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IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Abstract
The project of Identification of Training and developments needs in Neyveli Lignite
Corporation Ltd. The project duration was 7weeks and the project dealt with studying the
need for training and development process in the Company. The project started with the
induction program which acquainted us with the concept of HR Functions and gave us the
overview regarding various aspects of the company. After having an overview as to how the
company works, we started with the research on various dimensions of the organization.
Documents were provided to know about the company business divisions, location of offices,
hierarchies, reporting relationship, welfare activities, safety measures followed, five decades
journey of the company etc. After acquiring an insight about the organization, we prepared
questionnaires to identify and analyze individual and organizational training needs. The
questionnaire covered questions related to:
Training identification and evaluation
Preferable method of learning of every individual
Organizational need apart from individual needs
Organizational strengths and also areas of improvements
Before starting the final survey, we had done a sample testing at Personnel and HRD
department so that I could find the flaws in the questionnaire with respect to various
parameters like interpretation of the questions, time taken by the employees to give their
response etc.
After capturing the responses of the identified participants on the finalized questionnaire and
after conducting one-to-one interactions with them, individual and organizational training
needs were identified & analyzed.
On the basis of the findings from the analysis, various suggestions and recommendations
were given which will help HR department to formulate the strategies in near future. The
findings and analysis were filed and recorded so that it could be used for future reference.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION
Manufacturing confronts a negative public image. Characteristic notions that are
synonymous with this industry include: low pay, no scope for growth and so on.
Consequently, few highly skilled workers seriously consider manufacturing careers.
But now the general perception is changing dramatically. Apart from providing a more
structured career growth path, one of the reasons for this change in the mindset would be the
nature of training and coaching provided to new entrants once they are taken on board.
Employers are quickly realizing that the quality of their manpower is directly proportional to
the final bottom line, bringing forward the need to train and coach employees appropriately.
While an assessment process and competency-based interviews help identify talent, coaching
and training are initiatives that aim at grooming and nurturing the talent. Training provides
theoretical support to an individual development whereas coaching provides a more practical
and personal form of support. The combination of both creates a powerful foundation stone
for future development and potential identification.
Every organization has different processes, and at times, a different approach to work as well,
leading to the need for process-driven training and coaching to facilitate relevant learning.
Most hires may have the theoretical knowledge required for the job, but they need to be
taught the tricks of applying that knowledge in the fashion that best suits the process.
A company-specific structured training program is extremely essential. Fresh engineers
recruited straight off campuses cannot be put on the job straight away, as they have very little
knowledge about the actual dynamics at shop floor level. They need to be introduced to
Engineering Management skills in a systematic manner.
The manufacturing industry also boasts about the fact that it provides its workforce with
competency enhancement training. This ensures that they become competent to take up
different roles in the organization and have an insight into various managerial soft skills,
which are almost as essential as the technical ones. Training programs have been put in place
to address competency development at various levels by leading engineering companies like
BHEL,TKII, L&T and Essar. They are customized taking data from Assessment center
reports and from interactions with domain experts in the area. Faculty members from reputed

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

institutes conduct these programs on a regular basis. Programs like Leading high performance
teams, Resource Optimization, Risk management, Project management etc have been put
together to address managerial competencies by these leading companies.
The one important resource that can build and transform any organization is its human
resources. And this makes it essential to groom once workforce in order to ensure that
maximum productivity is generated. In the fiercely competitive market, one can actually
score above others if once workforce is well equipped and trained appropriately to meet
industry requirements.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW:

Mining Industry in India - An overview


Minerals constitute the back-bone of economic growth of any nation and India has been
eminently endowed with this gift of nature. There are many evidence that exploitation of
minerals like coal, iron-ore, copper, lead-zinc has been going on in the country from time
immemorial. However, the first recorded history of mining in India dates back to
1774 when an English Company was granted permission by the East India Company for
mining coal in Raniganj. M/s John Taylor & Sons Ltd. started gold mining in Kolar Gold
Fields in the year 1880. The first oil well was drilled in Digboi in the year 1866 - just seven
years after the first ever oil well was drilled anywhere in the world viz. in Pennsylvania
State, USA in 1859. Mining activities in the country however remained primitive in nature
and modest in scale uptill the beginning of the current century. Thereafter, with progressive
industrialization the demand for and hence the production of various minerals gradually
went

up.

After

India

became

independent, the

growth

of

mining

under

the

impact of successive Five Year Plans has been very fast. There are ambitious plans in coal,
metalliferous and oil sectors to increase production of minerals during the 8th Five Year
Plan and thereafter.
Coal: Deposits & Exploration
Indias major workable coal deposits occur in two distinct stratigraphic horizons - Permian,
commonly known as "Gondwana" coals and the Tertiary. About 99% of the countrys coal
resources are found within a great succession of fresh water sediments. The major coalfields
are represented by isolated basins which occur along prominent present day river valleys,
viz., Damodar, Koel, Sone-Mahanadi, Pench-Kanhan, Pranhita-Godavari. Nearly 50
coalfields, varying in size from a few km2 to as much as 1500 km2 are known today, barring
the small and lenticular occurrences of coal along the Himalayan foothills.
Coals of practically all ranks occur in India except peat and anthracite. The share of lignite,
however, is insignificant as compared to sub-bituminous and bituminous coal. Indian
bituminous coals are broadly divided into two categories, coking and non-coking.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Coal exploration in India even today is largely being carried out by conventional methods of
systematic geological mapping followed by drilling, core drilling playing a dominant role.
However, in the recent times modern exploration techniques like photo-geology, remote
sensing, non-coring drilling, geophysical surveys etc. are being increasingly used for detailed
and precise exploration.
Coal Reserves
The total coal reserves of the country have been estimated from time to time.
* Proved Reserves: In this case, the reserves are estimated from dimensions revealed in
outcrops, trenches, mine workings and boreholes and the extension of the same for
reasonable distance not exceeding 200m on geological evidence. Where little or no
exploratory work has been done, and where the outcrop exceeds one km in length, another
line drawn roughly 200m in from outcrop will define a block of coal that may be regarded as
proved on the basis of geological evidence.
* Indicated Reserves: In the case of indicated reserves, the points of observation are 1,000
m apart, but may be 2,000 m for beds of known geological continuity . Thus a line drawn
1,000 to 2,000 m from an outcrop will demarcate the block of coal to be regarded as
indicated.
* Inferred reserves : This refers to coal for which quantitative estimates are based largely on
broad knowledge of the geological character of the bed, but for which there are no
measurements. The estimates are based on an assumed continuity for which there is
geological evidence, and more than 1,000 to 2,000 m from the outcrop.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

State wise and depth wise Coal reserves are given in the following table,
In Million Tonnes
State
West Bengal
Bihar
Madhya Pradesh
Maharashtra
Orissa
Andhra Pradesh
North Eastern Region
Total
Percentage

0-300m
11999
40079
32638
4590
35015
5245
710
130276
67

300-600m
8933
17626
7433
1686
11167
3876
155
50876
26

600-1200m
4191
6666
14
37
1717
12625
7

Total
25123
64371
40085*
6276
46219
10838
865
193777
100

* includes 1062 Million. Tonnes in UP


The following table gives the State wise reserves indicating different categories,
State

West Bengal
Bihar
Madhya Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
Maharashtra
Orissa
Andhra Pradesh
North
Eastern
Region
Total
Percentage

Proved

Indicated

Inferred

Total

10590
28993
9387
662
3170
5714
6079
257

10867
28801
20480
400
1179
22120
916
149

3666
6579
9156
1927
18384
3843
458

25123
64373
39023
1062
6276
46218
10838
864

64852
33

84912
44

44012
23

193777
100

Percentage
of total
reserve
13
33
20
1
3
24
5
1
100

Thus, Indias total coal resources now stand at a level of a little over 194 billion tonnes in
coal seams of thickness 0.9m and above and upto a depth of 1200m. This is a little over 1%
of the global coal resources. Of the total coal reserves of 194 billion tonnes, 85% is of noncoking variety and only 15% is of coking variety. Further, 33% of the reserves fall under
Proved category 44% in the Indicated category and 23% in the Inferred category. The

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

coal occurring between 600m and 1200m depths, which may be economically tapped for
development in future, may be grouped as "Resources" and the rest as "Reserves".
Lignite Resources
The total lignite deposit of the country is estimated at about 2800 million tonnes, out of
which the major deposit is occurring in Tamilnadu ( 2500 million tonnes). The remaining
lignite deposits are found in Gujrat, Jammu & Kashmir and Rajasthan. Further exploration
activities indicate availability of additional lignite resources in Rajasthan, Gujrat and
Tamilnadu.
Mineral Resources (Other than Coal & Oil)
India is largely self sufficient in most of the minerals which include barytes, bauxite,
chromite, dolomite, fluorspar, gypsum, iron ore, kyanite, limestone, manganese ore,
magnesite, sillimanite, etc. except the minerals like copper, asbestos, lead and zinc, natural
phosphates, sulphur and crude petroleum, in which domestic production meets the demand
only partially.
India is rich in the resources of minerals like iron ore, bauxite, manganese, baryte etc. It has
resources of 12745 million tonnes of iron ore, 2,525 million tonnes of bauxite, 76446 million
tonnes of limestone, 233 million tonnes of magnesite, 167 million tonnes of lead & zinc ore,
70 million tonnes of barytes, 176 million tonnes of manganese ore and 90 million tonnes of
chromite. The reserves of iron ore, bauxite and manganese accounts for nearly 7 per cent, 16
per cent and 6 per cent respectively of the total known global resources of these minerals.
India possesses the largest known reserves of barytes in the world.
Oil Resources
India has prognosticated hydrocarbon reserves of more than 17 billion tonnes of which only
about 5 billion tonnes have been converted into geological in-place reserves. This brings out
the magnitude of exploratory efforts still to be carried out. The proved and indicated balance
recoverable reserves of crude oil and natural gas are given in the table below:

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Reserves of Crude Oil & Natural Gas


State

Crude Oil

Natural Gas

Gujrat

143.02

62.11

124.38

106.27

Bombay High

371.04

411.09

Total (All India)

638.44

579.47

Assam,

Nagaland

&

Rajasthan

* Crude Oil in million Tonnes, Natural gas in Billion Cubic metre


Operating Mines
India has a unique blend of big and small, manual and mechanised, opencast and
underground mines. The total number of working coal mines as on date are 572, in oil sector
there are 29 oil projects excluding installations off-shore beyond territorial waters. As far as
metalliferous mines are concerned the number of mines which are submitting returns stands
at about 2,500. However, there are many more mines which are small in size, seasonal in
nature and which are not submitting the statutory returns, a fair estimate indicates that total
number of metalliferous mines are about 6000. Total workforce of the mining industry in
India consists of about one (1) million workers.

