You are on page 1of 141

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening

of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

TABLE OF CONTENT
0.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................i


0.1

PROJECT BACKGROUND .............................................................................................................. i

0.2

NEED OF THE PROJECT ............................................................................................................... i

0.3

PROJECT ROAD ............................................................................................................................. i

0.4

PROJECT INFLUENCE AREA ........................................................................................................ i

0.5

PROJECT PROPONENT ................................................................................................................. i

0.6

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS ....................................................................................................... i

0.7

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (EIA) STUDY IN THE PROJECT ............................ ii

0.8

POLICY, LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE FRAMEWORK ............................................................. ii

0.8.1

Institutional Setting ...................................................................................................................... ii

0.8.2

Clearances .................................................................................................................................. ii

0.9

BASELINE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE ...................................................................................... ii

0.9.1

Physical Environment .................................................................................................................. ii

0.9.2

Biological Environment ............................................................................................................... iii

0.9.3

Social Environment..................................................................................................................... iv

0.10

PUBLIC INTERACTIONS, CONSULTATION & PUBLIC HEARING ............................................. iv

0.11

POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ................................................................................... v

0.11.1 Impacts on Climate ...................................................................................................................... v


0.11.2 Impact on Air Quality ................................................................................................................... v
0.11.3 Impact on Noise Levels ............................................................................................................... v
0.11.4 Impact on Water Resources and Quality..................................................................................... v
0.11.5 Impact on Ecological Resources ................................................................................................. v
0.11.6 Impact on Land ............................................................................................................................ v
0.11.7 Impact on Human Use Values ..................................................................................................... v
0.12

ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES ..................................................................................................... v

0.13

MITIGATION AVOIDANCE AND ENHANCEMENT MEASURES .................................................. v

0.14

INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN .................. vi

0.15

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN .................................................................................. vii

0.16

CONCLUSIONS ............................................................................................................................ vii

1.

INTRODUCTORY BACKGROUND ............................................................................................... 1-1


1.1

INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 1-1

1.2

NEED OF THE PROJECT .......................................................................................................... 1-1

1.3

PROJECT ROAD ........................................................................................................................ 1-1

1.4

PROJECT INFLUENCE AREA ................................................................................................... 1-1

1.5

PROJECT PROPONENT ............................................................................................................ 1-1

1.6

SCOPE OF WORK ...................................................................................................................... 1-2

1.6.1
1.7

Environmental Impact Assessment in the Project ................................................................... 1-2

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS .................................................................................................. 1-2

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


i
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

1.8

APPROACH TO EIA ................................................................................................................... 1-2

1.8.1

Preliminary Environmental Screening ..................................................................................... 1-2

1.8.2

Review of Applicable Environmental Regulations ................................................................... 1-4

1.8.3

Assessment of Baseline Environmental Profile ....................................................................... 1-4

1.8.4

Consultations ........................................................................................................................... 1-5

1.8.5

Assessment of Impacts ........................................................................................................... 1-5

1.8.6

Assessment of Alternatives ..................................................................................................... 1-5

1.8.7

Mitigations and Enhancement Measures ................................................................................ 1-5

1.8.8

Environmental Management Action Plans .............................................................................. 1-6

1.9
2.

STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT ................................................................................................ 1-6


PROJECT DESCRIPTION ............................................................................................................. 2-1

2.1

EXISTING ROAD FEATURES .................................................................................................... 2-1

2.1.1

Alignment ................................................................................................................................. 2-1

2.1.2

Right of way ............................................................................................................................. 2-1

2.1.3

Road inventory ........................................................................................................................ 2-1

2.1.4

Traffic ....................................................................................................................................... 2-1

2.2

PROPOSED ROAD FEATURES ................................................................................................ 2-1

2.2.1

Right of Way ............................................................................................................................ 2-1

2.2.2

Alignment ................................................................................................................................. 2-1

2.2.3

Pavement ................................................................................................................................ 2-4

2.2.4

Geometric Design Aspects ...................................................................................................... 2-4

2.2.5

Bypasses and Realignments ................................................................................................... 2-4

2.2.6

Service roads ........................................................................................................................... 2-5

2.2.7

Cross Drainage Structures ...................................................................................................... 2-5

2.2.8

Other Structures including Underpasses & Overpasses ......................................................... 2-5

2.2.9

Design of Intersections ............................................................................................................ 2-6

2.2.10 Traffic Control and Road Safety Features ............................................................................... 2-6


2.2.11 Enhancement of Inventories .................................................................................................... 2-6
2.3
3.

COST ESTIMATE........................................................................................................................ 2-6


POLICY, LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE FRAMEWORK .......................................................... 3-1

3.1

INSTITUTIONAL SETTING ......................................................................................................... 3-1

3.2

THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK ........................................................................................................ 3-1

3.2.1

Country Level Environmental Legislations .............................................................................. 3-1

3.2.2

State Level Environmental Legislation .................................................................................... 3-2

3.2.3

Other Legislations Applicable to Road Construction Projects ................................................. 3-2

3.3

CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROJECT.............................................................. 3-2

3.4

CONCLUSION............................................................................................................................. 3-3

4.

BASELINE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE .................................................................................... 4-1


4.1

PROJECT AREA ......................................................................................................................... 4-1

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


ii
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

4.2

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT ....................................................................................................... 4-1

4.2.1

Meteorology ............................................................................................................................. 4-1

4.2.2

Land ......................................................................................................................................... 4-1

4.2.3

Ambient Air Quality .................................................................................................................. 4-3

4.2.4

Water ....................................................................................................................................... 4-4

4.2.5

Noise ....................................................................................................................................... 4-6

4.3

BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT ................................................................................................... 4-7

4.3.1

Forest Areas ............................................................................................................................ 4-7

4.3.2

Road Side Trees...................................................................................................................... 4-7

4.3.3

Fauna ...................................................................................................................................... 4-7

4.4

SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................................................ 4-7

4.4.1

Census Profile ......................................................................................................................... 4-7

4.4.2

Linguistic Distribution............................................................................................................... 4-8

4.4.3

Settlement ............................................................................................................................... 4-8

4.4.4

Educational Institutes .............................................................................................................. 4-8

4.4.5

Cultural Properties ................................................................................................................... 4-8

5.

PUBLIC INTERACTIONS .............................................................................................................. 5-1


5.1

OBJECTIVES .............................................................................................................................. 5-1

5.2

CONSULTATION SESSIONS ..................................................................................................... 5-1

5.2.1

Stake Holders Consultation ..................................................................................................... 5-1

5.1.1

Consultations during Design ................................................................................................... 5-2

5.1.2

Location Specific Consultation Needs ..................................................................................... 5-2

5.3

IDENTIFICATION OF ISSUES.................................................................................................... 5-2

5.3.1

Issues Raised During Consultations ....................................................................................... 5-2

5.4

CONTINUED CONSULTATION .................................................................................................. 5-3

5.5

KEY FINDINGS OF THE CONSULTATION ............................................................................... 5-3

5.6

PUBLIC HEARING ...................................................................................................................... 5-4

5.6.1

Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 5-4

5.6.2

Public Hearing for the Project .................................................................................................. 5-4

6.

IMPACT ASSESSMENT ................................................................................................................ 6-1


6.1

WEIGHTAGE / RANKING OF VALUED ECO-SYSTEM............................................................. 6-1

6.2

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT ....................................................................................................... 6-3

6.2.1

Meteorological Parameters ..................................................................................................... 6-3

6.2.2

Land ......................................................................................................................................... 6-3

6.2.3

Air ............................................................................................................................................ 6-5

6.2.4

Water Resources ..................................................................................................................... 6-6

6.2.5

Noise levels ............................................................................................................................. 6-9

6.3

Biological Environment ................................................................................................................ 6-9

6.3.1

Forest Areas ............................................................................................................................ 6-9

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


iii
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

6.3.2

Roadside Plantations .............................................................................................................. 6-9

6.3.3

Fauna .................................................................................................................................... 6-10

6.3.4

Aquatic Ecology ..................................................................................................................... 6-10

6.4

SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT .......................................................................................................... 6-11

6.4.1

Human Use Values................................................................................................................ 6-11

6.4.2

Cultural Properties ................................................................................................................. 6-12

6.4.3

Quality Of Life Values ............................................................................................................ 6-12

7.

ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES .................................................................................................. 7-1


7.1

WITH AND WITHOUT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES ................................................................... 7-1

7.1.1

Without Project Scenario ......................................................................................................... 7-1

7.1.2

With Project Scenario .............................................................................................................. 7-1

7.2

JUSTIFICATION FOR SELECTION............................................................................................ 7-2

7.3

ALIGNMENT MODIFICATIONS .................................................................................................. 7-2

7.3.1

Rural Sections ......................................................................................................................... 7-2

7.3.2

Urban Sections ........................................................................................................................ 7-3

7.3.3

Bypass and Realignment Locations ........................................................................................ 7-3

7.4

WIDENING / SERVICE ROAD OPTIONS .................................................................................. 7-6

7.5

UNDERPASS / OVER PASS OPTION ....................................................................................... 7-6

7.6

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS .................................................................................... 7-6

7.6.1

Improvement of air and noise quality ...................................................................................... 7-7

7.6.2

Avoidance of Impact of Sensitive, Cultural and Community Properties .................................. 7-7

8.

MITIGATION, AVOIDANCE AND ENHANCEMENT MEASURES ............................................... 8-1


8.1

INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 8-1

8.2

MITIGATION MEASURES PROPOSED ..................................................................................... 8-1

8.2.1

Meteorological Parameters ..................................................................................................... 8-1

8.2.2

Land ......................................................................................................................................... 8-1

8.2.3

Air Quality Mitigation ............................................................................................................ 8-3

8.2.4

Water Mitigation.................................................................................................................... 8-5

8.2.5

Noise - Mitigation ..................................................................................................................... 8-8

8.2.6

Biological Environment .......................................................................................................... 8-10

8.2.7

Social Environment................................................................................................................ 8-14

8.3

ENHANCEMENT FOR CULTURAL PROPERTIES .................................................................. 8-17

8.3.1

Plantation ............................................................................................................................... 8-17

8.3.2

Seating Spaces ..................................................................................................................... 8-17

8.3.3

Specific Enhancement ........................................................................................................... 8-18

9.

IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENT ......................................................................................... 9-1


9.1

INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 9-1

9.2

EXISTING ENVIRONMENTAL CELL, NHAI ............................................................................... 9-1

9.3

IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS ..................................................................................... 9-1

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


iv
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

9.3.1

Independent Engineer (IE) ...................................................................................................... 9-1

9.3.2

Concessionaire ........................................................................................................................ 9-2

9.3.3

Contractor ................................................................................................................................ 9-2

9.4

REPORTING SYSTEM ............................................................................................................... 9-3

9.5

ENVIRONMENTAL CAPACITY BUILDING ................................................................................ 9-4

10.

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN ................................................................................ 10-1

10.1

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (EMP) ................................................................... 10-1

10.1.1 Specific Activities by NHAI .................................................................................................... 10-1


10.1.2 Specific Activities by Concessionaire .................................................................................... 10-1
10.2

SITE SPECIFIC MANAGEMENT PLAN ................................................................................... 10-1

10.2.1 Cultural Properties ................................................................................................................. 10-1


10.2.2 Sensitive Features ................................................................................................................. 10-1
10.2.3 Community properties ........................................................................................................... 10-2
10.3

IMPLEMENTATION OF EMP .................................................................................................... 10-2

10.4

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMME ................................................................ 10-19

10.4.1 Monitoring of Earthworks Activities ..................................................................................... 10-19


10.4.2 Monitoring of Concessionaire / Contractor's Facilities, Plant and Equipment ..................... 10-19
10.5
11.

BUDGET .................................................................................................................................. 10-19


BORROW AREAS STUDY .......................................................................................................... 11-1

11.1

MINING OF SOIL / EARTH FROM BORROW AREAS FOR THE PROJECT ......................... 11-1

11.1.1 Quantities Required ............................................................................................................... 11-1


11.1.2 Proposed Borrow Areas ........................................................................................................ 11-1
11.2

MINING METHODOLOGY / TECHNIQUES PROPOSED ...................................................... 11-10

11.2.1 Approved Mining Plan ......................................................................................................... 11-10


11.2.2 Mining Process .................................................................................................................... 11-10
11.2.3 General Procedure for Excavating Borrow Area ................................................................. 11-10
11.2.4 Opening of New Borrow Areas ............................................................................................ 11-11
11.3

BASELINE ENVIRONMENT ................................................................................................... 11-13

11.4

IMPACT ................................................................................................................................... 11-14

11.5

MITIGATIONS, ENHANCEMENT & REHABILITATION OF BORROW AREAS .................... 11-14

12.
12.1
13.
13.1
14.

ADDITIONAL STUDY .................................................................................................................. 12-1


ROAD SAFETY AUDIT ............................................................................................................. 12-1
ADDITIONAL TOR COMPLIANCE ............................................................................................. 13-1
THE ADDITIONAL TOR ............................................................................................................ 13-1
DISCLOSURE OF CONSULTANT .............................................................................................. 14-1

14.1

CONSULTANTS DETAILS ....................................................................................................... 14-1

14.2

LABORATORY .......................................................................................................................... 14-1

14.3

PROJECT TEAM ....................................................................................................................... 14-1

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


v
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1-1: Valued Ecosystem Components .................................................................................................. 1-2
Table 1-2: Weightage and Ranking System Adopted ................................................................................... 1-3
Table 1-3: Primary and Secondary Information Sources .............................................................................. 1-5
Table 2-1: Existing Cross Section details ...................................................................................................... 2-1
Table 2-2: Existing Road Inventory ............................................................................................................... 2-1
Table 2-3: Widening Options ......................................................................................................................... 2-2
Table 2-4: Summary of Proposed Horizontal Alignment ............................................................................... 2-4
Table 2-5: Bypass & Realignment Locations ................................................................................................ 2-4
Table 2-6: Details of Service Road ............................................................................................................... 2-5
Table 2-7: Proposed Structures .................................................................................................................... 2-5
Table 2-8: Proposed Structures .................................................................................................................... 2-5
Table 2-9: Details of Underpass .................................................................................................................... 2-5
Table 2-10: Enhancement of Inventories ...................................................................................................... 2-6
Table 2-11: Summary of Civil Cost Estimate ................................................................................................ 2-6
Table 3-1: Country Level Environmental Laws & Regulations ...................................................................... 3-1
Table 3-2: Summary of Clearances & NOCs ............................................................................................... 3-3
Table 4-1: Details of Monitoring Station for Soil ............................................................................................ 4-2
Table 4-2: Physico-chemical Analysis of Soil Quality ................................................................................... 4-3
Table 4-3: Air Pollution Receptors Types Identified along the Project Road ................................................ 4-3
Table 4-4: Details of Monitoring Station for Air Quality Monitoring ............................................................... 4-4
Table 4-5: Ambient Air Quality within Project Corridor .................................................................................. 4-4
Table 4-6: Details of Water Quality Monitoring Station ................................................................................. 4-5
Table 4-7: Physical and Chemical Results of Surface Water Samples ........................................................ 4-5
Table 4-8: Physical and Chemical Results of Ground Water Samples ......................................................... 4-6
Table 4-9: Observed Noise Levels along Road ............................................................................................ 4-7
Table 4-10: Forest Areas along the Project Road ......................................................................................... 4-7
Table 4-11: Census Details ........................................................................................................................... 4-8
Table 4-12: Settlements along Project Road ................................................................................................ 4-8
Table 5-1: Public Consultation held at Different Stages of Project ............................................................... 5-1
Table 5-2: Public Consultations..................................................................................................................... 5-2
Table 5-3: Addressal of General Issues and Concerns under the Project .................................................... 5-3
Table 6-1: Scoring system adopted for the Project ....................................................................................... 6-1
Table 6-2: General Impacts on Environment ................................................................................................ 6-2
Table 6-3: Likely Impacts on Water Resources during the Construction Stage ........................................... 6-6
Table 6-4: Noise Impacts .............................................................................................................................. 6-9
Table 6-5: Forest Area required on Project Road ......................................................................................... 6-9
Table 6-6: Likely Impacts on Flora .............................................................................................................. 6-10
Table 6-7: Proposed Land Requirement in the Project ............................................................................... 6-13
Table 7-1: "With and Without" Project Scenarios - A Comparative Assessment .......................................... 7-1
Table 7-2: Proposed Bypass & Realignment Locations ................................................................................ 7-3
Table 7-3: Analysis of Alternatives for Horti Bypass ..................................................................................... 7-3
Table 7-4: Analysis of Alternatives for Nandani Realignment ....................................................................... 7-5
Table 7-5: Minimisation of Environmental Impacts ...................................................................................... 7-6
Table 8-1: Summary of Mitigation on Impact on Land ................................................................................. 8-1
Table 8-2: Mitigation Measures for Soil Contamination ............................................................................... 8-2
Table 8-3: Details of Stone Aggregates Quarries ......................................................................................... 8-3
Table 8-4: Details of Natural Sand Quarries ................................................................................................. 8-3
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
vi
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 8-5: Summary of Mitigations for Impacts on Air Quality ...................................................................... 8-3
Table 8-6: Summary of Mitigations for Impacts on Water ............................................................................. 8-5
Table 8-7: Sources of Noise Pollution, Impacts and Generic Mitigation Measures ...................................... 8-8
Table 8-8: Specific Noise Mitigation Measures ............................................................................................. 8-9
Table 8-9: Summary of Mitigations for Impacts on Biological Environment ................................................ 8-10
Table 8-10: Forest Area Required ............................................................................................................... 8-10
Table 8-11: Species Recommended in Settlement Areas (Within 1 km of Last Dwelling) ......................... 8-12
Table 8-12: Species Recommended in Rural & Semi Urban Areas ........................................................... 8-12
Table 8-13: Species Recommended for Median Plantation ........................................................................ 8-12
Table 9-1: Summary of Reporting of Environmental components and Responsibilities .............................. 9-4
Table 9-2: Modules for Training ................................................................................................................... 9-5
Table 10-1: Environmental Management Plan ............................................................................................ 10-3
Table 10-2: Environmental Budget ............................................................................................................ 10-20
Table 11-1: Details of Borrow area along the Project Road ........................................................................ 11-1
Table 11-2: Probable Borrow Areas data (to be filled by Concessionaire) ............................................... 11-12
Table 11-3: Road Safety Audit Checklist .................................................................................................... 12-1
Table 12-1: Compliance to Additional TOR................................................................................................. 13-1
Table 13-1: Project Team ............................................................................................................................ 14-1

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1-1: Location of Project Road ............................................................................................................ 1-1
Figure 2-1: Proposed Typical Cross Sections ............................................................................................... 2-2
Figure 4-1: Seismic Zones of India ............................................................................................................... 4-2
Figure 5-1: Photographs of Interactions along the project road .................................................................... 5-2
Figure 7-1: Proposed Horti Bypass Alternatives ........................................................................................ 7-4
Figure 7-2: Proposed Horti Bypass ............................................................................................................... 7-4
Figure 7-3: Proposed Nandani Realignment Alternatives ............................................................................. 7-5
Figure 7-4: Proposed Nandani Realignment ................................................................................................. 7-6
Figure 8-1: Silt Fencing
........................................................................................................................... 8-7
Figure 8-2: Oil interceptor ........................................................................................................................... 8-7
Figure 8-3: Rain Water Harvesting Structure ................................................................................................ 8-8
Figure 8-4: Compound Wall and Trees as Noise Barrier .............................................................................. 8-9
Figure 8-5: Conceptual Landscaping Of Incidental Space .......................................................................... 8-13
Figure 8-6: Thematic landscaping around intersections ............................................................................. 8-13
Figure 8-7: Seating Spaces ......................................................................................................................... 8-18
Figure 9-1: Proposed Organisation Chart ..................................................................................................... 9-6
Figure 11-1: Borrow Area Location Map ..................................................................................................... 11-9

LIST OF BOXES
Box 9-1: Qualification and Responsibilities of Environmental Officer of Concessionaire ............................. 9-2
Box 9-2: Qualification and Responsibilities of Environmental Officer of Contractor ..................................... 9-3
Box 11-1: Earth Quantities required and to be Utilised ............................................................................... 11-1
Box 11-2: Borrow Area Plan Format ......................................................................................................... 11-13

LIST OF ANNEXURE
Annexure 2.1: Details of Bus Bays and Shelters
Annexure 4.1: Water resources along the project road
Annexure 4.2: Cultural Properties along the Project Road
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
vii
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Annexure 4.3:
Annexure 4.4:
Annexure 8.1:
Annexure 8.2:
Annexure 8.3:
Annexure 8.4:
Annexure 8.5:
Annexure 8.6:
Annexure 8.7:
Annexure 8-8:
Annexure 8.9:
Annexure 10.1:

Community Properties along the Project Road


Noise Sensitive Receptors
Guidelines for Identification of Debris Disposal Sites & Precautions
Guideline for Rehabilitation of Dumpsites & Quarries
Guidelines for New Quarry Management
Guidelines for Existing Quarry Management
Quarry Chart
Guidelines for Sediment Control
Tree Plantation Strategy
Traffic Control and Safety during Construction
Guidelines for Sitting and Layout of Construction Camp
Environmental Monitoring Plan

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


viii
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

ABBREVIATIONS

Abbreviations
AAQ
AAQMS

Full Form
Ambient Air Quality
Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Station

Abbreviations
LHS
MDR

AIDS

Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome

MoEF

BOQ

Bill of Quantities

NAAQS

BPL
CD

Below Poverty Line


Cross Drainage

NGO
NH

CF

Conservator of Forest

NHAI

CO
CoI
CPCB
DFO
DLC
DPR
EAC
EIA
EIRR
EMP
FGD
GO
GoI
GoK
GWQMS
HC
HD
HQ

NOC
NOX
ODR
PAF
PAH
PAP
PD
PF
PIU
PPP
PWD
R&R
RAP
RF
RHS
ROW
SH
SO2
SOS

Strategic Options Study

IE
IMO

Carbon Monoxide
Corridor of Impact
Central Pollution Control Board
Divisional Forest Officer
District Level Committee
Detailed Project Report
Expert Appraisal Committee
Environmental Impact Assessment
Economic Internal Rate of Return
Environmental Management Plan
Focus Group Discussions
Government Order
Government of India
Government of Karnataka
Ground Water Quality Monitoring Station
Hydrocarbons
Highways Department
Head Quarters
Indian Archaeological / Historical / Religious
Features
Independent Engineer
Indian Meteorological Organization

Full Form
Left Hand Side
Major District Roads
Ministry of Environment and
Forests
National Ambient Air Quality
Standards
Non Governmental Organisations
National Highway
National Highways Authority of
India
No-objection Certificate
Oxides of Nitrogen
Other District Roads
Project Affected Family
Project Affected Household
Project Affected Person
Project Director
Protected Forest
Project Implementation Unit
Public Private Partnership
Public Works Department
Resettlement and Rehabilitation
Resettlement Action Plan
Reserved Forest
Right Hand Side
Right of Way
State Highways
Sulphur Dioxide

SPCB
PM

IRC

Indian Roads Congress

SWQMS

IS

Indian Standard

TDS

State Pollution Control Board


Particulate Matter
Surface Water Quality Monitoring
Station
Total Dissolved Solids

IAR

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


ix
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

0.
0.1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

PROJECT BACKGROUND

National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) has been entrusted by GoI to implement the development of
stretches of NH under NHDP Phase-III on BOT Mode / EPC mode. NHAI has decided for Development of
the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of
existing 2 lanes of from proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH
13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka.
0.2

NEED OF THE PROJECT

The demand for the project has emerged from the increase of existing traffic numbers plying on the road.
The total traffic in this stretch has crossed 18000 PCUs in 2010, implying that the capacity of existing 2 lane
road with shoulders has already exceeded its capacity. It is estimated that the traffic will grow at 7.71 %,
7.46 %, 5.00 % and 7.48 % for cars, LCVs, 2-axle trucks and multi axle trucks, respectively. This enormous
growth calls for the development of the road to 4 / 6 lanes standards. Thus to enable that the project road is
able to withstand the pressure of the traffic growth, it has been found that the proposed widening of the
existing road to 4 / 6 lanes standards is needed.
0.3

PROJECT ROAD

The project road starts from existing Km 19.440 of NH 13 near Solapur and ends at Km 102.000 on NH-13
near Bijapur and is 82.560 Km long. The proposed length of the project road is 82.342 Km and the road
shall start at Km 28.200 near Solapur and end at Km 110.542 near Bijapur on NH-13.
0.4

PROJECT INFLUENCE AREA

The project districts are Solapur in Maharashtra and Bijapur in Karnataka. The district of Bijapur is bounded
by Gulbarga & Yadgir in North east, Raichur in South, Bagalkot and Belgaum in west and Maharashtara in
North. Solapur district in Maharashtra is bounded by Latur in East, Osmanabad, Pune & Ahmednagar in
North, Satara and Sangli in west and Karnataka in South. The project road falls under Solapur South
(Maharashtra), Indi & Bijapur (Karnataka) Talukas.
The existing Right of Way (RoW) varies from 13.2m to 45 m, as per the details obtained from NH Divisions
of Bijapur & Solapur on an average. The proposed RoW is 60m all throughout except at toll plaza and rest
areas while the Corridor of Impact (CoI) is 75 m respectively. The project area is 500 m on either side of the
project corridor i.e., a total of 1 Km.
0.5

PROJECT PROPONENT

The project proponent is National Highways Authority of India, Government of India.


0.6

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

To cater to the future traffic, the project proposes to:

Develop 4 / 6 lane divided carriageway with paved shoulders

In addition the project would improve the geometric deficiencies through curve improvements and the
improvement of the various intersections

The proposed improvement includes repair / rehabilitation of existing cross-drainage (CD) structures on
the highway and provision of new CD structures at appropriate locations

To minimise the adverse impacts on the various settlements bypass proposed at Horti besides 1 major
realignment at Nandani

Service roads are also provided at 5 locations for a total length of 6.538 Km (both sides length). These
locations were proposed based on the proximity to cultural properties, educational and health units, and
size of settlements.

Slip roads are also proposed for a total length of 22.128 Km of at 17 locations

1 cattle, 8 pedestrian and 6 vehicular underpasses have been proposed to ease access of local traffic
and population

2 Toll plazas near Proposed Km 32.100 & Km 82.550 are proposed

2 Rest Area at proposed Km 57.800 near Zalki Town (RHS) & Km 98.800 Near Arikeri Tanda Village
(RHS) & 2 Truck Lay byes at proposed Km 57.800 & Km 98.800 are proposed

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


i
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Proper drainage, grade-separators, road furniture, utilities and amenities wherever required shall also
be provided

0.7

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (EIA) STUDY IN THE PROJECT

The Environmental Impact Assessment study of the project road has been carried out as per terms of
reference of NHAI and guidelines given by the Ministry of Environment & Forests, Govt. of India. The study
methodology for the EIA employs a simplistic approach in which the important environmental receptors were
identified during the Environmental Screening phase. Based on the identification baseline data was
generated and then analysed to predict the impacts and quantify them. Avoidance, Mitigation and
Enhancements measures were then developed and these have been incorporated in the Environmental
Management Plan (EMP), design drawings and / or Bills of Quantities as appropriate. Implementation
arrangements including responsibilities of all the actors have been streamlined and documented for future
guidance.
0.8

POLICY, LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE FRAMEWORK

0.8.1

Institutional Setting

The project has been initiated and is being carried out by the NHAI. The primary responsibility of the project
rests with the NHAI in providing encumbrance free ROW to the concessionaire who shall implement the
project.
0.8.2

Clearances

As part of the project preparations, the Project Proponent shall take the following clearances and NOCs:

Clearance under the Forest (conservation) Act, 1980 for diversion of 2.665 ha of forestland for the
project. The application for forest diversion has also been processed and submitted to the Nodal Officer
in the Forest Department

Tree felling permission from the respective Divisional Forest Officer

Prior Environmental Clearance from EAC of MoEF as per Environmental Impact Assessment
Notification dated 14th September 2006 and its subsequent amendments as additional right of way
requirement for improvement of the project road is more than 20m

Apart from the clearances that the project requires to be obtained by the Project Proponent, the
concessionaire & contractor shall also obtain the required clearances NOCs & licenses from the various
agencies & authorities prior to his work initiation. These are:

NOC and Consents under Air, Water, EP Acts & Noise rules of SPCB for establishing and operating
plants from SPCB. The NOC shall be made available after the SPCB completes the process of
conducting Public Hearing of the project (which shall be carried out as per the Prior Environmental
Clearance process)

NOC under Hazardous Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 1989 from SPCB

PUC certificate for use of vehicles for construction from Department of Transport

Quarry lease deeds and license and Explosive license from Dept. of Geology and Mines & Chief
controller of explosives

NOC for water extraction for construction and allied works from Ground Water Authority

Apart from the above clearances, the concessionaire also has to comply with the following:

Clearance of Engineer for location and layout of Workers Camp, Equipment yard and Storage yard.

Clearance of Engineer for Traffic Management Plan for each section of the route after it has been
handed over for construction.

An Emergency Action Plan should be prepared by the contractor and approved by the Engineer for
accidents responding to involving fuel & lubricants before the construction starts.

Submit a Quarry Management Plan to the Engineer along with the Quarry lease deeds

0.9

BASELINE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE

0.9.1

Physical Environment

Climate
The climate of the project district is mainly of semi arid type and major part of the project district experiences
hot and dry summer. There are four seasons:
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
ii
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Hot Summer (from March to May),

South west monsoon season (from June to September)

Post monsoon season (October and November)

Cold winter (from December to February)

Temperature
o

May is the hottest month with a mean max of 43C. Mean (Min) and daily temperature is 25.5 C and the
o
mean (max) is 38.1 C. With the advance of south west monsoon into the area, by the middle of June, day
temperature drop is observed. By about the first week of October the monsoon, the temperature drops to
about 18C. The monthly temperature range is smallest in August because of overcast conditions and
largest in March on the contrary.
Rainfall
About 60% of the annual rainfall is received during June to September, while 24% is received in October
and November during the period of retreating monsoon. Average annual rainfall recorded is 553 mm.

Geology
Geologically, the project district is possessed of Achaean complex composed of crystalline schist, granite
gneisses and granite. The project district is well endowed with mineral deposits like sand stone, white clay,
and plastic clay of the project corridor.
Soil
The project districts have three types of soils viz. Black soils, Red sandy soils and mixed soils. Formation of
various types of soils is a complex function of chemical weathering of bedrocks, vegetative decay and
circulation of precipitated water. Soils are mostly in-situ in nature. Samples of soil have been collected and
are being tested for the physical and chemical properties
Seismicity
The entire stretch of the project highway traverses through sub category seismic zone II of seismic zoning
classification system which is a zone of stability.
Air Quality
The air quality in the project area is generally pristine. The Ambient air qualities were monitored at six
locations and it is found that the concentration of PM 10 is higher than the standards which can be attributed
to the dryness of the area and the dust present along the project corridor. Concentrations of CO, SO2 & NOX
are well within the standards as per the prescribed National Ambient Air Quality Standards.
Noise Quality
It has been observed that noise levels are within the prescribed limits of CPCB, as normally observed in
other National highways. Noise, though is a major area of concern, at locations of sensitive receptors
(educational establishments like schools and colleges, hospitals) identified quite close to the road especially
within the urban areas.
Water Hydrology and Drainage
A number of manmade water bodies and some seasonal water bodies are found in the project area. To
facilitate the cross-drainage at these water crossings, 140 cross-drainage structures are proposed. The
water quality of the surface water samples are within the standards.
0.9.2

Biological Environment

Forest Resources
The alignment of the proposed project road passes along patches of forest lands at alignment is likely to
directly impact the Reserve Forest area at Nandnani The total forestland required for the project is 2.665 ha.
There are no national park and wildlife sanctuary located within the project area.
Trees within ROW
No endangered flora has been reported along the roadside. The trees that are to be felled have been
marked and jointly verified with forest department and a total of 7684 trees of various species have been
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
iii
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

identified for felling. The predominant tree species are Acacia sp., Neem (Azadirchta indica), Siris (Albizia
procera), Eucalyptus sp., Banyan (Ficus bengalensis), Peepal (Ficus religiosa), Babul (Acacia nilotica) &
Subabul (Leucaena leucocephela). There are no endangered trees that are to be felled.
Fauna
Domesticated animals mainly constitute the faunal population within the project area. The forest department
have reported the presence of some wild & endangered animals in the forest areas within the project area,
however no such species were reported during the site reconnaissance and survey.
0.9.3

Social Environment

Census Profile
The project highway passes through the districts of Solapur in Maharashtra and Bijapur in Karnataka. As per
the 2011 census, Karnataka has a total population of 61,130,704 and the total male and female population
in the state is 31,057,742 and 31,057,742 respectively. Maharashtra has a total population of 61,130,704
and the total male and female population in the state is 58,361,397and 54,011,575 respectively. The
population density per sq km is 365 in Maharashtra and 319 in Karnataka. The literacy rate of the
Maharashtra is 82.91 and Karnataka is 75.60 while the sex ratios are 946 & 968 respectively. The
population density, sex ratio & literacy rate of the project districts are less than the state level.
Linguistic Distribution
Marathi & Kannada are the major vernacular language spoken by the majority of the people in the project
corridor.
Settlement
A total of 25 major and minor settlements varying in size and populations are present along the project
corridor.
Educational Institutes
There are a number of educational institutes along the existing project corridor. These sensitive receptors
are exposed to dust and noise from the road. Some of these educational institutions are located on the edge
of the road and is a serious concern from the point of safety and Signage and Safety measures are required.
Signage and Safety measures need to be built in the proposed road design at these locations.
Cultural Properties
The project highway traverses through a number of settlements and there are some religious and cultural
properties which though not of archaeological significance are nevertheless, significant to the community.
Places of Historical Importance / Cultural & Archaeological Heritage
The project area does not have any places of historical importance or cultural & Archaeological heritage.
Highway Amenities
There are number of amenities and utility services located along the highway like dhaba, petrol pumps, bus
stops etc. the location of these amenities along the highway is an issue of concern as the haphazard siting
of these amenities is contributing to congestion of the highway. Traffic aid posts and medical aid posts are
proposed. 21 bus bays and bus shelters are also proposed all along the project corridor.
Truck Parking Lay-bys & Rest Areas
There are no parking lay-byes for commercial vehicles along the project road. Many unorganised truck
parking at certain locations on both sides were found in the project corridor creating bottlenecks. 2 Rest
Area at proposed Km 57.800 near Zalki Town (RHS) & Km 98.800 Near Arikeri Tanda Village (RHS) & 2
Truck Lay byes at proposed Km 57.800 & Km 98.800 are proposed.
Land Use / Acquisition of the Proposed Corridor
A total of 128.1196 hectares of land including private and government will be acquired for the construction of
bypass, ROB, Flyover, junction improvement, service roads and two segregated carriageways.
0.10

PUBLIC INTERACTIONS, CONSULTATION & PUBLIC HEARING

Public Interactions & consultations were conducted during the project preparations. The main purpose of
these consultations was to know the communitys reaction to the perceived impact of proposed project on
the people at individual and settlement level. The issues of the most concern were related to rehabilitation
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
iv
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

and resettlements and have been dealt in social assessment report. It was also felt during the public
consultation process that most of the people are aware about the project but they did not appreciate
environmental problems associated with road projects. However, some people were concerned about
environmental issues, mainly air and noise pollution. The other concerns raised at during public consultation
were demand for submergence of project road and safety problems. Public Hearing for the project shall be
conducted and the issues raised by the public shall be duly incorporated in project design.
0.11

POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

The environmental components are mainly impacted during the construction and operational stages of the
project and have to be mitigated for and incorporated in the engineering design. Environmental mitigation
measures represent the projects endeavour to reduce its environmental footprint to the minimum possible.
These are conscious efforts from the project to reduce undesirable environmental impacts of the proposed
activities and offset these to the degree practicable. Enhancement measures are projects efforts to gain
acceptability in its area of influence. They reflect the pro-active approach of the project towards
environmental management.
0.11.1 Impacts on Climate
Impact on the climate conditions from the proposed road project widening will not be significant as no major
deforestation and / or removal of vegetation is involved for the project.
0.11.2 Impact on Air Quality
There will be rise in PM10 & PM2.5 levels during the construction activities, which shall again be within
prescribed limit after the construction activities are over.
0.11.3 Impact on Noise Levels
The impact of noise levels from the proposed project on the neighbouring communities is addressed. It has
been concluded that both day and nighttimes equivalent noise levels are within the permissible limits right
from start of project life. Noise sensitive receptors have been identified along the project road.
0.11.4 Impact on Water Resources and Quality
The construction and operation of the proposed project roads will not have any major impacts on the surface
water and the ground water quality in the area. Contamination to water bodies may result due to spilling of
construction materials, oil, grease, fuel and paint in the equipment yards and asphalt plants. This will be
more prominent in case of locations where the project road crosses rivers, canals distributaries, etc.
Mitigation measures have been planned to avoid contamination of these water bodies.
0.11.5 Impact on Ecological Resources
There is no major loss of vegetation hence adverse impact in terms of availability of nesting sites for the bird
doesnt arise. Furthermore, there is no sensitive ecological area along the existing project roads, so the
impact will be insignificant during construction period. But on the long run the project shall have a positive
impact due to the compensatory forestation and avenue plantation.
0.11.6 Impact on Land
During the construction of the proposed project, the topography will change due to excavation of borrow
areas, stone quarrying, cuts and fills for project road and construction of project related structures etc.
Provision of construction yard for material handling will also alter the existing topography. The change in
topography will also be due to the probable induced developments of the project. Benefits in the form of land
levelling and tree plantations in the vicinity of the project road shall enhance the local aesthetics.
0.11.7 Impact on Human Use Values
The PAPs shall be compensated as per the RAP. Accidents are bound to increase coupled with ribbon
development. There shall also be some impacts on cultural or religious properties along the corridor.
0.12

ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES

Detailed analyses of the alternatives have been conducted taking into account both with and without project
scenario and the available alignment options. The analysis also dealt with the justification of selections of
the proposed alignment and the modifications on it due to environmental considerations, realignment and
bypasses and the minimisation of negative impacts. Based on all these alternative studies the present
alignment was proposed.
0.13

MITIGATION AVOIDANCE AND ENHANCEMENT MEASURES

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


v
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Both generic and site specific mitigation and enhancement measures have been planned for identified
adverse environmental impacts. The construction workers camp will be located at least 500m away from
habitations. The construction yard, hot mix plants, crushers etc. will be located at 500m away from
habitations and in downwind directions. Adequate cross drainage structures have been planned to maintain
proper cross drainage. In order to compensate negative impacts on flora due to cutting of trees the project
plans compensatory plantation in the ratio of 1:2 i.e. for every tree to be cut, two trees will be planted. The
project shall also witness the plantation of trees for providing aesthetic beauty and shade. Approximately
7684 trees of various species have been identified along the proposed alignment for felling. A total of 15368
trees are to be planted to compensate the loss at a ratio of 1:2. A total of 27420 trees as avenue plantation
and 82342 ornamental, medicinal & flowering plants and shrubs in the median are proposed. In order to
rd
minimise the negative impact of tree felling, it is also proposed to transplant a minimum of 1/3 of trees
proposed for felling. Thus 2562 trees are proposed for transplantation and the cost has been budgeted.
The plantation of trees shall be done subject to availability of space in the proposed ROW . The project will
take an opportunity to provide environmental enhancement measures to improve aesthetics in the project
area. The planned environmental enhancement measures include plantation in available clear space in
ROW, enhancement of water bodies etc. In order to avoid contamination of water bodies during construction
sedimentation chambers, oils and grease separators, oil interceptors at storage areas and at construction
yard have been planned.
0.14

INSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN

The responsibility of implementing the mitigation measures and all activities under environmental
management plan (EMP) lies with the concessionaire (selected through International Competitive Bidding)
through the contractor. All construction activities being taken up by the contractor under the concessionaire
shall be scrutinised by the Independent Engineer who in turn shall report to the NHAI. Presently the NHAI is
fully equipped to meet the challenges of implementation of the environmental mitigation measures in the
EMP. The implementation of RAP shall be as per the details given in the RAP report. In the pre-construction
phase of the project the independent Engineer shall review the EMP and RAP to identify environmental and
social issues and arrive at a suitable strategy for implementation.
For effective implementation and management of the EMP, the Concessionaire shall contrive to establish a
Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) Cell headed by an Environment Officer to deal with the
environmental issues of the project. This officer shall interact with the contractor, NHAI, IC and other
departments to ensure that the mitigation and enhancement measures mentioned in the EMP are adhered.
The Environmental officer of the concessionaire shall be the interface between the Environmental Specialist
of IE and the Environmental Officer of the contractor. His prime responsibility shall be to apprise the
Environmental Specialist of the IE about the ground conditions. He shall also procure the requisite
clearances and the NOCs for the project and shall also strictly supervise that the contractor adheres to the
EMP. The officer shall also participate in training programmes and assist the IE in preparing documentation
for good practices in environmental protection.
This Environmental officer of the concessionaire should ideally be a Postgraduate in Environmental Science
/ Environmental Management / Zoology / Botany / Ecology / Environmental Engineer / Environmental
Planning. The EO should have 10 years of total experience with a minimum of 3 years in the implementation
of EMP of highway projects and an understanding of environmental issues. The environmental officer can
also look after the additional charges of safety and health. The Environmental Officer of the contractor
should ideally be a Postgraduate in Environmental Science / Environmental Management / Zoology / Botany
/ Ecology / Environmental Planning / Environmental Engineer. The Environment Officer should have 5 years
of experience with a minimum of 2 years in the implementation of EMP of highway projects and an
understanding of environmental, health and safety issues. The Environmental Officer of the contractor shall
report directly to the Resident Construction Manager / Project Manager so that the pertinent environmental
issues that he raises are promptly dealt with. He shall also have a direct interaction with the Environmental
Expert and the Environmental Officer of the IC and the concessionaire respectively.
The reporting system will operate linearly contractor who is at the lowest rung of the implementation
system reporting to the Concessionaire, who in turn shall report to IC and the NHAI. All reporting by the
concessionaire shall be on a quarterly basis, while the reporting time of the contractor shall be decided upon
by the concessionaire. The NHAI Site Office will be responsible for setting the targets for the various
activities anticipated during construction phase in consultation with the IC and obtaining agreement from the
Contractor after mobilisation but before beginning of works on site. The contractor will report from then on
regarding the status on each of these. The NHAI Site Office will monitor the activities through its own staff or
the consultants Environmental Specialist after it has obtained the Contractors report with the Consultants
remarks on it during the construction phase. During the operation phase, the supervision as well as reporting
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
vi
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

responsibilities will lie with the NHAI Site Office.


