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The changing landscape

for local government


A new working model to deliver integrated services in the run-up to 2025 and beyond

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Introduction
At a recent roundtable event, Civica brought together a group of
pioneering leaders to discuss what the local authority would look
like by 2025 and paint a picture of the changing citizen. They not
only looked at the demands of the citizen and the role of the local
authority but also at what the council of the futures business models,
partnerships, technology, senior management and culture will be like.
This report provides a vision of the future, supported by comments from the
roundtable to outline a new working model to deliver integrated services. An online
survey of 80 council leaders and chief executives from across the country was also
conducted.

Contributors
Vic Allison
Deputy Managing Director, Wychavon District Council
Paul Bradbury
Group Business Development Director, Civica
Graham Cook
Consultant and Former Deputy Chief Executive,
Reigate and Banstead Borough Council
Gerard Doyle
Managing Director, Canons Associates Ltd

The navigation below and top right corner is designed for you to easily move through
this report which discusses the cultural and behavioural changes required in order to
successfully implement new business models and partnerships for change. It reviews the
implications these changes will have and proposes a maturity model that should be
considered to meet the behaviours of citizens and the demands and needs of
authorities over the coming years.

Jack Hegarty
Managing Director, Wychavon District Council and Chief
Executive of Malvern Hills District Council
Kim Ryley
Former Chief Executive, Hull City Council and Shropshire Council
and Chair at SOLACE in Business
Steve Shakespeare
Managing Director, Civica Services
Julian Wain
Consultant and Interim Former Chief Executive,
Gloucester City Council

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Executive
summary

Our working group believes that a council of 2025 will be shaped by four main themes:

Transformational change
is front and foremost
of future local authority
service delivery.
The requirement for improvements
is being driven by a variety of
political, financial and people
factors. The government has set
out its ambition to balance the
nations books by reducing public
sector costs by approximately
40 billion over the next five years
so it can then pay off the deficit.
And so, the next decade promises
to be a complex and potentially
challenging one for
local authorities.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

1. The changing citizen

3. Staff, skills, partnerships and resources

Includes demographics, the generational mix,


their social interactions, service expectations
and how they group around issues, plus the
challenge of an expanding, ageing and more
demanding population for whom convenience
trumps everything.

Encompasses how councils will develop and retain


the necessary staff, skills and resources to deliver
quality services and achieve their objectives in
conjunction with partners, in an increasingly joined
up, and commercially complex environment.

2. The role of the council

4. Pervasive technology

From community guardian to commissioner of


services. Councils will increasingly be able to
interpret their data to derive citizen insight, take
a more commercial approach, incorporating
baseline and top-up services, and realign their
focus on automation and targeted intervention.

Technological advances are having a profound impact


on how we all deliver and consume services.
Local authorities will have to embrace digital
public services, for example, facilitating new voting
behaviours while automation and social media will
continue to shape the way that people engage,
interact and work.

Like any other organisation they need to react to increasing pace of change and adapt their business models
accordingly. As the CBI states, we must overhaul services in ways that match the needs of tomorrows society.

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Responding to the
changing citizen

87%
of British
adults used
the internet

In recent years, the role of local authorities in the UK has been


undergoing a significant change, driven by a steady shift in
consumer behaviour and the economy.

+33%

37%

The nation is becoming increasingly digitised and as the typical man and woman
on the street begins to embrace digital technology in all aspects of their daily lives,
so too must the authorities who deliver the public sector services they require.
According to the Office for National Statistics, 87% of British adults used the
internet in 2014; including 37% of those aged 75 years and over. Meanwhile
mobile devices have become the go-to device to access information services and
our contacts through the internet with over a third of all UK mobile traffic now on a
handheld mobile or tablet device1.
From 2025 onwards, it will be Generation Y in their 30s and 40s those born
between 1982 and early 2000 that shape public sector service demand. The first
generation to be completely immersed in digital life from birth, Generation Y, has
expectations of local government and the services it provides, that are distinctly
different from Generation X and the baby boomers that preceded them. Service
providers need to match those expectations.
1

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UK Mobile Traffic Statistics, Intelligent Positioning 2014

