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Course Code: MKT-613

Course Title: Consumer Behavior

Course Instructor: Rahul Sharma


Academic Task Title: DDB Need Ham Data Analysis
Date of Allotment: 28.10.2014

Academic Task No: 3


Date of submission: 10.01.2014

Students Name & Roll no: Perminder Singh (B59) 11002180 Neha Chopra (B63) 11002311
Evaluation Parameters:

Learning Outcomes: To further understand and gain extensive knowledge regarding concepts of
consumer behavior.
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I declare that this Assignment is my individual work. I have not copied it from any other students
work or from any other source except where due acknowledgement is made explicitly in the text, nor
has any part been written for me by any other person.
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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Table of content

Index
Consumer profiling
Characteristics of Heavy Stores Brand Buyers
Characteristics of Light Stores Brand Buyers
Marketing Strategy
Retail Implications
Advantages of retailers own brand
Conditions retailers must have for managing
their own brands
Conclusion
Annexures
References

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Page No.
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5
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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour

Consumer Profiling

Parameters

Table 1A HOUSEHOLDS

Table 2A EMPLOYMENT STATUS OF SPOUSES OF


MARRIED RESPONDENTS

Table 3A INCOME, EDUCATION, AND TECH SAVVY

Table 4A OCCUPATION

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No. of Heavy
users

No. of Light
users

Married couple
ranging their family
members 3-5, either
having youngest
child age from 0-5 or
having oldest child
from age 0-5 are the
heavy store brand
buyers.
(Annexure 1A)

Separated couple
ranging having 6+
members, either
having youngest
child age from 12
to 17 or having
oldest child age
from 12 to 17 are
light store brand
buyers.
(Annexure 1A)

Females whose
husband is
employed full time
or Males whose wife
is employed full time
are heavy store
brand buyers.
(Annexure 2A)

Females whose
husband is full
time homemaker
or males whose
wife is employed
part time are light
store brand
buyers.
(Annexure 2A)

household whose
annual income is
between 70k to
100k,they have been
to some college and
perceived
themselves to be
medium
tech savvy are heavy
store brand buyers.
(Annexure 3A)

Household whose
annual income is
in between 60k to
70k, they have no
college degree
and consider
themselves to be
highly tech savvy
are light store
brand buyers.
(Annexure 3A)

Not employed
people are heavy
store brand buyers.
(Annexure 4A)

Precision
production, craft
and repair.
(Annexure 4A)

MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour

Table 5A ETHNIC SUBCULTURE, AGE, AND COGNITIVE AGE

Table 6A GENDER AND GEOGRAPHIC REGION

Table 7A IDEAL SELF-CONCEPT

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White people in
between 25 to 34
and feel a lot
younger than their
age are heavy store
brand buyers.
(Annexure 5A)

Other ethnic
subculture
between age
group 18 to 24
and moderately
disagree/agree
are the light store
brand buyers.
(Annexure 5A)

Females and people


from South Atlantic
are the heavy store
brand buyers.
(Annexure 6A)

Males and the


people from New
England light
store brand
buyers.
(Annexure 6A)
People who are
Masculine
towards store are
light store brand
buyers.
(Annexure 7A)

People who are


Affectionate
towards store are
heavy store brand
buyers.(Annexure
7A)

MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Characteristics of Heavy Stores Brand Buyers
From the following parameters given in the DDB need ham sheet, the no. of heavy stores brand
buyers are the people who are married and have 3 to 5 family members in their family and have
youngest child of age 0-5 and oldest child of age 0-5 means the family can have either one or more
child living in an household. The family can be nuclear because the no of family members are in
between 3 to 5.
In many households where both the husband and wife work outside the home, men are expected to
share household duties. Men have also been playing an increasing role in raising their children. With
both parents working, the use of, and need for, day care facilities are increasing; this is especially
true for single-parent families. And in the household where either of the family members (male,
female) is full time employed are the heavy stores brand buyers.
Household whose annual income is in between 60k to 100k, educated and have degree of
qualification and also consider them medium on tech savviness are the heavy stores brand buyers.
Means they have more disposable income with them and are well educated and clearly understand
what they are buying and also belong to upper middle class society.
Not employed people are heavy stores brand buyer. Means that people are given extra support by
government or they are earning from the unfair means.
White people who are between the age group of 25 to 34 and they feel a lot more than younger than
their age are the heavy stores brand buyers and they more loyal to store.
Mostly females who belong to South Atlantic region are the heavy stores brand buyers. And
Washington DC has the 7th largest population in United States.
People who are Affectionate towards store are heavy stores brand buyers. They emotionally
attached with the store.

