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flhe 9apionian

9ublisked hi( the

eienior = junior y;lasses


cf

9apillion Jtigh eichcol


1926=1927
Vclume 1

PAPIO TOWN
What's tP.e matter with Papio?
That's just what I'd like to know.
Court house fine for everything
Taxes, Jail and Wedding Ring.
Park for horse shoe, tennis, song,
Shade and water all day long.
But the high school! It's the stuff,
Education, can't get enough.
There's Krejci teaches Latin,
While Cleland swings the batin.
Then Schaab knows her English, too,
And Barnhill teaches girls to stew.
There's Beachy keeps the boys in trim
And J acobey takes everything given him.
Now what do you think of Papio Town?
I think it's pretty nifty all around.
Clar~

Four

Hagan, '29

PRF:SBYTR IAN CNURCH

Mf:THOO{ST C HlLRUf

LUTHRAN

CHURCH

Five

"SCHOOL"
The channel through which all knowledge is gained
The root of our future success.
Each day is a brick for the foundation we lay,
For the glory we all hope to possess.
Why are we so sad when it's over,
Is not then that real life has begun?
Oh yes! But when recalled are the past years,
Think we not of the sports and the fun?
How sweet will be the memories of childhood
When we all have grown old and gray,
But the sweetest of all to remember,
Is that wonderful, happy schoolday.
Gretchen Sander, '26

Six

FOREWORD
To renew in the minds of the Alumni
The memory of by-gone days,
To set forth as plainly as possible
To the public, the advancement
Which the school has made,
And to instill in the hearts of the pupils
A desire to advance.
For this purpose and to this end,
Have we written this book.
And we sincerely hope
That the succeeding classes will
Continue the work which we,
The classes of 1926 and 1927, have begun.
The Editor.

Seven

DED1CA'l'ION

To Mrs. Mamie J. Barnhill,


Who has given unselfishly
Of her time and abilities,
-Without rewardIn order that this Annual
Might be a success;
We, the classes of
1926 and 1927,
With much appreciation
For her efforts,
Lovingly dedicate this
PAPIONIAN.

Eight

Nine

CONTENTS
Faculty
Seniors

Athletics Music

15
31
39
43
47
55
67

Alumni

73

Ads

82
83

Juniors
Sophomores
Freshmen
Grades

Jokes

Ten

- 12-13

'"

ANNUAL STAFF
Editor in Chief
Assistant
Alumni Editor
Assistant

Senior Editor
Junior Editor
Grade Editor
Joke Editor Assistant
Activities Editor Assistant
Business Manager Assistant
Advertising Manager
Assistant
Circulation Manager
Assistant
SPONSOR

Jesse Reinking
Wendell McManamy
Helen Spearman
Beulah Ross
Dorothy Fase
Lillian Cordes
Louise Eitelgeorge
Gretchen Sander
Stanley Beerline
Mercedes Schaab
Carl Fricke
Alvin Huebner
Elizabeth Sprague
Philip Steyer
John Beadle
Amelia Magaret
Helen Frazeur
Mamie J. Barnhill

Eleven

Industrious, and willing, always ready with


a helping hand, giving his best efforts for the
betterment of the school as a whole and for each
one, and placing the school before all other interests, this characterizes Professor Jacoby who
has been with P. H. S. two years and who in
that time has given his best to it.

Twelve

Thirteen

SCHOOL STRUGGLES
Oh, come on then school books
I'm ready to fight.
I'll put my hat back,
Cause I'm in for the night.

I thought for some fun


I'd just step away,
But you lay on my conscience
Like a ton of wet hay.

I might as well get you


And then I'll be done,
I'll know that its over
When the battle is won.
If I once get you done

And do all that I plan,


Then bring on your worst,
And I'll show you I can.
Ruby Otten, '29.

Fourteen

President
Vice President
Sec'y and Treas.

Paul McCoy Gretchen Sander


Mercedes Schaab
GREETINGS

The Papillion high school this year is graduating the largest class in its history, and it is thru
the hearty co-operation of the patrons and taxpayers that this has been made possible. Our parents, too, have been a large factor in encouraging
us to remain in school and complete the course and
to them no small credit is due.
The school has reached a point where it is
having a large influence over the community for
the upbuilding of humanity. It is fitting the boys
and girls who graduate from year to year for
higher and nobler places in life.
To those who have labored so diligently and
patiently that these conditions have been made
possible, we extend greetings.
Class of 1926.

Sixteen

J~DYTHE

ARCHER

Road Show (2), Class Play (4).


" Quiet, gentle and sincere,
It does one gcod to have her near."

GEORGE AYERS

Football

(3), Basketball

(3), Class Play

(3, 4).

His Ford is h' s parlor.

ORVILLE BROWNLEE

Play at l'ort ('rook (l), Orchestra {3, 4),


Class Play {3) .
Stop! Look! Listen! Here comes the
jazz horn.

RAYMOND CORDES

Sec retary and Treasurer (3), Orchestr a ( 4),


Class Yell Leader ( 4), Class Play ( 4).
Still water runs deep .

BLANCHE CRABTREE

Base ball {1, 2). Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4), Class


Plays (2, 3, 4).
The best of life is conversation.

Seventeen

DOROTHY FASE
Basketball (2, 3, 4, ('apt. 3, 4), Treasure Hunters (1), Garden of Shah (2), Road
Show (2), Secretary and Treasurer
(1), Presid ent (2), Debating Team (2),
Annual Staff (4), Class Plays (3, 4).
Her favorite flower is Sweet William.

IRENE l'RAZEUR
Treasure Hunters (J), Road Show (2), Garden of Shah (2), Pirate's Daughter
(3), Toast at Banquet (3), ('lass
Play (4), Glee Club (4).
A peppy, jolly girl, with a smile for everybod y.

FTIANCES FRAZEUR
Treasure Hunters (1), Road Show (2), Garden of Shah (2), Class Play ( 4).
A bit of s unshine a nd a bit of cheer that's
!'ranees.

MARIE HAGEDORN
Treasure Hunters (1), Road Show (2), Garden of Shah (2), Pirate's Dwgh ' er
(3), Operetta (4), Class Play \4) .
A sweet girl , with a winning peJc;,mallty
and a friendly smile.

EDWIN HAGEDORN
l'ootball (2), Basketball (2, 3, 4), Capt. of
Class B. B. Team (2), Pirate's Daughter (3), ('lass Plays (3, 4), Road
Show (2).
He's not so small, he's not so shy,
We a ll know Ed's a "regu lar g uy".

Eighteen

ANNA HAHN
Class Plays (3, 4).
Quiet- unlike most girls.

JOHN HAUG
Orchestra ( 4).
A nice, likeable chap, who's a! ways a good
sport.

ALVIN HUEBNER
Basketball ( 4), Baseball (3, 4), Annual Staff,
( 4), OrchElstra ( 4), Treasure Hunters
(1), Class Plays (3, 4).
Stalwart, manly and tall,
With a nod and smile for all.

DOROTHY JACOBEY
Elgin H. S.-Vice President {l), Girls' Club
(1), Girls' Reserve (2), Secretary of
Athletics (2), Staff Editor {1, 2), Literary Club (1, 2).
Papillion H. S.-Basketball (3, Capt. 4),
Class Plays {3, 4).
Quiet until you know her- and then!

AMELIA :\fAGARET
Basketball {2, 3, 4) (Capt. 2). Treasure Hunters (l), Road Show (2), Declamato1y
Contest (1), Debating Team (2), Vice
President (l), Treasurer (2), Class
Plays (3, 4), Annual Staff, Class History (4).
She's cute and peppy-rather small,
But happy-go-lucky and liked 'by a ll.

===========~----------Nineteen

PAUL 1\lcCOY
President (3, 4), Road Show (2), Captain of
debating team (2), Secretary of Athletics (3), "Address of Welcome" at
Banquet (3), "Response" at Banquet
( 4), Class Plays (3, 4).
Oh, what is so rare as a day with June!

E:\IERY :\IEGEL
Road
P lays
His
in the

Show (2), Orchestra (3, 4), Class


(3, 4).
size would assure him a high place
world.

.
BLANCHE ;\ULLER
Treasure Hunters (1), Garden of Shah (2),
Glee Club (3, 4), Road Show (2), Class
Play (4).
A girl of true worth, an admirable character, with many winning ways.

GATES MILLER
Treasure Hunters (1), Garden of Shah (2) ."
Don't look at me girls-I'm bashful.

HELEN PETERSE!'\
Springfield H . S.-Operetta (J), Class Play
(1, 3).

Papillion H. S.-Class Play ( 4).


H. S.-Class Plays (3, 4).
One of those studious, jolly, likeable girls
of our class.

Twenty

FLORENCE PRINZ
Millard H. S.-The Masonic Ring (2).
Papilion H. S.- Orchestra (4). Class Play
( 4), Music at Banquet (3), l\1 Jsic for
Commencement (3).
A girl whose ambition is height.

JESSE REINKING
President (1), Treasure Hunters (1). Garden of Shah (2), Baseb:l ll (2 :J, 4).
Annual Staff (4), Toast at Ba 1quet
(3), Captain of debatin,; team (::!).
Class Reporter ( 4), Class Plays ( :l, 4),
Class Will (4) .
A fellow with no end of wit .
With everyone he makes a lt't.

CLARK REYNOLD:J
Class Play ( 4).
He speaks, behaves, and acts, ju st a; he
ought.

GRETCHEN SANDE~
Treasure Hunters (1), Class D.eporter (::!),
Road Show (2), Debating Tea :1 (J),
Toastmistress at Banquet (')). y;, a
President (4), Class Plays (3, 4), Anm:al Staff ( 4).
Independent and fun loving is Grc <:he::;
Nothing seems to worry or annoy h J r.

MERCEDES SCHAAB
Treasure Hunters (1), Road Show (2), Debating team (2), Secretary and Treasurer ( 4), Class Play ( 4), Annual Sta:i
(4).

Oh, She's little but she's wise, and a terror for her size.

==========~~----------Twcnty-Ono

HATTIE SCHAULAND
Treasure Hunters (1), Glee Club (2), Vocal
Solo at Banquet (3), Class Play (4),
Operetta (4).
Her friendly and cheery personality is
hard to find.

EDNA SCHAULAND
Treasure Hunters (1), Road Show (2), Vice
President (3), Music for Banquet (3),
Class Play ( 4).
She's cute, snappy and jolly.

HELEN SPEARMAN
Basketball (2, 3, 4), Class Plays (3, 4), Class
Prophesy (3), Annual Staff ( 4).
"How pure in heart, and sound in head.

PHILIP STEYER
Basketball (1, 2, 3, 4, Capt. 3), Baseball (2, 3,
4), Football (2), Garden of Shah (2),
Vice President (2), Yell Leader (2, 3),
Annual Staff ( 4), Pirate's Daughter
(3), Class Plays (3, 4).
Sid, the married Romeo.

BEATRICE STOFT
Treasure Hunters (1), Road Show (2), Class
Play (4).
A snappy girl, who's always right up to
the minute.

---~--Twenty-Two

VELMA WALTER
Treasure Hunters (1), Road Show (3), Pirarte's Daughter (3), Class Play (4).
A fiery temper and a speedy Ford.

LOUTSE WEISS
Road Show (2), ('lass Play (4).
She is just the quiet kind whose
never varies.

na ~ ure

EVALINA ZEEB
Treasure Hunters (1), Road Show (2), CJ,;:tss
Play (4). '
Studious with calm reserve
Her aim is Scholarship to ~e1v2.

Twcn ty-Three

..

Tw~nty-Four

MOTTO:
"Life is now our School"
CLASS FLOWER:
American Beauty Rose
CLASS COLORS:
Blue and White

SENIORS
Seniors! Seniors! We're thirty-three strong,
We're the bunch that never are wrong,
We've got the pep, and the team work, too,
For we are the bunch that are true blue.
Senior ! Seniors ! of '26,
We'll take the knocks and we'll take the kicks.
We'll stick together through thick and thin,
For we, the seniors, will never give in.
And in the years that will soon roll by
We'll remember our school days in Papio High,
We'll remember our fights and we'll remember our kicks
When we were the Seniors of '26.
Evalena Zeeb, '26

Twenty-Five

THE CHARGE OF THE BRIGHT BRIGADE


(With apoligies to Tennyson.)
Half a grade, half a grade,
Half a grade onward,
To the realm of academics
Came the Class of Twenty-six,
Came to fight for Education
In Papio High, by acclamation
The best in all the nation.
"Forward, the Bright Brigade!
Charge for the book!" he said,
Into the Realm of Academics
Came the Class of Twenty-six.
"Forward, the Bright Brigade!"
Was there a one dismayed?
Not tho' these Freshies knew
The Seniors, and Juniors, too,
Would scoff at and jeer them.
Their's not to make reply,
Their's not to reason why,
Their's but to do, and to try
Not to see them or hear them.
Into the Realm of Academics
Came the Class of Twenty-six.
Teachers to right of them,
Teachers to left of them,
Teachers in front of them
Taught and expounded.
Is it a wonder, then,
They were dumfou:p.ded?
Stormed at with Latin rules,
Saucepans and sundry tools;
Into the lab. and shop
Steadily, with ne'er a stop,
Into the Vale of Mathematics
Came the Class of Twenty-six.
Passed in their Freshman work;
Not one thing did they shirk
Now to their Sophomore year
Boldly passed without fear.
Oh, what a prospect drear!
Plunged into Botany,
English, Geometry;
Right through the course they broke,
Victorious at every stroke,
Into the Realm of Academics,
Came the Class of Twenty-six.
Flashed all their talents bare,
Heads now held high in air,
Charging the course severe,
Of their Junior year.