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

of all UK mobile
traffic is hand
held mobile
or tablet

of those users
were aged 75 years
and over

Generation Y is the self-service information


generation, comfortable conducting all
aspects of their lives online and as such, they
want public sector services to be compatible
with their lifestyle.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back

The public sector has already made significant investment


to bring itself in line with the changing expectations of this
digitally savvy generation.
In June 2014, the electoral registration process became the third public
service to be digitised following the lasting power of attorney in 2013 and
student finance in 2012. In the first two months since this new online service
launched, 820,000 of the one million people (more than four in five) who
registered to vote opted to do so online, rather than via traditional
paper-based methods. Meanwhile, the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency
is no longer printing out tax discs. They have been replaced with an
electronic system in a move to modernise, cut costs and improve other parts
of the organisation such as enforcement.
The automation of these new processes is part of a national digital strategy
led by the Government Digital Service (GDS) to provide digital by design
public services, helping the sector prepare effectively for the demands of
societal change.
However, the effect of central governments appointment of 100 senior
digital and technology experts over the past year is yet to be felt. This
includes a new deputy chief technology officer (CTO) Magnus Falk,
who will work alongside CTO Liam Maxwell to transform the way that
government services are delivered digitally to citizens.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

The responsibility to transform services falls to local authorities. By working to put


appropriate and more streamlined processes, systems and channels in place early,
authorities will be able to establish an increasing focus on local communities and
places, in addition to more efficient and repeatable services, moving away from
the perceived faceless society that many believe we live in today.
Graham Cook: As well as representing a challenge in itself, the ageing
population will be far more tech-savvy. Todays users experience instant
delivery and response from everyday interactions with retailers, banks
etc. By 2025 there will be an expectation for local services to replicate this
level of accessibility and response.

Industry analyst Gartner explains that smart public


sector organisations will be those that harness the
power of social, mobile, cloud and information to
help facilitate innovation, improvements and savings.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Six key characteristics of


British society by 2025

Specifically people will be:

Our group of experts discussed existing research,


trends and historical data to form a number of
key assertions about the population of the UK a
decade from now.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

1. Living longer and


part of a diverse
and increasing
population

2. Connected,
mobile,
independent and
self-serving

3. Politically
disengaged but
locally engaged

4. Demanding
and impatient

5. Divided
over data

6. Lovers
of local

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

1. Living longer and part of a diverse


and increasing population
A recent study by ONS projects that the UK population will reach 70 million by 2025,
while over a quarter of people will be non-white or non-British. The government
predicts that there will be an additional 5.5 million elderly people, which equates to
one in five of the population being aged 65 and over, with just 2.8 working people
to support every person of a pensionable age. The increasing population and the
proportion of older people who naturally place heavier demands on local services
- will put a significant strain on public services and force organisations to change the
way they operate. As the Barnet Graph of Doom2 shows, if spending predictions are
accurate and if councils statutory responsibilities remain the same, then within the
near future statutory services and social care costs will swallow up most local council
spending. This will leave very little to support community services such as libraries,
parks and leisure centres.

Steve Shakespeare: Meeting the needs of the population will demand a more
joined up approach to service delivery. Therefore, authorities must take a leaf
from the book of retail and truly understand their local demographic makeup to
effectively segment their citizens and build digital services to satisfy their needs.

By

2025

=
+
+
+

70m
25%
5.5m
65yrs
2.8

The UK population
will reach 70 million

Over a quarter of people will


be non-white or non-British

There will be an additional


5.5 million elderly people

1 in 5 of the population
will be 65 and over

Just 2.8 working people to support


every person of a pensionable age

London Borough of Barnet

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back

2. Connected, mobile,
independent and self-serving

4. Politically disengaged but locally


engaged

The vast majority of the population will expect to access everything they
need conveniently through the internet and via connected/wearable
devices for both business and pleasure wherever they are. More people will
work from home or on the move than ever before, while technology will
also empower the population to solve issues themselves online rather than
relying on assistance from others, predominately through a smartphone
(or a smart vehicle).
Kim Ryley: Empowering citizens will promote greater self-sufficiency
amongst the local community and eventually encourage long term
behavioural change, reducing reliance on the welfare state.