Mining in India: Legacy of the past


Coal mining
The development of coal mining in India was historically linked with the development of the
railway system. Establishment of the railway lines prompted many companies to take up
mining leases. Large number of mining leases were granted by the erstwhile Zemindars and
Rajahs, the terms of leases and the periods varied, some being in perpetuity, some for 999
years and other for shorter periods. With the increasing awareness of the values of the
properties, lease periods became shorter and leased areas smaller. By the end of the World
War I the prolification of small owners became a problem and the coal mines of Raniganj &
Jharia came to acquire all the characteristics which created chronic problems in future years.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

From as early as the 1920s, the various consultants, commissions and committees sat over to
decide on the question of conservation and scientific exploitation of coal, working conditions
in the mines and safety of the work persons, and thereby regulate and control the coal
industry in India. All of them emphasized the necessity to have state ownership of the coal
mines. The overall problem of coking coal in India has been studied in depth by a whole herd
of prestigious committees including the Indian Coal Mining Committee (1937), the Indian
Coalfields Committee (1946), the Committee on Metallurgical coal conservation (1950). The
Estimates Committee of the Lok Sabha (1954-55) took notice of the evidence submitted by
different agencies. The then Coal Commissioner in his evidence to the estimates committee
wrote among other thins.
".............. we will be left with a number of units, which if not affected by underground fires,
and other hazardous conditions, would be uneconomic to work." The architect of coal
nationalization, the late S. Mohan Kumaramangalam, the then Minister of Steel and Mines
had given a vivid description of the mines of Jharia coalfield in his book "Coal Industry in
India".
"Slaughter mining, lack of conservation and unscientific methods remained characteristic of
large areas of the industry ....................... lack of safety & welfare measures, robbing of pillar
of coal, selective, seasonal and shallow depth mining in a haphazard manner, etc. seemed to
be the guiding principles of a large number of the private collieries."
All these, led to the take-over of coking coal mines on the 16th October, 1971. Subsequently,
these mines were nationalized on the 1st May, 1972 and are now operated by M/s.Bharat
Coking Coal Limited (BCCL). By Coal Mines (Taking over of Management) Ordinance 1973
the non-coking coal mines were also taken over. The mines were nationalized on the 1st May,
1973 and brought under the management of the Coal Mines Authority Limited (CMAL).
Later on the CMAL and the BCCL were merged and the holding company Coal India
Limited (CIL) was formed on the 1st November, 1975.
The beginning of coal mining in Central provinces dates from the year 1862 and in the Rewa
state from 1884. The Singareni field in the Hyderabad state had been discovered in 1872 and
went into production some 15 years later. Appreciable development also took place in Upper
Assam from 1881 and in Baluchistan and Punjab (now in Pakistan) in the last decade of the
19th century. Bokaro Karanpura areas were first examined between 1846 and 1848.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

10

Development of the Bokaro field commenced in 1915. Production from the Karanpura field
did not commence until 1925.
No .of Coal Mines in India Company Wise as on 31.03.2004
Company
COAL:
1. ECL
2. BCCL
3. CCL
4. NCL
5. WCL
6. SECL
7.MCL
8.NEC
Total CIL
(1 to 8)
SCCL
BSMDCL
DVC
IISCO
JKML
BECML
ICML
JSPL
TISCO
TOTAL COAL
LIGNITE:
NLC
GMDCL
GIPCL
RSMDCL
TOTAL LIGNITE
TOTAL COAL +
LIGNITE

OC

No. of Collieries
UG
Mixed

18
15
35
8
33
19
14
2
144

92
49
22
0
42
76
9
5
295

2
16
6
0
5
2
0
0
31

112
80
63
8
80
97
23
7
470

12
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
2
164

55
0
0
1
3
0
0
0
5
359

0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
33

67
1
1
3
4
1
1
1
7
556

33

2
2
1
1
6
576

2
2
1
1
6
170

359

Total

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11

NO OF COAL MINES SECTOR WISE AS ON 31-03-2003


STATES
COAL PUBLIC
COAL PRIVATE
LIGNITE
PUBLIC
LIGNITE
PRIVATE
TOTAL

OC
160
4
5

NO OF COLLIERIES
UG
MIXED
354
33
5
0

1
170

TOTAL
547
9
5
1

359

33

562

NO OF COAL MINES STATE WISE AS ON 31-03-2003


STATES
COAL:
ANDHRA
ASSAM
CHHATTISGARH
J&K
JHARKHAND
MADHYA
PRADESH
MAHARASHTRA
MEGHALAYA
ORISSA
WEST BENGAL
UP
TOTAL COAL
LIGNITE:
GUJARAT
TAMIL NADU
RAJASTHAN
TOTAL LIGNITE
TOTAL COAL +
LIGNITE

OC

NO OF COLLIERIES
UG
MIXED

12
2
12
1
60
18

55
4
44
3
85
53

28

21
1
9
84

359

33

50
1
23
100
3
556

33

3
2
1
6
562

14
14
3
164
3
2
1
6
170

359

2
24
4

TOTAL
67
6
58
4
169
75

Metalliferous Mines
At the turn of the century, India produced 14 minerals of commercial value. Now, the country
produces 11 metallic and 45 non-metallic minerals except coal and oil. In India, production of
minerals dates back to ancient times. Remnants of old workings can still be seen in some
parts of the country. In fact, some of these have led to the discovery of several large mineral
deposits which are being worked today like Lead & Zinc in Zawar, Copper in Khetri, Gold in

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

12

Karnataka etc. Despite the active past, the metal mining activities in the country remained
dormant over a long period until the beginning of this century.
Growth of the Industry
The post- Independence era witnessed a massive expansion of exploration activities through
various five-year plans which included the augmentation of mineral inventory as well as
addition of a number of mineral reserves to the existing ones. This took the country into the
realm of plenty in respect of some minerals which were earlier regarded as scarce.
The search for minerals did not remain only on the land mass alone but extended to off-shore
areas and deep seas. Large reserves of oil were discovered in the off-shore areas and their
exploitation opened up new and exciting vistas in the oil sector thereby conserving huge
foreign exchange reserves. In the Indian Ocean, India has explored successfully the presence
of poly metallic nodules lying on the ocean floor at a depth exceeding 3000 meters which
bear metals such as copper, cobalt, nickel, manganese, etc.
Keeping with the spirit of Industrial Policy for higher targets of mineral production, the
expansion and augmentation of mineral based industry in the country was quite obvious.
Therefore, ambitious programmes were launched to increase the production of minerals to
meet the ever growing demand of the core industries like steel, non-ferrous metals, fertilizers,
etc. keeping in view also the higher exports for much needed foreign exchange. Many public
sector organizations were set up to take up exploration and exploitation of minerals and the
state assumed direct responsibility for developing mines of important minerals and
establishing mineral based industries.
Thus there were increases not only of minerals but also in the metal production as
well as cement, chemicals, fertilizers and several other mineral based products.
The table below indicates the trend in growth of production of some important minerals in
our country.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

13

Production in Million Tonnes


Year
1951
1961
1971
1981
1991
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999*

Coal
34.98
55.71
75.64
127.32
237.76
260.60
267.52
284.59
304.10
316.68
319.90
313.55

Copper Ore
0.37
0.42
0.68
2.01
5.05
5.15
4.78
4.77
4.75
4.26
4.38
3.28

Lead &
Iron Ore Limestone Bauxite
Zinc Ore
0.01
3.71
2.96
0.06
0.15
12.26
15.73
0.48
0.30
32.97
25.26
1.45
0.96
42.78
32.56
1.75
1.82
60.03
75.02
3.86
2.10
63.26
87.72
4.81
1.90
64.91
86.77
4.70
2.10
73.00
93.64
5.09
2.06
71.59
120.87
5.35
2.01
78.36
123.56
5.17
2.23
77.34
116.61
5.91
3.08
73.05
108.29
5.24

*Provisional
In the last two decades, coal mining has witnessed a phenomenal growth in production from
70 million tonnes in 1971-72 to 246 million tonnes in 1993-94 and is projected to touch about
400 million tonnes by the turn of the century.
The strategies adopted for rapid expansion of mining activities include increased
mechanization, adoption of new technologies & their adaptation under Indian geo-mining
conditions and assimilation of latest scientific innovations in the concerned areas. However, it
has also brought in its wake increased hazard potential posing new problems of safety
management.
The new liberalized industrial policy may lead to high and accelerated growth in mineral
industry to complement and supplement the revival and rapid growth of national economy.
The present day environment demands of us to have a fresh look at safety management as a
structured process composed of well defined systems that emphasises continuous
improvement in work quality, health, welfare and productivity of workforce engaged in
mineral industry through setting up of improved safety standards and their effective
implementation and administration.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

14

Minerals & Economy


The gross value of mineral production in India in 1995 is estimated to be approximate
Rs.2,70,000 million up from about Rs.1,800 million in 1961, i.e. by nearly 150 times.
Mineral wealth and its exploitation have substantially contributed to the growth of national
economy. The contribution of mineral production to the Gross National Product went up from
1.02% in 1960-61 to 1.54% in 1980-81. Minerals continued to play a vital role in Indias
overseas trade too.
Employment
With the growth of production, employment in the mineral industry has also grown
phenomenally during the last few decades. The following table indicate the trends:
Average daily employment in Mines ( in '000 )
Year Coal Oil Copper Gold Iron Lime Mang. Mica Stone Others Total
Ore Ore Ore Stone Ore
Metals
1951 351.9 N.A.
3.7 21.9 20.2 16.0
55.5
25.2
5.1 49.5
197.1
1961 411.2 N.A.
4.2 16.3 54.5 54.6
46.9
29.6
8.5 45.1
259.7
1971 382.3 13.6
7.6 12.4 52.8 53.2
30.4
12.2
8.8 57.5
234.9
1981 513.4 14.5 13.4 12.3 44.9 49.8
26.5
6.7
7.7 60.6
221.9
1986 543.3 24.9 13.2 11.9 46.6 50.2
17.7
3.3 10.2 68.1
221.2
1987 549.7 25.9 12.6 11.6 48.8 51.2
17.6
3.3 10.8 69.6
225.5
1988 537.8 26.6 12.3 10.9 46.0 43.0
17.4
2.8 14.2 60.5
207.1
1989 548.1 25.2 10.8 10.5 44.5 44.6
16.1
2.9 12.9 62.0
204.3
1990 549.0 26.9 12.3 9.7 38.1 41.5
17.3
2.3 10.1 58.0
189.3
1991 554.1 35.5 12.8 9.3 40.1 43.5
17.9
2.2 11.2 63.2
200.2
1992 552.0 35.7 12.7 9.4 42.0 43.0
18.4
1.6
8.9 67.2
203.2
1993 546.3 33.5 12.2 7.9 39.8 41.6
18.5
1.5
9.2 68.9
199.6
1994 523.7 34.3 11.2 7.4 38.5 39.8
18.2
1.7
9.4 65.2
191.4
1995 513.3 34.0 10.5 7.1 39.6 39.8
18.1
1.8
7.5 64.4
188.8
1996 506.4 33.4
9.9 6.9 39.2 35.7
18.1
1.2
5.2 60.1
176.3
1997 503.4 28.6 10.3 6.8 38.6 33.0
16.0
1.2
4.9 61.6
172.4
1998 491.3 29.5
8.7 6.1 37.3 31.2
15.9
1.1
5.3 59.3
164.9
1999* 486.7 25.0
7.3 6.1 38.7 30.0
14.8
0.9
4.9 63.0
165.7
*Provisional
Although no firm figures regarding %age of persons employed under contractors in mineral
industry could be ascertained but during the visit of the sub-committee of the installations in

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

15

Kalol oil fields under ONGC, it was reported that approximately 25% of the total workforce
engaged at work were employed under contractors on one pretext or the other.
The trend reveals that there has been a gross reduction in employment potential in winning of
gold ore, manganese ore and mica . This has come about basically due to two reasons . Firstly
the lack of demand of the minerals due to substitution of the same in the user industry viz. the
manganese ore in manufacture of steel & mica as insulating material in electrical industry,
secondly to the rising cost of production of gold from the poor quality of gold ore available in
the country vis--vis global market. Barring above the employment in the mineral industry
has shown tremendous growth over the years. It is anticipated that the average daily
employment in the mineral industry at present is about 1(one) million.
Exploitation of resources: Problems faced
Mining industry in India has been progressing at an annual rate of 4% to 5% during the last
three decades. It appears that the concept of growth at all cost has become the order of the
day. This is rather too heavy a price to pay for developments sake. This mad rush to
produce gives way to unsustainable developments.
As far as mining is concerned, the price for progress has also been quite high. The late S
Mohan Kumarmangalam, the then Minister of Steel & Mines had given a scathing but vivid
description of the coal industry scene in his book Coal Industry in India. This was
generally true of smaller units specially spread over in the Jharia and Raniganj fields.
"Workers were cheated of their legitimate dues. Slaughter mining, lack of conservation and
unscientific mining methods remained characteristic of large areas of the industry. The mine
owners successfully prevented any further progress towards implementation of the numerous
recommendations of the different committees made over the years. Lathials or musclemen
protected the interests of the mine owners. Rampant corruption, forced labour, dubious and
duplicate records, under reporting of production, non-payment of full wages, extended hours
of shift without payment of lead or lift, lack of safety and welfare measures, robbing of pillars
of coal, selective, seasonal and shallow depth mining in a haphazard manner etc. seemed to
be the guiding principles of a large number of private collieries."

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

16

Violations of mine safety laws were widespread. The extensive fires and collapses were the
result of unscientific mining practiced over the years and the cost to the nation was
considerable in the shape of loss of coal reserves and in controlling fires. Mine ventilation
was poor, support inadequate, safety equipment conspicuous by their absence. The hazards to
which workers were exposed had been a matter of severe criticism. A dangerous situation had
developed and the Government could no longer remain a passive spectator. This paved the
way for nationalization of the coal industry during 1971-73.
Though the situation since then has improved considerably in some of the areas, many
problems of the past remain and need to be addressed sincerely at this point in time. Quest for
development has to go hand in hand with rapid industrialization, and mining has to remain an
important cog in the wheel of development. It is expected that accentuated efforts on mining
shall be witnessed in the years to come. As the mine operators begin to look forward for ways
and means to improve efficiency and cut costs, safety considerations certainly assume more
and more important position and emerge as significant factor even purely on economic
considerations. Side by side modern society is also tending more and more to demand a safe
and decent work environment, as a social need. Thus, results are being demanded. Tools and
skill are available, and achievement with tremendous humanitarian and economic benefits are
within the realm of practical possibility.