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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Characteristics of Light Stores Brand Buyers
From the following parameters given in the DDB need ham sheet, the no. of heavy stores brand
buyers are the people who are separated and having 6+ family members in their family and have
youngest child of age 12-17 and oldest child of age 12-17 means the family can have either one or
more child living in an household are light store brand buyers.
In many households where both the husband and wife work outside the home, men are expected to
share household duties. Men have also been playing an increasing role in raising their children. With
both parents working, the use of, and need for, day care facilities are increasing; this is especially
true for single-parent families. And in the household where husbands are the homemaker or they are
part time employed are light store brand buyers.
Household whose annual income is in between 60k to 70k, have no degree and also consider them
high on tech savviness are the light stores brand buyers. Means they have more disposable income
with them but are not educated they dont clearly understand what they are buying and also belong to
upper middle class society.
Precision production, craft and repair people are light stores brand buyer.
Other ethnic subculture between age group 18 to 24 and moderately disagree/agree are the light
stores brand buyers.
Mostly Males who belong to New England region are the light stores brand buyers.
People who are Masculine towards store are light stores brand buyers.

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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Marketing Strategy
Retailers have been liberating themselves from the traditional definition of private label marketing as
being the poor relative of national brand consumer goods, and, in doing so, opening up huge
opportunities for private label branding. These opportunities require the adoption of a different set of
marketing and branding practices to support and propel the retailers business and marketing ideals
for its private label brands. Retailers need to understand the contribution and role of their proprietary
or own brands in the long-term business strategy and marketing mix of the retail store and consider
both the supply side and the demand side of the equation. Effective category management can enable
retailers to solidify and optimize supply-chain relationships. Strategic brand management goes hand
in hand with these endeavours to establish sustainable points of difference in each aisle and segment
within the store. It also spurs decisions about how to appropriately define the retailers own brand
portfolio in order to galvanize consumers to connect and reconnect with its franchise in a compelling
manner.
Private label brands were traditionally defined as generic product offerings that competed with their
national brand counterparts by means of a price-value proposition. Often the lower priced alternative
to the real thing, private label or store brands carried the stigma of inferior quality and therefore
inspired less trust and confidence. Yet, they still grew and prospered by providing consumers lower
priced options for what was often a low involvement purchase decision. Retailers need to push more
and more private label products into different categories of the marketplace because they represented
high margins and the promise of profitability with little to no marketing effort.
Consumer directly understand his brand and product selection criteria, they took their cues from the
national brand competitors that had already identified and manifested some of the categorys salient
attributes and benefits through advertising, packaging and other brand messaging.
Retailers are beginning to recognize that they cannot simply rely on national branded products to
draw consumers into their stores and sustain loyalty. This is due to the fact that manufacturers
product brands often have the ability to transcend geographic location, distribution channel or retailer
(e.g., Bounty paper towels are available at a wide array of grocery stores, drug stores and mass
merchandisers across the United States.) Due to this pervasive presence of national brands,
consumers need not have a strong relationship with a particular brick-and-mortar store setting to
have access to these products. It is only the proprietary brands, exclusively available at a specific
retailer that can be a magnet to draw people into its store versus others and accrue direct meaning
and loyalty to the overarching banner.
Looking at consumers needs wants and desires rather than manufacturers existing products for
success cues. The term own brands acknowledges that todays visionary retail marketers have
powerful proprietary portfolios that they control and manage and there is potential to reap bigger and
better rewards by taking a closer look at the way they orchestrate the role and expression of these
brand offerings in the eyes of consumers in each product category.