Generation Y is notoriously politically disengaged, with just 44% of 18-24 year olds
voting in the last general election. Having said that, a record 3.6 million 16-17 year
olds turned out to vote in the Scottish independence referendum suggesting that
they could become more engaged over regional, personal and patriotic issues.

5. Divided over data


While some will openly surrender increasing amounts of personal data in exchange
for the services they desire, others will become hyper sensitive, demanding ever
increasing guarantees over data security. Particularly as technology acts to support
integrated service delivery.

6. Lovers of local

3. Demanding and impatient


As the average age of the population approaches 40 years and the number of
pensioners boom, there will be more demand both for the quantity of health
and social care support, and the choice available. Meanwhile, as business
and retail sectors continue to raise the bar for customer service and as
information online becomes more instantaneously available in multi-media
formats, the demand for instant, simple and integrated services will be higher
than ever before.

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Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

There will be a close affinity with the local community and a need for total place
a whole area approach to public service delivery to avoid duplication and improve
efficiencies.
Julian Wain: Throughout the past and current period of change in local authority
service delivery, there has been limited impact on the user. The changes that will
take place between now and 2025 mean that there is still a big culture shock yet
to come.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Five imperatives to
implement effective change
With devolution high on the political agenda, and citizen characteristics
and demographics set to change significantly over the next decade, it is
critical to assess the wider impact this will have on the role of the local
authorities that serve them and begin to plan accordingly. Our roundtable
delegates and the wider industry agree that the role of the local authority
will become one of integration, particularly with the continued focus
on how a whole area approach to public services can lead to better
services at less cost. It seeks to identify and avoid overlap and duplication
between organisations delivering a step change in both service
improvement and efficiency at the local level, as well as across Whitehall.

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

1. Become a broker of broad, collaborative and integrated services

2. Personalise services based on deep citizen insight


3. Community guardianship founded on quality services and
targeted intervention

4. Facilitate citizens to self-serve

Kim Ryley: The real issue with the current situation is a degradation of civic
life, to the extent that we now live in a faceless society, without much sense
of community. The current lack of citizen action to vote and be part of their
community is because politicians fail to engage in a meaningful way. Over the
next decade this demand to be courted and wooed wont change, but it will
shift from door knocking to the expectation for instant responses from local
councillors.

Paul Bradbury: Integration will have reached a new level where


local authorities act as the community warden - brokering
relationships between the user, community, private businesses
and central government to ensure people get support efficiently
and conveniently.

Introduction


5. Rebuild traditional civic life, safeguard the public and
the environment

Our roundtable delegates and the wider


industry agree that the role of the local
authority will become one of integration.

Home

We identified five imperatives that the role of the local authority must
deliver in order to fulfil its new role and implement effective change:

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

1. Become a broker of
broad, collaborative and
integrated services

2. Personalised and automated


services based on deep citizen insight

This was considered by 40% of public sector leaders to be a key focus


for the future. Local authorities are on the front line of government,
forging relationships in the community, to improve services at a local level
wherever possible. Even in a digitally savvy society there will always be
the need for interpersonal care and communication, but the number of
people in this role will most likely reduce as services are streamlined. In
the future, expect to see closer integration between services, which will be
conducted by multi-skilled, cross-sector workers.

Jack Hegarty: Theres no reason why we shouldnt see services such


as polling stations hosted in private places where the public convene
regularly, such as supermarkets. We shouldnt be afraid to integrate
public and private sector services for the good of the community,
especially in places where people regularly convene in large numbers.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

