.

Matches most pitches in


appropriate range.

Matches few pitches in


appropriate range.

291

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Symphonic Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective CCOIIB: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
B. Finger Patterns and Scales
Essential Question
How are scales the foundation of music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Three-octave scales: Majors: C, G, D,
A, E, F, B-flat; Minors: a, e, b, f-sharp,
c-sharp, a-flat, d, g, c, f

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA2, GLE: EP1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to play:
Play three-octave scales: Majors: C, G, D, A, E, F, B-flat;
Minors: a, e, b, f-sharp, c-sharp, a-flat, d, g, c, f

Unit Vocabulary: tonic, whole step, half step, diatonic, melodic minor, harmonic minor, natural minor
Pre-Assessment:
Students play three-octave scales in each designated key.
Students write out the scales.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Flash cards
Practice scale fingerings Practice pieces.
and finger patterns.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct instruction,
Modeling
Assessment:
Identify the key
signature and scale on
paper.

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Assessment:
Play three-octave scales
using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: Majors: C, G,
D, A, E, F, B-flat;
Minors: a, e, b, f-sharp,
c-sharp, a-flat, d, g, c, f

Assessment:
Perform pieces that
require a three-octave
range in the following
keys: Majors: C, G, D,
A, E, F, B-flat; Minors:
a, e, b, f-sharp, c-sharp,
a-flat, d, g, c, f

Technology Integration:
Students practice using internet-based software and SmartMusic.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Play a segment of the scale instead of the whole scale.
Play multi-octave scales.
Play a scale using alternate fingerings.

292

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Compose a short melody
that includes a threeoctave range in one of
the following keys:
Majors: C, G, D, A, E,
F, B-flat; Minors: a, e, b,
f-sharp, c-sharp, a-flat,
d, g, c, f
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Use a scoring guide to
assess an original
composition.

Application Level Assessment for CCO IIB:


Student Task(s):
Play three-octave scales using appropriate fingerings and finger patterns: Majors: C, G, D, A, E, F, B-flat;
Minors: a, e, b, f-sharp, c-sharp, a-flat, d, g, c, f
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to sight-read passages with greater fluency.
Students will improve sense of tonality.
Students will be better able to play in various key signatures.

293

Scoring Guide for Symphonic Orchestra, CCOIIB: Finger Patterns and Scales
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Play three-octave scales
using appropriate
fingerings and finger
patterns: Majors: C, G, D,
A, E, F, B-flat; Minors: a,
e, b, f-sharp, c-sharp, a-flat,
d, g, c, f.

4
Advanced
Student always plays the
targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

3
Proficient

2
Basic

Student consistently plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Student sometimes plays the


targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

294

1
Below Basic
Student rarely plays the
targeted scale with:
correct fingers
correct pitch

Symphonic Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective II: Students will demonstrate elements of music.
C. Composition
Essential Question
How do people compose music?

Content and Skills:


By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Write an eight-measure melody in the
key of A-minor, in a compound duple or
triple meter, using a variety of bowing
skills and shifting skills.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA1, PP2A9-12, PP4A9-12, EP1A912, EP1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Student will write an eight-measure melody in the key of Aminor, in a compound duple or triple meter, using a variety of
bowing skills and shifting skills.

Unit Vocabulary: meter, duple meter, triple meter, quadruple meter, simple meter, compound meter
Pre-Assessment: Students compose a short phrase in F Major.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, read a
Take notes, read a
Practice composing and
handout or article that
handout or article that
sharing feedback with
describes characteristics describes characteristics peers.
of a good melody.
of a good melody.
Discuss examples.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Guided Practice
Modeling
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Describe the qualities of Critique a melody using Write an eight-measure
a good melody line.
qualities of a good
melody in the key of A
melody.
minor, in a compound
duple or triple meter,
using a variety of
bowing skills and
shifting skills.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research compositions.
Practice composing and
sharing feedback with
peers.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Write an extended
composition with a
harmonized melody.

Technology Integration:
Students will use a music notation program such as Finale or Sibelius.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students could write in two parts or write a longer composition.
Advanced students could modulate to another key within their melody.
Students with less readiness could write shorter pieces or pieces with limited pitch range or a simple meter.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIC:
Student Task(s):
Write an eight-measure melody in the key of A minor, in a compound duple or triple meter, using a variety
of bowing and shift markings.

295

How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?


Students will understand that composing is a career option.
Students will better appreciate the work of composers.
Students who use elements appropriately will have enhanced reading skills.

296

Scoring Guide for Symphonic Orchestra, CCO IIC: Composition


Learning Target

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Learning Target:
Write an eight-measure
melody in the key of A
minor, in a compound
duple or triple meter, using
a variety of bowing and
shift markings.

Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of A minor
Complete phrases
Single focal point
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing
Dynamic markings
Expressive symbols

Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of A minor
Complete phrases
Single focal point
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing

297

2
Basic
Composition includes:
eight-measures
Strong tonal center of A
minor
Incomplete phrases
Multiple focal points
Consistent meter
Shifting
Bowing

1
Below Basic
Composition includes:
Less than eight-measures
Lacks A minor tonal center
Incomplete phrases
Multiple focal points
Inconsistent meter

Symphonic Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
A. Music Criticism
Essential Question
How do you evaluate a musical performance?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
How to critique musical performance
addressing: individuality of style and
expression.

Missouri State Standards & GLEs,


FA2, G1.5, AP2A9-12, AP2B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the
Romantic period addressing individuality of style and
expression.

Unit Vocabulary: Romanticism, nationalism, chromaticism, dissonance, consonance, modulation, tone


poem, programme music
Pre-Assessment:
Students will critique a recording or live performance of Romantic repertoire.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Look up definitions,
Listen to and/or watch a Listen to and/or watch a
take notes
performance of
performance of
Romantic music. Group Romantic music. Group
discussion of attributes.
discussion of attributes.
Practice writing a
Discuss personal
critique.
responses referencing
vocabulary and
characteristics of the
music.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Modeling, Facilitate a
Modeling, Facilitate a
class discussion, Guided class discussion on
Practice
personal responses to
music, Guided Practice
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
Vocabulary test over
Critique a performance
Respond to and critique
Romantic terminology.
of Romantic music
a performance of music
referencing the
of the Romantic period
individuality of style
addressing individuality
and expression.
of style and expression.

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research Romantic music.
Use audio-visual resources.
Type critiques on the computer.

298

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Independent research
using online and library
resources. Analysis of
works. Prepare a
presentation.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Guided
Practice

Assessment:
Research Romantic
music. Select works.
Respond to and critique
a performance of music
of the Romantic period
addressing individuality
of style and expression.
Present the results to the
class.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Advanced students research and compare Romantic music to another genre.
Worksheets that break criticism into parts can be provided to students who need more structure.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIA:
Student Task(s):
Respond to and critique a performance of music of the Romantic period addressing individuality of style
and expression.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will be able to apply analytical skills to other subjects.
Students will be able to critique other genres of music.
Students who continue to study music will apply critique skills to musical works.
The understanding of Romantic style will help students play with more stylistic accuracy.
Students will have a life-long appreciation of music.

299

Music Criticism Scoring Guide


Criteria
Introduction
Tells plan to critique. Gives
information about the work:
composers name, musicians
name, title of piece, when and
where it was created, how it
was used, time period, style, or
culture.
Description
Sentences that list everything
heard or seen in the
performance, including names
of instruments
Analysis
Describes pitch, tempo, and
dynamics

Interpretation
Explains the artists use of
style, emotional mood or
attitude toward the subject, and
purpose of the work

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

2
Basic

1
Below Basic

Clearly states plan to


critique another artists
work. All available
information is given.

States plan to critique


another artists work.
Most available
information is given.

Artists work is
mentioned. Tells
artists name and
title.

Artists name or
title of work
listed.

Logical, coherent, complete,


detailed description of what
is seen/heard in the
performance.

Logical, coherent,
complete description of
what is seen/heard in the
work.

Considers each element to


determine which are most
important in the work.
Explains, in detail, how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Clearly infers meaning of
work based upon analysis.
Clearly supports all
statements with detailed,
specific, reference to
musical elements. Relates
the performers choices to
personal interpretation of
the composers work.