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COMPANY PROFILE

Neyveli Lignite Corporation Limited (NLC) was incorporated in 14th November of the year
1956 as a private limited company under the house of Government of India (GOI). It went
to public in 7th March of the year 1986. The main core activity of NLC is lignite excavation
and power generation using lignite excavated.

Neyveli lignite corporation has been conferred with NAVARATNA status on 11th April
2011.In commencement of Golden Jubilee Celebrations ( 1956-2006) the Honble Prime
Minister Dr,Manmohan Singh, visited Neyveli on 04.02.2006 and laid foundation stone for
Mine-I and TPS II Expansation.
Vision of NLC
To emerge as a leading mining and power company. Continue to be socially responsible
company and strive for operational excellence in mining & Exploration.

Mission of NLC
Strive towards greater cost competitiveness and work towards continue financial
strength.
Continually imbibe best practices from the best India and international organization
engaged in power generation and mining.
Be a preferred employer by offering attractiveness avenues of carrier growth
andexcellent

work environment and by developing human resource to match

international standards,
Play an active role in society and sensitive to emerging environmental issues.

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LIGNITE RESERVES:

Geological reserves of lignite in the country have been estimated at around 36009
million tons. As on 01-01-2004 out of the above 4150(MT) of lignite spread over an area of
480 Sq.KM is on the Neyveli Lignite fields in cuddalore district of which around 2360
million tons have been proved.

EXSISTING PROJECTS :

MINE I
The lignite seam was first exposed in August 1961 and regular mining of lignite
commenced in May 1962. German excavation technology in open cast mining, using
Bucket Wheel Excavators, Conveyors and Spreaders were used for the first time in the
country in Neyveli Mine-I. The capacity of this mine was 6.5 MT which met the fuel
requirement of TS-I. The capacity was increased to 10.5MT of lignite per annum from
March 2003 under Mine-I expansion scheme and at present meets the fuel requirement for
generating power from TPS-I and TPS-I Expansion.

MINE II
In February, 1978 Government of India sanctioned the Second Lignite Mine of capacity 4.7
MT of lignite per annum and in February `83, Government of India sanctioned the
expansion of Second Mine capacity from 4.7 Million Tonnes to 10.5 Million Tonnes.
Unlike Mine-I, Mine-II had to face problems in the excavation of sticky clayey soil during
initial stage. The method of mining and equipment used are similar to that of Mine-I.

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The seam is the same as of Mine-I and is contiguous to it. The lignite seam in Mine-II was
first exposed in September 1984 and the excavation of lignite commenced in March, 1985.
GOI sanctioned the expansion of Mine-II from 10.5 MTPA to 15.0 MTPA of lignite in
October 2004 with a cost of Rs. 2295.93 crore. Mine-II Expansion project was completed
on 12th March 2010. The lignite excavated from Mine-II meets the fuel requirements of
Thermal Power Station-II and Thermal Power StationII Expansion under implementation.

MINE IA
Government of India sanctioned the project Mine-I A of 3 million tonnes of lignite per
annum at a sanctioned cost of Rs. 1032.81 crores in February'98. This project is mainly to
meet the lignite requirement of M/s ST-CMS for their power plant and also to utilize the
balance lignite to the best commercial advantage of NLC. The project was completed on
30th March 2003 within time and cost schedule.

BARSINGSAR MINE:
GOI sanctioned implementation of Barsingsar mine with a capacity of 2.1 MTPA of lignite
per annum at an estimated cost of Rs. 254.60 crore in December 2004. Both overburden and
lignite production has been outsourced. Lignite excavation commenced on 23rd November
2009 and production attained the rated capacity on 31st January 2010.

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THERMAL POWER STATION-I:

The 600 MW Neyveli Thermal Power Station-I in which the first unit was synchronized in
May'62 and the last unit in September'70 consists of six units of 50 MW each and three
units of 100 MW each. The Power generated from Thermal Power Station-I after meeting
NLC's requirements is fed into Tamil Nadu Electricity Board which is the sole beneficiary.
Due to the aging of the equipment / high pressure parts, Life extension programme has been
approved by GOI in March 1992 with an estimated cost of Rs.315.23 crore and was
successfully completed in March99 thus extending the life by 15 years. The extended life
also to be completed between 2009-2014. However as per the request of TNEB, this power
station is being operated after conducting Residual Life Assessment (RLA) study. GOI has
sanctioned a 2x500 MW Power Project (Neyveli New Thermal Power Plant NNTPS) in
June 2011 as replacement for existing TPS-I The Board of Directors of NLC accorded
approval to taper down the generation of TPS-I by 300 MW by March 2015 or earlier and to
close down the remaining units by September 2015 or earlier.

THERMAL POWER STATION-II


The 1470 MW Second Thermal Power Station consists of 7 units of 210 MW
each. In February 1978, Government of India sanctioned the Second Thermal Power Station
of 630 MW capacity (3 X 210 MW) and in Feb.'83, Government of India sanctioned the
Second Thermal Power Station Expansion from 630 MW to 1470 MW with addition of 4
units of 210 MW each. The first 210 MW unit was synchronized in March 1986 and the last
unit (Unit-VII) was synchronized in June'93. The power generated from Second Thermal
Power Station after meeting the needs of Second Mine is shared by the Southern States viz.,
Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Union Territory of Pondicherry.

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THERMAL POWER STATION-I Expansion:

Thermal Power Station-I has been expanded based on the additional lignite available from
Mine-I Expansion. The scheme was sanctioned by Government of India in February 1996
with a sanctioned cost of Rs. 1590.58 Crores. The Unit-I was synchronized in October 2002
and Unit-II in July 2003. The power generated from this Thermal Power Station after
meeting the internal requirements is shared by the Southern States viz., Tamil Nadu, Kerala,
Karnataka, and Union Territory of Pondicherry.

BARSINGSAR THERMAL POWER STATION:


Government of India sanctioned the Barsingsar Thermal Power Station 250 MW (2 X 125
MW) in October 2004 with a latest cost (RCE) of Rs. 1626.09 Crores. First Unit was
synchronised on 27th October 2009 and second unit was synchronized on 5th June 2010.
Both the units could not be taken for commercial operation due to teething trouble and
stablisation problem. Both the units were commissioned in December 2011 and January
2012.

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ONGOING PROJECTS
1. TPS-II EXPANSION (2 x 250 MW)
PROJECT INFORMATION:
1. Station Capacity: 2 x 250 MW.
2. GOI Approval : 18.10.2004
3. Original sanctioned Cost : Rs. 2030.78 Crs.
COMMISSIONING SCHEDULE: Anticipated
a) COD of Unit-I: November 2012
b) COD of Unit-II: March 2013

NNLC TAMILNADU POWER LIMITED (2 x 500 MW)

NLC Tamilnadu Power limited (NTPL), is a subsidiary of Neyveli Lignite Corporation


Ltd (NLC) and a joint venture between NLC and M/s TANGEDCO (Tamilnadu
Generation and Distribution Company), incorporated under the company act.

The equity participation between NLC and TANGEDCO is at the ratio of 89:11.

GOI had issued sanction for the implementation of coal based 2x500MW Thermal Power
Project by NTPL at Tuticorin at an estimated cost of Rs.4909.54 Cr.

The project is located in the Harbour Estate area of M/s V.O. Chidambaranar Port Trust
(VOCPT) and adjacent to the Thoothukudi Thermal Power Station of TANGEDCO.

Land for the project and residential colony has been allotted by VOCPT on long term
lease basis.

Service water requirement for the plant and the potable water requirement for the plant as
well as township will be met from the Desalination plant being set up at the project site.

All the major packages for the project have been awarded. The main plant package
namely Steam Generators & Turbo Generators has been awarded to M/s BHEL.
Construction activities are progressing in full swing and the commissioning of the first
unit is expected by December 2013 followed by the second unit in March 2014.

Power Purchase Agreement has been signed with TANGEDCO, ESCOMs of Karnataka
State, Puducherry Electricity Department, Kerala State Electricity Board, DISCOMs of
Andhra Pradesh.

Power evacuation from this project is being carried out by M/s Power Grid Corporation

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

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of India.

For the long term coal linkage for the project, M/s Mahanadi Coalfields Limited, a
subsidiary of M/s Coal India Limited, issued Letter of Assurance for the supply of F
grade coal. Coal is to be transported from Orissa by Rail-cum-Sea route through Paradip
Port.

Boilers are designed to fire imported coal up to 30%.

A dedicated coal jetty namely North Cargo Berth-1 (NCB-1) constructed at VOCPT port
will facilitate unloading of coal from ship. From NCB-1, the Coal will be transferred
through belt conveyors to the Plant.

For the residential accommodation of its employees, a township is being set up.

3. NEYVELI NEW THERMAL POWER PROJECT (2 x 500 MW)


Neyveli Lignite Corporation Limited is developing a green field 1000 MW
Lignite fired Thermal Power Station as replacement for the existing 600MW Thermal
Power Station-1 which has served for about 50 years. The new power project called
Neyveli New Thermal Power Project - (NNTPP) is located at Neyveli and will
receive the primary fuel lignite from the pithead mines of NLC Ltd. The power
generated in this Station will be shared among the southern states of Tamilnadu,
Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Kerala and Puduchery as per the directives of the Ministry
of Power. The proposed 2X500MW Power Plant when established, will become the first
lignite-fired 500MW Power plant in the country.
The Govt. of India sanction for the project was received on 09.06.2011.The
sanctioned cost of the Project is Rs 5907.11 crores (October -2010 base). The tendering
process for the project is underway and the plant is expected to be commissioned within
the 12th plan period.

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FUTURE PROJECTS
1. UTTAR PRADESH POWER PROJECT (3 x 660 MW - COAL BASED)

It is proposed to establish 4000 MW capacity coal based power project in the


State of Uttar Pradesh in 2 stages each having 2000 MW capacity. The estimated
cost of the project is around Rs. 14858.62 Crores.

MOU was signed with M/s Uttar Pradesh Rajya Vidyut Nigam Limited
(UPRVUNL) for implementing the first phase of the project as a Joint Venture
with equity participation in the ratio of 51% (NLC) : 49% (UPRVUNL).

Firming of Project inputs like water allocation is completed and land acquisition
is in process. Coal linkage is yet to be obtained.

Power Purchase Agreement has been signed with M/s Uttar Pradesh Power
Corporation Limited, within the time limit stipulated by Ministry of Power,

Joint Venture Agreement entered with UPRVUNL on 06.10.2012.

2. SIRKAZHI THERMAL POWER PROJECT (3 x 660 - MW COAL BASED)

Sirkazhi Thermal Power Project (STPP) is proposed with imported coal and it is
proposed to take up 2000 MW initially and increase it by another 2000 MW in
the second and final phase at a cost of Rs.10395.00 Crores.

Site selected in Thirumullaivasal village of Sirkazhi Taluk was inspected by Site


Selection Committee of Central Electricity Authority.

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Power Purchase Agreement was signed with Southern Electricity Boards within
the time limit stipulated by Ministry of Power.

Project inputs like Land and coal linkage are to be firmed up.

3. BBITHNOK THERMAL POWER STATION IN RAJASTHAN (1 x 250 MW - LIGNITE BASED)

Project Cost Rs.1670.54 Crs.

Power Purchase Agreement was signed within the time stipulated by Ministry of Power,
with Distribution Companies (DISCOMS) of Rajasthan for supplying entire power.,

Environmental Clearance for the power project was received from State Pollution Control
Board and NOC from Aviation and Defense Department were obtained.

50 Cusecs of water from IGNP canal has been reserved for Bithnok and Riri Projects and
water supply agreement is to be signed with IGNB.

Application was submitted for Land Acquisition and Notifications were issued to acquire
the private lands. The High Power Committee constituted by Government of Rajasthan in
its meeting held on 06.07.2012 has recommended the amount of compensation. The
recommended Compensation is under scrutiny by GoR. On approval by GoR, the award is
likely to be passed shortly which will complete the process of acquisition of private lands.

M/s Mecon has been engaged as Project Consultant and Tender documents are under
preparation.

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Bithnok Mine:

Project Cost Rs.349.77 Crs.

Application was submitted to state forest department for diversion of Forest land and it is
under process.

Application for issue of Mining Lease is under process by the State Mining Department
and will be issued after NOC for Forest Diversion is obtained.

Environmental Appraisal Committee has considered the project but sought clarification on
the mine closure plan. The Committee wanted NLC to carry out a Social Cost Benefit
Analysis to see whether the costs of destruction of the socio-economic factors and
livelihood is more than the returns or profits on the investment made. These two issues are
holding up the environmental clearance.