0.15

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Project specific environmental management plan have been prepared for ensuring the implementation of the
proposed measures during construction phase of the project, implementation and supervision
responsibilities, sufficient allocation of funds, timeframes for anticipated activities etc. has been dealt with in
this document, which will eventually form a part of the Contract documents between the NHAI and the
Concessionaire. The cost for environmental management is INR 43.088 crores.
0.16

CONCLUSIONS

Based on the EIA study and surveys conducted for the Project, it can be safely concluded that associated
potential adverse environmental impacts can be mitigated to an acceptable level by adequate
implementation of the measures as stated in the EIA Report. Adequate provisions shall be made in the
Project to cover the environmental mitigation and monitoring requirements, and their associated costs as
suggested in environmental budget. The proposed project shall improve Road efficiency and bring economic
growth. In terms of air and noise quality, the project shall bring considerable improvement to possible
exposure levels to population.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


vii
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

1.
1.1

INTRODUCTORY BACKGROUND

INTRODUCTION

National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) has been entrusted by GoI to implement the development of
stretches of NH under NHDP Phase-III on BOT Mode / EPC mode. NHAI has decided for Development of
the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of
existing 2 lanes of from proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH
13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka.
1.2

NEED OF THE PROJECT

The demand for the project has emerged from the increase of existing traffic numbers plying on the road.
The total traffic in this stretch has crossed 18000 PCUs in 2010, implying that the capacity of existing 2 lane
road with shoulders has already exceeded its capacity. It is estimated that the traffic will grow at 7.71 %,
7.46 %, 5.00 % and 7.48 % for cars, LCVs, 2-axle trucks and multi axle trucks, respectively. This enormous
growth calls for the development of the road to 4 / 6 lanes standards. Thus to enable that the project road is
able to withstand the pressure of the traffic growth, it has been found that the proposed widening of the
existing road to 4 / 6 lanes standards is needed.
1.3

PROJECT ROAD

The project road starts from existing Km 19.440 of NH 13 near Solapur and ends at Km 102.000 on NH-13
near Bijapur and is 82.560 Km long. The proposed length of the project road is 82.342 Km and the road
shall start at Km 28.200 near Solapur and end at Km 110.542 near Bijapur on NH-13. The location of the
project road is presented in Figure 1.1.
Figure 1-1: Location of Project Road

1.4

PROJECT INFLUENCE AREA

The project districts are Solapur in Maharashtra and Bijapur in Karnataka State. The district of Bijapur is
bounded by Gulbarga & Yadgir in North east, Raichur in South, Bagalkot and Belgaum in west and
Maharashtara in North. Solapur district in Maharashtra is bounded by Latur in East, Osmanabad, Pune &
Ahmednagar in North, Satara and Sangli in west and Karnataka in South. The project road falls under
Solapur South (Maharashtra), Indi & Bijapur (Karnataka) Talukas. The existing Right of Way (RoW) varies
from 13.2m to 45 m, as per the details obtained from NH Divisions of Bijapur & Solapur on an average. The
proposed RoW is 60m all throughout except at toll plaza and rest areas while the Corridor of Impact (CoI) is
75 m respectively. The project area is 500 m on either side of the project corridor i.e., a total of 1 Km.
1.5

PROJECT PROPONENT

The project proponent is National Highways Authority of India, Government of India.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


1-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

1.6

SCOPE OF WORK

1.6.1

Environmental Impact Assessment in the Project

The EIA has been included in project preparation to streamline environmental issues in project design,
constructional and operational stages. The scope of the Environmental Impact Assessment as envisaged in
the Terms of Reference (ToR) includes the delivery of a EIA and EMP Report, which assess the impact of
the project highway as per provisions of the applicable laws and also identify a package of measures to
reduce / eliminate the adverse impacts identified during the assessment. This report presents the
Environmental Assessment of the project and the EMP for the anticipated impacts based on the additional
ToR approved by the MoEF.
1.7

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

The existing project highway is presently a 2 lane undivided carriage. To cater to the future traffic, the
project proposes to:

Develop 4 / 6 lane divided carriageway with paved shoulders

In addition the project would improve the geometric deficiencies through curve improvements and the
improvement of the various intersections

The proposed improvement includes repair / rehabilitation of existing cross-drainage (CD) structures on
the highway and provision of new CD structures at appropriate locations

To minimise the adverse impacts on the various settlements bypass proposed at Horti besides 1 major
realignment at Nandani

Service roads are also provided at 5 locations for a total length of 6.538 Km (both sides length). These
locations were proposed based on the proximity to cultural properties, educational and health units, and
size of settlements.

Slip roads are also proposed for a total length of 22.128 Km of at 17 locations

1 cattle, 8 pedestrian and 6 vehicular underpasses have been proposed to ease access of local traffic
and population

2 Toll plazas near Proposed Km 32.100 & Km 82.550 are proposed

2 Rest Area at proposed Km 57.800 near Zalki Town (RHS) & Km 98.800 Near Arikeri Tanda Village
(RHS) & 2 Truck Lay byes at proposed Km 57.800 & Km 98.800 are proposed

Proper drainage, grade-separators, road furniture, utilities and amenities wherever required shall also
be provided

1.8

APPROACH TO EIA

The study methodology for the EIA employs a simplistic approach and analyses the environmental issues
identified. The sections below details out the methodology adopted for the assessment of the environment
for the project.
1.8.1

Preliminary Environmental Screening

A Rapid Assessment Survey (RAS) was undertaken to identify the Valued Ecosystem Components (VECs)
within up to 75 m during the feasibility stage and were categorised into various environmental components
for screening and to assess their subsequent impacts due to the project as per the table below.
Table 1-1: Valued Ecosystem Components

Environmental
Attributes
Topography

Land use

Water resources

Forests & Wild Life

5
6

Road side Plantations


Settlements
Sensitive Receptors

Sl. No.

Valued Ecosystem Components


Terrain (Rolling to Plain)
Agriculture: (Irrigated, Un-irrigated); Settlements; Forest; Notified Industrial Area / Estate;
Grazing; Fallow; No Development zone etc.
Water bodies like rivers, canals, reservoirs, lakes and ponds Crossings as well as water
bodies within COI
Designated Protected Areas like Biosphere Reserves, Terrestrial or Marine National Parks,
Sanctuaries, Tiger / Elephant Reserves, Coastal Regulation Zone etc.) within 15 Km (aerial
distances) from the proposed project location boundary
Migratory route / crossing of wild animals and birds crossing project road
Presence of RF, PF other forests within 100m on either side of the existing Centre line
Green Tunnels, Strip Plantation
Towns and villages abutting the road corridor
Sensitive receptors such as educational and health facilities within COI

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


1-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Sl. No.

Environmental
Attributes

Valued Ecosystem Components

Drinking water sources

Religious Structures

10

Cultural Properties

11

Market Places

12

Common Property
Resources

13

Other features

Total number of drinking water sources (wells, hand pumps, community water points / taps
etc.) within COI
Temples, shrines, mosque, church, gurudwara etc. within COI
Number (total) of cultural properties (protected / unprotected archaeological monuments)
within 500m from the road
Number (total) of weekly market places / haats; grain / fruit / vegetable / fish market; cattle
market within COI
CPRs such as pastures / grazing lands; seating areas of the community; cremation/burial
grounds etc. within / along the RoW (All CPRs other than religious structures, drinking water
sources and bus stops) within COI
Flood Plains; Soil Erosion; stone quarries etc.

After identification and compilation of VEC list, assessment to what extent proposed total road construction
would affect each VEC has been made. To arrive at the nature and significant impacts, numerical values
were assigned for each VEC and combined them all in a single overall measure of the impact as per details
in the table below:
Table 1-2: Weightage and Ranking System Adopted
Environmental Attribute

Total
Weight

Scoring Criteria

Score

Plains
Rolling terrain
Flood plains/coastal belt
Hilly/mountainous terrain
Not prone at all
Rare occurrence
Prone to natural disasters/risks
Highly prone to natural disasters (regular occurrence)
5 or less
6 to 10
Number (average) of water bodies per km
11 to 15
crossings as well as water bodies within
100m on either side of the road
16 to 20
21 or more
2 or less
3 to 4
Over-topping and / or water logging within
100m on either side of the existing Centre
5 to 6
line
6 to 7
7 or more
Yes (if the project falls
partially or fully within
Is ground water availability / extraction an
dark or over-exploited
issue in project?
blocks )
No
Within 50 km
50 to 100 km
Availability of stone quarries
100 to 200 km
More than 200 km
Not at all
To some extent
Is soil erosion an issue in / along the subproject road?
Critical
Very critical
Biological Environment
Presence of designated protected areas
Yes
within 15 Km from the proposed project
No
location boundary
Within 5 Km
Occurrences outside designated protected
areas from the proposed sub-project
5 To 10 Km
location boundary
10 km or more
Yes
Crossing project road or within 500 m from
the proposed project location boundary
No
Yes
Presence of RF within 100m from either side
of the existing Centre line
No
Less than 5 Km
Length of forests along the road within 100m

1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5

Natural Environment
Topography

Vulnerability to natural hazards (such


as floods, cyclones, cloud burst,
landslide, subsidence, earthquake
etc.)

Surface water resources

Drainage Conditions

Ground water resources

Materials Availability

Soil Erosion

Sub Total

30

Designated Protected Areas

10

Wildlife habitats

Migratory route / crossing of wild


animals and birds

Reserved Forests

Protected or Other Forests

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


1-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

4
0
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
10
0
6
4
2
6
0
5
0
1

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Environmental Attribute

Total
Weight

Scoring Criteria
from either side of the existing Centre line

Green tunnels

Length of green tunnel/s within 30m (on


either side) along the road

Road side trees (broad estimate,


specific numbers, girth and species
details etc. shall be presented)

Number of trees likely to be affected

Total

40

Social Environment

Settlements

Total length of settlement sections (both


towns and villages) abutting the road
corridor

Sensitive Receptors

Number (total) of sensitive receptors within


50m on either side of the road (such as
educational and health facilities)

Drinking water sources

Total number of drinking water sources


(wells, hand pumps, community water
points/taps etc.) within COI

Religious Structures

Number (total) of religious structures


(temples, shrines, mosque, church,
gurudwara) within COI

Cultural Properties

Number (total) of cultural properties


(protected / unprotected archaeological
monuments) within 500m from the road

Market Places

Number (total) of weekly market places /


haats; grain / fruit / vegetable / fish market;
cattle market within COI

Common Property Resources (All


CPRs other than religious structures,
drinking water sources and bus
stops)

Number (total) of CPRs (such as pastures /


grazing lands; seating areas of the
community; cremation / burial grounds etc.)
within / along the COI

Total
Grand Total

30
100

Score
5 To 10 Km
10 To 15 Km
15 To 20 Km
20 Km or more
2 Km or less
2 Km To 5 Km
5 Km To 10 Km
10 Km or more
Up to 1000
1000 to 2000
2000 to 4000
More than 4000
-

2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
-

10 Km or less
10 to 20 Km
20 to 30 Km
30 to 40 Km
40 Km or more
10 or less
11 to 20
21 to 30
31 to 40
41 or more
10 or less
11 to 20
21 to 30
31 or more
10 or less
11 to 20
21 to 30
31 or more
2 or less
3 to 5
6 to 8
More than 8
5 or less
6 to 10
11 to 15
15 or more
5 or less
6 to 10
11 to 15
15 or more
-

1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
-

Based on the scores the probable impacts were derived.


1.8.2

Review of Applicable Environmental Regulations

Applicability of various environmental regulations and guidelines was reviewed for the project and its allied
activities.
1.8.3

Assessment of Baseline Environmental Profile

The baseline conditions of the project area were studied. Data pertaining to all facets of environment which
include physical, ecological, and socioeconomic environment both through primary and secondary sources
were collected. Key relevant information sources has been summarised in table below. Ambient air & noise,
ground and surface water samples were monitored at various locations identified along the corridor. The
monitoring and analysis for each component were carried out as per MoEF and CPCB guidelines. The
results of the monitoring were compared with the relevant national standards.
As part of the baseline environmental profile, a detailed tree inventory along the RoW has been carried out
based on their chainage, species, girth and distance from the carriageway. All trees with a girths size more
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
1-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

than 30cm that are falling within the proposed ROW shall be marked on the ground. Based on the survey a
tree schedule has been prepared for submission to the authorities.
In order to quantify the impacts of the project road on various receptors a survey was carried out. The
receptors included educational institutes, hospitals, cultural & religious properties and community properties.
Table 1-3: Primary and Secondary Information Sources
Environmental Parameters
Project objectives, Technical information on
existing road features
Inventory of road features like water Bodies,
Community
structures,
environmentally
sensitive locations areas, congested locations
etc.
Climatic Condition

Geology, Seismicity, Soil and Topography

Information Sources
ToR, Design Report

Ground Physical surveys


Status of Environment report on Karnataka by SPCB, Envis and other Websites
(www.envfor.nic.in, http://www.bijapur.nic.in, http://solapur.gov.in, http://mpcb.gov.in,
http://parisaramahiti.kar.nic.in, http://kspcb.gov.in, etc.), Feasibility report, primary
data collection
State of Environment report published by SPCB, government websites and
feasibility
report,
primary
data
collection
(http://raitamitra.kar.nic.in),
http://parisaramahiti.kar.nic.in etc.)

Land Use / Land Cover

Survey of India (SoI) Toposheets, Satellite imagery and Observation during surveys

Drainage Pattern
Status of forest areas, Compensatory
afforestation norms etc.
Air quality Noise, Soil and Water
Borrow Areas, Quarries and other construction
material source
River geo-morphology, hydrology, drainage,
flood patterns

Survey of India Toposheet, water resources, field observation and local people

Socioeconomic Environment

1.8.4

Divisional Forest Office


Onsite monitoring and Analysis of Field samples
Material Surveys and public consultations
Feasibility report and information from local people, field observations
Different Govt. agencies/civic bodies, Official websites maintained by state Govt.,
census of India 2001 / 2011 and Public Consultation during the Field survey

Consultations

Consultations with community members, PAPs Focus Group Discussions with teachers, women groups and
others and stakeholder meeting with the NHAI were carried out. The feedback generated through these
meetings has been incorporated as far as possible in the design and construction of the road. The
consultation process shall continue even during the implementation stage to gauge the general opinion. The
details are elaborated in chapter 5.
1.8.5

Assessment of Impacts

Assessments of general potential impacts were done based on the baseline data. Assessment of the
environmental impacts was carried out to ascertain that the direct and indirect impacts likely to be induced
due to the project are being adequately identified and addressed. The general impacts are land acquisition
and allied impacts on society, dust and air pollution due to removal of structures, trees and vegetation,
quarrying and other construction activities; noise pollution due to construction, loss of flora and its impacts
on the ecology and impacts on water resources. The chapter on Impacts assessment details out the
impacts.
1.8.6

Assessment of Alternatives

Various project alternatives including with and without scenarios have been assessed during the project.
The assessment of alternatives included that of realignments, widening options, service roads, noise barriers
in sensitive areas etc. The chapter on Analysis of Alternatives elaborates the process.
1.8.7

Mitigations and Enhancement Measures

All affirmative actions not only to avoid and deter but also to capitalise on the opportunities provided by the
project in order to improve the environmental conditions have been deliberated. The various mitigation and
enhancement measures proposed have been included in the environmental budget and also in the technical
specifications for the aid of the concessionaire. Based on their applicability, both general and case specific
measures were incorporated as follows:

Generic measures: To avoid or mitigate impacts on environmental components, general mitigation


measures were identified based on the characteristic features.

Site Specific: At representative sensitive locations, site-specific mitigation measures and

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


1-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

enhancement designs have been formulated.


1.8.8

Environmental Management Action Plans

The EMP shall detail out the implementation of the proposed mitigation and enhancement measures.

Prediction and addressal of impacts on the various environmental components;

Site specific designs for the mitigation measures provided;

Site specific enhancement designs;

Traffic management plans during construction & operation phase; and

Monitoring mechanisms and indicators during construction and operation periods.

1.9

STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT

The EIA report excluding the first chapter has been structured into the following chapters:
Chapter - 2

Project Description describes the existing features and also discusses the various
proposed improvement programmes along the corridor;

Chapter - 3

Policy, Legal and Administrative Framework reviews the existing set-ups relevant to the
project, at the National and the State levels;

Chapter - 4

Baseline Environmental Profile describes the entire picture of the existing environmental
set up of the project;

Chapter - 5

Public Consultation describes consultations carried out and people's perceptions of the
project benefits and the potential impacts;

Chapter - 6

Impacts Assessment identifies and assesses the potential impacts on each of the
environmental components due to the proposed project development;

Chapter - 7

Analysis of Alternatives discusses the various alternatives for the project stretch along with
the criteria for analysis and evaluation;

Chapter - 8

Mitigation, Avoidance and Enhancement Measures presents the avoidance and mitigation
and enhancement measures suggested on each of the environmental components;

Chapter - 9

Implementation Arrangements & Monitoring Schedule gives a brief about the present
implementation arrangements for environmental components of the project, compliance
monitoring and reporting mechanisms;

Chapter - 10 Environmental Management Plan details both the generic and specific EMPs for the project
road. This chapter also includes the Environmental Budget
Chapter - 11 Additional Studies provides the additional studies undertaken as part of the EIA study;
Chapter - 12 Additional ToR Compliance provides the details of the compliance made to the ToR
provided by MoEF;
Chapter - 13 Disclosure of the Consultant provides the details of the consultants engaged along with
their capabilities and experiences.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


1-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

2.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

This Chapter describes the project road and discusses the various improvement measures proposed as part
of the project. The project description includes details of existing condition of project road, existing and
proposed traffic, pavement conditions, road inventory, safety and community facilities.
2.1

EXISTING ROAD FEATURES

2.1.1

Alignment

The project highway is a 2 Lane undivided carriageway

Earthen (unpaved) shoulders exist for almost entire length of the highway with width varying from 1 to
1.5 m

78% of the pavement condition is good (68.900 Km) followed by 15% fair (13.300 Km) & 7% poor
(6.300 Km )

A total of about 146 horizontal curves (which include 74 left hand curves and 72 right hand curves) and
about 514 vertical curves (254 summit curves and 260 valley curves) exist along the alignment.

The existing pavement for the entire stretch is of bituminous surface

Submergence isnt reported. Road side drains are present in urban parts but they are either nonfunctional or partially functioning
Table 2-1: Existing Cross Section details

Carriageway Width (m)


7

2.1.2

Paved Shoulder Width (m)


0-1.5

Earthen Shoulder Width (m)


1-1.5

Embankment Height ( m)
0-3

Right of way

The right of way along the project stretch varies from 13.2 to 45 m

Although no major encroachments are observed along the project highway, there are some locations
near to built-up areas and town limits where some unauthorised structures seems to have been
constructed within the ROW.

2.1.3

Road inventory

The road has 8 major junctions, 21 minor junctions besides 1 ROB

There are 11 bus stops in the existing road


Table 2-2: Existing Road Inventory
Underpass

At grade
Intersection

Grade separator
intersection

VUP

CUP

PUP

No. of major
bridges

29

No. of
minor
bridges
23

Culverts

ROB / RUB

Slab

Box

Pipe

ROB

RUB

108

Source: Primary Road Inventory Survey


2.1.4

Traffic
Mixed traffic flow is observed along the highway. The average daily traffic along the project road ranges
from the 20284 to 22266 PCUs at two different sections.

2.2

PROPOSED ROAD FEATURES

2.2.1

Right of Way

60m Right of Way all throughout the project corridor is proposed except at toll plaza and rest area
locations

150m is proposed at toll plazas (including all Toll plaza Admin Buildings, Traffic aid post, Medical Aid
Post and Vehicle Rescue post)

200 m ROW is proposed at rest area

2.2.2

Alignment
The proposed length of the project road is 82.342 Km

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


2-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

11 Typical Cross Sections for widening of the project road in urban, semi urban and rural areas has
been developed based on guidelines of IRC and are depicted in Figure 2.1.

As this is a PPP project, only the horizontal alignment has been fixed and the concessionaire shall
develop cross sections at every 25m.
Table 2-3: Widening Options

Sl. No.
1
2
3

Widening Option
Eccentric
Concentric
Bypass / Realignment
Total

Total Length
67.043
8.484
6.815
82.342

Remarks
Due to curve improvement or parallel addition of Structure
To remove disparity and to negate more LA
To reduce social impacts & provide better geometrics

Figure 2-1: Proposed Typical Cross Sections

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


2-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


2-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

2.2.3

Pavement
Flexible pavements are proposed for all throughout the road except at the toll plazas where rigid
pavement is proposed. This is due to the high cost of construction involved for rigid pavements.

2.2.4

Geometric Design Aspects

All geometric design aspects have been carried out as per the IRC and MoRT&H standards and
specifications. Adequate warnings have been provided for maintaining continuity has been emphasised
in the design.

The existing profile has been maintained all as far as possible

The design speed has been kept quite consistent, and speed difference between two consecutive
curves is not exceeded. All horizontal curves are designed for 100kmph as detailed in table 2.4
Table 2-4: Summary of Proposed Horizontal Alignment
Total No of Curves
121

2.2.5

0-199
0

200-499
7

Radius of Curve (m)


500-899
900-1999
27
35

>2000
32

15-35
0

Design Speed (Kmph)


50-65
80
0
0

100
121

Bypasses and Realignments

1 bypass proposed at Horti (2.000 Km)

1 major realignment of 1.060 Km length proposed at Nandani


Table 2-5: Bypass & Realignment Locations

Sl. No

Nearest Settlement

Type

1
3

Horti
Nandani

Bypass
Major Realignment
Total Length (Km)

Existing Chainage (Km)


From
To
63.600
65.700
24.200
25.250

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


2-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Proposed Chainage (Km)


From
To
72.200
74.200
32.940
34.000

Length (Km)
2.000
1.060
3.060

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

2.2.6

Service roads

Service roads are proposed at 5 locations to accommodate urban & local traffic & provide access to
commercial establishments, residences, offices and sensitive receptors like schools, hospitals and
cultural properties.

The service roads have been provided as per IRC SP 84: Four Lane Manual according to which,
service roads are to be provided in settlement areas which are more than 200m in length and should be
7m wide on both the sides.

The Typical cross sections of these locations shall correspond to TCS -2, 2A, 2B.

Besides the Service roads, a total length of 22.128 Km of slip roads at 17 locations has been proposed
Table 2-6: Details of Service Road
Design Chainage

Sl. No

From
41.130
41.498
57.936
85.140
87.702

1
2
3
4
5

2.2.7

Length (Km)
Side

Width (m)

To
41.154
Both
41.730
Both
58.293
Both
87.358
Both
88.030
Both
Total Length (Km)

7
7
7
7
7

LHS
0.024
0.452
0.357
2.218
0.328
3.379

RHS
0.024
0.232
0.357
2.218
0.328
3.159

Total Length (Km)

Remarks

0.048
0.684
0.714
4.436
0.656
6.538

Dhulked
Dhulked
Zalki
Domanala
Thirugundu

Cross Drainage Structures

The project proposes 30 minor bridges. There shall be addition of 2 new major bridges alongside the
existing bridges. The spans of the major bridges are 61.8m & 322.2m. The proposed span arrangement
and other particulars of the structures are provided in the Concession Agreement.
Table 2-7: Proposed Structures

2.2.8

Major bridges

Minor bridges

30

Slab
6

Culverts
Box
22

Total

Pipe
80

140

Other Structures including Underpasses & Overpasses

The project proposes to have has 4 flyover and 1 ROB

1 cattle, 8 pedestrian and 6 vehicular underpasses have been proposed to ease access of local traffic
and population.

Vehicular Underpasses have been proposed in Crossings where the traffic is more than 5000 PCU and
in all SH and NH crossings, whereas PUPs have been proposed to facilitate pedestrians near schools
and hospitals
Table 2-8: Proposed Structures
Flyovers
4

ROB
1

PUP
8

VUP
6

CUP
1

FOB
-

Table 2-9: Details of Underpass


Sl.
No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

Design
Chainage
33.800
37.506
41.326
46.160
49.445
58.033
59.635
62.120
73.000
84.975
87.530
96.532

Location

Road Crossing

Nandani
Dulkhand
Indi Road
Zalki Bus Stand
Zalki
Gundevera
Domanala
Tirugundi
Arikeri

13

104.620

14

106.590

Bijapur Bypass

Barur-Kurgut Road
Indi Road
Yelagi- Loni Road
Nimbal-Horti Road
Indi-Bijapur City
Road
-

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


2-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Over all width of the


Structure (m)
26
24
26
24
26
24
26
26
24
26
26
26

Remarks
PUP
VUP
PUP
VUP
CUP
VUP
PUP
PUP
VUP
PUP
PUP
PUP

24

VUP

26

PUP

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No

Design
Chainage

Location

Road Crossing

Over all width of the


Structure (m)

Remarks

15

Location shall be decided in


consultation with IE

24

VUP

2.2.9

Design of Intersections

All intersections have been studied thoroughly with respect to traffic volume and geometric. The important
minor junctions leading to villages and major settlements have been identified and proper junction layouts
(including road marking, and traffic signs) have been applied as per IRC-SP: 41-1994. Design of major
junctions has been based on peak hour traffic data.
2.2.10 Traffic Control and Road Safety Features
Traffic control devices and road safety features, including Traffic Signs, Road Markings, Road lighting &
Crash Barriers are proposed and designed as per relevant IRC codes and standards.
2.2.11 Enhancement of Inventories
Apart from widening to four / six lanes from the existing 2 lane carriageway, the project have also proposed
several other enhancements such as bus-bays, truck lay-byes, toll plazas and Rest areas with Restaurant,
toilet facilities, ATM facility, Emergency First Aid, Repair / Maintenance facility, Parking provisions for trucks
and cars, PCO and Police outposts. The table below gives the details.
Table 2-10: Enhancement of Inventories
Particular
Toll plaza
Rest Area
Truck Lay bye
Bus bays & bus shelters

2.3

Proposed Nos.
2
1
2
24

Location
Proposed Km 32.100 & Km 82.550
Km 57.800 & Km 98.800
Km 57.800 near Zalki Town (RHS) & Km 98.800 Near Arikeri Tanda Village (RHS)
Given in Annexure 2.1 of this Report

COST ESTIMATE

The total civil cost of the project cost is INR 605.659. The table below provides the civil cost estimate for the
project.
Table 2-11: Summary of Civil Cost Estimate
Bill No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

Bill Name
Site Clearance and Dismantling
Earth work
Granular Sub-Base and Base Courses
Bituminous works
Culverts
Bridges, ROB, Flyovers, Underpasses & FOB
Drainage, Protective Works, Duct & Other Services
Junctions
Traffic Signage, Road Marking and Other Appurtenances
Miscellaneous
Maintenance of Road during construction
Total Civil Cost

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


2-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Amount in Crores (INR)


3.557
80.533
102.340
194.643
16.204
153.816
19.814
12.783
10.895
9.488
1.585
605.659

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

3.

POLICY, LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE FRAMEWORK

This chapter reviews the existing institutional and legislative set-up pertaining to the project at the National
and state levels. The chapter also elaborates on the various clearances and permissions required for the
project from Government of Karnataka, Ministry of Environment and forests, Government of India.
3.1

INSTITUTIONAL SETTING

The project has been initiated and is being carried out by the NHAI. The primary responsibility of the project
rests with the NHAI in providing encumbrance free ROW to the concessionaire who shall implement the
project. The main government agencies who uphold the implementation of the various environmental
legislations are:

Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India (MoEF), New Delhi formulates and regulates
all country level legislations besides giving prior environmental clearances through a committee for
category A projects, wild life clearances and forest diversion clearances.

State Level Environmental Impact Assessment Authority (SEIAA), in the states gives prior
environmental clearances to category B projects.

Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) monitors and implements pollution related legislations

State Pollution Control Board monitors and implements pollution related legislations in the state
besides giving NOC for establishing and operating plants under air and water acts

State Department of Forests gives permission for forest diversion and felling of trees

3.2

THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK

The Government of India and the Governments of Maharashtra & Karnataka have formulated a host policy
guidelines; acts and regulations aimed at protection and enhancement of environmental resources. The
following sections discuss the various legal issues associated with the project.
3.2.1

Country Level Environmental Legislations

Table 3-1 provides the legislations pertaining to the project that has been framed by the Govt. of India.
Table 3-1: Country Level Environmental Laws & Regulations
Sl.
No.

Law / Regulation /
Guidelines

Relevance

The
Environmental
(Protection)
Act.
1986,
and
the
Environmental
(Protection)
Rules,
1987-2002 (various
amendments)

Umbrella
Act.
Protection
and
improvement of the environment.
Establishes
the
standards
for
emission of noise in the atmosphere.

The EIA Notification,


14th September 2006
and
subsequent
amendments

Notification for use of


Fly
ash,
3rd
November 2009

The
Water
(Prevention
and
Control of Pollution)
Act, 1974

The Air (Prevention


and
Control
of

Identifies (i) New


National
Highways; and (ii) Expansion of
National Highways greater than 30
Km involving additional right of way
greater than 20m involving land
acquisition" under (item 7 (f) of
schedule) as one of the projects
requiring prior clearance
Reuse fly ash discharged from
Thermal Power Station to minimise
land use for dispersal and minimise
borrow area material. The onus shall
lie with the implementing authority to
use fly ash unless it is not feasible as
per IRC
Central and State Pollution Control
Board to establish/enforce water
quality and effluent standards,
monitor water quality, prosecute
offenders, and issue licenses for
construction/operation
of
certain
facilities.
Empowers SPCB to set and monitor
air quality standards and to prosecute

Applicable
Yes / No

Reason for application

Implementing /
Responsible
Agency

Yes

All
environmental
notifications, rules and
schedules are issued
under the act

MoEF,
State
Department
of
Environment,
CPCB
and
KSPCB

Yes

The project Highway is a


National Highway which is
more than 30 Km and
involves additional right of
way greater than 20m
involving land acquisition
and hence is a Category
A project

MoEF

No

No Thermal Power station


located in 100 Km radius
of road

MoEF, SPCB

Yes

Consent required for not


polluting
ground
and
surface
water
during
construction

Karnataka &
Maharashtra
Pollution Control
Boards

Yes

Consent
required
for
establishing and operation

Karnataka &
Maharashtra

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


3-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Sl.
No.

Law / Regulation /
Guidelines
Pollution) Act. 1981

Relevance

Applicable
Yes / No

offenders, excluding vehicular air and


noise emission.

Reason for application


of plants and crushers

Noise
Pollution
(Regulation
And
Control) Act, 1990

Standards for noise emission for


various land uses

Yes

construction machineries
and vehicles to conform to
the
standards
for
construction

Forest (Conservation)
Act, 1980

Conservation and definition of forest


areas. Diversion of forest land follows
the process as laid by the act

Yes

Forest land diversion for


the project

Coastal
Zone
2011

Protect and manage coastal areas

No

The project area is not


within designated coastal
zone

Wild Life Protection


Act, 1972

Protection of wild life in sanctuaries


and National Park

No

No sanctuaries / national
park in the project area

10

Ancient Monuments
and Archaeological
sites and Remains
Act 1958

To protect and conserve cultural and


historical remains found.

No

No
Archaeological
monument area in the
project area

Yes

All vehicles used for


construction will need to
comply with the provisions
of this act.

Regulatory
Notification,

11

The Motor
Act. 1988

12

The Explosives Act


(&
Rules)
1884
(1983)

13

Public Liability And


Insurance Act,1991

Protection to the general public from


accidents due to hazardous materials

14

Hazardous
Wastes
(Management
and
Handling)
Rules,
1989

Protection to the general public


against improper handling and
disposal of hazardous wastes

15

16

17

3.2.2

Vehicle

Empowers State Transport Authority


to enforce standards for vehicular
pollution. From August 1997 the
"Pollution Under Control Certificate is
issued to reduce vehicular emissions.
Sets out the regulations as to regards
the
use
of
explosives
and
precautionary
measures
while
blasting & quarrying.

Chemical Accidents
(Emergency
Planning,
Preparedness
and
Response)
Rules,
1996
Mines and Minerals
(Regulation
and
Development)
Act,
1957 as amended in
1972
The Building and
Other
Construction
Workers (Regulation
of Employment and
Conditions
of
Service) Act, 1996

Yes

Yes

Yes

If new quarrying operation


is
started
by
the
concessionaire
/
contractor
Hazardous materials shall
be
used
for
road
construction
Hazardous wastes shall
be generated due to
activities
like
of
maintenance and repair
work on vehicles

Implementing /
Responsible
Agency
Pollution Control
Boards
Karnataka &
Maharashtra
Pollution Control
Boards
State Forest
Department,
MoEF
MoEF, State
Department of
Environment
State Forest
Department,
MoEF
Archaeological
Survey of India,
Dept. of
Archaeology
State Motor
Vehicles
Department

Chief Controller
of Explosives

Karnataka &
Maharashtra
Pollution Control
Boards

Yes

Handling of hazardous
(flammable, toxic and
explosive)
chemicals
during road construction

District & Local


Crisis Group
headed by the
DM and SDM

Permission of Mining of aggregates


and sand

Yes

Permission
of
Sand
Mining from river bed &
aggregates

Department of
Mining Govt. of
Karnataka

Employing Labour / workers

Yes

Employing
workers

District Labour
Commissioner

Protection against chemical accident


while handling any hazardous
chemicals resulting

Labour

State Level Environmental Legislation

Clearances for setting up hot-mix plants, batching plants, etc., under the Air and the Water Acts,
establishing new quarries and establishment of new tube-wells / bore-holes to be procured from SPCB,
State Department of Mining and Sate Ground Water Boards / Authorities respectively.
3.2.3

Other Legislations Applicable to Road Construction Projects

The concessionaire shall ensure that other legislations like Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act;
1986, Minimum Wages Act; 1948, The Factories Act; 1948, The Building and Other Construction Workers
(Regulation of Employment and Conditions of Service) Act, 1996 etc. are properly followed.
3.3

CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROJECT

The summary table showing time requirements for agency responsible for obtaining clearance, and a stage
at which clearance will be required is given below:
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
3-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 3-2: Summary of Clearances & NOCs


Sl.
No
1

Type of clearance
Prior Environmental
Clearance
Permission for
Activities near
archaeological
protected area
Clearance for working /
diversion of sanctuary
land

Approx
Time
required
7-12
months

Statutory Authority

Applicability

Project stage

Responsibility

MoEF

Applicable

Pre
construction

Archaeological survey
of India / the state
department of
Archaeology

Not Applicable

Pre
construction

Chief Wild Life


Warden

Not applicable

Pre
construction

NHAI

Forest Clearance

State Department of
Environment and
Forest and MoEF

Applicable

Pre
construction

9-12
months

NHAI

Tree felling permission

Forest department

Felling of trees

Pre
construction

3 months

NHAI

NOC And Consents


Under Air , Water, EP
Acts & Noise rules of
SPCB

State Pollution Control


Board

For establishing plants

Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)

2-3
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

NOC and Consents


Under Air , Water, EP
Acts & Noise rules of
SPCB

State Pollution Control


Board

For operating Hot mix


plants, Crushers and
batching plants

Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)

1-2
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

Permission to store
Hazardous Materials

State Pollution Control


Board

Storage and
Transportation Of
Hazardous Materials
and Explosives

Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)

2-3
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

Explosive license

Chief controller of
explosives

Storage of explosive
materials

Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)

2-3
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

State Pollution Control


Board

Disposal of
bituminous wastes

Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)

2-3
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

Department of
Transport

For all construction


vehicles

1-2
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

2-3
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

2-3
months

Concessionaire /
Contractor

10

11

NOC under Hazardous


Waste (Management
and Handling) Rules,
1989
PUC certificate for use
of vehicles for
construction

12

Quarry lease deeds


and license

Dept. of Geology and


Mines

Quarrying and
borrowing operations

13

NOC for water


extraction for
construction and allied
works

Ground Water
Authority

Ground water
extraction

3.4

Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)
Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)
Construction
(Prior to work
initiation)

CONCLUSION

The project requires prior environmental clearance, clearance for the diversion of forest land and permission
for cutting the trees within the proposed ROW. In addition to the above, the concessionaire would require
the following NOCs & licenses from the authorities during construction:

NOC & Consents under Air, Water, EP Acts & Noise rules for establishing & operating plants from
SPCB

NOC under Hazardous Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 1989 from SPCB

PUC certificate for use of vehicles for construction from Department of Transport

Quarry lease deeds and license and Explosive license from Dept. of Geology and Mines & Chief
controller of explosives

NOC for water extraction for construction and allied works from Ground Water Authority

Apart from the above clearances, the concessionaire also has to comply with the following:

Clearance of Engineer for location and layout of Workers Camp, Equipment yard and Storage yard

Clearance of Engineer for Traffic Management Plan for each section of the route after it has been
handed over for construction

An Emergency Action Plan should be prepared by the contractor and approved by the Engineer for

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


3-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

accidents responding to involving fuel & lubricants before the construction starts

Submit a Quarry Management Plan to the Engineer along with the Quarry lease deeds

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


3-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

4.

BASELINE ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE

This chapter assess the nature, type and dimensions of the study area and describes the physical,
biological, culture components along the Road. The baseline data on the environmental components was
generated by primary surveys conducted during project preparation, interactions at various levels with local
people and other stakeholders. The socio-economic profile has been distilled from the RAP Report.
4.1

PROJECT AREA

The project districts are Solapur in Maharashtra and Bijapur in Karnataka State. The district of Bijapur is
bounded by Gulbarga & Yadgir in North east, Raichur in South, Bagalkot and Belgaum in west and
Maharashtara in North. Solapur district in Maharashtra is bounded by Latur in East, Osmanabad, Pune &
Ahmednagar in North, Satara and Sangli in west and Karnataka in South. The project road falls under
Solapur South (Maharashtra), Indi & Bijapur (Karnataka) Talukas.
The existing Right of Way (RoW) varies from 13.2m to 45 m, as per the details obtained from NH Divisions
of Bijapur & Solapur on an average. The proposed RoW is 60m all throughout except at toll plaza and rest
areas while the Corridor of Impact (CoI) is 75 m respectively. The project area is 500 m on either side of the
project corridor i.e., a total of 1 Km.
4.2

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

4.2.1

Meteorology

The study of Meteorological and micro meteorological parameters is significant in a road project as these
parameters regulate transport and diffusion of pollutants released into the atmosphere. The following
sections describe the key elements of the climate, viz., temperature, wind, rainfall and relative humidity and
evaporation.
Climate
The climate of the project district is mainly of semi arid type and major part of the project district experiences
hot and dry summer. The weather of the project district is influenced by the Southwest and Northeast
monsoon. The summer season is from March to the end of May and remains under the influence of
Southwest monsoon during June to September, while in October and November, the retreating monsoon
prevails. The climate is distinguished by four seasons:

Hot Summer (from March to May),

South west monsoon season (from June to September)

Post monsoon season (October and November)

Cold winter (from December to February)

Temperature
o

May is the hottest month with a mean max of 43C. Mean (Min) and daily temperature is 25.5 C and the
o
mean (max) is 38.1 C. With the advance of south west monsoon into the area, by the middle of June, day
temperature drop is observed. By about the first week of October the monsoon, the temperature drops to
about 18C. The monthly temperature range is smallest in August because of overcast conditions and
largest in March on the contrary.
Rainfall
About 60% of the annual rainfall is received during June to September, while 24% is received in October
and November during the period of retreating monsoon. Average annual rainfall recorded is 553 mm.
4.2.2

Land

Seismicity
The southern part of India in which the project road lies comes under the stable seismic zone. The entire
stretch of the project highway traverses through sub category seismic zone II of seismic zoning classification
1
system as defined by the Seismic Zoning Committee . Zone II is most stable and zone V is considered to be
1

IS 1893(Part 1):2002 Criteria for Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures: Part 1 General provisions and
Buildings

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


4-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

least stable. In the revision of the seismic zones in year 2000, the seismic Zone I has been merged in Zone
II by BIS. The project corridor thus is in a zone of stability.
Figure 4-1: Seismic Zones of India

Source: National Atlas Thematic Mapping Organisation, Govt. Of India


Geology
Geologically, the project district is possessed of Achaean complex composed of crystalline schist, granite
gneisses and granite. The project district is well endowed with mineral deposits like sand stone, white clay,
and plastic clay of the project corridor.
Soil
The project districts have three types of soils viz. Black soils, Red sandy soils and mixed soils. Formation of
various types of soils is a complex function of chemical weathering of bedrocks, vegetative decay and
circulation of precipitated water. Soils are mostly in-situ in nature. Samples of soil have been collected and
are being tested for the physical and chemical properties.
Table 4-1: Details of Monitoring Station for Soil
Sl. No.
1
2
3
4

Monitoring Station Code


SQMS 1
SQMS 2
SQMS 3
SQMS 4

Chainage (Km)
25 approx
76 approx
49 approx
85 approx

Location
Nandani
Domonal
Zalki
Arikiri Tunda

Results & Analysis of Soil Quality


The soil was found to be brownish grey to brown in colour. The texture of the soil was mostly sandy loam.
3
Bulk density of soil in the study area varied between 1.36 - 1.49 gm / cm . The moisture content was fairly
good. The soil samples were alkaline. Most of the nitrogen is available in the form of nitrates, nitrites, NH 4
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
4-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

and organic nitrogen.


Table 4-2: Physico-chemical Analysis of Soil Quality
Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17

Parameter
Colour
Type of Soil
pH (1:2 ratio)
Electric Conductivity
Soil Texture
Sand
Silt
Clay
Infiltration Rate
Bulk Density
Porosity
Moisture Content
Organic Carbon
Organic Matter
Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen
Phosphorus
Potassium

Unit
umhos/cm
%
%
%
cm/hr
gm/cc
%
%
%
%
%
%
%

S1
Brownish Grey
Alkaline
8.31
187
Sandy Clay Loam
48
23
29
1.34
1.37
27
7.2
1.43
2.45
0.15
29
94

S2
Black Brown
Alkaline
7.98
97
Loam
41
43
16
1.59
1.49
35
6.1
1.67
2.88
0.20
58
87

S3
Black
Alkaline
7.67
127
Sandy Loam
52
33
15
1.71
1.36
39
5.7
2.21
3.81
0.16
36
88

S4
Brown
Alkaline
8.03
108
Sandy Loam
52
30
18
1.52
1.42
38
6.8
1.60
2.76
0.141
29
102

Source: Field Monitoring


Terrain & Land Use
The land use in the project area is mixed. The project corridor passes through mostly agricultural land along
with barren lands, forestland and sparingly industrial land. There are also some settlements along the
project road. Recent Satellite imageries for the project area road shall be procured and a land use map of
the study area to a scale of 1:25000 delineating the crop lands (both single and double crop), agricultural
plantations, fallow lands, waste lands, water bodies, built-up areas, forest area and other surface features
such as railway tracks, ports, airports, roads, and major industries etc. as per ToR provided by MoEF shall
be annexed to in the Final EIA report
4.2.3

Ambient Air Quality

The monitoring of ambient air quality (AAQ) for the various land uses along the project corridor was carried
out at a frequency of twice a week at each station in the post monsoon season months of October
December 2012, by Envirotech East Pvt. Ltd., Kolkata on behalf of Feedback Infrastructure Service Pvt. Ltd.
Monitoring was carried out by taking samples at each location as per guidelines of Central Pollution Control
Board and the requirements of MoEF.
Baseline AAQ Monitoring
Air Pollution Monitoring Stations were selected with an idea of establishing correlation between pollution
levels and road geometrics and air pollution and land use along the road. The methodology for the
monitoring instruments and techniques has been in accordance to the guidelines laid by the Central
Pollution Control Board (CPCB). The equipment was placed at open space free from trees and vegetation
which otherwise act as a sink of pollutants resulting in lower levels in monitoring results. With a view to
collecting the samples, Envirotech made Fine Particulate Samplers with Gaseous attachment facility have
3
been used. The instruments were well capable of drawing air at a flow rate of about 1 m /min. Glass microfibre filter papers (GF/A Sheets, Whatman) and Teflon Filter paper were used for the collection of PM 10 and
PM2.5 respectively. SO2 was collected by drawing air at a flow-rate of 0.5 litres per minute (lpm) through an
absorbing solution i.e., Sodium tetrachloromercurate (West and Gaek Method) and NO X were collected by
drawing air at a flow rate of 0.5 litres per minute (lpm) through the mixture of absorbing solutions i.e. sodium
hydroxide and sodium arsenite (Jacobs and Hochheiser Method). Although the selection of locations is not
in direct connivance with the traffic locations, the total no of stations have been distributed throughout the
project road so as to get representative baseline of any variation in land use as well as road geometrics and
traffic conditions across the project road. The purpose is also to establish a benchmark, which can form the
reference for monitoring in the construction and operation period. The following table gives the criteria for
selection of the monitoring stations.
Table 4-3: Air Pollution Receptors Types Identified along the Project Road
Sl.
No
1

Location of Receptor

Criteria for Selection

Near sensitive areas viz., educational

To obtain baseline concentrations at sensitive receptors and benchmark

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


4-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No
2

Location of Receptor

Criteria for Selection

institutes, hospitals, forest areas, etc.