Twenty-Six

Stormed at with science and math,


Still braving Latin's wrath,
Struggling o'er the rugged path,
In the Realm of Academic.
In all school activities
And Juniors festivities
Shone the Class af Twenty-six.
Teachers to right of them,
Teachers to left of them,
Teachers in front of them
Taught and expounded.
Were they dumfounded?
Not so you could notice it!
No not e'en a little bit.
Judged by their demeanors,
You see they are now seniors!
No more with the throng they mix,
This Class of Twenty-six.
Onward, the Bright Bridage!
Oh, what a charge they made,
Throughout the twelfth grade!
Now with their goal in sight,
Bravely renewed the fight.
Proudly waved the blue and white
History and Civics fell
They that had fought so well
Now of Chern's violence tell.
Through the Realm of Academics
Passed the Class of Twenty-six.
Oh, that was valiant charging
Through four years of toil and care.
Ever and anon enlarging
Their store of knowledge there.
With their courses now completed,
This valiant class, ne'er defeated,
May the joys of victory share.
In the field of Athletics
No other class surpasses
Either the lads or the lasses
Of the Class of Twenty-six.
Thirty-nine Freshmen came
Into this Realm. Thirty-three
Seniors this glory claim:
Their number surpasses
All previous classes
In the school's history.
When can their glory fade?
Oh, the wild charge they made
Through the Land of Academics!
Honor the Bright Brigade,
Noble Class of Twenty-six!
Amelia Magaret, '26

Twenty-Seven

Senior Class Prophecy


"Please note that this prophecy of the class of
'26 is written as though the author were a member of the class."
One day as I, Emery Megel, was working in my
office, my pretty secretary of whom my wife has
always been jealous, announced that an old schoolmate wished to see me. Although my duties as
mayor of Papillion kept me very busy, I was glad
to welcome my old friend, Paul McCoy, who had
won world- wide fame as an artist. I invited him
out to rriy home to have lunch with my wife and 1.
Florence was very glad to see him. After he had
left I began to wonder what had become of all my
classmates since the day we graduated some fifteen years ago. This thought and wonder bothered me in my business by day and dreams by night.
I became so filled with the desire to know about
them that I concluded to set my latest and most
reliable De Forest Detector at work to search the
universe for .trace of each of them.
Presently I was rewarded by a humming of the
metallic plate in the mercuric reservoir and put tipg my ear to the receiver, Lo! these are the wonderful passages of history that it repeated to me
as it responded to the vibrations of earth and air.
At first I heard a continual popping sound and
wondered what it coula be. I found that Edwin
Hagedorn, through the rash extravagance of his
wife, was forced to work for his living much
against his will and is running a popcorn stand.
Suddenly I heard an awful shriek. I looked about
to see what had happened to Florence but she was
calmly reading. It was Helen Spearman, private
secretary of Henry Ford. She was having a tooth
extracted by Jesse Reinking, a noted denust in
Detroit.
Next the village gossip of a small town in western N ebr;1ska came to me from the barber shop
of Gates Miller and John Haug.
Strains of wonderful music reached my ears!
It was a grand opera singer and none other than
Dorothy Fase.
Presently I heard a faint babble which reminded
me of hours spent in the little red schoolhouse. It
was a group of Filipino children reciting their A
B C's to their teacher, Irene Frazeur.
Hattie and Edna Schauland through the death
of a distant relative inherited a large fortune.
They used this to establish a large dog and cat
hospital in one of the large cities of this country
and are doing much to alleviate the suffering of
these poor animals.

Twenty-Eight

At this point the instrument stopped working;


