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Student Support Branch

Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities

Ontario Student Assistance Program

2007-2008
Student Eligibility and
Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR FULL-TIME STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ........................... 1


INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................................ 1
1. Citizenship..................................................................................................................................................... 1
2. Provincial Residency ..................................................................................................................................... 2
a) Specific provincial residency criteria....................................................................................................... 2
b) Grounds For Waiving Ontarios Residency Criteria ................................................................................ 3
3. Loan Defaults and Grant/Bursary Overpayments ......................................................................................... 4
4. Credit Screening............................................................................................................................................ 5
5. Satisfactory Academic Progress ................................................................................................................... 5
6. Maximum Duration of Assistance.................................................................................................................. 7
a) Lifetime limits .......................................................................................................................................... 7
b) Periods of study plus one ....................................................................................................................... 8
7. Postsecondary Program/Institution Requirements ........................................................................................ 8
8. Program Length............................................................................................................................................. 9
9. Course Load.................................................................................................................................................. 9
10. Types of Programs ........................................................................................................................................ 9
a) Co-operative program............................................................................................................................. 9
b) Distance education programs ............................................................................................................... 10
c) Concurrent study programs .................................................................................................................. 10
d) Professional training programs ............................................................................................................. 11
11. Institution Location ...................................................................................................................................... 11
12. Letter of Permission .................................................................................................................................... 12
13. Application Deadlines.................................................................................................................................. 13
14. Funding from Other Programs..................................................................................................................... 13
15. Loan Overpayments .................................................................................................................................... 13
a) Statement of Loan Overpayment B issuing criteria ............................................................................... 13
b) Impact on eligibility for further assistance............................................................................................. 14
16. Bursary/Grant Overpayments...................................................................................................................... 14
17. Bankruptcy .................................................................................................................................................. 15
CHAPTER 2: ASSESSING FINANCIAL NEED ..................................................................................................... 17
1. Introduction.................................................................................................................................................. 17
2. How Much Assistance Can Students Receive? .......................................................................................... 17
3. Steps to Follow in Assessing Need ............................................................................................................. 17
STEP A:
IDENTIFY THE STUDENTS CATEGORY...................................................................................... 18
1. Student Group Definition ............................................................................................................................. 18
STEP B:
ASSESS THE STUDENT'S COSTS DURING STUDY PERIOD .................................................... 19
1. Principle....................................................................................................................................................... 19
2. Allowable Educational Costs ....................................................................................................................... 19
a) Tuition and compulsory fees................................................................................................................. 19
b) Books, Supplies, Equipment, and Computer Allowance....................................................................... 21
c) Living allowance ................................................................................................................................... 22
d) Return transportation ............................................................................................................................ 24
e) Child-care ............................................................................................................................................. 24
STEP C:
ASSESS CONTRIBUTION FROM RESOURCES AVAILABLE ...................................................... 26
1. Introduction.................................................................................................................................................. 26
2. Types of Resources .................................................................................................................................... 27
STEP C.1
PRE-STUDY PERIOD INCOME CONTRIBUTION ......................................................................... 28
1. Single Dependent/Independent Students.................................................................................................... 28
a) Calculation of pre-study period income contribution............................................................................. 28
b) Pre-study period residency requirements (Item 615 of the OSAP application) .................................... 31
2. Married One Spouse a Student................................................................................................................ 31
a) Pre-study period income contribution for married students .................................................................. 31

Table of Contents

3. Married - Both Spouses Are Students......................................................................................................... 35


a) Pre-study period income contribution for married students .................................................................. 35
4. Sole Support Parents .................................................................................................................................. 40
a) Calculation of pre-study period income contribution............................................................................. 40
STEP C.2
STUDY PERIOD INCOME CONTRIBUTIONS................................................................................ 41
1. Single Dependent and Independent Students............................................................................................. 41
a) Contribution from reported income: Canada portion of the.................................................................. 41
Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan ................................................................................................ 41
b) Contribution from reported income: Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan 42
2. Married Students One is a Student .......................................................................................................... 46
a) Expected minimum spousal income contribution.................................................................................. 47
b) Contribution from reported income, Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan 47
c) Contribution from reported income, Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan . 48
3. Married Students Both Are Students........................................................................................................ 49
a) Contribution from reported income, Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan 49
b) Contribution from reported income, Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan . 50
4. Sole-Support Parents .................................................................................................................................. 51
a) Contribution from reported income, Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan 51
b) Contribution from reported income, Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan.. 52
STEP C.3
CONTRIBUTION FROM STUDENT AND SPOUSAL ASSETS ...................................................... 54
1. Principle....................................................................................................................................................... 54
2. Asset Valuation Date................................................................................................................................... 54
3. Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) ......................................................................................... 54
a) Single dependent/independent and sole support students................................................................... 54
b) Married students and Students in Common law/Same-sex Relationships ........................................... 54
4. Vehicles....................................................................................................................................................... 55
a) Single dependent/independent and sole support students................................................................... 55
b) Married Students .................................................................................................................................. 56
c) Adjustments to the vehicle exemption level.......................................................................................... 56
5. Other Assets................................................................................................................................................ 56
a) Single dependent/independent and sole support students................................................................... 56
b) Married students ................................................................................................................................... 57
STEP C.4
PARENTAL CONTRIBUTIONS - SINGLE DEPENDENT STUDENTS ........................................... 58
1. Principle....................................................................................................................................................... 58
2. Calculation of Parental Income Contribution ............................................................................................... 58
a) Determine family size ........................................................................................................................... 58
b) Determine total net parental income..................................................................................................... 58
c) Determine parental discretionary income ............................................................................................. 59
d) Determine weekly parental contribution................................................................................................ 60
e) Adjust weekly parental contribution for the number of postsecondary students................................... 60
f) Parental contribution............................................................................................................................. 61
STEP D:
CALCULATE THE STUDENT'S NEED ........................................................................................... 63
1. Canada Financial Need ................................................................................................................................ 63
2. Ontario Financial Need ................................................................................................................................. 63

Table of Contents

STEP E: CALCULATE THE STUDENTS ASSISTANCE ........................................................................................ 64


1. Canada Portion of Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan..................................................................... 64
2. Ontario Portion of Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan..................................................................... 64
3. Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants..................................................................................... 65
4. Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities .................................................................. 65
5. Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income Families ................................................................... 65
6. Millennium/Ontario Access Grants .............................................................................................................. 66
7. Ontario Access Grants................................................................................................................................. 68
8. Required Institutional Assistance Under the Student Access Guarantee ................................................... 70
9. Required Institutional Assistance in Graduate and Professional or High-Demand Programs ................ 71
10. Ontario Student Opportunity Grants ........................................................................................................... 71
DEFINITIONS AND CONTEXT................................................................................................................................ 73
APPENDIX 1: SAMPLE ASSESSMENTS .............................................................................................................. 81
APPENDIX 2: 2007-2008 MONTHLY LIVING ALLOWANCES FOR THE CANADA ONTARIO INTEGRATED
STUDENT LOAN.................................................................................................................................................... 110
APPENDIX 3: UNIVERSITY TUITION GUIDELINES ........................................................................................... 112
APPENDIX 4: COLLEGE TUITION GUIDELINES................................................................................................ 119

Page 1

CHAPTER 1:

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR FULL-TIME STUDENT


FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

INTRODUCTION
This chapter outlines the eligibility criteria for full-time student financial assistance available
through the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP).
Students must be enrolled in at least 60% or more of a full course load, as defined by the
institution, to be eligible for the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant
funding. A student with a permanent disability must be enrolled in at least 40% or more of a
full course load, as defined by the institution, to be eligible for the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding.
Students with course loads below these minimums are considered part-time students for
student financial assistance purposes and should apply for assistance through the Part-time
Canada Student Loan Program, Canada Study Grant for High-Need Part-time Students, or
the Ontario Special Bursary Plan. It should be noted, however, that students with permanent
disabilities who are enrolled in at least 40% of a full course load but less than 60% of a full
course load may apply for either full-time or part-time assistance. Refer to the appropriate
2007-2008 manuals for further information.
Eligibility for the Canada portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and the
federal grants is determined in accordance with the Canada Student Financial Assistance Act
and Regulations. Eligibility for the Ontario portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student
Loan and the provincial grants is determined in accordance with the Ministry of Training,
Colleges and Universities Act and Regulations.
The OSAP program/loan year covers the period commencing on August 1 in any year and
ending July 31 in the following year.
1. Citizenship
To be eligible for the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding, a
student must be a Canadian citizen, a Permanent Resident, or a Protected Person under
subsection 95(2) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (Canada).
Citizenship must be obtained prior to the 2007-2008 Application for Full-time Students
deadline date in order for the student to be eligible to apply for assistance for the current
study period.
Example:
Students 2007-2008 study period: September 5, 2007 to April 30, 2008
OSAP application deadline date: January 30, 2008
If student obtains Permanent Residency or Protected Person status on or before
January 30, 2008, student is eligible for Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
and/or grant funding from the date of the application to the end of the study period.
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If student obtains Permanent Residency or Protected Person status after January


30, 2008, student is not eligible for any Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
and/or grant funding for the entire 2007-2008 study period.

2. Provincial Residency
To be eligible for the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant, a student
must meet OSAP provincial residency criteria.
a) Specific provincial residency criteria
To be considered an Ontario resident, a student must meet at least one of the
following criteria:
As of the first day of the students study period, Ontario is the last province the
student resided in for 12 consecutive months without being a full-time
postsecondary student;
If the student is considered married for OSAP purposes (See Table A1), as of the
first day of the students study period, Ontario is the last province the students
spouse resided in for 12 consecutive months without being a full-time
postsecondary student, or
If the student is a single dependent student, as of the first day of the students study
period, Ontario is the last province the students parent(s), step-parent(s), legal
guardian(s) or official sponsor(s) resided in for at least 12 consecutive months.
Where parents/step-parents are separated or divorced, this requirement refers to
the residency of the parent with whom the student normally resides, or who
financially supports the student
Residency Examples:
A) Single independent students 2007-2008 study period starts September 5, 2007.
Student lived in Alberta from September, 2003 to December, 2006, and has lived in
Ontario since January 2007. During this entire period, the student was in the labour
force, and did not participate in full-time postsecondary education.
Outcome: Alberta is the last Province in which student resided for 12 consecutive
months. Student does not meet Ontario residency criteria and should apply for
assistance through Alberta.
B) Single independent students 2007-2008 study period starts September 5, 2007.
Student lived in Quebec until January 2004, then in Ontario from February 2004 to
April 2007, then in Quebec from May 2007 to August 2007, then returned to Ontario.
During this entire period, the student was in the labour force, and did not participate in
full-time postsecondary education.
Outcome: Ontario is the last Province in which student resided for 12 consecutive
months. Student meets Ontario residency criteria.

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Determining Provincial Residency for Students who are Protected Persons or Permanent
Residents
FAAs are to use the following questions to assist them in determining provincial
residency for student financial assistance purposes.
1. Has the student (or his or her supporting individual, if applicable) resided in
Ontario for 12 consecutive months without being a full-time student? (Note: The
date the student became a Protected Person or Permanent Resident is not to
be considered in determining the number of months a student has resided in
Ontario for determining provincial residency.)
If yes, then is Ontario the most recent Province where the student (or supporting
individual) resided for 12 consecutive months without being a full-time student?

Yes. Student has met Ontarios residency requirements.


No. Proceed to Question 2.

2. Has the student (or his or her supporting individual, if applicable) resided in any
Canadian province or territory, other than Ontario, for 12 consecutive months
without being a full-time student?

Yes. The student is not a resident of Ontario for student finanical


assistance purposes. He or she is to be instructed to apply for student
finanical assistance in that province or territory.
No. Although the student does not meet Ontarios residency criteria, these
criteria may be waived under a provincial residency review, as outlined
below. FAAs should refer to the 2007-2008 Review Manual for more
information.

b) Grounds For Waiving Ontarios Residency Criteria


Where a student does not meet the above Ontario residency criteria, he or she may
still be considered for assistance through the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan
Program under certain conditions. Details are provided in the 2007-2008 Review
Manual.
Never Resided in Any Province for 12 Consecutive Months:
Where a student and his or her supporting individuals have never resided in any
Canadian province or territory for 12 consecutive months (excluding time spent by the
student or his/her spouse in full-time postsecondary studies), he or she can be
considered on review for purposes of both the Ontario and Canada portion of the
Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan.
To be considered under this review, the student must reside in Ontario at the time of
application and must be applying to attend, or attending, an approved Ontario
postsecondary institution.
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Applicants to out-of-country institutions can also be considered under a variation of this


review, for federal assistance through the Canada-Ontario Student Loan Program.
FAAs should refer to the 2007-2008 Review Manual for more information.
Denied Assistance in Last Province of Residency:
Where a student was denied student assistance in the last province that he/she (or
his/her supporting individuals) resided in for 12 consecutive months based on its
residency criteria, he or she can be considered on review for purposes of the Canada
and Ontario portions of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan. To be
considered under this review, the student must reside in Ontario at the time of
application and must be applying to attend, or must be attending an approved Ontario
postsecondary institution.
If a student is denied assistance by his/her last province of residency (not Ontario)
because the students program of study (at a postsecondary institution in Ontario) is
also offered by a postsecondary institution in the last province of residency, the student
should be assessed for the Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student
Loan only.
FAAs should refer to the 2007-2008 Review Manual for information on this review.
3. Loan Defaults and Grant/Bursary Overpayments

Students who have defaulted on a previous Canada or Ontario portion of the Canada
Ontario Integrated Student Loan or who are in receipt of bursary overpayments are
ineligible for further assistance until the following conditions are met:
If a student has

defaulted on the Canada Ontario


Integrated Student Loan

defaulted on the Canada portion of the


Canada Ontario Integrated Student
Loan or a previous Canada Student
Loan

In order to receive further Canada Ontario Integrated


Student Loan funding, the student must...

defaulted on the Ontario portion of the


Canada Ontario Integrated Student
Loan or a previous Ontario Student
Loan
received a grant/bursary overpayment

have received clearance from Human Resources and


Social Development Canada, and
repaid the full value of the defaulted Ontario portion of
the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan

have received clearance from Human Resources and


Social Development Canada

repaid the full value of the defaulted Ontario portion of


the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan

repaid the full value of the overpayment

A student who has defaulted on an Ontario Student Venture Capital Loan is ineligible for
funding through the Ontario portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan until
he/she provides written confirmation from the Entrepreneurship Partnerships Unit of the
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Entrepreneurship Branch, Ministry of Economic Development and Trade (416-325-6541),


that he/she has fully repaid the Venture Capital Loan Default.
4. Credit Screening
All new OSAP applicants are subject to a check of their credit history to ensure that
funding is not issued to individuals with a history of serious credit abuse.
A new OSAP applicant is a student who, in the previous academic year, either:

did not receive loan and/or grant assistance; or,


failed a credit check on the Ontario portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student
Loan.

A @history of serious credit abuse@ is defined as having had three or more credit accounts
(e.g., personal loan, credit card, personal line of credit) with a combined value of $1,000 or
more that were 90 days or more in arrears in the three years prior to the time of
application.
It is recognized that a poor credit history may be due to extenuating circumstances,
including significant and unexpected loss of income or unusual increases in expenses. An
appeals process has been established for students who can demonstrate exceptional
circumstances and a strong likelihood of being able to repay their student loans. Refer to
the 2007-2008 Review Manual for information on this type of appeal.
5. Satisfactory Academic Progress
Students are required to complete satisfactorily the academic requirements of their
program of study to continue to be eligible for financial assistance. Inherent in this
requirement is that a student will achieve passing grades, as defined by the institution, in
the minimum required course load:

For OSAP purposes, the minimum required course load in which a student must
be enrolled is at least 60% of what the institution considers to be a full course
load.
For students with disabilities, the minimum required course load in which a
student must be enrolled is at least 40% of what the institution considers to be a
full course load.

Students are expected to progress through the different years of the program of study or,
if the program is only one year in length and geared to employment, the student is
expected to complete the program and move into the workforce.
Frequent or multiple program switches, drops, withdrawals, and/or multiple repeats of a
program, which are funded by OSAP may also be considered lack of progress and lack of
academic direction on the part of the student.
If a student does not make satisfactory academic progress, the following applies:
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Scholastic Situation

Consequence

Remedy

Failure to make satisfactory


academic progress during 1
period of study.

Student put on probation;


remains eligible for OSAP in
next period of study.

Must succeed in all following


academic years to maintain
continuous Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan and/or
grant eligibility.

Failure to make satisfactory


academic progress during 2
periods of study.

Student loses Canada Ontario


Integrated Student Loan and
grant eligibility for a minimum of
12 months.

Must maintain Canada


Ontario Integrated Student
Loans in good standing with
lending institution during the 12month period.

Failure to make satisfactory


academic progress during 3
periods of study.

Student loses Canada Ontario


Integrated Student Loan and
grant eligibility for a minimum of
36 months.

Must maintain Canada


Ontario Integrated Student
Loans in good standing with
lending institution during the 36month period.
Must maintain Canada
Ontario Integrated Student
Loans in good standing during
the 60 month period.
Must repay all loans prior to
obtaining new loans.

Failure to make satisfactory


academic progress during 4
periods of study.
Failure to make satisfactory
academic progress during 5
periods of study.

Student loses Canada Ontario


Integrated Student Loan and
grant eligibility for a minimum of
60 months (5 years).
Student loses eligibility for new
Certificate of Eligibility and new
loans.

In order to maintain the loans in good standing, the student must meet one of the following
conditions:
If continuing in full-time studies, the student must keep loans in interest-free status
by completing a Confirmation of Enrolment;
If not continuing in full-time studies, the student must consolidate his or her loans
and begin repayment.
The above table outlines the minimum successful scholastic standards to be enforced by
postsecondary institutions. Postsecondary institutions may use their internal policy if the
policy exceeds these minimum requirements.
Students experiencing temporary illness or disability may be exempted from the
satisfactory scholastic standard for that period of illness or disability. The student will have
to provide a letter of explanation, official transcripts, and other applicable documentation,
as determined by the Financial Aid Administrator, for the Financial Aid Administrators
review.
Additional details regarding satisfactory academic progress are outlined in the 2007-2008
Review Manual.

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6. Maximum Duration of Assistance


a) Lifetime limits
A student is eligible to receive student financial assistance provided he/she has not
exceeded the lifetime limits as outlined below:
i) Canada Student Loans
Students who received Canada Student Loans prior to August 1, 1995 (and who
received no loans after August 1, 1995) were eligible to receive assistance up to a
lifetime limit of 520 weeks, including all weeks for which a Certificate of Eligibility
(Schedule 1) or Confirmation of Enrolment (Schedule 2) was issued. This
includes weeks between program years.
Students who received Canada Student Loans on or after August 1, 1995 are
eligible to receive assistance up to a lifetime limit of 340 weeks, including all
weeks of postsecondary study for which a Certificate of Eligibility (Schedule 1) or
Confirmation of Enrolment (Schedule 2) was issued. This does not include weeks
between program years. The lifetime limit is extended an additional 60 weeks (i.e.,
to 400 weeks) for students in doctoral studies.
Students with disabilities are eligible to receive assistance up to a lifetime limit of
520 weeks, including all weeks of postsecondary study for which a Certificate of
Eligibility (Schedule 1) or Confirmation of Enrolment (Schedule 2) was issued.
Notes:
1. The number of weeks of assistance is the aggregate of the number of weeks
corresponding to the borrowers confirmed weeks of study as a full time
student.
2. For a student who has received a Confirmation of Enrolment or a Certificate
of Loan/Grant Approval and Eligibility but who withdraws before the end of
his or her period of studies, the actual number of weeks of study completed
counts toward the lifetime limit.
ii) Ontario Student Loans
Students enrolled in a program other than a doctoral program are eligible to
receive up to a maximum of 340 weeks of Ontario Student Loan,
Millennium/Ontario Access Grant and/or Ontario Access Grant assistance.
Students enrolled in a doctoral program are eligible to receive up to a maximum of
400 weeks of Ontario Student Loan, Millennium/Ontario Access Grant and/or
Ontario Access Grant assistance.
In the case of a person with a disability, a Certificate of Loan/Grant Approval and
Eligiblity may be issued to an individual who has exceeded the maximum weeks
of study.
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Note: The number of weeks of Ontario assistance does not include the weeks a
student receives in school interest-free status. There is no lifetime maximum on
the number of weeks a students Ontario Student Loans can be placed in interestfree status.
b) Periods of study plus one
Students may apply for Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or for grant
funding for the number of periods of study normally specified by the institution for
completion of that program of study plus 1 period of study. A period of study is defined
as 1 academic year.
Student is enrolled in a:

Number of Academic Years OSAP funding available

1-year certificate program

2 years

2-year diploma program

3 years

4-year degree program

5 years

This policy applies to years of study that occurred in, or since, 1996-97 and includes
only those years where the student applied for and received CSL and/or OSL funding
or Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan funding. Periods of study in which a
student did not receive CSL and/or OSL funding or Canada Ontario Integrated
Student Loan funding are not included.
Note: Students with permanent disabilities are exempt from this policy.
7. Postsecondary Program/Institution Requirements
A student must be enrolled in a postsecondary program and institution approved for
student financial assistance purposes to be eligible for Canada Ontario Integrated
Student Loan and/or grant funding. Institution approval is granted annually when an
institution meets predetermined requirements and deadlines. This approval can be
withdrawn at any time.
Most programs offered by Ontario universities and colleges of applied arts and technology
are approved for student financial assistance purposes. To be approved, programs
offered by Ontario universities and colleges of applied arts and technology must:

Have an entrance requirement of either an Ontario Secondary School Diploma


(OSSD) or equivalent; or mature student status. (See Definitions and Context)
Be approved for General Purpose Operating Grants. Students who are enrolled in
academic upgrading programs or full cost recovery programs are not eligible for
Canada or Ontario Student Loan.

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8. Program Length
A students period of studies must be at least 12 weeks in length and must not exceed 52
consecutive weeks in an academic year. A student enrolled in a period of study that is less
than 12 weeks in length (e.g., summer/intersession) is eligible for assistance provided that
when the weeks of study are combined with any previous period(s) of study within the
same academic year for which a student received assistance, the duration of the
combined periods of study is at least 12 weeks in length.
9. Course Load

A student with a permanent disability enrolled in courses that constitute at least 40% or
more of a full course load, as defined by the institution, may be considered for Canada
Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding.
A student without a permanent disability enrolled in courses that constitute at least 60% or
more of a full course load, as defined by the institution, may be considered for Canada
Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding.
If a student is enrolled in less than 60% of a full course load (less than 40% for a student
with a permanent disability), he/she is not eligible for Canada Ontario Integrated Student
Loan and/or grant funding. Students in this situation are studying on a part-time basis and
may be considered for funding through the Part-Time Canada Student Loans Program,
the Canada Study Grant for High-Need Part-Time Students, or the Ontario Special
Bursary Plan.
No averaging of course loads is permitted. If a student is taking 80% of a full course
load in the first term and 40% in the second term, the course load cannot be averaged to
equal 60% to meet the minimum course load requirement. The student would not be
eligible for assistance in the second term. This would not be the case, however, for a
student with a permanent disability, who would be eligible for full-time assistance in both
terms because he or she is taking at least 40% of a full course load in each term.
A student enrolled in a non-degree program at a private career college must be receiving
a minimum of 20 hours of instruction per week.
10. Types of Programs
a) Co-operative program
Co-operative education programs are programs that formally integrate a students
academic studies with work experience. The usual plan is for the student to alternate
periods of experience in career-related fields according to the following criteria:
Each work situation is approved by the postsecondary institution as a suitable
learning situation;
The co-operative education student is engaged in productive work rather than
merely observing;
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The co-operative education students progress on the job is supervised and


evaluated by the students employer;
The time spent in periods of work experience must be at least thirty per cent of the
time spent in academic study.
A student in a co-operative program is eligible for the following types of assistance:
Study Terms: Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding for all
educational costs or interest-free status.
Work Terms: Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding for
program-related fees, living costs, or interest-free status, provided that the work
term(s) is a required component of the program of study. Funding of employmentrelated expenses is not available.
b) Distance education programs
Distance education programs are programs where a majority of the teaching and
learning is conducted without the teacher or students physically meeting each other,
e.g., e-learning, correspondence, open broadcast, closed circuit, cable, microwave, or
satellite, audio conferencing.
A student in a distance education program may be eligible for Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding and interest-free status if the program of
study has been approved for student financial assistance purposes and the student
meets all Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant eligibility criteria.
Distance education programs may be approved for student financial assistance
purposes if:

there is a specified start and end date,

the students progress is monitored through regular assignments, exams,


and contact with faculty, and

the program of studies leads to a degree, diploma, or certificate.


c) Concurrent study programs
A student enrolled concurrently in two postsecondary institutions can apply for Canada
Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding, and interest-free status
provided that:
combined, the courses from both institutions equal 60% or more of a full course
load (40% or more for students with a permanent disability), as defined by the
institution where the student is taking the majority of courses in the study period in
question; and
all courses lead to a degree, diploma or certificate.
The Financial Aid Office (FAO) at the postsecondary institution where the student is
taking the majority of courses (the primary institution) is required to administer the
students OSAP application. Tuition, compulsory fees and book/equipment costs from
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the secondary institution are added to the students allowable educational costs at the
primary institution.
d) Professional training programs
Individuals in periods of practical training required for acceptance in a professional
corporation or for the practice of a trade or profession (e.g., medical
internship/residency, dietetic internship, apprenticeship programs) are not considered
full-time students for student assistance purposes.
The licensing process offered by the Law Society of Upper Canada is not approved for
student financial.
11. Institution Location
The types and amounts of Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and/or grant funding
available to students depend on the type and location of their postsecondary institution.
Institution Type/Location

Funding Available

Publicly-funded Ontario college, publiclyfunded Ontario university, or Ontario private


postsecondary institution

Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan


Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants
Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent
Disabilities
Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income
Families
Millennium/Ontario Access Grant
Ontario Access Grant
Millennium Bursary
Queen Elizabeth II Aiming for the Top Scholarship
Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants
Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent
Disabilities
Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income
Families
Millennium/Ontario Access Grant
Ontario Access Grant
Millennium Bursary

Publicly-funded college or university in


Canada, outside of Ontario

Private postsecondary institution in


Canada, outside of Ontario

Canada portion of Canada Ontario Integrated Student


Loan
Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants
Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent
Disabilities
Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income
Families
Millennium Bursary
Millennium/Ontario Access Grant

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Postsecondary institution outside of
Canada

Canada portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated


Student Loan
Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants
Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent
Disabilities
Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income
Families

Postsecondary institution outside of


Canada with specialized programs for deaf,
deafened, or hard-of-hearing students (i.e.,
for students requiring instruction in
American Sign Language)

Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan


Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants
Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent
Disabilities
Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income
Families
Millennium/Ontario Access Grant
Ontario Access Grant
Bursary for Students with Disabilities Attending Out-ofCountry Postsecondary Institutions

Ontario hairstyling school

Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan (up to $210


per week)
Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants
Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent
Disabilities
Millennium Bursary

Hairstyling school outside of Ontario

Not eligible

12. Letter of Permission


A student may interrupt studies at one institution and take courses at a second institution.
These courses may be eligible for transfer back to the home institution. The courses at the
second institution must be degree, certificate or diploma-level courses for the student to
be eligible for assistance.
If the student intends to apply for student financial assistance for the courses at the
second institution, he/she must submit an OSAP application through the second institution
(the institution which the student is attending during the specific time period and to which
the student is paying tuition fees).
If the student is enrolled in courses at the second institution that are less than 12 weeks in
length, the home institution can elect to process the student for assistance as a study
period extension under the following conditions:
the student must have an existing OSAP application/account at the home institution;
the existing period of study plus the extension period of study is 12 or more weeks in
length;
the student is enrolled in a full-time course load throughout the extension of the study
period; and
the student agrees to provide the home institution with proof of enrolment at the
second institution prior to release of any supplemental funding.
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13. Application Deadlines


If a student submits his/her OSAP application after the start of the current study period,
the following deadlines and penalties apply:
Number of
terms
(duration)

Application Deadlines

One term
(12-20
weeks)

If the FAO receives an application after the first 30 days of a students study period, the
student is ineligible for Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and grant funding.