Considers elements to
determine which are
most important in the
work. Explains how and
where each important
element and principle is
used in the work.
Interprets the meaning of
work based upon
analysis. Supports
statements with
reference to musical
elements. Connects
most of the performers
choices to a general
interpretation of the
composers work.
Evaluates the
composition on the basis
of information about the
composers intentions.
Evaluates the quality of
the performance on
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique articulation,
and expression or
musicianship. Supports
most statements with
reference to the work.

Complete
description of what
is seen/heard in the
work but slightly
unorganized.
Lists elements used.
Tells how or where
some elements and
principles are used
in the work.

Random
mention of one
or two details
seen/heard in the
work.
Partially lists
elements.

Suggests a meaning
of the work.
Supports statement
with reference to
some musical
elements.

Suggests
meaning of the
work.

Explains
information about
the composers life
without connecting
it to the meaning of
the composition.
Discusses the
musicians
tone/intonation,
technique
articulation, or
expression/musician
-ship. Few
references to the
work to support
statements.
Errors in grammar
and spelling without
affecting clarity.
Some use of first
person. Little
sentence variety.
First and/or last
name of artist used
throughout writing.
All steps of critique
model present but
out of order.

States personal
opinion.

Judgment
Evaluates the quality of the
composition

Evaluates the composition


on the basis of information
about the composers life,
times, and intentions.
Evaluates the quality of the
performance on musicians
tone/intonation, technique
articulation, and expression
or musicianship. Supports
all statements with specific,
detailed reference to the
work.

Mechanics
Grammar, Style, Form

Free of errors. Consistently


uses third person. Uses
sophisticated sentence
variety, precise vocabulary.
References last name only
after introductory
paragraph. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

Few minor errors in


spelling or grammar.
Uses third person. Some
sentence variety,
appropriate vocabulary.
References last name
only after introductory
paragraph. All steps of
critique model in correct
order.

300

Multiple
grammatical
errors interfere
with content and
readability.
Uses first,
second, and/or
third person.
First and/or last
name of artist
used throughout
essay.

Symphonic Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective III: Students will explain perceptions about and evaluations of music.
B. Form
Essential Question
How do composers use form to organize their music?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Characteristics of musical forms

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA3, G1.5, AP1A9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Compare and contrast programme music and absolute music
forms.

Programme Music
Imitation of sounds of nature
Rich harmonies
Sudden changes of mood or
character
Repeated motifs
Absolute Music
Adherence to classical forms
Expanded classical forms
Rich harmonic texture
Multi-movement works

Unit Vocabulary: programmatic music, absolute music, tone poem, symphony, sonata, scene, image,
mood, incidental music
Pre-Assessment: Vocabulary test
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Take notes, look up
Listen and/or watch
Practice composing
definitions
performances. Score
eight-measure melodies.
analysis.
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction
Direct Instruction,
Direct Instruction,
Modeling
Modeling, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List characteristics of
Compare and contrast
Compose an eightprogramme music and
programme music and
measure melody in the
absolute music forms.
absolute music forms.
programmatic style.

Technology Integration:
Use notation software to compose.
Use computer-based and library sources to research Romantic forms.
Use word processing software.

301

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Research. Practice
composing.
Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction,
Modeling, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Compose a single
movement in the
programmatic style.

Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a chart/poster that visually compares and contrasts the forms.
Compose an eight- measure melody in the Romantic style.
Compose a single movement in the Romantic style.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IIIB:
Student Task(s):
Compare and contrast programme music and absolute music forms.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music is organized sound.
Students will apply organization of ideas in music to other disciplines.
Audience members will better understand musical ideas through knowledge of musical forms.

302

Scoring Guide for Symphonic Orchestra, CCO IIIB: Form


Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
programme music and
absolute music forms.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates characteristics of
programme music and
absolute music forms.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
characteristics of programme
music and absolute music
forms.

303

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
programme music and
absolute music forms.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
programme music and
absolute music forms.

Symphonic Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
A. Connections among the arts.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other arts?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students should
know:
Romantic Music:
Individualism
Emotion
Imagination
Interest in supernatural
Grandiose
Larger ensembles

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, IC1A9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be
able to do:
Compare and contrast Romantic music and drama.

Romantic drama
Melodrama, Comedy of Manners
Good vs. Evil
Gas lights/industrial revolution
Unified stage picture
Elaborate fashion and sets reflecting the time
For adults and later redone for children
Bloody, gory
Trust in natures goodness
Middle and wealthy classes attended
Unit Vocabulary: grand opera, incidental music, lieder, chanson, gothic, exoticism, individualism,
supernatural
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Romantic music and drama.

304

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student
Student Activity:
Student Activity:
Activity:
Students will
Student will
Take notes.
investigate
independently research
Romantic music
Romantic music and
and drama in
drama using online and
cooperative groups. library resources. Student
will give an audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching
Teaching Strategy: Teaching Strategy:
Strategy:
Cooperative
Guided Practice
Direct
Learning
Instruction
Model
Assessment:
Assessment:
Assessment:
List
Compare and
Audio-visual presentation
characteristics
contrast Romantic
to class.
of Romantic
music and drama.
music and
drama.

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will independently research
Romantic music and drama using
online and library resources.

Teaching Strategy:
Modeling, Collaboration with
Theatre Arts teacher, Guided
Practice
Assessment:
Compose a piece of dramatic
incidental music in the Romantic
style and design the scene set of the
stage on which it would be
performed.

Technology Integration:
Students will use online and library resources to research Romantic music and drama.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts Romantic music and drama.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting Romantic music and drama.
Create examples of Romantic music and drama.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVA:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast Romantic music and drama.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that Romantic music and drama created in the same time and place are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different art forms.

305

Scoring Guide Symphonic Orchestra, CCO IVA: Connections between Romantic music and drama
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
Romantic music and
drama.

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates Romantic music and
drama.

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
Romantic music and drama.

306

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
Romantic music and drama.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
Romantic music and drama.

Symphonic Orchestra
Core Conceptual Objective IV: Students will make connections among the arts and with non-arts
disciplines.
B. Connections with non-arts disciplines.
Essential Question
What are the connections between music and other subjects?
Content and Skills:
By the end of this grade/course students
should know:
Romantic Music:
Individualism
Emotion
Imagination
Interest in supernatural
Grandiose
Larger ensembles

Missouri State Standards & GLEs


FA4, G1.10, IC1B9-12

Learning Target
By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will make connections between Romantic literature
and music

Romantic Literature:
Individualism
Emotion
Imagination
Interest in supernatural
Interest in Shakespeare
Unit Vocabulary: grand opera, incidental music, lieder, chanson, gothic, exoticism, individualism,
supernatural
Pre-Assessment: List characteristics of Romantic music and literature.
Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Recall
Skill/Concept
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Student Activity:
Students will investigate
connections between
Romantic literature and
music.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
connections between
Romantic literature and
music.

Assessment:
List characteristics of
connections between
Romantic literature and
music.

Student Activity:
Student will independently
research connections between
literary writing styles of
imagination, emotion, and
individualism with Romantic
music using online and library
resources. Student will give an
audio-visual presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice
Assessment:
Audio-visual presentation to
class.

307

Level 4
Extended
Thinking
Student
Activity:
Not Applicable

Teaching
Strategy:
Not Applicable
Assessment:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Use online and library resources to research connections between Romantic literature and music.
Write comparisons using word processing software.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts connections between literary writing styles of imagination,
emotion, and individualism with Romantic music.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting connections between literary writing styles of
imagination, emotion, and individualism with Romantic music.
Application Level Assessment for CCO IVB:
Student Task:
Compare and contrast connections between Romantic literature and music..
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that literary writing and Romantic music are related.
Students will understand that similar ideas can be expressed in different disciplines.

308

Symphonic Orchestra, CCO IVB: Connections between literary Romantic literature and music.
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Compare and contrast
connections between
Romantic literature and
music.

4
Advanced

3
Proficient

Compares, contrasts, and


evaluates connections between
Romantic literature and music.

Compares and contrasts


connections between
Romantic literature and music.

309

2
Basic
Explains characteristics
connections between
Romantic literature and
music.

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
connections between
Romantic literature or music.

Symphonic Orchestra, CCO V


Core Conceptual Objective V. Students will demonstrate knowledge of music in historical and
cultural contexts.
Essential Question
What is the relationship between music and historical events?