Both mine and power project proposal will be submitted to the NLC Board after the linked
Mining Project is cleared by Ministry of Environment & Forest.

NLC being Navratna Company, the Board has powers to approve the Mine and Power
Projects.

Hadla Mine:

In respect of Hadla Mine, Feasibility Report was prepared by M/S CMPDI and
EIA / EMP Report was prepared by M/s Kirloskar Consultants, Pune.

Public Hearing was conducted and the proposal was discussed by Environmental
Appraisal Committee for issuing Environmental Clearance (EC). Committee has
recommended for issue of EC.

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Application was submitted to Government of Rajasthan for land acquisition and


is under process. Land acquisition notice was issued in July 2012.

Mine Plan approval was obtained and application was submitted for issue of
Mining Lease, which is under process.

Palana Mine:

Feasibility Report has been received from M/s CMPDI and EIA / EMP Report is
under preparation by M/s Kirloskar Consultants, Pune.

Application has been submitted to MOE&F for fixation of Terms of Reference


(TOR) for preparation of EIA / EMP Report. MOE&F held the TOR meeting for
the project on 27.08.2012.

Proposal for Transfer of Mining Lease in favour of NLC was forwarded by the
Government of Rajasthan to Ministry of Coal.

NLC has deposited the amount with M/s Rajasthan Vidyut Pracharan Nigam
Limited (RVPNL) towards 7334 Bighas of land, which is to be surveyed and
transferred to NLC.

5. JOINT VENTURE COAL MINING PROJECT IN ODISHA (20 MTPA)

Project Cost Rs.447.72 Crs.

A Joint Venture Company viz., M/s MNH Sakthi Limited was formed by M/s
MCL, NLC & M/s HINDALCO as per the direction of Ministry of Coal, with

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equity participation in the ratio of 70% : 15% : 15%, to develop and mine
Talabira 2 and 3 coal blocks in Talcher Coal Fields of Odisha and share the
production in the same ratio.

M/s Mahanadi Coalfields Limited M/s MCL) being the major partner, carrying
out all the project activities for developing the Mine.

6. WIND POWER PROJECT

Based on the approval given by the Board, NIT issued on 20.04.2012 to fix up
agency for setting up 50 MW Wind Power Project at one or two locations
anywhere in India at an estimated cost of Rs.364.75 Crores which includes
O&M services for the first five years. Tender opened on 12.09.2012. Three bids
received and bid evaluation is in progress.

7. SOLAR POWER PROJECT

It is proposed to install 10 MW crystalline based Photo Voltaic Solar Power


Project at Neyveli (near the airstrip) in the first phase which will be increased to
25 MW in the second phase. For fixing up of agency for installing 10 MW Solar
Power Plant at an estimated cost of Rs. 133 crores, tender was floated on
13.03.2012. Tender was opened on 04.05.2012. 13 bids were received and 10
bids were Short-listed. Techno-Commercial evaluation is in progress.

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HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT


The number of employees in various categories behind the success of the company are:
N.L.C firmly believes in the adage learning Occurs at all times. All employees are
provided opportunity on a wholesome approach to develop their potential and use it in
achieving corporate goals. The training is important to employees thorough different
scheme on a 3 tier thus:

In Housing Training
Deputation Training within India
Foreign Training

The number of employees in various categories behind the success of the company
are
Executives

4,259

Non-executives(Regular)

8,106

Labour

5,228

Total

17,593

EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT CENTRE

The Company gives high priority towards training of executives, supervisors and
workers. Apart from utilising the training facilities available in the Employee
Development Centre of the Company, the employees are also deputed to other training
centres within India. Training facilities provided by the equipment manufacturers within
the country/abroad are also utilised.

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Quality Circle activities are co-ordinated in Employee Development Centre which has
given many benefits to the organisation. Case Study presentation of Neyveli Quality
Circles brought good name by demonstrating their contribution out side Neyveli in many
conferences.

Employee Development Centre is in the job of fulfilling the Training needs of all
Categories of Employes and developing the Skills, Knowledge and Attitude. TRAINING
adding VALUE to LIFE is the mantra for development and indeed the growth of the
individual and the organization to which he belongs. The enrichment of the individual is
achieved through the objectives:

excel in this Competitive World.


-house Competency of Human Potential
s.
-2008 Quality Management System
standard requirements.
At EDC Training Programmes are conducted under various categories.
In-house Training
Programmes are planned systematically. All training programmes will start with prayer
and end with a stress relieving Yoga / Meditation in most of the programmes as a worklife balancing art.

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Corporate Social Responsibility(CSR)

programmes aimed at reaching the rural public particularly the students and womenfolk
will be exposed to topics like Energy Conservation, Domestic Safety, Health, Hygiene
and Cleanliness, Examination Skills, Road Safety, Skill Development etc., Special
Programmes for Students belonging to Project Affected People (PAP) villages will be
done by engaging the services of Voluntary Organisation.

Training @ Site through which large number of employees can be motivated at the
work place itself to perform better. Team Building, Motivation, 5 S, QC Concepts,
Official Language Hindi, Energy Conservation etc., are some of the programmes
planned under the category.

OBT - Under Out Bound Training the following programmes are conducted in this
year

Deputation Training

NLC employees are deputed to various reputed Training Institutes to update their
Knowledge and Skills in various areas so as to apply the same at NLC. Employees are
deputed for the programmes sponsored by Department of Personnel and Training of

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Government of India at various State Government run institutes like Anna Institute of
Management, Chennai, Administrative Training Institute, Mysore, Dr. MCR Institute of
AP, Hyderabad, Institute of Public Enterprise, Hyderabad etc.,
Industry - Institute Interface
In line with the Industry - Institute Interface, Engineering Students belonging to
Diploma/Degree are permitted to do their In Plant Training (IPT) and Project work (PW)
in the period between December to July every year. Student community is benefitted by
way of synergizing the theoretical knowledge learned at class rooms with the practical
applications at the plants so as to enrich their creative brains.
Training Ambience
-A/C halls with state-of-the-art facilities creating an
ambience for effective training.
-Auditorium of 100 seats capacity to cater micro meetings. Buffet System in
Dining to choose their liking and avoid wastage.
uditorium of 300 seats capacity to host Corporate Events.
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
NLC continues to maintain cordial industrial relations. The Joint Council of Unions and
Associations of Engineers and Officers are functioning in NLC effectively. The
Management has a regular system of discussions on common matters which help to
maintain good industrial relations and to create mutual trust and belief among the
employees.

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WELFARE

The Company as a model employer lays great stress on the welfare of its employees and
peripheral villages. Some of the salient features are :
Welfare to Employees

Township with over 21000 houses

Subsidised transport

Medicare with more than 350 bed hospital supported by peripheral dispensaries.

Industrial Canteens

Family welfare

Special Incentive Schemes for small family norm.

Education - Schools and a college in Neyveli Campus.

Recreation facilities like clubs, gyms.

Sports with all infrastructural facilities.

Post retirement medical assistance.

A creche for children.

Health care programmes for school children.

Social Welfare - Peripheral Development :

Drinking water to surrounding villages

Irrigation water to 20,000 acres in nearby villages

Facilities for mentally handicapped children, destitute women and aged people
`Sneha'.

A Centre for making Jaipur type artificial limb for handicapped

Free Medical Camps for surrounding villages; Sterilizations.

A school for the speech and hearing impaired "Shravanee".

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

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CHAPTER II

OBJECTIVES
The primary objective of the project in identifying the organizational and individual training
needs and to analyze the same to give feedback and suggestions to the organization for
improving the training & development process of the organization.
The secondary objectives of the project are as follows:
To study the training and development process carried on in the Company.
To identify the knowledge and skills required to perform the job efficiently and
effectively.
To study the various training and development activities exist in NLC Ltd.
To find out the quality of training programme in NLC Ltd.
To find out training programme is productive to improve their performance or not.
To find out whether they are implementing the knowledge and skills or not.
To find out the changes the employees required in their training program.
To make suitable suggestion and recommendations for the improvement of training
and development programme based on the opinion of the employees and findings of
the study.

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SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY


Training and Development is very important and essential in every organization due to the
following:
Training is required to cover essential work-related skills, techniques and knowledge. It
is the process used to reduce the gap between the desired performance and the actual
performance which eventually results in increased Productivity, quality and healthy
work environment.
Optimum Utilization of Human Resources Training and Development helps in
optimizing the utilization of human resource that further helps the employee to achieve
the organizational goals as well as their individual goals.
Training helps to eliminate obsolesce in work, it gives the employees a clear view of
what is needed and also helps in upgrading their skills and knowledge to keep in pace
with the ever changing technology which is very essential in todays competitive
market.
Development of Human Resources Training and Development helps to provide an
opportunity and broad structure for the development of human resources technical and
behavioral skills in an organization. It also helps the employees in attaining personal
growth.
Team spirit Training and Development helps in inculcating the sense of team work,
team spirit, and inter-team collaborations. It helps in inculcating the zeal to learn within
the employees.
Safety in work place is another important feature of training which helps to avoid
accidents and injuries in the work place.
Organization Culture Training and Development helps to develop and improve the
organizational health culture and effectiveness. It helps in creating the learning culture
within the organization.

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Training and Development aids in organizational development i.e. Organization gets


more effective decision making and problem solving. It helps in understanding and
carrying out organizational policies
Training and Development helps in developing leadership skills, motivation, loyalty,
better attitudes, and other aspects that successful workers and managers usually
display.
For every employee to perform well especially Supervisors and Managers, there is
need for constant training and development. The right employee training,
development and education provides big payoffs for the employer in increased
productivity, knowledge, loyalty, and contribution to general growth of the firm. In
most cases external trainings for instance provide participants with the avenue to meet
new set of people in the same field and network. The meeting will give them the
chance to compare issues and find out what is obtainable in each others environment.
This for sure will introduce positive changes where necessary.
So I felt it is important to carefully identify the training needs, carefully plan a
training process and evaluate this process. Hence the study on Identification of
Training needs in NLC.

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LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY


Time constraint - While getting all the questionnaires filled, I faced that most of the
employees didnt want to respond because of the limited time they had. I faced a lot of
problem while convincing them.
Sample size constraint - As the employee base of the organization is about 17593
employees, so it was very difficult to cover all the employees in this survey. Number of
employee covered in this survey is limited to the sample size of 100 employees only. This
limits the scope of the project study and the analysis may not represent the whole
population.
Duration constraint - The time duration for the project is limited to 7 weeks so it was
difficult to analyze the trainings needs at micro level.
Perception constraint - Also, Employees have a tendency to underestimate their skills
before training and overestimate their skills post training to validate their participation in
the training program. In this way it is seen that it is difficult to comprehensively evaluate
or capture the effectiveness of a training program.