In rural areas that present a pristine
environment

existing pollution levels


As a representative sample for obtaining the concentrations in rural areas and
to benchmark existing pollution levels
As a representative for concentrations in industrial areas and also to check the
available concentrations and to benchmark existing pollution levels

Near Industrial areas

Table 4-4: Details of Monitoring Station for Air Quality Monitoring


Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6

Monitoring Station Code


AAQMS 1
AAQMS 2
AAQMS 3
AAQMS 4
AAQMS 5
AAQMS 6

Location
SH 149 & NH 13 Crossing
M. New Check Post
Zalki
Horti
Domonal
Arakri Tunda

Land use
Rural area
Rural area
Rural area
Rural area
Rural area
Rural area

Source: Field Monitoring


Results & Analysis of Ambient Air Quality
The air quality in the project area is quite pristine. The AAQ of the project area is given in table below. From
the table it is evident that concentration of the values of SO2, CO & NOX are well within the standards as per
the prescribed National Ambient Air Quality Standards. The higher values of PM10 can be attributed to the
dryness of the area and the dust present along the project corridor.
Table 4-5: Ambient Air Quality within Project Corridor
Pollutant Concentration
Monitoring Station Code
AQMS 1
AQMS 2
AQMS 3
AQMS 4
AQMS 5
AQMS 6
Standards (Industrial, Residential, Rural & other Areas)

SO2 g /
m3

NOX g /
m3

PM2.5 g / m3

PM (g / m )

16.2
14.6
14.8
12.4
14.4
16.8
80

17.8
18.4
21.4
16.4
18.4
17.3
80

60.4
48.8
64.8
46.6
54.9
53.3
60

151.6
152.4
158.2
148.2
136.8
144.6
100

10

CO

(mg/m )
1.302
1.376
1.482
1.374
1.174
1.208
4

Source: Field Monitoring


4.2.4

Water

Surface Water
Surface Water includes drainage channels (rivers, streams, and canals) and stagnant water bodies (lakes,
ponds, tanks and other impounded water bodies). A highway project can significantly alter the hydrological
setting of the project area by acting as an impediment to the natural drainage system of the region. It is
therefore, essential that all surface water resources and ground water resources and their characteristics be
identified and examined along the project road. The detailed list of water resources including along the
project road is given in Annexure 4.1.
Ground Water
The groundwater occurs under water table and semi-confined to confined conditions in weathered, fracture
zones in basalts, limestones, shales, orthoqurtzites, sandstones, granites and gneisses. The vesicular
portion of different flows varies in thickness and has the primary porosity. The nature and the density of
vesicles, their distribution and interconnection, depth of weathering and topography of the area are decisive
factors for occurrence and movement of ground water in these units. The weathered and fractured basalts
occurring in topographic lows are the main water bearing formations in the district. The Deccan traps /
basalts are the major litho-unit of the Bijapur taluk. The basaltic lava flows are mostly horizontal to gently
dipping. The contrasting water bearing properties of different lava flows control groundwater occurrence in
them. The topography, nature and the extent of weathering, jointing and fracture pattern, thickness, depth of
occurrence of vesicular basalt and occurrence of red bole bed are the important factors, which play a major
role in the occurrence and the movement of ground water in these rocks. Deccan basalts usually have
medium to low permeability depending upon the presence of primary and secondary porosity. The
weathered residuum serves as an effective ground water repository in this region. The massive portions of
the basaltic flows are devoid of water but when it is weathered, fractured, jointed, thus forming a weaker
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
4-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

zone, then the ground waters occurs in it. The massive basalt showing spheroidal weathering and exfoliation
have more groundwater carrying capacity than the unweathered massive trap. However, the water carrying
capacity of the massive trap is not homogenous as it is completely depends upon the presence of fractures
and joints, their nature, distribution and interconnection. All along the project road, there exist a large
number of hand pumps and wells within the ROW. These community owned resources are the major
sources of potable water. As per CGWB there are no notified blocks in Bijapur District. 30% of Bijapur Taluk
& 29% of Indi Taluk falls in critical area. The Post-monsoon Depth to water level range in Bijapur District
during 2006 was 0.78 13.20 m. No information on Solapur has been available from CGWB
Water Quality

Selection of Sampling Location

6 representative surface water and ground water monitoring stations were selected based on their
importance as source of irrigation and water supply, size, future impacts and quantum of water available.
The physical and chemical parameters of the collected samples were tested as per established standard
methods and procedures. The samples were collected on by Envirotech East Pvt. Ltd for testing on behalf of
Feedback Infra. The locations selected for water sampling are presented in table below. The monitoring has
been carried out with the following objectives:

To establish the baseline water quality at critical locations to be impacted; and

To work out the extent of enhancement of water resources along the corridor in terms of improvement
of water quality.
Table 4-6: Details of Water Quality Monitoring Station

Sl. No.
1
2
3
4
5
6

Location Code
SWQMS 1
SWQMS 2
SWQMS 3
SWQMS 4
GWQMS 1
GWQMS 2
GWQMS 3
GWQMS 4

Chainage (Km)
30.340
42.500
55.000
90.240
25.000
49.000
65.000
85.000

Location
Bhima River
Canal near Yelgi
Gundavana
Bhutnal
Nandani Village
Zalki
Horti
Arakari Tunda

Results & Analysis of Water Quality Sampling

By and large, the water quality is satisfactory and the major physical and chemical parameters are within
limits set by the Bureau of Indian Standards for drinking water and surface water quality for bathing except
for total hardness, Calcium & Magnesium. No heavy metals are presented in the ground water. Tables below
shows the quality of water at various locations where samples were collected to update the baseline on
environmental quality.
Table 4-7: Physical and Chemical Results of Surface Water Samples
Sl. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
2

Parameter
Odour
Turbidity
pH
Conductivity
Total Dissolve Solids
Alkalinity as CaCO3
Total Hardness
Calcium as Ca
Magnesium as Mg
Chloride as Cl
Sulphate as SO4
Fluorides as F
Aluminium
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Iron
Copper

Unit
NTU
-uS/cm
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

SWQMS 1
U/O
0.91
8.14
1413
384
326
234
88
3.51
164
118
0.9
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.32
BDL

SWQMS 2
U/O
2.1
7.59
2060
304
512
342
78
35.81
186
194
0.92
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.58
BDL

SWQMS 3
U/O
1.2
7.87
320.6
268
196
156
56
3.96
142
62
0.62
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.19
BDL

SWQMS 4
U/O
1.5
7.42
141.5
112
94
112
38
17.91
84
54
0.98
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.24
BDL

Max Desirable Limit2


Unobjectionable
5
6.5 to 8.5
500
200
300
75
30
250
200
1
0.03
0.05
0.01
0.05
0.3
0.05

Source: Indian Standard Drinking Water Specification IS 10500, 1994

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


4-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl. No.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.

Parameter
Lead
Manganese
Zinc
Dissolve Oxygen
BOD(3days) at 270c
COD

Unit
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

SWQMS 1
BDL
BDL
BDL
2.6
4.2
18

SWQMS 2
BDL
BDL
BDL
2
5.3
20

SWQMS 3
BDL
BDL
BDL
4.0
3.5
11.2

SWQMS 4
BDL
BDL
BDL
5.1
2.9
8.2

Max Desirable Limit2


0.05
0.1
5
4
-

Source: Field Monitoring


Table 4-8: Physical and Chemical Results of Ground Water Samples
Sl. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.

Parameter
Colour
Odour
Turbidity
pH
Conductivity
Total Dissolve Solids
Alkalinity as CaCO3
Total Hardness
Calcium as Ca
Magnesium as Mg
Chloride as Cl
Sulphate as SO4
Fluorides as F
Aluminium
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Iron
Copper
Lead
Manganese
Mercury
Zinc

Unit
Hazan
NTU
-uS/cm
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l
mg/l

GWQMS 1
C/L
U/O
0.2
7.98
1621
878
278
484
98
58.19
88
22
0.93
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.21
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL

GWQMS 2
C/L
U/O
0.3
7.45
1478
694
262
920
142
137.46
96
42
0.85
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.32
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL

GWQMS 3
C/L
U/O
0.1
7.55
2419
942
259
386
74
48.93
94
36
0.39
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.22
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL

GWQMS 4
C/L
U/O
1.2
7.34
1954
835
242
348
66.2
44.43
74
28
0.43
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
0.28
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL
BDL

Max Desirable Limit2


5
U/O
5
6.5 to 8.5
500
200
300
75
30
250
200
1
0.03
0.05
0.01
0.05
0.3
0.05
0.05
0.1
0.001
5

Source: Field Monitoring


4.2.5

Noise

The monitoring of the ambient noise quality for the various land uses along the project corridor was carried
out with the help of hand held noise level meters in the month of October December 2012 by Envirotech
East Pvt. Ltd., Kolkata on behalf of Feedback Infrastructure Service Pvt. Ltd.
Selection of Sampling Location
Locations for noise monitoring along the corridor are identified based on the criteria same as those used for
air monitoring. In case of noise monitoring locations, sensitive land use gains more importance due to ill
effects of noise on schools and hospitals.
Baseline Noise Monitoring
In the present study, sound pressure levels (SPL) have been measured by a sound level meter (Model:
Lutron SL-4010). Since loudness of sound is important for its effects on people, the dependence of loudness
upon frequency must be taken into account in environmental noise assessment. This has been achieved by
the use of A-weighting filters in the noise measuring instrument which gives a direct reading of approximate
loudness. A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure level (Leq) values have been computed from
the values of A-weighted sound pressure level measured with the help of noise meter. At each location,
noise monitoring has been carried out once during the entire study period over a period of twenty-four hours
to obtain Leq values at uniform time intervals of 1 hour. In each hourly time interval Leq values have been
computed from SPL readings taken at uniform time intervals of 15 minutes. For each location, day and night
time Leq values have then been computed from the hourly L eq values such that comparison could be made
with the national ambient noise standards. Day & night time L eq has been computed from the hourly Leq
values as per standards.
Results & Analysis of Noise Monitoring
Table below shows the noise levels measured. The noise monitoring survey shows that noise levels are
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
4-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

marginally higher than the noise standards. This may be due to mix activities as well as vehicular movement
on the road. Noise, though is a major area of concern, at locations of sensitive receptors (educational
establishments like schools and colleges, health units etc.) identified quite close to the road.
Table 4-9: Observed Noise Levels along Road
Monitoring
Station
Code

Location

Area Category

N1
N2
N3
N4
N5
N6

SH 149 & NH 13 Crossing


M. New Check Post
Zalki
Horti
Domonal
Arakri Tunda

Residential / Rural
Commercial
Residential
Commercial / Residential
Residential
Residential

Observed Noise Levels


in dB (A)
Leq Day
Leq Night
49.2
42.8
49.7
44.1
48.8
42.6
48.95
42.35
46.23
42.34
40.51
35.63

Noise Quality Standards


in dB (A)
Leq Day
Leq Night
55
45
65
55
55
45
65 / 55
55 / 45
55
45
55
45

Source: Field Monitoring; Note: The area categorisation has been done by the consultants based on the
sensitive features and not by the authorities.
4.3

BIOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT

4.3.1

Forest Areas

As per DCF, Solapur Division and the Forest Plans available with the division, the forest in the project area
in Solapur division fall under 6A/C1 Southern Tropical Thorn Forest. The alignment of the proposed project
road shall divert forest lands from RF in Nandani under Solapur Forest Division in Solapur district of
Maharashtra. There are no forest lands involved in Karnataka. There are no national park and wildlife
sanctuary located within 10 Km radius of the project.
Table 4-10: Forest Areas along the Project Road
Sl.
No.
1

Proposed
Chainage (Km)
From
To
33.275

33.810

Length
(Km)

Side

Village

Forest
Details

Compartment

Survey
No.

Gat
No.

Division

Remark

1.535

Both

Nandani

RF

138

104

Solapur

Nandani
Realignment

Source: Primary Survey


4.3.2

Road Side Trees

The baseline study of Flora has primarily taken into account the flora along the roadside, as the direct
impact of the road project is on trees in and adjacent to the RoW. No endangered flora has been reported
along the roadside. The trees that are to be felled have been marked and jointly verified with forest
department and a total of 7684 trees of various species have been identified for felling. The predominant
tree species are Acacia sp., Neem (Azadirchta indica), Siris (Albizia procera), Eucalyptus sp., Banyan (Ficus
bengalensis), Peepal (Ficus religiosa), Babul (Acacia nilotica) & Subabul (Leucaena leucocephela). There
are no endangered trees that are to be felled.
4.3.3

Fauna

The baseline study included identification of faunal species native to the study area especially with reference
to the ROW and adjoining areas. Domesticated animals dominate fauna species all along the project road
besides forest species. The Solapur forest division has reported the presence of Indian Wolf, Black Buck,
Hyena, Jackal, Monitor Lizard and common peafowl in the reserve forests found in the project area.
However no such faunal species were reported during the surveys and site reconnaissance carried along
the project corridor.
4.4

SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

4.4.1

Census Profile

The project highway passes through the districts of Solapur in Maharashtra and Bijapur in Karnataka. As per
the 2011 census, Karnataka has a total population of 61,130,704 and the total male and female population
in the state is 31,057,742 and 31,057,742 respectively. Maharashtra has a total population of 61,130,704
and the total male and female population in the state is 58,361,397and 54,011,575 respectively. The
population density per sq km is 365 in Maharashtra and 319 in Karnataka. The literacy rate of the
Maharashtra is 82.91 and Karnataka is 75.60 while the sex ratios are 946 & 968 respectively. The
population density, sex ratio & literacy rate of the project districts are less than the state level. Table below
gives the census profile of the project district and the state.
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
4-7
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 4-11: Census Details


District
Solapur
Maharashtra
Bijapur
Karnataka

Population
Male
Female
2233778
2081749
58,361,397
54,011,575
1112953
1062149
31,057,742
31,057,742

Total
4315527
112,372,972
2175102
61,130,704

Density
290
365
207
319

Persons
77.25
82.91
67.20
75.60

Literacy rate
Male
86.55
89.82
77.41
82.85

Female
68.55
75.48
56.54
68.13

Sex ratio
932
946
954
968

Source: Provisional Population Totals, Census of India 2011


4.4.2

Linguistic Distribution

Marathi & Kannada are the major vernacular language spoken by the people in the project corridor besides
Hindi, Telugu and English.
4.4.3

Settlement

There are approx 25 settlements varying in size and populations along the project corridor. The settlements
are given in the following table.
Table 4-12: Settlements along Project Road
Sl. No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Settlement
Basav Nagar
Nandani
Thakli (Bhima)
Dhulikhed
Halasangi
Yelgi (PH)
Arajanal
Zalaki
Ballolli
Gundawan
Kapanimbargi
Halagunaki
Sonakanahalli
Horti Town
Agasanal
Domanal
Tidagundi
Kannal
Baratagi
Arakeri
Bhootnal
Mahal Bagayat
Hanchinal
Rambhapur
Bijapur City

Talukas
South Solapur
South Solapur
South Solapur
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Indi
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur

District
Solapur
Solapur
Solapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur
Bijapur

State
Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Maharashtra
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka
Karnataka

Total Population
1295
1530
3345
5211
871
1601
2376
3502
1231
1553
1977
1117
7662
1541
2576
1528
1868
2169
8184
944
348
646
253,891

Source: Primary Survey & Census of India 2001


4.4.4

Educational Institutes

There are a number of educational institutes including private and government along the project corridor.
These sensitive receptors are exposed to dust and noise from the road. Some of these educational
institutions are located on the edge of the road and is a serious concern from the point of safety and
Signage and Safety measures are required. The total list of noise sensitive features like schools and
hospitals along the project road is given in Annexure 4.4.
4.4.5

Cultural Properties

The project highway traverses through a number of settlements and there are some religious and cultural
properties which though not of archaeological significance are nevertheless, significant to the community.
Cultural properties along the project highway were identified and documented based on site surveys and
during strip mapping. The total list of cultural and community properties along the project road are given in
Annexure 4.2 & 4.3.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


4-8
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

5.

PUBLIC INTERACTIONS

As a part of the project preparation and to ensure that the community support is obtained and the project
supports the felt needs of the people; public consultations were carried out as an integral component. A
continuous involvement of the stakeholders and the affected community was obtained. The feedback in the
consultation sessions has led to substantial inputs for the project preparation including, influencing
designs. Consultations involve soliciting peoples views on proposed actions and engaging them in a
dialogue. It is a two-way information flow, from project authorities to people and, from people to project
authorities. While decision making authority would be retained by the project authority, interaction with
people and eliciting feedback allows affected populations to influence the decision making process by
raising issues that should be considered in designing, mitigation, monitoring and management plans and the
analysis of alternatives.
This chapter documents the issues that are close to the community, their aspirations and their addressal by
the project. Information source for the chapter has been the similar documentation as part of the RAP, with
the social team conducting these sessions. The objectives of consultation sessions, the procedure adopted
and the outputs of the consultation conducted have been briefly described in the following sections.
5.1

OBJECTIVES

The main objective of the consultation process is to minimise negative impacts of the project and to
maximise the benefits from the project to the local populace. The objectives of public consultation as part of
this project are:

Promote public awareness and improve understanding of the potential impacts of proposed projects;

Identify alternative sites or designs, and mitigation measures;

Solicit the views of affected communities / individuals on environmental and social problems;

Improve environmental and social soundness;

Clarify values and trade-offs associated with the different alternatives;

Identify contentious local issues which might jeopardise the implementation of the project;

Establish transparent procedures for carrying out proposed works;

Inform the affected populace about the entitlement framework and to settle problems with mutual
consent; and

Create accountability and sense of local ownership during project implementation.

5.2

CONSULTATION SESSIONS

Consultations were done using various tools including, interviews with government officials, questionnairebased information with stakeholders etc. The public consultation carried out during the Environment impact
Assessment stages of the project has been summarised.
The extent or the likely level of adverse impacts was one of the major criteria in deciding locations for public
consultation sessions. A listing of the various consultation sessions conducted at different locations along
the entire project corridor is presented in Table 5-1. These community consultations were held during
various times of the design period and were attended by the NHAI staffs, Consultants Environmental and
Social experts.
Table 5-1: Public Consultation held at Different Stages of Project
Level
Individual
Village
Institutional

5.2.1

Type
Local level Consultation
Focus Group Discussion
Stake holder Discussion

Key Participants
People along the project corridor
Women, truckers, weaker sections, agriculturist, School teachers
Line departments

Stake Holders Consultation

The institutional level consultations were held with representatives of institutions having stakes in
implementation of the project. The institutions contacted included State Forest Department, State Pollution
Control Board etc. In addition to this, officials from other departments were also contacted on several
occasions. The contacted officials included revenue officers, industry department etc. Several meetings
were held with NHAI Officials and their inputs have been incorporated in the Reports.
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
5-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Figure 5-1: Photographs of Interactions along the project road

5.1.1

Consultations during Design

Consultations were carried out at the design stages to identify:

Location specific social and environmental issues to be addressed through designs;

Socio-economic profile of community along the project route;

Extent of likely social and environmental impact due to the project;

Expectations and reservations of people towards project; and

Resettlement and rehabilitation options


Table 5-2: Public Consultations

Sl.
No.

Settlement

Place

Hattur

Road Side
Eatery

5.1.2

Solapur

Issues / Concern

Start of Project
Road

Lack of traffic signal and


signs
Impact on the structures
Congestion and traffic jam
LA and R&R issues
Safety during construction
Health issues during
construction
Location of labour camps
Issues in street crossing
Employment opportunities
Other General Issues

Mitigation measures

Provision of traffic signs


Provision of Service / slip roads
Provision of bypass & realignments
R&R as per NPRR and NHAI policies
Safety measures to be strictly followed by
concessionaire and contractor
Labour camps to be located away from settlements
Provision of PUP & VUP
Employment opportunities during construction and
operation stage
Concessionaire & contractor shall follow the measures
given in EMP

Location Specific Consultation Needs

Several project road specific consultation needs identified were:

Where owners of property, land and building / structures or their tenants are involved, consultations are
required;

Need for improvement of intersection, curves, etc. has to be ascertained from people through
consultation process;

The noise sensitive receptors if any are to be identified through public consultation process.

5.3

IDENTIFICATION OF ISSUES

5.3.1

Issues Raised During Consultations

Table 5-2 summarises the issues raised during the FGD. Both specific issues of villages and common issues
raised by the villagers have been described. Based on the community consultation the key environmental,
health, safety and social issues identified were:

Air Quality & Noise levels

Water pollution, water scarcity in non-monsoon months, construction water requirements

Roadside trees, tree plantation

Health issues, such as water borne diseases / HIV / STD

Possession of skills and the training needs

Employment opportunity during civil works

Location of labour camp and hot mix plant sites

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


5-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Safety issues

Involvement of PAPs in Rehabilitation and Resettlement Plans & Resettlement Options

Impact on property and land acquisition

Enhancement of common property resources

Extension of Government Welfare schemes

5.4

CONTINUED CONSULTATION

As part of the continued consultation program, the following actions are proposed:

Conduct Public Hearing for the project at all the districts through which the project road is passing

Implement the suggestions / recommendations and address those grievances that are technically
feasible without compromising on the quality and safety

Continue consultations with the public and stake holders during the various stages of the construction
and operation for smooth implementation of the project
Table 5-3: Addressal of General Issues and Concerns under the Project
Issue / Concern
Dust and Air Pollution

Increased noise levels

Traffic Congestion

Road safety

Cultural properties

Fauna and flora

Roadside Drainage
Water bodies
Road side amenities
Loss of Livelihood and income
restoration option
Assistance to vulnerable
groups
Employment of locals during
construction

5.5

Addressal under the project


Plantation of trees and shrubs along the highway and on median
Turfing on earthen slopes and earthen shoulders
Water spraying to be adopted near the crushers during construction stage.
Provision of Noise attenuating wall near sensitive receptors
No-horns signage near schools, colleges and hospitals
Tree plantation and development of green belts along the project corridor abutting settlements to
attenuate traffic noise
Improvement of intersections
Provision of Flyovers, bypasses, underpasses and service lanes etc at suitable locations
Road widening itself will be a major factor to avoid traffic jams
Provision of Service lane to separate local traffic from through traffic
Proper highway signals provided
Widening of bridges to avoid accidents
Grade level pedestrian crossing
Proper lighting at accident prone locations
Care has been taken to preserve sites of cultural heritage as far as possible.
Where unavoidable the religious structures within ROW to be relocated only after consultation
with local community.
Tree clearing within ROW has been avoided beyond what is directly required for construction
activities and or to reduce accidents
Compensatory afforestation would be done as per the directives of the forest department.
Fruit bearing trees and shade trees, to be planted on the roadside.
Rising of road sections and cross drainage structures in areas facing overtopping problems.
Location of structures based on hydrological study
Provision of proper drainage scheme for the settlements
In unavoidable cases provision for increasing depth of water bodies to increase its capacity is
made.
Provision of facilities like Rest Areas, Truck stoppage site (lay bye) and bus stops along the
highway
The PAPs will be compensated as per National R&R policy
RAP to detail out the assistance programme to the needy
Special provisions have been made in the entitlement framework for assisting vulnerable groups
to improve their quality of life.
Locals will be given preference for employment during the project implementation

KEY FINDINGS OF THE CONSULTATION

Major findings related to key issues such as general perception about the project; suggestions to mitigate
hardships resulting from dislocation and loss of livelihood are presented below:

It was observed that people are not only aware of the project but also welcomed the project in general.
However, some PAPs have shown their concern due to acquisition of their properties

The PAPs in general and specially the legal titleholders were very much concerned about the mode of
compensation

People want that their views should be taken into account in every matter where it counts for new road

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


5-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

option

They requested for facilities and amenities like underpasses, bus stand and safer accessibility at points
of habitants area

Affected population wanted to know about the exact period when the work will start. Sufficient time
should be given before the acquisition in order to avoid any inconvenience

People requested about creation of employment opportunities during road construction and later
phases of the project

Some of them asked about the tender process for the construction, as they were willing to be part of it

People suggested that adequate safety measures should be provided such as speed breakers,
signages etc. near the In brief, it was felt during consultation that regular meeting with the local
population / community could easily resolve any dispute between the community people and
implementing agency settlements

The RAP shall address the social issues brought to the fore during the public consultations

The EMP both generic and specific has been designed to address environmental related issues

5.6

PUBLIC HEARING

5.6.1

Introduction

As per the guidelines of New EIA Notification 2009, Public Consultation refers to the process by which the
concerns host population and others who have plausible stake in the environmental impacts of the project or
activity are ascertained with a view to taking into account all the material concerns in the project or activity
design as appropriate. Public consultation process comprises of two parts, viz Public Hearing and written
response from stakeholders. The EIA Notification has arranged the Public Hearing procedure in a
systematic, time bound and transparent manner ensuring widest possible public participation at the project
site(s) or in its close proximity District wise, by the concerned State Pollution Control Board (SPCB).The EIA
report there after submitted to the State Pollution Control Board along with other relevant documents and
additional studies. The SPCB shall process the application for Public Hearing and conduct the hearing within
45 days of the application.
5.6.2

Public Hearing for the Project

As per EIA Notification, Public Hearing shall be conducted by the MPCB and KPCB for Solapur and Bijapur
districts at locations and dates that shall be advertised in the newspapers as per guidelines laid in the EIA
Notification of 2009 and its amendments. The summary of the important points in terms of opinions,
comments, suggestions and objections and the reply of the queries raised by the general public and their
answer / compliance by the project management officials shall be summarized in tabular form in the Final
EIA and the detailed MoM shall be attached

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


5-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

6.

IMPACT ASSESSMENT

This chapter assesses the nature, type and magnitude of the potential impacts likely on the various relevant
physical, biological and cultural environmental components along the project corridor. For the assessment of
impacts, the baseline information based on the field visits and the primary surveys of the various
environmental components carried out. The description of the impacts on the individual components has
been structured as per the discussion in Chapter 4: Baseline Environmental profile of this report.
The impacts of the project are expected to be mostly direct and confined to the ROW. Only at critical
locations where the engineering, environmental and social aspects have warranted a shift from the existing
alignment, realignments have been proposed. The impacts on the various environmental components can
occur at any of the following stages of the project planning and implementation:

Planning and design stage;

Construction stage; and

Operation stage

6.1

WEIGHTAGE / RANKING OF VALUED ECO-SYSTEM

A weigtage and ranking system has been developed so as to rank / weigh the various VECs identified during
the reconnaissance survey. Based on the VEC identified during the screening stage within 75m of Corridor
of Influence, the VEC were weighed and ranked as per the table below.
Table 6-1: Scoring system adopted for the Project
S. No.
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7

Environmental Attribute
Natural Environment
Topography
Vulnerability to natural hazards
Surface water resources
Drainage Conditions
Ground water resources
Materials Availability
Soil Erosion
Sub Total
Biological Environment
Designated Protected Areas
Wildlife habitat/s (outside designated PAs)
Migratory route/crossing of wild animals and birds (outside designated PAs)
Reserved Forests (RFs)
Protected or Other Forest/s
Green tunnels
Road side trees
Sub Total
Social Environment
Settlements
Sensitive Receptors
Drinking water sources
Religious Structures
Cultural Properties
Market Places
Common Property Resources
Sub Total
Grand Total

Total Weight

Score

4
4
5
5
4
4
4
30

1
1
1
1
0
1
1
6

10
6
6
5
5
4
4
40

10
2
0
5
1
2
4
24

5
5
4
4
4
4
4
30
100

2
2
3
3
2
1
2
15
45

The total score of the project is 45 against a total of 100 and it can be safely deduced that the project scores
medium on the sensitivity scale and hence there shall be some impacts on the project.
The Table 6.2 presents the general environmental impacts expected due to the proposed up gradation of the
project road. Impacts have been assessed based on the information collected from the screening & scoping
of environmental attributes at feasibility stage. The quanta of all the impacts on Natural Environment are
discussed in details in subsequent paragraphs. The description and magnitude of impacts for the various
environmental components as visualised for the project are presented in the following sections.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


6-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542
of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 6-2: General Impacts on Environment

Env.
Component
Affected

Planning and
Design / Pre
construction
Phase

Construction Phase

Road Operation

Project Activity

Indirect effects of
Operation or
Induced
Development

Land acquisition

Removal of
structures

Removal of trees
and Vegetation

Earth works
including quarrying

Laying of
Pavement

Vehicle &
Machine
Operation
& maintenance

Asphalt & Crusher


plants

Sanitation
& waste
(labour campus)

Vehicle operation

Air

Dust
generation
during
dismantling

Reduced buffering of
air & noise pollution,
Hotter, drier
microclimate

Dust generation

Asphalt odour

Noise, dust
pollution

Noise, soot, odour,


dust pollution

odour/Smoke

Noise, dust pollution

Other pollution

Land

Loss of Productive
Land

Generation of
Debris

Erosion and loss of


top soil

Erosion and loss of


top soil

Reduction of
ground water
recharge area

Contamination
by fuel &
lubricants
compaction

Contamination
compaction of soil

Contamination
from wastes

Spill from accidents


Deposition of lead

Change in cropping
pattern

Water

Loss of water
resources

Siltation due to
loose earth

Siltation due to loose


earth

Alteration of drainage,
break in continuity of
ditches Siltation,
Stagnant water pools
in quarries

Contamination
by fuel &
lubricants
compaction

Contamination by
asphalt
leakage or fuel

Contamination
from wastes
Overuse

Spill Contamination by
fuel, lubricants &
washing of vehicles

Increased
Contamination of
ground water

Noise

Noise pollution

Noise pollution due


to machinery

Noise pollution

Noise pollution

Noise pollution

Noise pollution

Noise Pollution

Distorted habitat

Flora

Loss of
Biomass

Fauna

Agricultural
land

Change in
land use

Buildings and
built-up
structures
People and
community

Anxiety and fear


among community

Disturbance habitat
loss
Loss of land
economic value
Loss of structures,
Debris generation,
noise and air
pollution
Displacement of
people psychological
impact on people
loss of livelihood

Cultural assets

Displacement of
structures from Row

Utilities &
amenities

Interruption in supply

Labour's health
& safety

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Removal of
Vegetation

Lower productivity
Use as
fuel wood

Felling trees for


fuel

Impact of pollution on
vegetation Lowered
productivity Toxicity of
vegetation

Disturbance

Disturbance

Disturbance

Poaching

Collision with traffic

Loss of standing
crops

Loss of
productive land
Noise vibration
may cause
damage to
structures

Lowered productivity
loss of ground for
vegetation

Loss of shade and


community trees, loss
of fuel wood and
fodder, loss of income

Noise & air


pollution

loss of sacred trees

Noise vibration
may cause
damage to
structures

Conversion of
agricultural land
Noise vibration damage to structures

Odour and dust

Increase of
stagnant water
and diseases

Noise & air pollution


collision with
pedestrians livestock
and vehicles

Community
clashes with
migrant labour

Damage from
vibration and air
pollution

Asphalt odour
and dust

6-2
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Damage to utility and


amenities
collision with
pedestrians livestock
and vehicles

Vibration and Noise

Change in building
use and
characteristics

Noise pollution, Risk


of accidents

Induced pollution

Damage from
vibration and air
pollution
Pressure on
existing amenities
Increase in
communicable
diseases

collision with
pedestrians livestock
and vehicles

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

6.2

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

6.2.1

Meteorological Parameters

The Project Highway is located in a subtropical region with marked monsoon effects. Though no change in
the macro-climatic setting (precipitation, temperature and wind) is envisaged due to the project, the
microclimate is likely to be temporarily modified by vegetation removal and the addition of increased
pavement surface. There will be an increase in daytime temperature on the road surface and soil due to loss
of shade and big trees, which in turn might lead to formation of heat islands especially along the inhabited
sections. In addition, at green tunnel locations, the removal of trees will increase the amount of direct
sunlight resulting in higher temperatures along the highway.
This increase in the daytime temperature assumes significance especially to the slow moving traffic, the
pedestrians and the first row of residences / receptors along the corridor, as the entire project stretch
experiences temperatures as high as 43C during summers. The impact will be felt more by the slow moving
traffic and pedestrians along the project road. Although the impact shall be significant and long term in
nature, it is reversible in nature and shall be compensated for by additional plantation of trees. It must be
noted that the impact is unavoidable. However, it may be pointed out that the project has taken care to
minimise tree felling in the ROW by realigning the road to save trees.
6.2.2

Land

Physiography

Pre construction and Construction Stage

Road construction activities involve alterations in the local physiography and drainage patterns. The impacts
on physiography may include destabilisation of slopes due to cut and fill operations. Cut-and-fills will be
designed for improvement to the road geometry, and parallel cross drainage structures will be added to
improve drainage. There would be no grading of the roadside area and the work would consist of raising the
pavement embankments. The highway stretch falls is a gentle rolling plain terrain. In some stretches, some
amount of cuts and fills would be necessary to accommodate the new pavement. There may be an impact
on the topography as a result of accelerated erosion on the cut-profiles.
Geology and Seismology

Pre-Construction, Construction and Operation Stage

The entire stretch of the project highway traverses through seismic zone II as defined by the Indian Standard
(IS) 1893-1994 seismic zoning classification system, i.e., a zone of stability. The project does not have any
impact on the geological or seismic stability of the area.
Quarries and Crushers
The excavation of quarries used for obtaining rocks, soil and aggregate materials for road construction can
cause direct and indirect long - term adverse impacts on the environment. The impacts of quarrying
operations could be significant at various stages of road construction and are described stage wise.

Pre Construction Stage

Existing quarries that are already in operation with the required environmental clearances have been
recommended for this project. No new quarries are proposed and hence no major impacts, which arise in
making new quarries operational, are likely. In case the concessionaire decides in opening new stone
quarries he shall follow the guidelines stipulated in Annexure 8.3.
A huge quantity of sand would be required for the cement concrete rigid pavement and for the crossdrainage structures proposed. Sand required for the construction will mostly be procured from the river
quarries as identified in Table 8.4. As an alternative to borrowing of sand from river bed, the possibility of
using stone crusher dust has been explored. Stone dust from crusher can be used for the construction
works provided the quantity and the quality produced is certified by the Independent Engineer to be
satisfactory for all construction works, else river sand shall be used from the identified quarries. None of the
sand quarry sites would require any preventive environmental measures. However, the long leads mean that
care would have to be taken to prevent spillage of material and damage to the haul roads during
transportation. No additional adverse environmental impact, except those resulting from spillage during
transportation, is expected to occur.

Construction Stage

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


6-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

A major source of dust during the construction stage is from stone crushing operations from the crusher and
the vibrating screen. The dust, in addition to being a health concern also reduces visibility thereby increasing
safety concerns. As no new quarry needs to be opened for this project (majority of the material shall be from
cut operations, reuse of old materials and existing quarries within the site itself), therefore, no new impacts
are likely to arise due to quarrying operations. A properly enforced EMP could improve the working
conditions of workers in the existing quarry areas selected for the project.
Though the quarry materials are to be transported over long distances to the construction sites, almost all
the quarries identified have proper access roads, therefore, no major impacts during the hauling of materials
is envisaged. The issue of dust generation etc along the haul roads needs to be addressed through proper
enforcement of dust suppression measures.
Soil Erosion

Pre Construction Stage

The removal of roadside vegetation will cause erosion, and increased run-off would in turn lead to erosion of
productive soil. The direct impact of erosion is the loss of embankment soil and danger of stability loss for
the road itself. This impact is generally restricted to the ROW. The project has taken care of this issue at the
engineering design stage itself, as at design gradients of 1:2, the slopes of the embankments are perceived
to be stable for all stretches of road. These sections of the road embankment would need stone pitching or
any other suitable turfing.

Construction Stage

Elevated sections of road in all sections, particularly all high embankments along the bridges, ROBs and the
bridge approaches would be vulnerable to erosion and need to be provided proper slope protection
measures to prevent erosion. Construction of new bridges involves excavation of riverbed and banks for the
construction of the foundations and piers. If the residual spoil is not properly disposed off, increased
sedimentation downstream of the bridge is likely. Though during construction period, drainage alteration and
downstream erosion / siltation is anticipated, due to the improved design and added capacity of the crossdrainage structures, there should be an improvement in the drainage characteristics of the surrounding area.
Adequate slope protection measures are proposed as part of engineering design. Removal of trees to
facilitate construction will cause erosion problems until the proposed compensatory afforestation plantation
is established. Silt fencing to be provided to prevent eroded material from entering watercourses. The
regular cleaning of the drains by the concessionaire will ensure that these structures will not be overloaded
or rendered Ineffective due to overload.

Operation Stage

No soil erosion is envisaged when the road is in operation as all the slopes and embankments of the project
road shall be stabilised through sound engineering techniques. The issue has been addressed at the design
stage itself and all slopes have been 1:2, which shall ensure stability of the embankment. Appropriate
landscaping measures such as pitching of slopes and turfing shall prevent soil erosion taking place.
Compaction of Soil

Pre-Construction Stage

Compaction of Soil will occur in the pre-construction stage (particularly during site clearance stage) due to
movement of heavy machinery and vehicles. Transplantation of trees if carried out shall involve very heavy
machinery to uproot trees and haul them to the site of transplantation. Similarly, compaction will take place
during setting up of construction camps and stockyards. However, this is a short duration impact.
Appropriate measures need to be specified in the Environment Management Plan to minimise the area of
soil compaction.

Construction Stage

Compaction shall occur beyond the carriageway and within the vegetated area of the ROW by the
movement of vehicles and heavy machinery. Movement of vehicles during road construction is the major
cause of soil compactions. This impact is direct and will be the maximum in the ROW. It is necessary to
ensure that there is no adverse impact of soil compaction in areas other than the ROW, where vegetation
can grow and rain infiltration will take place.

Operation Stage

During the operation period compaction will be restricted to the CW itself. Compaction cannot be said to be
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
6-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

an impact of the operation stage as the pavement itself is a function of compacted base and sub base.
Contamination of Soil

Pre-Construction Stage

Contamination of oil in the pre-construction stage may be considered a short-term residual negative impact.
Soil contamination may take place due to solid waste contamination from the labour camp set up during preconstruction stage. This impact is significant at locations of construction camps; stockyards, hot mix plants
etc. will come up in this stage.

Construction Stage

Contamination of soil during construction stage is primarily due to construction and allied activities. The sites
where construction vehicles are parked and serviced are likely to be contaminated because of leakage or
spillage of fuel and lubricants. Pollution of soil can also occur in hot-mix plants from leakage or spillage of
asphalt or bitumen. Refuse and solid waste from labour camps can also contaminate the soil. Contamination
of soil during construction might be a major long-term residual negative impact. Unwarranted disposal of
construction spoil and debris will add to soil contamination. This contamination is likely to be carried over to
water bodies in case of dumping being done near water body locations.

Operation Stage

During the operation stage, soil pollution due to accidental vehicle spills or leaks is a low probability as one
of the main objective of the project is to reduce accidents, but potentially disastrous to the receiving
environment should they occur. These impacts can be long term and irreversible depending upon the extent
of spill. There should be a disaster management plan in case of such major spills occurring.
6.2.3

Air

Air quality along the project corridor will be impacted both during the construction and operation stages
of the project.

Construction stage impacts will be of short term and have adverse impacts on the construction workers
as well as the settlements adjacent to the road, especially those in the down wind direction.

Operation stage impacts will not be as severe as the construction stage impacts and will be confined
generally to a band of width ranging from 50 to 75m from the edge of the last lane on either side of the
corridor.

Both the construction and operation stage impacts can be effectively mitigated if the impacts have been
assessed with reasonable accuracy in the design stage.

Generation of Dust

Pre Construction Stage

Generation of dust is the most likely impact during this stage due to:

Site clearance and use of heavy vehicles and machinery etc.;

Procurement and transport of raw materials and quarries to construction sites;

The impacts will mostly be concentrated in the ROW. If adequate measures such as sprinkling of water
on haul roads around sites where clearance activities are on, covering material trucks especially those
carrying sand and fly ash, then the impacts can be reduced to a great extent. It is likely that impacts
due to dust generation are felt downwind of the site rather than on the site itself.

Construction Stage

As the entire project corridor has a soil type with high silt content and the construction activities to be carried
out during the dry season when the moisture content would be less, dust generation, particularly due to
earthworks will be significant. Dust is likely to be generated due to the various construction activities
including:

Stone crushing operations in the crushers;

Handling and storage of aggregates in the asphalt plants;

Concrete batching plants;

Asphalt mix plants due to mixing of aggregates with bitumen; and

Construction and allied activities.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


6-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Generation of dust is a critical issue and is likely to have adverse impact on health of workers in quarries,
borrow areas and stone crushing units. This is a direct adverse impact, which will last almost throughout the
construction period. The Environmental Action Plan prepared by the concessionaire should lay emphasis on
enforcement of measures such as provision of pollution masks, regular sprinkling of water to suppress dust
along haul roads at quarries, crushers and borrow areas to mitigate this impact.

Operation Stage

The negative impacts on air quality during operation stage shall not be significant as that of
construction stage. This is due to the reduction of dust particles.

No dust generation is envisaged during the operation stage as the all road shoulders are proposed to
be paved and all slopes and embankments shall be turfed as per best engineering practices.

The air quality shall also improve due to the plantation activity carried out in the ROW during the end of
construction phase.

Generation of Exhaust Gases

Pre Construction Stage

Generation of exhaust gases is likely during the pre construction stage during movement of heavy
machinery, oil tankers etc. This impact is envisaged to be insignificant during the pre construction stage.

Construction Stage

High levels of SO2, HC and hydrocarbons are likely from hot mix plant operations. Volatile toxic gases are
released through the heating process during bitumen production. Although the impact is much localised, it
can spread downwind depending on the wind speeds. The Environment Management Action Plan prepared
by the concessionaire needs to ensure adequate measures are taken especially for health safety of workers
such as providing them with pollution masks during working hours. Also, the contractor should ensure that
hot mix plants, stockyards, etc. are away from residential areas and residential quarters of all workers.
Contractors also should be asked to provide regularly Pollution under Control certificate for their equipments
and machinery as per prevalent norms. If adequate measures are taken, then impacts from generated gases
can be negligible.

Operation Stage

The major impact on air quality will be due to plying of vehicles. The impacts on air quality will at any given
time depend upon traffic volume / rate of vehicular emission within a given stretch and prevailing
meteorological conditions. Air pollution impacts arise from two sources: (i) inadequate vehicle maintenance;
and (ii) use of adulterated fuel in vehicles. Enforcement standards to meet better vehicle performance in
emissions and the improvement of fuel constituents can assist in improving regional air quality.
6.2.4

Water Resources

To facilitate the cross-drainage at water crossings, 140 cross-drainage structures including minor bridges,
slab, box and pipe culverts are proposed. The surface water bodies along the project road might be subject
to adverse impacts due to the various construction activities as well as during the operation stage of the
project. The impacts on water resources have been summarised in Table 6-3.
Table 6-3: Likely Impacts on Water Resources during the Construction Stage
Impacts due to Construction
Loss of water bodies
Loss of other water supply sources
Alteration of drainage, run off, flooding
Depletion of ground water recharge
Use of water supply for construction
Contamination from fuel and lubricants
Contamination from improper sanitation and waste disposal in
construction camps

Indicators
Area of water bodies affected
Hand pumps, wells etc. affected
No. of cross drainage channels
Groundwater in Area rendered inaccessible & impervious
Quantum of water used
Nature and quantum of contaminators
Area of camp / disposal site and proximity to water bodies /
channels

Alteration of Drainage
Impacts of road construction, which lead to alteration of drainage, are generally widening at culvert or bridge
locations. This requires river and or gully training for the period during which the bridge is to be constructed.
Alteration of drainage can lead to soil erosion of adjacent areas, disturb local vegetation and impair local
ecology.
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
6-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Pre Construction Stage

No drainage modification of surface flow of rivers / streams is envisaged during pre construction period.

Construction Stage

Though the constructions along the watercourses are to be carried out in the lean flow periods, as the major
rivers are perennial, the construction activities will necessitate the diversion of the waterway. This diversion
of flow can significantly harm the aquatic habitat, if any. The waterway will be constricted, increasing velocity
downstream of the bridge. This will mean increased sediment load with the flow, thereby allowing less
sunlight to penetrate into the water and can reduce growth of micro flora. The impact shall be direct but short
term in nature and shall last till the construction period.
Short-term increase in runoff during construction may occur due to the removal of trees, vegetative cover
and compaction of the surrounding soil during pre construction. Thus the increased sediment load will be a
significant impact that needs to be addressed for all water bodies along the corridor and adequate silt
fencing measures need to be provided.
The design proposes the raising of the embankments from the existing levels to ensure that the finished
pavement is above the maximum flood level so as to prevent any impacts due to any water seepage in the
pavement. No significant impacts in the drainage pattern due to the raising of the road profile are likely, as
the road design itself takes care of the cross-pavement drainage.