Missouri State Standards


FA5, G1.9, HC1A9-12, HC1B9-12,
HC1C9-12, HC1D9-12

Content and Skills: By the end of this grade/course students should know:
Style/Genre/Period
Programme Music
Absolute Music
Time/Place when composed

19th century Europe

19th century Europe

Composer(s)

Tchaikovsky, Berlioz, R. Strauss

Brahms, Schumann

Form

Tone poem, Opera, Ballet

Symphony, Sonata

Characteristics of Music (clues


used to identify it)

Imitation of sounds of nature


Rich harmonies
Sudden changes of mood or
character
Repeated motifs
Entertainment

Function in society
Historical Context
What was happening at that
time and place? (war/peace,
science, technology, type of
government)
Who were the musicians?
What training did they have?
Who were audience members?

Contemporary Context
When/where is this music
played today?
How did this music influence
current musicians/composers?

Composers and musicians


become free lance artists.
Numerous political
revolutions instilled a sense
of freedom and liberation.
Music education became
more formalized.
Anyone who could afford to
buy a ticket could enjoy
concerts.
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

Adherence to classical forms


Expanded classical forms
Rich harmonic texture
Multi-movement works

Entertainment
Composers and musicians
become free lance artists.
Numerous political
revolutions instilled a sense
of freedom and liberation.
Music education became
more formalized.
Anyone who could afford to
buy a ticket could enjoy
concerts
Played today to all in concerts, or
through video/audio recordings
Foundation for later works

Learning Target: By the end of this grade/course students should be able to do:
Students will compare and contrast programme and absolute music in the Romantic era.
Unit Vocabulary: grand opera, incidental music, lieder, chanson, gothic, exoticism, individualism,
supernatural
Pre-Assessment: Student will list characteristics of programmatic and absolute music.

310

Facilitating Activities at Depth of Knowledge levels:


Level 1
Recall
Student Activity:
Take notes.

Level 2
Skill/Concept
Student Activity:
Students will investigate
programmatic and
absolute music of the
Romantic period in
cooperative groups.

Teaching Strategy:
Direct Instruction

Teaching Strategy:
Cooperative Learning
Model
Assessment:
Compare and contrast
programmatic and
absolute music of the
Romantic period

Assessment:
List characteristics of
programmatic and
absolute music.

Level 3
Strategic Thinking
Student Activity:
Student will
independently research
programmatic and
absolute music of the
Romantic period using
online and library
resources. Student will
give an audio-visual
presentation.
Teaching Strategy:
Guided Practice

Level 4
Extended Thinking
Student Activity:
Not Applicable

Assessment:
Audio-visual
presentation to class.

Assessment:
Not Applicable

Teaching Strategy:
Not Applicable

Technology Integration:
Students use online and library resources to research the historical period/style/genre.
Students present information to others using computer technology (e.g., written paper, power point
presentation).
Students use word processing software to write comparison.
Differentiation Suggestions:
Create a poster that compares and contrasts programmatic and absolute music of the Romantic period.
Complete a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting programmatic and absolute music of the Romantic
period.
Application Level Assessment for CCO V:
Student Task:
Students will compare and contrast programmatic and absolute music of the Romantic period.
How will students demonstrate transfer of skills to a new context?
Students will understand that music serves many functions/purposes in historical context.
Students will understand that contemporary music is influenced by music from the Romantic period.

311

Scoring Guide for Symphonic Orchestra, CCO V: Music in historical and cultural context
Learning Target

Learning Target:
Students will compare and
contrast programme and
absolute music in the
Romantic era

4
Advanced
Compares, contrasts, and
evaluates programme and
absolute music in the
Romantic era

3
Proficient
Compares and contrasts
programme and absolute
music in the Romantic era.

312

2
Basic
Explains characteristics of
programme and absolute
music in the Romantic era

1
Below Basic
Lists characteristics of
programme and absolute
music in the Romantic era

Appendix

313

Fine Arts Resource Selection Evaluation Scoring Guide


Use a value from 1 through 4 to indicate the quality of the text resource on each
criterion. 4=highest quality, 1=lowest quality, 0=not included.
Course:______________________________________________
Title of Text:__________________________________________________
Publisher:____________________________________________________
Copyright:____________________________________________________
Student Textbook:
______

Objectives for lessons are clear.

______

Activities address Knowledge/Recall level of thinking

______

Activities address Skill/Concept/Application level of thinking

______

Activities address Strategic/Analysis level of thinking

______

Activities address Extended/Synthesis/Evaluation level of thinking

______

Historical/cultural information matches curriculum content.

______

Emphasizes fine arts process skills and inquiry.

______

Performance assessments include high quality scoring guides.

______

Makes connections among the arts.

______

Makes connections with non-arts disciplines.

______

Incorporates computer technology.

_______

Appropriate reading level.

_______

Addresses equity: gender, racial, disability.

______

Text meets District CCOs (percent covered______%).

_______

Total Textbook Points divided by 14 = _________Overall Rating

314

Use a value from 1 through 4 to indicate the quality of the text resource on each criterion.
4=highest quality, 1=lowest quality, 0=not included.
Teacher Resources:
_______

Contains clearly written, easy-to-use plans.

_______

Includes enough background information for teacher.

_______

Includes differentiation by student readiness, learner profile, and interest.

_______

Integrates writing in lessons.

_______

Incorporates technology in lessons (provides lesson examples, websites).

_______

Provides quality supplemental materials.

_______

Total Teacher Resource Points divided by 6 = _________

Check one
_____This textbook would be a great choice.
_____This textbook should be considered.
_____I would not recommend this textbook.
Other Comments:

315

Rockwood
Writing Guidelines
While the emphasis of the Rockwood orchestra program is on music performance, formal writing is a portion of the
class grade. At least one formal writing assignment from any of the listed categories will be a part of the grade of
each course. Below are the minimum standards for formal writing assignments:
Content:
Critiques should be based on specific criteria supported by observations referenced to the artwork.
Expository Writing should include a thesis backed by supporting details.
Form:
Critiques should follow organizational pattern as directed by the teacher. Writing will follow grade appropriate
grammar, usage, and mechanics rules per Rockwood scoring guide.
Analyses should follow organizational pattern as directed by the teacher. Writing will follow grade appropriate
grammar, usage, and mechanics rules per Rockwood scoring guide.
Expository Writing should follow multi-paragraph essay format. Students should document sources as necessary.
Writing will follow grade appropriate grammar, usage, and mechanics rules per Rockwood scoring guide.

316

Ideas
4

Six-Trait Assessment for Intermediate Writers* (3-5 Writing)


Organization
Conventions
Word Choice Sentence Fluency

Voice

__ Clear controlling idea;


stays on topic
__ Clearly addresses the topic
and provides specific and
relevant concrete details or
examples; commentary
supports CDs (4th & 5th)
__ Narrowed focus tells a lot
about a little
__ Develops key ideas with
showing rather than
telling sentences
__ Contains a controlling
idea; stays on topic
__ Addresses the topic with
relevant concrete details or
examples; commentary
supports CDs (4th & 5th)
__ Attempts to narrow the
focus by telling a lot about
a little
__ Both shows and tells
ideas

__ Effective beginning,
middle, and end
__ Exemplifies assigned
format
__ Sequence is logical and
enhances writing
__ Transitions effectively
connect ideas, sentences,
and/or paragraphs

__ Contains few errors in:


o grammar/usage
o punctuation
o capitalization
o spelling
__ Sound paragraphing (when
present) reinforces the
organizational structure

__ Contains words that


are well-suited to the
topic
__Avoids repetition
(except for effect)
__ Uses new vocabulary
well
__ Interesting and
memorable words used

__ Consistently has
complete sentences without
fragments or run-ons (unless
for effect)
__ Consistently uses a variety
of effective sentence lengths
and structures
__ Sentences begin in
different ways
__ Natural rhythm and flow;
easy to read aloud

__ Original point of view


is evident
__ Clearly shows an
awareness of audience
and purpose
__ Shows a strong
commitment to the topic
__ Thoroughly engages
reader

__ Has a beginning,
middle, and end
__ Accurately follows
assigned format
__ Logically sequenced
__ Transitions connect
ideas, sentences and/or
paragraphs