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CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Bella Ya Hui Lien,Richard Yu Yuan Hung and Gary N. McLean on the title of
Training evaluation based on cases of Taiwanese benchmarked high-tech companies
suggested that Although the influence of workplace practices and employees experiences
with training effectiveness has received considerable attention, less is known of the influence
of workplace practices on training evaluation methods. The purposes of this study were to:
(1) explore and understand the training evaluation methods used by seven Taiwanese
companies benchmarked for their excellence; and (2) compare Kirkpatricks and Swansons
training evaluation models with practices used by the benchmarked Taiwanese organizations
from a cross-cultural perspective. Five themes emerged from in-depth interviews, extending
our understanding of training evaluation in the benchmarked Taiwanese organizations.
Cyril Kirwan and David Birchal on the topic of Transfer of learning from
management development programmes: testing the Holton model Transfer of learning from
management development programmes has been described as the effective and continuing
application back at work of the knowledge and skills gained on those programmes. It is a
very important issue for organizations today, given the large amounts of investment in these
programmes and the small amounts of that investment that actually translates into an
improved individual and organizational performance. This paper describes the testing of the
Holton model of learning transfer and suggests amendments to the model where appropriate.
A sample of participants on a management development programme within the Irish health
service completed the Learning Transfer System Inventory based on the Holton model. The
data obtained were analysed using multiple regression and partial correlation techniques.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

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Results indicate that the model does adequately represent the effects of its factors,
although a slightly revised model is presented. Important relationships between factors are
identified, and the central role of the learners personal capacity for transfer (hitherto
unreported in the literature) and their motivation to transfer in facilitating transfer is
highlighted. In practical terms, the tested model can be used as a diagnostic tool by
identifying individual, training design and work environment transfer issues in need of
attention and by developing strategies to deal with them. It can also be used as a framework
for the evaluation of training and development interventions, examining factors outside the
traditional range of most training evaluation efforts and providing a more complete picture of
the success or otherwise of that intervention.
Doo H. Lim & Scott D. Johnson on the topic of Trainee perceptions of factors that
influence learning transfer, The focus of the study was to assess learning transfer made by
HRD professionals from a Korean organization for a training program on performance
improvement technologies. Results revealed multiple reasons for high or low transfer and
provide insights into the design of highly transferable training programs.
Holly M. Hutchins and Lisa A. Burke on the topic of Identifying trainers' knowledge
of training transfer research findings closing the gap between research and practice
Training professionals were surveyed concerning their knowledge of transfer of training
research. Survey items were developed from an integrative literature review based on
empirical findings of factors that directly or indirectly (through learning) influence training
transfer. Survey results suggest that training professionals are in agreement with empirical
transfer findings in the areas of training design and the work environment, but differ in their
agreement of how individual differences impact transfer success and of relevant transfer
evaluation findings. Training professionals were more familiar with academic transfer
research when they occupied higher job positions within their organization, held a training

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

40

certification and had a college degree. The results of our study and the implications for
addressing the research-to-practice gap among training professionals are also discussed
Robert Blomberg on the topic of Cost-Benefit Analysis of Employee Training: A
Literature Review, This article reviews current literature related to cost-benefit analysis of
employee training programs. After a conceptual stage is set and the meaning of terms is
clarified, methodologies for measuring costs and benefits, and problems related to this
process are discussed. Primary and secondary beneficiaries of training are identified. The
need for distributional assignments of costs as a function of benefit is described. Following
the identification of problems inherent in cost-benefit research, concluding comments focus
on the need for practical applications of cost-benefit research.
George M. Alliger, Elizabeth A. Janak on the topic of Kirkpatrick's Levels Of
Training Criteria: Thirty Years Later Kirkpatrick's model (1959a, 1959b, 1960a, 1960b) of
training evaluation criteria has had widespread and enduring popularity. This model proposed
four "levels" of training evaluation criteria: reactions, learning, behavior, and results. Three
problematic assumptions of the model may be identified: (1) The levels are arranged in
ascending order of information provided. (2) The levels are causally linked. (3) The levels are
positively intercorrelated. This article examines the validity of these assumptions, the
frequency of each level in published evaluation studies, correlations from the literature in
regard to Assumptions 2 and 3, and implications for the researcher and training manager.
Raquel Velada ,Antnio Caetano, John W. Michel on the topic of The effects of
training design, individual characteristics and work environment on transfer of training, This
study aims to gain insight into some of the factors that determine the transfer of training to
the work context. The present research examined the relationship between three types of
predictors on transfer of training, including training design, individual characteristics and

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

41

work environment. Data was collected at two points in time from 182 employees in a large
grocery organization. The results indicated that transfer design, performance self-efficacy,
training retention and performance feedback were significantly related to transfer of training.
Contrary to expectation, supervisory support was not significantly related to transfer of
training. These results suggest that in order to enhance transfer of training, organizations
should design training that gives trainees the ability to transfer learning, reinforces the
trainee's beliefs in their ability to transfer, ensures the training content is retained over time
and provides appropriate feedback regarding employee job performance following training
activities.
In a study of Government (1997), 140 State Government agencies in 30 rates were
surveyed The assessment of training needs, collection of needs evaluation. The result
described standard training practices and the degree to which state Government agencies
adhere to accepted practices in determining training needs incorporated in the design and
assess training out comes.
Samson Jose(1985)conducted A study on training need assessment in MRF.the objective
of his study were and ascertain training and development needs keeping in video their
present assignment and to suggest the board outline of format training programme to meet
their needs. Saxena (1975) has evolved a group approach in identification needs.
Thayakeswara(1996) conducted A study in Zonal training school railwaytrichy on the
Effectiveness of the training programme .The objective of the study was to find the
effectiveness of the training programme and it was revealed that the training effectiveness
was found to only at moderate level.
In a study conducted by Richard,J.Brossetian(1969) it was reported that when the trainess
themselves identify their training needs and design the corresponding programmes yield better results.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

42

Training & Development

Training is a process of learning a sequence of programmed behaviour. It improves the


employee's performance on the current job and prepares them for an intended job.

Development not only improves job performance but also brings about the growth of the
personality. Individuals not only mature regarding their potential capacities but also become
better individuals.

Difference between Training & Development:

Training:

1. It's a short term process.


2. Refers to instruction in technical and mechanical problems
3. Targeted in most cases for non-managerial personnel
4. Specific job related purpose

Development:

1. It is a long term educational process.


2. Refers to philosophical and theoretical educational concepts
3. Managerial personnel
4. General knowledge purpose

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

43

Purpose of Training:

1. To improve Productivity: Training leads to increased operational productivity and


increased company profit.
2. To improve Quality: Better trained workers are less likely to make operational
mistakes.
3. To improve Organizational Climate: Training leads to improved production and
product quality which enhances financial incentives. This in turn increases the overall
morale of the organization.
4. To increase Health and Safety: Proper training prevents industrial accidents.
5. Personal Growth: Training gives employees a wider awareness, an enlarged skill
base and that leads to enhanced personal growth.

Steps in Training Process:

1. Discovering or Identifying Training needs: A training program is designed to assist


in providing solutions for specific operational problems or to improve performance of
a trainee.
o

Organizational determination and Analysis: Allocation of resources that


relate to organizational goal.

Operational Analysis: Determination of a specific employee behaviour


required for a particular task.

Man Analysis: Knowledge, attitude and skill one must possess for attainment
of organizational objectives

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

44

2. Getting ready for the job: The trainer has to be prepared for the job. And also who
needs to be trained - the newcomer or the existing employee or the supervisory staff.
3. Preparation of the learner:
o

Putting the learner at ease

Stating the importance and ingredients of the job

Creating interest

Placing the learner as close to his normal working position

Familiarizing him with the equipment, materials and trade terms

4. Presentation of Operation and Knowledge: The trainer should clearly tell, show,
illustrate and question in order to convey the new knowledge and operations. The
trainee should be encouraged to ask questions in order to indicate that he really knows
and understands the job.
5. Performance Try out: The trainee is asked to go through the job several times. This
gradually builds up his skill, speed and confidence.
6. Follow-up: This evaluates the effectiveness of the entire training effort

The Sequence of Training Program can be put in a Flowchart as below:

Discovering or Identifying Training Needs -> Getting Ready for the job -> Preparation of
Learner (Creating desire) -> Presentation of Operation & Knowledge -> Performance Try
out -> Follow up and Evaluation

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

45

TRAINING PROCESS

Training focuses on learning the skills, knowledge, and attitudes required to initially perform
a job or task or to improve upon the performance of a current job or task, while development
activities are not job related, but concentrate on broadening the employee's horizons.

Organizational Objectives
and Strategies

Departmental Objectives
and Strategies

Individual Goals (KRAs)

Training Need
Identification

Devising and
Implementation Training
Program

Evaluation of Results

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

46

TRAINING NEED IDENTIFICATION


INTRODUCTION OF TRAINING NEED IDENTIFICATION
Training need identification is a tool utilized to identify what educational courses or
activities should be provided to employees to improve their work productivity. Here the focus
should be placed on needs as opposed to desires of the employees for a constructive outcome.
In order to emphasize the importance of training need identification we can focus on the
following areas:

To pinpoint if training will make a difference in productivity and the bottom line.

To decide what specific training each employee needs and what will improve his or
her job performance.

To differentiate between the need for training and organizational issues and bring
about a match between individual aspirations and organizational goals.

Identification of training needs (TNI), if done properly, provides the basis on which all
other training activities can be considered. Also requiring careful thought and analysis, it is a
process that needs to be carried out with sensitivity as people's learning is important to them,
and the reputation of the organization is also at stake.
Identification of training needs is important from both the organizational point of view as
well as from an individual's point of view. From an organizations point of view it is
important because an organization has objectives that it wants to achieve for the benefit of all
stakeholders or members, including owners, employees, customers, suppliers, and
neighbours. These objectives can be achieved only through harnessing the abilities of its
people, releasing potential and maximizing opportunities for development. Therefore people
must know what they need to learn in order to achieve organizational goals. Similarly if seen
from an individual's point of view, people have aspirations, they want to develop and in order
to learn and use new abilities, and people need appropriate opportunities, resources, and
conditions. Therefore, to meet people's aspirations, the organization must provide effective
and attractive learning resources and conditions. And it is also important to see that there is a
suitable match between achieving organizational goals and providing attractive learning
opportunities

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47

DIFFERENT LEVELS AT WHICH TRAINING NEEDS ARE


IDENTIFIED
Identification of training needs can be done at three levels to ascertain three kinds of needs: -

Organizational Needs
These concern the performance of the organization as a whole. Here identification of training
needs is done to find out whether the organization is meeting its current performance
standards and objectives and if not, exploring ways in which training or learning might help it
to do so. Sometimes organizational training needs are also identified when the organization
decides that it has to adopt a major new strategy, create a new product or service, undergo a
large-scale change program, or develop significant new relationships, such as joining with
others to form new partnerships.

Fig. 4.2: Type of Needs

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48

Group Needs
Since working in groups and teams have become very much prevalent in today's corporate
world that is why nowadays there is increased emphasis given on team effectiveness and
team performance. Therefore training needs are nowadays even identified at the group level.
Training needs here are concerned basically with the performance of a particular group,
which may be a team, department, function, sub-unit, or so on. Information about the
performance of the group may identify areas of training need - which, again, may be further
utilized for training or other interventions. It is used to find out how efficiently a particular
team or group goes about its business and meets its current objectives.

Individual Needs
These concern the performance of one or more individuals (as individuals, rather than as
members of a group). Here identification of training needs is about finding out to what extent
individuals need to learn or be trained in order to bring their current performance up to the
required level as a result of changes in methods and processes that call for new competencies
and skills.
It also sees to it that there is continuous improvement initiative taken by them. Moreover it
also helps to find out whether individuals are comfortable in working across boundaries, with
people from different backgrounds and different perspectives. This is especially important
because there is so much work force diversity observed today in organizations that it has
become impossible to retain workforce, which is not flexible enough to accommodate such
changes into their daily work schedule.

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49

SOURCES FOR IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS


There are three sources for identifying training needs. Although they are independent sources
for gathering the necessary data but it is usually beneficial if they are considered
complementary to one another as the objective of the exercise is to prepare as consolidated
data of training needs as possible. The three sources are as follows: -

Job Profile
It is a comprehensive description of all the functions and the responsibilities that a person has
to carry out in due course of his job. It is very common for us sometimes to find that people
of a particular department more or less perform the same kind of job and therefore a
comparative study can be done on their performance to pinpoint on the training needs of
those people who have not performed up to the mark. In here we can also include Job
analysis in order to have a realistic and systematic appraisal of training needs. In order to do
this first we need to break up the functions and responsibilities into categories. Next we have
to classify these tasks/activities on the basis of their relative importance to the nature of the
job. And lastly we can compute a priority listing of these tasks in order to have a catalogue of
knowledge, skills and attitudes required for effective performance of the job.

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50

Experiences of the training agency


It is very common for organizations nowadays to hire professional training agencies in order
to look into the training matters. The training agency and the trainers thus should also draw
from their own experiences of organizing programs for comparable groups or in similar areas.
However, earlier experiences can only serve to facilitate the process. It cannot be the sole
basis, as training needs of majority of organizations are very specific.
At ThyssenKrupp this method is used in a modified way, the training agency named SIBM
along with the top management of the organization identify the training needs and decide the
training modules for the employees of all levels.

Pre-training survey of the participant's needs


This is suggested as the best way to conduct a training need identification .A pre-training
survey is nothing but a survey of the needs and expectations of the participants well in
advance of the program. And in this exercise it is better to include the superiors also as they
are in a good position to provide necessary data on the training needs of their subordinates,
especially in context of their performance. This is generally done in a systematic manner with
the help of a structured questionnaire in order to reflect the genuine desire to involve the
participants and the organization in the planning process. However it might happen in certain
cases that it is not possible to actively involve the superiors due to various reasons like lack
of time etc but in that case at least they must be kept fully informed of the proceedings.
In this project, Pre-training survey method is used to identifying the training needs of the
employees.

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51

EVALUATION OF TRAINING PROGRAM

INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE OF EVALUATION OF


TRAINING PROGRAM:
The process of examining a training program is called training evaluation. Training
evaluation checks whether training program has had the desired effect. Training evaluation
ensures that whether candidates are able to implement their learning in their respective
workplace, or to the regular work routines.