Operation Stage

One of the unavoidable aftermaths of road construction is the increased surface run off. The new lanes,
which are essentially a paved impervious surface, will cause increased surface runoff along the roadsides.
Increase in surface run-off is due to the creation of impervious surfaces that prevent the flow of water into
the ground. The project involves the construction of four lanes with paved shoulders on either side.
Impacts due to surface runoff include increased soil erosion and local flooding or water logging. However, as
the proposed lanes has been designed with ditches on both sides to take care of surface runoff local
flooding due to the proposed increased runoff shall be taken care of effectively. Surface runoff shall be
drained to the nearest cross drainage structure. The engineering design includes design of cross drainage
structures, which should take care of the extra flow.
Water Required for the Project

Pre Construction and Construction Stage

The most likely significant impact on water during construction is depletion of water table. Rigid pavements
have been suggested at the toll plaza locations only. The cement concrete construction works requires a
considerable quantity of potable water for the various activities including construction of the pavement, dust
suppression, curing etc. The demand of water to be used during the construction phase will be around 442
KLD. The demand though is only indicative in nature and shall differ during the lean period of construction.
The demand shall be met through both surface sources and ground water.

Operation Stage

The depletion of water is predominantly restricted to the construction phase. The road operation does not
make a demand on the available water resources apart from time to time requirement during works such as
maintenance of road side tree plantations. However, it is more likely that water from these rivers not be
tapped at all for this purpose.
Water Quality

Pre Construction Stage

Water sources including flowing and stagnant water sources are likely to be contaminated due to activities
such as setting up workers camp near water sources or transportation of construction material such as sand,
borrow material etc without covering it. Due to tree felling soils around the water bodies and surface
drainage channels will be exposed during the pre construction stage, during which, the suspended
sediments and the associated pollutants can be washed in to these water sources. As soil all along the
corridor isnt of alluvial type, the impacts due to the increased sediment load will not be a significant impact
that needs to be addressed for all water bodies along the corridor. Even then adequate silt fencing
measures need to be provided.
Contamination of groundwater is another likely impact of road construction and allied activities. The
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
6-7
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

groundwater recharge areas may be reduced due to an increase in impervious layers due to the
construction. The contamination of the groundwater resources due to the project is likely at the following
locations:

Along construction sites, camps involving moving of construction equipments and machinery.

At the various community water bodies and sources of water supply such as hand pumps etc

Along the entire length of the corridor especially around urban areas and productive lands.

The impact of contamination of water sources such as wells can be avoided if these sources are covered
while site clearance is going on at the site. The Management Plan needs to ensure that proper precautions
are taken to prevent / minimise contamination of all water sources. Construction camps or stockyards are
not to be set up near water bodies to prevent oil spills.

Construction Stage

The impacts on water quality will be of greater concern during the construction stage. Increased sediment
load during preparation of the site is the most likely adverse impact. The contamination by fuel and oil from
construction vehicles or bitumen from hot-mix plants is less likely and in any case expected to be localised.
Discharge from labour camps and vehicle parking areas will have to be treated before discharge into any
watercourse. It is during the operation stage that the leakage or spillage from vehicles damaged, overturned
or just badly maintained is more likely.
The construction activities around the surface bodies can affect the water quality due to the disposal of solid
and liquid wastes from labour camps, fuel and lubricant spills or leaks from construction vehicles, fuel
storage and distribution sites and from bitumen or asphalt storage at hot-mix plants.
Also, the raising of the road shall mean that more embankment surface is prone to erosion. However, the
engineering design shall ensure protection of embankment slopes. The spoil heaps around the construction
sites are also prone to erosion and contribute to the increased sediment load in the near-by water bodies.
The major parameter of concern would be the sediment load from the spoils. The major pollutants of
concern are suspended solids, oil and grease, lead and other heavy metals.

Concentration of suspended solids is likely to be highest during the construction stage and immediately
after the construction when vegetation has not been fully established on the embankment slopes.

Oil and grease form a film on the water surface and hinder the transfer of oxygen into water.

Though the compounds of lead are suspected to be carcinogenic, it is unlikely that leads pollution to
have significant effects as 90-95% of lead in run-off is inert, and will be further diluted in the receiving
water bodies, where the lead concentrations are minimal.

Discharge from labour camps and vehicle parking areas will have to be treated before discharge into any
watercourse. It is during the operation stage that the leakage or spillage from vehicles damaged, overturned
or just badly maintained is more likely. The existing levels of contaminants, which can trace their origin to
road run-off, indicate that water quality degradation is not a significant impact. Normally groundwater is
shielded from the effects of such degradation, but if the discharges from construction camps were disposed
off using soak-pits / septic-tanks that were not adequately designed, the consequences would be disastrous
since restoration of groundwater quality is a much slower process.
The impacts of run-off laden with sediment may be felt in villages that depend on the fish living in the waterbody. Increased sediment load, lesser sunlight, difficulty to settle, etc will make the water more turbid. If the
concentrations are higher, smaller fish may be harmed. Large, heavy sediment, particularly with slow moving
water may smother algae and eventually alter the nature of the sub-stratum. Excessive sediment loads may
also mean disruption to areas where fish lay their eggs. However, it must be noted that these effects are
probable only during construction stage. The water quality of surface drainage channels is likely to be
impaired as long as the construction period continues. However, measures to divert the passage of
pollutants into the river can be adopted to minimise the impact.

Operation Stage

No contamination of any water source is envisaged during the operation period.


Impact on other Water Supply Sources
The impact on the local water supply sources like hand pumps, natural and manmade water bodies, wells
and concrete tanks will be significant as many are directly impacted. These though shall be replaced with
new sources at locations near to the existing ones. The project alignment affects some water resources.
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
6-8
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Besides these cross drainage structures are built over the canal, river & nalla crossings. As part of the
project preparation, the alignment has been carefully routed to avoid any direct impact on these water
bodies, however, at some locations; the encroachment onto these water resources has been unavoidable. In
such locations the relocations of all these water supply sources has been recommended and the cost of the
relocation has been included as part of the project cost.
6.2.5

Noise levels

Though the level of discomfort caused by noise is subjective, there is a definite increase in discomfort with
an increase in noise levels. Road noise depends on factors such as traffic intensity, the type and condition of
the vehicles plying on the road, acceleration / deceleration / gear changes by the vehicles depending on the
level of congestion and smoothness of road surface (IRC: 104-1988).
The baseline noise levels monitored at various locations along the project packages indicate the baseline
levels is within the permissible limits for residential and rural areas and exceeds in some commercial areas.
Even the night levels recorded at the various locations are close to or higher than the noise levels allowed
during daytime. Thus, noise is a major area of concern, especially since a number of sensitive receptors
(schools, colleges and hospitals) have been identified to be quite close to the road. The impacts on noise
due to the project will be of significance in both the construction as well as the operation stages.
Table 6-4: Noise Impacts
Sl.
No.

Phase

Pre
Construction

Construction

Operation

Source

Impact

Man, material and machinery movement


Establishment of camps, site office, stock yards, construction plants
etc.
Plant site
Crushing, hot mix plants, machineries, batching plants, excavation,
grading, paving activities
Work zones
Community residing near the work zones
Increase in traffic

Short duration
Localised impact
Negligible
Plant site: significant impact
within 500m
Work zones: temporary and
negligible
Negligible impact

Though the noise levels are within the stipulated standard, the noise levels are a concern due to the number
of sensitive receptors located along the project road. The impacts on the receptors shall basically relate to
increase in noise levels, access and physical damage to the structure. There are some schools & health
units that are partially impacted. Even though complaints of noise and vibration are common, most of the
receptors are quite far away from the road and hence the noise is dissipated.
6.3

Biological Environment

6.3.1

Forest Areas

The proposed alignment is likely to directly impact the forest at Nandani Village along which realignment is
proposed. Though the alignment has been routed to minimise forestland acquisition, the acquisition of 2.665
ha of forestland has been unavoidable. The acquisition of forestland is being taken up in accordance to the
Forest (Conservation) Act.
Table 6-5: Forest Area required on Project Road
Sl.
No.
1

6.3.2

Proposed
Chainage (Km)
From

To

33.275

33.810

Length
(Km)
1.535

Side

Forest
Details

Both

RF

Compartment

Survey
No.

Gat
No.

138

104

Division

Forest Area
To Be
Acquired
(Ha.)

Remark

Solapur

2.665

Nandani
Realignment

Roadside Plantations

The principal impact on flora involves the removal of trees for the creation of a clear zone within the Corridor
of Impact. Reason for clearing trees is threefold:

To prevent single-vehicle collision with the roadside trees, trees very close to the road need to be
cleared. Roadside trees are safety hazards, particularly those trees with strong and rigid stems. Some
trees are safety hazards because they preclude clear sight distances. Some trees such as Tamarindus
indica have a propensity to overturn when old and are potential safety hazards depending upon age
and decay condition. All trees that are safety hazards need to be cleared.
To ease construction of the embankment for the widened road formation and, to permit construction of

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


6-9
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

adequate roadside drainage structure, trees located within the area between the pavement and the
daylight line needs to be removed.
Trees need to be cleared to facilitate construction of traffic detours. As the present project road is
mainly two lanes, there shall be need for diversions especially except for construction of bridges.
The stage wise impact on roadside trees and plantation has been described in the following sections.

Pre Construction Stage

The project has a significant, direct and long-term impact on Roadside trees in the Pre construction stage.
The cutting of trees shall have manifold impact. Most visible impact is the loss of shade. Also, there is a
possibility of the local people being deprived of tree products, such as wood, fruits, leaves etc. Removal of
roadside tress will reduce comfort levels for slow moving traffic and pedestrians. This is the only impact
considered important after the effect on the embankment stability has been considered. It may be pointed
out that this may be marginal in case of a full fledge National Highway, where the segregation of through
(fast-moving) and local (slow moving and pedestrian) becomes a major consideration. This negative
implication needs to be taken into consideration by compensating with new plantation along the ROW of the
project highway. The felling of trees need to be compensated for by compensatory afforestation, and
wherever possible, the options of transplantation of significant trees need to be worked out and adequate
provisions for the monitoring of the same need to be worked out.
A far less contentious issue, which normally takes the back seat, is the importance of the ecosystems
supported by the roadside trees. Not only would the removal of trees lead to erosion, it would also mean that
the micro-ecosystems developed on the roadside with the birds, animals and insects using the plantation
over the years would be lost too. The only mitigation would be to ensure that the compensatory afforestation
required as per the MoEF guidelines for the project is carried out with native species and proper care of the
saplings is taken to ensure that the roadside plantation returns to its previous state as quickly as possible.
Co-operation of locals to ensure that local cattle do not damage the saplings during the early stages of
growth will be required.
The roadside plantations will need to be cleared for the project. Though the loss of these trees is an
irreversible and long-term impact, the loss of the roadside plantations shall have to be compensated in
accordance to the principles of the Forest (Conservation) Act.

Construction Stage

The construction of new road shall involve removal of topsoil and clearing of vegetation cover and felling of
trees. These activities will exert wide-ranging impacts on the surroundings as summarised in Table below.
Table 6-6: Likely Impacts on Flora
Activity
Cutting and removal of earth/rock
Road Construction
Workers Camps

6.3.3

Impact
Loss of vegetation cover (shrubs & grasses) canopies;
Felling of trees of girth more than 30 cm and in forest areas;
Reduced shade and shelter for roadside fauna
Reduction in soil fertility, moisture and humidity
Use of plants and trees as fuel wood

Fauna

Domesticated animals dominate fauna species. The forest department has reported some endangered
species within the study area. There is likelihood of slight impact to local domestic animals, which graze in
the area especially after the road is constructed. Increased vehicle movement in the area might lead to
accidents involving animals. In areas with high traffic volumes, road kill can be a considerable or even the
predominant cause of mortality. To avoid such accidental kill, the project shall provide underpasses as part
of the project.
More over there shall be positive impact on the faunal species during the operational phase. The plantation
activity carried out, as part of the project component shall provide shelter and food for the smaller avian and
mammalian species, which in turn shall improve the overall food chain and food web and ultimately the
ecology of the area.
6.3.4

Aquatic Ecology

The construction of new bridges will cause some contamination of the river water due to spillage of
construction material, sediment loading & increased turbidity downstream of the bridge location. This change
shall have some impact on the flora and faunal species and change the nature of the substratum resulting in
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
6-10
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

decline in the number and diversity of plants and thus the food web. No negative impacts are envisaged on
the aquatic ecology during the operational phase.
6.4

SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

6.4.1

Human Use Values

Amenities and Facilities


Some of the infrastructures built to facilitate the basic needs of the communities in these areas are affected
by the project, the details of which are given in the RAP. Most of the bus shelters shall be affected and these
shall be relocated.
Change in Land Use
The development that the improved road will bring with it will induce a chain reaction towards change in land
use. Change In land use will be sparked off as a result of land speculation. The road, which is flanked by
agricultural fields, will witness overnight selling of these lands for the prices that they will fetch.
Industrialisation of fringe areas of cities is also a possible impact of a road development scheme. The
availability of cheap labour and easy access to markets in the city will make roadside areas quite an
incentive for the industrialist. Reduced transportation costs and availability of high-class transportation
facilities for raw materials and products will be the most important advantage of the improved road. The
mushrooming of industrial areas on roadside will mean that the use of whatever infrastructure facilities that
may be available will preferentially go to the 'deep pockets' of the industry. This will further strain these
almost non-existent services.
Land Speculation
Better connectivity will also mean that the value of roadside properties will rise almost overnight. The
encroachment onto the ROW for the road to cash in on this opportunity is an almost universal occurrence, to
varying degrees. Encroachment will mean that the future expansion / widening of the road scheme will be
problematic and the issues related with easement and eviction will become a real challenge for the NHAI
that is already stretched to the limit. However, the damage to encroaching structure, whatever its status, in
case of an accident will be far more visible and potentially dangerous impact of such activity. Strict planning
laws in conjunction with continuous unbiased monitoring of the development are the only proven strategies
against such illegal activities.
Cropping Pattern and Crop Productivity
The proposed project is likely to bring in its wake industrialisation and change in land use. This translates
into change of land currently under agriculture to more commercial use. It is envisaged that due to this
proposed change the crop productivity in the agricultural belt immediately adjoining the ROW shall
decrease. This impact is envisaged only to be valid for the agricultural land immediate to the ROW. Although
the spatial impact is likely to be insignificant the impact will be irreversible in nature.
Exploitation of Resource base
Development of a road in areas previously not easily accessible can work like a double-edged sword for the
environmental resources in the area. While the road would unlock potential value in the area, stimulate
growth and make the environment hospitable, the rapid depletion of natural resources, by means with which
these areas cannot cope is a distinct possibility. Development of such vital Infrastructure will lead to over
exploitation of the environmental resources (e.g. too much groundwater pumping, indiscriminate wastewater
disposal, etc.). While the medium term impacts may not be large enough to be noticed, the long-term
implications of such depletion are potentially disastrous. The severe depletion of ground water resources in
certain areas and threats of saltwater ingress into aquifers in areas near the coast are likely if the expanded
urban areas continue to use bore wells for their domestic water supply.
Road Safety
The improvement of the project road will entail doubling the existing carriageway to a two-lane section and
improve its condition to allow vehicles at design speeds of 100 km/hr. Increased vehicular speed mean that
the fringe areas of the road are at increased risk from speeding vehicles. The existing facilities and
amenities along the road shall be subjected to adverse impacts of road operation. The possibility of
accidents is likely to increase. The possibility of this happening is a cause of concern as there are many
educational, cultural and health institutes along the road.
Induced Ribbon Development
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
6-11
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

The development of a road scheme will lead to extension of urban areas especially at the ends of cities and
towns through which the road passes. The improved transportation facility provides the linkages that will
allow much better access to previously difficult to reach markets (for buyers and sellers). This would mean
not only the people from congested areas in cities will want to move to the fringe, but also, people from
nearby rural areas would migrate to the city. Urban services are seldom able to keep pace with the growth of
a city. The growth of a city beyond the established spread network will mean piecemeal arrangements for
services like water supply, wastewater treatment and disposal, and transportation. All the settlements along
the project corridor will experience a sudden boom in activity and population around the start of operation of
the project corridor. Thus, a ribbon development is envisaged all along the project road.
6.4.2

Cultural Properties

Relocation of Cultural Assets


Cultural properties (shrines, sacred and archaeological structures) lying near the ROW are most susceptible
to impacts due to pre construction and construction activities. Clearing of the site during movement of road
construction machinery is likely to require a belt of about 4-5m from the edge of the carriageway, which is
likely to adversely impact cultural properties. Cultural properties will be subjected to varying degree of impact
depending upon their placement in the ROW. Structures, which are close to the proposed CW, are likely to
need relocation. The project shall directly impact some temples which have to be relocated. The construction
shall also partially impact some cultural assets which shall be rehabilitated. The access of some of these
cultural properties shall also be compromised.
6.4.3

Quality Of Life Values

Socio-Economic Profile
The detailed socio-economic analysis of people, structures and property likely to be impacted by the
proposed project has been presented in the Resettlement Action Plan.
Public health and safety
Impacts on public health and safety may arise during the phases of pre-construction, construction and
operation phases. During the pre-construction and construction phases, dismantling of the structures for
ROW clearance and road construction activities may result in the following health hazards:

Breaking and dismantling of properties during pre-construction has psychological impacts on their
owners and others associated with them.
Debris generated on account of the above-mentioned activities if not properly disposed might give rise
to health problems in the area. However, the structures to be dismantled during pre-construction phase
will mainly be of semi-permanent and temporary nature and much of the waste shall be salvageable.
Dismantling of first row of structures (generally commercial) along the highway shall lead to exposure of
second row of properties (generally residential) to higher dust, air and noise pollution levels. This is a
long-term effect (might extend into the operation phase) and may increase the effected households'
medical expenditure.
In case of non-local labour (If so is arranged by the contractor), labour camps are set up at one or more
sites adjacent to the alignment, and at some ancillary sites, like aggregate quarries. These labourers
hired from outside can have clashes with the local population on account of cultural and religious
differences. The influx of a large work force to an area, already hard pressed for basic services
(medical services, power, water supply, etc.), can impose additional stress on these facilities.
In and around forest areas if alternative fuels are not made available to the workforce, there is a
likelihood that trees / branches will be cut down for cooking or heating purposes.
Unsanitary conditions in the labour camps might also result in impact on health of labourers as well as
the local population. Transmission of diseases is also facilitated by the migration of people. During the
construction phase work, crews and their dependents may bring with them a multitude of
communicable diseases including Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) like AIDS. This is more so if
the nature of the project requires more male-workers, who have migrated from other parts of the state
or country.
During road construction allied activities like quarrying and crushing operations, traffic diversions, etc.,
may cause disruption of social and economic life of the local population of the nearby areas. Dust and
noise generated in crushing and blasting operations may cause nuisance to the nearby communities.
Other problems perceived during construction period is inconvenience to the local people as well as the
highway passengers due to traffic jams and congestion, loss of access and other road accident risks,

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


6-12
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

as a result of diversion of traffic and construction work on road.


The traffic amount and speeds are likely to increase throughout the road corridors. The accident risk
would tend to increase. Although the design speeds have been kept lower in the major settlement
areas, some amount of severance is expected in the rural areas.

Land Acquisition
The new four-lane national highway shall require a 60m ROW. Land requirement estimates have been
shown in Table below. Total land required for widening and upgrading the project corridor is 128.12 ha of
which only 2.665 Ha shall be diverted from forest lands. The rest are to be acquired from private and other
government land holdings. The bulk of the land is required for widening and up gradation of the existing
road.
Table 6-7: Proposed Land Requirement in the Project
Bypass & Realignment
15.36

Widening
84.52

Toll Plaza
9.44

Service Road
9.20

Truck/bus byes
9.00

Rest area
0.60

Total land
128.12

Source: Primary Survey


Extent of Loss to Private Properties
As a corollary to land acquisition, the project affects a number of families, and displaces some of them.
These families are titleholders, and are distinct from the squatters and the encroachers. A total of 528
residential (228) & commercial (118) properties are being affected. There are also a total of 112 squatters in
the project. A total of 7316 persons and 1329 family are affected due to the project. The details are provided
in the RAP report.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


6-13
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

7.

ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES

The chapter tries to compare feasible alternative to the proposed project with respect to site, technology,
design etc. The alternatives examined take into account all possible and feasible options and includes both
with and without project scenarios in terms of the potential environmental impacts for the justification of the
project. The chapter discusses how environmental parameters were assigned due importance and were
carefully considered in the analysis of alternatives.
7.1

WITH AND WITHOUT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES

7.1.1

Without Project Scenario

The existing project road is a two lane national highway with pavement width of 7m. With present and
projected high traffic volumes, the capacity of the present highway is insufficient for handling the high
volume of traffic and calls in for improvements to a four lane carriageway. The road has many roadside
settlements and the traffic flow is seriously impacted by severe conflicts between the local and the through
traffic. This is further compounded by the various land use conflicts, in terms of uncontrolled development
along the highway and the encroachments onto the ROW. The population growth, increase in traffic volumes
and the economic development along the corridor would continue to occur and will worsen the already
critical situation. The existing unsafe conditions and the adverse environmental consequences in terms of
the environmental quality along the highway would continue to worsen in the absence of the proposed
improvements. Moreover, if it is decided not to proceed with the project, then the attendant reduced socioeconomic development of this remote, relatively poorly connected area cannot be justified. Therefore, the
no-action alternative is neither a reasonable nor a prudent course of action for the proposed project, as it
would amount to failure to initiate any further improvements and impede economic development.
7.1.2

With Project Scenario

The with project scenario is found to have a positive impact in the long run on social, environmental,
economic and financial issues. This scenario includes the widening to four lanes of the existing two lanes
stretch as envisaged in the project objectives. The scenario is economically viable and will improve the
existing conditions. It, would thereby, contribute to the development goals envisaged by the Government of
Karnataka and India, and enhance the growth potential of the area.
To avoid the large-scale acquisition of land and properties, the project envisages the four-laning of the
highway within the existing ROW, but for critical locations like where toll plaza and other amenities have
been proposed.
In spite of the various development benefits likely to accrue due to the project, as is the case of every road
development project, the project would be accompanied by certain impacts on the natural, social and
environmental components. The potential impacts on the various environmental components can be avoided
through good environmental practices. Wherever avoidance of negative impact has not been possible,
appropriate mitigation and enhancement actions will be worked out to effectively offset the environmental
damages inflicted due to the project. A detailed Resettlement and Rehabilitation (R&R) Action Plan is also
being worked out to improve the well-being and livelihood of the people to be impacted. Comparative
assessments of the with and without project scenarios are presented in the following Table 7-1.
Table 7-1: "With and Without" Project Scenarios - A Comparative Assessment
Component
Highway
Geometrics

"With" Project Scenario


Divided four lane carriageway with geometric
improvements

Design Speed

100 Kmph

Congestion in
Settlements
Felling of road side
trees
Cattle safety
Pedestrian safety

Segregation of local and through traffic by the provision of


service roads or realignment will greatly relieve
congestion.
Felling of both old and young trees. Old and weak trees
near the road edge shall be a road hazard and shall be
felled. Double the number of new young and healthy trees
to be planted in compensation.
Provision of cattle underpasses to provide safety to both
road users and cattle from accidents.
Along the settlement stretches with significant pedestrian

'Without" Project Scenario


Existing two lane carriageway with poor geometrics
50-60 Kmph in rural Sections, 30-40 Kmph in Urban
Sections
Congestion In urban areas due to mixing of local,
pedestrian and through traffic.
No felling of trees. The old trees may become a
safety hazard to the road users with passage of
time.
Accidents involving cattle and livestock shall be a
concern.
Pedestrian safety an issue of major concern

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


7-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Component

Road Safety
Measures

Environmental
Quality

Drainage
Road Side
Amenities
Wayside Facilities
Environmental
Enhancement
Development
Financial and
Economic Analysis

7.2

"With" Project Scenario


traffic, Service road has been provided besides
pedestrian
(zebra)
crossings
and
pedestrian
underpasses.
Provision of proper road markings, zebra crossings,
service roads, crash barriers and improvement of
geometry to reduce accidents.
Provision of service lane in urban settlements improves
environmental quality within the urban areas due to
lowered pollution levels and relieving of congestion.
Besides an aggressive tree plantation and provision of
enhancement features shall not only provide aesthetics
but also improve the quality of air
Will be improved due to reconstruction of culverts /
bridges with adequate hydraulics.
Appropriate road side amenities to be provided at various
locations along the corridor.
Wayside facilities proposed at several locations, where
necessary like rest areas, with appropriate facilities for
recreation, motels, highway patrol, highway public
telephones etc.
Enhancement of community and cultural properties and
also water front in an aesthetic manner.
Higher potential for development due to improvement in
access and consequent increase in connectivity
Project financially viable as per the HDM model. The cost
of operation and maintenance, VOC and other ancillary
cost are low.

'Without" Project Scenario


especially along the settlements and congested
sections.
Accident incidents shall rise with an increased traffic
volume.
Poor due to congestion and high emission levels
because of slow movement of traffic. A further
deterioration is expected due to Increase in traffic
volumes and further congestion.
These issues remain unaddressed without the
project
Not adequate.

Not of adequate standards, quality and number.

No enhancement measures involved.


Development activities will be greatly hampered by
the gross inadequacy of infrastructure.
The cost of maintenance while catering to the
projected higher traffic, accident cost, Vehicle
operating cost & travel time cost shall be higher.

JUSTIFICATION FOR SELECTION

The major difficulties with following an entirely new alignment or for that matter providing bypasses or major
realignments are the magnitude of land acquisition and social disruption likely, lack of funds, and lack of
viability for private financing. Therefore, as an alternative, the NHAI has adopted the policy of widening of
two-lane highways to four / six lanes on existing alignments, with selective use of bypasses and service
roads in order to minimise new land requirements and negative environmental and social impacts. The
feasibility study results confirmed that this approach was economically sound and could be implemented in a
considerably shorter time frame by the concessionaire.
Realising the significance and its importance, the widening of the project road to four lanes, has been
perceived by the NHAI as the most promising option. The project, therefore, involves mostly concentric
widening of the existing alignment to fully utilise the available ROW. The project road shall be flexible
pavement barring at toll plaza locations where rigid cement concrete pavement is proposed.
7.3

ALIGNMENT MODIFICATIONS

The selection of the alignment along various sections has been worked out based on continuous interaction
between the highway and environmental teams. Various alignment improvement alterative for the project
corridor have been analysed and have been presented in the following sections:
7.3.1

Rural Sections

The options available for widening in rural areas are:

Widening eccentrically on either side of the existing road

Concentric widening along the existing road

The concentric widening has been proposed for stretches of the corridor as per the govt. policy to reduce
land acquisition. However eccentric widening also have been proposed depending upon which side merits
preference for widening. The following factors influenced the choice of the side for the widening:

Improvement of geometries especially at curves and junctions

Acquisition of Private Properties

Loss of Productive agricultural land

Impacting environmentally sensitive features as forests

Impact on road side trees / vegetation

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


7-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Impact on sensitive receptors and sensitive land uses, as schools, hospitals etc.

Loss of community facilities and utilities

Loss of water bodies, other water resources, and

Loss of cultural properties

7.3.2

Urban Sections

Bypasses are being provided in the existing road at important urban sections like Horti & Bijapur. Other
urban areas which do not necessitate a bypass, but would involve considerable acquisition of properties and
result in large-scale displacement of both squatters and property holders, have been identified. However,
though none of these settlements are large enough to generate a significant local traffic, with the
introduction of such a high-speed facility, the safety of the pedestrians and the local traffic will be of great
significance. In these sections, the design team has proposed service lanes along with covered drains which
shall also act as pedestrian sidewalks based on the magnitude and nature of environmental and social
impacts. The decision on the proposal has been reached after discussions with the NHAI and also the social
experts, who wanted to reduce the land acquisition and utilise the existing ROW to the maximum.
7.3.3

Bypass and Realignment Locations

Bypass
A bypass at Horti has been proposed. The bypass candidates, based on the social conditions were
subjected to financial and economic viability. A pragmatic approach has been adopted, with minimum
subjectivity, uncertainty in evaluating the alignment to avoid social impacts that are likely to arise due to
type, nature and magnitude of alignment. Public consultation with stakeholders, client and general public
were undertaken in deciding the alignment. The project attributes considered for the bypasses are length,
terrain, geometrics, embankment, structures, land availability, land acquisition, terrestrial ecology, safety
consideration and alteration of drainage.
Table 7-2: Proposed Bypass & Realignment Locations
Sl. No

Nearest Settlement

Type

1
3

Horti
Nandani

Bypass
Realignment
Total Length (Km)

Existing Chainage (Km)


From
To
63.600
65.700
24.200
25.250

Proposed Chainage (Km)


From
To
72.200
74.200
32.940
34.000

Length (Km)
2.000
1.060
3.060

Horti Bypass

The town is an urban settlement where the existing ROW is insufficient for further widening and shall lead to
huge loss of private, government and cultural properties. To avoid the large scale social impact and to
upgrade the geometrics a bypass has been proposed. Alternative Analysis was carried out for both the
Bypass and upgrading the existing road considering Environmental impacts, engineering and economics
aspects.
Table 7-3: Analysis of Alternatives for Horti Bypass
Sl.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6

Take off Chainage on NH 13


End Chainage on NH 13
Route Alignment
Length of bypass
Terrain
Speed

Geometrics

8
9
10
11
12
13

Description

Obligatory Points
No of Structures
Land Acquisition
Area Required, Hectares
Resettlement & Rehabilitation
Recommendation

Alternate 1
Km 63.600
Km 65.700

Alternate 3
Km 63.400
Km 66.100

RHS
2.0 km
Plain Terrain
100 km/hr
Smooth horizontal and vertical
geometrics is possible
Village Road Crossing
VUP 1, Minor Bridge 2
60m width land required
125.88
Light impact
Recommended

LHS
2.9 km
Plain Terrain
100 km/hr
Smooth horizontal and vertical geometrics is possible
Village Road Crossing
VUP 1, Minor Bridge - 2
60m width land required
133.68
Light impact
Not recommended

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


7-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Figure 7-1: Proposed Horti Bypass Alternatives

Figure 7-2: Proposed Horti Bypass

Realignment
Realignment has been proposed at one location:

Nandani

The proposed realignment near Nandani village is 1.060 Km long while the existing road in the section is
1.050 Km long. The proposed realignment is on the RHS of the existing road. The realignment was made
necessary since exiting alignment is technically and from safety angle is unsuitable for widening from 2
lanes. The existing road also passes through settlement area making widening of the exiting road more
difficult due to social conditions. Upon deliberations only 1 alternative to the existing road was derived. Since
the widening of the existing alignment would have serious repercussions on safety and technical grounds
and also on the local populace it wasnt recommended. Any alternative on the LHS was not feasible since
the entire village is situated on the LHS. The proposed alignment chosen is the best alternative available
and suits the existing topography and forest land diversion is the minimum required. Any other alternative
chosen for the project shall involve acquisition of more private, government and forestland. Based on
environmental, social, technical and financial analysis the best alternative was chosen. The realignment is
proposed due to the following reasons.

The existing road has a sharp vertical & horizontal curve and geometric improvements are required

Concentric or eccentric widening isnt possible in order to improve the curve and also widen the road

Sight distances are poor and safety shall be compromised if realignment isnt proposed

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


7-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 7-4: Analysis of Alternatives for Nandani Realignment


Sl.
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Description

Alternate 1 (Existing Road)

Alternate 2

Take off Chainage on NH 13


End Chainage on NH 13
Route Alignment
Length of Realignment
Length of existing alignment Bypassed
Terrain
Speed

Geometrics

Km 24.200
Km 25.200
RHS
Plain
100 km/hr
Smooth horizontal and vertical geometrics is
not possible

Km 24.200
Km 25.200
RHS
1.060 Km
1.050 Km
Plain
100 km/hr
Smooth horizontal and vertical
geometrics is possible

Agricultural, & Built up Area

Agricultural, Forest & Barren land

Service road Required


60m land is required

VUP proposed
60m land is required
6.36 Ha including 2.665 Ha. of forest
land
Low
Agriculture, 2.665 Ha of of forest
and barren
LA at Built up location is less
Technically safe design
The land acquisition is optimum

11
12

Existing Land use pattern through


proposed alignment
Accessibility
Land Acquisition

13

Area Required

14

Resettlement & Rehabilitation

High

15

Environmental attributes

Agriculture & settlement area

16

Merits

17

Demerits

18

Recommendation

10

6.30

Doesnt involves forest land


Proposed length is less than existing
length
Existing road geometric is poor
Ribbon development in parallel to road
leading to social impacts
Not Recommended

Diversion of RF land
recommended

Figure 7-3: Proposed Nandani Realignment Alternatives

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


7-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Figure 7-4: Proposed Nandani Realignment

7.4

WIDENING / SERVICE ROAD OPTIONS

Widening options:
Three widening options were deliberated. These are concentric, LHS eccentric and RHS eccentric. In order
to improve the geometric conditions, reduce the impact of LA within the settlements and reduce the social
impacts of the project due to resettlement, bypass & realignments have been proposed for 6.815 Km,
concentric widening has been proposed for 8.484 Km and eccentric widening is proposed for 67.043 Km.
Service Road:
Service road has been provided as per IRC SP 84: Four Lane Manual, service roads are to be provided in
settlement areas which are more than 200m in length. The service road provided should be 7m wide on both
the sides. The service roads correspond to TCS 2, 2A, 2B. Service roads thus have been provided at 5
locations for a length of 8.880 Km. Since the manual is specific, no other options of service roads as related
to width and sides were deliberated. The service roads thus shall:

Accommodate urban & local traffic &

Provide access to commercial establishments, residences, offices and sensitive receptors like schools,
hospitals and cultural properties

7.5

UNDERPASS / OVER PASS OPTION

In order to allow crossing of the project road at sensitive, cultural, community receptors and at important
places, underpasses has been proposed. The underpasses proposed are cattle, pedestrian and cattle cum
pedestrian underpasses. The option for over passes were also deliberated but was not provided as the
underpasses shall be able to cater to the demand. A total of 15 underpasses have been proposed in the
project. The underpasses have been designed as per IRC guidelines.
7.6

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

The various avoidance measures for minimising the extent of environmental impacts and avoiding of
sensitive environmental features have been worked out. The Table 7-5 provides the measures that have
been adopted for offsetting the impacts. A description of the measures has been presented in the following
sections.
Table 7-5: Minimisation of Environmental Impacts
Criteria
Maintenance of Design Speed
for through traffic
Segregation of through traffic
from local traffic
Improvement of Road Safety

Means
Improved geometrics
Accommodating service roads
Intersection Improvements; Geometric improvements at curves; Grade separation; underpasses

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


7-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Criteria
Adequate drainage
Reduction of Air and Noise
Pollution
Displacement of Local
Population
Minimisation of Direct impact on
adjoining settlements
Minimisation of Direct Impact on
Sensitive Receptors, cultural
and religious properties
Minimisation of Property
acquisition
Displacement of Commercial
Properties
Minimisation of Loss of Utility
Lines
Stabilisation of Slope

7.6.1

Means
Provision of drains
Intersection improvements; site specific attenuation measures; aggressive tree plantations
Provision of Bypasses and realignments to reduce displacement; Provision of up gradation of skills
of PAPs, financial assistance
Provision of Bypasses and realignments
Public consultations, Realignment Service roads and underpasses provided at site specific
locations; Good EMP measures
Realignments; Concentric widening
Concentric widening
Centre line alterations
Turfing / Pitching

Improvement of air and noise quality

By improving intersections;

By removing traffic bottlenecks;

By maintaining a steady stream flow of traffic and by segregating slow and fast modes (also by
segregation of through traffic by providing service roads)

7.6.2

Avoidance of Impact of Sensitive, Cultural and Community Properties

By lateral shifting of the alignment, realignments and bypasses many cultural properties have been
saved;

By providing service roads at most of these locations especially where educational institutes are
present

By providing underpasses and zebra crossing for smooth travel of local populace

Providing noise attenuation measures mainly along schools and hospitals

Avoiding direct impact on sensitive receptors

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


7-7
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

8.
8.1

MITIGATION, AVOIDANCE AND ENHANCEMENT MEASURES


INTRODUCTION

The negative impacts of road projects can be reduced or minimised only if proper safeguards are put in
place during the design and construction stage itself. These can include reducing pollutant discharge from
the harmful activities at source or protecting the sensitive receptor. An effective mitigation strategy will utilise
a combination of both options to arrive at practically implementable measures. Conscious efforts have been
worked out to minimise any adverse impacts on the various environmental and social components. Where
the impacts on various environmental components have been unavoidable, mitigation designs have been
worked out.
8.2

MITIGATION MEASURES PROPOSED

The mitigation / avoidance / enhancement measures for the various environmental components for the
different project packages are described below. These measures have been fully and adequately
incorporated in the Environmental Management Plan prepared. The measures are described in the same
order as detailed out in the Chapter on Assessment of Impacts.
8.2.1

Meteorological Parameters

Avoidance measures, such as the minimising of the number of trees to be cut etc, have been worked out as
part of the design finalisation. However, there will be a significant tree felling due to the project. Though no
major change in the macro-climatic setting (precipitation, temperature and wind) is envisaged due to the
project, the microclimate is likely to be temporarily modified by vegetation removal, loss of roadside
plantations and the addition of increased pavement surface. Compensatory afforestation, planting along the
median and landscaping proposed shall help in restoring the green cover along the corridor along with the
microclimate conditions that exist before the removal of trees, within 2-3 years.
8.2.2

Land

Land Acquisition, soil erosion and contamination of soil have emerged as major sources of land impact
especially in urban areas and nearby watercourses. Due to the proposed road improvements aimed at
enhancing the efficiency of road transport system, which will result in economic growth in the region over
time.
Table 8-1: Summary of Mitigation on Impact on Land
Sl.
No

Particular

Impact

1.

Change in
Geology

Direct, long term,


negative Impact

2.

Change in
Seismology

No Negative Impact

Project in most Stable zone

3.

Loss of land

Direct, long-term
negative impact

Land Acquisition, Change in


land use pattern

4.

Generation of
Debris

Negative Impact

May contaminate air, water and


land, if not disposed properly

5.
Soil Erosion
6.

7.

Contamination of
Soil

Moderate, direct,
long-term negative
impact

Direct, long term


negative impact

Reason
Extraction of materials (borrow
earth, coarse and fine
aggregates)

Road slopes and spoils


Construction of new bridges
and culverts
Quarry and Borrow areas
Scarified bitumen wastes
Oil and diesel spills
Emulsion sprayer and laying of
hot mix
Production of hot mix and
rejected materials
Residential facilities for the
labour and officers
Routine and periodical

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Mitigation / Enhancement
No blasting is envisaged.
Quarry Development Plan need to be
enforced.
Cross drainage structures are checked and
complied with the seismological settings of the
region (Zone)
Land acquisition minimised. LA only at
locations which require geometric correction
Design restricted to within 60m of ROW
Disposed properly to avoid contamination.

Embankment protection through:


Stone pitching
Turfing
Residual spoil need to be disposed properly
Silt Fencing need to be provided
Quarries need to be reclaimed

Hazardous Wastes (Management and


Handling) Rules, 1989 to be enforced.
Oil Interceptor will be provided for accidental
spill of oil and diesel
Rejected material will be laid as directed by
engineer.
Septic tank will be constructed for waste
disposal.
Draft EIA Report
January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No

Particular

Impact

Reason

Mitigation / Enhancement

maintenance
Soil quality
monitoring

Effectiveness / shortfall (if any)


Any unforeseen impact

Measures will be revised & improved to


mitigate / enhance environment due to any
unforeseen impact.

Change in Seismology
No negative impact on the seismological setting of the region is anticipated. Rather, as part of the project all
the existing structures will be checked and constructed as per the seismological requirements of the region
in conformity to the IS 1893(Part 1):2002.
Erosion
Incorporating appropriate type of treatments of slopes has reduced the potential for erosion of high
embankments and bridge fills. The soil is assumed to have an angle of repose corresponding to 1V: 2H.
Slope protection is normally required only for slopes steeper than this. The side slopes gentler than this will
be turfed with shrubs and grasses as per IRC: 56-1974: Recommended Practices for Treatment of
Embankment Slopes for Erosion Control.
Contamination of Soil
Contamination of soil can spoil the soil and can also contaminate the surface as well as ground water
sources. Details of the activities from which the contamination can occur are presented below:
Table 8-2: Mitigation Measures for Soil Contamination
Potential impact
Scarified Bituminous
Wastes
Scarified Non Bituminous
Material
Cut material
Construction debris
generated from
dismantling of structures

Soil Contamination due to


accident spills

Soil contamination due to


Highway run off

Operation of residential
facilities for labour camps,
Vehicle parking areas

Mitigation
No scarification involved.
In case concessionaire decides to scarify then the material to be reused in the GSB layer.
Non reusable Bituminous wastes to be dumped in 30cm thick clay lined pits with the top 30cm layer
covered with good earth for supporting vegetation growth over a period only after obtaining permission
of Independent Engineer.
Used in the normal GSB layer (not the drainage layer)
Reused as embankment, median & shoulder fill materials
Excess material to be used for filling up of borrow areas identified by the concessionaire and approved
by the Independent Engineer
Annexure 8.1 : Guidelines for Identification of Debris Disposal Sites & Precautions needed
Annexure 8.2: Guideline for Rehabilitation of Dumpsites, Quarries and Borrow Areas will be applicable
An emergency response team to be created. The team shall contain members of the district and police
administration and also have specialist in remediation. Responsibility of Concessionaire to inform the
team to take actions. The roles and responsibility of the members of the ram shall be framed in
conjunction with all the parties to address the situation arising out of the accidental spills resulting in
situation like water and soil contamination, health hazards in the vicinity of the accident spot, fire and
explosions etc.
Improvements of design shall lead to less accidents and hence less spillage of oil and grease
Fuel storage will be in proper bunded areas.
All spills and collected petroleum products to be disposed off in accordance with MoEF and SPCB
guidelines and as per the directions of the Emergency Response team.
Fuel storage and fuelling areas will be located at least 300m from all cross drainage structures and
significant water bodies.
Vehicle parking area will be made impervious using 75 mm thick P.C.C. bed over 150 mm thick rammed
brick bats. The ground will be uniformly sloped towards to adjacent edges towards the road. A drain will
take all the spilled material to the oil interceptor (Fig 8-2)

Productive Top Soil


Efforts have been made to minimise the intake of productive lands. As the existing ROW is not sufficient at
various locations to accommodate the proposed four-lane cross sections and the need for the provision of
several bypasses along the corridor, the project calls in for a land acquisition of 128.1196 ha of agricultural,
barren, govt. and private land. To conserve the productive top soil the following measures have been
proposed:

The topsoil from all areas of cutting and all areas to be permanently covered shall be stripped to a
specified depth of 150mm and stored in stockpiles. At least 10% the temporarily acquired area shall be
earmarked for storing top soil.

The stockpile shall be designed such that the slope does not exceed 1:2 (vertical to horizontal), and the

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

height of the pile be restricted to 2m. To retain soil and to allow percolation of water, silt fencing shall
protect the edges of the pile.

The stockpiles shall be covered with gunny bags or tarpaulin.

Such stockpiled topsoil will be returned to cover the disturbed area and cut slopes. Residual topsoil will
be distributed on a areas as identified by concessionaire and approved by the Independent Engineer in
a layer of thickness of 75mm - 150mm. Top soil shall also be utilised for redevelopment of borrow
areas, landscaping along slopes, medians, incidental spaces etc,

During construction, some land will be temporarily needed to create detours, store equipment and material,
site construction workers' camp and other amenities. The top 150 mm of soil from these areas will be
stripped off and stored in heaps of less than 2 m height. The slope of the pile will be maintained to lesser
than 1:4 to reduce removal of sediment with runoff and to enhance percolation through stored soil. The
stored soil will be used for:

Covering all disturbed areas including for the rehabilitation of borrow areas

Top dressing of the road embankments and fill slopes

Distribution over barren / unproductive areas, for a depth of 75-100mm, to make these lands
productive.