1 was in dispair but presently the hum recommenced.
A terrible clamor next came through the receiver. Edythe Archer, who was happily married and
living on a farm, was tending her flock of prize
guineas.
George Ayres is the author of several text books
on astronomy and intelligence tests.
Anna Hahn and Helen Petersen both chose a
political career. Helen is governor of Texas and
Anna is the U. S. senator from Utah.
The Hottentots of Africa have two very efficient teachers, Marie Hagedorn and Louise Weiss.
Everybody listens when the noted violinist, .r{aymond Cordes, plays at station KFNF. Alvin Huebner is the harmonica player at KFNF.
Amelia Magaret, the great pianist, is one of the
leading instructors in the Boston Conservatory of
Music.
The bit of drama whicn i next heard was so well
given that I imagined myself in a great theater.
Gretchen Sander and Philip Steyer were two of
the leading characters but the success of the
drama was due to the coaching of Mercedes
Schaab School of Expression.
As instructor of Physical Culture at North High
in Omaha, Blanche Crabtree has a winning Basketball Team.
In the last few years Clark Reynolds has taken
more prizes on farm products at the State Fair
than any other individual.
Dorothy J acobey is a vety successful school
teacher in Nevada. Her favorite pastime is giving Ayers Intelligence Tests.
Evalena Zeeb graduated .from the Iowa State
Agricultural College and is a successful teacher
of Home Economics in Lincoln, Nebraska.
Blanche Miller inherited a large ranch in Arizona and the cowboys find her a very charming
mistress.
Frances Frazeur is head ;urse in an Omaha
hospital and Beatrice Stoft is principal of a large
high school in Kalamazoo. Velma Walters teaches
mathematics.
Faint and far away I heard a saxophone. It was
Orville Brownless, a member of Paul Whiteman's
Orchestra. Gradually the music grew louder un til something snapped within the vibrator and try
as I would I could never make it work again nor
has anyone ever invented a machine like it since.
Carl Fricke of '27.

~~~:w============

Last Will and Testament of the Clas~ of '26


We, the class of Papillion High School, Papillion,
ebr., being of sound mind, memory and underandin<Y considering the certainty of the fact
at we'"'have but a short time to remain in this,
ur present place of residence, and thereby be the
etter prepared to leave this school, when it shall
ease the Falculty to evoke us therefrom, do
erefore make and publish this our last Will and
estament, hereby revoking and annulling all
Vilis by us heretofore made, in manner and form
ollowing, that is to say:
FIRST, and principally, we leave this building
nown as Papillion Public School in the hands of
e Faculty, to be taken care of by the Executor
a proper and fitting manner;
SECOND,

Edythe Archer wills to Loren Doenges her close


ttention to all speakers and to Helen Frazeur her
bility to write notes.
George Ayers wills t~ Ernest Magaret his Ford
'oupe, providing that he keeps up its good repuation.
Orville Brownlee wills his title of Deacon to
endell McManamy. He makes no requirements
f the Heir as he trusts that the newly titled
eacon will live up to his title as far as talking
concerned.
Raymond Cordes wills the corpse of one stubailed, cross-eyed, color-blind cat to John Beadle,
hose love for cats has moved Mr. Cordes to leave
he corpse to him.
Blanche Crabtree wills jointly to Marie Cordes
nd Stanley Beerline, her red hair to be divided
hare and share alike.
Dorothy Fase wills her two passenger porch
wing to Louise Eitelgorge for one year. She may
eep it longer than this provided she uses it as
uch as its present owner has.
Frances Frazeur wills her ability to write letters
o Elizabeth Sprague.

concrete bicycle equipped with balloon tires and


stop light. He is to use the vehicle only for the
purpose of going to school during the year 1927.
Marie Hagedorn wills her shortness to Calvin
Sorenson and her favor'"ce expression, "do you
really think so?", to William Huebner.
Anna Hahn wills her normal training instructor, Mr. Jacobey, to Lillian Cordes.
Dorothy Jacobey wills her position as sinking
guard to Beulah Ross, sincerely hoping that she
will make good use of it . .
Emery Megel wills one long frozen toe to Carl
Fricke.
Blanche Miller wills her old electric curler to
Marie McKulskey and her love for Edythe Archer
to Loren Doenges.

Gates Miller wills his craving for Hersheys to


William Huebner and sincerely hopes that they
cause him to grow front-wards instead of upwards.

Amelia Magaret wills her good behavior to Ernest Magaret, she feels that he will need all of it.
Paul McCoy wills one cauliflower ear to Herman
Haeberlein and sincerly hopes that someone will
give him another one.
Helen Petersen wills her desk with all its deformities such as ink blots, initials and stray gum
to Lillian Cordes.
Florence Prinz wills her job of playing the
saxophone in the Papillion High School Orchestra
to Marie Mcl}:ulskey.
Jesse Reinking wills one perfectly good swing
in the city park to Herman Haeberlein and Helen
Frazeur, to be used only on moonlight nights.
Clark Reynolds wuls one torn shoe string to
Herbert Keefer.

Irene Frazeur wills her freckles to Lorraine


chroeder.

Gretchen Sander wills her little black hat which


has been commonly mistaken as a football by the
boys of P. H. S., to John Beadle to be taken care
of as he sees fit.

John Haug wills his desire to become a great


usician such as Luis Firpo to Stanley Beerline.

Mercedes Schaab wills her oversized golashes to


Calvin Sorenson.

Alvin Huebner wills to Irvin Doenges the job of


rying to fix tires for someone else. To Carl Fricke
1e leaves his old note book.
Edwin Hagedorn wills to Floyd Trumble one

Hattie Schauland wills her spectacles to Beulah


Ross, these she hopes will aid her in finding her
Romeo.
Edna Schauland wills all her old slippers, golashes, shoes and bed-room slippers to Marie Cor-

Twenty-Nine

des. These to provide her sufficient foot-wear to


continue the "Charleston."
Beatrice Stoft wills the expression "Oh, Cow",
which was willed to her last year, to Elizabeth
Sprague.
Helen Spearman wills her most wonderful and
beloved giggle to Lorraine Schroeder, this giggle
is to become hers permanently after she has giggled continuously for one year.
Philip Steyer desiring to dispose of his tropical
fruit, but feeling that he cannot part with his
Figgs wills .his dates to Beulah Ross.
Velma "Walter wills her Ford to Calvin Sorenson
and Louise Eitelgorge to be used only on their
honeymoon.
Louise Weiss wills her old comb and back seat
in the assembly to Louise Eitelgorge.
Evalena Zeeb wills her sleeping couch to Ervin
Doenges, this is not to be used during school.

assigns forever, share and share alike, as tenants


in common.
AND LASTLY, we do hereby nominate, constitute and appoint Lew Curti of Papillion, Nebr.,
Executor of this our Last Will and Testament, and
we desire that our Executor hereinbefore named
shall not be required to give bond for the faithful
performance .of that office.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, We have set our
seal to this, our last Will and Testament at Papillion, Nebr., this 30th day of April, one thousand,
nine hundred and twenty-six.
(seal)
CLASS OF 1926.
SIGNED, SEALED, PUBLISHED AND
DECLARED
By the said Senior Class in our presence, as and
for its last Will and Testament, and at its request and in our presence, and in the presence of
each other, we have hereunto subscribed our
names as attesting witnesses thereto.
Ralph Nickerson,
Papillion, Nebr.
1vliss Eliza M. Wilson,
Papillion, Nebr.

THIRD, all. the rest and residue of our esLate,


both real, personal and mixed, such as books,
swings, school grounds, etc., we give, devise and
bequeath to the Junior Class and to their heirs and

Senior Class Plays


This year the largest class in the history of the
school graduates. Because of this it was decided
to have two class plays, in order that each one
might take part in presenting one of the plays.
The first, "I(I Only Had a Million," is a comedy.
It has a well laid plot and many amusing situations.
The second, "Contents Unknown," is a mystery
play. The mysterious flight of certain pearls is
interwoven with comedy elements to form an interesting and humorous plot.
CAST OF CHARACTERS
"If I Only H a d A Million"
John W . Smith, who w a nts a million ................ Alvin Huebner
Mr s. Smith, his wife ...................................... ........... Irene Frazeu r
Cathe rine, th eir da ughte r .................. .................... Dor othy Fase
Mrs. Dugan , their landla dy .................................... Evalina Zeeb
E ddie, her son ............................................... ............... P a ul McCoy
Mrs. De L acey, of th e sm a rt set.. ..................Gretchen Sa n der
J ean , he r da ughter ............................................Ma rie H agedorn

Thirty

Edwa rd Evan s ton Ga rla nd , a clergyman ............Emery Megel


Lord F erdinand Rainscourt, a fortune hunter ........... .
........................................................................ Edwin Hagedorn
Adam Me rten s, a socia list... ................................... Beatrice Stoft
H . A. Va nderlip, a n a ttorney.................................... Anna Hahn
William, a n E n glish se rva n t... ............................. Edythe Archer
Nannette, a Fren ch se r van t.. ..............................H elen Petersen
A Socia list .............................................: .............. F rances Frazeur
"Conten ts Unknown"
Cynthi a Sayre, a n a m a t eu r Juliet .................. H elen Spearman
Sidney Stan ton, a married Romeo~ ....................... Philip Steyer
Cla udia Va n Buren , a n act ress ........................ Edna Schauland
Sa lly Gordon Stan ton, a b r ide ............................ Blanche Miller
Kenneth Go rdon, a n im porter ............................Jesse Reinking
Judith Shelby, Mach eavelli's unde r study .... Me rcedes Schaab
Craig Rutherford, a collec tor of an ti.IJ.ues ....R aymond Cordes
Carol K ing, " Chief W a rbler " .......................... H a ttie Schauland
Meredith Marsha ll , th e messe n ge r. ................. Amelia Magaret
Ke ith Winth r op, of the c ustom s .......................... George Ayers
Wu Fong, a Chinese servan t.. ................... ............... Louise Weiss
T ed Gordon , who makes-believe ........................ Clark Reynolds
L a ura Lee, a s u.m me r girl.. .................................. Florence Prinz
McDonald , from headquarters ..........................Bla n ch Crabtree
Cho rus .................................... Doroth y J acobey, Velma Walters

.,

President
Vice President
Secretary & Treas.

Elizabeth Sprague
Ernest Magaret
Carl Fricke

Sponsor-Estella Krejci
Class Colors:
Class Motto:

Red and White


B~

Class Yell:
Mush and Milk and Sunflower seed,
That's the stuff on which we feed.
We're the hot stuff of Creation,
We're the Junior Aggregation.

Thirty-Two

JOHN BEADLE
Basketball (1, 2, 3), Baseball. (1, 2, 3), Football (Capt. 1), Road Show (1), Operetta (2), Annual Staff, Junior Class
Play.
Normally a Romeo.

STANLEY BEERLINE
President (1), Operetta (1, 2), Road Show
(1), Declami),tory Contest (1), Yell
Leader (3), Annual Staff, Junior Class
Play, Orchestra (2, 3), Glee Club.
Even Paderewski might be jealous.

LILLIAN CORDES
Road Show (1), Declamatory Contest (1, 2),
Annual Staff, Junior Class Play.
Her merry laugh heralds her sunny personality.

MARIE CORDES
Operetta (2, 3), Junior Class Play.
Flirtation is attention without intention.

IRVIN DOENGES
Baseball (2, 3), Operetta (2), Orchestra (3),
Glee Club (3), Junior Class Play.
There is a new horizon for far-seeing eyes.

Thirty-Three

LOREN DOENGES
Baseball (2, 3), Operetta (2), Orchestra (3),
Glee Club (2), Junior Class Play.
Curly hair is a virtue, when backed by a
pair o' blue eyes.

LOUISE EI'l'ELGEORGE
Operetta (1, 2, 3), Declamatory Contest (2),
Annual Staff, Junior Class Play.
Good natured is a lass we know,
To laugh or talk she is not slow.

HELEN FRAZEUR
Declamatory Contest (2), Road Show (1),
Annual Staff, Junior Class Play.
Her studious ways, and her wisdO"'.
Fill her teachers' hearts with joy.

CARL FRICKE
President (2), Secretary and Treasurer (3),
Road Show Orchestra (3), Glee Club
(2), Basketball (3\. Annual StAff.
A small, faithful, likable student, who
does the right thing at the right time.

HERMAN HAEBERLEIN
Basketball (1, 2, 3), Football (1), Baseball
(1, 2, 3), Junior Class Play.
His pluck and perseverance in the ev~ry
day,
Will take him in the future a long, long
way.

WILLI AM HUEBN-ER
Glee Club (2), Junior Class Play.
A likeable fellow though terribly shy.

HERBERT KEEFER
Glee Club (2), Road Show (1), Orchestra
(3), Junior Class Play.
To be a friend is a man's greatest accomplishment.

ETINE8T MAGARET
Basketball (1, 2, 3), Football (l), Baseball
(1, 2, 3), Road Show (1), Orchestra
(2, 3), Junior Class Play.
When it comes to p}aying a joke, or
shooting a basket, Ernest is right on the
job.

MARIE l\1cKULSKY
Junior Class Play, Road Show, Glee Club (2).
Silence i s golden and silver too, when
backed by sterlin g worth.

WENDELL :\lc:\IANNA:\IY
Basketball (1, 2, 3), Baseball (1, 2, 3), Football (1), Declamatory Contest (1),
Road Show (1), Glee Club (1, 2), 01;chestra (2, 3).
Sh! Mama said boys should be seen, not
heard.

Thirty-Five

BEULAH ROSS
Declamatory Contest (1, 2), Road Show (1),
Annual Staff, Junior Class Play.
Working upon the hypothesis that a woman's defense is her tongue, Beulah has cultivated the art of elocution till she is capable of putting up some defense.

LORRAINE SCHROEDER
Junior Class Play.
Beauty and character go hand in hand.

CALVIN SORENSON
Basketball (3), Baseball (2, 3).
He delights in "tearing up Fords".

ELIZABETH SPRAGUE
Road Show (1), President (3), Secretary
and Treasure r (2), Annual Staff, Junior Class Play.
A promising littl e housewife, and an earnest worker.

FLOYD TRUMBLE
Baseball (2, 3), Basketball (2, 3),
Class Play, Glee Club (2).