Purpose of Evaluation
Feedback: It helps in giving feedback to the candidates by defining the objectives and
linking it to learning outcomes.
Research: It helps in ascertaining the relationship between acquired knowledge, transfer of
knowledge at the work place, and training.
Control: It helps in controlling the training program because if the training is not effective,
then it can be dealt with accordingly.
Power games: At times, the top management (higher authoritative employee) uses the
evaluative data to manipulate it for their own benefits.
Intervention: It helps in determining that whether the actual outcomes are aligned with the
expected outcomes.

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52

METHODS OF TRAINING EVALUATION:


As Organization spend a large amount of their time and resources in the training and
development of their employees, it is important to evaluate these programs for their
effectiveness.

Cost-Benefit Analysis:

A Cost- benefit analysis helps in analyzing and evaluating any development efforts. A
Cost-benefit analysis measures the benefits from the development program, against
the monetary costs of development. These costs include the costs of materials,
supplies, lost work time, travel expenses, consultant fees, and the like. Though it is
easy to calculate the monetary costs it is difficult to translate the benefits into
economic terms. For example, an improvement in an individuals Leadership skills
cannot be measured in monetary terms. Though the cost benefit analysis sounds
appealing, it may not always be practically useful.

Gap Analysis:
Another strategy to evaluate development efforts is to measure the extent to which the
objectives of the program are met. Identifying the gap between the actual and desired
level of performance helps in measuring the level of success of the development
program. However this strategy depends on the quality of the objectives set.

Kirkpatrick Model:
In the late 1950s D.L Kirkpatrick developed a model for evaluating workplace
education programs. Kirkpatricks system has four levels of evaluation. He proposed
applying each level of evaluation to a program, which includes the participants
reaction, participants learning, change in participants behavior and impact of the
program on the organizational effectiveness.

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53

KIRKPATRICKS MODEL IN BRIEF


ASSESSING TRAINING EFFECTIVENESS often entails using the four-level model
developed by Donald Kirkpatrick (1994). According to this model, evaluation should always
begin with level one, and then, as time and budget allows, should move sequentially through
levels two, three, and four. Information from each prior level serves as a base for the next
level's evaluation. Thus, each successive level represents a more precise measure of the
effectiveness of the training program, but at the same time requires a more rigorous and timeconsuming analysis.

Level 1 - Reactions
Just as the word implies, evaluation at this level measures how participants in a training
program react to it. It attempts to answer questions regarding the participants' perceptions Did they like it? Was the material relevant to their work? This type of evaluation is often
called a smile sheet. According to Kirkpatrick, every program should at least be evaluated
at this level to provide for the improvement of a training program. In addition, the
participants' reactions have important consequences for learning (level two). Although a
positive reaction does not guarantee learning, a negative reaction almost certainly reduces its
possibility.

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54

Level 2 - Learning
Assessing at this level moves the evaluation beyond learner satisfaction and attempts to
assess the extent students have advanced in skills, knowledge, or attitude. Measurement at
this level is more difficult and laborious than level one. Methods range from formal to
informal testing to team assessment and self-assessment. If possible, participants take the test
or assessment before the training (pretest) and after training (post test) to determine the
amount of learning that has occurred.

Level 3 - Transfer
This level measures the transfer that has occurred in learners' behavior due to the training
program. Evaluating at this level attempts to answer the question - Are the newly acquired
skills, knowledge, or attitude being used in the everyday environment of the learner? For
many trainers this level represents the true assessment of a program's effectiveness. However,
measuring at this level is difficult as it is often impossible to predict when the change in
behavior will occur, and thus requires important decisions in terms of when to evaluate, how
often to evaluate, and how to evaluate.

Level 4 - Results
Frequently thought of as the bottom line, this level measures the success of the program in
terms that managers and executives can understand -increased production, improved quality,
decreased costs, reduced frequency of accidents, increased sales, and even higher profits or
return on investment. From a business and organizational perspective, this is the overall
reason for a training program, yet level four results are not typically addressed. Determining
results in financial terms is difficult to measure, and is hard to link directly with training.

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55

BENEFITS OF TRAINING NEEDS IDENTIFICATION &


TRAINING EVALUATION
Benefits of Training Need Identification and Training Evaluation are:

The organization is informed about the broader needs of the participants. Through this
process it may be possible that certain new training programs, which were, previously
not in their list may come to the forefront.

The organization is able to reduce the perception gap between the participant and
his/her boss about their needs and expectations from the training program.

The organization is also able to pitch its course input closer to the specific needs of
the participants.

Find out if the learning is being applied at the workplace.

Ensure training improves continuously.

Track the development of staff knowledge and skills.

It also saves a lot of money for the organization as otherwise money is just
unnecessarily wasted on those training programs, which are either not needed by the
employees or they have no interest in undertaking them.

Lastly, time, which is the most important resource today, is also saved, as the training
programs conducted are the ones, which are actually needed by the participants.

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56

CHAPTER III
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research:
Research is a process in which the researcher wishes to find out the end result for a
given problem and thus the solution helps in future course of action. The research has been
defined as A careful investigation or enquiry especially through search for new facts in any
branch of knowledge.

Research Methodology:
The procedure using, which researchers go about their work of describing, explaining
and predicting phenomena, is called Methodology. Methods compromise the procedures used
for generating, collecting and evaluating data. Methods are the ways of obtaining information
useful for assessing explanations.

Design of Study:
The Research Design undertaken for the study is Descriptive one. A
study, which wants to portray the characteristics of a group or individuals or situation, is
known as Descriptive study. It is mostly qualitative in nature.
Hypothesis of the study:
The project Identification of Training Needs in NLC. is based on the following Hypothesis:
NLC, carries out training of the employees.
The Company aims at Effective Training and Development.
Training is needed at the following levels :
Junior Level-Shop Floor Workers
Middle Level-Engineers, Design Engineers, Supervisors
Senior Level-Assistant Departmental Managers, Departmental Managers
Training Evaluation is carried out in order to check the effectiveness of the training
and development process.

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57

The training and development process is structured, systematic, well defined and
involves active participation of the employees.
Feedback is available and this feedback can be used for analysis.
Data Collection Method:
Survey method is considered the best method for data collection of data and the tools
used for data collection are Questionnaire. This method is quite popular particularly in case
of big enquires. Private individuals, research works, private and public organizations and
even government are adopting it.
In this method a questionnaire is sent to the persons concerned with a request to
answer and return the questionnaire. A questionnaire consists of a number of question
involves both specific and general questions relating to needs for training.
Sources of Data:
The two sources of data collection are namely Primary & Secondary.
Primary Data
Questionnaires are prepared and personal interview was conducted. Most of the
questions are consist of multiple choices. The structured interview method was undertaken.
The interview was conducted in English as well as in Tamil.
Proper care was taken to frame the interview schedule in such a manner it should be
easily understood in view of educational level of the employees. Generally 24 questions are
prepared and asked to the employees of the NLC, Neyveli.
Secondary Data
Secondary data was collected from Internets, various books, Journals, and
Company Records.
QUESTIONNAIRE CONSTRUCTION
Questionnaires were constructed based on the following types

Open ended questions

Close ended questions

Multiple choice questions

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58

Period of the Study:


The period for the study is done for 9 weeks.
Sample Design:

Universe

: 17,593

Sample Element

: Employees

Sample Size

: 100 samples

Sample Test

: Percentage Method and

Sample Media

: Questionnaire

Statistical tools used:


o Percentage method

PERCENTAGE METHOD
In this project Percentage method test was used. The percentage method is used to
know the accurate percentages of the data we took, it is easy to graph out through the
percentages. The following are the formula
No of Respondent
Percentage of Respondent =

x 100
Total no. of Respondents

From the above formula, we can get percentages of the data given by the respondents.

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59

CHAPTER V

ANALYSIS AND INTREPRETATION


ANALYSIS USING PERCENTAGE METHOD:
Table 4.1: Age Level of the Respondents

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

20 - 30 Years

2%

31 - 40 Years

10

10%

41 - 50 Years

42

42%

Above 51 Years

46

46%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 46% of the respondents are at the group of
above 51 years, 42 % of the respondents are belongs to the age group between 41 50 years,
10% of the respondents are belongs to the age group between 31 40 years, 2% of the
respondents are belongs to the age group between 20 30 years.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Percentage

Chart 4.1: Age Level of the Respondents

50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%

42%

46%

10%
2%
20 - 30
Years

31 - 40
Years
Age-group

41 - 50
Years

Above
51
Years

60

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61

TABLE 4.2 : GENDER OF THE RESPONDENTS

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Male

98

98%

Female

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 98% of the respondents are belongs to male,
2% of the respondents are belongs to female.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

CHART 4.2 : GENDER OF THE RESPONDENTS

2%

Male
Female
98%

62

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63

TABLE 4.3: EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Below SSLC

40

40%

HSC

28

28%

Diploma/Degree

26

26%

PG

6%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 40% of the respondents are belongs to below
SSLC qualification, 28% of the respondents are belongs to HSC, 26% of the respondents are
belongs to diploma/degree, 6% of the respondents are belongs to post graduation.

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64

CHART 4.3: EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATION OF THE RESPONDENTS

6%

Educational Qualification

PG

26%

Diploma/Degree

28%

HSC

40%
Below SSLC

0%

10%

20%
Percentage

30%

40%

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65

TABLE 4.4: MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Married

94

94%

Unmarried

6%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 94% of the respondents are married, 6% of the
respondents are un married.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Percentage

CHART 4.4: MARITAL STATUS OF THE RESPONDENTS

100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%

94%

6%

Married
Marital status

Unmarried

66

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67

TABLE 4.5: WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Below 5 Years

2%

6 - 10 Years

2%

11 - 15 Years

10

10%

Above 15 Years

86

86%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 86% of the respondents are having the work
experience of above 15 years, 10% of the respondents are having 11 15 years of work
experience, 2% % of the respondents are having 6 10 years of work experience, 2% % of
the respondents are having below 5 years of work experience in NLC.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

CHART 4.5: WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE RESPONDENTS

86%

Work experience

Above 15 Years

10%

11 - 15 Years

6 - 10 Years

2%

Below 5 Years

2%

0%

20%

40%

60%

Percentage

80%

100%

68

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69

TABLE 4.6: MONTHLY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Below 5,000

2%

6,000 10,000

0%

11,000 - 15,000

8%

16,000 - 20000

2%

Above 20,000

88

88%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 88% of the respondents are in the income
level of above 20,000, 8% the respondents are in the income level between 11,000 15,000,
2% the respondents are in the income level between 16,000 20,000, 2% the respondents are
in the income level of below 5,000, 0% the respondents are in the income level between
6,000 10,000.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

CHART 4.6: MONTHLY INCOME OF THE RESPONDENTS

88%

90%
80%
Percentage

70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%

8%

2%

0%

Below
5,000

6,000
10,000

2%

0%
11,00015,000

Monthly income

16,00020000

Above
20,000

70

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71

TABLE 4.7: EXISTING TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME HELPS


TO ENSURE THE CHANGES OF KNOWLEDGE

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

64

64%

Agree

32

32%

Neither agree nor disagree

2%

Disagree

2%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 64% of the respondents strongly agree that the
existing training development programme is ensure the knowledge, 32% of the respondents
agree that the existing training development programme is ensure the knowledge, 2% of the
respondents neither agree nor disagree that the existing training development programme is
ensure the knowledge, 2% of the respondents disagree that the existing training development
programme is ensure the knowledge, 0% of the respondents strongly disagree that the
existing training development programme is ensure the knowledge of the employees.