Quarries
Existing quarries that are already in operation with the required environmental clearances have been
recommended for this project, and no new quarries have been proposed. The existing quarries are suitable
for the requirement of coarse and fine aggregate required for the road works.
In case the concessionaire decides in opening up of new quarries for the project, he shall follow the
instructions / procedures as laid out in Annexure 8.3: Guidelines for New Quarry Management. For all
existing quarries from where the concessionaire may source his supply of aggregates, Annexure 8.4:
Guidelines for Existing Quarry Management shall be followed.
Similarly natural sand quarries have also been identified for the project road. It has been found that the bed
of the rivers flowing in the vicinity of the project road contains good quality coarse sand in sufficient
quantities Table 8-3 & 4 shows details of quarry areas identified and recommended for the project. It needs
however, to be noted that recommendation on use of quarries is a guideline only and has been done to only
establish the feasibility of construction. Annexure 8.5 provides the Quarry chart.
Table 8-3: Details of Stone Aggregates Quarries
Sl. No
1
2
3
4
5

Chainage
60.700
97.850
97.850
97.850
97.850

Side
RHS
LHS
LHS
LHS
LHS

Details
Quarry (Hill)
Crusher, Sanglikar Stone Crusher, Gunnapur Road
Crusher, Gunnapur Road
Crusher, Sree Shidheswar Crusher, Gunnapur Road
Quarry

Distance to Quarry Km)


3.2
1
1.8
2
3

Approx Quantity
600,000.00
1,800,000.00

Source: Primary Survey


Table 8-4: Details of Natural Sand Quarries
Sl. No
1
2
3

Chainage
31.500
37.050
55 km on NH-208 from the end of the project

Side
LHS
LHS
RHS

Location
Bheema River
Bheema River
Krishna River

Distance to Quarry
5 km
6 km
55 km

Source: Primary Survey


Soil Quality Monitoring Mitigation
The quality of the soil shall be monitored to find out the effectiveness of the mitigation measures and further
improvement in designs if required. The monitoring plan shall be functional in construction as well as in
operation stages. The frequency, duration and responsibility will be as per the Annexure 10-1:
Environmental Monitoring Plan.
8.2.3

Air Quality Mitigation


Table 8-5: Summary of Mitigations for Impacts on Air Quality

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No.

Item

Impact

Reason

1.

Meteorological
factors and climate

Marginal
impact

Due to production and laying of hot


bituminous mix

2.

Dust generation

Temporary and
location
specific

Shifting of utilities, removal of trees &


vegetation, transportation of material

3.

Gaseous
pollutants

Moderate
impact

Clearing and grubbing materials dumping


brushing of the surface access roads to
borrow area hot mix plants, Crushers paving
of asphalt layers, Labour Camps

Air quality
emissions
Air quality
monitoring

Moderate
impact

Air pollutants from traffic

4.
5.

Effectiveness shortfall of any unforeseen


impact

Mitigation / Enhancement
Comprehensive afforestation
Avenue plantation
Shrub plantation in the median /
island
Sprinkling of Water
Fine materials to be completely
covered,
during
transport
and
stocking.
Plant to be installed in down wind
direction from nearby settlement.
Air pollution Norms will be enforced.
Labourers will be provided mask.
Local people will be educated on
safety and precaution on access
roads,
newly
constructed
embankment etc.
Compliance with future statuary
regulatory requirements
Measures will be revised &
improved to mitigate enhance

Design / Pre construction Stage


At critical sections especially along the congested stretches of the existing highway, removal of bottlenecks
and relieving congestion in built-up stretches were incorporated through improved design and improving
road geometry and widening of road to smoothen traffic flow.
Construction Stage
Reduction in congestion due to better highway design being one of the objectives, an improvement in
ambient air quality is expected to be one of the outcomes of the proposed improvements. However, these
may be offset by the projected increase in traffic. Since the project cannot directly influence the adverse
impacts of the operation stage, the efforts are concentrated in reducing air pollution during the construction
phase. Several provisions can be incorporated within the contract, through the EMP, to ensure that the
deterioration in air quality is limited to the maximum extent possible. During the construction stage, there are
two major sources of Air pollution:

Construction activities at working zones, which cause primarily dust emission and

Operation of the construction plant, equipments and machinery, which causes gaseous pollutants.

The specific measures include:

Dust Control

All precautions to reduce the level of dust emissions from the hot mix plants, crushers and batching plants
and other transportation of materials will be taken up including:

Vehicles delivering loose and fine materials like sand and fine aggregates shall be covered to reduce
spills on existing roads

Water will be sprayed on earthworks, temporary haulage and detour roads on a regular basis. During
and after compaction of the sub-grade, water will be sprayed at regular intervals to prevent dust
generation.

The hot mix plant will be fitted with dust extraction units.

It shall be ensured that the dust emissions from the crusher and vibrating screen at the stone quarries
do not exceed the emission standards set by Central Pollution Control Board by covering hoods and
incorporation of cyclones.

Emission Control

To ensure the control of exhaust emissions from the various construction activities, the contractor and the
concessionaire shall take up the following mitigation measures:

The asphalt plants and the batching plants will be sited at least 1 km in the downwind direction from the
nearest human settlement.

An adequate cyclone / scrubber to control emissions from the stack of hot mix plants will need to be

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

provided in the event of the emissions exceeding the SPCB norms. Other potential measures include
plantation around periphery of the hot-mix plants.

To ensure the efficacy of the mitigation measures suggested, air quality monitoring shall be carried out
at least once a month during the period the plant is in operation.

All vehicles, equipment and machinery used for construction will be regularly maintained to ensure that
the pollution emission levels conform to the SPCB norms. A vehicle maintenance schedule prepared by
the contractor and the concessionaire and approved by the Engineer shall be adhered to.

Operation Stage
During the operation stage, the mitigation that the project can carry out is related more to facilities for
checking levels of pollution. Additional measures proposed are as below:

Broad-leaved pollution resistant species, which can grow in high pollutant concentrations or even
absorb pollutants, shall be planted as they help settle particulates with their higher surface areas along
with thick foliage, which can reduce the distance for which particulates are carried from the road itself.
Cassia fistula (Amaltas), Ficus religiosa (Peepal), Ficus bengalensis (Banyan), Tamarindus indica (Imli)
and Azadirachta indica (Neem) are recommended.

Other measures such as the reduction of vehicular emissions, ensuring vehicular maintenance and
upkeep, educating drivers about driving behaviour I methods that will reduce emissions are beyond the
scope of the project but will be far more effective in reducing the pollutant levels. The concessionaire
together with the Motor vehicles Department and the SPCB can arrange for provision for inspection for
the Pollution under Control (PUC) certificates at all the three toll plazas proposed.

Air Quality Monitoring

Apart from provision of the mitigation measures, ambient air quality shall be monitored. The monitoring plan
shall be functional in construction as well as in operation stages. The frequency, duration and responsibility
will be as per the Environmental Monitoring Plan. The air quality shall be monitored at all the locations as
given in Table 4.4 beside the plant sites. The maximum desirable limits as per the national ambient air
quality standards are given in Annexure 10-1 and the monitored values should correspond with the table. All
deviated results shall be reported to engineer, for remedial measures.
8.2.4

Water Mitigation

The table below presents the adverse impacts on the water resources due to the project and the mitigation
measures that are proposed.
Table 8-6: Summary of Mitigations for Impacts on Water
Sl.
No.

Item

Impact

Impact (Reason)

1.

Loss of water
bodies

Major, direct
impact

Part or complete acquisition of


source of water

2.

Alteration of Cross
Drainage

Very Low
Impact

Major bridge constructions


Widening of minor bridges and
culverts.

3.

Runoff and
drainage

Direct
Impact

Siltation of water bodies


Reduction in ground recharge
Increased drainage discharge

4.

Water requirement
for project

Direct
impact

Water requirement for construction


activity.
Water requirement for labour

5.

Increased
sedimentation

Direct
impact

Increased sediment laden run-off


after the nature and capacity of the
watercourse

Contamination of
Water

Direct
adverse
impact

Scarified bitumen wastes


Oil and diesel spills
Emulsion sprayer and laying of hot
mix
Production facilities for the labour

6.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Mitigation / Enhancement
Land acquisition to be minimized with provision
of Retaining walls.
Relocation of ground / surface water sources.
Widening & construction of bridges, there will
be an improvement in the drainage
characteristics of the project area.
Silt fencing to be provided.
Recharge well to be provided to compensate
the loss of pervious surface.
Continuous drain is provided, unlined in rural
area and lined in urban area.
Contractor needs to obtain approvals for taking
adequate quantities of water from surface and
ground water sources.
This is required to avoid depletion of water
sources.
Water harvesting structures to be provided.
Silt fencing to be provided
Instructions given in Annexure 8.6 Guidelines
for Sediment Control to be enforced.
Hazardous wastes (Management and Handling)
Rules, 1989 to be enforced.
Oil Interceptor will be provided for accidental
spill of oil and diesel.
Rejected material will be laid as directed by IC.
Draft EIA Report
January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No.

7.

Item

Impact

Impact (Reason)

Mitigation / Enhancement

and officers.
Routine and periodical maintenance

Septic tank will be construction for waste


disposal.
Measures will be revised and improved to
mitigate / enhance environment due to any
unforeseen impact.

Effectiveness / shortfall (if any)


Any unforeseen impact

Water quality
monitoring

Loss of Water Resources


Loss of water resources includes removal of private and community water resources like hand pumps, water
taps, OHTs, ponds, well etc. The losses have been covered under the utility relocation process.
Compensatory water supply sources will be set up before the start of construction with location of the new
point as close to the original as possible.
Drainage and Hydrological flow
Various streams and irrigation canals at different locations have intersected the project corridor. To facilitate
the cross-drainage at these water crossings, 140 cross-drainage structures including minor bridges, slab,
box and pipe culverts are proposed. The existing minor bridge has been retained with widening on LHS. The
proposed span arrangement and other particulars of the structures are provided in the Design Report of the
Draft DPR.
Mitigation measures will include
desired by the host community,
formation is being raised, and
measures form a part of the
themselves.

contractual obligations for relocation of sources of water supply at locations


provision of balancing culverts of adequate capacity where the level of the
provision for adequately sized drains to prevent flooding etc. All these
good engineering practice and should be part of the design drawings

To ensure efficient flow of surface water and to prevent water logging along the side of the roads,
adequate size and number of cross-drainage structures have been provided.

Detailed drainage surveys and hydrological investigations have been carried out and suitable design of
bridges and culverts proposed.

Provision of lined drains at settlement areas and unlined drains at other areas

In addition to the above design requirements, the contractor and the concessionaire shall ensure that during
construction work the following are taken care of:

Construction work near Rivers and other channels and rivers have to be carried out in such a way that
flow of water is not blocked and even if it has to be blocked then the contractor and the concessionaire
must ensure that the local communities are informed about the same in advance. Work near the water
bodies should be carried out in dry season to avoid shortage of water,

Flooding of local drainage channels,

Measures to ensure that remnants from earthwork, stonework and other waste material do not hinder
the cross-drainage of rivers, nallahs,

In sections of the road near to watercourses or cross-drainage channels, the construction material
waste would be disposed off in a manner not to block the flow of water.

To maintain efficient storm water flow, the roadside drains will be cleaned regularly, especially before
the monsoon season.

Protection from Run off


Road run-off is let off into natural drains of adequate capacity from ditches at the end of formation to prevent
destabilisation of the embankment. Release of road run-off directly from the ditches can erode edges of the
water body into which the run-off is let off. Scouring of banks of flowing water bodies due to high velocity
run-off is also a potential danger. To ensure that run-off does not damage the water body it enters,
cascading for scour protection through stepped gabion is recommended.
Protecting Water Quality
To prevent any degradation of water quality of the various surface and ground water resources due to the
proposed project, the contractor and the concessionaire shall work out the following mitigative measures
during the construction period:

Provision of necessary mitigation measures at the various locations proposed in the design to prevent

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

contamination and degradation of water quality.

Construction work close to the streams or water bodies must be avoided during monsoon.

The discharge standards promulgated under the Environmental Protection Act, 1986 will be strictly
adhered to.

Impact on the river / nallah system can be minimised if the bridge construction is taken up during the
lean flow season and construction work close to the water bodies avoided during monsoon.

The fuel storage and vehicle cleaning area shall be stationed at least 500m away from the nearest
drain / water body

The slope of the embankments leading to water bodies shall be modified and re-channelled to prevent
entry of contaminants into the water body.

Provision of silt fencing and oil interceptors the details of which are given below

Silt Fencing

Silt fencing will be provided to prevent sediments from the construction site entering into the nearby
watercourses. The silt fencing consists of geo textile with extremely small size supported by a wire mesh
mounted on a panel made up of angle / wooden frame and post. It is expected a single person will be able to
drive the angles by pressing from the top. The frame will be installed at the edge of the water body along
which construction is in progress. The number of such units to be installed can be decided depending upon
the length of the water body along the side of the road construction.
Silt fencing is proposed for a length of 1000m. This is based on the primary survey data and detailed
discussions with structure engineers wherein it was found that the length shall be sufficient to cover all
bridge locations and the road side water bodies. Depending on the length of the individual water body, the
number of units of silt fencing to be installed is decided by the Independent Engineer.

Figure 8-1: Silt Fencing

Figure 8-2: Oil interceptor

Oil interceptor

Oil and grease from road run-off is another major concern during construction as well as operation. During
construction, discharge of oil and grease is most likely from workshops, oil and waste oil storage locations,
vehicle parking areas of the contractor and the concessionaires' camps. A total of 10 oil interceptors shall be
provided at all such locations to arrest oil and grease, as per figure 8-3. The arrested products shall be
disposed as per MoEF and SPCB guidelines. The location of all fuel storage and vehicle cleaning area will
be at least 300 m from the nearest drain / water body.
Disruption to Other Users of Water during Construction

The contractor and the concessionaire will arrange for water required for construction in such a way
that the water availability and supply to nearby communities remain unaffected.

If new tube-wells are to be bored, due to the non availability of water required for construction, prior
sanctions and approvals by the Ground Water Department has to be obtained by the concessionaire.

Wastage of water during the construction should be minimised.

Construction over and close to any non-perennial streams shall be carried out in the dry season.
Construction over irrigation canals should be carried out so as to minimise any disruption to the flows
and to ensure that a high quality of water is maintained.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-7
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Water Quality Monitoring


Apart from provision of the mitigation measures, water quality shall be monitored to understand the
effectiveness and further improvement in designs in reducing the concentration of pollutants. The monitoring
plan shall be functional in construction as well as in operation stages. The frequency, duration and
responsibility will be as per the Environmental Monitoring Plan. The water quality shall be monitored at all
the locations as given in Table 4.6 besides at other locations identified by the engineer. The maximum
desirable limits as per the water quality standards are given in Annexure 10-1 and the monitored values
should correspond with the table. All deviated results shall be reported to engineer, for remedial measures. It
should be ensured that no construction camps or stockyards are set up near rivers irrigation canals and
water bodies to prevent oil spills.
Water Consumption and Harvesting
Rainwater harvesting structures all along the proposed alignment as per as per MoEF guidelines and are a
cost effective method for recharging of ground water level in the project area. The rainwater-harvesting
3
chamber shall be placed at every 1000m interval c/c with dimensions of 2 x 2 x 0.75m all throughout the
project corridor except at urban areas. A perforated RCC Slab covers the chamber. There is a 20cm filling,
which also acts as sediment trap. There is another r sediment trap in the bottom from where debris can be
removed manually after certain period. A vertical drain (PVC pipe) is then sunk from the bottom of the
chamber to a depth which varies as per the water table. Drains interconnect these chambers.

Figure 8-3: Rain Water Harvesting Structure


The contractor and the concessionaire, along with the Engineer shall identify locations along the project
route where water can be stored for the summer at least in 10 locations. Since the project area is in a water
scarcity area, this shall act as good environmental practice. The measure will also reduce the cost of
transportation of water. These locations should be permanent which shall be handed over to the local
residents at the end of the project so that the water shortages can be reduced to a certain extent. Lump sum
provision has been provided in the EMP.
8.2.5

Noise - Mitigation

The contribution of project design towards mitigation of increased noise levels would be the improved riding
surface and geometry, which will reduce vehicular noise generation, at least during the initial years after
construction. The mitigation measures for noise are essentially aimed at protecting the receptor.
Noise and vibration during construction is a significant impact especially around settlements and inhabited
areas. During the construction stage, the most vulnerable population is the construction crew which is
subjected to very high noise levels, albeit intermittently. Provision of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
for the crew will be made a part of conditions of contract. Specifying construction timings will prevent
disturbance to the local populations. The following mitigation measures as given in table below need to be
worked out by the contractor and the concessionaire for the noise impacts associated with the various
construction activities.
Table 8-7: Sources of Noise Pollution, Impacts and Generic Mitigation Measures
Source of Noise Pollution
Mobilisation of heavy construction
machinery;
Acceleration / deceleration /gear
changes by the vehicles depending

Impacts
Increased
Noise
Levels
causing
discomfort

Generic Mitigation Measures


All construction equipment, plants, machinery and vehicles will follow
prescribed noise standards. All construction equipment used for an 8 hour shift
shall conform to a standard of less than 90 dB (A). If required, machinery
producing high noise as concrete mixers, generators etc, must be provided

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-8
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Source of Noise Pollution
on the level of congestion and
smoothness of road surface;
Excavation for foundations and
grading of the site;
Construction of structures and
facilities;
Crushing plants, asphalt production
plants; and
Loading,
transportation
and
unloading of construction materials.

Impacts
to local
residents
and
workers

Generic Mitigation Measures


with noise shields;
At construction sites within 500 m of human settlements, noisy construction
shall be stopped between 9.00 PM and 6.00 AM;
Vehicles and construction machinery shall be monitored regularly with
particular attention to silencers and mufflers to maintain noise levels to
minimum;
Workers in the vicinity of high noise levels must wear ear plugs, helmets
and should be engaged in diversified activities to prevent prolonged exposure
to noise levels of more than 90 dB (A) per 8 hour shift;
Hot mix plant, batching or aggregate plants shall not be located within 500
m of sensitive land use and settlements;
All activities pertaining to procurement, storage, transport and handling of
explosives and subsequent blasting will be carried out as per the statutory
Indian Explosives Act 1984. Blasting shall be restricted only to daytime hours.
Prior information of blasting operational times shall be given to people living
near such blasting sites.
The project road designed is a divided raised carriageway all throughout.
This design shall help in reducing the impact of highway noise.
Planting of trees, bushes and shrubs shall also to reduce noise levels.
Provision of noise barriers. Noise barriers will be most effective if they break
the line of sight between noise source and the properties being protected, and
if these are thick enough or adsorb or reflect the noise received.

Table 8-8: Specific Noise Mitigation Measures


Sl.
No.

Item

Impact

Reason

Mitigation / Enhancement

1.

Sensitive receptors

Direct impact

Increase in noise pollution


Man, material and machinery
movements.

2a.

Noise Pollution (PreConstruction Stage)

Direct impact,
short duration

Establishment of labour camps,


onsite offices, stock yards and
construction plants

2b.

Noise Pollution
(Construction Stage)

Marginal
Impact

Stone crushing, asphalt production


plant and batching plants, diesel
generators etc.
Community residing near to the work
zones.

2c.

Noise Pollution
(Operation Stage)

Marginal
Impact

Due to increase in traffic (due to


improved facility)

3.

Noise Pollution
Monitoring

Noise barrier to be provided


Traffic calming devises to be used.
No Horn Zone sign Post.
Area specific and for short duration.
Machinery to be checked and complied
with noise pollution regulations.
Camps to be setup away from the
settlements, in the down wind direction
Camps to be setup away from the
settlements, in the down wind direction.
Noise pollution regulation to be monitored
and enforced.
Temporary as the work zones will be
changing with completion of construction.
Will be compensated with the uninterrupted
movement of heavy and light vehicles
Measures will be revised and improved to
mitigate / enhance environment due to any
unforeseen impact.

Effectiveness / shortfall (if any) Any


unforeseen impact

Figure 8-4: Compound Wall and Trees as Noise Barrier

To reduce noise and vibrations, noise barriers in the form of compound wall is proposed. In case of space
crunch, the use of concrete screens is also suggested. However the concessionaire shall identify such areas
where concrete screens shall be used. The noise barrier wall shall be constructed by excavation of
foundation, laying of brick masonry wall up to a height of 2m above ground, plastering and coping as per the
direction of the engineer and as laid in the specification. Creepers and paints shall be used in consultation
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
8-9
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

with the affected community to give an aesthetic look. Shade and flowering trees shall be planted within the
boundary of the sensitive receptor, between the building line and the compound wall, wherever space shall
be available, 5m centre to centre. Figure 8.4 shows the combination of compound wall and trees which shall
be used as noise barrier. The measures adopted for noise attenuation for receptors (schools and hospitals
for all type of land use) identified above are as below:

Plantation within the premises if space available for plantation

Rising of existing boundary wall / construction of new wall up to 2m height

Planting creepers to provide aesthetic view

In urban areas the boundary wall can be painted with posters to provide aesthetic views. The option of
posters or creepers shall be agreed by the school / hospital administrator.

Noise Pollution Monitoring Mitigation


The effectiveness of mitigation measures and further improvement in designs to reduce the noise level due
to construction and operational activity shall be monitored. The frequency, duration and monitoring plan shall
be functional in construction as well as in operation stages as per the Environmental Monitoring Plan. Noise
shall be monitored at all locations identified in Table 4-9 beside the plant sites & other locations identified by
the engineer. The country standards are given in National Ambient Noise Standards in Annexure 10-1. Any
value / result not within acceptable limits shall be reported to engineer, for remedial measures.
8.2.6

Biological Environment

Flora
The major adverse impacts on flora shall involve the removal of trees, shrub and ground cover from within
the Corridor of Impact. As part of the project preparation, to minimise the loss of trees, clearance of only
those trees identified from the design will be removed.
Table 8-9: Summary of Mitigations for Impacts on Biological Environment
Sl.
No.

Item

1.

Forest area

2.

Wild Life

Impact
Direct
Impact
No
Impact

Reason

Mitigation / Enhancement

Diversion of forest area

Diversion of forest land as per Forest Act


Plantation of trees as per Forest Department

No wild life habitat

Nil

3.

Trees Cutting

Direct
Impact

Increase in soil erosion, silting of water


bodies.
Dust and noise pollution
Loss of shade and loss of tree products

4.

Vegetation

Direct
Impact

Increase in soil erosion, silting of water


bodies, noise pollution, dust pollution

5.

Cattle
Grazing

No
impact

No cattle grazing found

Compulsory tree plantation in the ratio of 1:2.


Option of compensatory afforestation through
Forest Department.
Avenue plantation along corridor, where ever
possible.
Identification of incidental spaces (ox bow areas)
for group plantation.
Transplantation of trees also explored.
Clearing and grubbing will be minimised, and
sprinkled with water to reduce dust pollution.
Exposed surface like embankment slopes will be
protected with stone pitching and turfing.
Open land in and around plant will be vegetated.
Nil

Reserve Forest Areas - Mitigation

Minimum forest land has been proposed for diversion. The area required is for realignment only. The
acquisition of forest land has been are being taken up in accordance to the Gol requirements. The breakup
of the forest land required is given below:
Table 8-10: Forest Area Required
Sl.
No.
1

Proposed
Chainage (Km)
From
To
33.275

33.810

Length
(Km)

Side

Village

Forest
Details

Compartment

Survey
No.

Gat
No.

Division

Remark

1.535

Both

Nandani

RF

138

104

Solapur

Nandani
Realignment

For stretches of the corridor through the forest areas, the contractor and the concessionaire shall ensure
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
8-10
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

that the construction activities shall be limited to the proposed ROW, so as to avoid any impacts on the
vegetation within the forest areas. The measures for avoiding / mitigating adverse impacts on the reserve
forest stretches are given below:

No construction camp shall be allowed within the designate limits of the forest areas and within 1km
from their boundaries.

No earthworks or surfacing permitted along stretches of road within these areas after sundown. No
workmen allowed shall be allowed to stay within the areas after sundown except with adequate
supervision.

As far as possible, concreting along the stretch of road within the areas to be planned such that work
after sundown is avoided or kept to the absolute minimum. Wherever this is unavoidable, the
Engineers Environmental staff shall remain present at site.

No disposal of debris shall be allowed within these areas except at locations identified during project
preparation.

Compensatory Afforestation

Compensatory afforestation for trees affected in forest areas will be taken up as per the Forest
(Conservation) Act, 1980.

The directions of the Forest Department on the issue of compensatory afforestation shall be binding.

Efforts though shall be to convince the department to plant trees in the affected project area to
compensate the ecological loss due to felling of the trees.

A total of 15368 trees are to be planted to compensate the loss of 7684 trees in non forest areas at a
ratio of 1:2. The raising and maintenance cost for three years of the rest shall be given to the forest
department who shall raise the trees. The cost for the same has been included in the EMP budget.
Transplantation

In order to minimise the negative impact of tree felling, it is proposed to transplant a minimum of 1/3 of
trees proposed for felling.

Thus a minimum of 2562 trees are proposed for transplantation and the cost has been budgeted.

However, a budget for 15368 trees (twice the number of 7684 trees) have been considered for
compensatory afforestation purpose

The concessionaire to identify trees that can be transplanted and adopt methodology for
transplantation. The methodology shall be approved by the IE and NHAI

rd

Avenue and Block Plantation

Avenue plantation along corridor, where ever possible given to compensate the loss of trees due to
felling.

The plantation scheme shall involve a plantation contractor who shall supply and maintain the
plantation as per details given in Annexure 8.7: Tree Plantation Strategy.

Native indigenous trees species shall be used as far as practicable, strictly avoiding any exotic (but
popular) species like Eucalyptus sp. that can have far-reaching adverse effects on the ecology and
water regime of the area.

Endeavour to initiate plantations before the construction is complete so that the trees are at least a year
or two old when the project is completed.

The concessionaire shall work out the number of trees to be planted around junctions and for
enhancement purposes.

Cost for a total of 27420 flowering, shade, medicinal, ornamental & fruit bearing trees in suitable area
including plantation and maintenance for the entire duration of the contract period has been budgeted.
This number of trees are excluding the trees to be planted for compensatory plantation

Pure avenue plantation with single species like Terminalia arjuna (arjuna), Magnifera indica (mango),
Azadirachta indica (neem) only to be planted for a few kilometres (or, the stretch between two market
places for example) to provide harmonious and pleasing look, and a regular and wavelike skyline. This
row of trees forms the first and innermost line.

Selection of tree species in outer rows (where multiple rows can be accommodated) has been
considered from economic point of view. Therefore, trees that provide fuel and fruit as well as small

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-11
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

timber for agricultural implements have been suggested.

Cost for a total of 82342 ornamental, medicinal & flowering plants and shrubs in the median including
planting and maintenance of in for the entire duration of the contract period has been budgeted
Table 8-11: Species Recommended in Settlement Areas (Within 1 km of Last Dwelling)

Scientific name
Anthocephalus cadamba
Artocarpus heterophyllus
Azadirachta indica
Bauhinia varigata, Bauhinia purpurea,
Bauhinia racemosa
Cassia fistula

Common Name
Kadamba
Jackfruit
Neem

Reason
Landscaping, flowering, pollution sink
Economical, pollution sink
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Economic & Medicinal Value

Kachnar

Landscaping, Flowering plant, Pollution sink

Indian laburnum

Ficus bengalensis

Banyan

Ficus religiosa

Peepal

Magnifera indica
Tamarindus indica

Mango
Tamarind

Landscaping, Flowering plant, Pollution sink


Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Shade, Supports other
species, Religious values
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Shade, Supports other
species, Religious values
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Economic Value, Shade
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Economic & Medicinal Value

Table 8-12: Species Recommended in Rural & Semi Urban Areas


Scientific Name
Anthocephalus cadamba
Azadirachta indica
Bauhinia purpurea, B.
racemosa, B. Variegata
Cassia fistula
Ficus bengalensis
Ficus religiosa
Ficus semicordata
Magnifera indica

Common Name
Kadamba
Neem tree

Reason
Landscaping, flowering, pollution sink
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Economic & Medicinal Value

Kachnar

Landscaping, Flowering plant, Pollution sink

Indian laburnum
Banyan
Peepal
Gargasa
Mango

Landscaping, Flowering plant, Pollution sink


Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Shade, Supports other species, Religious values
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Shade, Supports other species, Religious values
Noise barrier, Pollution sink
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Economic Value (fruit bearing)
Landscaping, wind break and shade, control soil erosion, Pollution sink,
Economic Value (oil, lubricant, cosmetics, flowers as compost, medicinal,
firewood)
Pollution sink, Economic Value (fruit bearing)
Noise barrier, Pollution sink, Economic & Medicinal Value

Derris indica / Pongomia


pinata

Pongam Oiltree

Syzygium cumini
Tamarindus indica

Jaman
Tamarind

Table 8-13: Species Recommended for Median Plantation


Scientific name
Bauhinia acuminata
Bouganvillea sp.
Hibiscus rosa sinesis
Lawsonig inermis
Nerium indicum
Thevetia nerifolia

Common Name
Kachnar
Bouganvillea
Chinese Hibiscus
Henna
Pink oleander
Pila Kaneer, Yellow oleander

Reason
Landscaping, Flowering plant
Landscaping, Flowering plant
Landscaping, Flowering plant
Landscaping, Flowering plant
Landscaping, Flowering plant
Landscaping, Flowering plant

Protection of Species

Activities during the construction period are likely to have adverse impact on the plant species located along
the carriageway. A total of 22279 tree guards are proposed to protect the young trees in the median.
Landscaping Strategy

The locations for landscaping shall be identified by the concessionaire.

The Figures 8.5 & 8.6 shows thematic landscape sketches.

Plantation along medians shall screen headlights glare from approaching vehicles and prevent
distraction to the driver. Species like Bauhinia purpurea, Thespesia populnea, Thevetia nerifolia etc. as
given in Table 8-13 are recommended prevent glare from the headlights.

Proper landscaping of the traffic islands and the surrounding areas shall integrate these features with
the surrounding landscape. Junctions of relatively low importance shall be planted with flowering
shrubs in the first row of planting in the curves and shade trees in the next rows. If the traffic islands are
spacious enough small shrubs or ground cover shall be planted on them.

The floral species that shall be used for landscaping along river and canals are Ficus bengalensis,
Azadirachta indica etc. The landscape treatment shall involve stepped access to the waterfront, seating

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-12
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

beneath tree groves facing the river side and stone pitching, gabion structures on road and other
embankments.

Due to the realignment of the project road within the ROW to improve the geometries, many small
incidental or irregular spaces have been formed. These micro spaces have potential to add to the
visual quality of the road landscape and have been considered form the point of enhancement.
Figure 8-5: Conceptual Landscaping Of Incidental Space

Figure 8-6: Thematic landscaping around intersections

Fauna
As the entire corridor is subject to intense human habitation, there are no significant fauna species along the
highway. The following measures need to be taken up during the construction stage by the contractor and
the concessionaire.

All works are to be carried out such that minimum damage and disruption to fauna is caused.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-13
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Construction workers shall be instructed to protect natural resources and fauna, including wild animals
and aquatic life.

Hunting and unauthorised fishing shall be prohibited.

During construction, at any point of time, if a rare / endangered / threatened fauna species is spotted,
the contractor and the concessionaire shall make all arrangements to intimate the wild life authorities
and measures will be taken as for is conservation during the operation period also.

8.2.7

Social Environment

Entire corridor will acquire a pattern of urban and rural stretches. At certain stretches the concentration,
density and level of urbanisation will be much higher due to the overlapping and amalgamation of two to
three settlements over time. All along the corridor length the urban and rural stretches have been identified.
Within the urban settlements the areas with highest, high, medium and low concentrations have been filtered
and accordingly suggested appropriate treatment to avoid further and future ribbon development.
Loss of Land
As far as possible the land acquisition has been kept to the minimum, by restricting the geometric
improvement within the existing right of way. However the land acquisition will be done at sections having
width, insufficient to accommodate the approved cross-sections & geometric Improvements.
Bus Shelters and Bus Bays
The existing design is not suited to the local climate and thus only finds use during the rainy season.
Further, utility of these facilities varies according to the traffic volume, intensity of user groups and visibility of
the moving traffic from the bus stop and comfort conditions within the bus stop. In places where bus stops
already exist, changes should be incorporated to increase the utility of these structures:

Bus shelters are proposed near to residences to minimise walking distance.

It should be positioned in straight and level sections of road and should be visible from a long distance
in both directions.

Bus bays are proposed as per the recommendations of IRC: 80-1981.

Bus bays with bus shelters are being provided at a total of 21 locations. These locations are given in
Annexure 2.1.

New bus stops would be provided with shade, benches and railings.

Interpretative signage would be displayed in Kannada / Marathi and English that could deliver
information about the bus numbers, origin & destination and routes of buses.

Rest areas
Roadside rest areas are intended for rest and relaxation intended for long distance travellers, and may
occasionally provide facilities for overnight stay also. The generic design for rest areas shall take into
account:

Parking facility shall be provided. Vehicle parking lay-by shall be provided at the frontage of these
locations.

Based on the location and availability of space landscaping shall comprise of walkways and soft
landscaped areas and outdoor seating spaces. Shade and fruit trees as well as flowering shrubs are
proposed in the rest areas.

The project proposes to provide the minimum required public conveniences such as toilets and drinking
water facilities at each of the rest areas.

Restaurant with outdoor and indoor seating spaces, Fast food joints, General stores, Chemists /
medicine shops, STD / PCO and Vehicle repairing shops shall be proposed

The locations of rest areas shall be advertised through signboards and overhead signs in advance.

Truck lay byes


The lay-byes have been proposed where congestion of heavy commercial vehicles was observed. An
additional pavement on both sides (but alternating with each other) shall be developed so that the flow of
traffic in carriageway is not obstructed. The generic enhancement outlines for truck parking lay-byes facilities
provided for supporting the functioning of the lay-byes shall be as per design in the Concession Agreement:
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
8-14
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Landscaping shall comprise primarily of shade trees. Ornamental trees, shade trees and shrubs shall
be planted in order to develop the area aesthetically. Trees shall be planted to define the length of the
lay-by on its outer side as also depending on availability of space

The minimum required public conveniences such as toilets, bathing spaces and drinking water facility
shall be proposed at these locations.

Chemists / medicine shops, STD / PCO and Vehicle repairing shops shall be proposed

The locations of rest areas shall be advertised through signboards and overhead signs in advance.

Community / Cultural Resources


The project proposes the relocation I replacement of all community resources likely to be impacted. Apart
from replacing these community resources along the highway generic enhancement measures have been
worked out for the enhancement of these resources.
Disruption to the Community

Loss of Access

The contractor shall provide safe and convenient passage for vehicles, pedestrians and livestock to and
from side roads and property access connecting the project road. The construction activities that shall affect
the use of side roads and existing access to individual properties shall not be undertaken without providing
adequate provisions. The construction works will not interfere with the convenience of the public or the
access to, use and occupation of public or private roads whether public or private. Service roads are
proposed along with underpasses to ease access at locations where land acquisition shall impact access.
The locations of service road are provided in table 2-6 of this report.

Traffic Control during Construction

Detailed Traffic Control Plans will be prepared prior to commencement of works on any section of the
project road by the concessionaire. These plans shall be approved by the IC and or the site office of the
NHAI prior to execution. The traffic control plans will contain details of temporary diversions details of
arrangements for construction under traffic and details of traffic arrangement after cessation of work
each day.

Temporary diversion (including scheme of temporary and acquisition) will be constructed with the
approval of the Engineer. Special consideration will be given in the preparation of the traffic control plan
to the safety of pedestrians and workers at night.

The Contractor and the concessionaire will ensure that the running surface is always properly
maintained, particularly during the monsoon so that no disruption to the traffic flow occurs. The
temporary traffic detours will be kept free of dust by frequent application of water, if necessary.

The Contractor and the concessionaire will take all necessary measures for the safety of traffic during
construction and provide, erect and maintain such barricades, including signs, markings, flags, lights
and flagmen as may be required by the Engineer for the information and protection of traffic
approaching or passing through the section of the highway under improvement. Annexure 8.8: Traffic
Control and Safety during Construction gives the details of the road safety measured to be adopted
during construction.

Risks Associated - Mitigation


The Contractor and the concessionaire is required to comply with all the precautions as required for the
safety of the workmen as per the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Convention No.62 as far as those
are applicable to this contract. The contractor and the concessionaire will supply all necessary safety
appliances such as safety goggles, helmets, masks, etc., to the workers and staff. The contractor and the
concessionaire has to comply with all regulation regarding sage scaffolding, ladders, working platforms,
gangway, stairwells, excavations, trenches and safe means of entry and egress.

Risk from Electrical Equipment

Adequate precautions will be taken to prevent danger from electrical equipment. No material or any of the
sites will be so stacked or placed as to cause danger or inconvenience to any person or the public. All
necessary fencing and lights will be provided to protect the public. All machines to be used in the
construction will conform to the relevant Indian Standards (IS) codes, will be free from patent defect, will be
kept in good working order, will be regularly inspected and properly maintained as per IS provision and to
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
8-15
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

the satisfaction of the Engineer.

Risk at Hazardous Activity

All workers employed on mixing asphaltic material, cement, lime mortars, concrete etc, will be provided with
protective footwear and protective goggles. Workers, who are engaged in welding works, would be provided
with welders protective eye-shields. Stonebreakers will be provided with protective goggles and clothing and
will be seated at sufficiently safe intervals. The use of any toxic chemical, if any will be strictly in accordance
with the manufacturers instructions. The Engineer will be given at least 6 working days notice of the
proposed use of any toxic chemical. A register of all toxic chemicals delivered to the site will be kept and
maintained up to date by the Contractor and the concessionaire. The register will include the trade name,
physical properties and characteristics, chemical ingredients, health and safety hazard information, handling
and storage procedures, and emergency and first and procedures for the product.

Risk of Lead Pollution

No man below the age of 18 years and mo woman will be employed on the work of painting with products
containing lead in any form. No paint containing lead or lead products will be used except in the form of
paste or readymade paint. Face masks will be supplied for use by the workers when paint is applied in the
form of spray or a surface having lead paint dry rubbed and scrapped.

Risk caused by Force Majure

All reasonable precaution will be taken to prevent danger of the workers and the public from fire, flood,
frowning, etc. All necessary steps will be taken for prompt first aid treatment of all injuries likely to be
sustained during the course of work.

Risk from Explosives

The contractor and the concessionaire will not use explosives except as may be provided in the contract or
ordered or authorized by the Engineer. Where the use of explosives is so provided or ordered or authorized,
the Contractor and the concessionaire will comply with the requirements of the following sub-clauses of this
clause besides the law of the land as applicable:
The Contractor and the concessionaire will at all times take every possible precaution and will comply with
appropriate laws and regulations relating to the importation, handling, transportation, storage and use of
explosives and will, at all times when engaged in blasting operations, post sufficient warning flagmen, to the
full satisfaction of the Engineer.
The Contractor and the concessionaire will at all times make full liaison with and inform well in advance and
obtain such permission as is required from all government authorities, public bodies and private parties
whatsoever concerned or affected or likely to be concerned or affected by blasting operations.

Malarial Risk

The Contractor and the concessionaire will, at his own expense, conform to all anti-malarial instructions
given to him by the Engineer; including filling up any borrow pits which may have been dug by him. Gravid,
blood-laden mosquitoes cannot fly very far, so they generally bite within a kilometre or so of their breeding
place. Thus borrow pits and any other water bodies created during the construction process will be situated
1 to 2km away from the human settlements. Pits dug up closer than these will be adequately drained to
prevent water logging. Similarly compensatory measures for filling up part of the water bodies situated
adjacent to the project corridors will be directed towards deepening of the water bodies concerned. This way
the capacity of the water body remains the same, while water surface available for breeding of mosquitoes is
reduced. This will have an additional advantage of decreased evaporation losses, which will be important in
the water-scarce project corridor.

First Aid

At every workplace, a readily available first and unit including an adequate supply of sterilised dressing
material and appliances will be provided as per the Factory Rules. Workplaces remote and far away from
regular hospitals will have indoor heath units with one bed for every 250 workers. Suitable transport will be
provided to facilitate take injured or ill person(s) to the nearest applicable hospital. At every workplace an
ambulance room containing the prescribed equipment and nursing staff will be provided as prescribed.

Potable Water

In every workplace at suitable and easily accessible places a sufficient supply of cold potable water (as per
IS) will be provided and maintained. If the drinking water is obtained from an intermittent public water supply
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
8-16
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

then, storage tanks will be provided. All water supply storage will be at a distance of not less than 15m from
any latrine, drain or other source of pollution. Where water has to be drawn from an existing well, which is
within such proximity of any latrine, drain or any other source of pollution, the well will be properly
chlorinated before water is drawn from it for drinking water. All such wells will be entirely closed in and be
provided with a trap door, which will be dust proof and waterproof. A reliable pump will be fitted to each
covered well. The trap door will be kept locked and opened only for cleaning or inspection, which will be
done at least once a month.

Hygiene

The Contractor and the concessionaire during the progress of work will provide, erect and maintain
necessary (temporary) living accommodation and ancillary facilities for labour to standards and scales
approved by the resident engineer. Refer Annexure 8.9: Guidelines For Sitting And Layout Of Construction
Camp.
There will be provided within the precincts of every workplace, latrines and urinals in an accessible place,
and the accommodation, separately for each for these, as per standards set by the Building and other
Construction Workers (regulation of Employment and Conditions of service) Act, 1996. Except in workplaces
provided with water-flushed latrines connected with a water borne sewage system, all latrines will be
provided with dry-earth system (receptacles) which will be cleaned at least four times daily and at least twice
during working hours and kept in a strict sanitary condition. Receptacles will be tarred inside and outside at
least once a year. If women are employed, separate latrines and urinals, screened from those for men and
marked Woman in vernacular will be provided. There will be adequate supply of water, close to latrines and
urinals.
All temporary accommodation must be constructed and maintained in such a fashion that uncontaminated
water is available for drinking, cooking and washing. The sewage system for the camp must be properly
designed, built and operated so that no health hazard occurs and no pollution to the air, ground or adjacent
watercourses take place. Compliance with the relevant legislation must be strictly adhered to. Garbage bins
must be provided in the camp and regularly emptied and the garbage disposed off in a hygienic manner.
Construction camps are to be sited away from vulnerable people and adequate health care is to be provided
for the work force. Unless otherwise arranged for by the local sanitary authority, arrangement for proper
disposal of excreta by incineration at the workplace will be made by means of a suitable incinerator
approved by the local medical health or municipal authorities. Alternatively, excreta may be disposed off by
putting a layer of night soils at the bottom of a permanent tank prepared for the purpose and covering it with
15 cm layer of waste or refuse and then covering it with a layer of earth for a fortnight (by then it will turn into
manure). On completion of the works, the whole of such temporary structures will be cleared away, all
rubbish burnt, excreta or other disposal pits or trenches filled in and effectively scaled off and the whole of
the site left clean and tidy, at the contractor and the concessionaires expense, to the entire satisfaction of
the Engineer.
8.3

ENHANCEMENT FOR CULTURAL PROPERTIES

The project strives to improve the experience of highway travelling by strengthening the physical link
between the corridor and the cultural properties falling along the road. Depending upon site-specific
situations the project strives to improve the access to these properties by providing walkway to the property
from the highway. Locally available materials like stone and bricks have been preferred for paving. CC
flooring also shall be adopted for ground treatment. At places plantation shall be used in addition to hard
landscaping measures to define precinct boundaries.
8.3.1

Plantation

Trees not only enrich the visual quality of a space but also act as functional buffer screens to counter
pollution, define areas and provide shade. Plantation of trees has been a prime enhancement as well as
mitigation measure in the project. Tree bases have been proposed around existing as well as proposed
shade trees to form informal seating spaces, which are evidently preferred to the formal seating spaces. At
cultural and religious properties locations, trees with religious significance like Ficus religiosa (Pipal) Emblica
officinalis (Amla), F. bengalensis (Banyan), Azadirachta indica (Neem), Magnifera indica (mango) etc. shall
be planted. Seating arrangement as given below shall be adopted depending upon site conditions.
8.3.2

Seating Spaces

Creating formal and / or informal seating spaces and rest areas where feasible and as per the scale of the
property in question were tried. In the case of availability of space, cultural properties if coupled with rest
areas will prove to be beneficial not only to the highway travellers but also the users of the religious
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
8-17
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

structure. The seating arrangements are given in figure below.