By studying, analysing and predicting the demographics of an area, local


authorities are much better positioned to offer the most appropriate support
and intervention activities. For instance, in an area where the average age of the
population is 60, investment in mobility support could be far more suitable than
investment in playgrounds.
At present, large retailers can legitimately claim to know more about many local
populations than the authorities serving them due to intelligent use of customer
data through loyalty systems such as reward and points cards and advanced
analytics. However, local authorities can gain an intimate understanding of
their people and communities by unlocking the wealth of official and personal
information within their files, conducting local market research and collaborating
with other data holders such as supermarkets, banks, neighbouring councils,
police, schools and so on.
Intelligent gathering, aggregation and analysis of this information will also
provide a powerful future revenue stream, and lead to better targeted support
and intervention activities supported by technologies that enable hyper-local
interaction. For example, Rotherham Council used Geographic Information
Systems (GIS) to build a community map platform to make more services available
online and on mobile devices. This has encouraged end-users to self-serve and
minimised the requirement for traditional means of contact, such as telephone
and face-to-face interactions.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

3. Community guardianship
founded on quality services and
targeted intervention
Local authorities will move further away from monolithic provision of
specialist services. Instead they will facilitate, broker and collaborate to build
a functional, happy and cost-effective community. Our group suggested that
local authorities will be required to engage with local citizens via suitable
channels on how best to allocate funds in the area. For example, asking them
directly whether 25,000 of funding should be used to clear up fly tipping
sites or renovate the local library.
Jack Hegarty: The next few decades will be all about community
leadership and the ability to let go of direct service delivery and move
towards strategic partnering to deliver services. This set-up will have
multiple public and private sector service lines that move beyond
the commissioning model to intelligently find the right fit for your
community. Hybrid services are the future.

4. Facilitate citizens to
self-serve
According to 43% of council leaders, the primary role of local authorities from
2025 onwards will be to provide citizens with the communication channels,
community connections, technology and information to improve local areas.
Examples of this can already be found online in the growing prevalence of
community campaign web pages on Facebook; but this is just a one facet of what
the future will look like.
As digital services become increasingly pervasive at every level of local
government, and as the digital economy advances, citizens will be able to use
personalised online portals to tailor the services they receive, choosing from
centrally procured suppliers via bespoke government eMarketplaces. Northern
Ireland is already making strides towards this with its single entry point to
government services, NI Direct. Gov.UK is not far behind. Facilitating self-service
in this way, either independently as councils or directing people to central
government portals, will also promote greater self-sufficiency amongst the local
community, with the ultimate aim of encouraging long term behavioural change
and reducing reliance on the welfare state.
Paul Bradbury: Disconnection between the local citizen and authority is
a big problem. To realise the vision of 2025 both parties will need to talk
more and work better together. Vancouver City Council in Canada recently
demonstrated people power in action by getting locals to help them move the
entire contents of its public library to a new building quickly and efficiently.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back

5. Rebuild traditional civic life,


safeguard the public and the
environment
The group agreed that a lack of state budget, increased engagement in local
issues and high-levels of service demand will create resurgence in traditional
civic values and a sense of community. This will be driven further by users
desire for personalisation, heritage and quality experiences. So how can
councils successfully transition from their current role to one more aligned
with the future needs of their communities? Setting clear objectives early in
the process will be invaluable in laying the foundations for successful change.

Kim Ryley: If we look ahead, it is about shifting the way we describe


the role of a local authority. Over the next few decades it will be about
facilitation, brokering services and collaborating to build a community.
Its about creating something that people care about and encouraging
users to engage and support what matters to them. The role of the
council will be to empower the people and encourage self-care and
social community actions to better their own areas and services.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Local authorities will become guardians of


their communities, offering flexible, integrated
delivery of services that bring people and
businesses together.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Eight characteristics of the


new future model
From 2025 and beyond, local authorities will be much
leaner organisations that focus on delivering the strategic
functions and requirements for a Place.
Demands will continue to increase as the purse strings tighten further, so
behaviours will change dramatically from today. At the forefront of this
behaviour change will be managing expectations, developing strategic
partnerships, cultural shift and encouraging self-service.