He forgets with such ease,
But oh what a tease!

Junior

---~--Thirty-Six

THE JUNIORS
Hurrah for the Juniors,
Hurrah for each one!
Our work is always ready,
And always rightly done.
We Juniors are famous,
We Juniors are bright
When we're called on to give money
We're never called tight.
We Juniors are honest,
And always so fair
We're brave and courageous
And most always take a dare,
So we are the Juniors
Who always have won;
Hurrah for the Juniors,
Hurrah for each one .
. Lorraine Schroeder.

---------~=========

History of the Junior Class


The Juniors, twenty-five strong, entered Papillion High School in the fall of nineteen hun . . . red
and twenty three. One of the interestmg events
of the Freshman year was our first party. This
was held at the home of Louise Eitelgeorge under
the supervision of our sponsor, Vern Jones. A
splendid time was enjoyed by all.
As English students we proved ourselves very
capable of producing some original plays for the
Annual High School Road Show. In athletics we
excelled all other classes, carrying off first honors
in the inter-class Basket Ball tournament. Som~
of the boys who .won the pennant that year are
now on the High School Team of nineteen hundred
and twenty-five and twenty-six.
At the close of our Freshman year we deeply regretted the departure of six of our class mates,
Martha Cartsens, Olga Kauss, Raymond Sorenson,
Benhart Stender., Lenord Peterson, and Josie Matranga.

Under the guidance of a new sponsor, Harold


Bonnstetter, we began our Sophomore year with
a greater determination to do the best that was

in us. We greatly enjoyed our numerous hikes


and parties and shall never forget the good times
we had on our Botany hikes. We were very
proud of our re~ord during the Sophomore year
for our class had the highest percentage of its
members on the honor roll that year. During our
Sophomore year we, together with the Seniors
carried off honors in the high school Olympics.
Again at the end of the Sophomore year we
suffered the loss of four more of our class mates
Stella Oliver, John McKulsky Georoe
Plunkett
0
an d Corrmne Frye.

'

Starting out on our Junior year under the leadership of Estella Krejci we sincerely hope that we
could ~ake it one of the biggest years of our
s~hoo~ hfe. Our play "Doctor Jim", proved a big
hit with the pubhc and and was enjoyed immensely by all. And now we are all lookin<r
forward to
0
~he glorious Junior-Senior banquet. And in closI~g we earne~tly trust that so far in our school
hfe we have hved and upheld the spirit and ideals
of our school.

JUNIOR CLASS PLAY


The Junior Class under the direction of Miss Krejci, presented
"Dr. Jim", a comedy in four acts, on Nov. 13th and 14th.
The play was a great success, as the characters wer e very well
chosen and the acting was well done.
CAST OF CHARACTERS
Dr. Jim, a young physician ........................................................ Stanley Beerline
Ephraim Goodenough, Jim's father ...................................... William Huebner
Lafe Goodenough, A woman-hater ....................................Herman Haeberlein
Orla T. Baker, of the Royal Grand Oil Corporation ........................ John Beadle
Nate Spoones, an amateur detective .............................. Wendell McManamy
Frank Randolph, Jim's college chum .......................................... Floyd Trumble
Sam Johnston, a colored errand boy .......................................... Ernest Magar,S)t
Martha Goodenough, Jim's mother......................................Elizabeth Sprague
Mary Jane Wheeler, a man hater................................................Marie Cordes
Miss Tabitha Tuttle, looking for her Romeo .................................. Beulah Ross
Bess Goodenough, Jim's cousin ............................................ Louise Eitelgeorge
Fanny Burton, Jim's fiance ................................................ Lorraine Schroeder
Madge Burton, Bess' chum ................................................. ~- - -Helen Frazeur
Hannah Spriggins, a would-be movie star....................................Lillian Cordes
Queen of the Ball -~--- Marie McKulsky
Patients ..............................................................Herbert Keefer, Irvin Doenges

SOPHOMORES
I suppose you have heard of the Sophomore class,
Which in strength and sportsmanship none can surpass.
Foremost in play, foremost in work,
None of us known to be idle or shirk
Any task in duty which comes our way,
But always to do it gladly and gay.
Wherever we are, on land or sea,
We always helpful to others will be.
If you want men, gallant and brave,
An Athlete, Fighter, Musician or Slave,
Just come to the Sophies, we're ready for you
For the least little thing that you want us to do.
So, if any are ,better in work or in play,
Just give 'em three cheers; that's what we say.

Harold Cordes, '28

Forty

SOPHOMORE CLASS 1926


Lillian Jacobey-President
Ronald Bell-Vice President
Milton Fricke-Secretary & Treas.
Miss Marie Schaab-Sponsor
Harvey Arbuthnot
Lorene Eichner
Ruth Kroeger
Howard Schobert
Marthe Hahn
Myrtle Clausen
James Nickerson
Laurine Schauland
Harold Cordes
William Jewett
Arthur Rahn
Thelma Way
Elmer Wittmuss
Claude Whitney
Gladys Zwiebel

Forty-One

SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY


The members of the Sophomore class are: Harvey
Arbuthnot, Ronald Bell, Harold Cordes, Myrtle Clausen,
Lorene Eichner, Milton Fricke, Ruth Kroeger, Lillian
Jacobey, James Nickerson, William Jewett, Arthur Rahn,
Howard Shobert, Loraine Schauland, Thelma Way, Elmer
Wittmuss, Claude Whitney and Gladys Zwiebel.
The officers of this class for the Freshman year were:
James Nickerson, President; Milton Fricke, Vice President; Gladys Zwiebel, Secretary and Treasurer. Officers
for the Sophomore year are: Lillian Jacobey, President;
Ronald Bell, Vice President; Milton Fricke, Secretary and
Treasurer.
This class has shown unusual pep and enthusiasm. In
their freshman year the class chose as their sponsor Miss
Helen Cleland, teacher of Music and Mathematics.
During the Freshman year several hikes and parties
were enjoyed. In the fall a hike was planned but rain interfered and the remainder of the evening was spent in
the High School Gymnasium.
In mid-winter a sleigh-riding party was enjoyed with
many face-washings which always accompan(Y such
parties.
In the Spring another hike was planned and an enjoyable time }Vas had by all who attended. It was held in
Harmsen's Grove, east of town~
The following fall we met again in school work.
This year we elected as our sponsor Miss Marie Schaab,
Teacher of English.
On Hallowe'en night a party was held in the Gym. and
some time was spent in playing games. Some of the
revelers of Hallowe'en tried to enter and take our "eats"
and finally did gain entrance thru a window but luckily
the food had been hidden in the Piano and it was saved.
Those of the Sophomore class who play on the Basketball teams are Harvey Arbuthnot, First Boys' Team;
Harold Cordes, Second Boys' Team; Gladys Zwiebel, First
Girls' Team.
James Nickerson, '28.

Forty-Two

FRESHMAN CLASS
The Freshmen are a jolly bunch
They always work together,
And come to school most any day
In any kind of weather.
Freshmen mean the firsf'year in school
And we feel a little shy;
The other grades poke fun at us
But we only laugh, not cry.

The studies in the Freshman Class


Are very hard to get,
But we will conquer them I know
It will make us dig, "you b'e t."
Our teachers all are very kind,
And will not take our sass,
But you may bet they think a lot,
Of our big Freshman Class.
Helen Virgin, '29.

Forty-Four

Scott Beadle, President


John Brown, Secretary & Treasurer
Miss Helen Cleland, Sponsor
Mildred Arbuthnot
Evelyn Eichner
Donaldine McManamy
Pearl Rothermund
James Bell
Margery Ehlers
Catherine McKulsky
Erna Schauland
Marguerite Bell
Ruth Fricke
Louise Mundt
Olive Siebold
Gertrude Burdorf
Clara Hagan
Herbert Nielsen
Venice Sorenson
Lilley Carsten
Edna Hansen
Elizabeth ,Oliver
Minnie Sorenson
Alfred Chapman
Ruth Horn
Ruby Otten
Mildred Sprague
Miriam Collins
Samuel Keefer
Donald Reis
Alma Schwab
Irene Cordes
Ruth Lutz
Ernest Ross
Helen Virgin
Glen Way

Forty-Five

FRESHMEN
In the fall of '25 the Freshmen organized their class.
Scott Beadle was elected President and proved very capable of handling the position. We selected Purple and
White as our class colors. The first activity was a party
given in honor of the Freshmen, the main feature being
the Initiation of the Freshmen. The second event was
another party held in the Papillion High School auditorium, December 10, which the Basket Ball Girls could
not attend as they had a game scheduled for the next
night. We are quite well represented in Athletics. We
afforded one girl for the First Team and two substitutes.
'

Forty-Six

OUR CLASS
We're now the eighth grade of '26,
In for victory and hard kicks,
But we're on the road to fight and win,
We'll stick to school thru thick and thin.
We'll all be Freshmen 'fore we're thru',
Up the ladder to Sophomores, too,
And Juniors we're all sure to be,
And Seniors too-you wait and see.
We're climbing the ladder of success,
To good men and women-well I guess,
. We're at the bottom, but we'll get there sure,
Then our ship of books and lessons we will moor.
Like an anchor we will hold to school,
Until Business calls us to its pool.
We will make our lives worth while,
And meet our troubles with a smile.
Isabelle Petersen.

Forty-Eight

----------~==========

EIGHTH GRADE
Lowell McManamy-President
Merle Smith-Vice President
Kenneth Kennedy-Sec'y & Treas.
Glenn Beerline-Sergeant at Arms
E . S. Beachy-Sponsor
Winefred Boyer
Willard Sorensen
Isabelle Petersen
Irvm Peterson
Mabel Nielsen
Mildred Stenten
Gladys Uhe

---~--Forty-Nine

Class Colors :
Class Flower:

Drown and Yell ow.


Sunflower.

Class Yell:
EI, EIG, GH, GHT, That's the way to spell it;
Here's the way to yell it, "EIGHTH GRADE.
HISTORY
The Eighth grade class of 1925-26 has six members
who started in "The Papillion Public School" in 1917-18.
Those starting at that time me: Mildred Stenten, Lowell
McManamy, Glenn Beerline) Donald Horn, Winefred
Boyer ap.d Isabelle Petersen.
Two members, Merle Smith from Springfield, and Ervin
Petersen from District 24, came in 1919-20, starting in
the Second Grade. Kenneth Kennedy made known his
presence to us ' when in the Third Grade, coming in 192021 from Omaha. Mabel Nielsen from Leigh, Nebraska,
joined us in the Seventh Grade in 1924-25. The last member to join our class was Willard Sorensen who united
with us when in the Eighth Grade coming from Omaha.
Our sponsor is Mr. E. L. Beachy.

Fifty

SIXTH GRADE

SEVENTH GRADE

George Beerline
Dean Brown
Martha Christiansen
Dorothy Hagedorn
Lloyd Linder
Orville McCarter
Mebel Petersen
Margaret Schwab
Earnestine Sorensen

Irene Arp
Woodrow Arp
Robert Beadle
Charles Brown
Martha Carpenter
Petrina Christiansen
Elva Clausen
Sophia Eitelgeorge
Henry Krohn
Helen Lutz
Harry Pacey
Donald Rausch
Ruth Sprague
Marjorie Smith
Leona Uhe
Irvin Zwiebel

Miss Esther Keefer, Teacher

Fifty-One

FOURTH GRADE

FIFTH GRADE

Clarence Arp
Ruth Arbuthnot
Loretta Arp
Robert Brown
Jack Borman
Richard Brown
Herbert Boyer
Sadie Mae Carpenter
Carl Christensen
Richard Christiansen
Dorothy Chapman
Arthur Giese
Verna Clausen
Marie Knapp
James Dooley
Lenora Leader
Marie Fricke
Garold Lindner
Charles Hutter
Phyllis Rhode
Irene Hutter
William Schwab
Charlie Jewett
Pearl Schmidt
Louise Jefferson
Charles Worrell
Walden Johansen
Ella Petersen
Lewis Rothermund
William Stenten
Mrs. M. L. Allen, Teacher

FiJLy-'fwo

SECOND GRADE

THIRD GRADE

Maxine Drown
Hany Christiansen
Bruce Corn
Loretta Jarman
Clarence Knapp
Burr McCarter
Wesley McDonald
Lydia Schmidt
Golda Worrell

Grace Mae Barnhill


Lenore Bonham
Juanita Borman
William Christiansen
Thelma Corn
Ervin Hansen
Lloyd Hutter
Don Jefferson
Ruth Linder

John Magaret
Orpha McCarter
Doris Pflug
LeRoy Rothermund
Gladys Schmidt
Viola Uhe
Mrs. E. L. Beachy, Teacher

Fifty.Three

KINDEilGARTEN

FIRST GTIADE

Alvena Christiansen
John Daup
Marion Dooley
Iva Mae Norton
Eileen Pflug;.
Eileen Plunkett
Willard Reinking
Eileen Spearman
Lloyd Zeorian

Frances Cook
Lorene Co1n
Cecil Cunningham
Evelyn Dillard
Grace Fricke
Harold Fricke
Junior Holcomb
Elizabeth Holcomb
Frances Jefferson
Harry Jefferson
Irene Miller
Harry Smith
Edgar Sorensen
Marion Stenten

Ellen Doan, Teacher

Mr. Beachy. came to us from Valentine, Nebr. He


has been with us one year and in that time has won a
place in the hem-ts of every one.

FiftrSix

Coach E. L. Beachy, Capt. Ernest Magaret, Philip


Steyer, Edwin Hagedorn, Herman Haeberlein, Wendell McManamy, John Beadle, Harvey Arbuthnot,
Alvin Huebner.

FiftySev&n

Back row: Coach E. L. Beachy, Capt. Ernest Magaret,


Philip Steyer, Edwin Hagedorn, Herman Haeberlein,
Wendell McManamy, John Beadle, Harvey Arbuthnot,
Alvin Huebner.
Front row: Gleen Beerline, Carl Fricke, Kenneth Ken-
nedy, Harold Cordes, Floyd Trumble, George Ayers,
Jesse Reinking, Calvin Sorensen.

----~--Fifty-Eight

'

BASKETBALL 1926
Team
Pap:lllion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion

Score
41
22
18
16
23
35
20
26
26
18
17
14
16
12
23
26

Score
Opponents
5
Gretna
11
Springfield
Am. Bus. College 23
hi
Central Res.
9
Dana Indep.
10
Louisville
34
Valley
17
Murdock
21
Springfield
12
Arlington
23
Central Res.
25
Benson
28
Valley
22
Weston
25
Benson
15
Central Res.

Where
Played
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Papillion
Louisville
Valley
Murdock
Springfield
Papillion
Omaha
Papillion
Papillion
Weston
Omaha
Papillion

Date
Played
Dec. 3
Dec. 11
Dec. 12
Dec. 18
Jan. 8
Jan. 14
Jan. 15
Jan. 22
Jan. 27
Jan. 19
feb. -2
Feb. 5
Feb. 12
Feb. 19
Feb. 20 ,
Feb. 24

Fifty-Nine

Miss Krejci has been the girls' basketball


coach for fhe five years she has been heie. lt is
due to her splendid coaching that the teams have
had such great success. She has willingly given
her time for the sake of the teams both in coaching and going on trips with us.
We, the team of '26, wish to express to her
our sincere appreciation.