Two and
three term
(21-52
weeks)

If the FAO receives an application within the first 45 days of a students study period, the
student is eligible for Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and grant funding for the
entire study period.
If the FAO receives an application after the first 45 days of the students study period and
no later than 90 days before the end of a students current study period, the student is
eligible for Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and grant funding from the date the
application was received until the end of the study period.
If the application is received less than 90 days before the end of a students current study
period, the student is ineligible for Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and grant
funding.

14. Funding from Other Programs


The OSAP application requires students to declare support from all other government
programs to ensure there is no duplication in funding. This information is then taken into
account in the OSAP needs assessment. If a student is receiving other government
assistance that covers a portion of their expenses, they must provide a letter from that
agency outlining the benefits they are receiving.
Recipients of Ontario Works (OW) must contact their social assistance caseworker to
discuss their eligibility for OSAP funding and OW income assistance while in
postsecondary studies.
Recipients of Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) may continue to receive income
assistance through ODSP while in postsecondary studies and apply for OSAP funding for
their direct educational costs.
15. Loan Overpayments
A loan overpayment exists when the student has negotiated loans in excess of his/her
current OSAP entitlement.
a) Statement of Loan Overpayment B issuing criteria
A Statement of Loan Overpayment will be issued to a student if all of the following
conditions apply:
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From 1997-98 onward, the student has applied for and received OSAP assistance
for at least two academic years; and,
The student has received a loan overpayment in each of two or more academic
years; and,
Each loan overpayment is in excess of $250.

b) Impact on eligibility for further assistance


A student who is issued a Statement of Loan Overpayment is not eligible for further
assistance until:
all outstanding loan overpayments have been repaid in full, with the exception of
the loan overpayment relating to the first academic year in which an overpayment
occurred, and the student has documented that this requirement has been met on
review; or
a decision has been made on review to allow repayment of the loan overpayment
to be waived for one year due to exceptional circumstances or hardship.
FAAs should refer to the 2007-2008 Review Manual for information on these types of
reviews.
To avoid generating loan overpayments unnecessarily, in calculating the amount of a
loan overpayment, the ministry will reduce the overpayment by the amount of tuition
fee refunds that are reported through the OSAP on-line system.
In addition, if in-year changes to a students calculated financial need result in a loan
overpayment situation arising before all funds have been disbursed to a student, the
loan overpayment will be recovered from remaining loans or grants not yet issued to
the student.
In a few situations, recovery of loan overpayments from remaining loans or grants will
mean that a student will receive less Millennium/Ontario Access Grant or Ontario
Access Grant assistance than he or she is entitled to. To ensure that students are not
disadvantaged, the Province will make an adjustment to the reduction in the students
repayable loan principal through the Ontario Student Opportunity Grant such that the
student receives the correct total amount of non-repayable assistance for the year from
his or her Ontario Student Opportunity Grant in combination with his or her
Millennium/Ontario Access Grant or Ontario Access Grant.
16. Bursary/Grant Overpayments
A bursary overpayment exists when a student receives bursary assistance to which
he/she was not entitled. Students who have received a bursary overpayment are not
eligible for further student financial assistance until:
all of the outstanding overpayment has been paid in full; or
a decision has been made on review to allow the grant/bursary overpayment to be
waived for one year due to exceptional circumstances or hardship.

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The Ministrys policies regarding Millennium/Ontario Access Grants and Ontario Access
Grants overpayments have not yet been established. FAAs will be notified of these policies
through the Internal Resources website when they have been finalized.
17. Bankruptcy
A bankruptcy-related event occurs where a student participates in one of the possible
events which may occur under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act:
filing for bankruptcy;
making a consumer proposal that is approved or deemed to be approved by a court;
obtaining a consolidation order under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act;
filing a document seeking relief for the orderly payment of debts.
The effect of bankruptcy and related events on eligibility for student financial assistance
depends on the date that the bankruptcy or related event occurred.
Bankruptcy-Related Events Prior to May 11, 2004:
If a student participated in a bankruptcy-related event prior to May 11, 2004 and had
outstanding student loans at the time he or she filed for bankruptcy, the student is
ineligible for further student financial assistance, continuation or reinstatement of interestfree status, or other OSAP programs. To have eligibility for further assistance restored, the
student must meet the same conditions outlined in section 3 of this chapter; OR the
students obligation to repay the student loans must have been released by reason of an
order of discharge under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act , and three years must have
elapsed since the day the order of discharge was made..
Bankruptcy-Related Events On or After May 11, 2004:
If a student participated in a bankruptcy-related event on or after May 11, 2004, additional
full-time student financial assistance (and/or interest-free status) may be available, on
review for up to a maximum of three additional years to allow the student to complete the
program of study he or she was enrolled in at the time of the bankruptcy-related event.
A student who does not meet the conditions for this review is ineligible for further student
financial assistance (and/or interest free status) unless he or she either:
meets the same conditions outlined in section 3 of this chapter for students who
have defaulted on their Canada or Ontario Student Loans, or
has been released from his or her obligation to repay the student loans by reason
of an order of discharge under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and three years
have elapsed since the day the order of discharge was made.
In some cases, a student who has declared bankruptcy but is still eligible to apply for
student financial assistance may have an undischarged bankruptcy (due to a review to
allow for the completion of a program, or because the student did not receive student
loans on or before the date they filed for bankruptcy). If the bankruptcy is undischarged,
the student must submit documentation to confirm that any OSAP assistance provided will
not be seized to repay creditors in the bankruptcy. Depending on the circumstances of the
review, the student may also be required to submit documentation identifying whether or
not OSAP was a creditor in the bankruptcy-related event.

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FAAs should refer to the 2007-2008 OSAP Review Manual for more information on
Bankruptcy Reviews.

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CHAPTER 2:

ASSESSING FINANCIAL NEED

1. Introduction
This Chapter provides information on the process of assessing need for full-time students
under the Canada - Ontario Integrated Student Loan program.
Definitions: Some of the words used in describing the need assessment process have a
specific meaning. See the Definitions and Context section at the end of this manual.
Item Numbers: The item numbers referred to in this chapter are from the 2007-2008
OSAP Application for Full-Time Students.
2. How Much Assistance Can Students Receive?
The amount of Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan and grant assistance a student
is eligible to receive is based on their assessed need, which is calculated as follows:
Allowable
Educational Costs
(Step B)

Expected
Financial Contributions
(Step C)

Calculation of
Assessed Need
(Step D)

Financial need assessment criteria used for the Canada portion of the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan are not necessarily the same as those used for the Ontario
portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan. Consequently, separate
financial need assessments are calculated for the Canada and Ontario portions.
Appendix 1 provides sample need assessments.
3. Steps to Follow in Assessing Need
The need assessment process consists of four steps:
STEP A: Identify the Student's Category
STEP B: Assess Student's Costs during the Study Period
STEP C: Determine the Resources Available from the Student (and Family)
STEP D: Calculate the Student's Need
STEP E: Calculate the Students Financial Assistance

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STEP A:

IDENTIFY THE STUDENTS CATEGORY

1. Student Group Definition


The need assessment process requires that a student be assigned a category which most
closely fits their living situation.
The categories reflect whether the student:
is considered dependent on or independent of parental support;
is considered to live at home or away from home; or
is married or is a sole support parent.
Canada and Ontario portions of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan

Category
Single
Dependent
Students

Independent
Single

Married or
Common
law
relationship

Solesupport

A student is considered to be dependent on parental support (and therefore a Single


Dependent Student) unless he/she meets one of the criteria outlined below:

out of high school for 4 or more years as of the start of the students study period
not a full-time student at a high school or postsecondary institution (i.e., has been in
the labour force on a full-time basis) for at least 12 consecutive months on 2 or more
occasions
both parents are deceased
current or former Ward of the Crown who has not been adopted
the student was previously identified as married or sole-support parent but no longer
meets those criteria (e.g., student is widowed, divorced, or separated with no
children).

married
common law relationship in which a borrower is living with a person in a conjugal
relationship outside marriage for not less than three years, or the borrower and a
person are living together in a conjugal relationship outside of marriage and are
raising a child of whom both are the biological or adoptive parents.

never been married

separated, divorced, or widowed


AND

have legal and/or physical custody and responsibility for supporting children; the
child(ren) must reside with the student full-time during the current study period.

A student who is not married but has children for whom he or she is the custodial parent is
defined as a Sole-Support Parent. If the student has shared custody with the other parent
of the child(ren), he/she must meet the guidelines in the 2007-2008 Review Manual to be
assessed as a Sole-Support Parent. Students who provide financial support for a
child(ren) for whom they do not have physical custody will be considered to be in a student
group other than sole-support parent.

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STEP B:

ASSESS THE STUDENT'S COSTS DURING STUDY PERIOD

1. Principle
The costs of postsecondary study include both education and living costs which are to be
assessed for the period of study during the academic year for which the student is
enrolled.

2. Allowable Educational Costs


a) Tuition and compulsory fees
The amount of tuition and compulsory fees used in the need assessment does not vary
between student groups.
i) Public Institutions
Regular Tuition Fee Programs:
Actual tuition and compulsory fees are used in both the Canada and Ontario
portions of the need assessment.
Graduate and Professional or High-Demand Programs:
Actual tuition and compulsory fees are used in the Canada portion of the need
assessment.
Tuition and compulsory fees are capped in the Ontario portion of the need
assesment for these programs:
Graduate and Professional programs at Ontario universities includes all
former Additional Cost Recovery university programs and some additional
programs identified in the 2006-07 University Tuition Guidelines (see
Appendix 3);
High-Demand programs at Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology
includes all former Additional Cost Recovery college programs and some
additional programs identified in the 2006-07 College Tuition Guidelines (see
Appendix 4).
For these programs, the maximum amount of tuition and compulsory fees that can
be recognized in the Ontario portion of the need assessment is:
$2,250 per term for non co-op programs
$2,675 per term for co-op programs ($2,250 for tuition/compulsory fees and
$425 for co-op fees)

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ii) Private postsecondary institutions and private degree-granting


institutions approved for student financial assistance purposes
designated on or after February 14, 2001
Actual tuition and compulsory fees are used in the Canada portion of the need
assessment.
The maximum tuition and compulsory fees recognized by Ontario and used in the
Ontario portion of the need assessment is $2,250 per term.
iii) Private postsecondary institutions and private degree-granting
institutions approved for student financial assistance purposes
designated before February 14, 2001
Actual tuition and compulsory fees are used in the Canada portion of the need
assessment.
The maximum tuition and compulsory fees that will be recognized by Ontario and
used in the Ontario portion of the need assessment is $5,000 per term.
iv) All other institutions
Actual tuition and compulsory fees are used in the Canada and Ontario portions of
the need assessment.
Not all compulsory fees charged by postsecondary institutions are recognized in
the needs assessment.

Recognized Compulsory Fees

co-op fees
student activity fees
athletic fees
health services
student union fees
laboratory fees
field placement
technology (excluding computer
purchase or lease fees)
professional fees

Unrecognized Compulsory Fees

confirmation fees
parking
late registration fees
convocation/graduate fees
appeal fees
fees for duplicate diplomas, ID cards,
and/or fee receipts
transcript fees
special tests and/or exam fees (these
costs may be allowed under
professional/exam fees)
local public transportation fees

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b) Books, Supplies, Equipment, and Computer Allowance


The maximum allowance for books, supplies, equipment, and computers is the lesser
of:
For one-term programs: $1,000 for the term and actual costs;
For two and three-term programs: $3,000 per academic year and actual costs.
The same books, supplies, equipment, and computer allowances are used in the
Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
The books, supplies, equipment, and computer allowance takes into consideration the
following:
book costs;
expendable supplies;
uniforms and minor equipment;
professional association/examination fees;
field trips;
major equipment;
graduate thesis costs;
computer and computer-related costs.
Each of these categories also has a specific maximum that cannot be exceeded.
Costs for individual categories greater than the allowable maximum cannot be carried
over into other categories in which the maximum was not reached. FAOs should refer
to the 2007-2008 Cost Code Update Manual-Information and Edit & Entry Guidelines
for further clarification on acceptable methods to calculate program book costs and
supply costs, and on how FAOs should document their calculations where book and
supply costs are being updated.
Costs provided in Table B1 are based on a 100% course load. If a student is taking
less than 100% of a full course load, costs are pro-rated in the need assessment
based on the percentage of full course load taken.
Table B1: Books, Supplies, Equipment, and Computer Maximums
Item

1 term
(12 - 20 weeks)

2 terms
(21 - 40 weeks)

3 terms
(41 - 52 weeks)

Book Costs: maximums are based on program type.


General Arts and Science

$300

$600

$900

Applied Science, Engineering or


any other Specialized Program

$525

$1,050

$1,575

Expendable Supplies: maximums are based on program type.


Non-Fine Arts Programs

$200

$400

$600

Fine Arts

$600

$1,200

$1,800

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Table B1: Books, Supplies, Equipment, and Computer Maximums
Item

1 term
(12 - 20 weeks)

2 terms
(21 - 40 weeks)

3 terms
(41 - 52 weeks)

Uniforms and Minor Equipment: maximums apply to all programs. Clothing expenses
incurred by students in co-op or work placement terms cannot be considered unless a specific
uniform is a mandatory requirement of the placement and the student does not already have this
uniform as part of the requirements of his/her program.
All programs

$150

$300

$450

Field Trips: maximums apply to all programs. Costs can be reported only if the field trips are
compulsory and are not already included in tuition or compulsory fees. Co-op student placement
fees are not included in this category; they should be listed under compulsory fees.
All programs

$475

$950

$1,425

Major Equipment: maximums apply to all programs. Costs include cameras, musical
instruments, medical or dental equipment, tool kits for aircraft mechanics.
All programs

$583

$1,165

$1,748

Graduate Thesis Costs: maximums apply to graduate level programs only. This category
addresses the costs associated with preparing a thesis.
Graduate Programs

$300

$600

$900

Professional Association/Examination Fee: includes mandatory fees charged by professional


associations that govern the field in which the student is studying (e.g., Registered Nurses
examination fees). Unlike all other categories, the maximum allowable cost is the same
regardless of the number of terms in the study period.
Program specific

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

Computer Costs
All programs

c) Living allowance
The same living allowances are used in assessing student costs for both the Canada
and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
Province Specific: Each student group has a standard living allowance based on the
province where the student is attending school and the number of dependants (if
applicable).
Students studying outside of Canada are assessed based on Ontario living allowance
rates.
Living allowances for Ontario are provided in Table B2 and for all other provinces in
Appendix 2.

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Table B2: Living Allowances for Ontario


Student Group

Monthly
Allowance

Weekly
Allowance1

Comments

Dependent/
Independent at
home

$414

$96.28

Dependent/
Independent
away from home

$999

$232.33

Married student
(not including
children)

$1,915

$445.35

Sole support
parent (not
including
children)

$1,294

$300.93

a single dependent student whose parents


reside in the same city as the institution that
he/she is attending is expected to live at home
and receives the Aat home@ living allowance
if the family home is more than 40 km or 1
hour travel time by public transit, or there is no
public transit, and the students new residence
is closer to the institution than the family
home, an Aaway from home@ allowance can
be assessed
if both spouses are full-time students, the
applicant is assessed with 2 of the living
allowance

$530
$123.26
Each additional
dependent child
1
Weekly Living Allowance = Monthly Living Allowance divided by a factor 4.3

The number of weeks in the students study period should be multiplied by the weekly
allowance, to calculate the total living allowance during the study period.
Distance Education Courses: If the student is enrolled in a distance education
course, the students living allowance will be assessed based on Ontario living
allowance rates.
If the student is in receipt of assistance through Employment Insurance, Loss of
Earnings Benefits (WSIB), Native Postsecondary Student Support Program or Canada
Pension Plan benefits, the student will be assessed with the full standard OSAP living
allowance. The amount of government income reported by the student is used as a
direct resource.
Social Assistance Benefits: If the student is in receipt of social assistance benefits
during the study period, OSAP does not provide living allowance support to meet the
students living costs as this would duplicate the funding provided. The standard
OSAP living allowance is reduced by the amount of income received as outlined in the
following table:

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Table B3: Effect of Government Benefits on Living Allowances


Status

Single
Student
SoleSupport
Parent

Married
Student

Source of Government Benefits


Item 630 lists income from:
Extended Care and Maintenance
Allowance from Childrens Aid
Ontario Works
Ontario Disability Support Program.

Adjustment to the Standard Living


Allowance
OSAP Living Allowance is reduced by the
income listed in Item 625.

Item 630 lists income from:


Ontario Disability Support Program.

OSAP Living Allowance is reduced by the


income listed in Item 625.

Item 630 lists income (for the student)


or Item 955 lists income (for the spouse)
from:
Ontario Disability Support Program.

OSAP Living Allowance is reduced by the


sum of:
Total in Item 950 divided by 12 divided by
4.3 and multiplied by the number of weeks
in students study period plus 100% of the
income listed in Items 620, 625 and 626

Note: If the amount of government benefits exceeds the OSAP living allowance, the
excess amount is not considered a resource in the OSAP assessment.
d) Return transportation
Dependent single students living away from home are eligible for a return
transportation allowance to their permanent home. No other student group is allowed
this cost.
The maximum amount allowed for return transportation is $1,200 per academic year.
There is a limit of two return trips per academic year at a maximum cost of $600 per
trip.
The cost of return trips is based on the most economical means of transportation from
the students institution to his/her permanent home. The same return transportation
allowance is used in both the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
e) Child-care
To be eligible for a child-care allowance, the student must have dependent children
aged 11 years and under, or children 12 years of age or older who have a disability.
For married students to be eligible for a child-care allowance, the applicants spouse
must either be employed or a full-time student.
The student reports expected child-care costs during the study period in Item 405 of
the OSAP application. The amount claimed is subject to the maximums outlined in the
following tables for child-care allowances for sole-support parents and married
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students enrolled in programs that have been approved for student financial assistance
purposes.
Table B4: Married Students - Child-Care Allowances
Number of
Children/
Comments
Maximum
assistance
(1-2 children)

Maximum
assistance
(3+ children)

Programs Approved for Canada


Ontario Integrated Student Loan

Programs Approved for the Canada


portion of the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan only

Lower of:
actual costs; or
$40 per study week multiplied by the
number of dependent children

Lower of:
actual costs; or
$40 per study week multiplied by the
number of dependent children

Lower of:
$80 per study week; or
actual child-care costs during the
study period divided by number of
dependent children multiplied by two
AND
Bursary assistance through the
Child-Care Bursary Program for the
3rd, 4th and 5th + children (refer to
2007-2008 Child-Care Bursary
Manual)

Lower of:
actual costs; or
$40 per study week multiplied by the
number of dependent children
Note: Ontarios Child-Care Bursary is
not available for students in programs
that have been approved for the Canada
portion of the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan only

Note:
If both spouses are full-time students, the applicant is assessed with one half (50%) of the child-care
allowance. This calculation is done to pro-rate child-care costs for the first two children eligible for loan
funding.

Table B4: Sole-support Parents - Child-Care Allowances


Number of
Children/
Comments

Programs Approved for Canada


Ontario Integrated Student Loans

Programs Approved for the Canada


portion of the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan only

Maximum
assistance
(1- 2 children)

Lower of:
actual costs; or
$83 per study week multiplied by
the number of dependent children;

Lower of:
actual costs; or
$83 per study week multiplied by the
number of dependent children

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Table B4: Sole-support Parents - Child-Care Allowances


Number of
Children/
Comments

Programs Approved for Canada


Ontario Integrated Student Loans

Maximum
assistance
(3+ children)

Lower of:
$166 per study week; or
actual child-care costs during the
study period divided by number of
dependent children multiplied by
two1
AND
Bursary assistance through the
Child-Care Bursary for the 3rd, 4th
and 5th + children (refer to 20072008 Child-Care Bursary Manual)

Programs Approved for the Canada


portion of the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan only

Lower of:
actual costs; or
$83 per study week multiplied by the
number of dependent children
Note: Ontarios Child-care Bursary is
not available for students in programs
that have been approved for the Canada
portion of the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan only.

Note: 1 This calculation is done to pro-rate child-care costs for the first two children eligible for loan
funding.

STEP C:

ASSESS CONTRIBUTION FROM RESOURCES AVAILABLE

1. Introduction
The student and his or her family are expected to contribute toward the costs of postsecondary education.
This section describes the various resources from which students are expected to draw
upon to meet the assessed costs of their postsecondary education, and identifies how
expected contributions from those resources are calculated.
The OSAP application is the main source of information on students financial resources.
In completing the 2007-08 OSAP application, students are asked to report income from all
sources of gross taxable and non-taxable world-wide income. However, there are
specified exceptions which are not reported in the OSAP application. These are:

GST rebates, Child Tax Benefits, Universal Child Care Benefit;

OSAP funding, including student loans, Child-Care Bursary, Bursary for


Students with Disabilities, Queen Elizabeth II Aiming for the Top Scholarships,
Canada Study Grants, Millennium Bursary, Millennium/Ontario Access Grants,
and/or Canada Access Grants.

Awards, bursaries, and/or needs-based scholarships from a publicly-assisted


Ontario college of applied arts and technology or university IF the
postsecondary institution has informed the student in writing that the

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institution will report it to OSAP directly (e.g., through the Bursary


Recording System).
In addition, students are not expected to report pain and suffering awards, including noneconomic loss (NEL) awards up to $100,000 (the amount of any award that is in excess of
$100,000 is to be reported in the period it was received.) If payments are received for
different incidents, they are not reported if each is less than $100,000. Students are also
not to report federal Hepatitis C or Indian Residential Schools payments when reporting
income, as per Government of Canada direction.
2. Types of Resources
The following types of resources are considered in the assessment of need:
STEP C.1 Pre-study Period Income Contribution
STEP C.2 Study Period Income
STEP C.3 Student and Spousal Assets
STEP C.4 Parental Income
STEP C.5 Federal resource used in the Ontario portion of the Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan need assessment.

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STEP C.1 PRE-STUDY PERIOD INCOME CONTRIBUTION


All students as well as their spouses, if applicable, are expected to work during the pre-study
period and to make a contribution toward the students educational costs.
Pre-study period income contributions are based on rates and allowances established by
Statistics Canada for the Province of Ontario.
1. Single Dependent/Independent Students
a) Calculation of pre-study period income contribution
The contribution expected from the pre-study period is the greater of:

the established minimum student contribution (defined below); or


80% of the students discretionary income from the pre-study period.
i) Calculating expected minimum pre-study period income contribution
The calculation of the expected minimum pre-study period income contribution for
single students is as follows:
[(Ontario hourly minimum wage X average weekly hours worked)
less (Tax Allowance (see Table C3) and the Standard Weekly Living Allowance
(see Table B2))] X the number of weeks in the pre-study period.
The expected minimum contribution is calculated where the students actual prestudy period income could result in a contribution lower than the expected
minimum contribution.
Table C1: Expected Minimum Pre-study Period Income Contribution Calculation
(Single Dependent/Independent Students)
The student lives at home during the 16-week pre-study period.
Instructions

Calculations

Line

$246.40

$987.47

Calculate Average Net Weekly Income: Divide Line B by 4.3

$229.64

Multiply Line C by the number of weeks in the students pre-study


period

X 16
$3,674.31

Multiply the average number of weekly work hours in Ontario (30.8)


by the minimum wage in Ontario ($8.00)
Calculate Net Monthly Pre-study Period Income:

Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine


tax rate (Multiply Line A by 4.3).

Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (6.8%).

Multiply gross monthly pre-study period income by (1 - tax rate)

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Table C1: Expected Minimum Pre-study Period Income Contribution Calculation
(Single Dependent/Independent Students)
The student lives at home during the 16-week pre-study period.
Instructions

Calculations

Line

Take the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a student living at


home from Table B2.

$96.28

X 16
$1,540.48

Multiply Line E by the number of weeks in the students pre-study


period
To get the expected minimum pre-study period contribution:
Subtract Line F from Line D

$2,133.83

For single students living at home during the pre-study period, the minimum
weekly contribution is $133.36. As a result, the pre-study period expected
minimum contribution is $2,134 for a 16-week pre-study period.
For single students living away from home during the pre-study period, the
expected minimum contribution is $0 for a 16-week pre-study period. This is
calculated by using the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for this category of
student ($232.33 per week) in Line E of Table C1.
Exception:

Adjustment for Students With Disabilities

If a single dependent or independent student reports in Item 605 of the OSAP


application that their main source of pre-study period income is from the Ontario
Disability Support Program, OSAP does not expect an income contribution during
the pre-study period. The pre-study period income contribution is to be adjusted
to zero for assessment purposes, regardless of any income reported in Item 600.
This exception does not apply for a single dependent or independent student who
reports in Item 605 that his or her main source of pre-study period income is from
Ontario Works. In this case, a minimum pre-study period contribution is
calculated.
ii) Calculating Expected pre-study contribution from actual income
The expected pre-study contribution from the students actual gross income for
the pre-study period, subject to the above minimum, is calculated as follows:
80% x (Net Income - Standard Living Allowance)
The students actual gross income for the pre-study period is adjusted to net
income based on an estimated tax allowance.
iii) Net income during the pre-study period
In Item 600 of the OSAP application, the student is asked to report pre-study
period income from all sources of gross taxable and non-taxable world-wide
2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Page 30

income, with the exception of specified income sources that the application
identifies are not reported by the student (see Step C, Part 1 for a list of the
excluded income sources).
It is assumed that all gross income is earned in equal proportions throughout the
pre-study period.
Net income is calculated by deducting an allowance for tax deductions from the
students gross income during the pre-study period. Table C3 lists the percentage
of monthly income which should be deducted for taxes, CPP and Employment
Insurance.
Table C3: Tax Deductions from Students Monthly Income During the Pre-study Period

Monthly Income Between:

Percentage
of income
to be
deducted

$1
to $1,499

$1,500
to $2,999

$3,000
to $4,499

$4,500
to $5,999

$6,000
and over

6.8%

7.4%

9.7%

13.7%

16.6%

Example: Pre-study Period Income Contribution from Actual Income (Single Student)
The student is a single dependent student living at home during the pre-study period. The
student graduated from high school during the pre-study period. Gross income during this 8week period is $3,250 (Item 600).
Instructions

Calculate Gross Weekly Income: Divide the gross pre-study period


income by number of weeks in the pre-study period
Calculate Pre-study Period Net Income:

Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine


tax rate (Multiply Line A by 4.3).

Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (7.4%).