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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Retail Implications
Collaborative category management with the supplier:

The retailer and trade partnership becomes more about cooperation and less about the retailer
negotiating with the manufacturer or supplier on price and listings. By working together, the
parties involved can solidify trade relationships and ensure that the category as a whole
remains profitable and emotionally appealing to the customer so that both private label and
branded goods win.

Recognize that a salient consumer need should be the springboard for an own brand proposition:

The own brand promise should be defined as a holistic representation of resonant


functional and emotional attributes and benefits. This ensures that it takes into account need
states that are important to consumers and offers a credible point of difference from other
category players.
A successful own brand literally has the ability to own the consumer connection. If it is
broadly defined, it has the capacity to strike a chord with consumers in multiple product
categories.
Unlike national branded products, own brands are exclusively available through a specific
retailer and can often transcend specific product categories because they use a consumer
focus rather than a product focus as their brand foundation.
They have the potential to be magnets that draw consumers into one specific retail store over
another. Take Wal-Marts success with its exclusive brands like OlRoy for dog food or ReliOn for diabetes.
The exclusive brands may be the reason that consumers are initially drawn into the store, but
once they are there, Wal-Mart also has the opportunity to encourage them to spend more on
incidental or impulse purchases.
Therefore, exclusive or own brands not only reinforce enduring loyalty and positive
feelings for the overarching retail brand, they often enable the retailer to capture a more
significant share of the consumers wallet, heart, mind and lifestyle than a national product
brand.
By developing store environments, in-store messaging like signage, merchandising systems,
and packaging as well as external messaging like circulars, catalogues and advertising in a
congruent manner, the retailer is able to create an enduring impression in-store, at shelf, at the
time of purchase and during usage.
It is important to consider how package design, nomenclature and product strategy can propel
and support the retail marketers vision for the own brand promise. Product quality and
innovation are a necessary functional underpinning for an own brand offering.
Product quality and innovation are a necessary functional underpinning for an own brand
offering. This is the reason that re-branding efforts are often synchronized with product
portfolio rationalization. By undergoing quality assessments, the retailer is able to ensure that
its products live up to consumers expectations and that negative consumption experiences do
not undermine the brand promise that is being developed and executed.

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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Building Competitive Advantage
More Sustainable

Less Sustainable

Location.
Customer Loyalty.
Customer Service.
Exclusive Merchandise.
Low Cost Supply Chain Management.
Information Systems.
Buying Power with Vendors.
Committed Employees.

Better Computers
More Employees
More Merchandise
Greater Assortments
Lower Prices
More Advertising
More Promotions
Cleaner Stores

Customer Loyalty
Customer liking towards one retailer over another one. Customers will be reluctant to patronize
competitive retailers.
Retailers build loyalty by:

Developing a strong brand for the store or store brands.


Developing clear and precise positioning strategies.
Creating an emotional attachment with customers through loyalty programs.

Retail Branding
Stores use brand (stores name and store brands private label brands) to build customer loyalty.
Retail brand:

Can create an emotional tie with customers that build their trust and loyalty.
Facilitates store loyalty because it stands for a predictable level of quality.

Building Customer Loyalty

Brand Image.
Positioning.
Unique Merchandise.
Customer Service.
Customer Relationship Management Programs.

Vendor Relationships

Low Cost - Efficiency Through Coordination.


Electronic Data Interchange (EDI).
Collaborative Planning and Forecasting to Reduce Inventory and Distribution Costs.

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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Human Resources Management
Employees are key to build a sustainable competitive advantage

Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Talented Employees.


Employee Branding.
Develop positive organizational culture.

Location

Location is a competitive advantage


Creates a top-of-mind awareness
Makes it very difficult for a competitor to enter a market and find a good location.

Growth Strategies

Market Penetration.
Market Expansion.
Retail Format Development.

Diversification.
Market Penetration

Attract customers from target market.


Get current customer to visit store more often or buy on each visit.

Market Expansion

Market expansion growth opportunity involves using the existing retail format in new market
segments.
Dunkin Donuts new stores (and at gas stations).
Abercrombie & Fitch (for college students) opens lower-priced chain Hollister Co. for high
school students.

Retail Format Development

Develops a new retail format with a different retail mix for the same target market.
Multi-channel retailing.