__ May contain some errors that


are not significantly distracting
to the reader:
o grammar/usage
o punctuation
o capitalization
o spelling
__ Paragraphing (when
present) is developed around
key ideas

__ Contains some
words that are related
to the topic
__ Minimal repetition
(except for effect)
__ Tries to use new
vocabulary
__ Some words are
interesting and
memorable

__ Has complete sentences


without fragments or run-ons
(unless for effect)
__ Some variety in sentence
length and structure
__ Most sentences begin in
different ways
__ Sections of writing have
rhythm and flow; are easy to
read aloud

__ Writing sounds like an


individual wrote it
__ Shows an awareness
of audience and purpose
__ Shows commitment to
the topic
__ Somewhat engages
reader

__ Contains a general sense of


direction; not completely on
topic
__ Attempts to address the
topic, but may lack relevant
details; commentary doesnt
support CDs (4th & 5th)
__ Needs to narrow focus
and tell a lot about a little
__ Tends to tell rather
than show ideas
__ Missing a controlling idea;
not on topic
__ Attempts to address topic
but lacks support from
concrete details; commentary
is ineffective (4th & 5th)
__ Broad focus that tells
little about a lot
__ Tells rather than
shows ideas

__ Evidence of beginning,
middle, and end
__ Attempts assigned
format
__ Sequencing may have
some flaws
__ Attempts transitions
between ideas, sentences
and/or paragraphs

__ Contains errors that may be


distracting to the reader:
o grammar/usage
o punctuation
o capitalization
o spelling
__ Paragraphing (when
present) is attempted but may
run together or begin in the
wrong places

__ Contains some fragments


or run-ons that may be
distracting to the reader
__ Uses simple sentences
correctly; attempts some
variety
__ Many sentences begin the
same
__ Some sections difficult to
read aloud

__ Writing displays
individuality in a few
parts
__ Shows some
awareness of audience
and purpose
__ Lacks consistent
engagement with topic
__ Inconsistently engages
reader

__ May lack evidence of a


beginning, middle, and end
__ Minimal evidence of
assigned format
__ Sequencing is illogical
__ Transitions awkward
or nonexistent

__ Contains repeated errors that


are distracting to the reader:
o grammar/usage
o punctuation
o capitalization
o spelling
__ Paragraphing (when
present) is irregular, too
frequent, or incorrectly
developed

__ Contains words that


are too general or not
related to the topic
__ Repetition is common
(not used for effect)
__ Limited use of grade
level vocabulary
__ Uses many
nonspecific words
common (ex. thing, stuff,
nice)
__ Words are not
related to the topic and
may distract the reader
__Repetition is common
(not used for effect)
__Limited or incorrect
use of grade level
vocabulary
__ Nonspecific or
incorrectly used words
may detract from
meaning

__ Includes fragments or
run-ons that are distracting
to the reader
__ Sentences may be choppy,
rambling, or awkward
__ Repetitive sentence
beginnings
__ Difficult to read aloud

__ Writing is similar to
everyone elses

*Modified based on the work of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Portland, Oregon

Bold descriptors = MAP criteria

__ Shows little or no
awareness of audience
and purpose
__ Limited engagement
with topic
__ Mechanical writing

Revised Nov. 2007

Six-Trait Assessment for Middle School Writers

Ideas

Organization

__Strong controlling idea


based on an interesting and
meaningful thesis narrows
focus
__Clearly addresses topic and
provides specific and relevant
concrete details/examples
__Effective, insightful
commentary connects concrete
detail to thesis

__Effective beginning, middle, and


end; engaging introduction; strong sense
of closure
__A clear, strong thesis statement
governs entire essay; the writer skillfully
emphasizes important ideas
__Use paragraphing appropriately
__Progresses in a logical order

__Controlling idea based on a


meaningful thesis begins to
narrow focus
__Addresses the topic using
relevant details/examples
__Strong commentary relates
concrete detail to thesis

__Contains some sense of


direction, but may lack focus
__Addresses the topic, but
may contain some details that
are irrelevant or vague
__Weak commentary

__Is difficult to follow and


lacks focus
__May address the topic, but
lacks details
__Attempts commentary

__Uses effective cohesive devices (transitions,


repetition, pronouns, parallel structure)
between and/or within paragraphs

__Successfully follows assigned format


__Has a beginning, middle and end
with an effective introduction and
conclusion
__A clear thesis statement governs the
entire essay; important ideas stand out
__Uses paragraphing
__Generally progresses in a logical
order
__May use cohesive devices
__Accurately follows assigned format
__Has evidence of a beginning, middle
and end
__Thesis statement attempted, but may
not govern the entire essay; some
important ideas begin to surface
__Shows evidence of paragraphing
__Flaws in logical order
__At times seems awkward and lacks
cohesion
__Attempts assigned format
__Little or no evidence of a beginning,
middle, and/or end
__Thesis statement unclear
__Little or no evidence of paragraphing
__Does not progress in a logical order
and may digress to unrelated topics
__Is awkward and lacks cohesion
__No evidence of format

Sentence Fluency

Conventions

Word Choice

__Contains few errors in


grammar/usage,
punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling
__No fragments or runons
__Correct
pronoun/antecedent
agreement and
subject/verb agreement;
consistent verb tense
__Contains some errors
in grammar/usage,
punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling that are not
distracting to the reader
__Few fragments or runons
_Few errors in agreement
and tense

__Uses precise and


vivid language
__Effectively uses
writing
techniques such
as imagery and
figurative language
if appropriate
__Consistently
avoids redundancy

__Contains sentences
that are clear and varied
in length and structure
__Variety of sentence
beginnings
__Natural rhythm,
cadence and flow

__ Individual perspective
comes through
__Clearly shows an
awareness of audience and
purpose
__Writers enthusiasm for the
topic is evident
__Effectively uses writing
techniques (such as humor,
point of view, tone) that evoke
a strong emotional response

__Uses language
that is usually
precise
__Uses writing
techniques such
as imagery and/or
figurative language
if appropriate
__Little
redundancy

__Contains sentences
that are clear and
show some variety in
length and structure
__Not all sentences
begin with the same
pattern
__Sections of writing
have rhythm and flow

__ Individual perspective
begins to show
__Shows an awareness of
audience and purpose
__Writer cares about topic
__Uses writing techniques
(such as humor, point of view,
tone) that may evoke an
emotional response

__Contains errors in
grammar/usage,
punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling that may be
distracting to the reader
__Some run-ons and/or
sentence fragments
__Some errors in
agreement and tense
__Contains repeated
errors in grammar/
usage, punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling that are
distracting
__Numerous run-ons
and/or fragments
__Frequent errors with
agreement and/or tense

__May use
imprecise language
__ Attempts to
use writing
techniques such
as imagery and/or
figurative language
if appropriate
__ Some obvious
redundancy
__Uses imprecise
language
__Does not use
writing
techniques such
as imagery or
figurative language
__ May contain
obvious and
distracting

__Contains sentences
that are generally
clear, but lack variety
in structure
__Some sentences
begin the same
__An occasional section
of writing has rhythm
and flow

__Attempts to develop
individual perspective
__Shows some awareness of
audience and purpose
__Writer shows limited
connection to the topic
__May use some writing
techniques (humor, point of
view, tone) to evoke a response

__Contains sentences
that are unclear and lack
variety in structure
__Sentences tend to
begin the same
__Writing is choppy;
reader may have to
reread to follow the
meaning

__Lacks individual perspective


__Shows little or no
awareness of audience or
purpose
__Treatment of topic is
predictable
__Does not use writing
techniques to evoke a response

Voice

Used with permission and modified based on the work of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Portland, Oregon

Bold descriptors = MAP criteria

Revised Aug. 2004

Ideas

Organization

__Strong controlling idea


based on interesting and
meaningful thesis narrows
focus
__Clearly addresses topic and
provides specific and relevant
concrete details and/or reasons
__Shows complexity and
freshness of thought
__Effective, insightful
commentary connects concrete
detail to thesis

__Effective beginning, middle, and


end; engaging introduction; strong sense
of closure
__A clear, strong thesis statement
governs entire essay; the writer skillfully
emphasizes important ideas
__Use paragraphing effectively
__Progresses in a logical order