Multiply reported pre-study period income (Item 600) by


(1-tax rate)
Take the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a student living at
home from Table B2.
Multiply Line C by the number of weeks in the students pre-study
period
Subtract Line D from Line B. If negative, enter zero.
Multiply Line E by the 80% expected contribution rate
Total expected pre-study period contribution
2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

Calculations

Line

$3,250.00
/8
$406.25

$3,009.50

$96.28
X8
$770.24

$2,239.26

X 80%
$1,791.41
June 2007

Page 31

The expected minimum pre-study period contribution for a single student living at
home during an 8-week pre-study period would be $1,067. As the expected prestudy period income contribution from actual income calculated above ($1,791) is
greater than the expected minimum pre-study period income contribution, the
greater amount would be used in both the Canada and Ontario portions of the
need assessment.
b) Pre-study period residency requirements (Item 615 of the OSAP application)
Single dependent students are expected to reside with their families during the prestudy period. The pre-study calculation is based on the at home living allowance
regardless of how the student answers Item 615. However, single dependent students
may request a review to have their pre-study calculations based on the away from
home living allowance. Reasons accepted for a single dependent residing away from
home in the pre-study period are outlined in the 2007-2008 Review Manual.
The pre-study calculation for single independent students is based on either the at
home or away from home living allowance during the pre-study period, depending on
how the student answers Item 615. If the student does not indicate on the OSAP
application where he or she will be residing, it is assumed that the student is living at
home during the pre-study period.
2. Married One Spouse a Student
a) Pre-study period income contribution for married students

The student and his or her spouse are expected to contribute to the cost of postsecondary education from income received during the pre-study period.
The expected contribution from the pre-study period is the greater of:
the established minimum family income contribution; or
80% x (combined net family income less Standard Living Allowance).
Note: The Standard Living Allowance increases with the number of dependants.
i) Calculating the expected minimum family pre-study income contribution
The calculation of the expected minimum family pre-study income contribution for
married students is as follows:
[(Ontario hourly minimum wage X average weekly hours worked)
Less (Tax Allowance and the Standard Weekly Living Allowance)
X the number of weeks in the pre-study period]

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The expected minimum family pre-study income contribution is assessed in


situations where the student and partners actual pre-study income results in a
contribution lower than the minimum expected contribution.
Adjustment for dependent children
If the student or spouse reports one or more dependent children in Item 400, 410
and/or 411 of the OSAP application, the minimum pre-study income contribution
from the student and spouse is automatically adjusted to zero for assessment
purposes. There is no minimum family contribution because the standard living
allowance for the family is greater than the expected contribution from average
hours worked at the minimum wage.
Example: Expected Minimum Pre-study Period Income Contribution Calculation
(Married Student, One Spouse a Student, One Dependent)
The student has a 16-week pre-study period. The couple has no dependent children.
Instructions
Calculate Gross Weekly Income:
Multiply the average number of weekly work hours in Ontario (30.8)
by the minimum wage ($8.00)
Contribution from the student:
Calculate Students Pre-study Period Monthly Net income:
Calculate gross monthly pre-study period income to
determine tax rate (multiply Line A by 4.3)
Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (6.8%)
Multiply gross monthly pre-study period income by (1-tax
rate)
Calculate average weekly net income:
Divide Line B by 4.3
Contribution from the spouse:
Calculate spouses pre-study period monthly net income:
Calculate gross monthly pre-study period income to
determine tax rate (multiply Line A by 4.3)
Obtain tax rate from Table C4 (9.7%)
Multiply gross monthly pre-study period income by (1-tax
rate)
Calculate spouses average net weekly income:
Divide Line D by 4.3

Calculations

Line

246.40
A

$987.47

$229.64

$956.75

$222.50

$452.14

X 16
$7,234.23

Take the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a married student


from Table B3

$445.35

Multiply Line H by the number of weeks in the students pre-study


period

X 16
$7,125.60

Add Line C and E to get the combined minimum net family income
per week
Multiply Line F by the number of weeks in the students pre-study
period.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Example: Expected Minimum Pre-study Period Income Contribution Calculation
(Married Student, One Spouse a Student, One Dependent)
The student has a 16-week pre-study period. The couple has no dependent children.
Instructions

Calculations

To get the minimum family pre-study period income contribution:


Subtract Line I from G

Line

$108.64

Table C4: Tax Deductions from Spouses Monthly Income


Monthly Income Between:
Percentage of
Income to be
Deducted

$1
to $499

$500
to $999

$1,000
to
$1,499

$1,500
to
$1,999

$2,000
to
$2,499

$2,500
to
$3,999

$4,000
and
over

6.8%

7.4%

9.7%

13.8%

17.0%

19.9%

29.3%

ii) Calculating Pre-study family income contribution from actual income


The pre-study family income contribution is based on the following:
80% x (combined net family income less Standard Living Allowance)
iii) Combined net family income
Combined Net Family Income consists of the students actual pre-study period
income reported in the OSAP application by the student in Item 600 and the
spouses actual 2006 income reported in Items 950 and 951. The student and the
spouse must report pre-study period income from all world-wide sources of gross
taxable and non-taxable income, including government income. However,, ,there
are specified income sources that the application identifies are not reported by the
student (see Step C, Part 1 for a list of the excluded income sources).
Note in particular that assistance received through the federal Universal ChildCare Benefit should not be reported and is not treated as a financial resource.
Students and spouses are also not to report federal Hepatitis C and Indian
Residential Schools payments when reporting income, as per Government of
Canada direction.
All gross income is assumed to be earned in equal proportions throughout the prestudy period.
The students net income is calculated by deducting a tax allowance from the
students gross income during the pre-study period. Table C3 lists the percentage
of monthly income which should be deducted for taxes, CPP and Employment
Insurance.

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The spouses net income is determined by deducting from the actual 2006 gross
income reported in Item 950 of the OSAP application the actual amount for CPP,
EI and income tax reported in Items 952, 953, and/or 954. To this amount, add
any other income reported in Item 951.
Where the spouse reports a contribution to CPP or EI in excess of the 2006
maximum contributions for both programs, OSAP will only recognize the 2006
maximum annual contributions (i.e. $1,911 to CPP and $729 to EI).
Exception:

Adjustment for Social Assistance Recipients or Students With


Disabilities
If, in Item 605 or Item 955 of the OSAP application, the student or spouse reports
that their main source of pre-study period income is from Ontario Disability
Support Program or Ontario Works, the pre-study period income contribution from
the student and spouse is automatically adjusted to zero for assessment
purposes.
Example: Pre-study Period Family Income from Actual Income
(Married Student, One Spouse a Student, One Dependent)
Married couple: one spouse is a student; the other spouse is employed; one dependent child.
The student reports pre-study period income of $8,000 (Item 600) over a 16-week period. The
spouse reports income of $30,000 for the year (Item 950). The spouse also reports $1,000 as
the total of all other income for the year (Item 951).
Instructions
Determine Students Income:
Calculate Students Gross Pre-study Period Income:
Divide the students gross pre-study income into the number of
weeks in the students pre-study period
Calculate Students Pre-study Period Net Monthly Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine
tax rate (Multiply Line A by 4.3).
Obtain tax rate from Table C3 7.4%).
Multiply reported pre-study period income (Item 600) by
(1-tax rate)
Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Item 950)
Subtract: CPP (item 952, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (item 953, maximum 729 per year)
Reported income tax deduction (item 954)
Total Deductions
Spouses Net Income
Subtract Total deductions (Line D) from Spouses Gross 2006
Income (Line C)
Add total value of all other income reported by the spouse in item
951 ($1,000) to get Total Net Annual Income
Calculate spouses net weekly income:
Divide the total net annual income (Line F) by 52

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

Calculations

Line

$8,000.00
/ 16
$500.00

$7,408.00

$30,000

$1,312.00
$561.00
$4,436.00
$6309.00

$23.691

$24,691

$474.83

June 2007

Page 35
Example: Pre-study Period Family Income from Actual Income
(Married Student, One Spouse a Student, One Dependent)
Married couple: one spouse is a student; the other spouse is employed; one dependent child.
The student reports pre-study period income of $8,000 (Item 600) over a 16-week period. The
spouse reports income of $30,000 for the year (Item 950). The spouse also reports $1,000 as
the total of all other income for the year (Item 951).
Instructions

Calculations

Line

X 16
$7,597.28

Calculate spouses net income for the pre-study period:


Multiply spouses net weekly income (line G) by the number of
weeks in the students pre-study period (16 weeks)
Calculate combined family income in the pre-study period: Add Line
B, and H
Determine Living Allowance:
Take the basic standard weekly living allowance for Married
Students and add the weekly living allowance for one child from
Table B2.

$15,005.28

$445.35
+123.26
$568.61

Multiply Line J by the number of weeks in the students pre-study


period (i.e., 16)

$9,097.76

Subtract the living allowance in Line K from the income in Line I. If


negative, enter zero.

$5,907.52

To calculate the total expected family contribution for the prestudy period, multiply Line L by the 80% allowance

X 80%
$4,726.01

3. Married - Both Spouses Are Students


a) Pre-study period income contribution for married students
Both the student and his or her spouse, if applicable, are expected to contribute to the
cost of post-secondary education from income received during the pre-study period.
The expected contribution from the pre-study period is the greater of:

50% of the established minimum family income contribution; or


50% of [80% x (combined net family income less Standard Living Allowance)]

Note: The Standard Living Allowance increases with the number of dependants.
i) Calculating the expected minimum pre-study family income contribution
The calculation of the expected minimum family pre-study income contribution for
married students is as follows:
[(Ontario hourly minimum wage X average weekly hours worked)
Less (Tax Allowance and the Standard Weekly Living Allowance)
X the number of weeks in the pre-study period] X 50%

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The expected minimum family pre-study income contribution is assessed in


situations where the students and spouses actual pre-study income results in a
contribution lower than the minimum expected contribution.
Adjustment for dependent children
If the student or spouse reports one or more dependent children in Item 400, 410
and/or 411 of the OSAP application, the minimum pre-study income contribution
from the student and spouse is automatically adjusted to zero for assessment
purposes. There is no minimum family contribution because the standard living
allowance for the family exceeds the expected contribution from average hours
worked at the minimum wage.
Example: Expected Minimum Pre-study Period Income Contribution Calculation
(Married Student, One Spouse a Student)
The student has a 16-week pre-study period. The couple has no dependent children.
Instructions
Calculate Gross Weekly Income:
Multiply the average number of weekly work hours in Ontario (30.8)
by the minimum wage ($8.00)
Contribution from the student:
Calculate Students Pre-study Period Monthly Net income:
Calculate gross monthly pre-study period income to
determine tax rate (multiply Line A by 4.3)
Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (6.8%)
Multiply gross monthly pre-study period income by (1-tax
rate)
Calculate average weekly net income:
Divide Line B by 4.3
Contribution from the spouse:
Calculate spouses pre-study period monthly net income:
Calculate gross monthly pre-study period income to
determine tax rate (multiply Line A by 4.3)
Obtain tax rate from Table C4 (9.7%)
Multiply gross monthly pre-study period income by (1-tax
rate)
Calculate spouses average net weekly income:
Divide Line D by 4.3

Calculations

Line

246.40
A

$987.47

$229.64

$956.75

$222.50

$452.14

X 16
$7,234.24

Take the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a married student


from Table B3

$445.35

Multiply Line H by the number of weeks in the students pre-study


period

X 16
$7,125.60

Add Line C and E to get the combined minimum net family income
per week
Multiply Line F by the number of weeks in the students pre-study
period.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Page 37
Example: Expected Minimum Pre-study Period Income Contribution Calculation
(Married Student, One Spouse a Student)
The student has a 16-week pre-study period. The couple has no dependent children.
Instructions

Calculations

Subtract Line I from Line G. If negative, enter zero.


Divide Line J in half to get the expected minimum family pre-study
income contribution

$108.64

Line
J

$54.32

ii) Pre-study family income contribution from actual income


When both spouses are full-time students, the pre-study family income
contribution is based on actual income, calculated as follows:
50% x [80% of (combined net family income less Standard Living Allowance)]
iii) Combined net family income
Combined net family income consists of the actual pre-study period income
reported in the OSAP application by the student in Item 600 and by the spouse in
Items 950 and 951. The student and the spouse must report pre-study income
from all sources of gross taxable and non-taxable world-wide income, including
government income. However, there are specified income sources that the
application identifies are not reported by the student (see Step C, Part 1 for a list
of the excluded income sources).
Note in particular, that assistance received through the federal Universal ChildCare Benefit should not be reported and is not treated as a financial resource.
Students and spouses are also not to report federal Hepatitis C and Indian
Residential Schools payments when reporting income, as per Government of
Canada direction.
All gross income is assumed to be earned in equal proportions throughout the prestudy period.
The students net income is calculated by deducting an allowance for tax
deductions from the students gross income during the pre-study period. Table C3
lists the percentage of monthly income which should be deducted for taxes, CPP
and Employment Insurance.
The spouses net income is determined by deducting from the actual 2006 gross
income reported in Item 950 of the OSAP application the actual amount for CPP,
EI and income tax reported in Items 952, 953, and/or 954. To this amount, add
any other income reported in Item 951.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Page 38

Where the spouse reports a contribution to CPP or EI in excess of the 2006


maximum contributions for both programs, OSAP will only recognize the 2006
maximum annual contributions (i.e. $1,911 to CPP and $729 to EI).
Exception:

Adjustment for Social Assistance Recipients or Students With


Disabilities
If, in Item 605 or Item 955 of the OSAP application, the student or spouse reports
that their main source of pre-study period income is from the Ontario Disability
Support Program or Ontario Works, the pre-study period income contribution from
the student and spouse is automatically adjusted to zero for assessment
purposes.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Page 39
Example: Pre-study Period Income Calculation From Actual Income (Married Student,
Both Spouses are Students)
Married couple with no children, both students. The student reports pre-study period income of
$8,000 (Item 600) over a 16-week period. The spouse reports an income of $10,000 for the year
(Item 950). The spouse did not report income in Item 951.
Instructions
Step 1: Determine Students Income:
Calculate Students Gross Weekly Income: Divide the students gross
pre-study period income into the number of weeks in the students prestudy period
Calculate Students Net Income:

Calculations

Line

$8,000
/ 16
$500

$7,408

$10,000
$322
$187
$244
$753

$9247

$9,247

$160.96

Calculate spouses net income for the pre-study period:


Multiply spouses net weekly income (line G) by the number of weeks in
the students pre-study period (16 weeks)

X 16
$2,575.36

Add Line B and Line H to get combined pre-study family income

$9,983.36

$445.35

Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine


tax rate (Multiply Line A by 4.3).
Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (7.4%).
Multiply reported pre-study period income (Item 600) by (1-tax
rate)
Step 2: Determine Spouses Income
Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Item 950)
Subtract: CPP (item 952, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (item 953, maximum 729 per year)
Reported income tax deduction (item 954)
Total Deductions
Spouses Net Income
Subtract Total deductions (Line D) from Spouses Gross 2006 Income
(Line C)
Add total value of all other income reported by the spouse in item 951
($0) to get Total Net Annual Income
Calculate spouses net weekly income:
Divide the total net annual income (Line F) by 52

Step 3: Determine Living Allowance:


From Table B2, take the basic standard weekly living allowance for
Married Students

Multiply Line J by the number of weeks in the students pre-study period


Subtract the living allowance in Line K from the income in Line I. If
negative, enter zero.

X 16
$7,125.60

$2,857.76

Multiply Line L by the 80% allowance

X 80%
$2,286.21

To get the expected family contribution for the pre-study period,


multiply Line L by 50%

$1,143.10

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June 2007

Page 40

4. Sole Support Parents


a) Calculation of pre-study period income contribution
For a sole-support parent, the pre-study period income contribution is based on the
expected income contribution for the pre-study period. It is calculated as follows:
80% x (Net Income Standard Living Allowance)
The Standard Monthly Living Allowance for a Sole Support Parent (see Table B2) living
in Ontario is $1,294 plus $530 for each dependent child.
i) Expected minimum pre-study period contribution
There is no expected minimum pre-study period contribution since the monthly
living allowance for the pre-study period for a sole-support parent with one
dependent child exceeds the students monthly pre-study net income. Therefore,
the pre-study period family contribution will always be calculated using actual
income.
ii) Pre-study period contribution from actual income
The pre-study period contribution for sole support parents is the same as for a
single student except for the Standard Living Allowance (See Table B2). Note
that the students living allowance increases with the number of children.
iii) Net income during the pre-study period
In Item 600 of the OSAP application, the student reports pre-study period income
from all world-wide sources of gross taxable and non-taxable world-wide income,
including income from government benefits. However, there are specified income
sources that the application identifies are not reported by the student (see Step C,
Part 1 for a list of the excluded income sources).
Note in particular, that assistance received through the federal Universal ChildCare Benefit should not be reported and is not treated as a financial resource.
Students are also not to report federal Hepatitis C and Indian Residential Schools
payments when reporting income, as per Government of Canada direction.
It is assumed that all gross income is earned in equal proportions throughout the
pre-study period.
Net income is calculated by deducting an allowance for tax deductions from the
students gross income during the pre-study period. Table C3 lists the percentage
of monthly income which should be deducted for taxes, CPP and Employment
Insurance.

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June 2007

Page 41

Exception:

Adjustment for Social Assistance Recipients or Students With


Disabilities
If, in Item 605 or Item 955 of the OSAP application, the student reports that their
main source of pre-study period income is from Ontario Disability Support
Program or Ontario Works, the pre-study period income contribution from the
student is automatically adjusted to zero for assessment purposes.
Example: Pre-study Period Income Calculation (Sole Support Parent)
The student is a sole support parent with one dependant. The student reported pre-study period
income of $8,000 (Item 600) over a 16-week period.
Instructions
Calculate Gross Weekly Pre-study Period Income: Divide the pre-study
period income into the number of weeks in the students study period.
Calculate Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine
tax rate (Multiply Line A by 4.3).
Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (7.4%).
Multiply reported pre-study period income (Item 600) by (1-tax
rate)
Determine living allowance:
Take the basic standard weekly living allowance for Sole-Support
Parents and add the weekly living allowance for one child from Table B2.
Multiply Line C by number of weeks in the pre-study period.

Calculations

Line

$8,000
/16
$500

$7,408
$300.93
+ $123.26
$424.19
X 16
$6,787.04

C
D

Subtract the standard living allowance in Line D from the net income in
Line B. If negative, enter zero.

$620.96

Multiply Line E by the 80% contribution rate

$496.77

Total expected pre-study period contribution from Line F is:

$496.77

STEP C.2 STUDY PERIOD INCOME CONTRIBUTIONS


The Canada and Ontario portions of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan recognize
different study period income contributions due to different treatments of income and tuition
fees by the Government of Canada and the Government of Ontario.
1. Single Dependent and Independent Students
a) Contribution from reported income: Canada portion of the
Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
All programs
Single dependent and independent students who do not receive merit-based
scholarships are expected to contribute an amount from study period earnings equal
to:
100% of [net income during the study period less an exemption of $50 per week of
study]; and
2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Page 42

100% of income from non-exempt government benefits.

Single dependent and independent students who receive merit-based scholarships are
expected to contribute an amount from study period earnings equal to:
100% of [net income during the study period less (an exemption of $1,800 for
merit-based scholarships plus an exemption of $50 per week of study from study
period earnings, to a total maximum exemption of $4,400)]; and
100% of income from non-exempt government benefits.
b) Contribution from reported income: Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario
Integrated Student Loan
Regular tuition fee programs
Single dependent and independent students who do not receive merit-based
scholarships are expected to contribute an amount from study period earnings equal
to:
100% of [net income during the study period less an exemption of $50 per week of
study]; and
100% of income from non-exempt government benefits.
Single dependent and independent students who receive merit-based scholarships are
expected to contribute an amount from study period earnings equal to:
100% of [net income during the study period less an exemption of $103 per week,
of study, of which up to $50 per week can be for study period income other than
merit-based scholarships, to a maximum total exemption of $3,500]; and
100% of income from non-exempt government benefits.
Graduate and Professional or High-Demand Programs
For the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan, the calculation
of the study period contribution is the same as that of regular tuition fee programs
except that the difference between the students actual tuition fees and the cap on
OSAPs allowance for tuition fees is also deducted from net income.
Notes on net income during the study period
Students report study period income through Items 661, 626, 625 and 620.
ITEM 626: In Item 626, the student reports all awards, scholarships and bursaries
expected during the study period.
However, students should not include awards, bursaries, and/or needs-based
scholarships from publicly-funded Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology or
universities, IF the postsecondary institution has informed the student in writing
that the institution will report it to OSAP directly (e.g., through the Bursary
Recording System).

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Awards that are reported through the BRS will automatically update the students
OSAP file if the income is considered a financial resource.
ITEM 625: The student reports gross income from government benefits to be received
during the study period in Item 625 of the application form.
Note on income from government benefits during study period:
The student reports gross income from government benefits to be received during the
study period in Item 625 of the application form.
If the student is in receipt of assistance through Employment Insurance, Loss of
Earnings Benefits (WSIB), Native Postsecondary Student Support Program or Canada
Pension Plan benefits, the student will be assessed with the full standard OSAP living
allowance. The amount of government income reported by the student is used as a
direct resource.
Income from the following sources is not considered as a direct resource for OSAP
purposes for single dependent and independent students but it is used to reduce the
living allowance in the assessment of costs -- Extended Care and Maintenance
Allowance from Childrens Aid, Ontario Disability Support Program, and Ontario Works.
Students are not expected to report in Item 625 income from GST Rebates; Child Tax
Benefits, Universal Child Care Benefit; or OSAP funding, including student loans,
Child-Care Bursary, Bursary for Students with Disabilities, Queen Elizabeth II Aiming
for the Top Scholarships, Canada Study Grants, Millennium Bursary, Millennium/
Ontario Access Grants, and/or Canada Access Grants.
In addition, students are not expected to report federal Hepatitis C or Indian
Residential Schools payments when reporting income, as per Government of Canada
direction.
ITEM 620: In Item 620, the student reports all other sources of taxable and nontaxable income expected during the study period.
It is assumed that all income is earned in equal portions throughout the study period.
Net income is calculated by deducting a tax allowance from the students gross income
during the study period. Table C6 lists the percentage of monthly income which should
be deducted for taxes, CPP and Employment Insurance.

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Table C6:

Tax Deductions from Students Monthly Income During the Study Period

Monthly Income Between:

Percentage
of Income to
be Deducted

$1
to $749

6.8%

$750
to $1,499

$1,500
to $2,249

7.4%

9.7%

$2,250 to
$2,999

$3,000 to
$3,749

$3,750
and over

13.7%

16.6%

19.0%

Note on income from Scholarship Trust Funds and Registered Education Savings
Plans (RESPs) Item 661
Where a scholarship trust fund or an RESP has been established for the student, the
student must report the amount that he or she expects to receive from this source to
assist with the costs of the current study period.
If the expected parental contribution is less than the income the student reports from
RESPs and/or Scholarship Trust Funds, the difference between the two figures is used
as study period income in determining the students expected income contribution.
If the expected parental contribution is greater than the income the student reports
from RESPs and/or Scholarship Trust Funds, the RESP and/or Trust Fund income is
not used as a resource in determining the students expected contribution from study
period income.
This calculation is done separately for purposes of the Canada and Ontario need
assessments, using the applicable parental contribution in each case.
Notes on Academic merit-based scholarship exemption
Ontario
The maximum total exemption for students who receive merit-based scholarships is
$3,500. Of this amount, up to $50 times the number of weeks in the study period (e.g.,
$1,700 for 34 weeks of study) may be from bursaries and part-time earnings.
Canada
The maximum total exemption for students who receive merit-based scholarships is
$1,800. In addition, students will be eligible for a study period exemption of up to $50
per week of study from bursaries and part-time earnings. In total, merit-based
scholarship recipients may receive a total maximum exemption of $4,400.

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Regular Programs
Example: Study Period Income Calculation (Single Dependent/Independent Students)
The student expects to work part-time during the study period and reports gross income of $2,500 in
Item 620. No income is reported in Items 625 and 626. The study period is 34 weeks.
Instructions

Calculations

Line

Canada Study Period Contribution:


Calculate Gross Weekly Income: Divide the gross income by the
number of weeks in the students study period
Calculate Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Study Period Income to determine tax rate
(Multiply Line A by 4.3).
Obtain tax rate from Table C6 (6.8%).

Multiply reported study period income by (1-tax rate)


Subtract the study period exemption ($50 per week X 34 weeks =
$1,700) from Line B. If negative, enter zero.
Multiply Line C by the 100% contribution rate
100% of non-exempt reported government benefits (in this case, zero)
To get the expected Canada Study Period Contribution, add Lines D
and E
Ontario Study Period Contribution:
Take the Canada portion net study period income from Line B
Subtract the study period exemption ($50 per week x 34 weeks =
$1,700) from Line A. If negative, enter zero.
Multiply Line B by the 100% contribution rate
100% of non-exempt reported government benefits (in this case, zero)
To get the expected Ontario Study Period Contribution, add Lines C
and D.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$2,500
/34
$73.53

$2,330.00

-$ 1,700.00
$630.00

$630..00

$0.00

$630.00

$2,330.00
- $ 1,700.00
$630.00

$630.00

$0

$630.00

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Graduate and Professional University Programs or High-Demand College Programs


Example: Study Period Income Calculation (Single Dependent/Independent Students)
The students reported gross study period income for a 34-week study period is $2,500 (Item 626).
All of this income is the result of a merit-based scholarship. No income is reported in Items 620 and
625. The difference between the students tuition/ compulsory fees and the OSAP allowance for
tuition fees is $1,500.
Instructions

Calculations

Line

Canada Study Period Contribution:


Calculate Gross Weekly Income: Divide the gross study period income by
the number of weeks in the students study period
Calculate Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Study Period Income to determine tax rate
(Multiply Line A by 4.3).
Obtain tax rate from Table C5 (6.8%).
Multiply reported study period income by (1-tax rate)
Subtract the $1,800 study period exemption for merit-based scholarships
from Line B. If negative, enter zero.
Multiply Line C by the 100% contribution rate
100% of non-exempt reported government benefits (in this case, zero)
To get the expected Canada Study Period Contribution, add Lines D
and E
Ontario Study Period Contribution:

$2,500
/34
$73.53

$2,330.00
-$ 1,800.00
$530.00

B
C

$530.00

$0

$530.00

Take net study period income from Line B

$2,330.00

Add the $3,500 study period exemption ($103 per week x 34 weeks) and the
$1,500 tuition difference

$5,000.00

Subtract Line G from Line F (if negative, enter zero)

$0

Multiply Line H by the 100% contribution rate

$0

100% of non-exempt reported government benefits (in this case, zero)


To get the expected Ontario Study Period Contribution,
add Lines I and J

$0

$0

2. Married Students One is a Student


Where only one of the spouses is a full-time student and the status of the other spouse is
employed or other, both the student and the spouse are expected to contribute from their
resources towards the costs of the students education.
The study period contribution is expected to be the greater of:

an expected minimum income contribution from the students spouse during the study
period; or
the contribution from the income reported by the student and the spouse.

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a) Expected minimum spousal income contribution


An expected minimum spousal income contribution is assessed because the spouse is
expected to be employed. The expected minimum income contribution is calculated as
follows:
[Ontario minimum wage X average number of weekly work hours in Ontario X 4.3
weeks less the spouses monthly taxes (Table C4)] X number of months in the study
period.
FAAs should refer to the 2007-2008 Review Manual for reviews of the expected
minimum spousal income contribution in cases where the spouse was not employed.
Exception: The minimum spouse contribution is not calculated for married students
who are in receipt of income from Ontario Works or the Ontario Disability Support
Program.
Example: Minimum Spouse Contributions Calculation (Married Student, One Spouse a Student)
It is assumed that the students study period is 20 weeks.
Instructions
Multiply the average number of weekly work hours in Ontario (30.8) by the
minimum wage ($8.00)
Calculate Spouse Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Amount to determine tax rate (Multiply
Line A by 4.3).
Obtain tax rate from Table C4 (9.7%).
Multiply gross monthly amount by (1-tax rate)
Divide Line B by 4.3 to convert into an average net weekly income
To get the expected minimum spouse contribution, multiply Line C by
the number of weeks in the students study period.

Calculations

Line

$246.40

$956.75

$222.50

$4,450.00

b) Contribution from reported income, Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario


Integrated Student Loan
All Programs:
Married students who do not receive merit-based scholarships are expected to
contribute an amount from study period income equal to:
100% of [students net income during the study period less an exemption of $50
per week of study];
100% of the students income from non-exempt government benefits; and
80% of the spouses net income.
Married students who receive merit-based scholarships are expected to contribute an
amount from study period income equal to:

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100% of [net income during the study period less (an exemption of $1,800 for
merit-based scholarships plus an exemption of $50 per week of study from study
period earnings, to a total maximum exemption of $4,400)];
100% of income from non-exempt government benefits; and
80% of the spouses net income .

c) Contribution from reported income, Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario


Integrated Student Loan
Regular Tuition Fee Programs
Married students who do not receive merit-based scholarships are expected to
contribute an amount from study period earnings equal to:
100% of [students net income during the study period less an exemption of $50
per week of study];
100% of the students income from non-exempt government benefits; and
80% of the spouses net income
Married students who receive merit-based scholarships are expected to contribute an
amount from study period earnings equal to:
100% of [net income during the study period less an exemption of $103 per week
of study, of which up to $50 per week can be for study period income other than
merit-based scholarships, to a maximum total expemption of $3,500];
100% of the students income from non-exempt government benefits; and
80% of the spouses net income.
Note on spousal contribution:
The contribution from the spouse of the married student is based on the gross taxable
and non-taxable world-wide income of the spouse reported in Item 950 and Item 951of
the OSAP application. Certain income sources that the application identifies are to be
excluded (see Step C, Part 1 for a list of the excluded income sources).
Note in particular that assistance received through the federal Universal Child-Care
Benefit is one of the income sources that spouses should not report. Spouses are also
not to report federal Hepatitis C and Indian Residential Schools payments when
reporting income, as per Government of Canada direction.
The spouses contribution is calculated as follows:

80% of the net income of the spouse during the students study period.