~~~====~---------Sixt;y

FIRST TEAM, GIRLS'


Blanche Crabtree, Helen Spearman, Dorothy Fase, Mildred Arbuthnot,
Dorthy Jacobey, Capt., Pearl Rothermund, Amelia Magaret, Miss Estella
Krejci, Coach.

Sixty-One

SECOND TEAM
Back row: . Louise Eitelgeorge, Alma Schwab, Beulah Ross, Donaldine
McManamy, Ruth Horn, Olive Siebold, Miss Estelle Krejci, Coach.
Front row: ,.Merle Smith, Elizabeth Sprague, Mabel Nielsen, Mildred
Sprague, Mildred Stenten, Gladys Zwiebel.

Sixty-Two

BASKETBALL
Papillion ________________ 36
Papillion ________________ 29
Papillion ________________ 31
Papillion ________________ 47
Papillion ________________ 34
Papillion ________________ 12
Papillion ________________45
Papillion ________________ 18
Papillion ________________ 11)
Papillion ________________ 38
Papillion ________________ 21
Papillion ________________ 53

Springfield ---------------- 9
Louisville __________________ 10
Y. W. C. A. ______________ 23
Murdock ____________________ 25
Springfield ________________ 22
Alumni ---------------------- 3
Valley ________________________ 16
Bellevue ______________ ______ 18
Valley ________________________ 22
Y. W. C. A. ______________ 50
Bellevue -------------------- 5
Murdock -------------------- 5

Sixty-Three

THE CARNIVAL
The night of February 5th was a gala night for the Papillion High
School. It was the occasion of the annual carnival given for the benefit of
the basketball teams.
The committees were in the following competent hands: Chicken Dinner, Mrs. Barnhill; Booths, Amelia Magaret; Stunts, Wendell McManamy;
Advertising, Philip Steyer; Equipment, Edwin Hagedorn; Popcorn, Dorothy
Jacobey.
The P. H. S. Orpheum, a program of five acts, was presented. Each
class was responsible for one act and a prize was given for the best. The
Eighth Grade presented Samson's troupe, a variety act. A Musical Revue
of 1927, clever and entertaining, was the act of the Freshmen. The Sophomores, always modern, contented themselves with Broadcasting from Ku
Ku with James Nickerson as Announcer Clock. Tazh Moha, the man who
knows, in the person of Stanley Beerline, was the contribution of the
Juniors. Many and profound were the mysteries performed by him. The
Seniors presented a one-act play, The Train to Maura.
The Sophomores were the lucky ones to receive the prize, a two-pound
box of chocolates. Mr. H. A. Collins, Mr. H. A. Sander and Mrs. D. S. Fase
were the judges.
The chief attnictions of the Carnival were the basketball games, Benson Boys vs. Papillion Boys, and Valley Girls vs. Papillion Girls. These
were both good games and the excellent school spirit was in evidence.

Besides being a great deal of fun, this carnival was financially one of
the most successful ever given. So, here's to the Spirit of Carnival, may
he always be as successful.

Sixty-Four

{j
.Vl'

Boys' Basketball Season


The 1926 basketball season closed with a world
of pep and enthusiasm. Everyone gave cheers in
countless numbers in acclaiming the 1926 Boys'
Basketball team as champions of Class G.
They proved the truth of several famiuar expressions such as: "you can't keep a good team
down," "there's many a slip between the cup and
the lip," "don't count your chickens before they
are hatched."
The season was very successful in respect to
victories, in a financial way and development of
the players physically and morally. At the start
of the season it appeared as though no defeats
would be chalked up by this team but alas, all
doubt was removed after it lost six games straight
in the middle of the season. This was due mainly
to the exceedingly fast competition and not entirely poor playing on their part. Five of these
defeats were administered by teams who later
played basketball in the state tournament in classes A, B and C. However, after a few more games
were won and lost they mustered all courage and
fiO'ht possible to finally lose their jinx and never
b~wed to defeat again, closing the season with
nine consecutive victories with fast company.
New teams played this year for the first time
in the history of the school athletics were: Arlington, Weston, Murdock, Central Reserves, Valley,
Paxton, Ainsworth and Oakdale.
When the classifications first appeared in the
state papers giving the first round opponents, very
few people felt as though Papillion High School
had a chance to win in Class G. There were
twenty-two classes running to W and 341 teams
making the largest tournament in the world.
These same state papers picked Oakdale as the
favorites for Class G champions. However, .Papio
High refused to concede anything but respect for
their opponents and remembered. that dope is
dope and nothing more. 'l'o prove this they turned
the old bucket up side down and won from Paxton,
a team that twice defeated North Platte, a class A
team. Papio continued cutting down opposition by
eliminating Big Springs, Ainsworth and Oakdale

thereby capturing the Class. G Championship.


This was the _first state cup that Papillion High
School boys ever won-hence the many jubilees
that were given them upon their return home
which explains all the pep and excitement .shown
at the close of the season.
Next year the team w ... be without the services of three valuable players: Philip Steyer,
Edward Hagedorn and Alvin Huebner. All three
finished the season in a commendabl~ way by
pulling in points at Lincoln when they were badly
needed. This was Huebner's first year and he
showed remaTkable ability at center or forward.
"Eddie" was a serious player at all times. Due to
his style of shooting, many of his would be goals
were snuffed out before they got away. But he
made up for this with his agility to grab passes
intended for the opponents. "Figs" was handicapped during most of the season with a pulled
muscle. This kept him from most of the games
but was a valuable guard in the state tourney and
deserves much credit in displaying "stick-to~
itiveness" in spite of his injury.
The rest of the squad expects to "carry on" next
year and with everybody's help prospects are
bright for another winning team. Several second
team players this year will probably rate something a little higher next year.
Ernest Magaret, alias "Doc", was captain of this
year's team. He was a marked man in every contest and reason enough for being so for even then
he frequently eluded his guards with his speed
and pivots. He is a steady player, a hard fighter
and great things are expected of him next year.
Haeberlein is the iceberg of the team. He
makes his presence felt by his steady nerves when
the game is close. "Ham" has just enough temper to put the necessary fight in all the others.
He is a forward with a keen eye for the goal but
also got some good experience as a guard which
position he played effectively.
Beadle is the captain-elect of the 1927 team.
He is a faithful worker and always gives his best.

Sixty-Five

Next year Johnny is going to show the crowds


how to connect with the hoop. He will prove to be
a capable captain.
Arbuthnot and McManamy, "Pete" and "Me",
the two one-year guards, can hardly be showered
with too much praise for their playing this year.
It was always their aim to be in the thick of it

and advance the ball to the center or forwards


whenever they could. They had some tough assignments to take care of in the way of opposing
forwards and in most cases took care of them
0. K. This has been a valuable year of experience
for them and next year they will take all the joy
out of the game for the opponents.

Girls' B<-1sketball Season


The 1925-26 season has been a very successful
one for Girls' Basketball. More girls turned out
for practice than in previous years and much enthusiasm prevailed.

upon their responsiveness to training, the fine


spirit of co-operation that alone makes team worK
possible, and their loyalty at all times to the
ideals of their school.