UK based TESCO:

Tesco Express: small stores located close to where customers live and work.
Tesco Metro: bring convenience to city centre location by specializing in ready-to-eat meals.
Tesco Superstores: traditional stores.
Tesco Extra: one-stop destination with the widest range of food and non-food products.

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Diversification

Introduces a new retail format toward a market segment that is not currently served by the
retailer.
Vertical integration into wholesaling or manufacturing.

Other Strategies
Price reductions: Reducing the price of its products and decreasing their own margins
manufacturers try to restrain private labels market share; however, this option is not useful in the
case of store brands because it may have a bad influence on national brands image, with a
consequent competitive advantage for store brands.
Secondary brands: Manufacturers can also decide to introduce a secondary owned brand with the
same price positioning of store brands in order to directly trouble store brands. However, this action
is short-termed and is not really likely to be effective because of the easy possibility of exclusion
from the assortments by retailers.
Pull strategies: National brand companies can try to enhance and consolidate the brand loyalty of
their customers through actions such as more accurate market segmentation, a more effective
branding strategy and higher investments on creative and original advertising.
Higher product quality-differentiation: Raising the investments on product development and
marketing strategy, the manufacturer can try to enhance the quality gap and positioning gap towards
store brands, reinforcing the communication and aiming at creating a distinctive brand image.
Product innovation: Focusing more effectively on R&D activities manufacturers can attempt to
introduce new features in their products or completely innovate them, thus creating technological and
financial obstacles for the retailers who aim at producing quality-equivalent store brands.

Advantages of retailers own brand


Conducive to the formation of differential advantage in the retail market
In order to implement the own-brand strategy, firms should base on external market conditions, the
strength of internal conditions, competitor market position and characteristics of target market needs,
organize production timely and supply some of its own brand. So products feature will be rich, while
enterprises are able to based on own commodity and to provide consumers with more comprehensive
services.
Conducive to the formation of price advantage
As own brand by the retailers themselves are generally organize production or direct orders from the
factory, so it can save a lot of purchase links, saving transaction costs and distribution cost.

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Conducive to the formation of information superiority
Retailers deal directly with consumers, so they are better than the manufacturer both in time access
to information or access to information on the quantity and quality. Retailers can keep abreast of
changing trends in consumer demand and first-hand information of consumer demand to make rapid
changes in the dynamic response.
Retailers can take full advantage of the product advantages of intangible assets
Large-scale retail enterprises have developed a unique business model in the operations management
for a long run, and product name are often deeply rooted in the minds of consumers. Good reputation
and best-known enterprises name own brand products with corporate name and sale within the
enterprise, which can set a good image into the goods. People can easily link the quality service and
rigorous management of enterprises with own brand products, and then that can transform into
commodity dependence and acceptance, which in turn further enhanced customer satisfaction.

Conditions retailers must have for managing their own brands


While managing their own brands will give retailers benefits, but not all retailers can operate,
retailers managing their own brands must have some conditions:
Substantial size
A considerable scale is the so-called retail business area, business projects and sales should reach a
certain size, only with a considerable scale, to reflect the significance of economies of scale.
Therefore, the own-brand strategy generally does not apply to all business enterprises, but it is
applicable to large commercial enterprises, especially large-scale retail enterprises.
Sufficient strength
Own brand strategy implementation is a very complicated systematic project, the retailer should do
such work as brand development, design and management, market research and product select.
Otherwise, it should organize OEM production; determine commodity prices, commodity markets
and marketing strategies. Small and medium sized retailers that do not have enough strength cannot
afford all the work.
Good reputation
Improve the quality of goods and services give companies a good reputation, good reputation is the
main part to cultivate its own brand value. If the retailer has good corporate image and high
reputation in the mind of the consumer, then own brand from the date of the birth of will have many
features easily recognized and accepted by the vast number of consumers.