Net income is determined by deducting from the actual 2006 gross income reported in
Item 950 of the OSAP application the actual amount for CPP, EI and income tax
reported in Items 952, 953, and/or 954. To this amount, add any other taxable and
non-taxable income reported in Item 951.

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Where the spouse reports a contribution to CPP or EI in excess of the 2006 maximum
contributions for both programs, OSAP will only recognize the 2006 maximum annual
contributions (i.e. $1,911 to CPP and $729 to EI).
Exceptions:
A. If the student or spouse reports study period income from Ontario Works, the
Family Income Contribution will be reduced to zero for assessment purposes.
B. If the student or spouse reports study period income from Ontario Disability
Support Program, the Family Income Contribution will be reduced to zero for
assessment purposes. As the family will continue to receive these benefits during the
study period, the family gross income received will be used to reduce the standard
OSAP living allowance calculated.
If the student is in receipt of assistance through Employment Insurance, Loss of
Earnings Benefits (WSIB), Native Postsecondary Student Support Program or Canada
Pension Plan benefits, the student will be assessed with the full standard OSAP living
allowance. The amount of government income reported by the student is used as a
direct resource.
Graduate and Professional or High-Demand Programs
For the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan, the calculation
of the study period contribution is the same as that of regular tuition fee programs
except that the difference between the students actual tuition fees and the cap on
OSAPs allowance for tuition fees is also deducted from net income.
3. Married Students Both Are Students
Both individuals are expected to contribute from their resources towards the costs of the
students education.
a) Contribution from reported income, Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario
Integrated Student Loan
All Programs:
If the applicant is not a merit-based scholarship recipient, the expected contribution
from study period income is:
100% of [one-half of the students net income during the study period less an
exemption of $50 per week of study];
50% of the students income from government benefits; and
100% of [one-half of the spouses net income during the study period less an
exemption of $50 per week of study].
If the student/applicant is a merit-based scholarship recipient, the expected
contribution from study period income is:

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100% of [one-half of the students net income during the study period less (an
exemption of $1,800 for merit-based scholarships plus an exemption of $50 per
week of study from study period earnings, to a total maximum exemption of
$4,400)];
50% of the students income from government benefits; and
100% of [one-half of the spouses net income during the study period less an
exemption of $50 per week of study].

b) Contribution from reported income, Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario


Integrated Student Loan
Regular tuition fee programs
If applicant is not a recipient of a merit-based scholarship, the expected contribution
from study period income is:
100% of [one-half of the students net income during the study period less an
exemption of $50 per week of study];
50% of the students income from government benefits; and
100% of [one-half of the spouses net income during the study period less an
exemption of $50 per week of study].
If applicant is a recipient of a merit-based scholarship, the expected contribution from
study period income is:
100% of [one-half of the students net income during the study period less an
exemption of $103 per week of study, of which up to $50 per week can be for
study period income other than merit-based scholarships, to a maximum total
exemption of $3,500];
50% of the students income from government benefits; and
100% of [one-half of the spouses net income during the study period less an
exemption of $50 per week of study].
Note on spousal contribution
The contribution from the spouse of the married student is based on the world-wide
gross taxable and non-taxable world-wide income of the spouse, as reported in Item
950 and Item 951. However, there are specified income sources that the application
identifies are not reported by the student (see Step C, Part 1 for a list of the excluded
income sources).
Note in particular that assistance received through the federal Universal Child-Care
Benefit should not be reported and is not treated as a financial resource. Spouses are
also not to report federal Hepatitis C and Indian Residential Schools payments when
reporting income, as per Government of Canada direction.
The spouses contribution is determined by calculating the spouses net income as
follows:

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deduct from the actual 2006 gross income reported in Item 950 of the OSAP
application the actual amount for CPP, EI and income tax reported in Items 952,
953, and/or 954. To this amount, add any other income reported in Item 951.
Where the spouse reports a contribution to CPP or EI in excess of the 2006
maximum contributions for both programs, OSAP will only recognize the 2006
maximum annual contributions (i.e. $1,911 to CPP and $729 to EI).
Note on Academic merit-based scholarship exemption
For information on what scholarships should be considered to be merit-based
scholarships, please see Definitions and Context (page 55).
For information on processing merit-based scholarship exemptions, please refer to the
2007-2008 OSAP Processing Guidelines.
Ontario
The maximum total exemption for students who receive merit-based scholarships is
$3,500. Of this amount, up to $50 times the number of weeks in the study period (e.g.,
$1,700 for 34 weeks of study) can be in the form of bursaries and earnings from parttime work.
Canada
The maximum total exemption for students who receive merit-based scholarships is
$1,800. In addition, students are eligible for a study period exemption of up to $50 per
week of study from bursaries and part-time earnings. In total, merit-based scholarship
recipients may receive a total maximum exemption of $4,400.
Graduate and Professional or High-Demand Programs
For the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan, the calculation
of the study period contribution is the same as that of regular tuition fee programs
except that the difference between the students actual tuition fees and the cap on
OSAPs allowance for tuition fees is also deducted from net income.
4. Sole-Support Parents
a) Contribution from reported income, Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario
Integrated Student Loan
All programs
If a sole-support parent does not receive a merit-based scholarship, the expected
contribution from study period income is:
100% of [net income during the study period less an exemption of $50 per week of
study]; and
100% of income from non-exempt government benefits.

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If a sole-support parent receives a merit-based scholarship, the expected


contribution from study period income is:
100% of [net income during the study period less (an exemption of $1,800 for
merit-based scholarships plus an exemption of $50 per week of study from study
period earnings, to a total maximum exemption of $4,400)]; and
100% of income from non-exempt government benefits.
b) Contribution from reported income, Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario
Integrated Student Loan
Regular tuition fee programs
If a sole-support parent does not receive a merit-based scholarship, the expected
contribution from study period income is:
100% of [net income during the study period less an exemption of $50 per week of
study]; and
100% of the students income from government benefits.
If a sole-support parent receives a merit-based scholarship, the expected contribution
from study period income is:
100% of [net income during the study period less an exemption of $103 per week
of study, of which up to $50 per week can be for study period income other than
merit-based scholarships,to a maximum total exemption of $3,500]; and
100% of the students income from non-exempt government benefits.
Note on Income from Government Benefits During the Study Period (Item 625)
If the student reports study period income from Ontario Works, the study period
income contribution will be reduced to zero for assessment purposes.
If the student reports study period income from Ontario Disability Support Program
(ODSP), the income contribution will be reduced to zero for assessment purposes. As
the student will continue to receive the ODSP benefits during the study period , the
gross income received will be be used to reduce the standard OSAP living allowance.
If the student is in receipt of assistance through Employment Insurance, Loss of
Earnings Benefits (WSIB), Native Postsecondary Student Support Program or Canada
Pension Plan benefits, the student will be assessed with the full standard OSAP living
allowance. The amount of government income reported by the student is used as a
direct resource.
Students are not expected to report in Item 625 income from GST Rebates; Cild Tax
Benefits, Universal Child Care Benefit; or OSAP funding, including student loans,
Child-care Bursary, Bursary for Students with Disabilities, Queen Elizabeth II Aiming
for the Top Scholarships, Canada Study Grants, Millennium Bursary,
Millennium/Ontario Access Grants, and/or Canada Access Grants.
In addition, students are not to report federal Hepatitis C or Indian Residential Schools
payments, as per Government of Canada direction.
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Graduate and Professional or High-Demand Programs


For the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan, the calculation
of the study period contribution is the same as that of regular tuition fee programs
except that the difference between the students actual tuition fees and the cap on
OSAPs allowance for tuition fees is also deducted from net income.

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STEP C.3 CONTRIBUTION FROM STUDENT AND SPOUSAL ASSETS


1. Principle
In addition to contributions from income, students are assessed a contribution based on
the assets and vehicles registered in their name and/or, where applicable, their spouse's
name.
2. Asset Valuation Date
All assets are to be valued on the date sixteen (16) weeks before the start of the students
study period. However, the student must inform the financial aid office, in writing, if there is
a change to any of his/her assets from 16 weeks before the start of the study period until
the end of the study period.
3. Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs)
a) Single dependent/independent and sole support students
Step 1: Assess 100% of the reported value of all RRSPs declared in Item 660 which
are registered to the student. Do not include the value of RRSPs mandatorily locked
in under the Canada Pension Plan Act. (See Definitions and Context)
Step 2: Deduct from the amount in Step 1 $2,000 for each 12 month period that the
student has been out of secondary school (Item 175 of the OSAP application)
b) Married students and Students in Common law/Same-sex Relationships
(i) One spouse is a student
Step 1: Assess 100% of the reported value of all RRSPs declared in Item 660. Do not
include the value of RRSPs mandatorily locked in under the Canada Pension Plan
Act. (See Definitions and Context)
Step 2: Deduct from the amount in Step 1 $2,000 for each 12 month period the
student has been out of secondary school (Item 175) and deduct $2,000 for each 12
month period the spouse has been out of secondary school (Item 945).

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Example:

RRSP Asset Calculation (Married, One Not a Postsecondary Student)

One spouse is a postsecondary student; the other is not. The reported value of the couples RRSPs
is $15,000. The student has been out of secondary school for 2 years, the spouse for 3 years.
Instructions

Calculations

Take 100% of the reported value of the students and spouses RRSPs from Item 660
and subtract $2,000 for every year each of them has been out of secondary school.
If negative, enter zero.
Student has been out of secondary school for 2 years (Item 175)
Spouse has been out of secondary school for 3 years (Item 945)

$15,000.00
-$4,000.00
-$6,000.00

The assessed contribution from RRSPs is

$5,000.00

(ii) Both spouses are students


Step 1: Assess each student with one half of all RRSPs declared in Item 660. Do not
include the value of RRSPs mandatorily locked in under the Canada Pension Plan
Act. (See Definitions and Context)
Step 2: Deduct from the amount in Step 1, $2,000 for each 12 month period each
spouse has been out of secondary school.
Example:

RRSP Asset Calculation (Married, Both are Postsecondary Students)

Both spouses are postsecondary students. The reported value of the couples RRSPs is $15,000.
The applicant has been out of secondary school for 2 years, the spouse for 3 years.
Instructions
Take 100% of the reported value of the applicants and spouses RRSPs
(Item 660)

Calculations

Divide asset value in Line A in half

$15,000.00
/2
$7,500.00

Contribution from applicants RRSP:


Subtract $2,000 for every year that the student has been out of secondary
school from Line B. If negative, enter zero.
Contribution from spouses RRSP:
Subtract $2,000 for every year that the spouse has been out of secondary
school from Line B. If negative, enter zero.

$7,500.00
- $4,000.00
$3,500.00
$7,500.00
- $6,000.00
$1,500.00

Add Lines C and D

$5.000.00

Multiply Line E by 50% to get the assessed RRSP contribution

$2,500.00

Line
A
B

D
E

4. Vehicles
a) Single dependent/independent and sole support students
Assess the total current gross market value of all vehicles reported in Items 643, 653,
683, and 693 of the OSAP application (or values provided by the Ministry of
Transportation) and deduct $5,000 from the total market value of all vehicles reported.

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Note: Outstanding debts on vehicles are not to be used to reduce the gross market
value.
Exemption for students with disabilities
If the student owns a specially-equipped vehicle related to the students disability, the
value of the vehicle is not considered when calculating an asset contribution. The FAA
should refer to the 2007-2008 Review Manual.
b) Married Students
Vehicle contribution formula for married students-both spouses are students:
(Total current gross
market value of all
vehicles reported less
$5,000 deduction)

Vehicle contribution
assessed to each
spouse

Vehicle Contribution Formula for Married Students-One spouse is a student:


(Total current gross market
Vehicle contribution assessed to
value of all vehicles reported
=
the student
less $5,000 deduction)
Exemption for students with disabilities
If the student or his or her spouse owns a specially-equipped vehicle related to either
the students or spouses disability, the value of the vehicle is not considered when
calculating an asset contribution. The FAA should refer to the 2007-2008 OSAP
Review Manual.
c) Adjustments to the vehicle exemption level
The FAO can increase the asset exemption level for vehicles up to $10,000 in specific
situations such as:
Public transit is not available within a reasonable travel distance for the student or
his or her spouse;
Access to a vehicle is needed for a student to fulfil program requirements;
A vehicle is needed for a spouse to work or for parents to transport a child;
A vehicle is owned or leased by a student or spouse of a student with disabilities.
Additional situations and an explanation of the rules and procedures to be followed by
the FAO are available in the 2007-2008 Review Manual.
5. Other Assets
a) Single dependent/independent and sole support students
Assess the full value of all other assets declared in Item 670.

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The current gross market value of all other assets is considered to be a direct
resource. Debts incurred in the purchase of the assets are not considered as a basis to
reduce expected contributions.
Exemption for students with disabilities
Single students with disabilities are permitted up to $3,000 in other assets
before a contribution is calculated.
Sole support parents are permitted up to $5,000 in other assets before a
contribution is calculated. This exemption level is increased by $500 for each
dependent child.
The FAO should refer to the 2007-2008 Review Manual.
b) Married students
If both spouses are full-time post-secondary students, each student will be assessed
one half of the value of other assets..
If only one of the spouses is a student, then the student will be assessed the full value
of the couples combined other assets.
Exemption for students with disabilities
Married couples where either the student or the spouse has a permanent disability can
have up to $5,500 in other assets before a contribution is calculated. This exemption
level is increased by $500 for each dependent child. The FAO should refer to the
2007-2008 Review Manual.
Example:

Asset Calculation (Single dependent/independent students)

The student has reported the following assets: a vehicle with a current gross market value of $6,000,
$10,000 in RRSPs since leaving secondary school 3 years ago, and other assets in the amount of
$1,500.
Instructions:

Contribution for RRSPs

Calculations

Line

Take the reported value of the students RRSPs from Item 660 and subtract
$2,000 for every year since the student has left secondary school (Item 175). If
negative enter zero.

$10,000.00
- ($2,000 X 3)
$4,000.00

Instructions:

Calculations

Line

$6,000.00
- $5,000.00
$1,000.00
Calculations

B
Line

Contribution for vehicles

Take the reported value of the vehicles from Items 643, 653, 683, and 693 and
deduct $5,000 from the total value of all vehicles reported.
Instructions: Contribution for RRSPs
Take 100% of the value of other assets reported in Item 670

$1,500.00

Add the totals of Lines A, B and C to get the total contribution from assets

$6,500.00

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STEP C.4 PARENTAL CONTRIBUTIONS - SINGLE DEPENDENT


STUDENTS
Note: Assistance received through the federal Universal Child-care Benefit by parents of
dependent students is not to be included in parental income.
1. Principle
Parent(s) of single dependent students are expected to contribute to their child(ren)'s
education, based on their financial ability. Parental contributions vary by family income
and family size.
There are different calculations for parental contributions used in the Canada need
assessment and the Ontario need assessment.
2. Calculation of Parental Income Contribution
To calculate the expected contribution from parent(s) to be included in the need
assessment, the following steps must be followed:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)

Determine the Family Size


Determine the Total Net Parental Income
Determine the Amount of Parental Discretionary Income
Determine Parental Contribution
Adjust Weekly Parental Contribution to Number of Postsecondary Students
a) Determine family size
To determine the size of the parent(s)' family, the definition of dependent children is
applied to the parents' household. Any dependent children listed in Item 805 of the
OSAP application and the parent(s) themselves, are counted to determine the number
of members in the family unit.
b) Determine total net parental income
A parent reports 2006 actual total income from Line 150 of their income tax return.
The net parental income is determined by deducting from the actual 2006 gross
income reported in Items 840 and/or 845 of the OSAP application the actual amounts
for CPP, EI, and income tax reported in Items 870, 880 and 890 and/or Items 875, 885
and 895. To this amount, add any other income reported in Item 850 and/or Item 855.
Where the parent(s) reports a contribution to CPP or EI in excess of the 2006
maximum contributions for both programs, OSAP will only recognize the 2006
maximum annual contributions. (i.e., $1,911 to CPP and $729 to EI)
When two parents are reporting income, net parental income is calculated by adding
the two net parental income amounts together.

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c) Determine parental discretionary income


Parental discretionary income is calculated by deducting a moderate standard of living
(MSOL) allowance based on family size from total net family income calculated in 3.b).
Canada and Ontario use different moderate standards of living (MSOL) to assess
parental contributions. The Canada living allowance based on the MSOL for parent(s)
of dependent students based on family size, is as follows:
Table C7a:

Moderate Standard of Living (CANADA ONLY)


Family Size

10

$41,054

$50,968

$58,002

$63,463

$67,916

$71,689

$74,951

$77,830

$80,411

The Ontario living allowance is as follows:


Table C7b:

Moderate Standard of Living (ONTARIO ONLY)


Family Size

10

$35,872

$41,049

$45,500

$49,435

$52,851

$55,750

$58,131

$59,994

$61,340

Using Tables C7a and b and the parent(s)' net income calculated in 3.c), determine the
parent(s)' discretionary income for the Canada and Ontario need assessments as
follows:
Annual Discretionary
Income (ADI) of the
parent(s)

Net family income


from 3.b)

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

the appropriate
Moderate Standard of
Living (MSOL)
allowance

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d) Determine weekly parental contribution


There are two different calculations for the weekly parental contribution for the Canada
assessment and the Ontario assessment. Use the amount of parental ADI to
determine the expected weekly parental contribution as follows :
Table C8a:

Weekly Parental Contribution Based on ADI Canada

If annual discretionary income is between:

Weekly Parental Contribution is calculated as:

$0 - $7,000

15% of ADI / 52 weeks

$7,001 - $14,000

[$1,050 + 20% of (ADI - $7,000)] / 52 weeks

$14,001 and over

[$2,450 + 40% of (ADI - $14,000)] / 52 weeks

Table C8b:

Weekly Parental Contribution Based on ADI Ontario

If annual discretionary income is between:

Weekly Parental Contribution is calculated as:

$0 - $7,000

25% of ADI / 52 weeks

$7,001 - $14,000

[$1,750 + 50% of (ADI - $7,000)] / 52 weeks

$14,001 and over

[$5,250 + 75% of (ADI - $14,000)] / 52 weeks

e) Adjust weekly parental contribution for the number of postsecondary


students
If the family unit has two or more dependent children in postsecondary studies, the
weekly parental contribution is divided by the number of dependent children in
postsecondary studies to determine the weekly contribution for each student.

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f) Parental contribution
The adjusted weekly contribution is multiplied by the number of weeks in the students
study period to determine the parental contribution for the study period.
Example: Parental Income Contribution
The father reports $42,000 in actual annual gross income in Item 840 of the OSAP Application and the
mother reports actual annual gross income of $36,000 in Item 845. There are two children, however
only one is in postsecondary studies.
Instructions: Determine family size

Family size

Calculations

Instructions: Determine total net parental income


Father: Gross 2006 income (Item 840)

Calculations

Line

A
Line

$42,000.00

$1,911
$729
$7,583
$10,223

$31,777

$36,000.00

$1,609
$673
$5.666
$7,948

Net Income of mother: Subtract Total Deductions (Line F) from Mothers Gross
2006 Income (Line E)

$28,052

Add the fathers net income (Line D) and the mothers net income (Line G) to
get the combined family income

$59,829

Subtract:

CPP (Item 870, maximum $1,911 per year)


E.I. (Item 880, maximum $729 per year)
Reported Income Tax Deduction
Total deductions
Net Income of father: Subtract Total Deductions (Line C) from Fathers Gross
2006 Income (Line B)
Mother:

Gross 2006 income (Item 845)

Subtract:

CPP (Item 875, maximum $1,911 per year)


E.I. (Item 885, maximum $729 per year)
Reported Income Tax Deduction
Total deductions

Canada: Determine amount of parental discretionary income


Canada Moderate Standard of Living Allowance from Table C7a for a family
size of 4 is
Subtract Line I from Line H to calculate Annual Discretionary Income (ADI). If
negative, enter zero.
Canada: Determine parental contribution

Calculations

Line

$58,002

$1,827

Calculations

Line

Table C8a shows that parents with under $7,000 of ADI from Line J should use the following calculation:
15% x ADI/52 weeks
15% x 1,827 / 52
Adjust the expected weekly contribution from parental income in Line L for the
number of students in postsecondary education (in this case, 1)
To get the expected parental income contribution that will be used in the
Canada portion of the need assessment, multiply Line L by the number
of weeks in the students study period (34 weeks)

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$5.27

$5.27

L
M

$179

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Example: Parental Income Contribution
The father reports $42,000 in actual annual gross income in Item 840 of the OSAP Application and the
mother reports actual annual gross income of $36,000 in Item 845. There are two children, however
only one is in postsecondary studies.
Ontario: Determine amount of parental discretionary income
Ontario Moderate Standard of Living Allowance from Table C7b for a
family size of 4 is
Subtract Line N from Line H to calculate Annual Discretionary Income. If
negative, enter zero.
Table C8b shows that parents with over $14,000 of ADI from Line O
should use the following calculation [$5,250 + 75% of (ADI - $14,000)] / 52
weeks
[$5,250 + 75% of (ADI - $14,000)] / 52
To get the expected parental income contribution that will be used in the
Ontario portion of the need assessment, multiply Line L by the number of
weeks in the students study period (34 weeks)

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Calculations

Line

$45,500

$14,329

$105.71

$3,594

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STEP D:

CALCULATE THE STUDENT'S NEED

A students calculated financial need is equal to total allowable costs minus expected
financial resources. Two separate financial need calculations are performed B one for
purposes of determining student financial assistance available from Canada, and another
for determining student financial assistance available from Ontario.
If a students combined Canada and Ontario financial need is less than $250, Canada
Ontario Integrated Student Loan will not be provided.
1. Canada Financial Need
The amount of Canada financial need is equal to the students total allowable costs minus
total financial resources for the purposes of the Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario
Integrated Student Loan (see Step B and Step C of this Manual).
If the result is negative, the student is considered by Canada to have sufficient resources
to finance his/her education and does not qualify for student financial assistance from
Canada. If the result is positive, the student is eligible to receive student financial
assistance from Canada.
2. Ontario Financial Need
Financial need, for the purposes of the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated
Student Loan, is equal to the students total allowable costs minus total financial resources
(including federal support through the Canada portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated
Student Loan, the Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants and/or the Canada
Access Grant for Students from Low-Income Families).
However, the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities is not used
as a resource in the calculation of a students Ontario financial need.
If the result of the calculation of Ontario financial need is negative, the student is
considered to have sufficient resources to finance his/her education and does not qualify
for student financial assistance from Ontario. If the result is positive, the student is eligible
to receive student financial assistance from Ontario.

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STEP E: CALCULATE THE STUDENTS ASSISTANCE


Once the students Canada and Ontario financial need have been calculated, the next
step is to calculate what assistance is available through programs for which eligibility is
determined directly through the OSAP needs assessment. These programs are: the
Ontario and Canada portions of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan; Canada
Study Grants for Students with Dependants; Canada Access Grants for Students with
Permanent Disabilities; Canada Access Grants for Students from Low-Income Families;
Millennium-Ontario Access Grants; and Ontario Access Grants.
1. Canada Portion of Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
A students Canada portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan entitlement
is equal to 60% of the calculated Canada portion need to a maximum of $210 per week of
study.
Interaction with Other Assistance:
If a student qualifies for a Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities,
the amount of the grant is subtracted from his or her assessed federal need prior to doing
the above calculation of the students entitlement to the Canada portion of the CanadaOntario Integrated Student Loan.
If a student qualifies for a Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income Families,
the amount of the grant does not alter the calculation of the amount of Canada loan
assistance to be provided. The grant is, however, provided in place of some or all of the
Canada loan assistance. The amount of the Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario
Integrated Student Loan is reduced by the value of any Canada Access Grant for
Students from Low-Income Families.
2. Ontario Portion of Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
A students Ontario portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan entitlement is
equal to the calculated Ontario portion of need to a maximum of $140 per week of study
for single students and $335 per week of study for married students and sole-support
parents.
Interaction with Other Assistance:
If a student qualifies for an Ontario Access Grant or Millennium/Ontario Access Grant, the
amount of the grant does not alter the calculation of the amount of Ontario loan assistance
to be provided. The grant is, however, provided in place of some or all of the Ontario loan
assistance. The amount of the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student
Loan is reduced by the value of any Ontario Access Grant or Millennium/Ontario Access
Grant.

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3. Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants


A student is eligible to receive a Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants if
he/she has a calculated Canada portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
need greater than $275 per week of study and has dependent children.
The amount of the grant is equal to the lesser of:
the students Canada assessed need over $275 per week;
$40 per week for students with 1 or 2 children; and
$60 per week for students with 3 or more children.
Interaction with Other Assistance:
Canada Study Grants for Students with Dependents are not provided in place of Canada
Student Loans. Canada Study Grants for Students with Dependents are considered a
resource in calculating Ontario financial need.
4. Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities
A student is eligible to receive the Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent
Disabilities if he/she has submitted proof of a permanent disability and has a calculated
need under the Canada portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
assessment.
The Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities is calculated as the
lesser of: $2,000 per academic year; or the students Canada assessed need.
Interaction with Other Assistance:
Canada Access Grants for Students with Permanent Disabilities are not provided in place
of Canada Student Loans, but if a student qualifies for this grant, the amount of grant is
subtracted from students assessed federal need prior to calculating other federal
assistance. Sixty per cent of the remaining federal need is then met through the
remaining federal programs, as applicable (i.e., Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario
Integrated Student Loan, Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-income Families
and/or Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependents). Therefore, students who
qualify for Canada Access Grants for Students with Permanent Disabilities may receive
total federal funding above the federal loan maximum of $210 per week.
The Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities is not used as a
resource in the calculation of a students Ontario need.
5. Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income Families
A student is eligible to receive a Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income
Families if he/she:
is enrolled in the first year of his or her program of study;
is studying at the postsecondary level for the first time
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has been out of high school for four years or less at the date of the start of
their program;
is enrolled in a first-entry program of study of at least two years that leads to a
certificate, degree or diploma, and his or her institution and program are approved for
student financial assistance purposes (Note: First-entry programs are programs that
do not require a postsecondary credential as an entrance requirement. For example,
an Arts and Science program would be considered a first-entry program, while law
or medicine would be considered second-entry programs.)
meets all eligibility requirements to be considered for a Canada-Ontario Integrated
Student Loan.
his or her parents 2006 net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) was
at or below the following income ceilings:
Family Net Income Thresholds (2007-2008 Loan Year)
Canada Access Grants for Students from Low-Income Families
Number of
dependent children
that parents have (1)

0-3

Parents' net income (3) $37,170

10

$42,180

$47,204

$52,228

$57,252

$62,276

$67,300

$72,324

(1) Number of dependent children, including the applicant, identified in the OSAP Application.
(2) Net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) of the applicants father, stepfather, legal guardian or official
sponsor plus the applicants mother, stepmother, legal guardian, or official sponsor as identified in the OSAP Application.

Once eligibility for this grant has been determined, the amount of Canada Access Grant
for Students from Low-Income Families is calculated as the lesser of:
50 per cent of the students tuition (excludes mandatory fees);
$3,000; and
the amount of the Canada portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan
that the student would otherwise be entitled to receive.
Interaction with Other Assistance:
The amount of the Canada portion of the students Canada-Ontario Integrated Student
Loan is reduced by the amount of Canada Access Grant from Students from Low-Income
Families that the student receives.
6. Millennium/Ontario Access Grants
A student is eligible to receive a Millennium/Ontario Access Grant for Students if he or
she:
is enrolled in the first year of his or her program;
is studying at the postsecondary level for the first time;
has been out of high school for four years or less at the date of the start of
their program;

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is enrolled in a first-entry program of study of at least two years that leads to a


certificate, degree or diploma, and his or her institution and program are approved for
student loan purposes;
meets all eligibility requirements to be considered for a Canada-Ontario Student Loan;
his or her parents 2006 net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) was
at or below the following income ceilings:
Family Net Income Thresholds (2007-2008 Loan Year)
Millennium/Ontario and Ontario Access Grants

Number of
dependent
children that
parents have (1) 0 - 1
Parents' net
income (2)

$71,502

$76,296 $81,396

10

$ 86,496

$91,596

$93,636 $97,512 $99,756 $101,388 $103,428

(1) Number of dependent children, including the applicant, identified in the OSAP Application.
(2) Net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) of the applicants father, stepfather, legal guardian or official sponsor
plus the applicants mother, stepmother, legal guardian, or official sponsor as identified in the OSAP Application.