Forming the basis of this model will be the following areas:


1. Forced or voluntary consolidation

2. Successful delivery of integrated baseline council services

3. Commissioning strategic partnerships

4. Encouraging citizens to self-serve


5. Targeted and personalised services for complex health and
social care needs, but on a restricted basis

6. Outcomes based intervention

7. Intelligent data and automation

8. Self-funding initiatives

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

1. Forced or voluntary
consolidation

2. Successful delivery of integrated


baseline council services

There will be fewer, larger authorities created through forced or voluntary


consolidation of current authorities across the country. Power will be
devolved to local government and regional centres. This will result in shared
technology, workspaces, teams, insights and service delivery in a bid to make
budgets work harder. As part of this, smaller, badly performing authorities will
be either brought up to standard or eliminated as part of larger mergers.

Julian Wain: Consolidation will have brought forward the slower and
badly performing areas to a basic standard, with many piggy-backing
on the advances of the larger and more advanced authorities.

Kim Ryley: The UK will adopt a more American style format with
elected officials including regional mayors and separate commissioners
for police, fire and rescue and education services. The local council will
be an important layer underneath this to connect the different aspects
and offer accountability at a local level.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Local authorities will identify services that are mutually compatible and the
technology needed to integrate them effectively. Working with third parties where
necessary, will put the required infrastructure in place and ensure employees are
adequately trained to deliver these new citizen services from a central team with
active encouragement for citizens to self-serve.
Jack Hegarty: There are huge opportunities to commercialise parts of
housing and social care by offering opt-in extras to baseline services.
For example, working with the financial sector, there could be a call for
notifications to family members or carers of inactive use of pre-paid or debit
cards by the elderly, potentially indicating if there is an issue.

3. Commissioning strategic
partnerships
An agile team of expert brokers will be tasked with assembling and maintaining a
diverse network of third parties and suppliers. The wider industry agreed with our
roundtable delegates that this will be one of the most of important characteristics
of the future (40%), with a third (29%) anticipating the need for outcome based
strategic partnerships to support intervention initiatives, such as the sponsorship
of vulnerable families. Joint strategic public private enterprises will evolve to meet
these needs.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

4. Encouraging citizens to self-serve

Delivering integrated services


(conception to death/cradle to grave)

Citizens will be empowered to consume the services they need through their
channel of choice. Individuals will choose the services that are most important
to them at any given point in time. Councils will offer combined/shared baseline
services and then look to add personalisation on top, at a cost to the citizen.

Pre-birth Pre-school Education Partnering Community services Health Care Death

Integrated platform

Baseline service

5. Targeted and personalised services


for complex health and social care
needs, but on a restricted basis

Enhanced service

A combination of dwindling budgets and increasing demands on local services


from a growing, ageing population means the current ways of working will not
be sustainable for much longer. Instead, our roundtable suggests councils offer a
basic level of core services to everyone, whilst providing personal care budgets to
those with greater needs. This will enable them to purchase bespoke services which
effectively meet their varying needs.

Augmented service

Elderly adult

Waste

Personal account
(eg domiciliary care)
age/adaptations grants

Recycling and household


waste collection
(fortnightly)

Top up services as
core rates

Larger and/or
multiple bins

Voluntary early age


adaptations

Regular bulk waste


collection

New services

Grounds clearance
House/garage clearance
Appliance testing
Tree surgery
Weekly collections

Elderly alert
Handyman jobs
Grounds maintenance

We could see an increase in local initiatives such as the Hogeway Dementia Village in the Netherlands. This
pioneering care facility part funded by the Dutch NHS - combines necessary care for the residents within a
village setting. This includes different style housing, a town square, hairdressers, supermarket, theatre and cafs.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back

6. Outcomes based intervention


Councils will move from a broad view of outcomes to a more granular view
to ensure every step of the process needed to deliver a specific outcome
is optimised. This will manifest in the way it proactively tackles the root of
many of societys problems such as drug addiction, youth unemployment and
homelessness. In so doing they will save time and money.

7. Intelligent data and automation

8. Self-funding initiatives
Self-funding will be the driving force behind every decision and offering
(such as data provision/analysis, team skills and selling capacity). This will
help them embrace open and honest risk taking and innovation for the good
of the community.
Kim Ryley: We could see councils brokering life-long insurance deals with
private companies to ensure every citizen is awarded a policy at birth.
This policy will then cover the cost of any health or social care that a specific
citizen would require over their whole lifetime.