Figure 8-7: Seating Spaces


8.3.3

Specific Enhancement

As part of good environmental practices, enhancement measures for water bodies and community
properties shall be drawn after consultations with the community. The cost of the enhancement measures
has been included in the EMP budget.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


8-18
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

9.
9.1

IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENT

INTRODUCTION

This chapter provides an assessment of the existing institutional arrangement within NHAI and, reflects on
capacity building / training issues that need to be addressed to ensure timely implementation of EMP. The
institutional arrangement proposed for this project has been presented here with newly defined roles and
responsibilities. The responsibility of implementing the mitigation measures lies with the NHAI. All
construction activities being taken up by the concessionaire selected through International Competitive
Bidding. The Independent Engineer shall monitor the implementation of the work on behalf of NHAI. The
concessionaire will be responsible for planning all Environmental Management Plan (EMP) activities. In the
pre-construction phase of the project the concessionaire shall study the EMP to identify environmental
issues and arrive at a suitable strategy for implementation.
9.2

EXISTING ENVIRONMENTAL CELL, NHAI

NHAI already has an organisational and institutional capacity at the headquarters created to meet the
requirements for implementation of the environmental mitigation measures in the EMP. At present, the
Environmental cell within the NHAI is headed by an Environmental Officer of the rank of DGM and reports to
CGM, LA at the headquarters. The incumbent officer is only entrusted with the proceedings of the
environmental issues of all NHAI projects. He is supported by the field staff of the Project Implementation
Units for all administrative purposes. As part of the PPP project it is envisaged that the Environmental Cell
will continue to:

Monitor progress of the implementation of the EMP measures in consonance with the timeline for the
project within the allotted budget;

Maintain interaction with the various other statutory bodies like State Pollution Control Board and the
MoEF;

Interact with the Environmental Expert of the Independent Engineer on the state of the environment
and mitigation and enhancement measures adopted;

Occasionally inspect the environmental measures being implemented by the Contractor;

Report progress of works, both in terms of physical progress and quality for transmission to statutory
authorities such as the Ministry of Environment and Forests;

Document and disseminate good practices, bottlenecks and their resolution during the implementation
of environmental measures.

9.3

IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS

The NHAI is responsible for the implementation of the provisions made within the EMP through its site
offices. The services of Independent Engineer will be procured to assist the site offices for monitoring the
environmental aspects of the project during implementation. The organisation chart for implementation
arrangements is shown in Figure 9.1.
9.3.1

Independent Engineer (IE)

The Independent Engineer, to be procured through ICB shall assist the NHAI with the implementation of
project, once the project documents are ready. The Environmental Expert of the IC shall be the key
personnel to ensure the successful implementation of EMP provisions. Since ICB procurement is envisaged,
the selected consultants are expected to have the necessary professional(s) to tackle the issues that the
project is likely to bring up. The Environmental Specialist of the IE will be a key position, which can be
leveraged to ensure that the contractor complies with the various EMP requirements.
The EMP prepared for the Project road under PPP, needs to be followed during the implementation of the
civil works. The EMP is integrated in the technical specification and contract documents. The key
responsibility of the Environmental Specialist will be the successful implementation of the EMP. In addition,
he / she will update NHAI on the progress of environmental protection and / or enhancement works as
envisaged in the EMP. It is envisaged that the responsibilities of the Environmental specialist of the IE will
include:

Supervise and monitor the implementation of EMP by the Contractor and the concessionaire

Review and approve site-specific environmental mitigation / enhancement designs worked out by the

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


9-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

contractor and the concessionaire based on the EMP prepared during project preparation

Review and recommend the contractors and concessionaires Implementation Plans for approval (with
any changes that may be necessary) to ensure compliance with the environmental provisions of the
Contract

Monitor tree plantation programs and the periodic Environmental Monitoring (Air, Noise, Water, etc.)
Programs to ensure compliance with the State requirements and the EMP.

Hold regular meetings with NHAI and keep it updated on the progress of site works

Prepare and submit Environmental progress report to NHAI

Develop and organise environmental training programmes to upgrade the skills within the staff of the
environmental cell, contractors and the concessionaire

Document and develop good practices during project implementation for wider dissemination

The project will require continuous environmental supervision from the IEs side. Since the Environmental
Specialist for IE projects are deployed on intermittent basis, it is desirable to have the field engineers
supervising construction can be trained on environmental aspects, who then shall apprise the Team Leader
and the Environmental Specialist of any significant development on environment.
9.3.2

Concessionaire

For effective implementation and management of the EMP, The BOT / Annuity concessionaire shall contrive
to establish a Safety, Health and Environment (SHE) Cell headed by an Environment Officer to deal with the
environmental issues of the project. This officer shall interact with the contractor, NHAI, IC and other line
departments to ensure that the mitigation and enhancement measures mentioned in the EMP are adhered.
The Environmental officer of the concessionaire shall be the interface between the Environmental Specialist
of IC and the Environmental Officer of the contractor. His prime responsibility shall be to apprise the
Environmental Specialist of the IE about the ground conditions. He shall also procure the requisite
clearances and the NOCs for the project and shall also strictly supervise that the contractor adheres to the
EMP. The environmental officer can also look after the additional charges of safety and health.
Box 9-1: Qualification and Responsibilities of Environmental Officer of Concessionaire
Qualifications & Experience

Postgraduate in Environmental Science / Environmental Management / Zoology / Botany / Ecology /


Environmental Planning / degree in Civil Engineering with specialisation in environment.

10 years of total experience with a minimum of 3 years in the implementation of EMP of highway projects and an
understanding of environmental, health and safety issues.

Prior practical experience in State and National Highways would be an advantage.


Roles & Responsibilities

He / She shall be reporting directly to the Chief Project Manager of the Concessionaire.

Primarily responsible for implementation of the EMP on site and ensuing that the environmental quality is meeting
the standards laid down by Central Pollution Control Board and other related authority.

The EO shall implement the EMP by assigning the necessary resources (manpower, money and machinery) and
attend such meetings as are required for the effective implementation of the EMP on site.

He shall maintain a Complain Register to record any grievances from members of public.

He shall maintain a register of all road side trees planted and present within ROW.

The EO shall be the interface of the concessionaire with the client and the IC.

9.3.3

Contractor

Execution of works will be the responsibility of the contractor. The concessionaire may himself be the
executioner of the project or might decide to outsource or hire contractor for highways and structures, who
may in turn sublet some part of their work to petty contractors. In case the concessionaire decides to
execute the work by himself then the responsibilities of the EO as given in Box 9.2 shall also be performed
by the EO of the concessionaire.
If the concessionaire decides to outsource the work then the contractors shall employ an Environmental
Officer whose qualification and responsibilities shall be as per Box 9.2. The contractor shall be responsible
for both the jobs done by the petty contactor (if Sublet) as well by him. In both the cases the concessionaire
will implement the environmental measures (either through the contractors or themselves). This has been
done with a view to ensure that road construction and environmental management go together.
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
9-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Box 9-2: Qualification and Responsibilities of Environmental Officer of Contractor


Qualifications & Experience

Postgraduate in Environmental Science / Environmental Management / Zoology / Botany / Ecology /


Environmental Planning / Environmental Engineering.

5 years of experience with a minimum of 2 years in the implementation of EMP of highway projects and an
understanding of environmental, health and safety issues.

Prior practical experience in State and National Highways would be an advantage.


Roles & Responsibilities

The Environmental Officer shall report directly to the Resident Construction Manager / Project Manager so that the
pertinent environmental issues that he raises are promptly dealt with.

He shall also have a direct interaction with the Environmental Expert and the Environmental Officer of the IE and
the concessionaire respectively.

Monitor / implement measures laid out in the EMP and or as directed by the IE for the work executed both by petty
contractors and the contractor.

Provide key inputs in the development of the Contractors implementation plan for all construction activities,
including haulage of material to site, adhering to the requirements of the EMP and getting approval of
concessionaire and the IE on the same before start of works.

Ensure that the regulatory permissions required for the construction equipment, vehicles and machinery (given in
the EMP) have been obtained and are valid at all times during the execution of the project.

Prepare / fill up the environmental and safety related forms given in the EMP

Prepare Safety Plans, Emergency Response Plans and Quarry Management and other safety, health and
environment related Plans for approval of the IE and the concessionaire.

Identify locations for siting construction camps and other plants, machinery, vehicles and equipment, as well as
locations for storage and disposal of wastes, both from the construction camps and from the site and obtain
approval for the same from the concessionaire and the IE.

Detail out site-specific environmental mitigation and enhancement measures and obtain approval of
concessionaire and the IE for the same

Carry out the measurements of environmental mitigation and / or enhancement works and prepares bills for the
same for approval and payment through the Concessionaires Environmental Officer

Ensure that the safety of the workers and other site users is not compromised during construction

Ensure that adequate monitoring facilities are available for collecting samples of all discharges from the
Contractors plants, equipment and camps

Verify the extent of environmental compliance at sites from where the Contractor is procuring the material
quarries, crushers or even sand and suggest appropriate mitigation measures, if required

Responsible for implementation of safety and health regulations if also acting as safety officer

The environmental officer shall have a small environmental, health and safety team to help him in
implementing the EMP. These team members may / may not report to him / her directly but shall apprise him
of all the incidents and mark a formal report of any incident having an impact on the Health, Environment
and Safety issues.
Duty Officers (DO)
The Duty Officers shall, on day to day basis, monitor the Project Facilities and report to the EO on activities
that adversely affect the environment in the vicinity.
Supervisors
They shall take the necessary mitigation measures.
Plant Engineer
The Plant Engineer has the responsibility of managing and controlling the hot mix plant, crusher unit and
fleet of vehicles shall ensure that the environment is not degraded at his plant site. Even though the
Environmental Officer shall routinely monitor to detect any negative issues due to operations and bring it to
the knowledge of Plant manager for taking rectification works. In case of emergency the Plant Engineer shall
immediately notify the Environmental officer for necessary actions.
9.4

REPORTING SYSTEM

Reporting system provides necessary feedback for project management to ensure quality of the works and
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
9-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

that the program is on schedule. The rationale for a reporting system is based on accountability to ensure
that the measures proposed as part of the Environmental Management Plan get implemented in the project.
Reporting system for the suggested monitoring program operates at two levels as:

Reporting for environmental condition indicators and environmental management indicators

Reporting for operational performance indicators at the NHAI site level.

The reporting system will operate linearly contractor who is at the lowest rung of the implementation
system reporting to the Concessionaire, who in turn shall report to IE and the NHAI as per figure 9-1. All
reporting by the concessionaire shall be on a quarterly basis, while the reporting time of the contractor shall
be decided upon by the concessionaire.
The NHAI Site Office will be responsible for setting the targets for the various activities anticipated during
construction phase in consultation with the IE and obtaining agreement from the Contractor after
mobilisation but before beginning of works on site. The contractor will report from then on regarding the
status on each of these. The NHAI Site Office will monitor the activities through its own staff or the
consultants Environmental Specialist after it has obtained the Contractors report with the Consultants
remarks on it during the construction phase. During the operation phase, the supervision as well as reporting
responsibilities will lie with the NHAI Site Office.
Table 9-1: Summary of Reporting of Environmental components and Responsibilities
Independent Engineer
Format No.

M1
M2
M3
M4

9.5

Item

Timing

Supervision

CONTRACTOR MOBILIZATION AND SITE CLEARANCE


Reporting by contractor to IC for dumping
Before start of
As required
locations & construction and labour camp site
construction
Reporting by contractor to IC for construction
Before start of
As required
and labour camp site
construction
Target sheet for Tree cutting
Before start of work
As required
Before start of
Reporting for borrow areas
As required
construction
CONSTRUCTION PHASE

C1

Target sheet for Pollution Monitoring

As per Monitoring Plan

C2

Top soil Conservation

O1

Target sheet for Pollution Monitoring

During Operation

As required

O2

Redevelopment of Borrow Areas

After completion of
usage of Borrow Area

As required

O3

Survival Rate of Trees

During Operation

As required

Before start of work


OPERATION PHASE

As required
As required

Reporting

NHAI PIU
Overseeing /
Compliance

Quarterly

As required

Quarterly

As required

After cutting

As required

Quarterly

As required

After
Monitoring
Quarterly
After
Monitoring
After
Monitoring
After
Monitoring

As required
As required

As required
As required
As required

ENVIRONMENTAL CAPACITY BUILDING

Training of staff will be done at a number of levels. Some short-term training is required for the Environment
Manager, other staff members of the Environment Unit and the contractor staff to raise their levels of
environmental awareness. The training can be conducted by either some external agency or through the
help of in-house expertise of the NHAI and the consultants and help of PCB can be sought in this regard. In
the long-term training, special environmental issues will be examined and likely solutions provided to the
Environment Unit.
The main focus of future training programmes has to be on implementation with special emphasis on BOT /
annuity. Since project preparation is drawing to a close, the officials can concentrate on the progress of the
project. Identification of candidate locations for siting construction camps, disposal of excess cut material
etc. would be a priority in the short term.
The proposed training should also allow the officials to enhance their skills for effective monitoring of project
by understanding the formats developed for reporting. In addition, close interaction is required among
members of the NHAI responsible for the Environmental and R&R activities since it is envisaged that the two
aspects will have a considerable overlap. It is envisaged that the training as part of the project will include
training on several issues important for both teams simultaneously. The following modules can be taken up:

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


9-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 9-2: Modules for Training


Sl
No.

2.

Timing

Target Group

Members of the NHAI site office,


After finalisation of
Environmental Specialist of the IC,
Contracts for Civil
Concessionaire and the Environmental
Works
staff of the Civil Contractor

During
implementation

Members of the NHAI site office,


Counterpart staff from other
departments such as Revenue,
Forests, etc.

Mode of training

Lectures,
Presentations,
Discussions

Lectures,
Discussions,
Presentations,
Role Play

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


9-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Short Description

Responsibility

Overview of
responsibilities
The roles and
responsibilities of the IC,
Concessionaire and the
External Agency or
Contractor
NHAI
Reporting arrangements
Contractual obligations,
Environmental Protection
and Social Development
Inter-Departmental Coordination
Clearance requirements
and prescribed procedures
External Agency,
Expectations of other
Consultants, NHAI
departments
documentation and followup
Developing formats for
ease of reporting

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Figure 9-1: Proposed Organisation Chart


NHAI
Project Director / CGM
(Env)

Chief Project Manager


(Concessionaire)

State Pollution
Control Board /
MoEF
Construction /
Project Manager
(Contractor)

Team Leader
(Independent Engineer)

Environmental Officer
(Concessionaire)

NHAI
Mgr (Tech) / DGM
(Env)

Environmental Expert
(Independent Engineer)

Environmental
Officer
(Contractor)

Direct

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Indirect

9-6
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

10.
10.1

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (EMP)

The Environmental Management Action Plan (EMP) is required to ensure sustainable development of the
road during construction and operational phases. EMP is location and time specific. In general, NHAI (with
assistance from Contractor / Concessionaire and Independent Engineer) is the responsible entity for
ensuring that the mitigation measures are carried out. Mitigation measures for generic impacts are listed in
Table 10-1. The list provides reference (MoRT&H specification), implementing organisation and responsible
entity.
10.1.1 Specific Activities by NHAI
The role of NHAI in the implementation of EMP involves the following activities:

Prior Environmental Clearance from MoEF

Clearance from Forest Department for diversion of 2.665 Ha of forest land.

Permission from Forest Department for felling of trees

10.1.2 Specific Activities by Concessionaire


The activities to be performed by the concessionaire to implement the EMP shall comprise the following:

Confirm the Tree Cutting Schedule based on the final design and provide modified schedule to NHAI.

Fell the trees after NHAI secures Forest Department permission

Selection of material sources (quarry, borrow materials, water, sand etc). (Refer Annexure 8.3, 8.4,
8.5 and chapter 11).

Selection, design and layout of construction areas, hot mix and batching plants, labour camps etc.
(Refer Annexure 8.9)

Apply for and obtain all the necessary clearances from the agencies concerned after finalising the
locations of the sites. (Refer Table 3.2)

Planning traffic diversions and detours including arrangements for temporary land acquisition. (Refer
Annexure 8.8)

Plant and maintain 27420 flowering, shade, medicinal, ornamental & fruit bearing trees in suitable area
for the entire duration of the contract period. (Refer Annexure 8.7)

Planting and maintenance of minimum 82342 ornamental, medicinal & flowering plants and shrubs in
the median for the entire duration of the contract period. (Refer Annexure 8.7)

Identify, transplant and maintain 2562 trees of various girth, height and species for the entire duration
of the project period

10.2

SITE SPECIFIC MANAGEMENT PLAN

10.2.1 Cultural Properties


The relocation issue of the cultural properties like temples, mazars etc. that are directly or partially impacted
are taken up in RAP. Service lanes are proposed to provide access to most of the cultural property and shall
correspond to TCS 2, 2A, 2B. Where ever possible the concessionaire shall try to enhance the aesthetic of
the area. In this regard the landscaping strategy suggested in chapter 8 shall be used.
10.2.2 Sensitive Features

Noise barriers in the form of compound walls have been proposed

The educational institutes (mainly primary and high schools) and hospitals wherein no direct impacts of
the road widening shall happen, the existing compound walls shall be raised to a height of 2m.

In case where in there shall be partial impacts, new boundary wall which shall also act as noise barrier
shall be constructed to a height of 2 m

Service roads are also proposed at almost all those locations where sensitive features like educational
institutes and hospitals are present. The cross sections to be followed are TCS 2, 2A, 2B

At some locations underpasses have been proposed in the vicinity

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


10-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

The concessionaire shall provide Foot over bridge or other facilities near schools & hospitals beside the
proposed underpasses and service roads (if found necessary during construction)

10.2.3 Community properties

Some community properties like graveyards are impacted. The relocation / rehabilitation shall be as
recommended in the RAP

New bus shelters along with bus bays are proposed in place of the existing bus shelters which are
directly impacted.

Water resources to be impacted shall be relocated prior to construction works

10.3

IMPLEMENTATION OF EMP

The Environmental Officer of the concessionaire should be available for the entire duration of the project.
The Environmental Officer of the concessionaire shall be primarily responsible for compliance of EMP. The
Environmental Specialist of the IC who should ideally be deployed for the entire duration shall monitor the
compliance of the EMP. The key issues that require special attention along with the mitigations and
enhancement measures to be implemented have been detailed in Table 10-1.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


10-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 10-1: Environmental Management Plan


Environmental
Impact / Aspect
DESIGN STAGE
General consideration
of Cross section
Alternatives

Geometric Design

Issues from
stakeholder
Consultations
Impact on Cultural
Properties

Preservation of trees

Mitigation Measures3

Use TCS 1-9 as per design specifications.


The proposed alignment is selected / adjusted
(within IRC / MoRT&H specifications)
to minimise land disturbance
to avoid culturally & environmentally sensitive
areas cultural properties, water bodies etc.
Various issues raised were examined & suitably
incorporated based on merit & other road safety
measures.
Cultural properties affected to be relocated as per
RAP and Public Consultation.
Mitigation / enhancement measures have been
suggested for each of the cultural property
individually.
No tree will be cut beyond toe line.
Identify incidental spaces for plantation of trees

Orientation of
A comprehensive tanning / orientation schedule has
Implementation
been prepared at different stages of NHAI.
Agency
Road safety issue
Design of Geometric improvements as per IRC
due to poor
codes and MoRT&H Specifications
geometrics
PRE-CONSTRUCTION STAGE
All requirements of the RAP shall be complete before
start of construction stage. The activities broadly
include acquisition of structures, cultural properties,
relocation of utilities, common property resources etc
Implementation of
The land acquisition will be done as per LA Act,
RAP and LA
1894.
Compensation will be paid to PAPs based on the
RAP that includes the Entitlement Policy.

3
4
5
6

Location4

Annexure 8.7

Right of Way (ROW)

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

During Design

Concessionaire /
Contractor

NHAI

Design Report

During alignment
Design

Concessionaire /
Contractor

NHAI

Design Report

During Design

Concessionaire /
Contractor

NHAI

Chapter 5:
Community
Consultation

During alignment
Design

Concessionaire /
Contractor

NHAI

RAP

During alignment
design

Concessionaire /
Contractor

NHAI, Department
of Forest.

Annexure 8.7

During Design

NHAI

NHAI

Annexure 10.1

During alignment
design

Concessionaire /
Contractor

NHAI

IRC codes and


MoRT&H
Specifications

Before
construction starts

NGOs, Collaborating
Agencies, SLAO, NHAI,
Grievance Redressal
Cells (GRC), District
Revenue authorities

NHAI

Cross reference6

Resettlement
Action Plan (RAP)

Some of the mitigation measures are preventive in nature while some others include additional measures in terms of environmental conservation and involve physical and construction work.
Unless otherwise stated, the Project Site covers area beyond ROW, such as borrow areas, access roads, service roads and equipment storage sites (MoRT&H: 306.3).
Time frame refers to the duration or instant of time when the mitigation measures will be taken.
The contract requirements refer to the following:
Ministry of Shipping, Road Transport & Highways, (MoRT&H) Government of India, Specifications for Road and Bridge Works, Specific and general conditions of the contract.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

10-3
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Relocation of Utilities

Loss of drinking water


source

Cultural Properties

Loss of existing bus


stops and waiting
shed facilities

Mitigation Measures3

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Cross reference6

Post design to Preconstruction

R&R Officer,
Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Resettlement
Action Plan (RAP),
Utility Relocation
Plan

Post design to Preconstruction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Resettlement
Action Plan (RAP)

Pre-construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

During design stage.

Design Consultants

Location4

Time Frame5

All community underground and overhead utilities will


be shifted as per Utility Shifting Plan, prior
permission will be required from regional offices of
Electricity, Telecommunications, OFC, Water works
etc.
Private drinking water source replaced according to
RAP and public water sources replaced.
Temporary arrangements shall be provided, if the
existing water supply is disrupted accidentally.
Cultural properties affected to be relocated as per
RAP and Public Consultation.
Mitigation / enhancement measures have been
suggested for each of the cultural property
individually.
Bus stops suitably relocated or integrated to the
design. Bus lay byes and bus waiting shed designs
are provided.

Annexure 2.2

IE

Resettlement
Action Plan (RAP),
MoRT&H: 301.5

Mobilisation & Site Clearance

Removal of
Vegetation

Vegetation will be removed from the ROW before the


commencement of Construction after obtaining
necessary permissions from the Karnataka forest
Department.

ROW

Procurement of
Crushers, Hot-mix
plants & Batching
Plants, other
Construction
Vehicles, Equipment
and Machinery

Specifications of crushers, hot mix plants and


batching plants, other Construction Vehicles,
Equipment and Machinery to be procured will comply
to the relevant Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS)
norms and with the requirements of the relevant
current emission control legislations

Setting up of
construction camps

The construction camps will be located at least 500m


away from habitations & 1 km away from sensitive
locations (Refer Annexure 8..9)
The Concessionaire / Contractor during the progress
of work will provide, erect and maintain necessary
(temporary) living accommodation and ancillary
facilities for labour to standards and scales approved
by the IE.

All areas in
immediate vicinity of
construction
campsite chosen by
the Concessionaire /
Contractor and
approved by the
Independent
Engineer (IE).

Setting up of Hot mix


Plants and crushers

Hot mix plants, crushers and batching plants shall be


located at least 1000m away from the nearest
habitation. The Concessionaire / Contractor shall
obtain the consent to operate the plants from the

All Hot mix Plants


Batching Plants

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Before construction
Starts
After centre line
marking at site

Prior to
mobilisation at site

During
Establishment,
Operation and
Dismantling of
Such Camps.

During erection,
testing, operation
and dismantling of
such plants

10-4
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Design; MoRT&H:
201

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Contract,
MoRT&H: 111,
GoI Air & noise
Standards,
Environment
Protection Act,
1986 and OSHA
Standards

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 111.1,
111.14
Annexure 8.9

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 111.5

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Mitigation Measures3

SPCB and submit a copy to the Independent


Engineer (IE).
Location of dumping sites shall be finalized based on
the guidelines given in Annexure 8.1 and the
Independent Engineer (IE) shall certify that :
These are not located within designated forest
Identification of
areas.
dumping sites
The dumping does not impact natural drainage
courses
Settlements are located at least 1 km away from
the site.
CONSTRUCTION STAGE
Secure the following clearances prior to start of
construction activity:
Type of clearance
Applicability
NOC and consents under
For establishment
Air, Water & Environment
of construction
Act and noise rules from
camp.
SPCB
NOC and consents under
For operating
Air, Water & Environment
construction plant,
Act and noise rules from
crusher, batching
SPCB
plant etc.
Explosive License from
For storing fuel oil,
Chief Controller of
lubricants, diesel
Explosives
etc.
Manufacture
Permission for storage of
storage and Import
hazardous chemical from
Clearances and
of Hazardous
CPCB
approvals
Chemicals
Borrow Area, approval
from District Collector,
Borrow area for
Consent letter, lease
excavation of earth
agreement with the Owner
of land.
Quarry Lease Deed and
Quarry operation
Quarry License from State
(for new quarry)
Department of Mines
Permission for extraction
of ground water for use in
Extraction of
road construction activities
ground water
from State Ground Water
Board
Use of surface
Permission for use of
water for
water for construction
construction
purpose from irrigation
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Location4

Time Frame5

Throughout the
corridor

During
mobilisation

Concessionaire /
Contractor

Construction stage
(Prior to initiation of
any work).
Time period in
getting the
permission varies

NHAI, SPCB, CPCB,


Chief Controller of
Explosives, District
Collector State
Department of Mines,
State Ground Water
Board, State Irrigation
Department, Labour
Commissioner Officer

10-5
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

IE, NHAI

Concessionaire /
Contractor

Cross reference6

Annexure 8.1

General Conditions
of Contract.
Clause 111.3,
MoRT&H

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Mitigation Measures3

Location4

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Cross reference6

department
Labour license from labour
Engagement of
commissioner office
Labour
Provide a copy of all necessary clearances to the IC
Adhere to all clearance terms and conditions
Obtain
written
permission
from
private
landholders to conduct construction activities on
their land prior to commencing works.
Land

Soil Erosion and


Sedimentation control

Loss of agricultural
top soil

Main reason of soil erosion is rains. Concessionaire /


Contractor should plan the activities so that No
naked / loose earth surface is left out before the
onset of monsoon, for minimising the soil erosion
following preventive measures to be taken such as:
Embankment slopes to be covered, soon after
completion.
Next layer / activity to be planted, soon after
completion of clearing and grubbing, laying of
embankment layer, sub-grade layer, sub-base
layer, scarification etc.
Top soil from borrow area, Debris disposal sites;
borrow area, construction site to be protected /
covered for soil erosion.
Debris due to excavation of foundation,
dismantling of existing cross drainage structure
will be removed from the water course
immediately.
Diversions for bridges will be removed from the
water course before the onset of monsoon
Along sections abutting water bodies, stone
pitching needs to be carried out.
At the outfall of each culvert, erosion prevention
measure, such as the following, will be
undertaken,
All areas of cutting and all areas to be permanently
covered will be stripped to a depth of 150 mm and
stored in stockpile.
The stockpile will be designed such that the slope
does not exceed 1:2 (vertical to horizontal), and the
height of the pile is to be restricted to 2m. Stockpiles
will not be surcharged or otherwise loaded and
multiple handling will be kept to a minimum to ensure
that no compaction will occur. The stockpiles will be
covered with gunny bags or tarpaulin. It will be
ensured by the Concessionaire / Contractor that the
topsoil will not be unnecessarily trafficked either

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Throughout Project
Corridor,
Service roads and
equipment storage
sites, etc.

All along Project


Corridor, where
productive land is
acquired

Upon completion of
construction
activities at these
sites.

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MORT&H
Specification
305.2.2.2, 306, 307,
308

During construction

During construction

10-6
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

MoRT&H: 301.3.2,
301.7, 305.3.3 &
305.3.9

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Compaction of Soil
and Damage to
Vegetation

Contamination of soil

1. Quarrying

2. Material sources

Mitigation Measures3
before stripping or when in stockpiles.
Top soil will be safeguard from erosion and will be
reused as follows:
Covering all borrow areas after excavation is
over.
Dressing of slopes of road embankment
Agricultural field, acquired temporarily
Construction vehicles should operate within the
Corridor of Impact avoiding damage to soil and
vegetation.
Diversions, access road used will be redeveloped by
Concessionaire / Contractor, to the satisfaction of the
owner / villagers.
Construction vehicle, machinery and equipment shall
move or be stationed in the ROW only. While
operating on temporarily acquired agricultural land
for any construction activities, top soil will be
preserved in stockpiles.
Guidelines of Hazardous waste (management
and handling) rules, 1989 will be enforced.
Vehicle / machinery and equipment operation,
maintenance and refuelling shall be carried out in
such a fashion that spillage of fuels and lubricants
does not contaminate the ground. An oil
interceptor will be provided for wash down and
refuelling areas.
Fuel storage shall be in proper bunded areas. All
spills and collected petroleum products shall be
disposed off in accordance with MoEF and SPCB
guidelines at designated locations.
Plant to be set up 500 m away from surface water
body.
Oil interceptor will be installed at construction site.
Septic tank will be constructed for safe disposal of
waste.
Quarry material shall be sourced from approved
and licensed aggregate and sand quarries as
given in Table 8.3 & 8.4. Copy of licenses to be
submitted to the IE.
For operating new quarries, the Concessionaire /
Contractor shall obtain materials from quarries
only after consent of the DoF or other concerned
authorities and only after development of a
comprehensive quarry redevelopment plan.
Adequate safety precautions shall be ensured
during transportation of quarry material from

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Location4

Time Frame5

Throughout Project
Corridor and all areas
temporarily acquired.

During construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MORT&H
Specification 112.6,
201.2

At fuel storage areas


usually at
construction camps,
temporarily acquired
site.

During
Construction.

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Chapter-8 of this
Report.

During construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Annexure 8.3
MORT&H
Specification 111.3,
302, 305.2.2.

Table 8.3 & 8.4

10-7
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Cross reference6

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Generation of Debris

Disposal of Debris

Mitigation Measures3
quarries to the construction site. Vehicles
transporting the material shall be covered to
prevent spillage. Operations to be undertaken by
the Concessionaire / Contractor as per the
direction and satisfaction of the IE.
Debris generated due to the dismantling of the
existing pavement structure and the cutting of the
hillside for the widening shall be suitably reused in
the proposed construction as fill materials for
embankments
The disposal of debris shall be carried out only at
sites identified for the purpose. The Concessionaire /
Contractor shall carry out the disposal as described
in Annexure 8.1.
All
arrangement
for
transportation
during
construction including provision, maintenance,
dismantling and clearing debris, where necessary will
be considered incidental to the work and should be
planned and implemented by the Concessionaire /
Contractor as approved and directed by IE.

Location4

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Cross reference6

Throughout Project
Corridor.

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 112.6 &


112.2

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor, IC / SC

IE, NHAI

Annexure 8.1

Beginning with &


throughout
construction until
asphalting is
completed and side
slopes are covered.

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MORT&H
Specification 111.1,
111.5, 111.8, 111.9,
111.10 & 118.1

Sites identified by the


Concessionaire /
Contractor and
approved by the
Independent
Engineer (IE).

Air

Dust Generation

Vehicles delivering materials should be covered


to reduce spills and dust blowing off the load.
Clearing and grubbing to be done, just before the
start of next activity on that site.
In laying sub-base, water spraying is needed to
aid compaction of the material. After the
compaction, water spraying should be carried out
at regular intervals to limit the dust to below
Road surface should be cleaned with air
compressor and vacuum cleaners prior to the
construction works. Manual labour using brooms
should be avoided, if used labour to be provided
masks.
Embankment slopes to be covered with turfing /
stone pitching immediately after completion.
The Concessionaire / Contractor shall take every
precaution to reduce the level of dust emission
from the hot mix plants and the batching plants up
to the satisfaction of the IE
All existing highways and roads used by vehicles
of the Concessionaire / Contractor, or any of his
sub-Contractor or suppliers of materials or plant
and similarly roads which are part of the works
shall be kept clean and clear of all dust/mud or
other extraneous materials dropped by such

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Throughout Project
Corridor, all access
roads, temporarily
acquired sites.

10-8
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Equipment Selection,
Maintenance and
Operation

Pollution from
Crusher

Mitigation Measures3
vehicles or their tyres.
Plants, machinery and equipment shall be so
handled (including dismantling) as to minimise
generation of dust.
The discharge standards promulgated under the
Environment Protection Act, 1986 shall be strictly
adhered to. All vehicles, equipment and
machinery used for construction shall conform to
the relevant Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS)
norms.
All vehicles, equipment and machinery used for
construction shall be regularly maintained to
ensure that pollution emission levels comply with
the relevant requirements of SPCB and the
Independent Engineer (IE).
All crushers used in construction shall conform to
relevant dust emission control legislations.
Clearance for siting shall be obtained from the
SPCB.
Alternatively, only crushers already licensed by
the SPCB shall be used.
Water will be sprayed during the non-monsoon
months, regularly to minimise dust, in the whole
crusher plant area.
The suspended particulate matter contribution
value at a distance of 40m from a controlled
isolated as well as from a unit located in a cluster
should be less than 500g/m3. The monitoring is
to be conducted as envisaged in the monitoring
plan.

Location4

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Throughout Project
Corridor, all access
roads, sites
temporarily acquired
and all borrow areas.

During
Construction.

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MORT&H Spec 106,


IRC: 72-1978, IRC:
90-1985, 111.5,
111.9, 111.10, 2013

All Aggregate
Crushing Plants.

During Erection,
Testing, Operation
and Dismantling of
Such plants.

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 111.1

During construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

Cross reference6

Water

Loss of water bodies/


surface / ground

No excavation from the bund of the water bodies.


No debris disposal near any water body.
Prior written permission from authorities for use of
water for construction activity will be submitted to
IC.
Construction labours to be restricted from
polluting the source or misusing the source.
Shifting of source to be completed prior to
disruption of the actual source.
Alternate measures to be taken / ensured during
disrupted period.
Source to be replaced immediately, in case of
accidental loss.
Construction work shall be restricted to 3m 4m

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Near all water bodies

10-9
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Concessionaire

MORT&H
Specification 111.4,
201.2, 301, 304,
306 & 305.4.1

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Alteration of drainage

Runoff and drainage

Water requirement for


project

Silting / sedimentation

Mitigation Measures3
width from the existing formation near ponds.
The volume of water storage lost shall be
compensated for by excavation of an equal
volume of similar depth at closest possible
location in the direction of flow and shall be done
with the approval of the Independent Engineer
(IE).
Diversions will be constructed during dry season,
with adequate drainage facility, and will be
completely removed before the onset of
monsoon.
Debris generated due to the excavation of
foundation or due to the dismantling of existing
structure will be removed from the water course.
Temporary Silt fencing to be provided on the
mouth of discharge into natural streams.
Continuous drain (lined / unlined) is suggested /
will be provided. Obstruction, if any, will be
removed immediately.
Throughout continuous drain is provided.
Lined drain is provided at built-up locations for
quick drainage.
Increased runoff due to increased impervious
surface is countered through increased pervious
surface area through soak pits and rain water
harvesting structures.
Concessionaire / Contractor will provide a list of
sources (surface / ground) for approval from IE
Prior to use of source Concessionaire / Contractor
will take the written permission from authority, to
use the water in construction activity, and submit
a copy to IE.
During construction only permitted quantity
(permission taken) from approved sources will be
used.
Concessionaire / Contractor will ensure optimum
use of water; discourage labour from wastage of
water.
Measures suggested under Soil Erosion and
Sedimentation control will be enforced.
Silt fencing is provided around water bodies.
Construction activities will be stopped near water
bodies during monsoon.
Soil trap are suggested / will be provided in all
ancillary sites and camps.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Location4

Time Frame5

Throughout Project
Corridor, all access
roads, temporarily
acquired sites.

Whenever
encountered during
construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

During Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

During Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Throughout
construction period

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Throughout Project
Corridor, all access
roads, temporarily
acquired sites.

10-10
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Cross reference6

MORT&H
Specification 201.2,
301, 304, 306, 312.

MORT&H
Specification 111.4,
306
EP Act, 1986

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Contamination of
water

Mitigation Measures3

Location4

Time Frame5

Measures suggested under Contamination of


soil will be enforced.
Construction work close to water bodies will be
avoided during monsoon.
Labour camps will be located away from water
bodies.
Car washing / workshops near water bodies will
be avoided.

All areas in
immediate vicinity of
construction
campsite chosen by
the Concessionaire /
Contractor.

Throughout
construction period,
During
Establishment,
Operation and
Dismantling of
Labour Camps.

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Cross reference6
MORT&H
Specification 111.1,
111.4, 111.9,
111.13, 122, 201.2,
201.4, 301.1.3.10,
304.3.3, 306

Noise

Noise from Vehicles,


Plants and Equipment

Noise from Blasting or


Pre-splitting
Operations

Noise standard at processing sites, eg. Aggregate


crushing plants, batching plant, hot mix plant will
be strictly monitored to prevent exceeding of
noise standards.
Workers in vicinity of loud noise, and workers
working with or in crushing, compaction, concrete
mixing operations shall wear earplugs and their
working time should be limited as a safety
measure.
In construction sites within 150 m of sensitive
receptors construction will be stopped from 22:00
to 06:00.
Machinery and vehicles will be maintained to
keep their noise to a minimum.
Construction of noise barriers at sensitive
receptors.
All vehicles and equipment used in construction
shall be fitted with exhaust silencers. During
routine servicing operations, the effectiveness of
exhaust silencers shall be checked and if found to
be defective shall be replaced.
Noise limits for construction equipment used in
this project (measured at one metre from the
edge of the equipment in free field) such as
compactors, rollers, front loaders, concrete
mixers, cranes (moveable), vibrators and saws
shall not exceed 75 dB(A), as specified in the
Environment (Protection) Rules, 1986.
Blasting shall be carried out only with permission
of the Independent Engineer (IE). All the statutory
laws, regulations, rules etc., pertaining to
acquisition, transport, storage, handling and use
of explosives shall be strictly followed.
Blasting shall be carried out during fixed hours
(preferably during mid-day), as permitted by the
Independent Engineer (IE). The timing should be
made known to all people within 500m (200m for

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

MORT&H
Specification No.
111, 111.1, 111.13,
111.5 & 111.6

Throughout Project
Corridor, all access
roads, sites
temporarily acquired
and all borrow areas.

Throughout
construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

All Blasting and Presplitting Sites.

During
Preparation,
Operation and
Closure of Such
Sites.

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

10-11
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Environment
(Protection) Rules,
1986.

MoRT&H: 302.1 &


302.4

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Mitigation Measures3

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Cross reference6

After completion of
construction
activities

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Annexure 8.7
MORT&H
Specification, 111,
111.5, 201.5, 306,
308

During cleaning
operations.
During construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MORT&H
Specification 201.2

During construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MORT&H
Specification 111.1,
111.6.

During Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

During Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

During Construction

Concessionaire /

IE, NHAI

Location4

Time Frame5

Annexure 8.7

pre-splitting) from the blasting site in all directions.


People, except those who actually light the fuse
shall be excluded from the area of 200m (50m for
pre-splitting) from the blasting site in all directions
at least 10 minutes before the blasting.
Flora & Fauna
Plant and maintain 26647 flowering, shade,
medicinal, ornamental & fruit bearing trees in
suitable area for the entire duration of the contract
period
Plant and maintain a minimum 80020 ornamental,
medicinal & flowering plants and shrubs in the
median for the entire duration of the contract
Loss of trees and
period
Avenue Planting &
Identify, transplant and maintain 1394 trees of
transplantation
various girth, height and species for the entire
duration of the project period
Cost of plantation included in the EMP Budget.
Concessionaire / Contractor has to make sure
that no trees / branches to be fell by labourer for
fuel & or warmth during winter. Enough provision
of fuel to be ensured.
Clearing and grubbing should be avoided beyond
that which is directly required for construction
activities.
Next activity to be planned / started immediately,
Vegetation clearance
to avoid dust generation and soil erosion during
monsoon.
Turfing / re-vegetation to be started soon after
completion of embankment.
Construction workers must protect natural
resources and wild animals.
Fauna
Hunting will be prohibited.
Nesting grounds & migratory paths will be
protected.
Socio Economic Environment
Debris generated will be disposed to the satisfaction
of Independent Engineer (IE).
Public Health and
Safety
Monitoring of air, water, noise and land during
construction and operational phase.
The Concessionaire / Contractor will provide, erect
and maintain barricades, including signs marking
Accidents
flats, lights and flagmen as required by the
Independent Engineer (IE).
Resettlement Action
A comprehensive resettlement action plan has been
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

10-12
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect
of People

Mitigation Measures3

prepared to improve the standard of living of the


affected population.
Precaution to be taken for any accidental loss to
community and cultural property
Any loss made shall be the responsibility of the
Concessionaire / Contractor and made good by
him at his own cost
Sensitive community
and cultural facilities
Through access / identification to be maintained
Endeavour towards enhancement of community
and cultural property
Community consultations for any relocation,
mitigation measures adopted
The Concessionaire / Contractor shall provide
safe and convenient passage for vehicles,
pedestrians and livestock to and from side roads
and property accesses connecting the project
road. Work that affects the use of side roads and
existing accesses shall not be undertaken without
providing adequate provisions to the prior
satisfaction of the Independent Engineer (IE).
The works shall not interfere with or cause
inconvenience to public or restrict the access to
Temporary Loss of
use and occupation of public or private roads, and
Access
any other access footpaths to or of properties
whether public or private.
Access across the work-zone will be provided for
two slots every day during construction (2 hours
in the morning and 2 hours in the afternoon). For
this purpose the Concessionaire / Contractor shall
maintain a strip of pavement across the work
zone of such quality that light motor vehicles
(LMV) can pass without difficulty or danger of
breaking down.
Road Safety And Construction Safety
Detailed Traffic Control Plans shall be prepared
and submitted to the Independent Engineer (IE)
for approval, 5 days prior to commencement of
works on any section of road. The traffic control
plans shall contain details of arrangements for
Traffic Delays and
construction under traffic and details of traffic
Congestion
arrangement after cessation of work each day.
The Concessionaire / Contractor shall ensure that
the running surface is always maintained in
running condition, particularly during the monsoon
so that no disruption to the traffic flow occurs.
Traffic Control and
The Concessionaire / Contractor shall take all
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Location4

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision
Contractor, NHAI

Cross reference6

During Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

All along the Project


corridor

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

All along the Project


Corridor.

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 112.1 &


112.2

Entire Project site.

During

Concessionaire /

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 112.1 &

10-13
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

RAP

MoRT&H: 112.7

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect
Safety

Mitigation Measures3

Risk from Operations

Risk from Electrical


Equipment

Risk at Hazardous
Activity

necessary measures for the safety of traffic during


construction and provide, erect and maintain such
barricades, including signs, markings, flags, lights
and flagmen as may be required by the
Independent Engineer for the information and
protection of traffic approaching or passing
through the section of the highway under
improvement.
All signs, barricades, pavement markings shall be
as per the MoRT&H specification. Before taking
up construction on any section of the highway, a
traffic control plan shall be devised to the
satisfaction of the Independent Engineer.
The Concessionaire / Contractor is required to
comply with all the precautions as required for the
safety of the workmen as per the International
Labour Organisation (ILO) Convention No. 62 as
far as those are applicable to this contract.
The Concessionaire / Contractor shall supply all
necessary safety appliances such as safety
goggles, helmets, masks, etc., to the workers and
staff.
The Concessionaire / Contractor has to comply
with all regulation regarding safe scaffolding,
ladders, working platforms, gangway, stairwells,
excavations, trenches and safe means of entry
and egress.
No child labour shall be utilized in the project
Adequate precautions will be taken to prevent
danger from electrical equipment.
No material or any of the sites will be so stacked
or placed as to cause danger or inconvenience to
any person or the public.
All necessary fencing and lights will be provided
to protect the public.
All machines to be used in the construction will
conform to the relevant Indian Standards (IS)
codes, will be free from defect, will be kept in
good working order, will be regularly inspected
and properly maintained as per IS provisions and
to the satisfaction of the Independent Engineer
(IE).
All workers employed on mixing asphaltic
material, cement, lime mortars, concrete etc., will
be provided with protective footwear and
protective goggles.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Construction

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision
Contractor

Entire Project site.

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Factory Act

Entire Project site.