In addition, if the student is attending a program of two or more terms, the student must
still be in full-time studies at the start of his or her second term in order to receive this
grant. The Millennium-Ontario Access Grant can only be received once by a student.
The amount of the Millennium/Ontario Access Grant is calculated as the lesser of:
$3,000,
the amount of the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student
Loan that the student would otherwise be entitled to receive,
25 to 50 per cent of the students tuition, depending on parental income.

# of Dependent Children
Supported by the
Student's Parents (3)

50%

50% to 25% (4)

25%

0-1

$37,170 or less

$37,171 to $47,940

$47,941 to $71,502

$37,170 or less

$37,171 to $53,550

$53,551 to $76,296

$37,170 or less

$37,171 to $58,650

$58,651 to $81,396

$42,180 or less

$42,181 to $63,240

$63,241 to $86,496

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$47,204 or less

$47,205 to $66,810

$66,811 to $91,596

$52,228 or less

$52,229 to $70,380

$70,381 to $93,636

$57,252 or less

$57,253 to $73,440

$73,441 to $97,512

$62,276 or less

$62,277 to $75,480

$75,481 to $99,756

$67,300 or less

$67,301 to $77,316

$77,317 to $101,388

10

$72,324 or less

$72,345 to $79,356

$79,357 to $103,428

(1)

Percentage of tuition used for purposes of the Canada need assessment (e.g., not subject to the OSAP tuition
fee cap). Mandatory fees are not included.
(2)
Net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) of the applicants father, stepfather, legal guardian or
official sponsor plus the applicants mother, stepmother, legal guardian, or official sponsor as identified in the
OSAP Application.
(3)
Number of dependent children, including the applicant, identified in the OSAP Application.
(4)
For families in the income ranges for which the maximum percentage of tuition covered is between 50 and 25
per cent, the percentage covered is calculated using the following formula:
0.5-((0.25/(B - A)) * (parental income - A))
A = income ceiling up to which 50% of tuition is covered
B = income ceiling at which 25% of tuition starts to be covered

Interaction with Other Assistance:


The amount of the Ontario portion of the students Canada-Ontario Integrated Student
Loan is reduced by the amount of Millennium/Ontario Access Grant that the student
receives.
7. Ontario Access Grants
A student is eligible to receive an Ontario Access Grant for Students if he or she:
is in the second year of his or her program;
has been out of high school for four years or less as of the first day of their current
period of study;
is in a first-entry program of study of at least two years that leads to a certificate,
degree or diploma, and his or her institution and program are approved for student loan
purposes
meets all eligibility requirements to be considered for a Canada-Ontario Integrated
Student Loan.
his or her parents 2006 net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) was
at or below the following income ceilings;

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Family Net Income Thresholds (2007-2008 Loan Year)


Millennium/Ontario and Ontario Access Grants
Number of
dependent
children that
parents have

0-1

10

$71,502

$76,296

$81,396

$ 86,496

$91,596

$93,636

$97512

$99,756

$101,388

$103,428

(1)

Parents' net
income (3)

(1) Number of dependent children, including the applicant, identified in the OSAP Application.
(2) Net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) of the applicants father, stepfather, legal guardian or
official sponsor plus the applicants mother, stepmother, legal guardian, or official sponsor as identified in the
OSAP Application.

In addition, if the student is attending a program of two or more terms in length, the
student must still be in full-time studies at the start of his or her second term in order to
receive this grant. The Ontario Access Grant can only be received once by a student.
The amount of the Ontario Access Grant is calculated as the lesser of:
$3,000,
the amount of the Ontario portion of the Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan
that the student would otherwise be entitled to receive
from 25 to 50 per cent of the students tuition.
The maximum percentage of tuition that can be covered depends on parental income.
Maximum Percentage of Tuition (1) that Can be Covered
by Parental Income (2) Range and Family Size
# of Dependent Children
Supported by the
Student's Parents (3)

50%

50% to 25% (4)

25%

0-1

$37,170 or less

$37,171 to $47,940

$47,941 to $71,502

$37,170 or less

$37,171 to $53,550

$53,551 to $76,296

$37,170 or less

$37,171 to $58,650

$58,651 to $81,396

$42,180 or less

$42,181 to $63,240

$63,241 to $86,496

5
6

$47,204 or less

$47,205 to $66,810

$66,811 to $91,596

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$52,228 or less

$52,229 to $70,380

$70,381 to $93,636

$57,252 or less

$57,253 to $73,440

$73,441 to $97,512

$62,276 or less

$62,277 to $75,480

$75,481 to $99,756

$67,300 or less

$67,301 to $77,316

$77,317 to $101,388

10

$72,324 or less

$72,345 to $79,356

$79,357 to $103,428

(1)

Percentage of tuition used for purposes of the Canada need assessment (e.g., not subject to the OSAP tuition
fee cap). Mandatory fees are not included.
(2)
Net income (from Line 236 of the Income Tax form) of the applicants father, stepfather, legal guardian or
official sponsor plus the applicants mother, stepmother, legal guardian, or official sponsor as identified the OSAP
Application.
(3)
Number of dependent children, including the applicant, identified in the OSAP Application.
(4)
For families in the income ranges for which the maximum percentage of tuition covered is between 50 and 25
per cent, the percentage covered is calculated using the following formula:
0.5-((0.25/(B - A)) * (parental income - A))
A = income ceiling up to which 50% of tuition is covered
B = income ceiling at which 25% of tuition starts to be covered

Interaction with Other Assistance:


The amount of the Ontario portion of the students Canada-Ontario Integrated Student
Loan is reduced by the amount of Ontario Access Grant that the student receives.
8. Required Institutional Assistance Under the Student Access Guarantee
The 2007-08 Student Access Guarantee Guidelines provide direction to provinciallyassisted universities and colleges of applied arts and technology on how institutions must
participate in the student access guarantee initiative during 2007-08.
Under the student access guarantee, it will be the responsibility of institutions to ensure
that students are able to get enough aid to cover their costs for tuition, books, compulsory
fees, equipment and supplies, when these are above the usual range of costs covered by
OSAP.
To assist financial aid offices in identifying shortfalls in students resources related to
tuition, books, compulsory fees, equipment and supplies, the Ministry will provide financial
aid offices with calculations of OSAP recipients tuition/book shortfalls. The calculation
is based on program cost information entered into the OSAP system in accordance with
the OSAP Cost Code Update Manual.
The tuition/book shortfall is defined as, a students remaining financial need after receipt
of available OSAP assistance, that is due to tuition and compulsory ancillary fees above
$4,500/year ($5,350 for co-op programs) and/or book, equipment and supply costs above
$1,000/year.
In meeting tuition/book shortfalls, the institution can base the aid provided either the
snapshot shortfall (a fixed value generated by the Ministry upon receipt of student
Confirmation of Enrolment data), or on the current shortfall displayed for the student at
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the time institutional aid is allocated. Both figures are available to institutions through
their OSAP download files.
For detailed instructions on required institutional assistance under the student access
guarantee, please refer to the 2007-08 Student Access Guarantee Guidelines.
9. Required Institutional Assistance in Graduate and Professional or HighDemand Programs
The Ministrys former requirements for institutional assistance towards tuition and
compulsory fees for students in Graduate and Professional and High Demand programs,
as set out in various Ministry documents, are being discontinued for 2007-08.
These requirements are replaced and superseded by the requirements set out in the 200708 Student Access Guarantee Guidelines.
10. Ontario Student Opportunity Grants
A student is eligible for an Ontario Student Opportunity Grant (OSOG) provided that:

A student completes the period of study for which he/she received Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan/CSG funding; and
A student has received loan funding above the maximums specified below; and
A student is not restricted from further assistance.
Number of terms

OSOG funding available for Canada Ontario Integrated


Student Loan entitlements that are greater than

1 term

Not applicable

2 terms

$7,000

3 terms

$10,500

OSOG funding is paid on an annual basis. The OSOG payment is applied directly to the
Ontario portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan principal after a student
has completed his/her academic year and all income reported to OSAP has been verified
with Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Until tax returns have been submitted to Canada
Revenue Agency by students and/or their supporting individuals, their eligibility for OSOG
cannot be confirmed and OSOG payments cannot be processed.
Some students who have not received past years OSOG payments as a result of not
having submitted a Tax Return do eventually submit the tax returns at a later date. In
these cases, CRA will automatically send updated tax information to the Ministry, allowing
the OSOG payment to process.

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Students may request a review of a decision to deny them OSOG eligibility because the
student withdrew or was expelled from studies. Please refer to the 2007-2008 Review
Manual for further information on reviews of this nature.

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DEFINITIONS AND CONTEXT


Academic year
The academic year generally covers the period between August 1 and July 31. Programs
that have a start date between August 1, 2007 and July 31, 2008 are considered to be part of
the 2007-08 academic year, and are subject to a maximum length of 52 weeks. A program
may comprise multiple terms or semesters, including summer and intersession. Within the
criteria set by the Ministry, the length and format of the academic year for a particular
program of study is defined by the educational institution.
Assets
For the purpose of assessing contributions from student and spousal resources, assets mean
RRSPs, vehicles and other assets.
Other assets refers to any investment owned by the student (and spouse), including: cash,
guaranteed investment certificates, treasury bills, provincial savings bonds, mutual funds,
corporation bonds, real estate (other than principal residence), and funds in chequing and
savings accounts. Other assets do not include vehicles, RRSPs, or the value of the students
principal residence.
Asset Valuation Date
The asset valuation date is the day sixteen (16) weeks prior to the start of the study period.
This date is used to avoid double counting students savings from income earned during the
pre-study period.
Note: If students come into possession of significant new assets (e.g. gift of a new vehicle)
after the asset valuation date, they are expected to contact their financial aid office to update
their financial information.
At home
A dependent single student is living at home in the study period if either of the following
circumstances applies:
the student is living in the parental home; or
the students parents live in the city where the students postsecondary institution is
located (see Table B2 of this Manual for details).
An independent single student is living at home if he or she is living in the parental home.
Away from home
A dependent single student is living away from the parental home in the study period if he or
she is not living in the parental home and both of the following circumstances apply:
the student is living away from the parental home; and,
the students parents do not live in the city where the students postsecondary institution is
located (see Table B2 of this Manual for details) .
Note: A single dependent student who lives away from home but whose parents live in the
city where the students postsecondary institution is located may be assessed as living away
from home during the pre-study period if living away from home is required to obtain full-time
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employment.
Common law or same sex relationship
See Student Group Definition in Chapter 2, Step A: Identifying the Students Category.
Compulsory fees
Acceptable compulsory fees include: co-op fees, student activity fees, athletic fees, health
services fees, student union fees, fees for paying tuition in two instalments, laboratory fees,
field placement, fees, technology fees. .
Unacceptable compulsory fees are: confirmation fees; parking fees; late registration fees;
convocation and /or graduation fees; appeal fees; fees for duplicate diplomas, I.D. cards, and
or fee receipts; transcript fees; local transportation fees. For details see the 2007-08 Cost
Code Update Manual.
Computer Allowance
The eligible expenses under the current books and supplies allowance have been expanded
to include a $500 computer allowance for all categories of students.
Default
A loan is in default when a student makes no payments for at least 90 days.
Dependent Student
For both the Canada and Ontario portions of Canada-Ontario Integrated Student Loan,
students identified as dependant are financially dependent on parent(s), guardian(s),
sponsor(s) or other supporting relative(s) and do not qualify as independent students.
Dependent students are defined as:
Have never been married or in a common-law relationship; and,
Have never been a single parent with legal custody and financial responsibility for
supporting child(ren); and,
Are pursuing postsecondary education within four years of leaving secondary school; or
not been in the labour force full-time for two years. The two years need not be
consecutive, however, each year must be a period of twelve consecutive months.
Dependent Children
A dependent child is a child (including an adopted child, a stepchild, or a foster child) who is
living with the applicant (and spouse, if any) during the applicant's study period and who
meets one or more of the following criteria:
is under 16 years of age;
is 16 years of age or over and
is enrolled in high school and taking at least 60% of a full course load;
is a full-time postsecondary student and has been out of high school less than four
years; or
has a permanent disability and is wholly dependent on the applicant (and spouse, if
any).
Note: Students attending hairstyling schools can be considered as dependants if they meet
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the above criteria.


Discretionary income parents
For parents, discretionary income is annual income less applicable taxes and less a weekly
living allowance based on the Moderate Standard of Living. Canada and Ontario use different
living allowances to calculate discretionary income.
Discretionary income students
For students, discretionary income is defined as gross income less a standard tax allowance
less a standard living allowance for the period.
Disability (Permanent)
A permanent disability is a functional limitation that is caused by a physical or mental
impairment which restricts the ability of a person to perform the daily activities necessary to
participate in studies at a postsecondary level or in the workforce and is expected to remain
with the person for the persons expected life.
Financial need
Financial Need is equal to the total assessed costs minus the total assessed resources. This
may be a positive or a negative number. The calculated financial need will be used in
determining the amount of assistance awarded under the Canada Ontario Integrated
Student Loan program.
If the figure is a negative value, the student has sufficient resources to finance his/her
education and does not qualify for financial assistance.
Food costs
Agriculture Canada's Retail Food Price Report is the source for the data used to determine
the allowances for food costs. The Report provides estimates for the purchase of a nutritious
food basket in various urban areas.
Income
For students, income means gross taxable and non-taxable income from all world-wide
sources, including, but not limited to:
employment earnings;
child-support and alimony payments;
monetary gifts;
lottery winnings;
government benefits, such as payments received from any social services agency,
workers' compensation benefits, or unemployment insurance;
cashed in Registered Education Savings Plans or Scholarship Trust Funds;
cashed in Registered Retirement Savings Plans;
business earnings
any other income (e.g. awards, scholarships, fellowships, bursaries, grants, interest,
investments and/or trust fund income).
Income tax refunds including: GST rebates, child tax benefits, universal child care benefits,
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property tax credits, GST credits and other refundable tax credits are not included as income.
OSAP funding, including student loans, Child-Care Bursary, Bursary for Students with
Disabilities, Canada Study Grants, Millennium Bursary, Millennium/Ontario Access Grants,
and/or Canada Access Grants is not included as income. Queen Elizabeth II Aiming for the
Top Scholarships are not reported by the student, as the application is automatically updated
to include this income.
Awards, bursaries, and/or needs-based scholarships from a publicly-funded Ontario college of
applied arts and technology or university are not reported by students IF the postsecondary
institution has informed the student in writing that the institution will report it to OSAP
directly (e.g., through the Bursary Recording System). They are automatically added to
income if they are not OSAP exempt.
Indian Residential Schools payments, Hepatitis C Compensation payments, and pain and
suffering awards, including non-economic loss (NEL) awards up to $100,000, are not included
as income.
For parents:
Income means the income reported on Line 150 on the previous year's income tax return.
Other income means the total value of all other taxable and non-taxable income (Items 850
and 855) received from all world-wide sources that was not reported on the mothers and/or
fathers Canadian income tax return (e.g., foreign income, lottery winnings, insurance
payouts, cashed-in RRSPs, etc.)
Net parental income, when used for purposes of calculating eligibility for Access Grants that
are targeted by parental income, means parental income reported on Line 236 of the previous
years income tax return.
Net parental income, for purposes of determining financial contributions, means income
minus amounts for CPP, EI and income tax.
For spouse:
Income means the income reported on Line 150 of the current year income tax return.
Other income means the total value of all other taxable and non-taxable income (Item 951)
received from all world-wide sources that was not reported on the spouses Canadian income
tax return (e.g., non-taxable income, lottery winnings, cashed-in RRSPs, etc.)
Income tax refunds including: GST rebates, child tax benefits, universal child care benefits,
property tax credits, GST credits and other refundable tax credits are not included as income.
Student Living allowances
Living allowances are the standard allowances to cover the costs of shelter, food, and local
transportation costs, amounts for dependent children and miscellaneous expenses.
Living costs are assessed on a standard basis across Canada using data for each region
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derived from objective national databases. The monthly allowances for standard living costs
are provided in Appendix 2 and depend on each student's category and number of dependent
children.
Loan year
Loan year means the period commencing on August 1 in any year and ending on July 31 in
the following year.
Local transportation
A monthly amount for local transportation is available to all students (as well as to students'
spouses and dependants). This amount is included in the student living allowances set out in
Appendix 2.
Mature Student
A mature student is defined as an applicant who has reached the age of 18 years on or
before the start of their study period.
Married student
Students identified as married are either married or are in a common-law relationship.
The need assessment of students who are identified as married assumes a financial
contribution from the spouse. The unwillingness of the spouse to assume financial
responsibility for the other person does not affect the identification of the student as a married
student.
Married students whose marriage or common-law relationship ceases are assessed as either
independent students or sole support parents, depending on whether the student has
dependent child(ren).
Married students whose relationship ceases do not revert to dependent students, even if they
have not otherwise met the criteria for independent status.
Merit-based scholarship/merit-based scholarship exemptions
To qualify for the Ontario study-period exemption for merit-based scholarships, the
scholarship must base its selection of recipients on exceptional academic qualifications, such
as would be typically demonstrated by having a minimum academic standard for applicants of
an A- or better, consistent with institutional grading practices.
Such a standard may apply to a students overall average, or to academic qualifications in a
particular subject area. Scholarships may also be considered to be merit-based scholarships
that do not set a minimum grade standard but that accomplish similar results through
evaluating students marks in comparison to their peers and selecting those with top
academic performance. Queen Elizabeth II Aiming for the Top Scholarships and Canada
Millennium Excellence Awards are considered eligible.
To qualify, the academic and eligibility criteria of the specific scholarship and the selection
process used must be in written guidelines, available for audit.

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Provided that the scholarship can be demonstrated to meet the standard outlined above for
exceptional academic performance, it may also have other criteria such as financial need,
community service, or athletic accomplishments.
Miscellaneous expenses
The Statistics Canada Family Expenditure Survey is the source for the data used to
determine the allowances for miscellaneous expenses. The miscellaneous expense
allowance includes amounts for clothing, personal care, health care, household expenses,
communication and other expenses. An amount for miscellaneous expense is included in the
student living allowances set out in Appendix 2.
Moderate Standard of Living (MSOL) (Tables C7a and b)
The moderate standard of living is a measure of the costs of living for the parents of
dependent students. It is based on various sources from Statistics Canada..The parents'
MSOL includes the costs for various family sizes for shelter, food, household operation, childcare, furnishings and equipment, clothing, transportation, health and personal care, reading
materials, life insurance premiums, pension contributions, charitable donations and other
miscellaneous expenses.
The federal government recalculated its Moderate Standard of Living using different
weightings beginning in the 2007-08 academic year. Ontario continues to index the Moderate
Standard of Living to Consumer Price Inflation. As a result, Canada and Ontario use different
Moderate Standards of Living.
Net Income
For purposes of calculating eligibility for Access Grants that are targeted by parental income,
net income means the income reported on Line 236 of the parents previous years income
tax return.
Parents
For the purpose of assessing parental contributions, parents include natural parents,
step-parents, legal guardians and sponsors.
Pre-study period
For a student who was a full-time high school or a postsecondary student in 2006-2007, the
pre-study period is the time between the start of the 2007-2008 study period and the end of
the last study period, to a maximum of sixteen (16) weeks immediately preceding the start of
the students 2007-2008 study period.
For a student who was not a full-time high school or a postsecondary student in 2006-2007,
the pre-study period is the sixteen (16) week period immediately preceding the start of the
students 2007-2008 study period.
Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs)
RRSPs include the net value of all RRSPs registered to the students (and spouse or
common-law spouse, if applicable) as of the asset valuation date. For Canada Ontario
Integrated Student Loan purposes, RRSPs do not include the value of RRSPs mandatorily
locked in under the Canada Pension Plan Act. Only those RRSP investments which are
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deemed as completely inaccessible under the Canada Pension Act (that is, by law, the
investor cannot withdraw the funds until he or she reaches the age of 65 years) are
considered "locked in".
The student can deduct any debts that are directly related to the RRSPs such as any financial
penalties assigned by the financial institution and/or income tax withheld by financial
institution in calculating the net value.
Shelter
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) and Statistics Canada are the sources
for the data used to determine the shelter allowances. CMHC provides estimates of average
rental payments for major urban and rural areas (including utilities but not electricity). The
Statistics Canada Family Expenditure Survey provides the cost estimates for electricity.
For Single Students living away from home, the allowance for shelter is based on half the
average cost of a two-bedroom apartment, including utilities.
Single Students living at home are not entitled to a shelter allowance.
For sole support parents, the allowance for shelter is based on the full average cost of a onebedroom apartment, including utilities.
For married students, the allowance for shelter is based on the full average cost of a
two-bedroom apartment, including utilities.
The cost of shelter for dependants is based on the average incremental cost of an additional
bedroom. The shelter allowance for dependent children is included in the dependants total
monthly allowance in Appendix 2, which is added to the total monthly allowances for sole
support parents who have full-time physical custody of children and for married students.
Sole support parent
Students identified as sole support parents are students who have never married, who are
separated or divorced from a spouse, or who are widowed, and who have legal and/or
physical custody and responsibility for child(ren) who live with the student full-time during the
study period.
Student living allowance
Student living allowance is the standard allowance to cover the costs of shelter, food, local
transportation and miscellaneous expenses. The monthly allowance for various individual
costs is provided in Appendix 2 along with the student living allowance for each category of
student and for dependants.
Study period
Study period is the time period in which the student is considered by the students institution
and OSAP to be in school. This time period is used to determine the amount of the students
funding as well as the deadline dates for OSAP. The starting and ending dates for the
students study period are displayed when the student checks the status of his or her
application on the OSAP website and are printed on the documentation sent to you by the
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ministry, including the students Confirmation of Enrolment.


Tuition
Tuition is the fee payable for the teaching and instruction received in an approved postsecondary education institution. Tuition fees may be based on the course weight (e.g., full or
half-credit), the number of courses enrolled in, and/or the length of the program.
Universal Child Care Benefit
The Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB), which was announced in the 2006 Federal Budget,
is federal assistance paid to parents with children under the age of 6. The benefit is paid in
instalments of $100/month per child. The first payments were made to parents in July 2006.
Money received through the UCCB is not to be included in any income reported on the OSAP
application.
Vehicles
Vehicles include both primary and secondary modes of transportation owned or leased by the
student and/or the spouse. Vehicles can be:
automobiles; or
recreational vehicles (e.g., boats, planes, motorcycles).
Ward of the crown
A Ward of the Crown is assessed as an independent student. Under the Child and Family
Services Act, R.S.O. 1990, a court may issue an order making a child a Ward of the Crown,
thus giving the Children's Aid Society permanent custody of the child and responsibility for the
child's care. If it is in the best interests of the child, adoption to a suitable family may be
undertaken.

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APPENDIX 1:

SAMPLE ASSESSMENTS

SINGLE DEPENDENT STUDENT LIVING AT HOME DURING STUDY PERIOD


The student is single and dependent on his or her parent(s). The student is enrolled in the
third year of post-secondary studies.
Step B:

Assess the Student's Costs during Study Period

B.1 Tuition and compulsory fees


The student is in a regular tuition fee program, so both the Canada and Ontario portions of
the need assessment recognize the same fee amounts.
The university has reported:

Eligible tuition fees of $4,330 for a 34-week study period


Eligible compulsory fees of $1,200

A total of $5,530 is used in the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
B.2 Books, supplies, equipment and computer allowance
For a 34-week study period, the institution has reported that the student will be enrolled in
a Bachelor of Arts program with the following costs:
Cost component
Book fees general
TOTAL

Actual costs as
reported by institution
$457
$457

Maximum
Per Table B1
$600

Amount used for


assessment purposes
$457
$457

The $457 expense plus the $500 computer allowance or $957 should be entered in the
Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
B.3 Living allowance
The student is living at home during the study period, attending a university in Ontario.
The Standard Living Allowance for this situation, per Table B2, is $414 per month or
$96.28 per week.
The number of weeks in the students study period is multiplied by the weekly allowance to
get the total Living Allowance during the study period, as follows:

$96.28 per week of study X 34 weeks study period = $3,274

B.4 Return transportation


Students who live at home during the study period are not eligible for transportation costs.
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B.5 Child care costs


Single students are not eligible for a child-care allowance.
Step C:

Assess Contribution from Resources Available

C.1 Pre-study period income contribution


The expected minimum pre-study contribution is $2,134 (See Table C1). Calculate the
pre-study income contribution from actual income. The greater amount is used in the
assessment.
Calculate Pre-Study Income Contribution from Actual Income
The student is living at home during the pre-study period. Gross income for the 16-week period is
$3,000 (Item 600).
Calculation
Instructions
Line
s
Calculate Gross Weekly Pre-study Period Income ($3,000/16)
Calculate Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine tax
rate. Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (6.8%).
Multiply reported pre-study period income (Item 600) by (1-tax rate)

$187.50

$2,796.00

$96.28

Multiply Line C by the number of weeks in the students pre-study period.

X 16
$1,540.48

Subtract Line D from Line B. If negative, enter zero.

$1,255.52

From Table B2, the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a student living at
home during the pre-study period is $96.28 per week.

Multiply Line E by the 80% expected contribution rate


Total expected pre-study period contribution is:

X 80%
$1,004.42

As the calculated contribution from actual income ($1004.42) is lower than the minimum
expected contribution ($2,134), the minimum expected contribution is used in both the
Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
C.2 Calculate contribution from study period income
Regular Tuition Fee Programs: The student reported study period income from part-time work of
$3,000 (Item 620). There are 34 weeks in the students study period. For this student, the calculations
are the same for the Canada and Ontario portion
Instructions
Study Period Income Contribution:
Calculate Gross Weekly Income ($3,000/34)
Calculate the Net Study Period Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Study Period Income to determine tax rate.
Obtain tax rate from Table C6 (6.8%).
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Calculations
$88.23

$2,796

Line
A

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Regular Tuition Fee Programs: The student reported study period income from part-time work of
$3,000 (Item 620). There are 34 weeks in the students study period. For this student, the calculations
are the same for the Canada and Ontario portion
Instructions

Calculations

Line

Multiply reported study period income (Item 626) by (1-tax rate)

Subtract the study-period exemption ($50 per week X 34 weeks = $1,700. If


negative, enter zero.
Multiply Line D by the 100% contribution rate
100% of reported non-exempt government benefits (in this case, zero)
To get the expected study period contribution for the Canada and Ontario
portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan:
Add Lines D and E

-$ 1,700.00
$1096.00
$1096.00
$0

C
D
E

$1096.00

C3. Calculate contribution from students assets


This student has not reported any assets.
C.4 Calculate expected parental contribution
The level of discretionary income determines the applicable formula to use when
calculating the parental income contribution. There are different formulas for the Canada
and Ontario needs assessment, so two calculations must be performed.
Parental Income Contribution
The father reports $75,000 in actual annual gross income in Items 840 of the OSAP Application and
the mother reports an actual annual gross income of $15,000 in Item 845 of the OSAP Application.
There are two dependent children, but only one in postsecondary studies.
Lin
Instructions: Determine family size
Calculations
e
Family size (Item 805) is:
4
A
Lin
Instructions: Determine total net parental income
Calculations
e
Father: Take Actual Gross Income 2006 (Item 840).
Deductions:
CPP (Item 870, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (Item 880, maximum $729 per year)
Reported Income tax Deduction

$1911
$729
$17,661

Total Deductions

$20,301

Net Income of Father: Line C from Line B

$54,699

Mother: Take Actual Gross Income 2006 (Item 845).