The first team started the season with eight


straight victories, then suffered two reverses, and
ended the regular season with two games in
which they completely outclassed their opponents
in all departments of the game. In the twel vc
games played, the Papillion team chalked up ~~0
points against their opponents' 207.

Five of the first team players are Senior::; and


finish their high school basketball career this Aeason. While their absence from the ranks w1ll l1e
felt keenly next year, the1e are many member::;
of the second team and reserves who have been
practicing faithfully during the past season, who
will give good account of themselves in upholding
the high standing of the Papillion Girls' Teams
during the coming years .

The members of the team are to be comm<>ndcd

...

::,1xty-Six

Miss Helen P. Cleland has been instructor of


music here the past two years. It is through her
able directing that a splendid Orchestra and Glee
Club have been organized.

Sixt~-Eight

ORCHESTRA
First row: Stanley Beerline, Wendel McManamy, Raymond Cordes, Alvin Huebner, Ruth Horn, Florence Prinz,
Milton Fricke and Herman Haeberlein.
Second row: John Haug, Howard Schobert, Pearl Rothermund, Earnest Magaret, Miss Helen Cleland, Director;
Carl Fricke, Herbert Keefer, Loren Doenges and lrvin
Doenges.

---~---

PAPILLION HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA


On September 7, 1925 Papillion's High School Orchestra
was organized by Miss Helen Cleland, music instructor. The
Orchestra meets every day in the Gynasium from 11 :20 to
12:00 for practice.
Thirteen members enrolled for the first semester's work.
They were Stanley Beerline, Piano; Alvin Huebner, Raymond Cordes and Wendell McManamy, Violins; Orville
Brownlee and Florence Prinz, Saxophones; Irvin Doenges,
Banjo; Loren Doenges, Trombone, John Haug, Clarinet;
Ernest Magaret, Herbert Keefer and Carl Fricke, Comets;
and Herman Haeberlein, Drums. At the beginning of the
second semester Orville Brownlee dropped out and Milton
Fricke took his place. Other new members for the 2nd
semester were Pearl Rothermund and Howard Schobert,
Clarinets; Ruth Horn, Violin; and Emery Megel, Trombone.
On December 4 the orchestra played several selections
before the operetta, "The Golden Whistle", was given.
On January 15 the Orchestra went to Springfield and
played for the Parent -Teachers meeting. On January 18
they played for the Papillion Parent-Teachers meeting.
On March 22 the Orchestra played over the radio from station K. 0. I. L. in Council Bluffs.

) Seventy

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB


Erna Schauland
Mildred Arbuthnot
Miriam Collins
Thelma Way
Marie Cordes
Alma Schwab
Myrtle Clausen
Irene Cordes
Evelyn Eichner
Margery Ehlers
Lorene Eichner
Irene Frazeur
Louise Eitelgeorge
Clara Hagan
Marie Hagedorn
Ruth Kroeger
Mabel Nielsen
Lillian Jacobey
Ruby Otten
Ruth Lutz
Laurine Schauland
Blanche Miller
Olive Siebold
Louise Mundt
Mildred Sprague
lJonaldine McManamy
Helen Virgin
Elizabeth Oliver
Hattie Schauland
Miss Helen Cleland, Director

Seventy-One

THE GOLDEN WHISTLE


Friday evening, December 4, the pupils of the
grades presented the operetta, "The Golden
Whistle."
Beffo, awaking, after a nap in the woods one
Summer afternoon, sees before him the Little Old
Woman. After talking to him, she gives him, on
her departure, the Golden Whistle. He soon finds
that whenever he blows it, all the fairy folks of the
woods, as well as birds, flowers and butterflies
come in answer to its summons. They prove delightful and entertaining companions, and when
the Golden Whistle is lost and stolen by the White
Rabbit, they summon to Beffo's aid the Fairy
Queen herself. The old woman returns and the
Fairy Queen re)eases her from the evil enchantment which had been over her.
Throwing off the long cloak she stands revealed,
a lovely young girl. Everyone joins in a Grand
March led by Beffo and Alcea, the beautiful maid.

The Girls' Glee Club gave an Operetta, March 19, 1926.


The title was "Eeny-Meeny-Miney-Mo."
It is a story of a young girl who is attending boarding
school. She has two suitors, one who is in Japan. She
finally decides to marry the one from Japan.

Cast of Characters
Virginia __________________________________________________________ Hattie Schauland
Mercedes ________________________________________________________________ Clara Hagan
Elizabeth -----------------------~ --------------------------Mildred Arbuthnot
Madge -------------------------------------------------- Donaldine McManamy
I sa bel ____________________________________ --------- ___________________ E rna Scha uland
Miss Grundy ________ ____ ________________________________________ Marie Hagedorn
Sammie __________________________________________________________________ Helen Virgin
Mrs. Lair __________________________ ------------------------ ____________ Louise Mundt
Bob _______ -~-- __________ ------ _____ --------- _________________________________ .. Ruby Otten
Maid ____________________________________________________________________ Myrtle Clausen
Chorus
Miriam Collins
Irene Cordes
Lillian J acobey
Ruth Lutz
Elizabeth Oliver

Lilly Carstens
Lorene Eichner
Louise Eitelgeorge
Mildred Sprague
Mildred Stenten

Irene Frazeur ---------------- ------~----------------------------- Stage Manager


Ruth Kroeger ____________________________________________________ House Manager
Marie Cordes ______________________________________________________________ Costumes
Blanch Miller ___________ . ____________________________________ Business Manager
Lorine Schauland _____________________.___________________________________ Assistant

~--e-'rlty-Two

ALUMNl

The Alumni are a peppy bunch.


Since they have left our school:
The reason for this, I will guess
Is the training received at P. H. S.
They left our school at different years,
Some in smiles and some in tears,
But most of them to-day would like
To be with us again for old times sake.

-Alvin Huebner, '26

Seventy-Four

GRADUATES OF PAPILLION HIGH SCHOOL


In 1888
Herbert Wilcox, First National Bank of Omaha ______________________ Papillion, Nebr.
In r889
Tena Schaab-Brown-W.ilcox, Married ________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Mabel Geddes-Stone, Married ______________ __________________________________________ Qmaha, Nebr.
Albert Copenhaver, Pacific Express Co ------~------------------- ------------ St. Louis, Mo.
In 1890
Married ______________________________________________________Denver, Colo.
E~fth aC~~:;t~oe~:r M~:~~i~d--------------------------------------------------------~m~ha, Nebr.
--------------------------------------------------------Richfield, Nebr.
,
In 1891
7{~lls Wilcox, Business Secretary ________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Bla~cteea~:~~b~l~~s::~~n~~~ri~~~~i~d ________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
~ell~h Stomer-Hudson,

~~?;ri~l~:~~:: ~~~~i~~ --:- -~ : ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~:~ : ~ if~f-~ff~

.
fu1~2
Tillie Fase-Clarke-Hoscher-Aulin, Married ____________________________ Cheyenne, Wyo .

In 1893
'
Clara Stormer-Nichols, Married __________________________________________________ Norfolk, Nebr.
In 1894
No class graduated this year.
In 1895
No class graduated this year.
In 1896
Margaret Lees-Fase, Married ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Carrie Lees-Smith, Married ________________________________________________ Council Bluffs, Iowa
Rena Ayer-Martin, Deceased _____________________________________________________ _
Emma Catherwood-Schaab, Married ________________________________________Papillion, Nebr.
Birdie Stormer-McClaskey, Married __________________________________________ Stratton, Nebr.
Virdie Welch, At Home __________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Lottie Carpenter-Trumble, Married ______________________________________________ Hazard, Nebr.
In 1897
Art Ireland, Automobile Salesman ______________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
David Bell, Doctor --------------------------------------~---------------------------------------Blair, Nebr.
William Daup, Minist er ______________________________________________________________ :_________ N ew York
James Bell, Deceased ------------~---------------------------------------------------Ernest Empey, Deceased----------------------------------------------------------Fred Salsbury, Collecting Agency ________________________________________________ Lincoln, Nebr.
Cora Schobert-Stoft, Married ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
In 1898
Roscoe N ownes ---------------------------------------------------------------------------Chas. Trumble, Farmer______________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
James Nolan, Vice Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. Menihan Shoe Co.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Rochester

' New
M York
t
Edith Jewett-Oberfell, Married ________________________________________________ Sld?-ey, .on ana
Mamie Lees-Andrews, Married ____________________________________________ Council Bluffs, Iowa
In 1899
No class. One year was added to the Course, making 11 grades.

Seventy-Five

In 1900
Luella Nichols ............................................................................. .
Edith Trumble-Lanktree, Married ________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Tillie Rosencrans-Tex, Married ____________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
In 1901
Gertrude Schobert-Dietz, Married ____________________________________________ Papillion, N ebr _
Gertrude Sipherd-Robinson, Married ______________________________________________ Tulsa, Okla.
Eliza Wilson, Clerk of District Court________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Florence Danke -------------------------------------------------------------------------In 1902
Marguerite Dooley-Rosell, Married __________________________________________________ Chicago, Ill.
Delia Gates-Miller, Married __________________________________________________________ Gilmore, Nebr.
Amos Gates, Business __________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Lizzie Kline-Smazal, Married ______________________________________________________ Brandon, Nebr.
Charlie Lieber, Doctor________________________________________________________________________ Chicago, Ill.
Lottie Welsn-Sheehan, Married __________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Edna Wilson-Barton, Married ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
In 1903
Laura Adams-Timbrook, Married ________________________________________________________ California
Mabel Anderson-Beblack, Married ________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Eleanor Dooley, Teacher ________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Almeda Fredrick, Deceased _______________________________________________________ _
Carrie Jewett-Hammond, Married ____________________________________________ Sidney, Montana
Mayme Lilley-Rosencrans, Married ___ :__________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
In 1904
Lola Cain -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Geneva Critchfield-Dooley, Married __________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Lena Gehringer-Lilley, Married __________________________________________________ Gilmore, Nebr.
Albert Gille ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Glenn Nichols ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Colorado
In 1905
Oswald Doenges, Business ______________________________________________________________ Oak Park, IlL
Eunice J ewett-San,dgren, Married:_________________________________ McLaughlin, So. Dak.
Margaret Rogers -----------------------------------------------------------------------Geraldine Secord, Deceased _______________________________________________________ _
Clara Startzer, At Home ______________________________________________________________ P apillion, Nebr.
In 1906
Emil Fricke, Business ____________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Ida Fricke, At Home .... ________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Ada Hagan, N urse ___________________ _____________________________________________________ Ashland, Nebr.
Mae Patterson-Barber, Married ________________________________________________________________ Florida
Nettie Schram-Farrell, Deceased _____________________________________________ _
Eula Wester-Ross, Married ____________________________________________________________ Benson, Nebr.
In 1907
Grace Clarke-Davidson, Married _________________________________ ___________ Springfield, Nebr.
Myrtle Elfeldt ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Colorado
Mae Gatewood-May, Married ____________________________________________________ Chapman, Nebr.
Stella Stoft-Merchant, Married ........................... :...... ,. ________________ Omaha, Nebr.
In 1908
No, Class.
In 1909
Ida Gates-King, Bible Institute ________________ ............................................ California
Cordelia Gramlich-Borman, Married .... ____________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.

Seventy-Six

Frances Lieber-Hagan, Deceased _____________________________________________ _


Grace Pflug, Employee of Union Pacific ______________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
In 1910
Lillie Boiling-Sutter, Married ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Mae Rhode-Greve, Married _____________________._____________________________________________ California
Irene Trumble, Music T~acher ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
In 1911
Fred Gramlich, Farmer __________________________________________________________________ Chalco, Nebr.
Marie Harder-Kaslin, Married ______________________________________.___________ _Davenport, Iowa
Valentine Klein, Farmer __________________________ __ ______________________________________ Grant, Nebr.
Clara Lieber-Harper, Married ______________________________________________ ________ Massachusetts
Blanche Pflug-Westover, Married ________________________________________________________ Michigan
Leona Snyde, Postmistress ________________________________________________________ Papillion, N ebr _
In 1912
Verna Bignell-Andresen, Married ________________________________________________ Ralston, Nebr.
Ella Bolling-Woodward, Married __________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Barbara Gramlich-Callaway, Married ______________________________________________ Chicago, Ill.
Clair King -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------Estella .Maxfield-Livingston, Married __________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Chester Rhode --------------------------------------------------------------------Whittier, California
Leila Sutter-Elsasser, Married ____________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Clarence Welch, Captain in Army _________________ _____________________________________ Canal Zone
Ruth West-Strawn, Married ______________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
In 1913
Caroline Bloedel ______________________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Ida Bossard, Business ___________________ _______________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Pearle Carpenter-Lamb, Deputy Co. Treasurer ________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Helene Clarke-Farber, Married _______________________________________________________ _____ Califorriia
Maud Corey-Shepherd, Married ____________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Forrest King, Business ________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Frances Klein-Stepp, Married ____________________________________________________ Pa pillion, Nebr.
Georgia Oliver-Vance, Married ________________________________________________ Lexington, Nebr.
Irma Pflug, At Home _______________________________________________________________ ___ Papillion, Nebr.
Nina Rhode-Linberg, Married ____________________________________________ Whittier, California
Charles Reis, Railroad ________________________________________________________________ Fremont, Nebr.
Anna Schmitz-Schram, Married _________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Elsie Seibold-Clarke, Married ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Ralston Spearman, Banker___________
Bridgeport, Nebr.
Veda Spearman-Wester, Married ______________________________________________ J ohnston, Nebr.
La verna Zwiebel-Timm, Married ______________________________________________ Ft. Crook, Nebr.
Lucy Zwiebel-Schobert, Married ________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
< _______ : ________________________________

In 1914
Kenneth Barton, Wire ChieL __________________________________________________________ Boise, Idaho
Karl Brown, Cashier Bank. _________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Kenneth Brown, Store ____________________________________________________________ Pomona, California
Doris Clarke-Becker, Married ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Milton J ungmeyer, Automobile Business ______________________________ ____ Cortland, Nebr.
Gladyz King, Business ____________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Anna McComick-Strahl, Married ____________________________________________ so. Omaha, Nebr.
Laura Saalfeld-Weidenschilling, Deceased _____________________________ _
Marie Sander-Rice, Married __________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Edna Shafer ______________________________________________________________________________ Milwaukee, Wis.
Claude Welch, Business __________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Elsie Zwiebel-Uhe, Married ________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.