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 106

Entire Project site.

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Location4

Time Frame5

10-14
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Cross reference6
112.4
Annexure 8.9

MoRT&H: 111.1
Draft EIA Report
January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Risk caused by Force


Majure

First Aid

Safety Measures
During Construction

Mitigation Measures3
Workers, who are engaged in welding works,
would be provided with welders protective eyeshields. Stonebreakers will be provided with
protective goggles and clothing and will be seated
at sufficiently safe intervals.
The use of any toxic chemical shall be strictly in
accordance with the manufacturers instructions.
The Independent Engineer (IE) shall be given at
least 6 working days notice of the proposed use
of toxic chemical. A register of all toxic chemicals
delivered to the site shall be kept and maintained
up to date by the Concessionaire / Contractor.
The register shall include the trade name,
physical properties and characteristics, chemical
ingredients, health and safety hazard information,
safe handling and storage procedures, and
emergency and first aid procedures for the
product.
All reasonable precaution will be taken to prevent
danger of the workers and the public from fire, flood,
drowning, etc. All necessary steps will be taken for
prompt first aid treatment of all injuries likely to be
sustained during the course of work.
At every workplace, a readily available first aid
unit including an adequate supply of sterilised
dressing material and appliances will be provided
as per the Factory Act.
Workplaces, remote and far away from regular
hospitals will have indoor heath units with one
bed for every 250 workers. Suitable transport will
be provided to facilitate take injured or ill
person(s) to the nearest applicable hospital. At
every workplace and construction camp,
equipment and nursing staff shall be provided.
All relevant provisions of the Factories Act, 1948
and The Building and other Construction Workers
(regulation of Employment and Conditions of
Service) Act, 1996 will be adhered to.
Adequate safety measures for workers during
handling of materials at site will be taken up.
The register will include the trade name, physical
properties
and
characteristics,
chemical
ingredients, health and safety hazard information,
safe handling and storage procedures, and
emergency and first aid procedures for the
product.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Location4

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Cross reference6

MoRT&H: 111.6

Entire Project site

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Entire Project site.

During
Construction

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

All construction sites

During
construction

10-15
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

MoRT&H: 1207.6,
Factories Act,
1948

Factories Act,
1948 and The
Building and other
Construction
Workers
(Regulation Of
Employment and
Conditions of
Service) Act, 1996

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Hygiene

Clearing of
Construction of
Camps &
Restoration

Monitoring at critical
locations
OPERATION STAGE
Water
quality
degradation due to
road run-off

Mitigation Measures3
Latrines shall be provided with septic tank. The
effluents can be diverted for horticulture inside the
camps.
The septic tank may be cleaned once in 6 months
and filter cleaned after a year.
All
temporary
accommodation
must
be
constructed and maintained in such a fashion that
uncontaminated water is available for drinking,
cooking and washing.
Garbage bins must be provided in the camps and
regularly emptied and the garbage disposed off in
a hygienic manner.
Adequate health care is to be provided for the
work force. Unless otherwise arranged for by the
local sanitary authority, the local medical health or
municipal authorities.
On completion of the works, all such temporary
structures shall be cleared away, all rubbish
burnt, septic tank and other disposal pits filled in
and effectively sealed off and the outline site left
clean and tidy, at the Concessionaire /
Contractors expense, to the entire satisfaction of
the Independent Engineer (IE).
Concessionaire / Contractor to prepare site
restoration plans for approval by the Independent
Engineer (IE). The plan is to be implemented by the
Concessionaire / Contractor prior to demobilisation.
On completion of the works, all temporary structures
will be cleared away, all rubbish burnt, excreta or
other disposal pits or trenches filled in and effectively
sealed off and the site left clean and tidy, at the
Concessionaire / Contractors expense, to the entire
satisfaction of the Independent Engineer (IE).
Residual topsoil will be distributed on adjoining /
proximate barren / rocky areas as identified by the
Independent Engineer (IE) in a layer of thickness of
75mm - 150mm.

Location4

Time Frame5

During
construction

All Workers Camps

All Workers Camps

The monitoring of land, air, water and Noise to be


carried out identified critical locations as given in
Table 4.1, 4.4, 4.6 & 4.9 besides locations identified
by IC along the project corridor.
Silt fencing, Oil & Grease traps, etc. shall be
provided at sensitive water bodies to ensure that
the water quality is not impaired due to

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

Concessionaire /
Contractor

At sensitive water
bodies identified.
As specified in the

During Operational
Stage
10-16

UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

NHAI and / or SPCB

IE

NHAI

Cross reference6

Table 4.1, 4.4, 4.6 &


4.9 of chapter 4;
Table 10.1: EMP
Budget &
Annexure 10.1
As per Monitoring
plan in Annexure
10.1
Draft EIA Report
January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Contamination
of
Soil and Water
Resources
from
Spills Accidents

Traffic and Accident


Safety

Accidents involving
Hazardous
Materials

Road
side
plantation

tree

Mitigation Measures3

Location4

contaminants from road run-off.


Monitoring shall be carried out as specified in the
Monitoring plan
Contingency plans to be in place for cleaning up
of spills of oil, fuel and toxic chemicals.
Spill of oil, fuel and automobile servicing units
without adequate disposal systems in place to be
discouraged.
Accidental spills are potentially disastrous, but its
probability is quite low as one of the objectives of
this project is to enhance road safety.
The Public will be informed about the regulations
on land pollution.
Land pollution monitoring program has been
devised for checking pollution level and
suggesting remedial measures.
Depending on the level of congestion and traffic
hazards, traffic management plans will be
prepared.
Traffic control measures including speed limits to
be enforced strictly.
Road control width to be enforced. Local
government bodies and development authorities
will be encouraged to control building
development along the highway.
Compliance with the Hazardous Wastes
(Management and Handling) Rules, 1989
Creation of an Emergency Response team
For delivery of hazardous substances, permit
license, driving license and guidance license will
be required.
Public security, transportation and fire fighting
departments will designate a special route for
vehicles delivering hazardous material. These
vehicles will only be harboured at designated
parking lots.
In case of spill of hazardous materials, the
relevant departments will be intimated at once to
deal with it with the spill contingency plan.
Trees planted along the corridor shall be
maintained for a period of three years.
Maintenance works include, watering of the
saplings, and all necessary measures for survival
of the sapling.
The avenue plantation should be completed,

monitoring plan

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Entire Project
corridor.

During Operational
Stage

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE, NHAI

All along the Project


corridor and
surrounding areas.

During Operational
Stage

Concessionaire /
Contractor, Local
Government Bodies,
Development
Authorities.

NHAI /
Concessionaire /
Contractor

All along the Project


corridor and
surrounding areas

During Operational
Stage

Concessionaire /
Contractor

All along the corridor


Immediately from the
planting of sapling

During Operational
Stage

Concessionaire /
Contractor

10-17
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Cross reference6

Through
Operation Stage.

NHAI, Motor
Vehicles
Department,
District
Administration

IE, NHAI

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Environmental
Impact / Aspect

Mitigation Measures3

Location4

Time Frame5

Responsibility
Implementation
Supervision

Cross reference6

maintained and casualties to be replaced.


Discouraging local peoples from cutting tree /
branches for fuel, cattle food etc.
Educating people about the usefulness of trees.
Monitoring at critical
locations

The monitoring of land, air, water and noise to be


carried out identified critical locations as given in
Table 4.1, 4.4, 4.6 & 4.9 besides locations identified
by IC along the project corridor.

Noise

HORN PROHIBITED sign post will be enforced


Maintenance of noise barriers
Discouraging local people from establishing
sensitive receptor near the road.
The public will be informed about the regulations
on noise pollution.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

After completion of
construction
Throughout and after
project development
period

During Operational
Stage

10-18
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Concessionaire /
Contractor

IE

Table 4.1, 4.4, 4.6 &


4.9 of chapter 4;
Table 10.1: EMP
Budget &
Annexure 10.1

SPCB, State Police,


Traffic Police, State
Forest Dept., Transport
Dept., Concessionaire /
Contractor and Planning
Authorities

IE

IRC 35-1971
IRC 79-1981
IRC 93-1995

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

10.4

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PROGRAMME

The Environmental Monitoring Programme has been detailed out in Annexure 10.1 Successful
implementation of the Environmental Monitoring Program is contingent on the following:

The IC is to request the Concessionaire / Contractor to commence all the initial tests for monitoring (i.e.
for Air, Water Quality and Noise Levels) early in the Contract to establish 'base' readings (i.e. to assess
the existing conditions prior to effects from the Construction activities being felt).

The Independent Engineer is to request the Concessionaire / Contractor to submit for approval a
proposed schedule of subsequent periodic tests to be carried out.

Monitoring by the Independent Engineers Officer of all the environmental monitoring tests, and
subsequent analysis of results.

Where indicated by testing results, and any other relevant on-site conditions, IC to instruct the
Concessionaire / Contractor to:
Modify the testing schedule (dates, frequency)
Modify (add to or delete) testing locations
Verify testing results with additional testing as/if required
Require recalibration of equipment, etc., as necessary
Request the Concessionaire / Contractor to stop, modify or defer specific construction
equipment, processes, etc., as necessary, that are deemed to have contributed significantly to
monitoring readings in excess of permissible environmental "safe" levels.

10.4.1 Monitoring of Earthworks Activities


Most of the environmental problems related to the construction works are anticipated to be associated with
the earthworks, particularly for the Quarries and Borrow Areas. Details regarding the guidelines and
procedures adopted to minimise the environmental impacts of opening, operating and closing of Quarries
are presented in Annexure 8.2-4. Other environmental effects associated with the earthworks include the
development of adequate temporary drainage to minimise detrimental effects (e.g. erosion) due to run-off,
and safety aspects related to Works implementation.
10.4.2 Monitoring of Concessionaire / Contractor's Facilities, Plant and Equipment

All issues related to negative environmental impacts of the Concessionaire / Contractor's Facilities,
Plant and equipment are to be controlled through:

The Concessionaire / Contractor's self-imposed quality assurance plan

Regular / periodic inspection of the Concessionaire / Contractors plant and equipment

Monthly appraisal of the Concessionaire / Contractor.

Other environmental impacts are to be regularly identified and noted on the monthly appraisal inspection
made to review all aspects of the Concessionaire / Contractor's operation. The officer is to review all monthly
appraisal reports, and through the team leader is to instruct the Concessionaire / Contractor to rectify all
significant negative environmental impacts.
10.5

BUDGET

The environmental budget for the various environmental management measures proposed in the EMP is
detailed in Table 10-2. There are several other environmental issues that have been addressed as part of
good engineering practices, the costs for which have been accounted for in the Engineering Cost. Various
environmental aspects covered under engineering costs are listed below:

Turfing and Pitching of slopes

Construction of slope protection works as retaining walls; breast walls toe walls, drains, and gabions.

Construction of roadside amenities as bus stops etc.

The rates adopted for the budget has been worked out on the basis of market rates and the Schedule of
rates.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


10-19
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Table 10-2: Environmental Budget


Item
No.
1
1.1
1.1
1.1.2
1.2
1.2.1
1.2.2
1.2.3
1.2.4
1.2.5
1.2.6
1.2.7
1.2.8
1.2.9
1.2.10
1.2.11
1.2.12
1.2.13
1.2.14
1.2.15
1.2.16

Component

Description

Unit

MITIGATION / ENHANCEMENT COST


Pre-construction Stage
Land acquisition
Acquisition of private land
Relocation and construction of hand pumps, water storage tanks, open wells, water taps as per
Water
directions of the Engineer.
Construction Stage
Compensatory Re-plantation to offset the loss of trees due to widening of the project corridor in
accordance to the relevant forest laws (2 trees planted for every tree cut) including Plantation and
maintenance
Transplantation of existing trees as per guidelines of the engineer including transportation,
Replantation and maintenance
Planting and maintenance of flowering, shade, medicinal, ornamental & fruit bearing trees in
suitable area for the entire duration of the contract period @ 333 numbers per Km.
Planting of ornamental, medicinal & flowering plants and shrubs in the median for the entire
duration of the contract period @ 1000 numbers per Km as per MoRT&H standard data book
Horticulture
Maintenance of ornamental, medicinal & flowering plants and shrubs in the central verge / median
for the entire duration of the contract period @ 1000 numbers per Km as per MoRT&H standard
data book
Half brick circular tree guard as per design provided by the engineer and complete in all respect as
per MoRT&H Standard Data book for analysis of rates.
Bamboo tree guard as per design provided by the engineer and complete in all respect as per
MoRT&H Standard Data book for analysis of rates.
Landscaping and aesthetics of junctions and at other locations as per design, drawings and
direction of the Environmental Engineer / Environmental Specialist of the Engineer
Slope /
Embankment
Turfing of embankment with grasses and herbs.
protection
Providing Oil Interceptors as per design and drawing at vehicle parking areas and as per directions
Soil
of the Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer.
Cost of transport & distribution of cooking fuel to construction workers to prevent indiscriminate
Flora
felling of trees
Air
Dust Management with sprinkling of water, covers for vehicles transporting construction material
1) Extension of the existing compound walls and 2) Dismantle and new construction of compound
wall at govt. schools, health units etc. using brick masonry work including excavation, levelling,
Noise
plastering, coping etc. up to a height of total 2m above ground level complete in all respect as per
Technical Specifications and as per the direction of the Engineer.
Silt Fencing around soil stockpiled near water bodies and at areas identified by the engineer.
Rainwater Harvesting Structures complete in all respect and confirming to the relevant
specifications as directed by the Engineer and as per drawing approved by Engineer.
Water Quality
Water harvesting structures for storage of water especially during summer and also for the use of
local populace at 10 locations identified by the engineer and as per directions and drawings
approved by the Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

10-20
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Quantity

Unit
(INR)

cost

Total cost (INR)


Detail Cost

Cost in
Crores

Covered in RAP Budget

0.00

0.000

Covered in Utility Shifting Budget

0.00

0.000

No.

15368

1,000.00

5,368,000.00

1.537

No.

2562

10,000.00

25,620,000.00

2.562

No.

27420

1,000.00

27,420,000.00

2.742

No.

82342

100.00

8,234,200.00

0.823

No.

1646840

175.00

288,197,000.00

No.

6855

973.00

6,669,915.00

0.667

No.

15424

300.00

4,627,200.00

0.463

LS

500,000.00

500,000.00

0.050

0.00

0.000

sq. m. (Covered in Engineering Cost)

28.820

Nos.

10

27,000.00

270,000.00

0.027

Months

36

20,000.00

720,000.00

0.072

Km

82.342

30,000.00

2,470,260.00

0.247

LS

15,000,000.00

15,000,000.00

1.500

1000

850.00

850,000.00

0.085

No.

165

35,000.00

5,775,000.00

0.578

No.

10

100,000.00

1,000,000.00

0.100

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Item
No.
1.2.17
1.2.18
1.2.19
1.2.20

Component
Solid Waste
Disposal
Cultural properties
Environmental
Enhancements

1.2.21

Description

Unit

Disposal of Sewage and other wastes in the construction yard and labour camps as per directions
of the Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer.
Relocation of cultural properties
Enhancement of water bodies at locations and chainages as per design, drawings and direction of
the Environmental Engineer / Environmental Specialist of the Engineer.
Enhancement of cultural properties including seating arrangements.
Construction of Bus Shelters

Roadside amenities
1.2.22

Construction of Truck lay-byes

Quantity

Month

36

Unit
(INR)

cost

15,000.00

Air
2.1.2
2.1.3
Water Quality
2.1.4

2.1.5

Noise

2.1.6
2.2

Transportation Cost
Operation Stage

2.2.1
Air
2.2.2

2.2.4

Cost in
Crores
0.054

0.00

0.000

1,000,000.00

1,000,000.00

0.100

LS
2,000,000.00
As per design, Covered in Engineering
Cost
As per design, Covered in Engineering
Cost

2,000,000.00

0.200

0.00

0.000

0.00

0.000

LS

406,261,575.00

40.626

MONITORING COST
Construction Stage

2.1.1

2.2.3

Detail Cost
540000.00

Covered in RAP Budget

TOTAL MITIGATION / ENHANCEMENT COST


2
2.1

Total cost (INR)

Water Quality

Sampling and monitoring ambient Air Quality and gaseous pollutants as per CPCB Standard
Procedures at 8 locations including approved hot mix plant locations, sensitive area and chainages
as per direction by Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer of the
Engineer for thrice a year for three years as per the Monitoring Plan given in Annex 10.1.
Analysis charges of Ambient air from samples collected for SO 2, PM2.5, PM10, Pb, CO and NO2 as
per MoEF charges.
Collection of grab samples of water quality at 10 locations for 3 years at the end of summer /
before start of monsoon as per the Monitoring Plan given in Annex 10.1 as per direction of
Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer.
Analysis of water quality at locations in the monitoring plan for pH, Turbidity, total solids, turbidity
COD, BOD, DO, Chlorides, Hardness, Oil & Grease, TSS, TDS, Total Coliform, Iron, Fluorides,
Nitrates, E. coli, Total coliform and faecal coliform as specified in "Standard Methods for
Examination of Water and Wastewater" published by WEF, AWWA and APHA as per direction of
Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer and as per MoEF rate list.
Monitoring Noise level at Equipment Yards, Sensitive area and Settlements using hand held noise
meters at 10 locations as per directions of Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of
the Engineer for thrice a year for three years as per the Monitoring Plan given in Annex 10.1.
Transportation cost for monitoring of noise, air and water during construction period for 3 years
Sampling and monitoring ambient Air Quality and gaseous pollutants as per CPCB Standard
Procedures at 6 locations (5 mentioned in EIA report and at 1 chainage identified by the Engineer)
including sensitive area and chainages as per direction by Environmental Specialist /
Environmental Engineer of the Engineer for once a year for one season for 8 years in alternate
years as per Annex 10.1
Analysis charges of Ambient air from samples collected for SO 2, PM2.5, PM10, Pb, CO and NO2 as
per MoEF charges.
Collection of grab samples of water quality at 10 locations (6 mentioned in EIA report and 4 at
chainages identified by the Engineer) identified by the engineer for 8 years in the alternate years at
the end of summer / before start of monsoon as per direction of Environmental Specialist /
Environmental Engineer of the Engineer
Analysis of water quality at locations in the monitoring plan for pH, Turbidity, total solids, COD,

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

10-21
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

No. of
Samples

72

1,500.00

108,000.00

0.011

No. of
Samples

72

3,000.00

216,000.00

0.022

No. of
Samples

30

400

12,000.00

0.001

No. of
Samples

36

6,000.00

216,000.00

0.022

Nos.

90

2,500.00

225,000.00

0.023

L.S.

75,000.00

75,000.00

0.008

No. of
Samples

48

1,500.00

72,000.00

0.007

No. of
Samples

48

3,000.00

144,000.00

0.014

No. of
Samples

80

400

32,000.00

0.003

No. of

80

6,000.00

480,000.00

0.048

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Item
No.

2.2.5

2.2.6
2.2.7
3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5

Component

Description

Unit

BOD, DO, Chlorides, Hardness, Oil & Grease, TSS, TDS, Total Coliform, Iron, Fluorides, Nitrates,
E. coli, Total coliform and faecal coliform etc. as specified in "Standard Methods for Examination of
Water and Wastewater" published by WEF, AWWA and APHA as per direction of Environmental
Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer and as per MoEF rate list.
Choked drains and water bodies undergoing siltation and subject to debris disposal should be
monitored under cleaning operations all throughout the corridor and at frequency as mentioned in
the monitoring plan.
Monitoring Noise level at Equipment Yards, Sensitive area and Settlements using hand held noise
meters at 6 locations (5 mentioned in EIA report and at 1 chainage identified by the Engineer)
Noise
identified by the Engineer for once a year for 8 years in the alternate years as per directions of
Environmental Specialist / Environmental Engineer of the Engineer
Transportation Cost Transportation cost for monitoring of noise, air and water during operation period for three years.
TOTAL MONITORING COST
MISCELLANEOUS COST
Training
Training
Advocacy and
Holding meetings for policy planning and subsequent review meetings with Revenue Department,
Policy Making
Forest Department, local representatives, NGOs, etc. regarding development controls.
Administrative
Maintenance of vehicle with the Environment Cell, Data processing, administrative support,
Charges including
stationery etc.
logistics
Digital Camera for the Environment Cell
Miscellaneous
Items
Portable sound level meter
TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS COST
TOTAL COST
Contingency @ 5% on Total Environmental Cost
GRAND TOTAL

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

10-22
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Quantity

Unit
(INR)

cost

Total cost (INR)


Detail Cost

Cost in
Crores

Samples

L.S.

75,000.00

75,000.00

0.008

Nos.

48

2,500.00

225,000.00

0.023

L.S.

30,000.00

30,000.00
1,912,400.00

0.003
0.191

L.S.

250,000.00

250,000.00

0.025

Year

20

25,000.00

500,000.00

0.050

Months

36

35,000.00

1,260,000.00

0.126

No.
No.

1
1

25,000.00
150,000.00

25,000.00
150,000.00
2,185,000.00
410,358,975.00
20517948.75
430876923.75

0.003
0.015
0.219
41.036
2.052
43.088

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

11.
11.1

BORROW AREAS STUDY

MINING OF SOIL / EARTH FROM BORROW AREAS FOR THE PROJECT

Borrow areas are required to be identified in order to supply earth materials for filling materials to be used
in sub grade and embankments. It is the endeavour to utilise the cut materials generated from the project
road to be utilised in the embankment and sub grade. However the quantity generated is not sufficient to
meet the demand of the filling materials and hence borrow areas are to be identified and selected after
material testing to use as fill materials.
11.1.1 Quantities Required
Significant borrowing of earth is required for the embankment fill material, and for the construction of the
3
pavement. A total of 35,95,314.00 m of earth quantities shall be required for sub grade and fill materials
Box 11-1: Earth Quantities required and to be Utilised

Earth material required for entire construction works


Earth material to be produced due to cutting in road works
Earth material utilised from cutting in road works

=
=
=

37,89,786.00 m
3
2,77,817.00 m
3
1,94,472.00 m

Earth material required from borrow areas for entire construction works

35,95,314.00 m3

The earth materials produced from Burrowing shall be utilised as sub-grade material. The burrow areas proposed
have sufficient quantities for the entire project works

Use of Fly Ash as Fill Material


There are no Thermal Power Stations within the project area for supply of fly ash for the project corridor.
Thus the use of fly ash hasnt been explored for filling up of embankments.
11.1.2 Proposed Borrow Areas
Borrow Areas Identified
A total of 71 borrow areas were selected and identified based on both technical and environmental
criteria.
Table 11-1: Details of Borrow area along the Project Road
Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Chainage

Village/
Panchayat

Taluka

60.600

Hadalsang

Indi

60.600

Hadalsang

Indi

60.600

Hadalsang

Indi

60.600

Hadalsang

Indi

60.600

Sonakanahalli

Indi

579364.95
579494.00
579395.74
579161.89
579395.74
579161.89
579161.89
579021.13
579619.00
579572.00
579799.00
579967.74
579967.74
579791.00
580028.40
579871.58
581006.00
580937.00
580941.00
581231.96

1896959.91
1896946.00
1896648.81
1896700.41
1896648.81
1896700.41
1896700.41
1896520.34
1897528.00
1897328.00
1897184.00
1897373.50
1897373.50
1897191.00
1897342.16
1897144.93
1896669.00
1896637.00
1896868.00
1896870.70

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

RHS

5.200

136/1

0.567

RHS

5.200

135/2

0.567

RHS

5.200

132

0.809

RHS

5.200

131

0.202

RHS

3.600

102/3

0.364

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Chainage

Village/
Panchayat

Taluka

60.600

Hadalsang

Indi

60.600

Sonakanahalli

Indi

36.000

Dhulikhed

Indi

46.600

Zalaki

Indi

10

45.800

Arajanal

Indi

11

77.700

Tidagundi

Bijapur

12

80.250

Tidagundi

Bijapur

13

85.000

Kannal

Bijapur

14

85.000

Kannal

Bijapur

15

85.500

Kannal

Bijapur

16

85.500

Kannal

Bijapur

581006.00
580937.00
580781.14
580774.09
581574.00
581707.00
582102.65
582106.01
589382.00
589468.00
589667.00
589599.08
585532.00
585537.00
585314.00
585311.00
586241.00
585986.00
586111.00
586398.87
580812.71
580807.66
580963.04
580961.27
580025.61
580028.14
579891.15
579890.36
578897.40
578612.94
578940.03
578655.57
578967.38
578967.38
579014.43
579014.69
579196.93
579266.74
579204.08
579303.55
579270.72
579307.16
579299.09
579200.19
579513.64
579527.81
579219.80
579205.63

1896669.00
1896637.00
1896885.05
1896663.68
1896405.00
1896407.00
1896393.51
1896322.90
1919973.00
1919772.00
1920002.00
1919776.94
1910356.00
1910382.00
1910462.00
1910352.00
1910699.00
1910817.00
1911037.00
1910995.17
1880368.97
1880256.83
1880357.35
1880256.83
1877868.16
1877926.29
1877932.24
1877870.75
1873063.63
1872999.14
1873391.37
1873326.88
1873181.69
1873148.06
1873182.41
1873148.78
1872855.94
1872856.67
1872748.64
1872857.12
1872747.98
1872798.20
1872745.96
1872802.13
1872851.12
1872764.46
1872629.64
1872716.30

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

RHS

3.600

102/1

0.364

RHS

0.500

117

0.486

RHS

0.100

149

0.405

RHS

0.500

67/1

0.202

RHS

0.100

173

0.971

LHS

0.100

0.162

RHS

0.100

111B

0.081

RHS

0.100

(100 to
102) &
(103 to
107)

3.238

LHS

0.100

LHS

0.400

91/1

0.121

LHS

0.400

87 & 91/2

0.405

0.081

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Chainage

Village/
Panchayat

Taluka

17

85.500

Kannal

Bijapur

18

91.200

Bhutnal

Bijapur

18/
A

70.100

Bhutnal

Bijapur

19

70.100

Basanal

Indi

20

68.000

Horti

Indi

21

68.900

Horti

Indi

22

70.200

Agasnal

Indi

23

70.200

Agasnal

Indi

24

70.200

Agasnal

Indi

578523.00
578481.00
578467.00
578424.00
578480.00
577509.18
577648.98
577615.96
577511.56
577517.72
577365.82
577370.71
583561.63
583576.28
583687.35
583811.58
583983.35
583957.27
583923.29
583458.53
583464.23
583488.11
583487.08
583541.53
583542.88
583630.80
583391.31
583363.36
583615.73
583705.72
583944.87
583942.74
583767.06
583516.74
583483.03
583632.74
583608.88
583174.66
583167.31
583140.35
583077.90
583091.23
583174.66
583053.46
583039.86
583040.58
583172.38
583040.58

1868320.00
1868233.00
1868200.00
1868234.00
1868354.00
1867131.27
1867154.87
1867186.58
1867199.30
1867230.63
1867209.72
1867288.23
1887161.33
1887041.62
1887006.17
1886976.20
1886934.25
1887012.63
1887159.01
1887461.44
1887524.64
1887523.62
1887567.13
1887572.48
1887447.32
1889112.28
1889099.87
1889318.95
1889334.29
1889159.08
1889174.17
1888687.94
1888694.85
1888333.97
1888239.01
1888294.93
1888205.45
1886828.05
1886904.62
1886974.22
1886963.46
1886822.35
1886828.05
1886821.72
1886821.63
1886719.79
1886731.34
1886719.79

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

LHS

0.900

81/2C/1

0.364

LHS

0.000

93

0.162

LHS

0.450

173/1

0.809

LHS

0.000

99/5

0.081

LHS

0.000

459

0.162

LHS

0.400

RHS

0.200

104/2A

0.162

RHS

0.200

104/2B

0.162

RHS

0.200

104/2C

0.162

0.121

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Chainage

Village/
Panchayat

Taluka

25

68.200

Horti Tanda

Indi

26

91.200

Bhutnal

Indi

27

72.600

Agasnal

Indi

28

72.650

Agasnal

Indi

29

70.100

Agasnal

Indi

30

68.700

Horti

Indi

31

61.600

Savakanalli

Indi

32

63.000

Halagunki

indi

33

88.100

Arakeri Tanda

Bijapur

583042.71
583169.75
583172.38
583723.64
583943.66
583939.57
583887.97
583731.68
583746.43
577615.96
577578.87
577524.51
577517.72
577511.56
582132.08
582432.78
582460.53
582476.84
582406.49
582387.41
582369.90
582256.60
582107.77
581744.61
581878.94
581760.06
581709.35
581486.25
581475.93
582482.11
582783.88
582730.67
582505.06
582710.97
582481.82
582498.27
582481.82
583888.23
583877.02
583817.16
583817.16
584583.12
584558.57
584323.01
584313.47
578206.21
578178.18
578390.95
578362.19

1886635.56
1886651.41
1886731.34
1889158.39
1889176.01
1889385.09
1889382.33
1889237.91
1889383.69
1867186.58
1867222.60
1867258.40
1867230.63
1867199.30
1887624.07
1887514.93
1887317.68
1887171.22
1887171.43
1887322.13
1887377.63
1887489.56
1887499.10
1887255.29
1886831.02
1886823.21
1886994.04
1887032.26
1887152.48
1887165.40
1887240.88
1886936.42
1886948.12
1888666.46
1888648.04
1888509.82
1888648.04
1895572.18
1895521.51
1895595.99
1895595.99
1894783.24
1894915.52
1894923.72
1894676.84
1870222.76
1870127.80
1870177.60
1870081.11

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

LHS

0.000

459/4

0.243

LHS

0.300

93.0

0.040

RHS

2.000

72

0.809

RHS

2.000

73

0.809

RHS

0.500

RHS

1.000

RHS

0.500

LHS

1.000

LHS

0.200

0.607

440

0.283

0.040

80

0.567

0.202

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Chainage

Village/
Panchayat

Taluka

34

88.100

Arakeri Tanda

Bijapur

35

86.200

Barradgi
Tanda LT1

Bijapur

36

86.000

barradgi

Bijapur

37

85.000

Kannal Tanda

Bijapur

38

75.100

Bommanahalli

Indi

39

56.250

Nandurgi

Indi

40

60.450

Sankanahalli

Indi

41

65.500

Horti

Indi

42

56.250

Nandurgi

Indi

43

59.100

Hadalsang

indi

44

65.300

Deginal

Indi

577688.03
577658.11
577614.46
577645.42
578590.37
578244.79
578320.79
578574.04
578803.48
578745.33
579183.79
579131.60
579083.34
579102.43
578786.18
578830.53
581571.74
581439.63
581842.13
581695.13
581138.25
581191.75
581679.06
581479.74
581381.44
581209.82
581366.95
581508.63
581643.50
581609.62
581505.68
581240.44
581506.88
581239.24
585940.83
586051.35
586158.60
585881.08
581662.00
581788.87
582604.78
582495.67
580105.80
580924.80
580194.96
580194.96
584300.54
584878.68
584997.44
584355.62

1870396.03
1870301.66
1870313.32
1870409.13
1872204.16
1872217.89
1871983.51
1872037.19
1872287.17
1872112.92
1872159.94
1871992.52
1872729.96
1872612.08
1872601.71
1872728.86
1882645.99
1882414.84
1882487.17
1882261.57
1901440.64
1901472.53
1902159.80
1902122.80
1902285.90
1902059.21
1901935.38
1901743.58
1901767.20
1901977.68
1895777.67
1895730.42
1895685.10
1895822.99
1892613.17
1892610.20
1893022.12
1893032.40
1902379.76
1902991.35
1903031.13
1902512.30
1899686.80
1900150.47
1900270.23
1900270.23
1891744.63
1891917.43
1891594.00
1891429.50

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

RHS

0.500

RHS

0.100

LHS

0.100

RHS

0.300

LHS

0.200

RHS

4.500

184,194
& 188

1.497

RHS

3.200

221/3,
219/B/1,
132

0.324

LHS

2.600

20/2

1.052

RHS

4.000

221

0.445

RHS

4.800

0.486

LHS

0.950

0.202

1.202

34

0.728

0.728

91/3

0.445

0.809

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Chainage

Village/
Panchayat

Taluka

45

65.300

Deginal

Indi

46

65.700

Deginal

Indi

47

90.750

Bhutnal

Indi

48

90.750

Bhutnal

Indi

49

90.750

Deginal

Indi

50

65.500

Nimbalkhed

Indi

51

60.450

Sankanhalli

Indi

52

60.450

Sankanhalli

Indi

53

60.450

Hadalsang

Indi

54

75.000

Dommanal

Indi

55

99.300

Ukamnal

Bijapur

56

85.500

Kannal

Indi

584997.44
584355.62
585798.53
584827.91
583117.89
582996.74
582915.50
583046.44
580688.32
580866.32
580928.20
580757.57
581070.10
581454.50
581137.61
580928.20
581070.10
581454.50
581668.46
581299.06
589085.00
588895.00
588773.55
588963.55
582653.80
582665.97
582531.31
582543.49
582531.31
582515.42
582605.06
582589.17
581734.62
581812.00
581967.40
581890.02
581297.61
581248.74
581475.00
581617.12
583205.15
583481.42
583434.17
583268.63
579527.81
579312.89
579320.99
579550.98

1891594.00
1891429.50
1890831.44
1890690.51
1891412.62
1891437.46
1891331.90
1891258.94
1867769.57
1867804.01
1867878.96
1867869.59
1867620.10
1867783.14
1868141.09
1867878.96
1867620.10
1867783.14
1867542.89
1867329.24
1893118.00
1893166.00
1892685.26
1892637.26
1896118.09
1896200.35
1896149.34
1896231.63
1896149.34
1896035.57
1896132.76
1896018.99
1898069.20
1897973.52
1898281.42
1898377.10
1883169.12
1882775.30
1882753.25
1883027.78
1859860.66
1859834.76
1860096.81
1860029.27
1872764.46
1872670.39
1872559.68
1872679.48

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

LHS

1.200

0.809

RHS

0.300

0.202

LHS

4.000

0.081

LHS

4.000

0.324

LHS

4.000

0.405

LHS

6.500

226/1,
226/2
& 226/3

0.971

RHS

1.340

107

0.121

RHS

1.700

106 &
106/2

0.121

RHS

3.000

47

0.121

RHS

0.200

1.012

LHS

4.000

0.486

LHS

0.600

0.324

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Chainage

Village/
Panchayat

Taluka

57

69.000

Basanal

Indi

58

65.200

Horti

Indi

59

63.000

Horti

Indi

60

60.800

Halagunki

Indi

61

99.150

Shivgeri

Bijapur

62

60.450

Sankanahalli

Indi

63

40.000

Yeligi PH

Indi

64

40.000

Yeligi PH

Indi

65

68.700

Horti Tanda

Indi

66

68.700

Horti Tanda

Indi

67

68.700

Horti Tanda

Indi

68

99.150

Ukamnal

Bijapur

584913.95
585049.86
585087.70
584943.54
584026.66
584024.76
584279.88
584266.43
584171.02
584125.69
584117.80
584158.27
584220.66
584334.94
584264.64
584290.96
580672.65
580817.89
580768.66
580444.65
581592.65
581623.42
581602.38
581571.61
587693.00
587682.00
587644.00
587741.00
587653.00
587653.00
587760.00
582397.70
582375.65
582710.97
582733.02
582481.52
582498.27
582296.91
582280.46
582117.43
582092.46
582274.93
582280.46
583449.00
583574.00
583661.26
583706.51
583828.58
583778.98
583685.50
583563.17

1887632.60
1887567.47
1887970.51
1888018.28
1891877.31
1892052.14
1891928.39
1891756.71
1894078.14
1894091.55
1894004.62
1893997.98
1896398.61
1896457.65
1896551.03
1896305.23
1859213.61
1859087.43
1858864.85
1859090.18
1895695.32
1895690.09
1895798.59
1895803.82
1916262.00
1916388.00
1916391.00
1916190.00
1916177.00
1916177.00
1916050.00
1888857.58
1888640.76
1888666.46
1888883.28
1888648.04
1888509.82
1888487.89
1888626.11
1888610.73
1888786.77
1888762.60
1888626.11
1860107.00
1860035.00
1859983.66
1859957.04
1860143.36
1860172.68
1860226.92
1860302.92

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-7
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

RHS

2.100

197

0.546

LHS

0.800

0.436

LHS

0.500

0.081

LHS

0.100

LHS

1.500

1.214

LHS

2.200

0.040

RHS

1.100

0.040

RHS

1.200

0.243

RHS

0.800

0.721

RHS

0.800

0.201

RHS

0.800

0.269

LHS

4.100

0.688

75

0.121

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including
strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of
NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Co-ordinate
Sl.
No

Village/
Panchayat

Chainage

Taluka

69

99.150

Mahalianapur

Bijapur

70

99.150

Baratagi

Bijapur

71

85.300

Baratagi

Bijapur

584019.00
584031.00
584040.70
584351.03
584341.33
584329.33
579478.00
579457.00
579791.00
579812.00
580191.00
580154.00
580731.00
580787.00
Total

1860200.00
1860070.00
1859964.89
1859993.54
1860098.65
1860228.65
1872176.00
1871938.00
1872190.00
1872428.00
1872125.00
1872027.00
1872089.00
1872265.00

Side

Lead
in km

Survey
Nos.

Qty
(Lakhs
cum)

LHS

4.200

0.728

LHS

0.800

1.497

LHS

1.700

1.497

36.035

Borrow Area Location Map


The borrow area Location map is given in Figure 11-1.
Agreement with Landowners
The Concessionaire shall sign a lease / purchase agreements with the present owner of the land. The
concessionaire shall furnish the statement of ownership of the land along with lease / purchase
agreements to the IE & NHAI.
NOC from the Gram Panchayat / Local body
NOC from the Gram Panchayat / Local Bodies shall be collected for each and every individual borrow
areas and submitted along with the Final EIA Report at the stage of submitting the proposal for Prior
Environmental Clearance.
Selection Criteria
Borrow areas were identified based on a number of selection criteria. These included:

Total amount of borrow area available and quantity that can be made available

Lead distance of the borrow area from the project road

Existing land use including Agricultural / Barren / Scrub / grazing / any other type (priority were given
to barren & non agricultural areas)

Ownership of the land

Vegetation / trees to be removed

Erosion / degradation potential

Distance and name of the nearest settlement

Distance from the nearest surface water body

Drainage pattern of the area

Suitability of material for sub grade and embankment use through material testing

Public Opinion (there were no objections or issues raised by the general public during the public
hearing on the selection of borrow areas)

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-8
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Figure 11-1: Borrow Area Location Map

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd

11-9
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

11.2

MINING METHODOLOGY / TECHNIQUES PROPOSED

11.2.1 Approved Mining Plan


A copy of the approved mining plan from the State Government shall be submitted along with the Final EIA
Report at the stage of submitting the proposal for Prior Environmental Clearance.
11.2.2 Mining Process
The mining process is opencast semi mechanized method (only excavator and dumper combination) without
drilling and blasting and the work shall be as per relevant government rules.
11.2.3 General Procedure for Excavating Borrow Area
To avoid any embankment slippage, the borrow areas will not be dug continuously, and the size and shape
of borrow pits will be decided by the Engineer. Redevelopment of the borrow areas to mitigate the impacts
will be the responsibility of the Concessionaire. The Concessionaire shall evolve site-specific redevelopment
plans for each borrow area location, which shall be implemented after the approval of the Supervision
Consultant.
Precautionary measures as the covering of vehicles will be taken to avoid spillage during transport of borrow
materials. To ensure that the spills, which might result from the transport of borrow and quarry materials do
not impact the settlements, it will be ensured that the excavation and carrying of earth will be done during
day-time only. The unpaved surfaces used for the haulage of borrow materials will be maintained properly.
Borrowing of earth shall be carried out at locations recommended as follows:
Non-Cultivable Lands: Borrowing of earth will be carried out upto a depth of 2.0 m from the existing ground
level. Borrowing of earth shall not be done continuously. Ridges of not less than 8m width shall be left at
intervals not exceeding 300 m. Small drains shall be cut through the ridges, if necessary, to facilitate
drainage. Borrow pits shall have slopes not steeper than 1 vertical in 4 horizontal.
Productive Lands: Borrowing of earth shall be avoided on productive lands. However, in the event of
borrowing from productive lands, under circumstances as described above, topsoil shall be preserved in
stockpiles. The conservation of topsoil shall be carried out as described in section of this chapter. At such
locations, the depth of borrow pits shall not exceed 45 cm and it may be dug out to a depth of not more than
30 cm after stripping the 15 cm top soil aside.
Elevated Lands: At locations where private owners desire their fields to be leveled, the borrowing shall be
done to a depth of not more than 2 m or up to the level of surrounding fields.
Borrow pits along Roadside: Borrow pits shall be located 5m away from the toe of the embankment. Depth
of the pit should be such that the bottom of the pit shall not fall within an imaginary line of slope 1 vertical to
4 horizontal projected from the edge of the final section of the bank. Borrow pits should not be dug
continuously. Ridges of not less than 8 m width should be left at intervals not exceeding 300 m. Small drains
should be cut through the ridges to facilitate drainage.
Borrow pits on the riverside: The borrow pit should be located not less than 15m from the toe of the bank,
distance depending on the magnitude and duration of flood to be withstood.
Community / Private Ponds: Borrowing can be carried out at locations, where the private owners (or in
some cases, the community) desire to develop lands (mostly low-lying areas) for pisciculture purposes and
for use as fishponds.
Borrow Areas near Settlements: Borrow pit location shall be located at least 0.8 km from villages and
settlements. If unavoidable, they should not be dug for more than 30 cm and should be drained.
Guidelines for Stripping, Stocking, Preservation of Top Soil
During the excavation of the borrowing material Concessionaire must ensure that the topsoil from all areas
of cutting and all areas to be permanently covered shall be stripped to a specified depth of 150mm and
stored in stockpiles. At least 10% of the temporarily acquired area shall be earmarked for storing topsoil. The
stockpile shall be designed such that the slope does not exceed 1:2 (vertical to horizontal), and the height of
the pile is restricted to 2m. Stockpiled will not be surcharged or otherwise loaded and multiple handing will
be kept to a minimum to ensure that no compaction will occur. The stockpiles shall be covered with gunny
bags or tarpaulin.
It shall be ensured by the Concessionaire that the topsoil will not be unnecessarily trafficked either before
stripping or when in stockpiles. Stockpiled topsoil will be returned to cover the disturbed area and cut slopes.
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
11-10
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Residual topsoil will be distributed on adjoining/proximate barren/rocky areas as identified by the Engineer in
a layer of thickness of 75mm-150mm. Top soil shall also be utilized for redevelopment of borrow areas.
Landscaping along slopes, medians, incidental spaces etc.
Extent of Mechanization

No drilling is required to undertake removal of soil

Compressors are not required since only soil shall be excavated

Excavators shall be used for loading the soil into dumpers which shall be used for transportation

Work Force
Depending upon the work load, general shifts working, man power will be proposed. However the work
force shall typically consist of Mining Competent Persons (Foreman), Administrative persons, Supervisors,
Skilled & Unskilled labourers.
Blasting

No blasting operations are required

Infrastructure

No infrastructure facilities like aerial rope way, conveyor belts, power lines, buildings, structures and
treatment plants are required for these processes. Therefore no utilization and their physical stability
and maintenance will be required.

11.2.4 Opening of New Borrow Areas


Siting
Borrow areas identified shall be used by the Concessionaire for the project. In case the contractor or the
concessionaire wants to open any new borrow areas other than mentioned in this report, then the selection
and recommendations for borrow areas will be based on environmental as well as civil engineering
considerations. Location of source of supply of material for embankment or sub-grade and the procedure for
excavation or transport of material shall be in compliance with the environmental requirements of the MoEF,
NHAI and as specified in IRC: 10-1961.
The Concessionaire shall establish a new borrow areas only with the prior consent of the Independent
Engineer (IE) only in cases when:

Lead from existing borrow area & quarries is uneconomical and

Alternative material sources are not available. The Concessionaire shall prepare a Redevelopment
Plan for the borrow area and get it approved by the IE.