Deductions:
CPP (Item 875, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (Item 885, maximum $729 per year)
Reported Income tax Deduction

$15,000

Total Deductions

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$75,000

$569
$281
$1,159
$2,009

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Net Income of Mother: Line F from Line E

$12,991

Calculate Combined Net Family Income: Add the fathers net income (Line D)
and the mothers net income (Line G)

$67,690

H
Lin
e

Canada: Determine amount of parental discretionary income

Calculations

The Moderate Standard of Living from Table C7a for a family size of 4 is:

$58,002

Subtract the MSOL in Line I from Line H to calculate Annual Discretionary


Income (ADI). If negative, enter zero.

$9,688

Calculate expected weekly parental contribution using the formula: [$1,050


+20% of ADI-$7,000]/52

$30.53

Multiply by number of weeks in study period (34) to get the Canada expected
parental contribution

$1,038

L
Lin
e

Ontario: Determine amount of parental discretionary income

Calculations

The Moderate Standard of Living from Table C7b for a family size of 4 is:
Subtract the MSOL in Line M from Line H to calculate Annual Discretionary
Income (ADI). If negative, enter zero.
Calculate expected weekly parental contribution using the formula: [$5,250 +
75% of (ADI - $14,000)] / 52
Multiply by number of weeks in study period (34) to get Ontario expected
parental contribution

$45,500

$22,190

$219.09

$7,449

Both expected contribution amounts should be included in the need assessment.

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Need Assessment Summary Table:


Single Dependent Student Living at Home During Study Period
Canada

Allowable Educational Costs (Step B)

Ontario

$5,530

Tuition and Compulsory Fees - Step B.1

$5,530

$957

Books/ Equipment/ Supplies/Computer Allowance - Step B.2

$957

$3,274

Personal and Living Allowance - Step B.3

$3,274

N/A

Return Transportation Allowance - Step B.4

N/A

N/A

Child-Care - Step B.5

N/A

$9,761

A) Total Costs

$9,761

Canada

Expected Contributions (Step C)

Ontario

$2,134

Pre-study Income Student and Spouse Contribution - Step C.1

$2,134

$1,096

Study Period Student and Spouse Income Contribution - Step C.2

$1,096

$0

Student/Spouse Asset Contribution - Step C.3

$0

$1,038

Parental Income Contribution - Step C.4

$7,449

N/A

Federal portion/CSG as a resource - Step C.5

$3,296

$4,268

B) Total Contributions

Canada

$13,975

Calculation of Assessed Need (Step D)

Ontario

$5,493

Need: (Total Costs minus Total Contributions = A - B)

$0

$3,296

Federal Funding: 60% of need to maximum of $210 per week of study

N/A

N/A

Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income Families


Lesser of: 50% of tuition and federal funding to a maximum of $3,000

N/A

Federal Loan Funding:


Federal funding less Canada Access Grant for Students from LowIncome Families

N/A

N/A

N/A

Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants


For calculated need above $275 per week to a maximum of:
$40 per week for students with 1-2 children
$60 per week for students with 3 or more children

N/A

N/A

Provincial Funding: need to a maximum of:


$140 per week for single students
$335 per week for married students with no dependants
$295 per week for students with 1 or 2 dependants
$275 per week for students with 3 or more dependants

N/A

N/A

Millennium/Ontario Access Grant


Lesser of: 50% of tuition and provincial funding to a maximum of

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$3,000
N/A

Provincial Loan Funding:


Provincial funding less MillenniumOntario Access Grant

N/A

$2,197

Difference Between Assessed Need and Funding

$0

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SINGLE DEPENDENT STUDENT LIVING AWAY FROM HOME DURING STUDY PERIOD
Step A:

Determine the Students Status

The student is single and dependent on his or her parent(s). The student is enrolled in the
first year of post-secondary studies.
Step B:

Assess the Student's Costs during Study Period

B.1 Tuition and compulsory fees


The student is in a regular tuition fee program, so both the Canada and Ontario portions of
the need assessment recognize the same fee amounts.
The university has reported:

Eligible tuition fees of $4,724 for a 34-week study period


Eligible compulsory fees of $100

A total of $4,824 is used in the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
B.2 Books, supplies, equipment and computer allowance
For a 34-week study period, the institution has reported that the student will be enrolled in
a Bachelor of Arts program with the following costs:
Cost component
Book fees general
Expendable supplies
non-fine arts
TOTAL

Actual costs as
reported by institution
$957

Maximum
Per Table B1
$600

Amount used for


assessment purposes
$600

$345
$1,302

$400

$345
$945

The $945 expense plus the $500 computer allowance or $1,445 should be entered in the
Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
B.3 Living allowance
The student is living away from home during the study period, attending a university in
Ontario. The Standard Living Allowance for this situation, per Table B2, is $999 per month
or $232.33 per week.
The number of weeks in the students study period is multiplied by the weekly allowance to
get the total Living Allowance during the study period, as follows:

$232.33 per week of study X 34 weeks study period = $7,899.22

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B.4 Return transportation


The student has been determined to be a dependent single student who is living away
from home. Students in this situation are eligible for a return transportation allowance.
The student has listed the cost of one return trip as $200 on the OSAP application
(Item 560). There is a limit of two trips per academic year, with a maximum allowable cost
of $600 per term or $1,200 per academic year. Therefore, the return travel allowance for
this student is $400.
B.5 Child care costs
Single students are not eligible for a child-care allowance.
Step C:

Assess Contribution from Resources Available

C.1 Pre-study period income contribution


The expected minimum pre-study contribution is $2,134 (See Table C1). Calculate the
pre-study income contribution from actual income. The greater amount is used in the
assessment.
Calculate Pre-Study Income Contribution from Actual Income
The student is living at home during the pre-study period. Gross income for the 16-week period is
$5,200 (Item 600).
Instructions

Calculate Gross Weekly Pre-study Period Income ($5,200/16)


Calculate Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine tax
rate. Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (6.8%).
Multiply reported pre-study period income (Item 600) by (1-tax rate)

Calculations

Line

$325.00

$4,846.40

$96.28

Multiply Line C by the number of weeks in the students pre-study period.

X 16
$1,540.48

Subtract Line D from Line B. If negative, enter zero.

$3,305.92

From Table B2, the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a student living at
home during the pre-study period is $96.28 per week.

Multiply Line E by the 80% expected contribution rate


Total expected pre-study period contribution is:

X 80%
$2,644.77

As the calculated contribution from actual income ($2,645) is greater than the minimum
expected contribution ($2,134), the greater amount is used in both the Canada and
Ontario portions of the need assessment.

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C.2 Calculate contribution from study period income


Regular Tuition Fee Programs: The student reported study period income from part-time work of
$2,500 (Item 620). There are 34 weeks in the students study period. For this student, the calculations
are the same for the Canada and Ontario portion
Instructions
Study Period Income Contribution:
Calculate Gross Weekly Income ($2,500/34)
Calculate the Net Study Period Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Study Period Income to determine tax rate.
Obtain tax rate from Table C6 (6.8%).
Multiply reported study period income (Item 626) by (1-tax rate)
Subtract the study-period exemption ($50 per week X 34 weeks = $1,700. If
negative, enter zero.
Multiply Line D by the 100% contribution rate
100% of reported non-exempt government benefits (in this case, zero)
To get the expected study period contribution for the Canada and Ontario
portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan:
Add Lines D and E

Calculations
$73.53

Line
A

$2,330.00

-$ 1,700.00
$630.00
$630.00
$0

C
D
E

$630.00

C3. Calculate contribution from students assets


The student has reported the following assets on the application: a vehicle with a current gross
market value of $6,000, no RRSPs since leaving secondary school and other assets in the
amount of $1,500.
Instructions: Contribution from RRSPs
Take the reported value of the students RRSPs (Item 660). Subtract $2,000
for every year since the student has left secondary school (Item 175). If
negative, enter zero.
Instructions: Contribution from Vehicles

Take the reported value of the vehicles (Items 643, 653, 683, 693). Deduct
$5,000 in total from the value of all vehicles reported.
Instructions: Contribution from Other Assets

Calculations
$0
- N/A
$0
Calculations
$6,000.00
- $5,000.00
$1,000.00
Calculations

Line

A
Line

B
Line

Take 100% of the value of other assets reported in Item 670

$1,500.00

Add the totals of Lines A, B and C to get the total contribution from
assets

$2,500.00

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June 2007

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C.4 Calculate expected parental contribution


The level of discretionary income determines the applicable formula to use when
calculating the parental income contribution. There are different formulas for the Canada
and Ontario needs assessment, so two calculations must be performed.
Parental Income Contribution
The father reports $26,000 in actual annual gross income in Items 840 of the OSAP Application and
the mother reports an actual annual gross income of $12,000 in Item 845 of the OSAP Application.
The only child is in postsecondary studies.
Lin
Instructions: Determine family size
Calculations
e
Family size (Item 805) is:
3
A
Lin
Instructions: Determine total net parental income
Calculations
e
Father: Take Actual Gross Income 2006 (Item 840).
Deductions:
CPP (Item 870, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (Item 880, maximum $729 per year)
Reported Income tax Deduction
Total Deductions

$26,000

$1,114
$486
$3,739
$5,339

Net Income of Father: Line C from Line B

$20,661

Mother: Take Actual Gross Income 2006 (Item 845).


Deductions:
CPP (Item 875, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (Item 885, maximum $729 per year)
Reported Income tax Deduction

$12,000

Total Deductions

$421
$224
$564
$1,209

Net Income of Mother: Line F from Line E

$10,791

Calculate Combined Net Family Income: Add the fathers net income (Line D)
and the mothers net income (Line G)

$31,452

H
Lin
e

Canada instructions: Determine amount of parental discretionary income


The Moderate Standard of Living from Table C7a for a family size of 3 is
Subtract the MSOL in Line I from Line H to calculate Annual Discretionary
Income (ADI). If negative, enter zero.
Ontario instructions: Determine parental contribution
The Moderate Standard of Living from Table C7b for a family size of 3 is
Subtract the MSOL in Line K from Line H to calculate Annual Discretionary
Income (ADI). If negative, enter zero.

Calculations
$50,968
$0
Calculations

I
J
Lin
e

$41,049

$0

As the annual discretionary income in both calculations is zero, the parental contribution for
both the Canada and Ontario assessments is zero.
In addition to reporting gross income on the OSAP application, the father has reported $24,200 net income in item 841
and the mother has reported $11,000 net income in item 846 of the OSAP application. The combined net family income
of $35,200 is below the income thresholds for a family of three for Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income
Families and Millennium-Ontario Access Grant eligibility. Therefore, the student is eligible for both grants.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Need Assessment Summary Table:


Single Dependent Student Living Away From Home During Study Period
Canada

Allowable Educational Costs (Step B)

Ontario

$4,824

Tuition and Compulsory Fees - Step B.1

$4,824

$1,445

Books/ Equipment/ Supplies/Computer Allowance - Step B.2

$1,445

$7,899

Personal and Living Allowance - Step B.3

$7,899

$400

Return Transportation Allowance - Step B.4

$400

N/A

Child-Care - Step B.5

N/A

$14,568

A) Total Costs

$14,568

Canada

Expected Contributions (Step C)

Ontario

$2,645

Pre-study Income Student and Spouse Contribution - Step C.1

$2,645

$630

Study Period Student and Spouse Income Contribution - Step C.2

$630

$2,500

Student/Spouse Asset Contribution - Step C.3

$2,500

$0

Parental Income Contribution - Step C.4

$0

N/A

Federal portion/CSG as a resource - Step C.5

$5,276

$5,775

B) Total Contributions

Canada

$11,051

Calculation of Assessed Need (Step D)

Ontario

$8,793

Need: (Total Costs minus Total Contributions = A - B)

$3,517

$5,276

Federal Funding: 60% of need to maximum of $210 per week of study

N/A

$2,362

Canada Access Grant for Students from Low-Income Families


Lesser of: 50% of tuition and federal funding to a maximum of $3,000

N/A

Federal Loan Funding:


Federal funding less Canada Access Grant for Students from LowIncome Families

$2,914

N/A

Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants


For calculated need above $275 per week to a maximum of:
$40 per week for students with 1-2 children
$60 per week for students with 3 or more children

N/A

Provincial Funding: need to a maximum of:


$140 per week for single students
$335 per week for married students with no dependants
$295 per week for students with 1 or 2 dependants
$275 per week for students with 3 or more dependants

N/A

Millennium/Ontario Access Grant


Lesser of: 50% of tuition and provincial funding to a maximum of

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

N/A

N/A

$3,517

$2,362

June 2007

Page 92
$3,000
N/A

Provincial Loan Funding:


Provincial funding less MillenniumOntario Access Grant

$1,155

$3,482

Difference Between Assessed Need and Funding

$0

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Page 93

MARRIED STUDENTS - ONE SPOUSE A STUDENT


Step A:

Determine the Students Status

The student is married. The students spouse is not in school. The couple has no
dependants.
Step B:

Assess the Student's Costs during Study Period

B.1 Tuition and compulsory fees


The institution has reported eligible tuition and compulsory fees of $8,063 for a 42-week
study period.
A total of $8,063 is used in the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
B.2 Books, supplies, equipment and computer allowance
For a 42-week study period, the institution has reported that the student will be enrolled in
a Bachelor of Engineering program with the following costs:
Cost component

Book fees -- Applied


science, engineering and
any other specialized
program
Expendable supplies
non-fine arts
Uniform and equipment

Actual costs as reported


by institution

Maximum
Per Table B1

Amount used for


assessment
purposes

$2,700

$1,575

$1,575

$518

$600

$518

$230

$450

$230

$100

$1,425

$100

$900

$1,748

$900

Field trips
Major equipment

TOTAL

$4,448

$3,323

The $3,323 expense plus the $500 computer allowance or a total of $3,823 is the
allowable cost based upon category maximums. However, the maximum allowance for a
three-term program of study for books, supplies, equipment and computer allowance is
$3,000. Therefore, $3,000 should be entered in the Canada and Ontario portions of the
need assessment.
B.3 Living allowance
The married student is attending an institution in Ontario. The Standard Living Allowance
for this situation, per Table B2, is $1,915 per month or $445.35 per week.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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The number of weeks in the students study period is multiplied by the weekly allowance to
get the total Living Allowance during the study period, as follows:
$445.35 per week of study X 42 weeks = $18,704.70
B.4 Return transportation
Not applicable to a married student.
B.5 Child care costs
The couple has no dependent children. They are not eligible for a child-care allowance.
Step C:

Assess Contribution from Resources Available

C.1 Pre-study period income contribution


The minimum pre-study family income contribution is $109.00 (See Table C2). Calculate
the pre-study income contribution from actual income.
Calculate Pre-study Income Contribution from Actual Income
One spouse is student. The other spouse is employed. The couple has no children. The student reports
pre-study period income of $5,000 (Item 600) over a 16-week period. The students spouse reports an
estimated income of $30,000 for the year (Item 950).
Instructions
Calculations Line
Determine Students Net Income:
$5,000.00
/ 16
$312.50
A
Calculate Gross Weekly Income
Calculate Net Income:

Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine tax rate.


(Line A X 4.3)

Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (6.8%).

Multiply reported pre-study period income by (1-tax rate)


$4,660.00
B
Determine Spouses Income:
Spouses Gross 2006 Income (item 950)
Subtract: CPP (item 952, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (item 953, maximum 729 per year)
Reported income tax deduction (item 954)
Total Deductions
Spouses Net Income
Subtract Total deductions (Line D) from Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Line C)
Calculate spouses net weekly income:
Divide the total net annual income (Line E) by 52
Calculate spouses net income for the pre-study period:
Multiply spouses net weekly income (line F) by the number of weeks in the
students pre-study period (16 weeks)
Calculate Combined Family Income: Add Line B and G
From Table B2, the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a married student with
no dependents is $445.35 per week.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$30,000
$1,312
$561
$4,436
$6,309

$23,691

$455.60

X 16
$7,289.60

$11,949,60,

$445.35

June 2007

Page 95

Multiply Line I by the number of weeks in the students pre-study period


Subtract Line J from Line H. If negative, enter zero.
To get the total expected family contribution for the pre-study period: Multiply Line
K by 80%

X 16
$7,125.60

$4,824

X 80%
$3,859.20

As the calculated contribution from actual income ($3,859.20) is greater than the minimum
expected contribution ($109), the greater amount is used in both the Canada and Ontario
portions of the need assessment.
C.2 Calculate contribution from family study period income
The student and the spouse are expected to contribute from the familys resources towards
the costs of the students education. The family study period contribution from one-student
families is expected to be the greater of:

a minimum spousal income contribution from the spouse of a married student during
the study period; or
the income reported by the student and the spouse which they expect to receive during
the study period.

Minimum spousal income contribution


The student has a 42-week study period.
Instructions
From Table C2 (Line E), the minimum weekly contribution from the spouse is:
Multiply Line A by the number of weeks in the students study period
The minimum spousal contribution is

Calculations
$222.50

Line
A

X 42
$9,345

Because the student is not a merit-based scholarship recipient, the contribution from study
period income is the same for both the Canada and Ontario portions of the need
assessment.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Page 96

Regular Tuition Fee Programs: The students reported gross income from a 42-week study period in Item
620 is $4,200. All of this income is earnings from part-time work. The spouses actual annual income is
$30,000.
Instructions:

Calculations

Line

Study Period Contribution by Student:

Calculate Gross Weekly Income


Calculate Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Income to determine tax rate. Obtain tax rate
from Table C6 (6.8%).
Multiply reported pre-study period income by (1-tax rate)

$4,200
/ 42
$100.00

$3,914.40

Subtract the study period exemption ($50 per week X 42 weeks) from Line B. If
negative, enter zero.

-$ 2,100.00
$1,814.40

$1,814.40

$0

$30,000
$1,312
$561
$4,436
$6,309

$23,691

$455.60

X 42
$19,135.20

X 80%
$15,308.16

Multiply Line C by the 100% contribution rate


100% of reported non-exempt government benefits (in this case, zero).
Study Period Contribution by Spouse:
Spouses Gross 2006 Income (item 950)
Subtract: CPP (item 952, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (item 953, maximum 729 per year)
Reported income tax deduction (item 954)
Total Deductions
Spouses Net Income
Subtract Total deductions (Line G) from Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Line F)
Calculate spouses net weekly income:
Divide the total net annual income (Line H) by 52
Calculate spouses net income for the study period:
Multiply spouses net weekly income (line I) by the number of weeks in the
students study period (42 weeks)
Calculate the spouses study period income contribution:
Multiply the amount in Line J by the 80% contribution rate
To get the expected study period contribution for the Canada and Ontario
portions of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan,
add Lines D, E and K

$17,122.56

As the calculated contribution from actual family income ($17,122) is greater than the
minimum expected spouse contribution ($9,345), the greater amount is used in both the
Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

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C.3 Contribution from student and spouse assets


One spouse is not a postsecondary student. The student has been out of secondary school for 2 years, the
spouse for 3 years. The student has reported the following combined assets on the application: a vehicle
with a current gross market value of $6,000, $7,000 in RRSPs since leaving secondary school, and other
assets in the amount of $500.
Instructions: Contribution from RRSPs

Calculations

Line

Take the reported value of the student and spouses RRSPs (Item 660). Subtract
$2,000 for every year out of secondary school. If negative, enter zero.
Student has been out of secondary school for 2 years (Item 175)
Spouse has been out of secondary school for 3 years (Item 945)
The assessed contribution from RRSPs is
Instructions: Contribution from Vehicles
As only one of the spouses is a student, take the reported value of the vehicles
(Items 643, 653, 683, 693). Deduct $5,000 in total from the value of all vehicles
reported.
Instructions: Contribution from Other Assets
As only one of the spouses is a student, take 100% of the value of other assets
reported in Item 670.
Calculate the total contribution from assets:
Add Lines A, B and C

C.4

$7,000.00
- $4,000.00
- $6,000.00
$0.00
Calculations
$6,000.00
- $5,000.00
$1,000.00
Calculations

Line

B
Line

$500.00

$1,500.00

Calculate expected parental contribution

Married students are not assessed for contributions from their parents.

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Need Assessment Summary Table:


Married Student-One Spouse A Student
Canada

Allowable Educational Costs (Step B)

Ontario

$8,063

Tuition and Compulsory Fees - Step B.1

$8,063

$3,000

Books/Equipment/Supplies/Computer Allowance - Step B.2

$3,000

$18,705

Personal and Living Allowance - Step B.3

$18,705

N/A

Return Transportation Allowance - Step B.4

N/A

N/A

Child-Care - Step B.5

N/A

$29,768

A) Total Costs

$29,768

Canada

Expected Contributions (Step C)

Ontario

$3,859

Pre-study Income Student and Spouse Contribution - Step C.1

$3,859

$17,122

Study Period Student and Spouse Income Contribution - Step C.2

$17,122

$1,500

Student/Spouse Asset Contribution - Step C.3

$1,500

N/A

Parental Income Contribution - Step C.4

N/A

N/A

Federal Funding/CSG as a resource - Step C.5

$4,372

$22,481

B) Total Contributions

$26,853

Canada

Calculation of Assessed Need (Step D)

Ontario

$7,287

Need: (Total Costs minus Total Contributions = A - B)

$2,915

$4,372

Federal Funding: 60% of federal need to maximum of $210 per week of


study)

N/A

Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants


For calculated need above $275 per week to a maximum of:
$40 per week for students with 1-2 children
$60 per week for students with 3 or more children

N/A

N/A

N/A

$2,915

Provincial Funding: need to a maximum of:


$140 per week for single students
$335 per week for married students with no dependants
$295 per week for students with 1 or 2 dependants
$275 per week for students with 3 or more dependants
Difference Between Assessed Need and Funding

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$2,915

$0

June 2007

Page 99

MARRIED STUDENTS - BOTH SPOUSES ARE STUDENTS


Step A:

Determine the Students Status

The student is married. Both the applicant and the spouse are in postsecondary studies. The
couple has one dependent child.
Step B:
B.1

Assess the Student's Costs during Study Period

Tuition and compulsory fees

The student is enrolled in a law program, which is a professional program, so the Canada and
Ontario portions of the need assessment recognize different fee amounts.
Federal assessment:
The institution has reported:

Eligible tuition fees of $8,323 for a 34-week study period.


Eligible compulsory fees of $500.

A total of $8,823 is used in the Canada portion of the need assessment.


Provincial assessment:
There is a cap on the amount of tuition and compulsory fees charged in Graduate and
Professional university programs and High-Demand college programs for purposes of the
Ontario portion of the need assessment. The maximum amount which can be included in the
Ontario portion of the need assessment for a two-term, non-co-op program between 21 and
40 weeks in length, is $4,500.
B.2

Books, supplies, equipment and computer allowance

For a 34-week study period, the institution has reported that the student will be enrolled in a
Bachelor of Administration program with the following costs:
Cost component

Book fees--General
Expendable supplies
non-fine arts
Uniform and equipment
TOTAL

Actual costs as reported


by institution

Maximum
Per Table B1

$896
$345

$600
$400

$230
$1,471

$300

Amount used for


assessment
purposes
$600
$345
$230
$1,175

The $1,175 expense plus the $500 computer allowance for a total of $1,675 should be
entered in the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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B.3

Living allowance

The student is attending a university in Ontario. The standard living allowance for this
situation, as per Table B2, is $1,915 per month or $445.35 per week. The couple also has a
dependent child, so an additional living allowance of $123.26 per week ($530 per month) is
added, for a total weekly living allowance of $568.61.
The number of weeks in the students study period is multiplied by the weekly allowance to
get the total Living Allowance during the study period, as follows:

$568.61 per week of study X 34 weeks study period = $19,332.74

As both spouses are students, the living allowance must be divided in half:
$19,332.74/ 2 = $9,666.37

Enter $9,666 in the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
B.4

Return transportation

Not applicable
B.5

Child-care costs

The couple reports one dependent child under the age of 11 years and the applicant reports
expected child - care costs during the study period will be $3,400.
As per Table B4, the maximum assistance available for married students with one dependent
child is the lower of:

actual costs; or
a maximum of $40 per study week X number of dependent children.

As the students study period is 34 weeks, the maximum child-care allowance is $1,360.
As both spouses are students, the childcare expenses must be divided in half: $1,360/2 =
$680.

Enter $680 in the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Page 101

Step C:

Assess Contribution from Resources Available

C.1 Pre-study period income contribution


Calculate the pre-study period income from the familys actual income because the couple
has dependent children and their monthly living allowance for the pre-study period
exceeds the expected minimum monthly pre-study period income.
Calculate Pre-study Income Contribution from Actual Income
The student reports pre-study period income of $5,000 (Item 600) over a 16-week period. The spouse
reports an actual annual income of $10,000 for the year (Item 950).
Instructions
Step 1: Determine Students Pre-study Period Income:
Calculate Gross Weekly Pre-study Period Income
Calculate Pre-study Period Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Pre-study Period Income to determine tax rate.
Obtain tax rate from Table C3 (6.8%).
Multiply reported pre-study period income by (1-tax rate)

Calculations

Line

$5,000.00
/ 16
$312.50

$4,660.00

$10,000
$322.00
$187.00
$244.00
$753.00

$9,247.00

$9,247.00

$177.83

X 16
$2,845.28

$7,505.28

$568.61
X 16
$9097.76
$0

J
K
L

X 80%
$0

Step 2: Determine Spouses Income: (Spouse is also a student)

Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Item 950)


Subtract: CPP (item 952, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (item 953, maximum 729 per year)
Reported income tax deduction (item 954)
Total Deductions
Spouses Net Income
Subtract Total deductions (Line D) from Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Line C)
Add total value of all other income reported by the spouse in item 951 ($0) to get
Total Net Annual Income
Calculate spouses net weekly income:
Divide the total net annual income (Line F) by 52
Calculate spouses net income for the pre-study period:
Multiply spouses net weekly income (line G) by the number of weeks in the
students pre-study period (16 weeks)

Calculate Combined Pre-study Period Family Income: Add Line B and H


Determine Living Allowance:
From Table B2, the Standard Weekly Living Allowance for a married couple with
one dependent is $ 568.61.
Multiply Line J by the number of weeks in the students pre-study period
Subtract Line K from Line I. If negative, enter zero.
Multiply Line L by the 80% allowance
2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Page 102
Calculate Pre-study Income Contribution from Actual Income
The student reports pre-study period income of $5,000 (Item 600) over a 16-week period. The spouse
reports an actual annual income of $10,000 for the year (Item 950).
Instructions

Calculations

To get the expected family contribution for the pre-study period, divide Line
M in half

Line

$0

As the calculated contribution from actual income is zero, and there is no required
minimum expected contribution, no pre-study period contribution is required in either the
Canada or the Ontario portion of the need assessment.
C.2 Calculate contribution from family study period income
The student and the spouse are expected to contribute from the familys resources
towards the costs of the students education.
The students gross study period income for 34 weeks in Item 620 is $6,000. The difference between the
students tuition/compulsory fees and the OSAP allowance is $4,323. The spouses actual annual income
is $10,000.
Instructions

Calculations

Line

Study Period Contribution by Student: Canada portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student
Loan
Step 1: Calculate students study period contribution:
$6,000
/ 34
$176.47
A
Calculate Gross Weekly Income
Calculate Students Net Income:

Calculate Gross Monthly Study Period Income to determine tax rate.

Obtain tax rate from Table C6 (7.4%).

Multiply reported gross study period income by (1-tax rate)


$5,556.00
B
/ 2
Divide the amount in Line B in half
$2,778.00
C
Subtract the study period exemption ($50 X 34 weeks =$1,700) from Line C. If
negative, enter zero.

-$1,700.00
$1,078.00

Multiply Line D by the 100% contribution rate

$1,078.00

50% of reported non-exempt government benefits (in this case, zero).