__Controlling idea based on a


meaningful thesis begins to
narrow focus
__Addresses the topic using
relevant details and/or
reasons
__Shows some complexity
and/or freshness of thought
__Strong commentary relates
concrete detail to thesis

__Contains some sense of


direction, but may lack focus
__Addresses the topic, but
relies on generalities (lists)
rather than specifics
(development)
__Limited complexity and/or
freshness of thought
__Weak commentary

__Clear beginning, middle and end


with an effective introduction and
conclusion
__A clear thesis statement governs the
entire essay; important ideas stand out
__Uses paragraphing appropriately
__Generally progresses in a logical
order
__Uses cohesive devices between and
within paragraphs
__Accurately follows assigned format
__Evidence of a beginning, middle and
end
__Thesis statement attempted, but may
not govern the entire essay; some
important ideas begin to surface
__Shows evidence of paragraphing
__Inconsistency in logical order

__Is difficult to follow and


lacks focus
__May address the topic, but
lacks details
__Lacks complexity and
freshness of thought
__Attempts commentary
unsuccessfully

__Uses effective cohesive devices (transitions,


repetition, pronouns, parallel structure)
between and within paragraphs

__Successfully follows assigned format

__Inconsistent use of cohesive devices

__Attempts assigned format


__Little or no evidence of a beginning,
middle, and/or end
__Thesis statement unclear
__Little or no evidence of paragraphing
__Does not progress in a logical order
and may digress to unrelated topics
__Lacks cohesion
__No evidence of format

Sentence Fluency

Conventions

Word Choice

__Contains few errors in


grammar/usage,
punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling
__Intentional or clever use
of atypical sentence
structure
__Correct
pronoun/antecedent
agreement and
subject/verb agreement;
consistent verb tense
__May contain errors in
grammar/usage,
punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling that are not
distracting to the reader
__Fragments or run-ons
are rare (unless stylistic)
_Very few errors in
agreement and tense

__Uses precise and


vivid language
__Effective use of
writing techniques
such as imagery and
figurative language if
appropriate
__Consistently
avoids redundancy

__Contains sentences
that are clear and
varied in length and
structure
__Variety of
sentence beginnings
__Natural rhythm,
cadence and flow

__Uses precise
language
__Uses writing
techniques such as
imagery and/or
figurative language if
appropriate
__Avoids
redundancy

__Contains
sentences that are
clear and show
some variety in
length and structure
__Not all sentences
begin with the same
pattern
__Sections of writing
have rhythm and
flow
__Contains
sentences that are
generally clear, but
lack variety and
complexity
__Some sentences
begin the same
__An occasional
section of writing has
rhythm and flow

__Contains errors in
grammar/usage,
punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling that may be
distracting to the reader
__Some run-ons and/or
sentence fragments
__Inconsistent
subject/verb agreement
and or verb tense
__Contains repeated
errors in grammar/
usage, punctuation,
capitalization, and/or
spelling that are
distracting
__Numerous run-ons
and/or fragments
__Frequent errors with
agreement and/or tense

Modified based on the work of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, Portland, Oregon

Voice

__May use imprecise


language
__ Attempts to use
some writing
techniques such as
imagery and/or
figurative language if
appropriate
__ Some obvious
redundancy
__Uses imprecise
language
__Shows little or no
evidence of writing
techniques such as
imagery or figurative
language
__Obvious and/or
distracting
redundancy

__ Shows individual
perspective; personality comes
through
__Clearly shows an
awareness of audience and
purpose
__Writers enthusiasm for the
topic is evident

__

__Contains sentences
that lack variety and
clarity
__Most sentences
begin the same way
__Writing is choppy;
needs rereading to
follow the meaning

Bold descriptors = MAP criteria

Effectively uses writing


techniques (such as humor,
point of view, tone) that evoke
a strong emotional response
__ Shows some individual
perspective; personality begins
to show
__Shows an awareness of
audience and purpose
__Writer cares about topic
__Uses writing techniques
(such as humor, point of view,
tone) that may evoke an
emotional response
__May lack individual
perspective
__Shows some awareness of
audience and purpose
__Writer shows limited
connection to the topic
__Attempts to use some
writing techniques (humor,
point of view, tone) to evoke a
response
__Lacks individual
perspective
__Shows little or no
awareness of audience or
purpose
__Treatment of topic is
predictable
__Shows little or no evidence
of writing techniques to evoke
a response
Revised Aug. 2004

KNOWLEDGE + PERFORMANCE = ACADEMIC SUCCESS


Note to Readers: What should high school graduates in Missouri know and be able to do? The Missourians
who developed these standards wrestled with that question. In the end, they agreed that knowing and doing
are actually two sides of the same coin. To perform well in school or on the job, one must have a good
foundation of basic knowledge and skills. Equally important, though, is the ability to use and apply ones
knowledge in real-life situations.
These standards (73 in all) are intended to define what students should learn by the time they graduate
from high school. There are 33 Performance standards, listed under four broad goals. There are also 40
knowledge standards, listed in six subject areas. Taken together, they are intended to establish higher
expectations for students throughout the Show-Me State. These standards do not represent everything a student
will or should learn. However, graduates who meet these standards should be well-prepared for further
education, work, and civic responsibilities.

All Missourians are eager to ensure that graduates of Missouris public schools have the knowledge, skills, and
competencies essential to leading productive, fulfilling and successful lives as they continue their education,
enter the workforce and assume their civic responsibilities. Schools need to establish high expectations that will
challenge all students to reach their maximum potential. To that end, the Outstanding Schools Act of 1993
called together master teachers, parents, and policy-makers from around the state to create Missouri academic
standards. These standards are the work of that group.
The standards are built around the belief that the success of Missouris students depends on both a
solid foundation of knowledge and skills and the ability of students to apply their knowledge and skills to the
kinds of problems and decisions they will likely encounter after they graduate.
The academic standards incorporate and strongly promote the understanding that active, hands-on
learning will benefit students of all ages. By integrating and applying basic knowledge and skills in practical
and challenging ways across all disciplines, students experience learning that is more engaging and motivating.
Such learning stays in the mind long after the tests are over and acts as a springboard to success beyond the
classroom.
These standards for students are not a curriculum. Rather, the standards serve as a blueprint from
which local school districts may write challenging curriculum to help all students achieve their maximum
potential. Missouri law assures local control of education. Each school district will determine how its
curriculum will be structured and the best methods to implement that curriculum in the classroom.

Authority for the Show-Me Standards: Section 160.514, Revised Statutes of Missouri, and the Code of State
Regulations, 5 CSR 50-375.100.

320

GOAL 1

Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to gather, analyze, and apply
information and ideas.

Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

develop questions and ideas to initiate and refine research


conduct research to answer questions and evaluate information and ideas
design and conduct field and laboratory investigations to study nature and society
use technological tools and other resources to locate, select, and organize information
comprehend and evaluate written, visual, and oral presentations and works
discover and evaluate patterns and relationships in information, ideas, and structures
evaluate the accuracy of information and the reliability of its sources
organize data, information, and ideas into useful forms (including charts, graphs, outlines) for analysis or
presentation
9. identify, analyze, and compare the institutions, traditions, and art forms of past and present societies
10. apply acquired information, ideas, and skills to different contexts as students, workers, citizens, and
consumers

GOAL 2

Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively
within and beyond the classroom.

Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

plan and make written, oral, and visual presentations for a variety of purposes and audiences
review and revise communications to improve accuracy and clarity
exchange information, questions, and ideas while recognizing the perspectives of others
present perceptions and ideas regarding works of the arts, humanities, and sciences
perform or produce works in the fine and practical arts
apply communication techniques to the job search and to the workplace
use technological tools to exchange information and ideas

321

GOAL 3
Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to recognize and solve
problems.

Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

identify problems and define their scope and elements


develop and apply strategies based on ways others have prevented or solved problems
develop and apply strategies based on ones own experience in preventing or solving problems
evaluate the processes used in recognizing and solving problems
reason inductively from a set of specific facts and deductively from general premises
examine problems and proposed solutions from multiple perspectives
evaluate the extent to which a strategy addresses the problem
assess costs, benefits, and other consequences of proposed solutions

GOAL 4

Students in Missouri public schools will acquire the knowledge and skills to make decisions and act as
responsible members of society.