Collaborative and intelligent use of data from a variety of public and private
sources and partners to better anticipate and automate community services will
become common place. Almost a quarter (24%) of local authority leaders see this
as being a key focus for the local authority of the future.
Jack Hegarty: We are starting to see a more commercial approach to the
outsourcing of service delivery, and the whole relationship between the public
and private sectors is transforming. In the future, it wont just be about the
public sector providing services and the private sector delivering them, but a
combined delivery of efficient services.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Key leadership attributes


to ensure success

Industry leader research

As the role and business model of the local authority transforms, so will its
management, people and skills. Specialist in-house teams will give way to
agile groups of expert brokers focused on the management of strategic
partners and skilled third parties. This shift in approach will require a new
breed of senior management with different skillsets in order to fulfil this
critical role.

Project management skills

Flexibility to perform multiple roles


as hybrid managers in
cross-functional teams
The ability to plan strategically and
develop a roadmap to drive change

Digital communications expertise

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

46%
38%
35%
35%

But felt the following were significantly less important:


LESS IMPORTANT

While this is clear to the leaders involved in our roundtable discussion,


the wider industry seems a little unsure (see results opposite). This lack
of entrepreneurial focus is particularly concerning. Especially given the
Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Eric Pickles,
continued call for councils to go full steam ahead and grab a share of
wealth for their communities - stand tall and seize the opportunities of
enterprise, growth and prosperity. With statutory services and social care
costs threatening to swallow up most local council spending, its vital
organisations consider new ways to replenish their dwindling budgets.

MOST IMPORTANT LEADERSHIP QUALITIES

When asked, they ranked the four most important leadership qualities as:

Eight future
model
characteristics

Commercially minded

21%

Accountable for progress


against expectations

26%

A deep understanding of analytical


and behavioural dynamics

26%

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

With the previous statistics in mind, we have identified seven key


attributes the leader of the future will need to ensure success:

3. Councillors with
local accountability

1. Strategic planning and a visionary


roadmap to drive and sustain change
Particularly important at management level, the new consolidated leadership team
will be more agile and forward thinking with a clear roadmap in place that is not
focused on engine room activity. They will need to build and sustain a culture of
innovation within the organisation. As our Changing Places how innovation and
transformation is taking place in local government report with independent
think-tank Localis revealed in 2013; 93% of council leaders and executives see clear
vision and leadership as key factors in innovation and transformation success.

2. Hybrid managers, cross functional


teams, flexible relationships
Teams will be multi-skilled, able to perform numerous roles within the organisation.
Flexibility will form a key part of contracts with suppliers as well as technology and
delivery partners. Third party relationships will also be expertly nurtured to ensure
engagement brings maximum benefit to the community. Project management skills
will be vital.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

As the devolution debate evolves, local services and council leaders will be
accountable for progress against expectations. They will be accountable for
managing citizen data, understanding and taking action on the voice of citizen
and translating central government policy to a local level.

4. Digital communications
expertise
As the number of councillors from the digital native generation rises up the
ranks, they will appreciate the role of digital communications and be able to
harness the latest, most effective digital channels and formats to interact with
all stakeholders including employees, partners, suppliers, influencers and the
local community.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

2025

5. Conductor of strategic and


integrated partnerships
As diminishing budgets and rising demand on services will make it impossible
for councils to directly deliver all that their local population requires identifying, commissioning and managing strategic partnerships will be key.
These can take many forms, from sharing services with other authorities to
take advantage of increasing economies of scale, to partnering with local
charities for their knowledge of vulnerable citizens and outsourcing
back-office functions or services entirely to third-party experts.
According to our research, local authority leaders currently see themselves
most likely to partner with third parties in 2025 to deliver technology
innovation (44%), outsource whole services (41%) and streamline services and
efficiencies (41%). Just 6% said they planned to manage everything in-house.