Step 2: Calculate spouses study period contribution
Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Item 950)
Subtract: CPP (item 952, maximum $1,911 per year)
EI (item 953, maximum 729 per year)
Reported income tax deduction (item 954)
Total Deductions

$0

$10,000

$322.00
$187.00
$244.00
$753.00

$9.247.00

$9,247.00

Spouses Net Income


Subtract Total deductions (Line D) from Spouses Gross 2006 Income (Line C)
Add total value of all other income reported by the spouse in item 951 ($0) to get
Total Net Annual Income

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Page 103
The students gross study period income for 34 weeks in Item 620 is $6,000. The difference between the
students tuition/compulsory fees and the OSAP allowance is $4,323. The spouses actual annual income
is $10,000.
Instructions

Calculations

Line

Calculate spouses net weekly income:


Divide the total net annual income (Line J) by 52
Calculate spouses net income for the study period:
Multiply spouses net weekly income (line K) by the number of weeks in the
students study period (34 weeks)

$177.83

X 34
$6,046.22

$3,023.11

- $1,700.00
$1,323.11

$1,323.11

Divide the amount in Line L in half.


Subtract the study period exemption ($50 X 34 weeks of study = $1,700) from
Line M. If negative, enter zero.
Calculate the spouses study period income contribution:
Multiply the amount in Line N by the 100% contribution rate
To get the expected study period contribution for the Canada portion of the
Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan, add Lines E, F and O

$2,401.11

Study Period Contribution: Ontario portion of the Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan
Take the students net study period income from Line B, and divide in half

$2,778.00

Add the $1,700 ($50 x 34 weeks) study period exemption and the $4,323 tuition
difference ($1,700 + $4,323)

$6,023.00

Subtract Line Q from Line P. If negative, enter zero.

$0

Multiply Line P by the 100% contribution rate

$0

50% of reported non-exempt government benefits (in this case, zero)

$0

Spouses study period contribution for the Ontario portion (Line M -$1,700)
To get the expected study period contribution for the Ontario portion of the
Canada Ontario Student Loan, add Lines R and U.

$1,323.11

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$1,323.11

June 2007

Page 104

C.3

Contribution from student and spouse assets


The combined RRSPs of the couple total $40,000. The student (applicant) has been out of secondary
school for 9 years, the spouse, also a student, for 5 years. The student has reported the following assets
on the application: one vehicle with a current gross market value of $5,000, and no other assets.
Instructions: Contribution from RRSPs

Calculations

Line

Take the reported value of the student and spouses RRSPs from Item 660.

Divide RRSP value in Line A in half to get each spouses share.


Contribution from students share of RRSPs:

$40,000.00
/2
$20,000.00
$20,000.00

Subtract $2,000 multiplied by the number of years the student has been out of
secondary school from (Line B). If negative, enter zero.
Contribution from spouses share of RRSPs:

- $18,000.00
$2,000.00
$20,000.00

Subtract $2,000 multiplied by the number of years the spouse has been out of
secondary school from (Line B). If negative, enter zero.

- $10,000.00
$10,000.00

Add Lines C and D.

$12,000.00

Divide Line E in half to get the assessed RRSP contribution:

$6,000.00

Instructions: Contribution from Vehicles

Calculations

Line

Take the total current gross market value of all vehicles (Items 643, 653, 683, and
693). Deduct $5,000 from this amount.

$5,000.00
- $5,000.00
$0.00
/ 2
$0.00

Instructions: Contribution from Other Assets

Calculations

Line

As both spouses are students, take 50% of the value of other assets reported in
Item 670.

$0.00

Add the totals of Lines F, G and H to get the total contribution from assets

$6,000.00

As both of the spouses are students, divide by 2.

C.4 Calculate expected parental contribution


Married students are not assessed for contributions from their parents.

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

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Need Assessment Summary Table:


Married Students-Both Spouses Are Students
Canada

Allowable Educational Costs (Step B)

Ontario

$8,823

Tuition and Compulsory Fees - Step B.1

$4,500

$1,675

Books/Equipment/Supplies/Computer Allowance - Step B.2

$1,675

$9,666

Personal and Living Allowance - Step B.3

$9,666

N/A

Return Transportation Allowance - Step B.4

N/A

$680

Child-Care - Step B.5

$680

$20,844

A) Total Costs

$16,521

Canada

Expected Contributions (Step C)

Ontario

$0

Pre-study Income Student and Spouse Contribution - Step C.1

$0

$2,401

Study Period Student and Spouse Income Contribution - Step C.2

$1,323

$6,000

Student/Spouse Asset Contribution - Step C.3

$6,000

N/A

Parental Income Contribution - Step C.4

N/A

N/A

Federal portion/CSG as a resource - Step C.5

$8,500

$8,401

B) Total Contributions

$15,823

Canada

Calculation of Assessed Need (Step D)

Ontario

$12,443

Need: (Total Costs minus Total Contributions = A - B)

$698

$7,140

Federal Funding: 60% of need to maximum of $210 per week of study)

N/A

$1,360

Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants


For calculated need above $275 per week to a maximum of:
$40 per week for students with 1-2 children
$60 per week for students with 3 or more children.

N/A

N/A

Provincial Funding: need to a maximum of:


$140 per week for single students
$335 per week for married students with no dependants
$295 per week for students with 1 or 2 dependants
$275 per week for students with 3 or more dependants

$698

$3,943

Difference Between Assessed Need and Funding

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$0

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SOLE SUPPORT PARENT


Step A:

Determine the Students Status

The student is a sole support parent with one dependent child. In addition, the student has
self-identified as having a permanent disability.
Step B:

Assess the Student's Costs during Study Period

B.1 Tuition and compulsory fees


The student is in a regular tuition fee program, so the Canada and Ontario portions of the
need assessment recognize the same fee amounts.
The institution has reported:

Eligible tuition fees of $4,724 for a 34-week study period.


Eligible compulsory fees of $100.

A total of $4,824 is used in the both the Canada and Ontario portions of the need
assessment.
B.2 Books, supplies, equipment and computer allowance
For a 34-week study period, the institution has reported that the student will be enrolled in
a Bachelor of Fine Arts with the following program costs:
Cost component

Book fees--general
Expendable supplies
fine arts
TOTAL

Actual costs as reported


by institution

Maximum
Per Table B1

$440

$600

$530
$970

$1,200

Amount used for


assessment
purposes
$440
$530
$970

The $970 expense plus the $500 computer allowance for a total of $1,470 should be
entered in the Canada and Ontario portions of the need assessment.
B.3 Living allowance
The Standard Living Allowance for a sole support parent with one dependant, as per Table
B2, is $1,824 per month or $424.19 per week.
The number of weeks in the students study period is multiplied by the weekly allowance to
get the total Living Allowance during the study period, as follows:

$424.19 per week of study X 34 weeks study period = $14,422.46

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Therefore, $14,422 will be used as the Living Allowance in both the Canada and Ontario
portions of the need assessment.
B.4 Return transportation
The student is not eligible for a return transportation allowance because this allowance is
only available to dependent single students living away from home.
B.5 Child - care costs
The student reports one dependent child under the age of 11 years and reports in Item
405 that expected child - care costs during the study period will be $3,400.
As per Table B4, the maximum assistance available for a sole support parent with one
dependent child is the lower of:

actual costs; or
a maximum of $83 per study week x number of dependent children.

As the students study period is 34 weeks, the maximum child - care allowance is $2,822.
As the maximum child - care allowance ($2,822) is less than expected child - care costs
($3,400), enter the lesser amount in both the Canada and Ontario portions of the need
assessment.
Step C:

Assess Contribution from Resources Available

C.1 Pre-study period income contribution


The student reported $3,500 in pre-study period income and noted in Item 605 that the
main source this pre-study income is from Ontario Works. Therefore the pre-study period
income contribution is adjusted to zero for assessment purposes.

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C.2 Calculate contribution from students study period income


Sole Support Parents in regular tuition fee programs are expected to contribute an amount
from study period earnings.
Regular Programs: In Item 620 of the OSAP application, the student has reported study period earnings of
$1,000 from a bursary. The study period is 34 weeks.
Instructions

Calculations

Line

$1,000
/ 34
$29.41

$932

-$ 1,700.00
$0

Multiply Line C by the 80% contribution rate

$0

100% of reported non-exempt government benefits


To get the expected Study Period Contribution for the Canada portion of the
Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan, add Lines D and E:
Study Period Contribution: Ontario portion
Take study period income (Line B) and subtract the study period exemption ($50 X
34 weeks = $1,700. If negative, enter zero.

$0

Study Period Contribution: Canada portion


Calculate Gross Weekly Income
Calculate Study Period Net Income:
Calculate Gross Monthly Study Period Income to determine tax rate.
(Line A X 4.3)
Obtain tax rate from Table C6 (6.8%).
Multiply reported study period income by (1-tax rate)
Subtract the study period exemption ($50 X 34 weeks = $1,700) from Line B. If
negative, enter zero.

$0

$0

Multiply Line F by the 100% contribution rate

$0

100% of reported non-exempt government benefits

$0

To get the expected Study Period Contribution for the Ontario portion of the
Canada Ontario Integrated Student Loan, add Lines G and H:

$0

C.3 Contribution from student assets


The student has reported only one asset on the application: a vehicle with a current gross market value of
$6,000.
Instructions: Contribution from Vehicles

Take the reported value of the vehicles (Item 643, 653, 683, and 693). Deduct
$5,000 from the total value of all vehicles reported.
Total contribution from assets

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

Calculations

Line

$6,000.00
- $5,000.00
$1,000.00

$1,000.00

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C.4
Calculate expected parental contribution
Students who are sole support parents are not assessed for contributions from their
parents.
Need Assessment Summary Table:
Sole Support Parents (One Dependent Child)
Canada

Allowable Educational Costs (Step B)

Ontario

$4,824

Tuition and Compulsory Fees - Step B.1

$4,824

$1,470

Books/Equipment/Supplies/Computer Allowance - Step B.2

$1,470

$14,422

Personal and Living Allowance - Step B.3

$14,422

N/A

Return Transportation Allowance - Step B.4

N/A

$2,822

Child-Care - Step B.5

$2,822

$23,538

A) Total Costs

$23,538

Canada

Expected Contributions (Step C)

Ontario

NIL

Pre-study Income Student and Parental Contribution - Step C.1

NIL

$0

Study Period Student and Parental Income Contribution - Step C.2

$0

$1,000

Student/Parental Asset Contribution - Step C.3

$1,000

N/A

Parental Income Contribution - Step C.4

N/A

N/A

Federal Funding/CSG as a resource - Step C.5

$8,500

$1,000

B) Total Contributions

$9,500

Canada

Calculation of Assessed Need (Step D)

Ontario

$22,538

Need: (Total Costs minus Total Contributions = A - B)

$14,038

$2,000

Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities


Federal need to a maximum of $2,000

N/A

$7,140

Federal Funding: 60% of need after consideration for the Canada


Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities to maximum of
$210 per week of study)

N/A

$1,360

N/A

$12,038

Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependants


For calculated need above $275 per week to a maximum of:
$40 per week for students with 1-2 children
$60 per week for students with 3 or more children

Provincial Funding: need to a maximum of:


$140 per week for single students
$335 per week for married students with no dependants
$295 per week for students with 1 or 2 dependants
$275 per week for students with 3 or more dependants

$10,030

Difference Between Assessed Need and Funding

$4,008

2007 2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

N/A

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APPENDIX 2: 2007-2008 MONTHLY LIVING ALLOWANCES FOR THE CANADA ONTARIO


INTEGRATED STUDENT LOAN
To convert the monthly living allowance into a weekly amount, divide the monthly amount by 4.3.
Living Situations

NF

PEI

NS

NB

QC

ON

Man

SK

Alta

BC

Yukon

NWT

Single Student Living At Home


Shelter
Food (Agriculture Canadas Nutritious Food
Basket)
Miscellaneous (Personal & health care,
clothing, H/H cleaning, communication)

156

195

200

200

182

169

158

159

172

173

242

194

163

158

1148

138

183

178

194

196

211

190

167

207

Local Public Transportation

57

56

56

58

35

67

70

51

57

72

47

57

Total Monthly Allowance

376

408

404

396

401

414

421

406

440

435

456

458

353

358

409

374

345

482

364

335

380

535

476

649

218

195

200

200

221

216

204

206

222

219

242

243

190
57
819

206
56

202
56

194
58

259
35

234
67

245
70

248
51

267
57

220
72

251
47

255
57

814

867

825

860

999

882

840

926

1,046

1,017

1,204

751

705

817

741

689

962

726

670

758

1,070

951

1,296

390

391

401

400

392

395

370

374

403

387

485

388

381
114
1,635

413
111
1,619

404
112
1,734

389
115
1,646

411
70
1,562

423
135
1,915

466
139
1,702

471
102
1,617

508
114
1,783

465
143
2,065

501
93
2030

416
114
2,215

631

597

689

654

577

777

560

538

603

821

865

1,022

218

195

200

200

221

216

204

206

222

219

242

243

Single Student Away From Home


Shelter (2 bedroom apt. including utilities
shared by two)
Food (Agriculture Canadas Nutritious Food
Basket)
Miscellaneous (Personal & health care,
clothing, H/H cleaning, communication)
Local Public Transportation
Total Monthly Allowance
Married Student & Partner (No Dependent)
Shelter (2 bedroom apartment including
utilities)
Food (Agriculture Canadas Nutritious Food
Basket)
Miscellaneous (Personal & health care,
clothing, H/H cleaning, communication)
Local Public Transportation
Total Monthly Allowance
Sole Support Parent (Without Dependent)
Shelter (1 bedroom apartment including
utilities)
Food (Agriculture Canadas Nutritious Food
Basket)

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Page 111
Living Situations
Miscellaneous (Personal & health care,
clothing, H/H cleaning, communication)
Local Public Transportation
Total Monthly Allowance
Each Dependent Person
(Married And Sole Support Parents Only)
Shelter (including utilities)
Food (Agriculture Canadas Nutritious Food
Basket)
Miscellaneous (Personal & health care,
clothing, H/H cleaning, communication)
Local Public Transportation
Total Monthly Allowance

NF

PEI

NS

NB

QC

ON

Man

SK

Alta

BC

Yukon

NWT

190
57
1,096

206
56
1,054

202
56
1,148

194
58
1,105

259
35
1,092

234
67
1,294

245
70
1,079

248
51
1,043

267
57
1,149

220
72
1,331

251
47
1,405

255
57
1,577

81

146

170

138

125

206

154

110

135

212

144

279

156

159

162

162

182

169

158

159

172

173

198

194

83
57
377

61
56
408

61
56
448

58
58
416

97
35
439

88
67
530

111
70
493

112
51
432

121
57
485

102
72
559

75
47
464

89
57
619

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APPENDIX 3: UNIVERSITY TUITION GUIDELINES


Guidelines for Implementation of the Tuition Fee Policy
For Publicly-Assisted Universities, 2006-07 to 2009-10
These guidelines are intended to give direction to publicly-assisted university level
institutions on how to implement the tuition fee policy, as announced by the Honourable
Christopher Bentley, Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities on Wednesday, March
8, 2006. Publicly-assisted institutions are those defined in the Operating Funds
Distribution Manual, including the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and the University
of Ontario Institute of Technology.
Introduction
The government policy seeks an additional contribution from students to meet the quality
goals of the Reaching Higher Plan. The student contribution will come from a regulated
tuition framework. Increases will be capped, predictable and linked to improvements in
quality and access. Institutions will have more flexibility to set fees, but only within this
capped, regulated and predictable framework.
Tuition increases must be tied to quality improvements and the student access guarantee.
Quality improvements and access for students will be ensured through multi-year
accountability agreements that every institution is required to sign. The agreement sets
out the institutions commitment to quality, access and will include the student access
guarantee.
All policies and directives in the current university Ontario Operating Funds Distribution
Manual, in relation to tuition fees, will be in effect with the changes noted below. The
Operating Manual will be revised to reflect the policy.
Overview of Tuition Fee Policy
This is a regulated framework for all publicly funded programs. It allows for tuition fee
differentiation based on program and program year of study. These guidelines are based
on the principle that tuition fees may increase within specified limits over current actual
2005-06 tuition fee levels with the average tuition increase not to exceed 5%, excluding
changes in enrolment.
Program Type
Arts & Science and Other
Programs
Professional and Graduate
Programs
TOTAL TUITION INCREASE

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FEE INCREASE


Program Year
First Year
Continuing Years
4.5%
4%
8%

4%
5%

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Arts & Science and Other Programs
Subject to the total tuition increase cap of 5%, existing arts and science and other selected
undergraduate programs, may increase by no more than 4.5% for students in the first year
of their program and 4% for students in continuing years of their program. A detailed list of
programs included in this category is specified in Appendix A.
Professional and Graduate Programs
Subject to the total tuition increase cap of 5%, existing graduate and professional
programs, may increase by no more than 8% for students in the first year of their program
and 4% for students in continuing years of their program. A detailed list of programs
included in this category is specified in Appendix A.
Calculating the 5% Total Tuition Increase Cap
The 5% total tuition increase cap is to be calculated at each institution by multiplying every
programs year-over-year tuition fee increase in percent by every programs current year
FTE enrolment. These results are to be added together and then divided by the
institutions total FTE enrolment. Using this method, fluctuations in enrolment are taken into
account.
FA 1= Fees in program A in 2005-06
FA 2= Fees in program A in 2006-07
FB 1= Fees in program B in 2005-06
FB 2= Fees in program B in 2006-07
FA etc= as above for all other programs in 2005-06
FA etc = as above for all other programs in 2006-07
EA = Enrolment in program A in 2006-07
EB = Enrolment in program B in 2006-07
E etc = Enrolment in all other programs
=

EA * (FA 2/ FA1 -1) + EB * (FB 2/ FB1 -1) + (change in fees for all other programs)
(EA + EB + enrolment in all other programs)

For the current year, tuition revenue, as calculated on an FTE basis, net of enrolment
change, should not exceed the 5% cap.
For the purposes of establishing fees for the 2006-07 academic year, institutions will be
basing fee increases on projected enrolment for the academic year. Final reporting of fee
levels will be based on final audited enrolment.
Differentiating First and Continuing Year of Study
Institutions should use their existing definitions and practices in defining first and continuing
years of study for the purposes of implementing these guidelines. The distinction between
first and continuing years in a program should be operationalized in a way that is
consistent with established enrolment reporting practices, and institutional definitions
between the first and upper years of programs.
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In general, the first year of study should be considered to be the initial year of study in a
program or the period required for a student to complete the first full year of the academic
program (as adapted to reflect terms, semesters and course levels appropriately). A
continuing year of study should be defined as any one of the subsequent years of study in
a program after the first year of a program.
Students who choose to change programs or enter a program through transfer should be
charged the tuition fee in effect in for the relevant program year (be it first year or
continuing) in the program to which they transfer.
Students who repeat a year should be charged the same tuition rates as students starting
the same program.
In cases where an institution has an existing program with higher (or lower) fees in the
upper years of a program, the differential between tuition fees in each year of study may be
maintained, in addition to any increases mandated under the new tuition fee framework.
Tuition Fee Policy Application
The tuition policy does not apply to programs or for student categories that are ineligible for
MTCU operating grant funding (e.g., full cost recovery/self-funded programs, fees for
international students).
As is the current policy, a university may not convert an existing publicly funded program to
a full-cost recovery program without prior approval by the Ministry.
The tuition fee policy comes into effect in the 2006-07 academic year. It is linked to the
Reaching Higher investments and will be in place, until the end of Reaching Higher, in
2009-10.
Tuition Fee Policy
Tuition Levels for New Programs
Institutions may introduce new programs, subject to normal Ministry approvals.
Institution may set the tuition fee for new programs up to a level commensurate with the
tuition charged for comparable university programs in Ontario. Fees should not exceed the
maximum fee rates charged by other comparable Ontario university programs.
Comparability will consider factors such as course and program design, credential outcome
and assigned BIU weight.
Institutions must indicate in their new program approvals submission to the Ministry the
proposed fee rate for any new program. Institutions may provide information on the
comparator programs used to set the tuition fee level. Recognizing that final decisions in
the program approvals cycle could occur after the date required for governing body
approval and student notification, it is strongly recommended that information be provided
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Page 115
to the Ministry in advance of the program approval deadline. The Ministry will review the
appropriateness of the comparator programs chosen to set the tuition fee rate and has the
final authority on all decisions of comparability.
Once program fees for the first year of a program being offered have been established, the
program will be subject to the maximum allowable percentage increase for first-year
programs and the 4% maximum allowable percentage increase for each continuing year. In
their first year of operation, new programs will not be included in the 5% total tuition
increase cap.
Annual Tuition Fee Reports and Compliance
Universities will be required to report their annual tuition fees to the Ministry. University
Executive Heads will be required to sign-off on the report confirming that the tuition policy
has been correctly implemented. Institutions may expect further communication with
regards to the reporting requirements and template.
Any institution that raises fees over the allowable amount may be required to reimburse
students for the excess fees charged. In the event that the students cannot be reimbursed,
the amount of excess tuition fee revenue may be deducted from the institutions operating
grants as a penalty in the form of a grant reduction.
Tuition Fee Set-Aside Policy
The tuition fee set-aside policy will continue to be in effect in 2006-07 with modifications to
reflect enhancements to OSAP and increased harmonization between provincial and
institutional student aid. The annual tuition fee set-aside amount should be set at the
projected 2005-06 level, as reported by each institution in 2004-05 tuition set-aside reports.
Tuition fee set-aside amounts will be finalized after the final 2005-06 reports have been
received. The amount of tuition fee set-aside is to be increased/decreased by the annual
percentage increase/decrease in final audited full time equivalent (FTE) enrolment.
Universities continue to be responsible for expending this amount annually to provide
financial support to students through bursaries, scholarships, work-study programs, and
work between academic terms. The policy has been revised to include disbursement for
emergency assistance as eligible expenditures. Universities will continue to report on the
disbursement of tuition set-aside funds.
Ancillary Fee Policies
Ancillary fees are not covered by the tuition policy. The current ancillary fee policy outlined
in the Ontario Operating Funds Distribution Manual remains in place. The protocol process
for introducing new or increasing current, ancillary fees will continue. For those ancillary
fees exempt from the protocol process, it is the Ministrys expectation that institutions will
limit fee increases to reflect the reasonable cost of providing service to students.
Tuition Freeze Compensation

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All tuition fee increase are to be calculated over 2005-06 actual tuition fee levels charged
to students. Tuition fee compensation should not be included in the calculation of tuition
fee increases to students as institutions are considered to have been fully compensated for
the tuition freeze.
Further Information
If you have any policy questions about tuition, ancillary fees, set-aside calculations and
expenditure guidelines, and other tuition policy matters, please call Andrew Boggs,
Universities Branch at (416) 324-6980.

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Appendix 3a: Program Categories
Ontario University Formula (Standard) Fee Schedule 2006-07
Arts & Science and Other Programs
Group 1:
Technology (Lakehead)(a)
Groups 2 & 3:(b)
Group 4:
Dental Hygiene (Technology)
Nursing Technology
Group 5:
Agriculture
Arts & Science (Toronto)
Arts & Science (1st Year, Trent)
Arts, General & 1st Year Honours
Arts, Upper Years Honours
Conversion Engineering (Lakehead)
Diploma Public Health Nursing
Education
Environmental Studies
Fine & Applied Arts
Forestry
Household & Food Science
Journalism
Library Science
Music
Nursing*
Ontario College of Art and Design Programs (formerly Group 3)
Physical & Health Education
Preliminary Year
Pre-medicine
Secretarial Science
Science General & 1st year Honours
Science, Upper years Honours
Social Work, 1st year
Social Work, Upper years
Theology

Standard Fee: $1,575


Discontinued
Standard Fee: $2,034

Standard Fee: $2,386

Professional and Graduate Programs**


Group 5:
Commerce & Business Administration
Computer Science
Law
Pharmacy
Physical & Occupational Therapy
Veterinary Medicine

Standard Fee: $2,386

Group 6:(c)
Architecture
Engineering
Landscape Architecture
Industrial Design
Optometry

Standard Fee: $2,591

Group 7: (c) (d)


Dentistry (e)
Medicine
Graduate (One Term Fee) All Programs

Standard Fee: $3,035

Standard Fee: $1,198

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* Collaborative Baccalaureate of Nursing: Subject to the tuition increase of cap of 5 percent, tuition
fees for the Collaborative Baccalaureate of Nursing programs may increase 4.5 percent for the first
year and 4 percent for the continuing years of study as is consistent with the fee increases that
colleges may charge.
** Former Additional Cost Recovery programs are now regulated under the new tuition policy.
Programs which were formerly ACR and additional programs (such as Physical & Occupational
Therapy, Industrial Design and Landscape Architecture) have been placed in a new category of
graduate and professional programs. These programs are permitted a higher tuition fee increase
than programs in the arts & science program category. Due to the variation in maximum
discretionary fee by program that emerged during program deregulation between 1997 and 2003,
the maximum discretion fee above standard fee will now be monitored as a part of each institutions
tuition fee reports.

(a) Not all standard fees for institution-specific programs are listed. Please refer to the
"Essential Notes and Reporting Instructions", produced by the ministry, for a
detailed breakdown of institution-specific standard fees.
b) Group 2 ( Ryerson-specific fee category) and Group 3 (OCAD-specific fee
category) have been discontinued.
(c) Group 6 fees apply to all programs in the group, with the exception of the
Optometry program at Waterloo, for which an additional $1,000 may be charged on
top of the standard fee including the discretionary component.
(d) Standard fees are applied to Group 7 programs, except for the residency years of
Oral Surgery and Oral Pathology and Medical Interns and Residents, to which a
zero standard fee applies.
(e) For their Doctor of Dental Surgery program, Toronto and Western were permitted to
increase the standard fee including the discretionary component, by an additional amount
of up to $4,000, beginning with students entering in September, 1996.

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APPENDIX 4: COLLEGE TUITION GUIDELINES


Guidelines for Implementation of the Tuition Fee Policy for Colleges of
Applied Arts and Technology, 2006-07 to 2009-10
These guidelines are intended to give direction to institutions on how to implement the new
tuition fee policy as announced by the Honourable Christopher Bentley, Minister of
Training, Colleges and Universities on Wednesday, March 8, 2006.
Introduction
The government policy seeks an additional contribution from students to meet the quality
goals of the Reaching Higher Plan. The student contribution will come from a regulated
tuition framework. Increases will be capped, predictable and linked to improvements in
quality and access. Institutions will have more flexibility to set fees, but only within this
capped, regulated and predictable framework.
Tuition increases must be tied to quality improvements and the student access guarantee.
Quality improvements and access for students will be ensured through multi-year
accountability agreements that every institution is required to sign. The agreement sets
out the institutions commitment to quality, access and will include the student access
guarantee.
All policies and directives in the current Ministers Binding Policy Directive and operating
procedure on Tuition and Ancillary Fees will be in effect with the changes noted below.
These documents will be revised to reflect the changes to the policy to implement a
regulated fee policy with differentiated fee increases.
Overview of Tuition Fee Policy
This is a regulated framework for all publicly funded programs. It allows for tuition fee
differentiation based on program and program year. The stated guidelines are based on
the principle that annual tuition fees may increase within specified limits as given in the
appendices over current actual 2005-06 tuition fee levels with the average tuition increase
not to exceed 5 percent, adjusted for changes in enrolment.
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FEE INCREASE
Program Year
Program Type
First Year Levels
Continuing Year Levels
Up to the greater of $100 or
Up to 4%
4.5%
Regular Fee programs
Up
to
8%
Up to 4%
High Demand programs
TOTAL TUITION INCREASE
5%

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Regular Fee Activity: As noted in Appendix A, maximum average annual fees for
regular programs in effect for 2005-06 are replaced by the maximum allowable
percentage increase for first year and one-year programs and continuing years of study
beginning in 2006-07 and subject to the tuition increase cap of 5 percent. This includes
the following types of activity:

full-time regular postsecondary basic programs

part-time activity

tuition-short programs

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition

High Demand Programs: The tuition fee policy continues to recognize that some high
demand programs may support a higher tuition fee based on specific criteria and
approved by a colleges board of governors. Subject to the tuition increase cap of 5
percent, for high demand programs (formerly additional cost recovery), tuition fees
may increase by the maximum percentage increases as specified in Appendix B.