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72

Chart 4.7: Existing Training and Development Programme helps to ensure the changes
of Knowledge

70%

64%

60%
Percentage

50%
40%

32%

30%
20%
10%

2%

2%

0%

Neither
agree
nor
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
Disagree

0%
Strongly
Agree

Agree

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73

Table 4.8: Present Training &Development Programme are framed with the Objective
of Improving Skill and Overall growth

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

30

30%

Agree

62

62%

Neither agree nor disagree

2%

Disagree

4%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 62% of the respondents are agree that the
training and development programme is framed with improving skill and knowledge, 30% of
the respondents are strongly agree that the training and development programme is framed
with improving skill and knowledge, 4% of the respondents are disagree with the training
and development programme, 2% of the respondents are strongly disagree with the training
and development programme, 2% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that the
training and development programme is framed with improving skill and knowledge of the
employees.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

74

Chart 4.8: Present Training &Development Programme are framed with the Objective
of Improving Skill and Overall growth

2%

Strongly Disagree

4%

Disagree

2%

Neither agree nor disagree

62%

Agree
30%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

Percentage

50%

60%

70%

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

75

Table 4.9: Present Training &Development Programme increases the Quality of Work
life

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

46

46%

Agree

40

40%

Neither agree nor disagree

8%

Disagree

4%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 46% of the respondents are strongly agree that
the training & development programme increases the quality of work life, 40% of the
respondents are agree that the training & development programme increases the quality of
work life, 8% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that the training &
development programme increases the quality of work life, 4% of the respondents are
disagree with the training & development programme, 2% of the respondents are strongly
disagree that the training & development programme.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

76

Chart 4.9: Present Training &Development Programme increases the Quality of Work
life

50%

46%

45%

40%

40%
Percentage

35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
8%

10%

4%

5%

2%

0%
StronglyAgree

Agree NeitheragreenordisagreeDisagree

StronglyDisagree

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

77

Table 4.10: Training and development programme will improve the value of individual

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

54

54%

Agree

40

40%

Neither agree nor disagree

2%

Disagree

2%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 54% of the respondents are strongly agree that
the training and development programme will improve the value of individuals, 40% of the
respondents are agree that the training and development programme will improve the value of
individuals, 2% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that the training and
development programme will improve the value of individuals, 2% of the respondents are
disagree with the training and development programme, 2% of the respondents are strongly
disagree about the training and development programme in
individuals.

improving the value of

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

78

Chart 4.10: Training and development programme will improve the value of individual

Strongly Disagree

2%

Disagree

2%

Neither agree nor disagree

2%

Agree

40%

Strongly Agree

54%

0%

10%

20%

30%
Percentage

40%

50%

60%

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

79

Table 4.11: Knowledgeable & Experienced trainers have been engaged in Training and
development Programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

50

50%

Agree

44

44%

Neither agree nor disagree

4%

Disagree

0%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 50% of the respondents are strongly agree that
knowledgeable and experienced trainers are engaged in training and development
programme, 44% of the respondents are agree that knowledgeable and experienced trainers
are engaged in training and development programme, 4% of the respondents are neither agree
nor disagree with the training and development programme, 2% of the respondents are
strongly disagree with the training and development programme, 0% of the respondents are
disagree that knowledgeable and experienced trainers are engaged in training and
development programme.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

80

Chart 4.11: Knowledgeable & Experienced trainers have been engaged in Training and
development Programme

50%
50%

44%

45%
40%
Percentage

35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%

4%

5%

0%

2%

0%
StronglyAgree

Agree NeitheragreenordisagreeDisagree

StronglyDisagree

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

81

Table 4.12: Employees suggestions are considered in deciding the training programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

20

20%

Agree

38

38%

Neither agree nor disagree

22

22%

Disagree

12

12%

Strongly Disagree

8%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 38% of the respondents are agree that
employees suggestions were considered in training programme,22% of the respondents are
neither agree nor disagree that employees suggestions were considered in training
programme, 20% of the respondents are strongly agree that employees suggestions were
considered in training programme, 12% of the respondents are disagree that employees
suggestions were considered in training programme, 8% of the respondents are strongly
disagree that employees suggestions were considered in training programme.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

82

Chart 4.12: Employees suggestions are considered in deciding the training programme

8%

Strongly Disagree

12%

Disagree

22%

Neither agree nor disagree

38%

Agree
20%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%
Percentage

30%

40%

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

83

Table 4.13: High Scope for learning technical and Non technical skill and knowledge
from the Programmes

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

36

36%

Agree

48

48%

Neither agree nor disagree

8%

Disagree

8%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 48% of the respondents are agree that there is
a high scope for learning by the training programme, 36% of the respondents are strongly
agree that there is a high scope for learning by the training programme, 8% of the
respondents are neither agree nor disagree that there is a high scope for learning by the
training programme, 8% of the respondents are disagree that there is a high scope for learning
by the training programme, 0% of the respondents are agree that there is a high scope for
learning the technical and non-technical skill and knowledge.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

84

Chart 4.13: High Scope for learning technical and Non technical skill and knowledge
from the Programmes

Strongly Disagree

0%

Disagree

8%

Neither agree nor disagree

8%

Agree

48%

Strongly Agree

36%

0%

10%

20%

30%
Percentage

40%

50%

60%

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

85

Table 4.14: Presentation of the Programme is interesting and clear

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

36

36%

Agree

52

52%

Neither agree nor disagree

10

10%

Disagree

2%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that,52% of the respondents are agree the
presentation of the programme is interesting and clear, 36% of the respondents are strongly
agree the presentation of the programme is interesting and clear, 10% of the respondents are
neither agree nor disagree the presentation of the programme is interesting and clear, 2% of
the respondents are disagree the presentation of the programme is interesting and clear,0% of
the respondents are disagree the presentation of the programme is interesting and clear.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.14: Presentation of the Programme is interesting and clear

0%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Disagree

10%

Neither agree nor disagree

52%

Agree
36%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%
Percentage

40%

50%

60%

86

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

87

Table 4.15: Improvement of employees moral after attending the training programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

30

30%

Agree

44

44%

Neither agree nor disagree

16

16%

Disagree

8%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 44% of the respondents are agree that there is
an improvement in moral in work, 30% of the respondents are strongly agree that there is an
improvement in moral in work, 16% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that
there is an improvement in moral in work, 8% of the respondents are disagree that there is an
improvement in moral in work, 2% of the respondents are strongly disagree that there is an
improvement in moral in work,

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

88

Chart 4.15: Improvement of employees moral after attending the training programme

44%

45%
40%

Percentage

35%

30%

30%
25%
20%

16%

15%
8%

10%

2%

5%
0%
StronglyAgree

Agree NeitheragreenordisagreeDisagree

StronglyDisagree

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

89

Table 4.16: Programme provides motivation to implement that learned

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

32

32%

Agree

38

38%

Neither agree nor disagree

20

20%

Disagree

6%

Strongly Disagree

4%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 38% of the respondents are agree that the
programme provides motivation, 32% of the respondents are strongly agree that the
programme provides motivation, 20% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that
the programme provides motivation,6% of the respondents are disagree that the programme
provides motivation, 4% of the respondents are strongly disagree that the programme
provides motivation to implement that are learned.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.16: Programme provides motivation to implement that learned

Strongly Disagree

4%

Disagree

6%

Neither agree nor disagree

20%

Agree

38%

Strongly Agree

32%

0%

5%

10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%


Percentage

90

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

91

Table 4.17: Satisfaction about the Worker educational programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

44

44%

Agree

39

39%

Neither agree nor disagree

2%

Disagree

8%

Strongly Disagree

7%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 44% of the respondents are strongly agree that
the workers educational programme is satisfactory, 39% of the respondents are agree that the
workers educational programme is satisfactory, 8% of the respondents are disagree that the
workers educational programme is satisfactory, 7% of the respondents are strongly disagree
that the workers educational programme is satisfaction, 2% of the respondents are neither
agree nor disagree that the workers educational programme is satisfactory.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.17: Satisfaction about the Worker educational programme

7%

Strongly Disagree

8%

Disagree
2%

Neither agree nor disagree

39%

Agree

44%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

92

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

93

Table 4.18: Satisfaction about the Computer Literacy programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

42

42%

Agree

38

38%

Neither agree nor disagree

8%

Disagree

8%

Strongly Disagree

4%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 42% of the respondents are strongly
satisfactory with computer literacy programme, 38% of the respondents are satisfactory with
computer literacy programme, 8% of the respondents are neither satisfactory nor dis
satisfactory with computer literacy programme, 8% of the respondents are dis satisfactory
with computer literacy programme, 4% of the respondents are strongly dis satisfactory about
the satisfaction of computer literacy programme.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.18: Satisfaction about the Computer Literacy programme

4%

Strongly Disagree
Disagree

8%

Neither agree nor disagree

8%
38%

Agree

42%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

94

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

95

Table 4.19: Satisfaction about the Self - Development and Growth training Programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

32

32%

Agree

50

50%

Neither agree nor disagree

10

10%

Disagree

6%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 50% of the respondents are agree that there is
a satisfaction on self-development and growth, 32% of the respondents are strongly agree that
there is a satisfaction on self-development and growth, 10% of the respondents are neither
agree nor disagree that there is a satisfaction on self-development and growth, 6% of the
respondents are disagree that there is a satisfaction on self-development and growth, 2% of
the respondents are strongly disagree that there is a satisfaction on self-development and
growth on the training.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

96

Chart 4.19: Satisfaction about the Self - Development and Growth training Programme

2%

Strongly Disagree

6%

Disagree

10%

Neither agree nor disagree

50%

Agree
32%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

97

Table 4.20: Satisfaction about counselling system

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

36

36%

Agree

38

38%

Neither agree nor disagree

16

16%

Disagree

6%

Strongly Disagree

4%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 38% of the respondents are agree that the
counselling system is satisfactory, 36% of the respondents are strongly agree that the
counselling system is satisfactory, 16% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that
the counselling system is satisfactory, 6% of the respondents are disagree that the counselling
system is satisfactory, 4% of the respondents are strongly disagree that the counselling
system is satisfactory.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.20: Satisfaction about counselling system

40%

36%

38%

35%

Percentage

30%
25%
20%

16%

15%
10%

6%

5%

4%

0%
StronglyAgree

Agree NeitheragreenordisagreeDisagree

StronglyDisagree

98

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

99

Table 4.21: Satisfaction about the Operator training programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

44

44%

Agree

41

41%

Neither agree nor disagree

13

13%

Disagree

2%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 44% of the respondents are strongly agree
with the operator training programme, 41% of the respondents are agree with the operator
training programme, 13% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree with the operator
training programme, 2% of the respondents are disagree with the operator training
programme, 0% of the respondents are strongly disagree with the operator training
programme.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.21: Satisfaction about the Operator training programme

0%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Disagree

13%

Neither agree nor disagree

41%

Agree

44%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

100

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

101

Table 4.22: Satisfaction about the special Lecture training programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

43

43%

Agree

37

37%

Neither agree nor disagree

10

10%

Disagree

6%

Strongly Disagree

4%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 43% of the respondents are strongly agree that
the special lecture training is satisfactory, 37% of the respondents are agree that the special
lecture training is satisfactory, 10% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that the
special lecture training is satisfactory, 6% of the respondents are disagree that the special
lecture training is satisfactory, 4% of the respondents are strongly disagree that the special
lecture training is satisfactory.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.22: Satisfaction about the special Lecture training programme

4%

Strongly Disagree

6%

Disagree

10%

Neither agree nor disagree

37%

Agree

43%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

102

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

103

Table 4.23: Training is helps to Know the Employees Strengths and weakness

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

40

40%

Agree

48

48%

Neither agree nor disagree

6%

Disagree

6%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 48% of the respondents are agree that the
training helps to identify the employee strength and weakness, 40% of the respondents are
strongly agree that the training helps to identify the employee strength and weakness, 6% of
the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that the training helps to identify the employee
strength and weakness, 6% of the respondents are disagree that the training helps to identify
the employee strength and weakness, 0% of the respondents are strongly disagree that the
training helps to identify the employee strength and weakness.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.23: Training is helps to Know the Employees Strengths and weakness

Strongly Disagree

0%

Disagree

6%

Neither agree nor disagree

6%

Agree

48%

Strongly Agree

40%

0%

10%

20%

30%
Percentage

40%

50%

60%

104

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

105

Table 4.24: Training is helps to aligning the individual and organisational goal

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

40

40%

Agree

30

30%

Neither agree nor disagree

26

26%

Disagree

4%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 40% of the respondents are strongly agree that
training helps to aligning the individual and organisational goal, 30% of the respondents are
agree that training helps to aligning the individual and organisational goal, 26% of the
respondents are neither agree nor disagree that training helps to aligning the individual and
organisational goal, 4% of the respondents are disagree that training helps to aligning the
individual and organisational goal, 0% of the respondents are strongly disagree that training
helps to aligning the individual and organisational goal.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.24: Training is helps to aligning the individual and organisational goal

0%

Strongly Disagree

4%

Disagree

26%

Neither agree nor disagree

30%

Agree

40%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%
Percentage

30%

40%

106

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

107

Table 4.25: Training is helps to work independently

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

32

32%

Agree

46

46%

Neither agree nor disagree

10

10%

Disagree

12

12%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 46% of the respondents are agree that the
training work independently, 32% of the respondents are strongly agree that the training work
independently, 12% of the respondents are disagree that the training work independently,
10% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree that the training work independently,
0% of the respondents are strongly disagree that the training helps to work independently.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Percentage