Gerard Doyle: For technology and service providers, progress will only
be achieved by offering a matrix of services that is fuelled by
best-of-breed partnerships that are responsive to change. This isnt
about trying to offer everything under one roof; it is about finding the
right selection of partners that can work together.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Deliver technology
innovation

44%

Outsource whole
services

Streamline services
and efficiencies

41%

41%

Just 6% said they planned to manage everything in-house

Truly innovative and successful partnerships


create a virtuous circle for local authorities. As
service delivery becomes more efficient, costs
are reduced, service levels rise and those in the
partnership have more time and resources to
develop better ways of working.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back

6. Deep understanding of
analytical and behavioural
dynamics

23% admit to being not very equipped, saying


they have some of the skills they need in-house but
not enough.

Within the data-driven economy of the future, management will be


able to effectively commercialise its intimate understanding of people
in the local area.

7. Commercially minded
A commercial mind-set will be the central tenet of the new breed
of management. By driving constant profitability they will be able to
reinvest in service delivery. The ability to spot commercial opportunities
and maximise them will be vital to sustaining service delivery.
Future managers will be more responsive and flexible to meet the
ever-changing population demands. We asked the market how
equipped they felt their current management team is to oversee the
transformation required over the next ten years. Whilst many are already
taking the necessary steps to fill any skill gaps, another quarter (23%)
admit to being not very equipped, saying they have some of the skills
they need in-house but not enough.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Kim Ryley: For local authorities, service delivery in the future will be like being a
small spider within a big web. A reduced and more agile management team will
shift the focus from maintaining the engine room to more strategic issues.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Impact of future technology


and as a service delivery
Theres no doubt that technology and as a service delivery will play a leading
role in the new business models, automation and processes over the next
two decades, to enable authorities to meet both financial and service
delivery targets.
Kim Ryley: With a shrinking workforce, technology will play a major role
in streamlining and combining services for the user.

Home

Our experts suggest that technology will play a crucial role in automating
blended services and provisioning information on the move. Access to
information and insights will be vital to tailoring services and ensuring the
maintenance of individual online portals. Slick back-office processes ensure
resources are synced and demand is met.
For the majority, the reality of this technology isnt actually that far away.
Our research highlights that authority leaders already see a need for:

Local Authority services need to be able to flex and adapt to citizens


demands right down to their communication channel and format of
choice. As technology evolves at an increasing pace, local authorities are
under threat of falling behind technology savvy and demanding citizens.

1. Completely paperless processes (51%)

Current trends such as wearable technology, smart devices (from your


phone to your TV), driverless cars and the internet of things, for example,
will be entrenched in day-to-day citizen life. Consider wearable technology
and the recent launch of the Apple watch, the ability for users to remotely
or automatically input information and access self-service technology can
offer huge economies of scale. Imagine remote monitoring of the elderly or
vulnerable people in the community via a TV or wearable device to instant
sharing of information, thus being able to respond quickly to incidents or
crises such as a sudden flood all in real-time. This will be particularly useful
for local authorities working to integrate health and social care services in
order to better cater for the growing ageing population, at a lower cost.

4. App versions of core services (45%)

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

2. Collection of citizen data from all interactions (50%)


3. Secure resident portals with individual profiles for council
interactions (45%)
5. Flexible working supported by mobile devices (44%)
6. Community portals for information on government services (41%)
7. Multi-channel communication, such as Twitter, Facebook, email,
phone and live chat from any device (33%)
The understanding and enthusiasm for these ways of working seems quite
low. Particularly when considered alongside the governments pronounced
Digital Strategy and drive for smarter working; and conversations weve been
having with our customers. Gartner, and many other industry reports, have
made it abundantly clear that smart authorities will be those that harness
these technologies to facilitate innovation, improvements and savings.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back

Whilst some are already putting this in action, those who arent need to wake
up fast to the changing demands of their evolving communities. The majority
of people no longer want to engage and interact with services through
traditional channels. Organisations just need to have the confidence and
creative will to use the technology at hand to deliver services that fit with their
local citizen expectations.

A typical day for a social care worker


Existing method of working

Underpinning improved, smarter service delivery is the continued desire to


support a work-life balance that blends home life with work. There will no
longer be a clear line between ones home and a place of work. Technology
will continue to support home/remote/mobile working to significantly increase
the time that front-line staff spend with citizens. A care worker for example,
could go from spending up to four hours a day in the community to a full days
work, delivering substantial reductions to the cost of providing care.