_ _ _:~==========
Seventy-Seven

In 1915
Marian Brown, Deceased ___________________________________________________________ _
Maude Carlson-Boiling, Married ________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Ruth Corey-Woodrow, Married __________________________________________________ Cleveland, Ohio
Edith Gramlich, Teacher ______________________________________________________________ Clarinda, Iowa
Walter J ungmeyer, Automobile Business ______________________________________ Chicago, Ill.
Eva Kennedy-Johns, Married _______________________________________ , ________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Ralph Nickerson, Lawyer ____________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Agnes Palla, Teacher___________________________________________ , ____________________ So. Omaha, Nebr.
Fred Rhode, Deceased _________________________________________________________________ _
Amelia Schmidt-Swanson, Married ______________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr .
Martha Spearman-Irwin, Married __________________________________________ Ainsworth, Nebr.
Lloyd Wright, Creamery _________________ ,______________________________________________ Lincoln, Nebr.
Marjorie Thornton, Deceased ___________________________________________________ _
Anna Zwiebel, At Home ______________________________________________________________ Ft. Crook, Nebr.

,.

In 1916
Dorothy Hanchett-Wright, Married ____________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Hazel King, Business ______________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Harold Morrison, Business ____________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Mary Platt, Teacher ______________________________________________________________ Los Angeles, Calif.
Harold Plunkett, Insurance Agent ____________________________________ Council Bluffs, Iowa
Hazel Sieberg ________________________________________________________________________________________Wisconsin
Marie Spearman-Ellis, Married ____________________________________________________ Benson, Nebr.
Clarence Becker, Creamery.__________________________________________________________ Seward, Nebr.
Alice Bell-Zeeck, Deceased _______________________________________________________ _
Pauli:o.e Bell-Spearman, Deceased _____________________________________________ _
Alice Bossard-Eaton, Married ____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Eunice Davis-Witmuss, Married ______________________________________________ Ft. Crook, Nebr.
Ethel Daup, Business __________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Louise Durkop-Dreyer, Married ____________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
In 1917
Henry Byrne, Railroad __________________________________________________________ Grand Island, Nebr .
Frank Deter, Farmer __________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Paul Fricke, Minister __________________________________________________________________________________Illinois
Mary Gramli~h, At Home __________________________________________________________ Ft. Crook; Nebr.
Amanda Harder, Nurse __________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Brayton Hanchett, Business ________________________________________________________________ Minnesota
Gladys Horn-Plunkett, Deceased _____________________________________________ _
Earl Lieber, Farmer ____________________________________________________________________ Ft. Crook, Nebr.
Frank Schmidt ______________________________________________________________________________________ California
Margaret Schmitz, Business ______________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Tom McClure, Deceased _____________________________________________________________ _
Agnes Spearman-Wilson, Married ________________________________________ Bridgeport, Nebr.
Gladys Sutter, Teacher ______________________________________________ University Place, L'ncoln
Elizabeth Behrendt-Krambeck, Married __________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
In 1918
Arnold Boettcher ____________________________________________________________________________Millard, Nebr.
Leland Hanchett, Attending SchooL ___________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Merle Barton, Switch Board Maintenance ________________________ San Francisco, Calif.
Dewey Calloway, Farmer ____________________ . ___________________________________ Springfield, Nebr.
Wesley Fricke, Farmer________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
George Larson, Farmer ________________________________________________________________ Ralston, Nebr.
Mildred Schobert, Teacher __________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Dorothy Sutter, Teacher ____________________________________________ University Place, Lincoln

~~~~~------
Seventy-Eight

Marie Wixon, Nurse ____________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.


Arthur Zwiebel, Railroad _______________________________________________________ _______.________ California
In 1919
May Bell-Melia, Married ______________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
John Fricke, Business ___________________________ , ______________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Blanche Gramlich-Campbell, Married __________________________________________________ California
Olga Lenser-Becker, Married ______________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Harry Platt, Garage ______________________________________________________________Plattsmouth, Nebr.
Mary Wixon, N urse ________________________________________________________________________Omaha, Nebr.
In 1920
Paul ,Graham, Cashier in Bank_ _________________________________________________ Richfield, Nebr.
Arthur Witmuss, Farmer __________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Anna Byrne-Janda, Married __________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Bert Calder, Attending Chicago Art Institute ________________________________ Chicago, Ill.
Leta Fase, Deputy Co. Clerk_ _____________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Lydia Fricke, At Home ________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Elsie Gramlich, University of Nebraska __________________________________Papillion, Nebr.
Freda Schmidt, Teacher ________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Ruth Seibold, Teacher____________________________________________________________ Scotts Bluff, Nebr.
Marguerite Urion-Clarke, Married _____________ _________________________________ Norfolk, Nebr.
Kenneth Reis, Farmer________________________________________________________________ Richfield, Nebr.
Marie Schaab, Teacher ________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Emily Phelps-Lieber, Married ____________________________________________ ! _____ Ft. Crook, Nebr.
Gertrude Phelps, Omaha University ____________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
In 1921
Lester Lutz, Farmer ____________________________________________________________________ Ft. Crook, Nebr.
Esther Keefer, Teacher ______________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
James Klingeman, Drug Store ______________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Emery Plunkett, Garage ___________________________________________ _____________________________ California
Louis Reinking, Commercial Trust Co. ____________________________________________ Chicago, Ill.
Faith Spearman, University of Nebraska ________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Bruno Schmidt, University of Nebraska ____________________________________ Lincoln, Nebr.
Margaret Schobert, University of Nebraska ____________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Daniel Seibold, University of N ebraska ____________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Blanche Seibold, Teacher ____________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Clare Sitts, Stenographer____________ , _______________________________________________ Bellevue, Nebr.
John Skinner, Business _________________________________________________ _________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Gladys Bell-Haney, Married ______ ______________________ __________________________ Sioux City, Iowa
Echo Chapin, Teacher ________________________________ ___________________________ _________ Ralston, Nebr.
Delia Carlson, Teacher________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Mattie Gramlich, University of California ______________ __________-__________________ California
Loretta Voss-Rice, Married ____________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
Frances Boyer, Business ________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.
In 1922
Audra Chapin, Teacher __________________________________________________________________ Ralston, Nebr.
Raymond Fase, Business ____________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Lorine Johansen, University of N ebraska ______________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Elmer Cordes, Business ___________________ ___________________________________________ Papillion, Neor.
Gerald Collins, University of N ebraska ______________________________________ Papillion, N ebr
Harland Trumble, University of N ebraska ______________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Ethel Thompson -------------------------------------------------------------------------Henry Zwiebel, Boyles College __________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Pearl Spearman, University of Nebraska ________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Ferne Archer, At Home ______________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.

Seventy-Nine

Ellen Pflug, Nurse __________________________________________________________________________ Omaha, Nebr.


In 1923
Elizabeth McKulsky, Teacher ____________________________________________________ Ft. Crook,
James Arbuthnot, Creighton University __________________________________ Papillion,
Harold Becker -----------------------------------------------------------------------------Ivy Beerline, Nurse .......... -----------------------------------------------~----------Papillion,
Esther Cordes, Business ______________________________________________________________ Papillion,
Hannah Clifton-Nichelsen, Married ______________________________________________ Omaha,
Dorothy Dietz, Teacher ______________________________________________________________ Papillion,
Jessie Fase-Sam uel, Married __________________________________________________________ Omaha,
Margaret Graham, University of Omaha ______________________________________ Omaha,
Abner Hagedorn, Farmer _______________________________________________ :__________ Papillion,
Leona Harder, Teacher _______________________________________________________________ Millard,
Golda Keefer, Business --------------------------------------------------------------Papillion,
Willard Pflug, Business ______________________________________________________________ Papillion,
Margaret Reis, At Home ____________________________________________________________ Richfield,
Florence Sitts, County Telephone Department __________________________ Bellevue,
Carl Sorenson, Farmer_________________________________________________________ _____ Papillion,
Thelma Spearman, Teacher__ __________________________ ________________________ Bridgeport,
Grace Stoft, Teacher _________________ ___________ ______________________________________ Papillion,

Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.

In 1924
Pearl Waters-Klein, Married ______________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Frances McKulsky, Nurse ________________________________________________________ Ft. Crook, Nebr.
Delia Pacey, Teacher__________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
William N u tt, Farmer ______________________________________________________________ Springfield, Nebr.
Kathryn Schobert, Teacher ________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Marie Arp-Brown, Married ______________________________________________________ Lexington, Nebr.
Helen Becker,. University of N ebraska ______________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Vera Bolling, Business ________________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Inez Beerline-Risor, Married ____________________________________________________________________ Florida
Wayne Collins, University of N ebraska _____________________ _____________ Papillion, Nebr.
Noreen McCoy-Beadle, Married __ .__________________________________________________________... Florida
1VIearl Hagedorn, Farmer ______________________________________________ __________ ____ Papillion, Nebr.
Caroline Haug, At Home __ __________________________________________________________ Papillion, Nebr.
Pearl Keefer, Teacher----------------------------------------------------------------Papillion, Nebr.
Vera Huebner, Teacher______________________________________________ ________________ Papillion, Nebr.
In 1925
Violet Doenges, N urse _____________________ ___________________________________________ Papillion,
Delmar Dietz, At Home ______________________________________________________________ Papillion,
Fred Fricke, North western Uni ________________________________________________ Papillion,
Stella Fase, Teacher__ __________________________________________________________________ Papillion,
Louis Kremke, Salesman ___________________ _________________________________________ Papillion,
Bernice Keefer, Nurse's Training ___________________________________________ _Papillion,
Amos Lilley, Creighton Uni.. ______________________________________________________ Gilmore,
Anna Paulsen, Business ________________________________________________________________ Omaha,
Martha Zwiebel, Uni of N ebr. ____________________________________________________ Papillion,
Margaret Virgin, At Home ________________________________________________________ Papillion,
Helen Arp, At Home ________________________________________________________ : ___________ Papillion,
Viola Bell, At Home ______________________________ _____________________________________ Papillion,
Susie Arbuthnot, Teacher ________________________________________________________ Papillion,
Marguerite Brown, National Park Seminary, Wash. D. C..... Papillion,
Thelma Brown, Business ____________________________________________________________ Papillion,

Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
ij' ebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.
Nebr.

- - - $ - - -Eighty

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SANDER'S STORE
ONE OF PAI ' lLLION'S OLDEST BUSINESS INSTITUTIONS

Proof of It's Outstanding Stability


and
Successful Merchandising

Dry Goods, Furnishings, Shoes, Notions.

Groceries, Fruits and Vegetables

H. A. SANDER, Propiietor

-~amnnmmmmDII_nTTDmmnnnumw

Eighty-Two

''''''' ,, ,,,,,,,,,

""""""'"'"""'""""""""""""""""'""""""""""""' '"""""""'""""'""'""""'""""""""""'""'"""'"'""~

THE VALUE OF A SMILE

Marie Mc.-"Oh, yes, auntie; ~ man offered me


a big plate of money and I said, 'No, thank you'."

It costs nothing, but creates much.


It enriches those who receive, without impoverishing those who give.
It happens in a flash and the memory of it
sometimes lasts forever.

None are so rich they can get along without it,


and none so poor but are richer for its benefits.

Jane-"I'm going to sell kisses at the charity


bazaar tonight. Do you think one dollar each is
too much to charge for them?"
Paul Mc.-"No. People at these affairs always
expect to pay more than a thing is worth."

It creates happiness in the home, fosters goodwill in a business, and is the countersign of
friends.
It is rest to the. weary, daylight to the discouraged, sunshine to the sad, and nature's best antidote for trouble.

Yet it cannot be bought, begged, borrowed, or


stolen, for it is something that is no earthly good
to anybody till it is given away!
-Exchange.

John B-"I'm trying to grow a moustache and


I'm wondering what color it will be when it comes
out."
Philip S.-"At the rate it is growing I should
think it will be gray."

Surgeon-"I'll sew that scalp wound for you


for ten dollars."
'
Carl F.-"Gee, Doc, I just want plain sewing,
not hemstitching and embroidery.

Parson-"You love to go to Sunday School,


don't you Irvin'!"
Irvin D.-"Yes, Sir."
Parson-"What do you expect to learn today?"
Irvin-"The date of the picnic."

Aunt-"And were you a good little girl at


church this morning?"

"Now", said the Sunday School teacher, "Why


is a certain part of the church called the altar?"
"Because," said George Ayers, "ifs where people alter their name."

Mercedes Schaab thought their Ford had a new


invention in it. She was proudJy telling all about
its "intermission."

Madge-"Is that little brother of yours a


tease?"
Marjorie-"That kid is the limit. He put a "No
Parking' sign on the place where I hung up ~Y
mistletoe."

"Where is the island of Cuba?" asked the


teacher.
"I dunno, ma'am."
"Don't you know where your sugar comes
from?"
"Yes, ma'am; we borrow it from next door."

Teacher-"Dear me, how dirty your hands are!


What would you say if I came to school with hands
as dirty as yours?"
Pupil-"Please, miss, I'd be too polite to mention it."

How many sisters have you?

Eighty-Three

DR. 0. H.MAGARET

BE LL'S

Ph ysician a nd Surgeon.

PHA RMACY

Office over Clarke's Bank


Office Phone 16

Residence Phone 91

\'' ATERS' BARBER


SHOP
We have been gratified to have
the p~tronage of so many of the student's for the past twenty years and
the good will they have shown.
We -have a complete line of School
Supplies, also carry the following:
Jewelry, Watches and Clocks, Fountain Pens, Eastmall Cameras, Films,
Stationa ry, Toilet Articles, Fine
Chocolates, Magazin~s,
Athletic
Goods and many other articles usually kept for sale in a first class
drug store.

FIRST CLASS WORK


Hair bobbing a specialty
solicited.

Your patronage

oitl!illllllilliillllili ll illl l lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllll!l!!l!llll!l!!iiiillilllllltllllllllllllliillilliliillllllliillllllillllll lillllll!lllll!llllltlillllliliiiiilllllllllll!!


i !lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliliiiiillllllil!lllllllti//IIII//IIIIII!I!I!IJIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I IIIIIIIIII!IIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIItliliiiiiillllliililllllliill ~

HARVEY A. COLLINS
LAWYER .

Papillion,

Nebraska

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIII!Itlllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltullllltull

IRENE TRUMBLE
Teacher of Pia no
Papillion,

Nebraska.

Studio, Schmoeller & Mueller Bldg.


15.14 Dodge Street,
Omaha,

~frliD

rnrr..m:rr.JJ:mn:mmm "' """""""" """" " "" '

Eighty-Four

Nebr.

One by birth and three by law.

Iky-"Say, Abe, your shirt tail is out."


Abe-"Out Vhere ?"
Iky-"Out vhere the vest begins."

'Tis wrong for any maid to be


Abroad at night alone;
A chapero~e she needs till she
Can call some chap'er own.

"How can you tell when a man has wheels in his


head?"
"By the spok~s that come out of his mouth."

"You said this tpoth has never been worked on before but I find small flakes of gold on my instrument."
"I think you have struck my back collar button,"
moaned the victim.

"Are you laughing at me?" demanded the irate


professor of h1s class.

"No," came the answer in chorus.


"Well," insisted the professor. "What else is
there in the room to laugh at?"

A Freshie and a Sophomore were asked a question. The Freshie began to scratch his head and
the teacher asked him why he did that. "Well,"
he said, "You see I'm the only one who knows
where it itches."

Two women from a country district came to a


Gretchen, Joke Editor-"! certainly don't get
small city to live. One day as they were leaving
""
what's
coming to me for my jokes."
a department store the proprietor was standing
'Classes of '26 and '27 in unison. "Your're
at the door. "Good day." he said courteously, "I
lucky!"
hope you will call again."
"Oh, thanks," replied one of the women not to
be outdone in politeness, "And you must come and_
see us sometime."

English history puzzles me


I never could see why,
Why after so many reigns
It still could be so dry.

George A.-"Ma, can you sign your name with


your eyes shut?"
Mother-"Why, of course, I can."
George-"Then shut your eyes and sign my report card."

"Here's something queer," said the dentist.

There was a young man named Howard,


Who got a new vest that was flowered ;
And his face did shine bright
With a gay, gladsome light
Like a dishpan that's lately scoured.

"Bobby," said the teacher stePnly, "Do you


know that you have broken a commandment by
stealing James' apple?"
"Well," explained Bobby, "I might just as well
break one and have the apple as break another
and only covet it."

First Junior Girl-"I heard you had a beau.


How are you getting along with him?"
Second Junior Girl-"Oh, very well. The first
time he called he took Tootsie, my poodle in his

Eighty-Five

HUNTER BROS. GARAGE


Phone Ralston 19-J

Chevrolet Sales and Service


All Kinds of Auto Repairing
~

Storage

Auto Towing

()
()
t:rj

Dependable Used Cars


24 Hour Service
H . D. HUNTER, Prop.

II

...................

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II

GODFI-tEY'S

LU

E!~~:~Ge~h~~1KET
For Your Money

GRADUATION GIFTS

GROCERIES and MEATS

Phone Market 1270

Phone 1 or 5

South Omaha, Nebr.

2409 N Street

Ralston, Nebraska.

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!!
TOBIN'S PHARMACY

II

C. P. S. Tobin, Prop.

RUSSEL SPRAGUE
Teacher of Violin

South-west Corner 24th and N St s.

Phone 158-W

Nebraska.

Southt Omaha,

~~
"'"""""""'""'

"'""""

Eighty-Six

!!

""

"""""'

"""'"'" '

Papillion, Nebr.

lap. Next time he took Baby Sis, so I suppose it


will be my turn next."

Harvey A.-''I had a position in my father's


office.''
Stanley-"Oh. I wasn't working either."

SEVEN AUES OF WOMAN


Safety pins
Whip-pins
Hair pins
Fraternity pins
'
Diamond pins
Clothes pins
Rolling pins

Mrs. Profiteer was very proud of the stunts they


were doing at the smart private school to which
she had sent her daughter.
"My Dear", she said to her friend, "She's
learning Civics, if you please."
"What's Civics," asked a friend.
"Civics? Why, My Dear, don't you know? It's
the science of interfering in public affairs."

Calvin S.-"Do you think my moustache becoming?"


Irene F.-"I can't see it but I guess it's coming."

Miss Cleland-"Who originated the first geometry propositions?"


Herman H .-"N oah."
Miss Cleland-"How is that?"
Herman-"Didn't he construct an arc B. C ?"

At the Physics examination Mr. Jacobey asked,


"Does the question embarass you?"
"Not at all," replied Philip Steyer. "Not at all.
It's quite clear. It is the answer that bothers me."

Stanley B.-"What have you been doing all


summer?"

Mr. Beachy-"Give three proofs that tne world


is actually round ."
Winifred B.-"Geography says so, you say so,
an_d Ma says so."

Gretchen S.-"Do you understand the traffic


signals?"
Mercedes S.-"Perfectly. When the car ahead
of me starts I do the same."

Teacher in History-"What can you tell me of


the age of Elizaoeth ?"
Gates M.-"She was seventeen last November."
Edythe A.-"My doctor has ordered a hot
shower bath for me every morning and I don't
know how I'm going to take it."
Blanche M.-"Why not heat a grapefruit?"

Dorothy J.-"Do you know the human body


contains 40% water and the amount of sulphur
varies?"
Dorothy F.-"Oh! Is that why some girls
make better matches than others?"

John H.-"If the President dies who gets the


job?"
Frances F.-"The Vice-President."
John-"No, the undertalcer."

The flivver is my car,


I shall not want another,
It maketh me to lie down in wet places,
It soileth my soul,
It leadeth me into deep waters,

Eighty-Seven

AN IRO N SAFE AND A GROCER

Back in the days prior to 1880 when Omaha was the nearest banking
point your parents and grand parents left their money with A. W. Clarke,
the grocer, for safe keeping. This he placed in a big iron safe in the back
of his store.
In those days when they owed a neighbor they would give him a note
written on wrapping paper and addressed to Mr. Clarke, telling him to pay
to the bearer o~t of the funds that he was keeping for them.
Because of his honesty and willingness to aid; many people took advantage of his integrity and in 1880 he was forced to start a bank in the back
ot his store.
'Though small and humble, as it was in those days, its policies of safet y
and service have continued to guide and build this bank to its present size.
You, like your father and your father's father, will continue to find here
everything that safety and service can give.

Banking House of A. W. Clarke


Papillion, Nebraska

Eighty-E ight

It leadeth me into paths of ridicule for its namesake;


It prepareth a breakdown for me in the presence
of mine enemies.
Yea, though I run through the valleys, I am towed
up hills.
I fear great evil when it is with m~
Its rods and its engine discomfort me
It anointeth my face with oil:
Its tanks run over,
Surely to goodness if this thing follow me all the
days of my 1ife I shall dwell in the house of
the insane forever. Amen.

Inquisitive Suitor:__"Edwin, why did you call


your sister Babe?"
Edwin H.-"Well everytime I look in the parlor
she's in somebody's arms or talking like a baby."

"Have you ever laughed until you cried?"


"Yes, I did so this morning."
"How?"
"Father stepped on a tack.-1 laughed-He saw
me-l cried."

"What were you and Mr. Smith talking about in


the parlor?" demanded an irate mother.
"Oh we were discussing our kith and kin," replied the young lady.
"Yeth, you wath," interposed her little sister.
"Mr. Smith athed you for a kith and you said you
kin."

Father-"That man Jerry stayed very late last


night."
Daughter-"Yes, Father, I was showing him
my photo album."
Father-"Well the next time he wants to stay
so late show him my electric light bill."

Said a young cadet to his Juliet

I'm like a ship at sea,


.
Exams are near and much I fear
That I'll a flunker be.

"Oh, no," said she, "A shore I'll be;


"Come, rest, our journey's o'er."
Then silence fell and all was well;
For the ship had hugged the shore.

least once in my life I was glad to be


and out."
"And when was that?"
"After my first trip in an airplane."
'"At

-~ --.-;n

"Clarence", she called.


He stopped the car and looked around.
"I'm not accustomed to call my chauffeurs by their
fi.rst nl:!-me,
"Clarence. What is your surname?"
"Darlin, Madam."
"Drive on, Clarence."

"Jim, that's the worst necktie you are wearing


that I ever saw."
"Say, dine with us tonight, will you?"
"Sure! But what's the connection?"
"I want you to repeat that remark before my
wife."

"Do you think that Professor Kidder meant


anything by it?"
"What?"
"He advertised a lecture "On Fools." I bought
a ticket and it said "Admit One."

She-"I just put my furs into cold sorage."


He-"Cold Storage! Ha! Jolly good, never
had it called that before; my cuff links and watch
are there, too."

Eighty-Nine

W. F. SCHWAB
Dealer

In

The Best of Meats

We make a specialty of pleasing you

lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHlllllllllllllltlltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltrtlllllltlllllllltlllltllllllttlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

lllllllllllllllllliiii/IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIILIIIIJIJIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII.IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllll/lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll/tlltlllllllllllllllllllllll

RINEHART - MARSDEN
Photographs
300-302 South Eighteenth Street

OMAHA

Ninety

"I suppose," sa1d the city man, "That you hatch


all these chickens yourself."
"Nope," retorted the farmer, "we keep hens to
look after those details."

The vicar's appeal had been a most eloquent one


and had even penetrated the depth of Mr. Brown's
granite organ. The latter came forward and offered fifty dollars for the fund.
The Reverend was over-joyed.
"I don't know your name, sir", he said, "but I
thank you from the bottom of my heart. May
your business prosper."
There was a solemn hush and the committee
looked askance at their vicar.
"What's the matter?" whispered the clergyman
turning to the chairman.
'
"Well-er-that donor is an undertaker."

"I'm going to divorce my wife, she hasn't spoken


to me for six months."
"Better be careful. You'll never get another
wife like that."
Lover (anxious to propose)-"Look here, young
man, if you'll see that no one comes into this room
for half an hour, I'll give you a dollar."
Little brother-"Gee, three dollars.
Easy
money."
Lover-"How's that?"
Little brother-"Why, one from you, one from
sister and one from mother."

Boss (sarcastically)-"Oh, I suppose you want


to go to your grandmother's funeral, eh ?"
Office Boy-"No, indeed, grandmother's got her
hair bobbed, wears 'em rolled and she's going
along to the game with me."

A man went to have his picture taken. "Mounted or otherwise?" asked the photographer.

"Well, I'll have it taken mounted," replied the


man, "but I don't know what my wife will say, she
never seen me on a horse before."

"Dearest, this kiss tells you all I have to say.


Have you understood me?"
"Oh, please say it again."

Doctor-"You have acute appendicitis."


Patient-"How you flatter me."

A young man went into a stationery store asking for some cards of sentiment.
Clerk-"Here are some nice ones-"To the Only
Girl I Love."
Young Man-"Give me five, no better give me
six."

Book Agent-"Have you a Charles Dickens in


your house?"
Lady-"No."
B. A.-"Or a Robert Louis Stevenson?"
Lady-"No !"
B. A.-"Or a Gene Field?"
Lady-"No! We haven't and what's more we
don't run no boarding house here neither. If
you're looking for those fellows, you might try the
house across the street."

Sue-"I can't help it if I'm not perfect. There's


only been one perfect little girl."
Mother-"Oh! and who was that?"
Sue-"You, mamma, when you were little."

Wifey-"Only one man when in love ever told


the truth."
Hubby-"Who was that?"
Wifey-"That was Adam when he said, "Eve,
you are the only woman in the world for me."

Ninety-One

""'"""""""""

"""""

HENRY TIMME
Hardware, Paints and Furniture

Our Motto

- "Quality, Ser-vice and Low Prices"

And after all Papillion and vicinity is a


great place in which to live and prosper

Ninety-Two

"" " "

"

' """ '

ii ii ii !ii iijj ii i

"These college girls should make wonderful


firemen."
"Why?"
"Because they've had so much experience rolling
hose."

over again?"
He-"Not so you could notice it. -I got a twentyyear life insurance policy coming due next week."

The young man raises his first mustache on the


installment plan-a little down each week.
Mother-"Where do you feel sick?"
Son-"On my way to school."

"How do you like my moustache, Alice, be frank


about it."
"Between you and me, I don't."

1st Soph.-"You say you flunked in Latin? Why


I can't understand it."
2nd Soph.-"Same here. That's why I flunked."

Sambo-"Mandy, can I kiss you?"


Mandy-"Piggly Wiggly."
Sambo-"What do yo' mean by that?"
Mandy-"Help yo'self."

Long ago
Young Romeo
Loved pretty Juliet.
But what a load
Young Romeowed
For all that Juliet.

Hale and Hearty-"Don't give up the ship, old


fellow."
Dreadfully Seasick-"How can I? I didn't
swallow it, did I?"

A telegram was received by the bride of a civil


engineer who took only winter flannels with him
to the tropics"S 0 S-B. V. D-C 0 D-P. D. Q."

The Four Chapters of High School.


Freshman-"Comedy of Errors."
Sophomore-"As You Like It."
Junior-"lV!uch Ado About Nothing."
Senior-"All's Well That Ends Well."

Soph-"Teachers are worse than immigration


authorities at Ellis Island now days."
Alumnus-"How come?"
Soph-"They've swiped the slogan-"Thou
shalt not pass."

"What geometrical figure is a dead parrot?"


"A polygon." (Polly gone.)
Agent-"Is your mother home, son?"
Wen dell Me., sweeping off sidewalk-"Sure she
is, I wouldn't be doing this if she wasn't."
He said her hair was dyed and when she indignantly said-"Tis false!" he said he presumed
so.

She-"But wouldn't you like to live your life

Amelia M.-"I wish you could work and earn


the money for the candy you send me."
Edwin H.-"If you knew how hard it is to work
Dad you'd think I earned it."