Certain precautions have to be taken to restrict unauthorised borrowing by the contractor and the
concessionaire. No borrow area shall be opened without permission of the Engineer. The borrowing shall
not be carried out in cultivable lands, unless and until, it shall be agreed upon by the Engineer that there is
no suitable uncultivable land in the vicinity for borrowing or private landowners are willing to allow borrowing
on their fields.
The construction schedule and operations plans to be submitted to the IE prior to commencement of work
shall contain a detailed work plan for procuring materials that includes procurement; transportation and
storage of borrow earth material. The concessionaire shall provide the following:
Selection Criteria for Evaluation of Potential Borrow Areas

A brief statement as to how the site was chosen.

Alternative sites that were considered to be mentioned.

Record any public consultations involved while choosing and what the public concerns were, if any.

Existing land use (Agricultural / Barren / Scrub / grazing / any other type)

Vegetation / trees to be removed

Erosion/degradation potential

Distance and name of the nearest settlement

Distance from the nearest surface water body

Drainage pattern of the area

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-11
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Distance of the nearest Reserve Forest (if any)

Distance of the nearest Sacred Tree (if any)

Distance from the nearest school / hospital / primary health center

Daily / Occasional use of borrow area by the community

Any schemes or avenues for generation of income for adjoining community

Location and Layout


Sketch plans and photographs to be provided along with adequate details:

A map and sketch plan of the area showing the location of the proposed site with respect to the project
road, nearby villages and worker accommodation locations along with indicative distances of the
different sites from each other and from the road.

A detailed sketch plan of the borrow area showing approach and haulage roads, location etc.,
indicating which sites will be quarried in which year or phase, location of stock piles, location of guard
house, perimeter fence, location of water sources, amenities, and any further details.

Photographs of the site


Table 11-2: Probable Borrow Areas data (to be filled by Concessionaire)
Site identification

Sample no.

Approximate Quantity (Cum)

Available Surrounding
Name of Material Nearest
Offset from
Remarks
Land /
Land /
Left
/
Length
Breadth
Depth
Total
Village
type
Chainage
nearest
Terrain
Right
(m)
(m)
(m) (Cum) Terrain
(Km.)
Chainage (m)

Documentation of Borrow Pit


Following checklist provides guidelines in order to ensure that redevelopment of borrow areas must comply
with MoSRT&H, Clause 305.2.2.2 and EMP Requirement. The Concessionaire must ensure that following
data based must be documented for each identified borrow areas that provide the basis of the
redevelopment plan.

Chainage along with offset distance

Area (in Sq m)

Type of Access/width/kutcha/pucca etc from carriageway

Soil Type

Slope / Drainage Characteristics

Water Table of the area or identify from nearest well etc/ask people

Existing Land-use such as barren/agricultural/grazing land

Location/Name/Population of Nearest Settlement/Community & distance from Borrow Area

Daily / occasional use of the Borrow Area by the community, if any

Identification of any other community facility in the vicinity of the borrow pit

Workers Accommodation & Other Infrastructure

Concessionaire to provide details of how many workers will be accommodated on site and what the
accommodation arrangements and standard will be.

All basic amenities and other infrastructure requirement of the labourers shall be made available by the
concessionaire

Removal of trees and plants

Concessionaire to describe briefly the floral species that have had to be removed (it will be helpful give
local names if English or scientific names are not known), and roughly how many.

Approach road

Concessionaire to state whether this will be maintained, and if so in what condition.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-12
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Dismantling and removal of machinery

Concessionaire to state whether and when this shall be done.

Slope stabilisation and / or protection

Measures taken to protect the slope and to guard against any possible serious rock fall, or any
measures to safeguard against hazards like this.

Hand-over

Terms of hand-over of the quarry site to the owner / authority at the end of its use.

Removal of debris and solid waste

Confirmation of Concessionaire in removal of debris and solid wastes and disposal at a suitable site.

For each borrow area source, the plan should be the same. The box below gives the format:
Box 11-2: Borrow Area Plan Format
SI.
No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.

Item

Unit

Name / identity of the location


Nearest project road Chainage.
Name of the owner
Area involved
Existing land use (verification from land records with revenue department)
Land use of the area surrounding the proposed site including a map
Access roads existing conditions, proposed development and maintenance
Tree cutting and vegetation clearance if any, along with compensation measures
Arrangement with the owner (agreement with land owner should be attached as an
Annexure)
Quantity of material to be withdrawn vis-a-vis the material available
Particular areas to be quarried should be clearly identified
Machinery & equipment to be used
Drainage plans
Top soil management
Description of the operating practices to be adopted.
Health facilities
Safety provisions made including fire protection systems and the availability of different
personal protective equipment
Monitoring plans for air, noise and water quality
Copy of the consents to establish and operate should be attached as an Annexure.
Copy of the license from Mining & Geology, Police & Fire dept.
Conditions laid down in the clearances / licenses and plans to ensure compliance
Information on whether or not the quarry will be closed under this project. If yes, the
proposed closure & restoration plan.
Concerns of the local people living in the immediate / near vicinity should be identified
and appropriates measures should be reflected
Photograph of the quarry prior to commencing operations.
Sketch of the layout of the quarry

Details

Remarks by IC,
if any

m2

Nos.

Cum

Attach Photograph of Proposed Site, Location Map, Consents, licenses, safety plan, tree compensation plan, restoration
plan, drainage plan, monitoring plan, Agreement with land owner etc. as annexure
Submitted

Checked & Approved

Signature
Name
Designation
Concessionaire

Signature
Name
Designation
Independent Engineer

11.3

BASELINE ENVIRONMENT

The monitoring of the ambient air, water & noise quality along the project corridor was carried out as per
guidelines of Central Pollution Control Board and the requirements of MoEF by Envirotech East Pvt. Ltd.,
Kolkata on behalf of Feedback Infrastructure Service Pvt. Ltd. The locations are near to the proposed
borrow areas, but on the existing NH 13. Moreover since majority of the borrow areas are located within the
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
11-13
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

project area, no stations were selected specially to monitor the baseline quality of the borrow area. The air
quality in the project area is pristine, by and large, the water quality is satisfactory and the major physical
and chemical parameters are within limits set by the Bureau of Indian Standards for drinking water and
surface water quality for bathing except for total hardness, Calcium & Magnesium. No heavy metals are
presented in the ground water. The noise monitoring survey shows that noise levels are marginally higher
than the noise standards which may be due to mix activities as well as vehicular movement on the road. The
borrow areas are not located within 10 Km of any wild life Sanctuary or national park. The borrow areas also
do not require any diversion of forest areas. No endangered flora has also been reported. The details are
given in chapter 4.
11.4

IMPACT

Significant borrowing of earth is required for the embankment fill material, and for the construction of the
pavement.
Pre Construction Stage
As the borrowing is to be carried out in accordance to the guidelines laid out in IRC-10-1961, no major
adverse impacts are anticipated. Also, productive agricultural areas have been avoided for borrowing.
However, the borrow area pits, if not treated properly after the borrowing is complete, can form stagnant
pools and pose health hazards to prevent which redevelopment of borrow areas need to be worked out.
Additionally, they can also act as breeding ground for vectors like mosquitoes just after monsoon. It is
expected that the implementation of the mitigation measures for borrow area redevelopment proposed as
part of the project will reduce these impacts to acceptable levels.
Construction Stage
Cartage of the borrow materials to the construction sites can be of significance, as almost all such areas are
accessible through dirt tracks only and therefore, spillage and compaction of soil along these tracks will be a
significant impact. Proper protections measures need to be worked out for the minimising of such impacts
during the haulage of borrow materials. Rehabilitation of borrow areas from which earth has been excavated
can be a major potential problem. In addition to visual blight, the other problems more down-to-earth are the
safety issues. At borrow area locations where the owners are willing to create ponds for fisheries etc, proper
protection measures for the drainage of the surrounding land and slope protection measures need to be
worked out.
The soils along the corridor are in general capable to produce high yielding agricultural produce and may be
negatively impacted if unduly borrowed. The loss of productive topsoil due to road construction is a direct
adverse long-term impact. The concessionaire should ensure that in all such locations topsoil must be
stacked aside and replaced after the borrowing activity is over. The soil heaps should be periodically
compacted and sprinkled with water to avoid loss. Emphasis should be laid on maximum use of the stripped
topsoil in medians, road junctions, redevelopment of borrow areas and additional landscaping works in the
road project. The project shall take enforcement measures to prevent / minimise the use of topsoil from other
locations such as borrow areas, stockyards, lands for diversions.
The impact on air, water & noise has been documented in the chapter 6 under the relevant sections.
11.5

MITIGATIONS, ENHANCEMENT & REHABILITATION OF BORROW AREAS

The soils to be used, as sub-grade, select sub-grade and shoulder materials need to be hauled from
designated borrow areas. Similar to the identification of suitable quarries, suitable borrow areas for supply of
soil to the new road formation were also identified. Based on the total requirement and availability of each
soil type, estimates of soil quantity to be obtained from each of the borrow areas were worked out in
accordance with IRC: 10-1961: Recommended Practice for Borrow Pits for Road Embankments constructed
by Manual Operation. In the selection of the borrow areas, care was taken to ensure that:

Sufficient quantity of suitable soil is available from the borrow areas;

The borrow areas are as close to the project road as possible;

The loss of productive and fertile agricultural soil is minimum; and

There is minimum loss of vegetation.

For opening new borrow areas other than those identified the contractor and or concessionaire shall follow
section 11.1.5. The borrowing shall not be carried out in cultivable lands, unless and until, it shall be agreed
upon by the Engineer that there is no suitable uncultivable land in the vicinity for borrowing, or there are
private land owners willing to allow borrowing on their fields. Borrowing of earth shall be carried out at
Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
11-14
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

locations recommended as follows:

Non-Cultivable lands: Borrowing of earth will be carried out to a depth of 1 m. The borrowing of earth
shall not be done continuously and the slope of the edges shall be maintained at not more than 1:4.

Productive lands: Borrowing of earth shall not be carried out on productive lands. However, in the
event of borrowing from productive lands, the contractor has to obtain the prior permission of the
Engineer. At such locations, the depth of borrow pits shall not exceed 45 cm and if may be dug out to a
depth of not more than 30 cm after stripping the 15 cm top soil aside and the topsoil shall be carried out
and preserved.

Borrow Areas near Settlements: Borrow pit location shall be located at least 0.8 km from villages and
settlements. If unavoidable, they should not be dug for more than 30 cm and should be drained.

To avoid any embankment slippages, the borrow areas will not be dug continuously, and the size and shape
of borrow pits will be decided by the Engineer. The borrow pits will be redeveloped by filling and providing
150 mm thick layer of preserved top-soil; by creating shallow pond for water harvesting etc. Replantation of
trees along the edges of borrow areas will be carried out.

Precautionary measures as the covering of vehicles will be taken to avoid spillage during transport of
borrow materials. To ensure that the spills, which might result from the transport of borrow and quarry
materials do not impact the settlements, it will be ensured that the excavation and carrying of earth will
be done during day-time only, The unpaved surfaces used for the haulage of borrow materials will be
maintained properly.

Rehabilitation

The objective of the rehabilitation programme is to return the borrow pit sites to a safe and secure area,
which the general public should be able to safely enter and enjoy. Securing borrow pits sites in a stable
condition should be a fundamental requirement of the rehabilitation process. This could be achieved by
filling the borrow pit floor to approximately the access road level.

It is important to plan restoration from the outset and coordinate restoration activities. In addition to the
bio-diversity issues, land planning considerations are also taken into account when defining a
rehabilitation project in order both to preserve the environment and to generate income for the local
communities. In this framework rehabilitation often leads to the creation of wetlands and or recreation
areas.

Special borrow pit rehabilitation plan shall be specified according to the location and shaping of the
mining slopes after exploitation and overburdened dump, with different subsequent uses e.g. forest,
meadow, water body etc., the re-greening and replanting methods.

Other criteria which shall be followed for rehabilitation of quarry/ borrow pits are as given below:

Borrow pits can be backfilled with rejected construction wastes and will be given a vegetative cover. If
this is not possible, then slopes will be smoothed and depression will be filled in such a way that it looks
more or less like the original ground surface.

During works execution, the Concessionaire shall ensure preservation of trees during piling of
materials; spreading of stripping material to facilitate water percolation and allow natural vegetation
growth; reestablishment of previous natural drainage flows; improvement of site appearance; digging of
ditches to collect runoff; and maintenance of roadways where a pit or quarry is declared useable water
source for livestock or people nearby. Once the works are completed, and at own expense the
concessionaire and Concessionaire shall restore the environment around the work site to its original
splits.

Appropriate plant species for the planting programme have to be selected in consultation with
ecological consultant and local forest department. Depending on the limitations on the availability of
appropriate plant material, harsh growing conditions (lack of irrigation and hot summer) and ongoing
quarry rehabilitation operations there may be substantial loss of plantation and the planting programme
may have to be continued for over 35 years. As plantings are progressively established they should
be monitored before undertaking the next stage to ensure maximum plant survival rates.

The borrow pit immediate surroundings shall be developed as a low maintenance reserve, with
significant areas of native trees and shrubs and areas of longer grass and tussocks forming the open
spaces. Walkways around the borrow site may be constructed. Provision for a future drive-in picnic
area and car parking area may be developed.

Guidelines for Enhancement


Proponent: National Highways Authority of India
11-15
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

As far as possible borrow area selected for enhancement shall be on government / community land in the
vicinity of settlement. The Concessionaire must ensure that any enhancement design proposed should be
workable, maintenance free and preferably worked out in consultation with the community and proposed
enhancement materials should be locally available. The borrow area can be developed either of the
following:
Vegetative Cover

Vegetative cover must be established on all affected land.

Topsoil must be placed, seeded, and mulched within 30 days of final grading if it is within a current
growing season or within 30 days of the start of the next growing season.

Vegetative material used in reclamation must consist of grasses, legumes, herbaceous, or woody
plants or a mixture thereof.

Plant material must be planted during the first growing season following the reclamation phase.

Selection and use of vegetative cover must take into account soil and site characteristics such as
drainage, pH, nutrient availability, and climate to ensure permanent growth.

The vegetative cover is acceptable if within one growing season of seeding:

The planting of trees and shrubs results in a permanent stand, or regeneration and succession rate,
sufficient to assure a 75% survival rate;

The planting results in 90% ground coverage.

The site shall be inspected when the planting is completed and again at one year to ensure compliance
with the reclamation plan.

Certificate of Completion of Reclamation

Concessionaires have to obtained certificate of satisfaction from the landowner and submit it to the
Engineer before final payment is to done.

Working Plan
The Concessionaire must prepare a working plan before enhancing the identified borrow areas. Following
are the inputs that provide the guidelines to the Concessionaire to formulate the working plan:

Access of Property / width of access / material

Orientation of property with respect to the road

Site Slope

Local Drainage / water logging etc if any

Location of nearest culvert etc if any to drain water if required

Any other community resources such as tube well/well etc in vicinity

Location of trees including Species / girth / foliage spread and afternoon shaded area on ground

Surrounding land use; nearby settlements (name of structure/pattern of settlement)

Mark on plan part of the borrow area, most suitable for storing and staking topsoil.

Drawings to be Prepared

The Concessionaire have to prepared the drawings showing both cross-section as well as plan of the
identified borrow areas incorporating following inputs:

Contours if any, depth if any

Location of trees, height, foliage spread and afternoon shaded area on ground

Any other existing details at the road / property interface such as signage/railing/etc.

Details of immediate surrounding for at least 5m on either sides

Photographs to Include
The Concessionaire must ensure that photographs are to be taken before and after the excavation of borrow
materials and also after the implementation of redevelopment plan, incorporating the following:

Overall View from access side

Any other community resource in the vicinity

All spots to be detailed such as access to borrow pit /cluster of existing trees etc.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


11-16
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

12.

12.1

ADDITIONAL STUDY

ROAD SAFETY AUDIT

The road safety audit details are given below


Table 12-1: Road Safety Audit Checklist
Sl.
No.
1.
(a)
2.
3.

Item to be checked
Have all recommendations from the previous stage
been followed? If not, why not?
Have any changes been made which should be
audited at the previous stage?
Is the desired speed compatible with the crosssection and other design elements and is the desired
speed realistic?
Cross-section:

(a)

Has delineation of the carriageway with a kerb been


proposed?

(b)

Is there adequate space for all groups of road users?

(c)
4.
(a)

(b)

(c)

5.

6.

Remarks

Is there appropriate separation between various


groups of road users?
Horizontal and Vertical alignment and visibility:
Does the proposed alignment satisfy any demands on
visibility at junctions and sight distances on free
sections?
Will sight distances/visibility be blocked by traffic
signs, guardrails, bridge parapets, buildings, rigid
obstacles or plantations (now and in the future)
Can parts of the project constitute a risk, especially in
combination (e.g. peaks in the vertical alignment plus
sharp horizontal bends, crests of hills plus traffic
signals)?
Are the lane widths, shoulders, medians and other
cross-section features in accordance with standard
design and adequate for the function of the road?
Check whether there are undesirable variations in
cross-section design. Check cross-falls, which could
affect safety, particularly where sections of existing
highway have been utilized, or where there have
been compromises to accommodate access to
abutting properties.

7.

Check the safety aspects of shoulder provision,


including the provision of paved and earthen
shoulders, the width and treatment on embankments
and cross-fall of shoulders? Are the shoulders likely
to be used by slow-moving vehicles or cyclists?

8.

Check for the provision of climbing lanes in hilly


sections where vertical gradients are high for

Yes
No
Yes

Yes, at median edges throughout the


highway and at divider edges in urban
locations.
In urban sections service roads are provided
to cater local traffic and other slow moving
vehicles.
Yes

Yes
No
Sight distances and setbacks are checked for
their adequacies.
No
Any such possibility is eliminated in the
design.
Yes.

Checked and didnt find any.

Width of shoulders was checked for


adequacy. 1.5 m wide paved shoulders with
same composition as the carriageway and
2.0 m wide earthen shoulders with adequate
design strength are provided.
The shoulders are recommended for stopping
of vehicles in case of emergency, not for
moving.
No hilly sections or sections with high vertical
gradient.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


12-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Sl.
No.

Item to be checked

Remarks

considerable length of the highway?


Typical intersection designs / layouts are
provided conforming to all geometric and
safety requirements.

9.

Junctions, interchanges and their design:

(a)

Will road users coming from all directions (including


side roads) be able to see that they are approaching
a conflict area? Are give-way lines, stop lines, turning
lanes and ramps clearly visible?

Recommended and provided in typical


designs.

(b)

Are existing conjoining and intersecting roads


appropriately adjusted and matched to the new road
(without sharp bends and gradients)?

Recommended.
Junctions are listed as major and minor
separately
with
recommendations
for
interventions.

(c)
(d)
(e)

(f)

(g)

10.
11.
(a)
(b)
(c)

12.
(a)
(b)
(c)
13.

14.

15.

Do the routes of road users through the junction seem


clear for all directions and manoeuvres?
Is there sufficient space for all types of vehicles to
undertake all manoeuvres?
Are the crossing facilities for pedestrians and nonmotorised traffic adequate and safe?
Can parking cause problems?

Recommended.
Recommended.
Yes, typical drawings feature proper signs
and markings.
Likely to cause problems and need to be
avoided. However, the design does not
recommend any parking provisions near
junctions.

Have roundabouts been considered?


In urban areas, ghost markings and left-turning lanes
with islands are safest; they prevent overtaking and
assist pedestrians and cyclists who are crossing the
road.
Decide whether or not old, unremoved section of road
can give undesired optical directions.
Special points at roundabouts:
Are all entrance lanes curved and is speed
adequately reduced?
Will the central island be visible?
Are the measures taken for the benefit of pedestrians
from a safe stopping distance and cycle traffic
adequate?
At the junction/transition to existing roads (especially
from multi-lane to two-lane, dual to single
carriageway):
Are there sudden changes of alignment?
Does the road standard change too rapidly, or can
road users clearly see and recognize the transition in
good time?
Would a roundabout be able to mitigate any sudden
changes in standards and alignment?
Are existing junctions and intersections adjusted and
matched to the new road appropriately (without sharp
bends and gradients)?
Are there any constructions that will be difficult to
drain and are the cross-fall and any gutter gradient
adequate at the critical spots?
Are there places where there is a risk of flooding?
Will overtaking be prevented at critical places (not
simply by restrictions, but also by making it quite

No.

Checked and found no obstruction.


No roundabouts proposed in the present
project.
NA
NA
NA
Typical intersection designs / layouts are
provided conforming to all geometric and
safety requirements.
Checked and didnt find any.
Checked and didnt find any such location.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


12-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

No.
Yes.

Checked and found no.


No.
Yes
Draft EIA Report
January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Sl.
No.
16.
(a)
(b)
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.

22.

23.
24.
(a)
(b)
(c)

Item to be checked
apparent that overtaking is prohibited)?
If signs and road markings have been proposed:
Are the markings consistent and are they adequate?
Has the quantity of information been kept at a
reasonable level?
If markings have not been proposed: will special
markings be necessary?
Is there any risk that cannot be marked out of
existence?
Will there be any large sign constructions? Is so; will
guardrails or breakaway safety devices protect them?
Has it been proposed that lighting be located on the
outside or inside of bends?
Will it be possible to carry out maintenance work (on
lighting, gantries, plantations, etc.) safely and without
using the carriageway or cycle path?
Is the landscaping design or planting likely to lead to
a lowering of safety with mature or seasonal growth?
Is frangible vegetation appropriate?
Are there arrangements for safe access by
emergency vehicles? Check the design of medians
and barriers, and the ability of emergency vehicles to
stop without necessarily disrupting traffic?
Pedestrians
Have pedestrian needs been considered?
If footpaths are not specifically provided, is the road
layout safe for use by pedestrians, particularly at blind
corners and on bridges?
Are pedestrian subways or footbridges sited to
provide maximum use?

(d)

Is the avoidance of footbridges or subways possible


by crossing the road at grade?

(e)

Has specific provision been made for pedestrian


crossings, school crossings or pedestrian signals?

(f)
(g)
25.

26.

27.
28.
29.

Are pedestrian refuges/ kerb extensions needed?


Whether needs of disabled road users taken care of?
Have the needs of public transport users been
considered?
Are bus stops positioned for safety?
Is lighting envisaged in specified locations of the
project? Are the difficulties of illuminating sections of
the road caused by trees or over bridges, for
example?
Are there any aspects of the provision of the lighting
poles, which would require consideration from the
safety point of view in their being struck by vehicles?
Is adequate safe access to the work site available?
Are there any factors requiring specific road safety
provision, including maintenance?
Are there any traffic management features, which
would require special attention during construction or

Remarks
Yes
Yes
Verified and found yes
NA
No.
NA
No sharp curves in the design.
Yes
The proposed landscaping plantation is such
that it will not cause any safety issues.
No
Median openings are found to be wide
enough to allow emergency vehicles. Also
they are placed at standard intervals.

Yes
The blind corners are eliminated. Footpaths
are provided on all new bridges.
Yes
Footbridges / subways are provided at
specific locations where they are warranted
based on site requirements ensured by
surveys and studies.
Yes. Pedestrian underpass, Road signs and
markings are provided.
No pedestrian signals are recommended for
present project.
Provided wherever required.
Yes
Yes
Yes

At major junctions, on approaches and on


flyovers, major bridges, VUPs and PUPs, and
urban locations highway lighting is proposed.
No
Yes
No
Yes. During construction to be taken care by
the concessionaire.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


12-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

Sl.
No.

30.

Item to be checked

Remarks

during the transition from construction to full


operation?
Other checks made at discretion of auditor or client.

NA

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


12-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

13.
13.1

ADDITIONAL TOR COMPLIANCE

THE ADDITIONAL TOR


The proposal was appraised by Expert Appraisal Committee for Building Construction, Coastal
th
th
Regulation Zone, Infrastructure Development, MoEF during its 115 meeting held on 16-17 August
2012.

NHAI had requested for an amendment to convert in to following two projects:


Finalisation of ToR for development of the existing two lane carriageway to four / six lanes dual
carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing two lanes of Proposed Km 0.000 to
Proposed Km 28.200 of NH 13 including Solapur Bypass in Maharashtra
ii) Finalisation of ToR for development of the existing two lane carriageway to four / six lanes dual
carriageway configurations including strengthening of existing two lanes of from proposed Km
28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the states of Maharashtra
& Karnataka
i)

The request was considered by the Expert Appraisal Committee, MoEF during its 118th Meeting held
th
th
on 8 - 9 November, 2012 and was duly approved

The compliance to Additional Terms of Reference as being suggested by Committee members is given
hereunder:
Table 13-1: Compliance to Additional TOR

Sl.
No.
1

ToR Points

Compliance

The project road is within 10 km of Great Indian


Bustard Wildlife Sanctuary. Clearance from NBWL is
required.
The proposal indicates the acquisition of 2.665. Ha
protected forest land. Necessary stage-I forestry
clearance shall be obtained as per OM dated
31.03.2011 and submitted along with final EIA
report.

Project road not within 10 Km. Amended ToR sought


from MoEF which has been accepted by MoEF

It is indicated that approximately 7855 nos. trees


falls within ROW, however, bare minimum trees
shall be cut, the information should be provided
about their species and whether it also involved any
protected or endangered species. Necessary green
belt shall be provided on both side of the highway
with proper central verge and cost provision should
be made for regular maintenance.
Design is to be updated as per the latest IRC
guidelines/practices
Examine and submit the water bodies including the
seasonal ones within the corridor of impacts along
with their status volumetric capacity, quality likely
impacts on them due to the project.
Submit the details of the road safety audit and plans
for meeting the IRC safety requirements.

Examine and submit a brief description of the


project, project name, nature, size, its importance to
the region/ state and the country

The proposal for diversion is in process by the Forest


Department
No endangered / protected species
Avenue plantation along the project road and in
median is proposed & shall be carried out as per IRC:
SP: 21-2009 based on availability of land
The concessionaire shall further try to save approx
2562 trees by transplantation
The cost for avenue, median plantation & maintenance
for entire contract period is budgeted for approximately
Rs 32.385 Crores.
The Species details shall be provided in final EIA
IRC guidelines have been followed for the design of
the project widening and up-gradation of project road
Inventory of water bodies attached in Annexure 4.1.
volumetric capacity shall be given in the final report
Road safety audit carried out and details given in
Chapter 11
Project Name: Development of the existing 2 lanes
carriageway to4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway
configurations including strengthening of existing 2
lanes of from proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km
110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Nature: 4 / 6 laning
Size: Existing length is 82.560 Km and design length is
82.342 Km
Importance:
Better connectivity between NH 9, & NH 63 with

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


13-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No.

ToR Points

Compliance

10

11

12

13

14

15

The water tanks along the project road shall not be


disturbed.
Any litigation(s) pending against the proposed
project and / or any direction or orders passed by
any court of law/ any statutory authority against the
project is to be detailed out.
Submit detailed alignment plan, with details such as
nature of terrain (plain, rolling, hilly), land use
pattern, habitation, cropping pattern, forest area,
environmentally sensitive places, mangroves,
notified industrial areas, sand dunes, sea, river,
lake, details of villages, teshils, districts and states,
latitude and longitude for important locations falling
on the alignment by employing remote sensing
techniques followed by ground truthing and also
through secondary data sources.

Describe
various
alternatives
considered,
procedures and criteria adopted for selection of the
final alternative with reasons

Submit Land use map of the study area to a scale of


1:25,000 based on recent satellite imagery
delineating the crop lands (both single and double
crop), agricultural plantations, fallow lands, waste
lands, water bodies, built-up areas, forest area and
other surface features such as railway tracks, ports,
airports, roads, and major industries etc. and submit
a detailed ground surveyed map on 1:2000 scale
showing the existing features falling within the right
of way namely trees, structures including
archaeological & religious, monuments etc. if any.
If the proposed route is passing through any hilly
area examine and submit the stability of slopes, if
the proposed road is to pass through cutting or
embankment / control of soil erosion from
embankment
If the proposed route involves tunnelling, the details
of the tunnel and locations of tunnelling with
geological structural fraction should be provided. In
case the road passes through a flood plain of the
rover, the details of micro drainage, flood passages
and information on flood periodicity at least of last
50 years in the area should be examined
The project is passing through an Elephant Corridor
a map duly authenticated by Chief Wildlife Warden
showing these features vis--vis the project location
and the recommendations or comments of the chief
Wildlife Warden thereon should be furnished at the
stage of EC. An underpass in Elephant Corridor

NH 13, thus improving connectivity between Pune


& Hyderabad with Bijapur
Faster and safe connectivity;
Decongestion of traffic on road;
Saving in travel time, fuel, transportation cost

The condition shall be complied with


No litigations are pending against the project road.

Detailed Alignment Plan shall be attached


Terrain along the project road is plain
2.665 Ha of forest land will be diverted for the project.
The project does not involve any mangroves,
ecologically sensitive areas, sand dunes, sea, lake etc.
Project Districts: Solapur (Maharashtra) & Bijapur
(Karnataka)
Tehsils: South Solapur (Maharashtra), Indi & Bijapur
(Karnataka)
The project road is an existing NH and connects
Solapur in Maharashtra with Bijapur in Karnataka.
Hence question of various alternatives for the project
road does not arise.
However to decongest built up areas along the project
route bypass proposed at Horti besides a major
realignment at Nandani. Different alternate route were
compared considering the factors like road length,
available ROW, land acquisition, structures to be
demolished, project affected families, forest area
diversion, tree cutting and construction cost.
The details of analysis of alternative are given in
Chapter 7.
The land use map based upon recent satellite imagery
and on desired scale shall be enclosed
The land use of the study area (10km on either side of
project road) comprise of agricultural land, built up
area, forest, rivers, canals & barren areas
Strip plan (1:2000 scale) has also been prepared &
shall be enclosed

The proposed route is not passing through hilly area

The proposed route does not involves tunnelling

The proposed route does not passes through any


elephant corridors

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


13-2
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No.

ToR Points

Compliance

16

Study regarding the Animal bypasses / underpasses


etc. across the habitation areas shall be carried out.
Adequate cattle passes for the movement of
agriculture material shall be provided at the
stretches passing through habitation areas.

All underpasses have been provided based on traffic


studies and IRC 103 which states that pedestrian
grade separators / underpasses are to be provided if
the PV^2 value (p: pedestrian count, v : vehicles in
peak hour) exceed 1 X 10^8. At both locations, PV^2
values are (1.2 X 10^8 and 1.6 X 10^8)
Adequate cattle passes have been provided based on
IRC guidelines

17

If the proposed route is passing through a city /


town, with houses and human habitation on the
either side of the road; the necessity for provision of
bypasses / diversions / under passes shall be
examined and submitted. The proposal should also
indicate the location of wayside amenities, which
should include petrol station/service centre, rest
areas including public conveyance etc.

Bypass at Horti & a major realignment at Nandani have


been proposed for smoother movement of traffic in
densely populated areas.
Chainage wise locations of bypass locations are given
in table 2.5, chapter-2 of EIA report.
Details of wayside amenities, service roads &
underpasses are provided in chapter 2

shall be provided.

6.538 Km service road proposed at 5 locations


21bus bays with bus shelters proposed along with 2
truck lay bays
15 underpasses (8 PUP, 1 CUP, 6 VUP) proposed
2 toll plaza, highway patrol, trauma centre and
ambulance facilities are proposed.
Underpasses & flyovers shall take care of pedestrians
needs & safety. Apart from these, provisions are
proposed for pedestrian safety, in Schedule C (Project
Facilities)
and
Schedule
D
(Standards
&
Specifications) of the Concession Agreement signed
between the Concessionaire and project Proponent.
During construction period, appropriate traffic
management will be adopted to minimize congestion.
During Operation period, the proposed project would
smooth the traffic jams and congestion and would
minimize traffic accidents.
Detailed traffic management plan enclosed as
Annexure 8.8
The project shall improve connectivity in the region,
enhancing the inter-urban, inter-district and inter-state
mobility, and it will attract more traffic in the form of
diverted and generated traffic from the influencing
areas. Development of project road will not lead to any
congestion on other roads in the areas, the measures
for traffic control / diversion while construction is
proposed.

18

Submit details about measures taken for the


pedestrian safety and construction of underpasses
and foot-over bridges along with flyovers and
interchanges.

19

Assess whether there is a possibility that the


proposed project will adversely affect road traffic in
the surrounding areas (e.g. by causing increases in
traffic congestion and traffic accidents).

20

Clearly indicate / provide details regarding the


location, date (along with site photographs with the
background of monitoring equipments and/or
sample collection in process) and protocol adopted
for sampling and analysis of various environmental
parameters as a part of the baseline data collection.

Refer Section 4.2.3 of chapter 4

21

Examine and submit the details of sand quarry,


borrow area and rehabilitation.

Details of quarry areas identified for the project is given


in Tables 8-3, 8-4 & 8-5. Quarry chart enclosed as
Annexure 8.5. Borrow Area details given in table 11.1

22

23
24

Climate and meteorology (max and min


temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, frequency of
tropical cyclone and snow fall); the nearest IMD
meteorological station from which climatological
data have been obtained to be indicated.
The air quality monitoring should be carried out as
th
per the new notification issued on 16 November,
2009.
Identify project activities during construction and

For climate and meteorology data kindly refer Section


4.2.1 of Chapter 4 of EIA. Secondary meteorological
data are procured
Air quality monitoring has been carried out as per new
notification for the period October - December, 2012.
Impact evaluation and results and proposed mitigation

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


13-3
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No.

25

26

27

28

29

ToR Points
operation phases, which will affect the noise levels
and the potential for increased noise resulting from
this project. Discuss the effect of noise levels on
nearby habitation during the construction and
operational phases of the proposed highway.
Identify noise reduction measures and traffic
management strategies to be deployed for reducing
the negative impact if any. Prediction of noise levels
should be done by using mathematical modelling at
different representative locations.
Examine the impact during construction activities
due to generation of fugitive dust from crusher units,
air emissions from hot mix plants and vehicles used
for transportation of materials and prediction of
impact on ambient air quality using appropriate
mathematical model, description of model, input
requirement and reference of derivation, distribution
of major pollutants and presentation in tabular form
for easy interpretation shall be carried out.
Also examine and submit the details about the
protection to existing habitations from dust, noise,
odour etc. during construction stage.
If the proposed route involves cutting of earth, the
details of area to be cut, depth of cut, locations, soil
type, volume and quantity of earth and other
materials to be removed with location of disposal /
dump site along with necessary permission.
If the proposed route is passing through low lying
areas, details of fill materials and initial and final
levels after filling above MSL, should be examined
and submit.
Examine and submit the water bodies including the
seasonal ones within the corridor of impacts along
with their status, volumetric capacity, quality likely
impacts on them due to the project.

30

Examine and submit details of water quantity


required and source of water including water
requirement during the construction stage with
supporting data and also classification of ground
water based on the CGWA classification.

31

Examine and submit the details of measures taken


during constructions of bridges across river / canal /
major or minor drains keeping in view the flooding of
the rivers and the life span of the existing bridges.
Provision of speed breakers, safety signals, service
lanes and foot paths should be examined at
appropriate locations throughout the proposed road
to avoid the accidents.

32

33

34

If there will be any change in the drainage pattern


after the proposed activity, details of changes shall
be examined and submitted.
Rain water harvesting pit should be at least 3 - 5 m.
above the highest ground water table. Provision
shall be made for oil and grease removal from
surface runoff.
If there is a possibility that the construction /
widening of road will cause impact such as
destruction of forest, poaching reductions in wetland
areas, if so, examine the impact and submit details.

Compliance
measures are given in Chapter 6 & 8 of EIA report

Regular water sprinkling system will be adopted to


minimize the dust emission.
Raw materials with covered vehicles to avoid fugitive
emission;
Impacts on Ambient air quality and its mitigation
measures are assessed & shall be provided
An environment management plan has been proposed
to minimize the impact on habitation from dust, noise
etc. during construction stage. Please refer Table 10.1
of Chapter 10 of EIA report.
The borrow materials will be withdrawn as per IRC: 101961. The aggregate and sand will be procured from
the Govt. approved licensed quarries by paying the
cost of material as well as cost for rehabilitation.
The locations of borrow areas are given in Chapter 11
No low lying areas exist along the project road

Inventory of water bodies attached in Annexure 4.2.


Total water required for the project will be 442 KLD,
this will be sourced from both surface & ground water
during construction phase.
As per CGWB there are no notified blocks in Bijapur
District. No information on Solapur has been available
from CGWB
The schedule for construction of piles will be done, so
that the existing volumetric flow of the river will not
affect.
Coffer dam will be used.
No excavated material will be dumped on river bed /
bank even though 500 m from the river bank.
Silt fencing will be provided to protect surface run-off.
Speed breakers, safety signals and service lanes will
be provided as per IRC guidelines and codes.
108 culverts & 30 minor & 2 major bridges are
proposed based on hydrological studies. Therefore,
change in drainage pattern may not be happen.
Rain water harvesting structures at 500m distance in
staggered pattern proposed.
Refer Rain Water Harvesting chapter 8
2.665 Ha of forest land adjoining the existing
carriageway shall be diverted and the proposal has
been submitted to the forest department, hence the
project shall not lead to increase in poaching. The

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


13-4
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No.

ToR Points

Compliance

35

36
37

Submit the details of road safety, signage, service


roads, vehicular under passes, accident prone zone
and the mitigation measures.

IRC guidelines shall be followed for widening & up


gradation of road
Submit details of social impact assessment due to
the proposed construction of road.

38

Examine road design standards, safety equipment


specifications and Management System training to
ensure that design details take account of safety
concerns and submit the traffic management plan

39

40

41

42

Accident data and geographic distribution should be


reviewed and analyzed to predict and identify trends
- in case of expansion of the existing highway and
provide Post accident emergency assistance and
medical care to accident victims.

If the proposed project involves any land


reclamation, details to be provided for which activity
land to reclaim and the area of land to be reclaimed.
Details of the properties, houses, businesses etc.
activities likely to be effected by land acquisition and
their financial loses annually.
Detailed R&R plan with data on the existing socioeconomic status of the population in the study area
and broad plan for resettlement of the displaced
population, site for the resettlement colony,
alternative livelihood concerns/ employment and
rehabilitation of the displaced people, civil and
housing amenities being offered, etc and the
schedule of the implementation of the project
specific

43

Submit details of Corporate Social Responsibility.


Necessary provisions should be made in the budget.

44

Estimated
cost
of
the
project
including
environmental monitoring cost and funding

forest land is required to upgrade the road to required


specifications without which there shall be a
compromise in road safety issues. Thus the acquisition
of 2.665 Ha. of forest area is unavoidable
All safety provisions are being considered during
design, construction and operation phases.
Improvements of geometry have been proposed as per
IRC guidelines and codes
Bus shelters, truck lay bays, traffic signage will be
provided. The details are given in chapter 2
The provisions are as per Schedule C & D of the
Concession agreement and IRC: SP 84 2009,
Manual of Specifications & Standards for Four-laning
of Highways through Public Private Partnership.
IRC guidelines have been followed for widening and
up-gradation of project road
Social Impact Assessment is provided in Impact
Assessment chapter
The entire project road is designed by maintaining the
IRC codes, MoRT&H manual and other applicable
guidelines for safety standards. Provision of road
safety has been kept as per IRC: SP-44-1996 and IRC:
SP-32-1998.
A traffic management plan is proposed as part of the
project. Road safety audit carried out.
With the project the traffic congestion will reduce along
with reduction in accidents. Further densely habitat
areas are bypassed. HTMS and highway patrolling,
ambulance facility, computerised highway monitoring
and Emergency call box system will be there.
Attempts were made to review accident data and their
distribution and cause as part of feasibility study. The
design of new 4-lane facility is taking care of accident
black spots. The facility minimizes accident possibilities
with superior design and safety features. Necessary
measures have proposed to take care post accident
emergency / trauma care; they are listed in the
Schedules of the concession agreement.

No land reclamation involved in this project.


A total of 7316 PAPs & 1329 PAFs are to be impacted.
A total of 528 properties are being affected which
includes 228 residential & 118 commercial properties.

Compensation to the project affected families (PAFs)


will be as per NPRR 2007 and NHAI policy. Separate
R&R budget kept.

The project is a Government of India project which


aims at providing better connectivity and also providing
better economic development in the region. Hence
CSR details is not applicable for the project
However the Concessionaire shall make necessary
provisions for Corporate Social responsibility in their
budgetary provisions
The project will be on DBFO basis. Civil cost for the
project is INR 605.659 while the Total Project cost is

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


13-5
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to 4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening
of existing 2 lanes from Proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka
Sl.
No.

45

ToR Points

Compliance

agencies, whether governmental or on the basis of


BOT etc and provide details of budget provisions
(capital & recurring) for the project specific R&R
Plan.

INR 757.074 Crores


EMP budget for INR 43.088 crores is presented in
Table 10-2
The R&R cost is budgeted at INR 25.37 Crores

Submit environmental management and monitoring


plan for all phases of the project viz. construction
and operation.

Kindly refer Chapter 10 for Environment Management


Plan of EIA report.

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


13-6
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013

Development of the existing 2 lanes carriageway to4 / 6 lanes dual carriageway configurations including strengthening of
existing 2 lanes of from proposed Km 28.200 to Proposed Km 110.542 of Solapur to Bijapur Section of NH 13 in the
states of Maharashtra & Karnataka

14.
14.1

DISCLOSURE OF CONSULTANT

CONSULTANTS DETAILS

Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd. (FISPL) is Indias leading integrated infrastructure Services
Company, with a mission of Making Infrastructure Happen. Totally focused on infrastructure
development, Feedback Infra offers an integrated suite of services across the core and social sectors of
infrastructure.
FISPL is known for its innovative work and for operationalising challenging projects in difficult locations. No
wonder, 17 of Indias 50 biggest listed companies are Feedbacks clients. So are the governments of 22 of
the 28 Indian states and 4 of Indias 7 Union Territories. FISPL is presently working on more than 35,000
MW of new power generation capacity; 20,000 km of National and State Highways; 100,000 acres of real
estate development and a building area of more than 22 million square feet.
This is enabled by a large pool of multidisciplinary experts; cutting-edge functional and domain knowledge;
an all-India network of offices with corporate HQ at Gurgaon and 6 Regional Offices at Mumbai, Bangalore,
Gandhinagar, Chandigarh, Kolkata & Hyderabad besides a host of site & project offices; and a strong
shareholding L&T, IDFC, and HDFC.
FISPL offers a range of services including EIA across eleven focused infrastructure sectors including
Transportation & Logistics (including highways, railways, MRTS, ports, airports and logistics), Energy
(including Power Generation, Transmission, Distribution, Coal & Mines and Oil & Gas), Housing &
Townships, Commercial Infrastructure (including IT Parks, Corporate Offices & Commercial Buildings),
Industrial Infrastructure, Water & Sanitation, Retail & Entertainment, Healthcare, Hospitality, Urban
Development & SEZ.
14.2

LABORATORY

Envirotech East Pvt. Limited, Kolkata has carried out the sampling and analysis for various air, water, noise
samples as per procedure & guidelines of Central Pollution Control Board and the requirements of MoEF on
behalf of Feedback Infrastructure Services. The study periods were the months of October - December
2012. The laboratory is a MoEF approved laboratory.
14.3

PROJECT TEAM

The project team members involved in this project are:


Table 14-1: Project Team
Sl. No,
1
2
3
4
5
6

Name
Mr. Arijit Choudhury
Dr. Raj Kumar Singh
Dr. Gandikota Ananda
Mr. Ajay Sharma
Ms. Aruna Tageja
Mr. Virendra Kumar

Qualification
PGD Env Mgt.
PhD, MSc (Botany)
PhD, MA (Social Science)
MA (Economics)
M. E. (Structural Engineering)
Masters in Urban Design

Expertise
EIA Coordinator, Biodiversity & Noise Expert
Air Pollution Control & EIA Expert
R&R and Social Expert
R&R and Social Expert
Hydrologist
Land use

Organisation
FISPL
FISPL
FISPL
FISPL
FISPL
FISPL

FISPL has been approved by QCI NABET for sector 34 (Highways, railways, transport terminals, mass rapid
th
transport systems) vide MoM of 87 Accreditation Committee Meeting of QCI NABET held on September
11, 2012. The EIA report prepared has complied with the prescribed ToR and the data submitted is factually
correct

Proponent: National Highways Authority of India


14-1
Consultant: Feedback Infrastructure Services Pvt. Ltd
UNCONTROLLED IF PRINTED

Draft EIA Report


January 2013