Chart 4.25: Training is helps to work independently

50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%

46%

32%

10%

12%
0%

Strongly
Agree

Agree

Neither
agree
nor
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
Disagree

108

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

109

Table 4.26: Proper feedback system available to record the responses

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

28

28%

Agree

35

35%

Neither agree nor disagree

15

15%

Disagree

10

10%

Strongly Disagree

12

12%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 35% of the respondents are agree that there is
proper feedback system is available, 28% of the respondents are strongly agree that there is
proper feedback system is available, 15% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree
that there is proper feedback system is available, 12% of the respondents are strongly
disagree that there is proper feedback system is available, 10% of the respondents are
disagree that there is proper feedback system is available to record the responses of the
employees.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.26: Proper feedback system available to record the responses

35%
35%
30%

28%

Percentage

25%
20%
15%
15%
10%

12%

10%
5%
0%
StronglyAgree

Agree NeitheragreenordisagreeDisagree

StronglyDisagree

110

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

111

Table 4.27: Proper evaluation method is available for evaluating the training
programme

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

31

31%

Agree

44

44%

Neither agree nor disagree

13

13%

Disagree

2%

Strongly Disagree

10

10%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 44% of the respondents are agree that proper
evaluation method is available for training, 31% of the respondents are strongly agree that
proper evaluation method is available for training, 13% of the respondents are neither agree
nor disagree that proper evaluation method is available for training, 10% of the respondents
are strongly disagree that proper evaluation method is available for training, 2% of the
respondents are disagree that proper evaluation method is available for training programme.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

112

Chart 4.27: Proper evaluation method is available for evaluating the training
programme

10%

Strongly Disagree
2%

Disagree

13%

Neither agree nor disagree

44%

Agree
31%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

113

Table 4.28: Training is helps to increasing the motivation level

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

26

26%

Agree

43

43%

Neither agree nor disagree

23

23%

Disagree

6%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 43% of the respondents are agree that the
training helps to increase the motivational level, 26% of the respondents are strongly agree
that the training helps to increase the motivational level, 23% of the respondents are neither
agree nor disagree that the training helps to increase the motivational level, 6% of the
respondents are disagree that the training helps to increase the motivational level, 2% of the
respondents are strongly disagree that the training helps to increase the motivational level.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.28: Training is helps to increasing the motivation level

43%

45%
40%

Percentage

35%
30%

26%
23%

25%
20%
15%
10%

6%
2%

5%
0%
StronglyAgree

Agree NeitheragreenordisagreeDisagree

StronglyDisagree

114

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

115

Table 4.29: Training methods focus on developing team work and Leadership skill

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

30

30%

Agree

36

36%

Neither agree nor disagree

26

26%

Disagree

4%

Strongly Disagree

4%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 36% of the respondents are agree that training
focuses on team work and leadership skill, 30% of the respondents are strongly agree that
training focuses on team work and leadership skill, 26% of the respondents are neither agree
nor disagree that training focuses on team work and leadership skill, 4% of the respondents
are disagree that training focuses on team work and leadership skill, 4% of the respondents
are strongly disagree that training focuses on team work and leadership skill.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.29: Training methods focus on developing team work and Leadership skill

Strongly Disagree

4%

Disagree

4%

Neither agree nor disagree

26%

Agree

36%

Strongly Agree

30%

0%

5%

10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%


Percentage

116

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

117

Table 4.30: Training programme encouraged participation and discussion

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

36

36%

Agree

37

37%

Neither agree nor disagree

21

21%

Disagree

4%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 37% of the respondents agree that the training
programme encourage participation and discussion, 36% of the respondents strongly agree
that the training programme encourage participation and discussion, 21% of the respondents
neither agree nor disagree that the training programme encourage participation and
discussion, 4% of the respondents disagree that the training programme encourage
participation and discussion, 2% of the respondents strongly disagree that the training
programme encourage participation and discussion.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.30: Training programme encouraged participation and discussion

40%

36%

37%

35%

Percentage

30%
25%

21%

20%
15%
10%
4%

5%

2%

0%
Strongly
Agree

Agree

Neither
agree
nor
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
Disagree

118

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

119

Table 4.31: Course objective clearly communicated to the participants

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

28

28%

Agree

49

49%

Neither agree nor disagree

11

11%

Disagree

10

10%

Strongly Disagree

2%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 49% of the respondents are agree that the
course objectives are clearly communicated, 28% of the respondents are strongly agree that
the course objectives are clearly communicated, 11% of the respondents are neither agree nor
disagree that the course objectives are clearly communicated, 10% of the respondents are
disagree that the course objectives are clearly communicated, 2% of the respondents are
strongly disagree that the course objectives are clearly communicated to the participants.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.31: Course objective clearly communicated to the participants

49%

50%
45%
40%
Percentage

35%

28%

30%
25%
20%
11%

15%

10%

10%

2%

5%
0%
StronglyAgree

Agree NeitheragreenordisagreeDisagree

StronglyDisagree

120

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

121

Table 4.32: Training helpful to perform the job in better way

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

31

31%

Agree

46

46%

Neither agree nor disagree

18

18%

Disagree

5%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 46% of the respondents are agree that the
training is helpful to perform the job, 31% of the respondents are strongly agree that the
training is helpful to perform the job, 18% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree
that the training is helpful to perform the job, 5% of the respondents are disagree that the
training is helpful to perform the job, 0% of the respondents are strongly disagree that the
training is helpful to perform the job in a better way.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

Chart 4.32: Training helpful to perform the job in better way

0%

Strongly Disagree

5%

Disagree

18%

Neither agree nor disagree

46%

Agree
31%

Strongly Agree

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

122

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

123

Table 4.33: Learnings of the programme is practiced and will be applied on the job

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

36

36%

Agree

40

40%

Neither agree nor disagree

16

16%

Disagree

8%

Strongly Disagree

0%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 40% of the respondents are agree that the
learning from the training is applied, 36% of the respondents are strongly agree that the
learning from the training is applied, 16% of the respondents are neither agree nor disagree
that the learning from the training is applied, 8% of the respondents are disagree that the
learning from the training is applied, 0% of the respondents are strongly disagree that the
learning from the training is applied in the job.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

124

Chart 4.33: Learnings of the programme is practiced and will be applied on the job

Strongly Disagree

0%

Disagree

8%

Neither agree nor disagree

16%

Agree

40%

Strongly Agree

36%

0%

10%

20%

30%

Percentage

40%

50%

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

125

Table 4.34: Necessary action is being identified the training needs on the basis of
feedback

PARTICULARS

FREQUENCY

PERCENTAGE

Strongly Agree

36

36%

Agree

25

25%

Neither agree nor disagree

16

16%

Disagree

9%

Strongly Disagree

14

14%

Total

100

100%

INTREPRETATION:
From the above table it is inferred that, 36% of the respondents are strongly agree that
necessary action is taken on basis of feed back, 25% of the respondents are agree that
necessary action is taken on basis of feed back, 16% of the respondents are neither agree nor
disagree that necessary action is taken on basis of feed back, 14% of the respondents are
strongly disagree that necessary action is taken on basis of feed back, 9% of the respondents
are disagree that necessary action is taken on basis of feed back.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

126

Chart 4.34: Necessary action is being identified the training needs on the basis of
feedback

40%

36%

35%

Percentage

30%

25%

25%
20%

16%

14%

15%
9%

10%
5%
0%
Strongly
Agree

Agree

Neither
agree
nor
disagree

Disagree

Strongly
Disagree

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

127

CHAPTER- V
FINDINGS

98% of the respondents are belongs to male.


94% of the respondents are married.
86% of the respondents are having the work experience of above 15 years.
88% of the respondents are in the income level of above 20,000.
64% of the respondents strongly agree that the existing training development
programme is ensure the knowledge.
62% of the respondents are agree that the training and development
programme is framed with improving skill and knowledge.
50% of the respondents are strongly agree that knowledgeable and
experienced trainers are engaged in training and development programme.
52% of the respondents are agree the presentation of the programme is
interesting and clear.
50% of the respondents are agree that there is a satisfaction on selfdevelopment and growth.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

128

CHAPTER -VI
SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATION

o The organization may give more emphasis on the suggestion of the employees while
designing the training programme.
o The training programmes provided to the employee may give more emphasis on
factor like increasing moral.
o All the training and development programmes may be design such that it will helpful
in boosting the motivation of employees to implement the same on the job.
o There is a scope for little bit improvement in the counseling system of training and
development programme.
o More emphasis may be given on aligning the individual need with the organization
need while deciding the training programme.
o Feedback system after training and development programme required little bit of
improvement for further development of employee.
o Training programme on developing the teamwork and leadership skill may be
encouraged more to increase the employees productivity.
o Training and development programme encouraging the employees participation and
discussion may always be provided to the employees.
o While identifying the training needs, feedback of the employee should always be
given preferences.
o No employees should be left out while providing the training programme as it is
essential for the performing the individual duties.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

129

CHAPTER VII
CONCLUSION

The study is aimed to measure the employee training and development needs in Neyveli
Lignite Corporation Limited, Neyveli. The study has conducted a survey with help of
questionnaire, to study the effectiveness of training program. The study reveals that the
training program is playing a vital role in this organization.
After the careful Data analysis through the study I conclude that measurement of training and
development needs at NLC Limited are Good level. The employees are very much satisfied
with the programs offered by the company.
More ever training and learning is a continuous process and so the organization should
provide adequate training to their employees for development of organization.
Through this study, I got some findings and also I have to give some suggestion based on the
findings. I hope that my suggestion will help to improve the training and development in
future development of our esteemed organization.

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

130

CHAPTER -VIII
APPENDIX
A STUDY OF IDENTIFICATION TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS IN NEYVELI
LIGNITE CORPORATION LIMITED, MINE-I
Questionnaire

1.

Name

2.

Age

20-30 Years

31-40 Years

41-50 Years

Above 51Years
Female

3.

Gender

Male

4.

Qualification

Below SSLC

HSC

Diploma/Degree

PG

5.

Marital Status

Married

6. How many years experience you have


Below 5 Years

6 10 Years

11 -15 Years

above 15 Years

7. Monthly Income
Below 5,000
16,000 20000

6,000-10,000

11,000 15,000

Above 20,000

Kindly rate the following statement on a 5 point scale as stated below


[Tick on your answer]
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Strongly Agree
Agree
Neither Agree nor Disagree
Disagree
Strongly Disagree

Unmarried

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


S.NO

QUESTIONS

1.

The existing training and development programmes help to meet


out the needs and ensure effective change in the knowledge of
employees.

2.

The present training and development programmes are framed with


the objectives of improving the skills of employees and overall
growth of employees.

3.

The present training and development programme increases the


quality of work life in an organization.

4.

Training and development will improve the value of individual


employees in terms of self development, career growth and
contribution to the organization.

5.

Knowledgeable & Experienced trainers have been engaged in


training and development programmes.

6.

Employees suggestion are given due importance while deciding the


training programme.

7.

There is very high scope for learning technical and non-technical


skills and knowledge from the programmes.

8.

The presentations of the programme are interesting, clear and


understandable easily.

9.

There is a considerable improvement in the employees moral in


respect of work after attending the training programme.

10.

The programme provides motivation to implement whatever


learned from the programme.

11.

Are you satisfied with the following training and development


programme provided by NLC
Workers educational programme.
Computer literacy programme.
Self-development and growth training programme.
Counseling system.
Operators training programme.
Special lecture training programme.

131

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS


12.

Training helps employees to know about their interests as well as


their strengths and weakness.

13.

The training programmes helps to aligning the individual and


organization goals.

14.

The training course helps employees to work independently.

15.

There is a proper feedback system available to know the response


of employees attended the training programme.

16.

There is a proper method available in the organization to evaluate


the result of the training programme.

17.

The training helps to increase the motivation level of employees.

18.

Training method focus on developing team work and leadership


skills.

19.

The programme encouraged participation and discussion.

20.

Course objective and clearly communicated to the participants.

21.

The training helpful to perform the job in a better way.

22.

The learning of the programme is practiced and will be applied on


the job.

23.

Necessary action is being taken to identify the training needs on the


basis of feedback received by the trainees.

132

24.
Any other suggestion to improve the identification of training and development needs in your
organization.

Thanks for your co-operation

Signature of the respondent

*****************

IDENTIFICATION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT NEEDS

133

CHAPTER -IX
BIBLOGRAPHY
Books

Gower handbook of training and development : Anthony Landale

How to identify your organization s training needs: John H McConnell

Hiring and Keeping the Best People : Harvard Business School Press, 2002

Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels :


Donald L. Kirkpatrick, James D. Kirkpatrick

Newspapers:
Economic Times
The Times of India
Hindustan Times

Websites

http://www.hr-guide.com/

http://www.hreonline.com/

http://www.managementparadise.com

www.nlc.co.in