Students will demonstrate within and integrate across all content areas the ability to
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

explain reasoning and identify information used to support decisions


understand and apply the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in Missouri and the United States
analyze the duties and responsibilities of individuals in societies
recognize and practice honesty and integrity in academic work and in the workplace
develop, monitor, and revise plans of action to meet deadlines and accomplish goals
identify tasks that require a coordinated effort and work with others to complete those tasks
identify and apply practices that preserve and enhance the safety and health of self and others
explore, prepare for, and seek educational and job opportunities

322

Missouri students must build a solid foundation of factual knowledge and basic skills in the traditional content
areas. The statements listed here represent such a foundation in reading, writing, mathematics, world and
American history, forms of government, geography, science, health/physical education, and the fine arts. This
foundation of knowledge and skills should also be incorporated into courses in vocational education and
practical arts. Students should acquire this knowledge base at various grade levels and through various courses
of study. Each grade level and each course sequence should build on the knowledge base that students have
previously acquired.
These concepts and areas of study are indeed significant to success in school and in the workplace.
However, they are neither inclusive nor are they likely to remain the same over the years. We live in an age in
which knowledge grows at an ever-increasing rate, and our expectations for students must keep up with that
expanding knowledge base.
Combining what students must know and what they must be able to do may require teachers and
districts to adapt their curriculum. To assist districts in this effort, teachers from across the state are developing
curriculum frameworks show how others might balance concepts and abilities for students at the elementary,
middle, and secondary levels. These models, however, are only resources. Missouri law assures local control
of education. Each district has the authority to determine the content of its curriculum, how it will be organized,
and how it will be presented.

Communication Arts
In Communication Arts, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation which includes
knowledge of and proficiency in
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

speaking and writing standard English (including grammar, usage, punctuation, spelling, capitalization)
reading and evaluating fiction, poetry, and drama
reading and evaluating nonfiction works and material (such as biographies, newspapers, technical manuals)
writing formally (such as reports, narratives, essays)
comprehending and evaluating the content and artistic aspects of oral and visual presentations (such as
story-telling, debates, lectures, multi-media productions)
participating in formal and informal presentations and discussions of issues and ideas
identifying and evaluating relationships between language and culture

Mathematics
In Mathematics, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation which includes knowledge
of
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; other number sense, including numeration and
estimation; and the application of these operations and concepts in the workplace and other situations
geometric and spatial sense involving measurement (including length, area, volume), trigonometry, and
similarity and transformations of shapes
data analysis, probability, and statistics
patterns and relationships within and among functions and algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric concepts
mathematical systems (including real numbers, whole numbers, integers, fractions), geometry, and number
theory (including primes, factors, multiples)
discrete mathematics (such as graph theory, counting techniques, matrices)

323

Science
In Science, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation which includes knowledge of
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

properties and principles of matter and energy


properties and principles of force and motion
characteristics and interactions of living organisms
changes in ecosystems and interactions of organisms with their environments
processes (such as plate movement, water cycle, air flow) and interactions of earths biosphere,
atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere
composition and structure of the universe and the motions of the objects within it
processes of scientific inquiry (such as formulating and testing hypotheses)
impact of science, technology, and human activity on resources and the environment

Social Studies
In Social Studies, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation which includes knowledge
of
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

principles expressed in the documents shaping constitutional democracy in the United States
continuity and change in the history of Missouri, the United States, and the world
principles and processes of governance systems
economic concepts (including productivity and the market system) and principles (including the laws of
supply and demand)
the major elements of geographical study and analysis (such as location, place, movement, regions) and
their relationships to changes in society and environment
relationships of the individual and groups to institutions and cultural traditions
the use of tools of social science inquiry (such as surveys, statistics, maps, documents)

Fine Arts
In Fine Arts, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation which includes knowledge of
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

process and techniques for the production, exhibition, or performance of one or more of the visual or
performed arts
the principles and elements of different art forms
the vocabulary to explain perceptions about and evaluations of works in dance, music, theater, and
visual arts
interrelationships of visual and performing arts and the relationships of the arts to other disciplines
visual and performing arts in historical and cultural contexts

324

Health/Physical Education
In Health/Physical Education, students in Missouri public schools will acquire a solid foundation which
includes knowledge of
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

structures of, functions of, and relationships among human body systems
principles and practices of physical and mental health (such as personal health habits, nutrition, stress
management)
diseases and methods for prevention, treatment, and control
principles of movement and physical fitness
methods used to assess health, reduce risk factors, and avoid high-risk behaviors (such as violence, tobacco,
alcohol, and other drug use)
consumer health issues (such as the effects of mass media and technologies on safety and health)
responses to emergency situations

325

Graphic Organizers

326

Easy Start Herringbone

1. Who is it about?

2. Where did it happen?

3. When did it happen?

MAIN IDEA

4. What happened?

5. How did it happen?

327

6. Why did it happen?

Compare and Contrast

Transition Words: different from, same as, instead of, on the other hand

328

TOPIC: _____________________________________________________________________
MAIN IDEA: ________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________

MAJOR SUPPORTING DETAILS

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

329

Suggested Graphic Organizer for Cause and Effect

Cause
Effect

Effect
Effect
Effect

Transition Words: because, since, so that, if/then

330

Chronological/Sequence

Event 1

Event 3

Event 2

Transition Words: First, second, then, after, next etc.

331

Event 4

Problem/Solution

Problem

Transition Words: One answer is, the question is, the problem,

332

STORY MAP (CHART)


(Isabel Beck)
The Character:
The setting:
Statement of the Problem:

Event 1:
Event 2:
Event 3:
Event 4:
Event 5:
Event 6:
Event 7:

Statement of the Solution:


Story Theme: (What is this story REALLY about?)
Values brought out in the story:

333

SEQUENCE CHAIN

334

Essay Organizer - Standard Outline


Introductory Paragraph
Thesis Statement:
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________

Support Paragraph
Topic Sentence:
______________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________

Support Paragraph
Topic Sentence:
______________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________

Support Paragraph
Topic Sentence:
______________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________
Detail_________________________________________________________________
(Note: You are NOT limited to only 3 support paragraphs!)

Conclusion
(Emphasize Thesis)
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
335

Paragraph Organizer
Topic Sentence:

Concrete Detail

Commentary

Commentary

Concrete Detail

Commentary

Commentary

Concrete Detail

Commentary

Commentary

Concluding sentence:

336

Essay Organizer Standard Outline


Paragraph 1 Introduction:

Main Idea/ Thesis:

Paragraph 2 Concrete Detail


commentary: ______________________________________________
commentary: ______________________________________________
commentary: ______________________________________________

Paragraph 3 Concrete Detail


commentary: ______________________________________________
commentary: ______________________________________________
commentary: ______________________________________________
Paragraph 4 Concrete Detail
commentary: ______________________________________________
commentary: ______________________________________________
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Rockwood School District


Fine Arts Department

Procedures for
New Rockwood
String Teachers

Helpful hints and how to advice . . .

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Dear new orchestra teacher,


Welcome to Rockwood! We are glad you are here and hope this packet will be a help to you as you
plan your first year. Please dont hesitate to ask any fellow string teacher or the Fine Arts Office for
help or advice. We are all here to help and work as a team. These hints have not been updated since
third grade strings started so there may be some changes, please ask the other string teachers.
Good luck on a great first year in Rockwood.
Sincerely,
The Rockwood Strings Staff

What Every Rockwood String Teacher Needs To Know


Faculty Vertical Teams
The string faculty is divided into 4 geographical quadrant teams. The high school orchestra teacher
leads each quadrant. For example, the Lafayette Quadrant consists of Lafayette High School, its feeder
middle school Rockwood Valley and the feeder elementary schools, Green Pines, Babler, and
Chesterfield. The Lafayette High School orchestra teacher leads this team.
The string faculty within each quadrant works as a team. The string team plans together for the annual
Music In Our Schools Concert(s). This vertical teaming approach has proven very successful for
collaboration of teacher planning, use of teacher instrument specialties, and retention of students to the
next grade level.
Substitutes
It is very important to be responsible about any absence. Rockwood policy requires employees to
phone any absence into RASCAL, a computerized absence system. See your building secretary for
RASCAL information.
When you know you will need to be absent:
1. Call RASCAL and request a sub. If you know of a string sub, you may request him/her. You must
know his/her phone number and be ready to enter it into Rascal.
2. Build positive relations with your principal and classroom teacher staff by being well prepared for
an absence. Have emergency sub plans in a place where the building secretary can find them in all
of your schools. They should include:
A. Seating charts for each class.
B. A class schedule for the building.
C. Your daily schedule, including travel directions to other schools.
D. Two general lesson plans with materials, one for a music sub and the other for a
non-music sub. You might want to purchase a movie and keep it with student
response or note-taking forms for the non-music sub.
3. If you know in advance that you will be absent, write a sub plan tailored to what your students are
currently studying.
4. Call ALL your scheduled buildings for each date you will be absent.
5. It is very important to handle all plans for a substitute professionally.
Mentors
You will be provided with a district mentor teacher if you are in your first year of teaching. The home
school principal, in collaboration with the Fine Arts coordinator, assigns this mentor. If your official
mentor is a non-string teacher, you will be paired with a string teacher in your quadrant for content
specific questions. Use those people for any help you need. The mentors have no evaluative
responsibilities.