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Choosing right products
Retailers with the operating conditions of own brand should be clear that not all products are suitable
for a retail brand. From the perspective of retailer profit, products which sale is in large scale are
suitable for own brand. Because only for large sales of goods, business can develop to implement
such a large number of orders, thereby reduce development and production costs and ensures its own
brand merchandise at lower prices on the shelf; Starting from the consumer's buying behaviour,
goods which purchase for high frequency are suitable of its own brand. This will help retailers to
develop new customers, enabling them to buy a new brand of merchandise; Goods which are fresh
and in good quality requirements are in high level are suitable for own-brand goods. At present,
many stores have a lot of own-brand goods in fresh areas, such as bread, vegetables, fruit, and frozen
products. Retailers use the advantages of short-channel in time to genuine goods available to the
general consumers with good reputation as a guarantee.
To develop the right price
In the Pricing strategy of its own brand, it needs to decide price positioning fit with product
positioning. If the manufacturers own brand product is not available, or when the retailer's own brand
is a strong brand, you can take high-priced strategy. If the own-brand product are similar products
and in the manufacturers reputation is obviously low, retailers tend to use lower prices to attract
customers, and gradually increase the visibility of its own-brand goods. If the aim of the
development of private brand merchandise is to form operating characteristics, to improve customer
loyalty, and to attract a large number of consumer goods, you can take low-cost strategy.
Choosing right brand
From the perspective of the choice of retailer own-brand strategy, mainly the following types:
Original brand
Use the supermarket's own name, such as Hualian rice, Agriculture eggs. In general, the local
supermarket brands tend to use the existing channels, fewer new brands. The benefits of using the
original channel brand is by virtue of its brand awareness of the original channel, brand import time
is short. If own brand products business is not successful, the brand could damage the original
channel.
Single-brand and multi-brands
For example, Carrefour uses single brand strategy, such as the "Harmonies" for slippers, underwear,
bathrobe and other textile category. Wal-Mart's own brand is much more complex, there is Sam
selected (Sams Choice), George Clothing (George), Kathie Lee and many own brand, its own brand
is in many categories, such as pet food, children's toys entering the industry sales of the top.
Hard and soft brands Brand
Hard supermarket brand is that fully uses their own brands and conceal the information of
manufacturers. Soft-brand may be a safer, more flexible options for supermarket, which is more
flexible in application, you can adapt at any time according to the products and promotions.
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Select the appropriate promotions
When retailers managing their own brands, its advertising primarily goodwill with retailers.
Conventional methods including free distribution with in-kind photo posters, shelf promotions,
themed activity of promotion, staff promotion, and store advertising and other methods. The concrete
form of advertising inside including direct signs, parking placard, shelf announcement, store
broadcasting, shopping cart tips and so on. The greatest advantage of the direct sales force staff is to
promote through customer communication. In durables sales, such a direct dialogue determines to a
certain extent whether a customer's purchase behaviour will occur, and how and so on. Many
supermarkets also frequently linked by the system displays and promotions to encourage people to
try their own brand. In the way of display, its own brand is often close to category leading brands,
which will get good sales results. Linkage promotion is conducted through its own brand, buy
Colgate toothpaste, its own brand toothbrush send, or buy Tide detergent to send its own brand
towels. Although these methods are in a different way with the manufacturers commonly to use
television, newspapers and other mass media to promote ,but this still not only reached a promotional
effect, but also saved the cost of advertising.

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Conclusion
Private label brands need to embody the attitude and demeanour of an own brand. Own brands
are relevant to the broadest set of audiences. The trade feels an affinity and desire for the own
brand to prosper. The consumer is loyal to own brands and seeks them out as an integral part of
his/her lifestyle. The retailer celebrates and nurtures the own brand as a vital embodiment of its
brand proposition that will build and sustain a greater degree of loyalty. Category management and
brand management must work together to fuel the marketing strategy. One cannot replace the other.
Both product and positioning points of difference set the own brand apart in consumers minds. A
consumer-centric approach is at the heart of own brand development and elevates above the
product-centric thinking of the past. In order to have a consistent and compelling brand voice,
retailers need to understand the contribution and role of proprietary or "own" brands within their
business and also within the lives of their consumers. Own brand products, branded
communication and expressions should all be developed in accordance with this thinking. When
own brands are appropriately created and steered, they have the potential to reach their pinnacle of
success. In doing so, they create a persuasive connection with consumers, drawing them into a retail
store, but more importantly, becoming an essential, experiential and indispensable lifestyle choice
that they embrace over the long-term.