~~~~~~==========
: ~l

Ninety-Three

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II

"''"''"'""""'I

'"'"''""iiiiiiiiii!iiliii!i!iii!i!iii!iii!iii!iilii!ii!

ii!iiiiiiiiiiiii!iili!!

111!1111111

Bakery and Lunch


Fresh Bread and Rolls Daily

All Cake and Other Orders Given


Prompt Attention

Sandwiches, Pie and Coffee

PAPILLION BAKERY
C. F. STAMM, Prop.

fiillll!lll!lljjiiliiii!iiiiiiiiii!ii!iiiiii!iiiiiiiil!llfilllllfllfllll!!lflllllil!i!!l

Ninety-Four

Mrs. Barnhill-"Ernest. your conduct is outrageous, I shall have to consult your father."
Ernest M.-"Better not, teacher, it will cost
you two dollars. He's a doctor."

Youthful Suitor-"You are the sunshine of my


life! You alone reign in my heart. Without you
life is but a dreary cloud."
Beatrice S.-"Is this a proposal or a weather
report?"

Miriam C.-"How much are eggs?"


Grocer-"Thirty cents a dozen for cracked and
fifty cents for good eggs."
Miriam C.-"Crack me a dozen then."

Anna H.-"Oh, see the pussy washing her face."


Helen P.-"She's not washing her face, she's
washing her feet and wiping them on her face."

Marie H.-"Of course, he clasped you in his


arms when the boat upset."
Florence P.-"No, just the opposite."
Marie H.-"Just the opposite, what do you
mean?"
Florence P.-"Why the boat upset as he clasped
me in his arms."

Mrs. Barnhill in American History class.-"Who


can name one important thing we have now that
we did not have one hundred years ago?"
Alvin H.-"Me."

Orville B.-"Gates calls his car true love."


Edna S.-"Why ?"
Orville-"Because it never runs smoothly."

Miss Schaab-"It is very kind of you to ask me

for this dance."


Jesse R.-"Don't mention it, its a charity ball."

"It is very kind of you," said Louise _Weiss to


William Huebner as he knelt before her to put on
her overshoes.
"Don't mention it," replied William. .!'Nevertheless, I'm glad you're not a centipede."

Miss Krej ci-"Can anyone tell me where Noah


lived?"
.
'Beulah R.-"I don't think he had a regular
home, I guess he and his family belonged to the
floating population."

Jesse R.-"Teacher, didn't you say you'd giv~


me a kiss if I could get some greenstuff for your
rabbits?"
"Yes, I did," replied the teacher.
Jesse R.-"Her~'s the greenstuff, and I've sold
the kiss to my big brother for fifty cents."

Lady-"Do you like school Evalena ?"


Evalena Z.-"Yes and I like my tea(!her."
Lady-"What do you learn there, dear?"
Evalena Z.-"Reading, writing and gozintas."
Lady-"Gozintas, what are they?"
Evalena Z.-"Why don't you know? Three goes
into twelve four times, five goes into fifteen three
times, and like that."

Emery M.-"I get a kick everytime I kiss Florence."


Paul M.-"I didn't think she would object so
strenuously."

Teacher-"What was Shakespeare's mother's


name?"
Velma W.-"Mrs. Shakespeare."

Ninety-Five

~ ! !!l!!!!!!!lil!lli!l!!!l!illllll!llj!lj j ljj!li!lliillll!lll!lljjjjjjjjjjl

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lllllll!!l!!!i!iil!

STATE BANK OF
PAPILLION

The Bank of Service


At
Your Service

Ninety-Six

In American History class Mrs. Barnhill was


telling about the youngest United States Senator.
She said he was a bachelor.
Helen Spearman responded, "Where does he
live?"

Herbert K.-','James is a nice -chap but he is too


terribly tight."
Loren D.-"He isn't tight; he is simply saving
for a rainy day."
Herbert-"Rainy day nothing. He's saving for
a flood."

"I've been playing baseball, Mama," cried


Floyd T.
"What? I told you to clean the rugs," replied
his mother.
"No," answered Floyd. "You told me to hang
the rug on the line and then beat it."

Teacher-"Give me a good example of coincidence."


Lillian C.-"My Mother and Father were married on the same day."

The teacher was giving the class a lecture on


gravity. "Now, children," she said. "It's the law
of gravity that keeps us down on the earth."
"But Teacher," inquired Blanche Crabtree,
"how did we stick on before the law was passed?"

Teacher-"Give me an example of a long and


short sentence."
Clark R.-"Ten years. Ten days."

Raymond C.-"Why is he so sick?"


Hattie S.-"Oh, he swallowed a couple of times."
Raymond-"How can swallowing a couple of
times hurt him?"
Hattie-"They were the 'Papillion Times'."

Louise E.-"What is an octogenarian, anyway?"


Helen F.-"I don't know. Why?"
Louise-"They must be an awfully sickly lot because whenever I hear of one they're always
dying."

Miss Schaab-"Elizabeth, what is a synonym?"


Elizabeth S.-"A synonym is a word you use
when you can't spell the other."

Miss Krejci-"What can you tell me about


nitrates?"
Marie, C.-"Well-er-they're a lot cheaper
than the day rates?"

"Never wear your wishbone where your backbone ought to be."


"Captain Gray, why do you always call a ship
a 'she'?" asked Lorraine S.
Captain-"Say, miss, you wouldn't ask me if
you tried to steer one."

"When you are down in the mouth, think of


Jonah. He got out!"

Ninety-Seven

iiiill'l!!!"'ll'l!l lillill!iiii@i!i!lii!ITU!i!l!!iiiii l l ! l l ! i ! " l l ' " ' l l ' l l ' " " " ' " """""ll""""'"ilii""""'"""""lliill""ll"'ll'l!!l!i"'""""""lliii!iii!ifiii!iilii!ii!ii!iilii!iiliii!!iiliii!!iiiilliii!iiiii!liiil!lllii

We Are At Your Service


If

lll

Need of

Groceries, Hardware, Shoes


and Dry Goods

The Busy Store


Papillion, Nebr.
E. SCHAULAND, Prop.

'"'""'""

"""

"""""'"""'""

Ninety-Eight

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~""

==========

"'"""""""'""' '"' m' "'""""""""""""""""

0 1d Age
B
a
r
==========
.
Soft Drinks, Cigars and Candy

HARDING ICE CREAM


The Cream of All Creams

Harding Private Brand Always in Stock Brick or Bulk

Eskimo Pies and Ice Cream Sandwiches in Season

SPECIAL PRICES TO SCHOOLS


AND CHURCHES

Give Us a Trial and Be Convinced

HENRY CORDES, Proprietor


Telephone 36-W

Papillion, N e nr.

Ninety-Nine

"'""'

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Omaha & Lincoln Ry. & Lt. Company


Phones JAckson 1312 or Ralston 9
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A Size and Style


for every purpose.
Only a few
Dollars Down
Installs this
Range in your
Home

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F.ree Yourself of Intense Heat, Smoke and Work


on Baking Days
Thor Washing Machines
Vacuum Cleaners
Excell Cookers
Irons
Curling Irons
Perculators
Portable Lamps
Fans
Toasters
Waffle Irons
Ironing Machines
Hair Driers
Heating Pads
Hot Plates
Grills
wiring and Wiring Supplies
-t ""'"!!ll'"'

"f!ll!!llll"!!ll!!ll'"" ' """"'""" """"'"' """"'

One Hundred

Hurley-Thor Electric Ironer

iiiifi!ii

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mmm:rmnniiD.J:lii!IIIII!Inr:! LIII

The new and unusu:Jl-that spar!~lin;; rcaHty which is


known as the life of each schocl yc::r-is C::lu[;ht and
h eld forever within the pa;;;::::; cf Dt.:rc:m b;.~ilt a:mua!s.
TI1e ability to assist in m::kir.;; pcrr..uncnt suc!1 dd igl:-.t.
ful bits of class spc::1tane:~y rc:::; b :m org:mization of
creative artists guided by so::::c 17 yc:.rs of College Annual
work, which experience is the t:1owledge of bal:mce and
taste and the fitness of doing things well. In the finest
year books of American Colleges the sincerity and genu
ineness of Bureau Engraving quality instantly impresses
one. TI1ey are class records that will live forever.

BUREAU OF ENGRAVING, INc.


"COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS"
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

Th~

practical side of Annual management. including

ad'VtrliJing. selling, organi~alion and finance, is com-

prehetui,dy coYeud in a series uf Editorial and


Busineu Managem~t books (ul/ed "Success in Annual
Building," furnished fr.:e to Annual Exen.ties. Secure
''Bureau" co-operation. We in..-ilfl ...our corTespon

dinct.

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One Hundred One

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t1 !til ti!it(j!llili11!UUUUUJOIJWQOU!DOUL

I III III

f1 I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I!! I I II I I I I I! I I !I I till 1t l l l l l l l l l l l l l 1 !I I 1t !If! I t!!ITOUO- {

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11 tlll l lll t 11 I 1 I I I I! I I I I I I I I II I I !1 I I !1 I I I I !! I I I I I I !J I I I I I I I I I I ill

~~

THE PAPILLION TIMES


(Established 52 years ago)
G. P. MILLER, Editor

Sarpy County's Pioneer Newspaper

A Clean, Progressive Journal

Read

111 a

Thousand Homes Every Week

A Splendid Advertising Medium

Complete Job Department tn Connection

The Times Congratulates the Papillion High School on this, its first
High School Annual, and rejoices with Papillion and Vicinity upon the
g:rowth of the sch'ool which has ever kept apace with the best educational
ideas and progress.

One Hundred Two

~"""""""""'"""""""""""

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UHE MANUFACTURING CO.


Farm Implements, Hardware

.JOHN DEERE TRACTORS

Automobiles and Accessories- - Stoves

P hone 24

Papillion, Nebr.

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This Book Printed by

J. W. SKOG LUND
Photographer

TH E

CITIZEN PRINTING

co.
W . S. SHAFER , Mgr.

Residence, 314 South 54th Street


Phone Walnut 7762

Printers--- Publishers

2308 N Street

Studio 1520 Douglas Street


Phone J ackson 1375

Phone Market 0203

South Om aha, Nebr.

One Hundred Three

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-.TI::!..:i::Ui.IIlnliim.ll!l.Dllna:a
_ _ _ __

CORDES

GARAGE

Automobile Sales and Service


Tires and Accessories-Gasoline and Oils
Battery Service-Storage
Come

111

and see us before buying and see what we can do for you

Prompt Service

Guaranteed Repair

Telephone 96

Papmion, Nebr.

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Liberty Clear
Serum

DR. J. W. SNYDER
DENTIST
Office: Bloedel Building.
Residence: 'NHcox Ho.tel
Office Hours: 8:30a.m. to

~:00

p. ::.

The last word in a


SCIENTIFIC PRODUCT

Office Phone 30

~esidencc

Phone 97-J

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NIEMANS BARBER
SHOP

Save your hogs


WE SAVE OURS

ALL FIRST CLASS WORK


Ladies Hair Bobbing a Specialty

Liberty Labor.a tories


Ralston,

.One Hundred Four

Nebraska.

Agency for South Side Cleaners and Dyers.


Deliveries twice a week. Under Bell.:;
Drug Store
Papillion, Nebraska.

1::1

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11 !!!1! 1

Ellison's . Grocery
Groceries That Are Clean and Fresh

Papillion, Nebr.

Phone 50

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WENDEL'L MEGEL & SONS


Coal

Feeds

Implements

Building Materials

One Hundred Five