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Music In Our Schools Concerts - MIOS


Each quadrant schedules a MIOS concert or concerts. Team planning for the year includes setting the
date and location, as well as repertoire. 4th graders are not included in MIOSM concerts. 5th grade
strings are optional and models include:
5th grade beginning orchestra ( if concert is in late winter or spring)
5th grade performing memorized Suzuki repertoire
5th grade Honors/String orchestra to perform (rehearsing outside of school)
The middle school and high school orchestras also perform at these concerts.
Supplies
String supplies are available from the Fine Arts Office. There is a string storage area at the annex.
Key can be obtained from the Fine Arts secretary. Strings, rosin, bows, and sponges are kept in stock.
Budgets
Each building has a string budget from the Fine Arts Coordinator. Information on your individual
budget should be obtained at the beginning of the school year. Check with the Fine Arts Office on
budget amount if you do not receive this information. Procedures for purchasing supplies or music
must be followed. Keep an individual record of each schools budget. DO NOT purchase anything
without a PO number. Money may also be available through your principal or the PTO. Check with
your building principal to see if there is any building money available for you.
Testing/Assessment
Teachers must use Application Level Assessments with Scoring Guides for each Core Conceptual
Objectives in the curriculum.
Report Cards
Middle and high school orchestra teachers use electronic grade reporting.
Fourth and fifth grade teachers use a district template. They may use it on the computer. Strings
report cards are issued at the end of each quarter. Check with your building principal about due dates
for specialists. Most of the building principals will ask to review your report card comments before the
cards are given to the classroom teachers. Check with your principal regarding the procedure.
Concert Checklist
1) Type program, including all student names and turn it into your school secretary to proofread
and run.
2) Send home permission slips/concert reminder notes
3) VTS student arrangements including host family and cab (if necessarycheck with your
building)
4) Reserve 4th grade instruments from other schools arrange for pickup and return
5) Give the custodial staff a sketch of your concert set-up
6) Arrange for setup and equipment for concert
7) Order risers and other needed district equipment at least three weeks ahead of your concert
date through the districts Community Education-- Technical Theater department.
Elementary String Concerts
At least one elementary string concert per year is presented in each building, generally in the spring.
This date is usually scheduled the previous year and put on the school calendar. You will need to
check on this date and put it on the school calendar, if not already scheduled. Extra violins will need to
be brought in for the concert, so it is important not to schedule the elementary concert to close to the
school from which you are going to get the extra violins. Be careful to coordinate dates with other
string faculty on your team. Contact other Strings teachers for sample concert programs.

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Emergency Procedures
Know each of your buildings emergency procedures, such as fire, tornado, and intruder drills. Be
aware what you should do in your teaching location in each of these events.

Summer Camps
Brochures are available in the spring for all teachers to share with students and their parents. The
district offers these summer camps for students entering the following grades: Fifth/Sixth grade String
Camp and Middle school String Camp.
Honor Orchestra
Rockwood sponsors an All-District Honor Intermediate Honor Orchestra for grades 4-8. If elementary
string teachers have students who are advanced players for their age and who read well, the honor
orchestra program is recommended. Audition material is available the first week of school and
auditions are in late September. The Honor Orchestra season runs from October to March.
Information Specific to Fourth Grade Suzuki Violin Classes
Elementary Building Lead Teachers
One string teacher is designated as the lead teacher in each elementary building. Each 4th grade
classroom will be scheduled to take violin instruction as an entire class. You will have students of all
abilities.
The lead teacher is responsible for all planning in that building as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Recruiting for 5th grade classes in February of the preceding school year.
Assignment of 5th grade classes to other string teachers on team
Assignment of 5th grade students to classes (based on low strings and high strings)
Planning of concerts, including: repertoire, facilities, program, parent notes, school
newsletters
The lead teacher is the facilitator for the string faculty team in that building.
The lead teacher is in charge of the budget at the lead schools.

Before School Starts


In the week before school starts, it is very important to prepare the school set of violins for class.
These things need to be done (unless done in May by the former teacher).
1. 4th Grade Violin Instrument Preparation
Check violins and prepare as needed including the use of violin polish or Goo Gone for
adhesive removal
Replace worn strings (can be obtained from Fine Arts Office)
Gather a set of replacement strings to have on hand for emergency breakage. Strings can be
obtained from Fine Arts Office.
Check bows for screw tightening
Identify any needed repairs. Obtain a purchase order number from the Fine Arts secretary (92332) and call for pick-up or take the instrument to the Rockwood authorized vendor.
Finger tape each instrument (district practice is to tape for 1-2-3). Car striping tape from car
stores such as Auto Zone is recommended.
Put rosin in each case (can be obtained from Fine Arts Office)
Place a shoulder sponge in each violin case ( sponges can be obtained from Fine Arts office)
Develop a storage plan- either a cart or rack and label violin spots on cart or rack
If any violin is beyond repair, send it to the Orchestra room (502) at Crestview Middle School
and order a replacement (if necessary) from your instructional budget.
Place a dusting cloth in each case.

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2. Class Schedule confirmation review your class schedule with your principals and classroom
teachers. Check with the school secretary or 4th grade teachers for classroom rosters. Be ready to
begin class on the first scheduled Strings day for your school.
3. Prepare a first week flyer (be sure to have principal approval before sending it home) to go home
with 5th grade students to include:
Welcome and introduction of yourself
Overview of year string class schedule including which days of week to bring instruments to
school
Registration form for new students only
A list including the book information and supplies to buy
Where to obtain rental instruments
How to contact you
4. First week lesson plans
5. Temporary grade book - Wait to do the permanent grade book until class lists are finalized, usually
by the 3rd or 4th week of school. Helpful hint - you will always need your grade book with you during
a fire drill*
6. Secure supplies you will need to prepare the 5th grade rental instruments:
Striping tape
Cleaner (Goo Gone recommended)
Rubber bands
Chin rest adjuster tool
Find the building keyboard for your use. Can go on a cart if necessary.
7. As a suggestion, you may want to assemble the following items in a tool box at each of your schools
for use during the school year:
Peg dope
Peg drops
Screwdrivers (Philips and flathead)
Polish
Sandpaper (extra fine)
My Peg Pal (gives extra torque to turn tight pegs without strain and can be ordered at
www.mypegpal.com)
Tweezers
Pliers with a wire cutter
Alcohol pads
Pencil
Sponges
Scissors
Strategies for teaching Fourth Grade Violin:
1. Goals for the 4th Grade Year1. NUMBER 1 a love of violin playing
2. Good instrument setup
3. Good bow hold
4. A concept of good tone
2. GO SLOWLY at the beginning. The most important thing in the first month is to establish class
procedure.