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Annexure 1A

Table 1A HOUSEHOLDS
Number in
Sample

% Total Sample

Household Size

Marital Statusa

Children at Home

Youngest Child at
Home

Oldest Child at Home

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523

1294

3-5

1351

6+

133

2262

216

77

283

484

1805

765

2-3

687

4+

88

0 to 5

675

6 to 11

275

12 to 17

258

18+

277

0 to 5

399

6 to 11

321

12 to 17

344

18+

421

No. of
heavy/lo
52.3 w users
49.7
260
51.4
665
54.6
737
54.3
72
54.3
1229
42.0
91
40.0
31
46.2
131
52.8
255
51.0
921
52.6
402
56.3
387
44.4
39
58.4
54.3
50.2
47.8

394
149
130
132

59.0
59.9
51.1
48.0

235
192
176
202

MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


aCoded as: 1 = married; 2 = widowed; 3 = separated; 4 = divorced; 5 = single (never married)

bCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered 12 or more times per year:
codes 5, 6, and 7

cCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who use product 5+ times a week
(dessert, diet soda, sports drinks) or 1+ times a week (cordials, chocolate bar, premium icecream):
codes 5, 6, and 7

dCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who indicated ownership: codes 1 and 2

eCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who watch that type of show regularly;
coded as 1 = yes; 2 = no

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Annexure 2A
Table 2A EMPLOYMENT STATUS OF SPOUSES OF MARRIED
RESPONDENTS
% Total Sample

Female Respondents

Spouse's Work Level a

Male Respondents

Spouse's Work Level a

1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4

Number in
Sample
795
36
210
5
571
144
171
228

No. of
52.3 heavy
61.8
491
45.5
16
57.5
121
80.0
4
47.2
270
52.5
76
45.1
77
48.4
110

aIf married, spouse's work level: 1 = employed full-time; 2 = employed part-time; 3 =


unemployed/retired; 4 = full-time homemaker

bCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered 12 or more times per year:
codes 5, 6, and 7

cCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who use product 5+ times a week
(dessert, diet soda, sports drinks) or 1+ times a week (cordials, chocolate bar, premium icecream):
codes 5, 6, and 7

dCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who indicated ownership: codes 1 and 2

eCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who watch that type of show regularly;
coded as 1 = yes; 2 = no

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Annexure 3A

Table 3A INCOME, EDUCATION, AND TECH SAVVY


Number in
Sample
% Total Sample

Household Income

Education

Tech Savvya

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1,2,3
4
5
6
7
(Perceived)

In Thousands

No
HS
Some
College
Graduate
1,2
3,4
5,6

<20
20-30
30-40
40-50
50-60
60-70
70-100
>100
Degree
Degree
College
Degree
School
Low
Medium
High

526
359
335
333
325
279
522
477
197
747
1102
630
417
1078
1511
690

52.3
46.0
45.5
55.3
55.1
59.6
52.2
55.8
54.1
36.1
49.0
52.9
57.2
59.7
53.8
50.9
54.2

No. of
heavy
users
242
163
185
183
194
146
291
258
71
366
583
360
249
580
769
374

alevel of agreement with "I consider myself tech savvy." 1,2 = definitely/generally disagree; 3,4 =
moderately disagree/agree; 5,6 = generally/definitely agree

bCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered 12 or more times per year:
codes 5, 6, and 7

cCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who use product 5+ times a week
(dessert, diet soda, sports drinks) or 1+ times a week (cordials, chocolate bar, premium icecream):
codes 5, 6, and 7

dCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who indicated ownership: codes 1 and 2
eCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who watch that type of
show regularly; coded as 1 = yes; 2 = no

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Annexure 4A

Table 4A OCCUPATION

% Total Sample

Occupationa

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Number
in
Sample
512
368
269
202
160
219
130
26
242
923