Collaborative Baccalaureate of Nursing: Subject to the tuition increase cap of 5


percent, tuition fees for the Collaborative Baccalaureate of Nursing programs may
increase 4.5 percent for the first year and 4 percent for the continuing years of study as
is consistent with the fee increases that universities may charge.

Total Tuition Increase Cap: The 5 percent total tuition increase cap is to be calculated
at each institution by multiplying every programs year-over-year tuition fee increase in
percent by every programs current year full-time equivalent enrolment (FTE). These
results are to be added together and then divided by the institutions total FTE
enrolment. (Appendix C provides details on the conversion to FTE for enrolment in parttime, tuition short and PLAR programs.) Using this method, changes in enrolment are
taken into account.
FA 1= Fees in program A in 2005-06
FA 2= Fees in program A in 2006-07
FB 1= Fees in program B in 2005-06
FB 2= Fees in program B in 2006-07
FA etc = as above for all fees in all other programs in 2005-06
FA etc = as above for all fees in all other programs in 2006-07
EA = Enrolment in program A in 2006-07
EB = Enrolment in program B in 2006-07
Eetc = Enrolment in all other programs
=

EA * (FA 2/ FA 1 - 1) + EB * (FB 2/ FB 1 1) + (changes in fees for all other programs )


(EA + EB + enrolment in all other programs)

For the purposes of establishing fees for the 2006-07 academic year, institutions will be
basing fee increases on projected enrolment for the academic year. Final reporting of
fee levels will be based on enrolments as submitted in the annual enrolment audit
reports. Note that the audit report is based on fiscal year.

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Program Level: As given above, maximum allowable tuition fee increases are
differentiated by program level or year. The definition of program level is consistent
with the definition of reporting enrolments as outlined in the annual Enrolment and
Graduate Reporting Operating Procedure where colleges are directed to define the
program level in years OR semesters.
o When program levels are defined as years (i.e. year 1, 2, 3 or 4), the enrolment
for a given year would be the enrolment in at least two semesters for each level.
Where the program level has been defined by year, all programs with an
MTCU code beginning with 4 or 7 indicating a program of one years
duration, one fee level will be determined annually with the beginning of
each academic year.
All other programs (i.e. those MTCU codes beginning with a 5, 6 or 8)
with a duration of greater than one academic year will be subject to tuition
fees differentiated by program year with the appropriate increases applied
annually with the beginning of each academic year. Students are subject
to the fee that corresponds to the program year as consistent with the
year reported for enrolment auditing purposes.
See Appendix D.
o When program levels are defined as semesters (i.e., semester 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
8), the enrolment for a given level would be the enrolment in one semester for
each level.
Where the program level has been defined by semester, all programs with
an MTCU code beginning with 4 or 7 indicating a program of one years
duration, one fee level will be determined annually with the beginning of
each academic year. Students are subject to a single fee for program
levels 1, 2 & 3 where the levels are offered consecutively in a single
academic year.
For all other programs (i.e. those beginning with a 5, 6 or 8 in the
MTCU code) with a duration of greater than one academic year, all
students in levels 1 & 2 are subject to the entry level program tuition fee.
All other students in upper levels are subject to fees corresponding to
upper years with no fee increases imposed between two consecutive
program levels offered in the same academic year.
See Appendix E.

In cases where an institution has an existing program with higher (or lower) fees in the
upper years of a program, the differential between tuition fees in year of study may be
maintained in addition to any increases mandated under the new tuition fee framework.

The tuition fee policy does not apply to programs or student categories that are
ineligible for Ministry operating grant funding (e.g., full cost recovery/self-funded
programs, fees for international students).

Enrolment in basic postsecondary programs of instruction identified as high demand


may not exceed 15 percent of a colleges total basic postsecondary enrolment. The 15

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percent does not include Ontario Graduate Certificate and applied degree programs
and Baccalaureate of Nursing. Please see Appendix C for the calculation of enrolment
in full-time basic programs.

Regular-fee programs may be converted to high demand programs where the program
has been found to meet the specific criteria of high demand as given below. As stated
above, enrolment in basic postsecondary high demand programs may not exceed 15
percent of a colleges total basic post-secondary enrolment. Any percentage increase
in fees as a result of converting a regular program to a high demand program is subject
to the maximum allowable increase for high demand programs and to the overall tuition
increase cap of 5 percent.

Students who choose to change programs should be charged the tuition fee in effect for
the relevant program year (be it first year or continuing) in the program to which they
transfer. Students who repeat a year should be charged the same tuition rates as
students starting the same program year.

The tuition fee policy comes into effect in the 2006-07 academic year. It is linked to the
Reaching Higher investments and will be in place until the end of Reaching Higher, in
2009-10.

Tuition Fee Policy


As noted, all other current tuition fee policies, as stated in the Minister's Binding Policy
Directive and operating procedure on Tuition and Ancillary Fees, continue to apply.
Institutions may introduce new regular or high demand programs and part-time
programs/activity. Only those new programs approved for funding through the general
purpose operating grants are subject to the policies set out below.
New Regular Programs
For college regular programs and part-time programs/activity, tuition fees are set such that
the fee falls between the following minimum and maximum fees established for 2006-07.

Full-time postsecondary program annual tuition fees are set between $1,275 and
$2,418. The tuition fee factor is to be applied to the annual fee to calculate the tuition
fee the student pays.
Full-time tuition short weekly fees are set between $35.65 and $67.63.
Part-time fee per student contact hour is set between $3.05 and $5.76
Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition fee is set between $5.00 and $132.72 per
assessment/challenge evaluation.

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New High Demand Programs
College boards of governors may approve new high demand programs provided they meet
the following criteria:
1. high demand for instructional spaces;
2. high employer demand for graduates; and
3. high income for employed graduates
Similar to the policy in place during the tuition fee freeze from 2004-05 to 2005-06,
institutions may set the tuition fee for new high demand programs at a level commensurate
with the tuition charged for comparable college programs in Ontario. Fees should not
exceed the maximum fee rates charged by other comparable Ontario college programs.
Comparable programs will be identified by the assigned ministry program code (MTCU
code), used to identify programs that are broadly similar in their vocational objectives and
titles.
Programs with an MTCU code beginning with a 7 or 8 are considered high demand.
Colleges requesting funding approval from the Ministry for any new high demand program
are required to submit with the Request for Approval for Funding Form a covering letter
detailing the proposed fee and the comparator programs used to set the tuition fee level.
The Ministry will review the appropriateness of the comparator programs chosen to set the
tuition fee rate. Where a proposed new program is unique and there are no comparable
programs, the Ministry will consider maximum fees of high demand programs within the
same family. Finally, where no comparison exists within the MTCU code family, the
maximum fees for the occupational cluster will be used. The Ministry has the final authority
on all decisions of comparability.
Further information will be provided by summer, 2006.
Once program fees for the first year of a program being offered have been established, the
program will be subject to the maximum allowable percentage increase for first-year and
one-year program and the 4 percent maximum allowable percentage increase for each
continuing year. In their first year of operation, new programs will not be included in the
calculation of the maximum average tuition increase (not to exceed 5 percent).
Enrolment in new high demand programs will be included in the calculation to ensure that
not more than 15 per cent of a colleges basic postsecondary enrolment is in high demand
programs. As is currently outlined in the Minister's Binding Policy Directive on Tuition and
Ancillary Fees, corrective action will be taken for institutions found to have enrolment in
excess of the maximum 15 percent once audited enrolment information for a given year is
available.

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Annual Tuition Fee Reports and Compliance
Institutions will be required to continue to report their annual tuition fees to the Ministry.
College presidents will be required to sign-off on the report confirming that the tuition fees
and related information is correct. The reporting will replace the annual tuition fee survey.
Further communication regarding the reporting requirements and template will be sent to
colleges in summer, 2006.
As given in the Ministers Binding Policy Directive on Tuition and Ancillary Fees, where a
college charges students fees that do not conform with these guidelines, the ministry is to
initiate corrective action, which may include withholding an amount from the general
purpose operating grant equivalent to the amount to which the college would otherwise be
entitled for the associated enrolment.
Tuition Fee Set-Aside
The tuition fee set-aside policy will continue to be in effect in 2006-07 with the following
modifications. The annual tuition set-aside is to be set at the projected total 2005-06
amount as reported by each college in the 2004-05 Tuition Set-aside reports, net of any
carry-forward. Colleges have projected this amount at $43.2 million. Tuition fee set-aside
amounts will be finalized after June 30.
The amount of tuition fee set-aside is to be increased/decreased by the annual percentage
increase/decrease in full time equivalent enrolment (FTE) as determined through the
annual enrolment audit.
Colleges are to disburse assistance to students with assessed financial need through
bursaries, scholarships, work-study programs, or employment between academic
semesters. The policy has been revised to include disbursement for emergency
assistance as eligible expenditures. Expenditure guidelines will be distributed to Colleges
in the summer, 2006.
Colleges will continue to report on the disbursement of tuition set-aside funds. The
changes to the Tuition Set-Aside policy and reporting requirements will be reflected in
revisions to the Ministers Binding Policy Directive and Operating Procedure on Tuition and
Ancillary Fees and the 2006-07 Tuition Fee Set-Aside Expenditure Guidelines for Colleges
to be shared with colleges by summer, 2006.
Ancillary Fee Policies
The current ancillary fee policy outlined in the Minister's Binding Policy Directive and
operating procedure on Tuition and Ancillary Fees remains in effect with no changes. The
protocol process for introducing new or increasing current ancillary fees will continue. For
those ancillary fees exempt from the protocol process, it is the Ministrys expectation that
institutions will limit fee increases to reflect the reasonable cost of providing service to
students.

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Tuition Freeze Compensation
All tuition fee increases are to be calculated over 2005-06 actual tuition fee levels charged
to students. Tuition fee compensation should not be included in the calculation of tuition
fee increases to students as institutions are considered to have been fully compensated for
the tuition freeze.
Further Information
If you have any policy questions about tuition, incidental or ancillary fees, set-aside
calculations and expenditure guidelines, additional cost recovery fees, and other tuition
policy matters, please call Susan Peschken, Senior Policy Analyst, Colleges Branch at
416-325-5426.

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Appendix A: Regular Programs: Maximum and Minimum Annual Base Tuition Fees
and Maximum Annual Percentage Increase, 2006-07

Program Type
Full-time Postsecondary Annual
Tuition Fees 1

Full-time Tuition Short Tuition


Weekly Fees 2 & 4
Part-time Fee per Student Contact
Hour 4
PLAR Fee per Challenge Process
or Portfolio Assessment

Maximum Allowable %
Fee Increase
2006-07,
2006-07, Continuing
First Year3
Years 3
Up to the
greater of
Up to 4%
$100 or
4.5%

2006-07
Minimum

2006-07
Maximum

$1,275.00

$2,418.13

Up to 4.5%

n/a

$35.65

$67.63

Up to 4.5%

n/a

$3.05

$5.76

Up to 4.5%

n/a

$5.00

$132.72

These are annual fees for most programs delivered in a standard two-semester program.

A tuition short program of instruction is generally less than 52 weeks in duration. The annual
percentage increase in fees as it applies to first-year programs of a multi-year duration is applicable to Tuition Short
Tuition Fees.
For programs of more than one years duration, first year tuition fees are applied to all courses that make up the first
year requirements; Continuing year fees are applied to advanced courses of subsequent years of study.

Part-time fees and Tuition Short Weekly Fees for high-demand programs may increase by 8% annually.

Example of Year-over-Year Tuition Fee Increases


Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-2010

First Year or OneYear Programs


$1,820
$1,920
$2,020
$2,120
$2,220

2nd Year
$1,820
$1,893
$1,997
$2,100
$2,205

3rd Year
$1,820
$1,893
$1,969
$2,077
$2,184

4th Year
$1,820
$1,893
$1,969
$2,047
$2,160

Examples:
Existing Programs
1. A college offers a two-year (4 semesters) diploma program for Energy Systems
Engineering Technicians. In 2005-06 the annual base tuition fee for the program was
$1,820. The Tuition Fee factor is 2.0

The maximum increase in 2006-07 may be the greater of $100 or 4.5 percent above
the 2005-06 level. The college decides to raise the fee by $100 to $1,920.

A student entering the first year of the program as a full-time student will pay in
2006-07:
Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$1,920

2.0

.5

$1,920

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2. Using the same example as given above, a college offers the Energy Systems
Engineering Technician in a compressed 50-week format. As in the example above,
the program had a annual base tuition fee of $1820. The Tuition Fee Factor is 2.0

The maximum increase in 2006-07 may be the greater of $100 or 4.5 percent above
the 2005-06 level. The college decides to raise the fee by $100 to $1,920.

A student entering the compressed 50-week program would pay in 2006-07:


Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$1,920

2.0

$3,840

3. A college offers a one-year (2 semesters) certificate program in Forest Operations. In


2005-06 the annual base tuition fee for the program was $1820. The Tuition Fee
Factor is 1.25.

The maximum increase in 2006-07 may be the greater of $100 or 4.5 percent above
the 2005-06 level. The college decides to raise the fee by $100 to $1,920.

A student entering the first year of the program as a full-time student will pay in
2006-07:
Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$1,920

1.25

$2,400

New Programs
4. A college decides to offer a two-year (4 semesters) diploma program in Apparel
Manufacturing Management and have received approval for funding from the Ministry.
The college decides to set the annual base tuition fee for the new program at $2,000
beginning in 2006-07. This is within the minimum and maximum allowable fee for
regular-fee programs. The tuition fee factor is 2.5.

A student entering the program in 2006-07 will pay an annual fee of:
Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$2,000

2.5

.5

$2,500

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Appendix B: High Demand Programs: Maximum Annual Percentage Increase, 200607


Maximum Allowable Annual %
increase, 2006-07
First Year1 & OneContinuing Years
Year Programs
Up to 8%
Up to 4%

Collaborative Baccalaureate of Nursing Programs: Maximum Annual Percentage


Increase, 2006-07
Maximum Allowable Annual %
increase, 2006-07
First Year1
Continuing Years
Up to 4.5%
Up to 4%
1

Year of study is defined by the course level for which the tuition fee applies.

Example of Year-over-Year Tuition Fee Increases


Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-2010

First Year or OneYear Programs


$3,383
$3,654
$3,946
$4,262
$4,603

2nd Year
$3,383
$3,518
$3,800
$4,104
$4,432

3rd Year
$3,383
$3,518
$3,659
$3,952
$4,268

4th Year
$3,383
$3,518
$3,659
$3,805
$4,110

Examples:
Existing Programs
1. A college offers a three-year (six semesters) diploma in Game Development. In 200506 the annual base tuition fee for the program was $6000. The Tuition Fee factor is 3.0

The maximum increase in 2006-07 may be 8% above the 2005-06 levels or $480.

A student entering the first year of the program as a full-time student will pay in
2006-07:
Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$6,480

3.0

1/3

$6,480

2. A college offers a one-year, post-basic program in Microcomputer Systems. In 2005-06


the annual base tuition fee for the program was $2,500. The Tuition Fee factor is 1.5

The maximum increase in 2006-07 may be 8% above the 2005-06 levels for a total
annual base tuition fee of $2,700.

A student entering the first year of the program as a full-time student will pay in
2006-07:
Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$2,700

1.5

$4,050

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New Programs
3. A college has determined that there is a high demand for instructional spaces for a
post-basic Geographic Information Systems (GIS) program, that graduates have high
employment rates and the potential for high income. The college therefore decides to
begin a new GIS program as a high-demand, post-basic program delivered in 2
semesters beginning in 2006-07 subject to the Ministrys approval for funding. The
tuition fee factor is 1.5.

The college decides to set the annual base tuition fee at $7,000 which is similar to
the fee set by other colleges offering comparable programs and verified by the
Ministry.

A student entering the program in 2006-07 will pay an annual fee of:
Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$7,000

1.5

$10,500

Conversion of Regular-fee programs to High Demand Programs


4. A college has determined that its two-year diploma program for Audio Technician,
offered as a regular-fee program, meets the criteria for high demand programs. The
college therefore decides to convert its existing regular program to a high demand
program. The regular base tuition fee charged in 2005-06 was $1820. The Tuition Fee
Factor is 2.0. The fees as they impact each cohort are given in the table below:
Regular
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08

1st Year
$1,820
n/a
n/a

High Demand
1st Year
2nd Year
n/a
n/a
$1,966
n/a
$2,123
$2,045

2nd Year
$1,820
$1,893
n/a

A student entering the newly established high-demand program in 2006-07 will pay:
Annual
Base
Tuition Fee

Tuition Fee
Factor

Portion of
program

Annual Fee Paid by


Student

$1,966

2.0

.5

$1,966

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Appendix C: Calculation of FTE
Calculation of FTE for maximum 5% enrolment-weighted average tuition fee
Tuition fee increases are not to exceed a maximum average of 5 percent for any program.
For this purpose, the enrolment-weighted average will be calculated using fulltime
equivalent enrolments (FTE) for each program type (full-time, part-time, Tuition Short,
PLAR, Baccalaureate of Nursing) to be calculated as follows:

Full-time enrolment headcount for all semesters combined divided by 2 semesters;

Part-time student contact hours (SCH) divided by 840 SCH;

Tuition short trainee days divided by 140 trainee days;

Baccalaureate of Nursing FFTE for all semesters combined divided by 2 semesters


The following example illustrates the calculation of FTE and a sample of the enrolment
weighted average tuition fee increase.
Example of calculating enrolment weighted average tuition fee increases
Program
Type
Full-time
st
Basic 1
year, oneyear;
Regular Fee
Full-time
Basic
continuing
years;
Regular Fee
Full-time
st
Basic 1
year, oneyear; High
Demand
Full-time
Basic
continuing
years; High
Demand
Part-time

Tuition
Short

Fall
2006
3000
(head
count)

Enrolment
Winter
Summer
2007
2007
2500
(head
count)

2000

500
(head
count)

1500

500

2005-06 Base
Tuition Fee

2006-07 Base
Tuition Fee

$1,820

$1,920

FTE
(3000 + 2500 + 500)
2

% of Total
FTE
Enrolment

% Fee
Increase

Enrolment
Weighted
Increase

52.77%

5.5%

2.9%

35.18%

4%

1.4%

5.28%

8%*

0.4%

2.64%

4%

0.1%

3.25%

4.5%

0.1%

0.88%

4.5%

0.0%

Enrolment Weighted
Average Percentage
Tuition Fee Increase

5.0%

= 3000 FTE

$1,820

$1,893

(2000 + 1500 + 500)


2
= 2000 FTE

300

250

50

$3,000

$3,240

(300 + 250 + 50)


2
=300 FTE

150

100

50

$3,000

$3,120

(150 + 100 + 50)


2
= 150 FTE

155,000 Student Contact


Hours (SCH)

7,000 Trainee Days

$4.34 per
Student
Contact
Hour

$4.53 per
Student
Contact
Hour

$50.82/wee
k

$53.10/wee
k

155,000
840
= 185
7,000
140
=50

Total FTE

5,685

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Calculation of FTE to identify the percentage of enrolment in high demand programs
The policy requires colleges to limit enrolment in full-time basic high demand programs to
15% of total full-time enrolment in basic programs. To recognize variation in the timing of
program delivery and duration, the calculation is based on headcount reported for each
semester or year pro-rated for the program duration reported for that program. The
calculation is demonstrated below and based on the reporting guidelines outlined for
Enrolment and Graduate Reporting. The calculation is illustrated below.
Example 1
A college has a three-year program delivered in 15-week semesters in fall and winter. The
full program duration is 90 weeks and the semesters are offered in a schedule that
coincides with one semester per enrolment count date. The calculation of enrolment
based on pro-rated program duration is as follows:

Summer Semester
(Academic Year 1)
30 wks
60
90 wks X students

) + (

Fall Semester
(Academic Year 2)
30 wks
50
90 wks X students

) + (

Winter Semester
(Academic Year 2)
30 wks
50
90 wks X students

Total

) =

53.3
FTE

Example 2
A college offers a one-semester program of 15 weeks. The program is offered twice in an
academic year but is delivered such that the full program is offered once in the fall
semester. The second offering takes place over the winter and summer term with seven
weeks counted towards the winter semester and 8 weeks counted towards the summer
semester. Note that total enrolment for two terms considers two annual enrolment audit
cycles.

60 students were enrolled in the Winter in-take semester of Academic Year 1 (and
reported in the summer semester of the audit cycle)

50 students were enrolled in the Fall semester of Academic Year 2

50 students were enrolled in the Winter in-take semester of Academic Year 2


The calculation of enrolment based on pro-rated program duration is as follows:
Summer (Academic Year 1)
8 wks
60
( 15 wks X students

) + (

Fall (Academic Year 2)


15 wks
50
15 wks X students

) + (

Winter (Academic Year 2)


7 wks
50
15 wks X students

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Total

) =

105.3

Page 132
Appendix D: Determination of Annual Base Tuition Fee where Program Level is
Given by Year
A. For Programs with MTCU Codes beginning with 4 or 7 (one years duration)
Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Regular Fee
Program
$1,820
$1,920
$2,020
$2,120
$2,220

Example of High
Demand Fee Program
$3000
$3,240
$3,499
$3,779
$4,081

B. For Programs with MTCU Codes beginning with 5


Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Regular Fee Program


Year 1
Year 2
$1,820
$1,820
$1,920
$1,893
$2,020
$1,997
$2,120
$2,101
$2,220
$2,205

Example of High Demand Fee


Program
Year 1
Year 2
$3,000
$3,000
$3,240
$3,120
$3,499
$3,370
$3,779
$3,639
$4,081
$3,930

C. For Programs with MTCU Codes beginning with 6


Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Regular Fee Program


Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
$1,820
$1,820
$1,820
$1,920
$1,893
$1,893
$2,020
$1,997
$1,969
$2,120
$2,101
$2,077
$2,220
$2,205
$2,185

Example of High Demand Fee


Program
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
$3000
$3,000
$3,000
$3,240
$3,120
$3,120
$3,499
$3,332
$3,245
$3,779
$3,639
$3,505
$4,081
$3,930
$3,785

D. For Programs with MTCU Codes beginning with 8


Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Example of High Demand Fee Program


Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
$3,000 $3,000
$3,000
$3,000
$3,240 $3,120
$3,120
$3,120
$3,499 $3,332
$3,245
$3,245
$3,779 $3,639
$3,505
$3,375
$4,081 $3,930
$3,785
$3,645

2007-2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Page 133
Examples of Fee Increases as they would be applied with different in-take semesters
through the year are given below.
Example 1: A 2-semester program with MTCU code beginning with 4
Cohort
Cohort
1
Cohort
2
Cohort
3
Cohort
4

2005-06
W

$910

$910

$910

$946
(+4%)
$960
(+$50)

2006-07
W

$960
(+$50)

$998
(+4%)

2007-08
W

$960

Example 2: A 3-semester program with MTCU code beginning with 4


Cohort
Cohort
1
Cohort
2
Cohort
3
Cohort
4
Cohort
5

2005-06
W

$910

$910

$910

$910

$910
$910

$946
(+4%)
$946
(+4%)
$960
(+$50)

2006-07
W

2007-08
W

$946
$960

$960

$960
(+$50)

$960

$998
(+4%)

Example 3: A 4-semester program with MTCU code beginning with 5


Cohort
Cohort
1
Cohort
2
Cohort
3
Cohort
4
Cohort
5
Cohort
6
Cohort
7

2005-06
W

$910

$910
$910

F
$946
(+4%)

$910

$910

$946
(+4%)
$946
(+4%)
$960

2007-08
W

$946
$946
(+ 4%)
$946
(+ 4%)
$960
(+$50)

$910

$910

2006-07
W

$946
$946

$984
(+4%)
$998
(+4%)

$960
$984
(+4%)

$946
$946

$946

$960

$946

2007-2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$984

June 2007

$998

Page 134
Example 4: A 5-semester program with MTCU code beginning with 5
In this example, the college has determined that students will pay entry-level fees for the
first three semesters and upper level fees for the final two semesters of the program.
Cohort
Cohort
1
Cohort
2
Cohort
3
Cohort
4
Cohort
5

2005-06
W

$910

$910

$910

$910

$910
$910

$910

F
$946
(+4%)

2006-07
W

2007-08
W

$946
$946
(+4%)

$946
(+4%)
$960
(+ $50)
$946
(+4%)

$946

$946
$960

$960

$946

2007-2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$984
(+4%)
$984
(+4%)
$998
(+4%)
$984
(+4%)

$984
$998
$984

June 2007

Page 135
Appendix E: Determination of Annual Base Tuition Fee where Program Level is
Given by Semester
A. For Programs with MTCU Codes beginning with 4 or 7 (one years duration)
Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Example of High
Demand Fee Program
Semester 1, 2 & 3
$3,000
$3,240
$3,499
$3,779
$4,081

Regular Fee Program


Semester 1, 2 & 3
$1,820
$1,920
$2,020
$2,120
$2,220

B. For Programs with MTCU Codes beginning with 5


Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Example of High Demand Fee


Program
Semester
Semester 1 & 21
3&4
$3,000
$3,000
$3,240
$3,120
$3,499
$3,370
$3,779
$3,639
$4,081
$3,930

Regular Fee Program


Semester
Semester 1
3&4
& 21
$1,820
$1,820
$1,920
$1,893
$2,020
$1,997
$2,120
$2,101
$2,220
$2,205

C. For Programs with MTCU Codes Beginning with 6


Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Regular Fee Program


Semester
Semester
Semester
3&4
5&6
1 & 21
$1,820
$1,820
$1,820
$1,920
$1,893
$1,893
$2,020
$1,997
$1,969
$2,120
$2,101
$2,077
$2,220
$2,205
$2,185

Example of High Demand Fee


Program
Semester
Semester
Semester
1 & 21
3&4
5&6
$3,000
$3,000
$3,000
$3,240
$3,120
$3,120
$3,499
$3,370
$3,245
$3,779
$3,639
$3,505
$4,081
$3,930
$3,785

Where a program is delivered in an odd number of semesters, it is at the colleges discretion to determine
which semesters will have entry-level fees applied and which semesters will have upper level fees applied
while ensuring that students will experience fee increases only once for two semesters offered consecutively
in a single academic year.

D. For Programs with MTCU Codes beginning with 8


Academic
Year
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10

Example of High Demand Fee Program


Semester
1&2

Semester
3&4

Semester
5&6

Semester
8&9

$3,000
$3,240
$3,499
$3,779
$4,081

$3,000
$3,120
$3,332
$3,639
$3,930

$3,000
$3,120
$3,245
$3,505
$3,785

$3,000
$3,120
$3,245
$3,375
$3,645

2007-2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

June 2007

Page 136

Examples of Fee Increases as they would be applied with different in-take semesters
through the year are given below.
Example 1: A 3-semester program with MTCU code beginning with 4
Cohort
Cohort
1
Cohort
2
Cohort
3
Cohort
4
Cohort
5

2005-06
W

$910

$910

$910

$910

$910
$910

$946
(+4%)
$946
(+4%)
$960
(+$50)

2006-07
W

2007-08
W

$946
$960

$960

$960
(+$50)

$960

$998
(+4%)

Example 2: A 4-semester program with MTCU code beginning with 5


Cohort
Cohort
1
Cohort
2
Cohort
3
Cohort
4
Cohort
5

2005-06
W

$910

$910
$910

F
$946
(+4%)

2006-07
W

$910

$960
$946
(+4%)

$910

2007-08
W

$946
$946
(+ 4%)
$946
(+ 4%)

$910

$946
$946

$984
(+4%)
$998
(+4%)

$960

$946

$998

$984

Example 3: A 5-semester program with MTCU code beginning with 5


In this example, the college has determined that students will pay entry-level fees for the
first three semesters and upper level fees for the final two semesters of the program.
Cohort
Cohort
1
Cohort
2
Cohort
3
Cohort
4
Cohort
5

2005-06
W

$910

$910

$910

$910

$910
$910

$910

F
$946
(+4%)

2006-07
W

2007-08
W

$946
$946

$946
(+4%)
$960
(+ $50)
$946
(+4%)

$946

$946
$960

$960

$946

2007-2008 Student Eligibility and Financial Need Assessment Manual

$984
(+4%)
$984
(+4%)
$998
(+4%)
$984
(+4%)

$984
$998
$984

June 2007