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3. First week ideas:


Measure the students for the correct size violin (this is essential)
No violins - do a personal introduction and tell about the violin
Teach parts of the instrument.
Perform for the class.
Perhaps show a movie about the violin (suggestion: Nurtured by Love the story of Dr.
Suzuki or The sounding Tree)
Use these types of activities to establish class routine:
Enter the classroom quietly.
Assign seats on the floor (chairs are not recommended).
Have students sitting.
Wait for students to become quiet before going on.
Emphasize respect and self-control before violins are ever brought out.
Invite students to learn.
Learn students names.
If you want to use a Suzuki style to teach lessons, perhaps ask them to stand and bow to
indicate the beginning and ending of the lesson.
4. When the violin is brought out, stress it should be only yours! GO SLOWLY! Demonstrate what
you want them to do on the day before they get their violin. Begin echo type rote exercises such as
clapping, singing, etc.- to establish rote-teaching routine. Remember to insist on appropriate behavior
as you go through these opening weeks. It gets harder when they get the violins in their hands.
5. The first day they get violins, the only objective should be establishing the class routine of getting
out and putting away the violin. Go one step at a time and make sure everyone understands what to do.
Establish a routine of you walking up and down the rows to make sure all are doing and understanding.
Do not use the bow for approximately the first month. You may start with guitar position in a seating
or standing position and just teach the names of open strings or you may begin with violin on the
shoulder after putting on sponges. Go slowly. Insist that students respect people and instruments.
6. Other ideas:
Vary class activities between sitting & standing, playing & rote activities, doing & listening
Write songs for transition times, such as Tighten your bow when you want to play, loosen
your bow when you put it away. The students can sing while they work!
Get out violins and dismiss class by rows
Invite students to open their cases. Cannot open until invited
You are invited to tighten your bow and put on your sponges
You are invited to quietly stand and show me you are ready for class
I am waiting to see that everyone is ready to start
Feet, V, Violin foot forward
You should stand at the end of the first row where they can see you over the end of their
violin- for better posture
A sample number routines for violin position1.
Rest position, bow at side
2.
violin out to side
3.
turn up
4.
look at it
5.
set it on the top of your shoulder
6.
set your chin up and over
Use a seating chart use post it notes with each name are good for switching it up.
Use giant finger charts- on wall or board. Contact the Fine Arts Coordinator to request these.

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7. Instructional Methods: use a rote method in 4th grade. Use finger charts on the board/wallTeach songs by sections (I.E., Twinkle burger). Continuous review is essential to building solid skills.
Practice Routines:
Echo fingerings
Sing fingerings
Silent fingerings
Bow in air
Bow on open string
Pizzicato
Suggested Time Line for Fourth Grade Violin
September
Pizzicato the open strings
Pop Goes the Weasel*
Teach first Twinkle rhythms (variations A, C and D) on E and A without bow.
Introduce bow hold
Im a Little Monkey Song (on E string first, then A)
Open String Hoedown*
October
Bow on the string
String crossings
Im a Little Monkey on A and E
Continue bow hold work
Bow rhythms
Twinkle variations with bow added
Completion of the A Major scale
November
Thanksgiving- Is a good benchmark to have all Twinkle Variations learned (Mississippi stop- stop,
Mississippi- Mississippi, Run Pony, and theme)
Continue work with bow rhythms
French Folk Song (in key of A)
December
Jingle Bells*
Hot Cross Buns
January
When returning from winter break, a review of all songs already learned is recommended
Lightly Row
Review of all Twinkle variations and theme
February
Hot Cross Buns *on all four strings
French Folk Song *(in key of D)
Recruitment for fifth grade Strings classes
March
Lightly Row
Happy Fiddlin*

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April
Concert preparation
Add fun songs to repertoire*

(Flintstones, simple fiddle tune such as Bile em Cabbage)

May
Concert preparation
Review of all songs learned
Final student assessments
*Optional repertoire
Fifth Grade Orchestra
Textbook: Essential Elements 2000, Book 1 (students purchase their own)
In 5th grade, Rockwood offers the second year of violin instruction and the first year of viola, cello, and
bass. The 5th grade program is an elective for the students. However, participation is very high in
most schools. The program is taught with 2 or 3 string teachers in the building, dividing the classes by
high strings and low strings. Each teacher should have their own teaching space.
The 2 or 3 string classes taught should be divided into same instruments. A sample model would be:
5th grade violin class teacher A
5th grade combined violin/viola class teacher B
5th grade cello/bass class- teacher C
This division may depend on the number of students enrolled for each instrument. The lead teacher in a
building makes the decision regarding class assignments, in collaboration with team members.
The 5th grade violin/viola class will proceed with learning more advanced Suzuki repertoire in Suzuki
Book 1, which may include Perpetual Motion and Minuet 1. The violin class also proceeds to the
Essential Elements Book in early fall to teach music reading skills.
The 5th Grade viola, cello, and bass classes are taught with a combined Suzuki Essential Elements
book approach because the students are beginners on their instruments. The skills and repertoire
learned in 4th grade violin are taught in an accelerated manner to these students in the fall of 5th grade,
while the use of the Essential Elements book may be postponed until later in the fall when basic
playing concepts and beginning Suzuki repertoire have been mastered.
Practicing outside of the class is an important component and it is suggested that students practice a
minimum of 60 minutes per week.
Flash Cards are highly recommended for note reading.
Other pearls of wisdom

Give all vital telephone numbers and schedules to each school secretary
Fill out and sign emergency (green) cards for nurse at every building
Check out keys to your room from the school secretary
If you are having any travel problems, be sure to phone ahead to your next building.
You may need a parking sticker if you assist at one of the high schools.
Be on time with your classes. It is very important to be professional about this.
Dont run over time you must stop promptly. Be sure to allow enough time for the students to put
their instruments away. Classroom teachers appreciate this. It will help build positive
relationships.
Read the school calendar each week in the staff bulletin. Note assemblies or special programs that
will affect your class schedule. Sometimes your classes will be cancelled for special events.

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If an assembly is to take place during your Strings time, you take your class to the assembly and
remain with them through the duration of your class time. Be positive about this. Support all
school activities.
If you can, have a full size instrument for yourself at each school to use instead of carrying your
own instrument. This will minimize what you have to carry and Rockwood will not cover repair
of your personal instrument.
Communication with parents is VITAL! You may want to initiate a Strings newsletter to go home
monthly or bi-monthly. Be sure to communicate often about class expectations and upcoming
events. Make good news phone calls as well as concern calls. Write a String article of the
month for school newsletters.
Get permission slips well in advance for any trip or concert that takes students off the school
campus.
Follow-up on students who want to quit. Talk with the student, classroom teacher, and parent.
Encourage participation for the full year. Work with principal on building policy on this issue.

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Infinite Campus Report Cards for Grades 3, 4, and 5


Each student will receive formal assessment scores in four categories during second and
fourth quarters. Infinite Campus report card prompts will be:

Demonstrates music performance techniques


May include assessments from CCO I

Demonstrates an understanding of the elements of music


May include assessments from CCO II, CCO III

Responds to music, its history, and relates it to other disciplines


May include assessments from CCO III, CCO IV, CCO V

Non-Academic Indicators
Follows directions, completes work, cares for equipment

The Infinite Campus system will allow the input of individual student comments.

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Student
Name
Sing Rep.

Improvise - rhythm

Improvise - melody

Ensemble

Repertoire

Bowing

Bow Hold

Left Hand

Violin Position

Stance

Tone

Total

Composition
Total

Musical Form

Personal Response

Critique

Total

Folk Music/Art

CCO IV

Total

History/Culture

CCO III

Sound Science

CCOII
Final Grade

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Reading/Charts

CCOI

A scale

3rd Grade Violin Learning Targets


CCO V

Total

Student
Name
Sing-P5, M2, m2

Improvisation

Ensemble Playing

Repertoire

Bow Hold

Bowing

Left Hand/Arm

Instrument Position

Sitting/Standing

Tone

Total
Total

Musical Form

Personal Response

Critique

Total

Music//Science

CCO IV

Total

History/Culture

CCO III

Music/Art

CCOII
Final Grade

349

Composition

CCOI

Music Reading

D Scale

4th Grade Orchestra Learning Targets


CCO V

Total

Student Name
Sing Scale

Improvise

Ensemble

Repertoire

Bowing

Bow Hold

Left Hand/Arm

Instrument Position

Sitting/Standing

Tone

Total

Composition
Total

Musical Form

Personal Response

Critique

Total

Music/Language Arts

CCO IV

Total

History/Culture

CCOIII

Music/Art

CCO II
Final Grade

350

Music Reading

CCOI

C, G, D scales

5th Grade Orchestra Learning Targets


CCOV

Total