No. of
heavy
52.3 users
55.4
284
53.2
196
57.3
154
51.6
104
45.8
73
54.0
118
56.6
74
38.5
10
53.0
128
52.0
480

aCoded as 1 = professional; 2 = executive, manager, administrator; 3 = administrative support; 4 =


sales; 5 = precision production, craft and repair; 6 = operator, fabricator, laborer; 7 = technical
and related support; 8 = farming, forestry, fishing; 9 = service; 10 = not employed
bCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered 12 or more times per year:
codes 5, 6, and 7

cCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who use product 5+ times a week
(dessert, diet soda, sports drinks) or 1+ times a week (cordials, chocolate bar, premium icecream):
codes 5, 6, and 7

dCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who indicated ownership: codes 1 and 2

eCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who watch that type of show regularly;
coded as 1 = yes; 2 = no

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Annexure 5A
Table 5A ETHNIC SUBCULTURE, AGE, AND COGNITIVE AGE

% Total Sample

Ethnic Subculture

Age

Cognitive Age (Feel a lot


younger than age)a

White
Black
Hispanic
Other
18-24
25-34
35-44
45-54
55-64
>64
1,2
3,4
5,6

Number
in
Sample
2549
317
310
169
163
654
739
707
485
597
526
1261
1529

no. of
heavy
52.3 users
56.0
1426
35.8
113
41.7
129
47.0
79
57.4
94
59.8
391
49.4
365
54.3
384
51.7
251
44.3
264
55.2
290
51.6
651
52.3
799

aAgreement with "I feel a lot younger than my age." 1,2 = definitely/generally disagree; 3,4 =
moderately disagree/agree; 5,6 = generally/definitely agree
bCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered 12 or more times per year:
codes 5, 6, and 7
cCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who use product 5+ times a week
(dessert, diet soda, sports drinks) or 1+ times a week (cordials, chocolate bar, premium icecream):
codes 5, 6, and 7
dCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who indicated ownership: codes 1 and 2

eCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who watch that type of show regularly;
coded as 1 = yes; 2 = no

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Annexure 6A

Table 6A GENDER AND GEOGRAPHIC REGION

% Total Sample
Gender

Geographic
Regiona

Male
Female
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

Number in
Sample
1588
1757
160
479
537
257
638
227
336
225
486

No. of
heavy
52.3 users
48.4
769
55.8
981
53.8
86
48.8
234
53.2
286
51.6
133
53.4
341
53.7
122
49.8
167
61.9
139
49.9
242

a1 = New England; 2 = Middle Atlantic; 3 = East North Central; 4 = West North Central; 5 =
South Atlantic; 6 = East South Atlantic; 7 = West South Central; 8 = Mountain; 9 = Pacific

bCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered 12 or more times per year:
codes 5, 6, and 7
cCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who use product 5+ times a week
(dessert, diet soda, sports drinks) or 1+ times a week (cordials, chocolate bar, premium icecream):
codes 5, 6, and 7
dCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who indicated ownership: codes 1 and 2

eCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who watch that type of show regularly;
coded as 1 = yes; 2 = no

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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


Annexure 7A

Table 7A IDEAL SELF-CONCEPT

% Total Sample

Ideal Self-Concepta

Adventurous
Affectionate
Ambitious
Assertive
Careful
Competitive
Easy-going
Independent
Masculine
Sensitive
Tolerant
Traditional
Youthful

Number in
Sample
1478
2359
1999
1706
1866
1279
2196
2395
893
2150
1966
1481
1302

No. of
heavy
52.3 users
53.6
792
54.6
1288
53.4
1067
52.4
894
51.8
967
49.4
632
54.1
1187
53.5
1280
48.2
430
53.8
1157
55.5
1091
52.7
780
51.6
672

aCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered that the term would
generally or definitely describe ideal self; 5 or 6 on a 6-point scale

bCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who answered 12 or more times per year:
codes 5, 6, and 7

cCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who use product 5+ times a week
(dessert, diet soda, sports drinks) or 1+ times a week (cordials, chocolate bar, premium icecream):
codes 5, 6, and 7

dCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who indicated ownership: codes 1 and 2

eCell values are the percent of respondents to the question who watch that type of show regularly;
coded as 1 = yes; 2 = no

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MKT 613 Consumer Behaviour


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