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Review allocated
cases at home

Case allocation
meeting

Conference call to
discuss cases

Case paperwork
preparation

Time spent
with clients

Enter details
on care system

We are unable to predict the future, but what


we can do is take advantage of innovative
technologies that are available now to begin to
prepare for the future demands.

Introduction

Drive to office

Time spent
with clients

Jack Hegarty: We have seen smart phone adoption and application


driven services take off. Future authorities will need to continue to act
quickly and smartly to embrace new mediums of communication and
ensure they are meeting the demands of the user.

Home

Mobile working

Mobile can be used to


send feedback to clients
or update carefirst with
time critical information

Return home to
review

Time spent with clients increases from 4 to 7.5 hours per day, an
87% improvement and substantial reduction in cost.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Accelerating the
maturity model of the future
For the majority, the current model of service delivery was established in the
1970s. Gradual and piecemeal transformation of such an established and
engrained approach is not going to achieve the new model for the future within
the next ten years. In many senses it is about approaching transformation at
pace with no fear of knocking down the old and starting anew. In order to
do so, authorities need to overcome any barriers that are likely to hold back
transformation, such as a restrictive culture, poor or inadequate succession
planning, as well as inflexible and limited technology and processes.
Graham Cook: Legacy contracts need to be unlocked to make way for
refreshed pay-as-you-go models that allow local authorities to evolve,
rather than be tied down. From a supplier point of view, the winners will
be those that can demonstrate the ability to broker services and bring
together different experts, authorities, charities and so on.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

With any programme for change, we recommend the following


accelerating approach is considered to ensure expectations are met and
the best result for the community is delivered.
1. Understand the community - Understanding the real needs of
your community

2. Define clear outcomes - If faced with a blank sheet of paper,


what really needs to be put into action to meet the needs of your
community and wider stakeholders?
3. Prototyping - To re-evaluate service design.
4. Agile transformation - Take action on clarified outcomes by
moving fast on tested concepts or processes.

5. Scale-up and shift out When prototypes prove successful, rapidly


scale-up and shift out the approach as part of the new model.
6. Innovation taskforce - A taskforce should include local politicians,
workforces, suppliers, partners and any other key stakeholders for
the authority.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next
Stay on track with an ongoing innovation taskforce

Understanding the real needs of your community

Engage appropriately skilled & experienced change agents

 Engage with the community and listen to their experiences,


preferences and ideas

Proposals & regular updates should be transparent


Evolution of service delivery in-line with outcomes

Understand citizen behaviour, interactions and channel of choice

Continuous collaboration across working groups

Citizen insight through data segmentation and analysis



 Review projected regional citizen demographics for the next decade

Regular reviews against transformational road-map

6.

C
 reation of innovation workshops including operational teams

1.

Collaborate with other data holders to get both the bigger picture and

Understand
the community

Establish targeted groups, i.e. troubled families

Innovation
taskforce

Capture and share promptly innovation and lessons learnt as you go

granularity of hyper-local detail

Scale-up & shift out to complete the new model


Speed and agility are critical to success

Define clear outcomes to meet citizen demands

Review outcome against agreed objectives


Scale-up & shift out - streamline to minimise duplicate spend
& resource
Scale-up services sub-regionally or integrate across local agencies to
create economies of scale

5.

6 CLEAR STEPS
to accelerate your
maturity model

Scale and shift

D
 etermine the core purpose, role and focus/priorities of the authority

Develop and agree upon clear strategy and objectives

2.
Define clear
outcomes

Agree a manageable number of key quality of life outcomes and the


key measures of progress towards them

Develop hybrid managers & cross functional teams

Establish agile project methodology & governance

Clear resourcing and investment model to shift quickly from


prototype to full service delivery

Identify potential Quick Wins

Ensure benefits realisation is tracked and progress reported regularly


against the business case

4.
Agile
transformation

Agile transformation to pilot test

3.

Prototyping to re-evaluate service design

Prototyping

Review best-practice examples from all sectors


Undertake regular gap analysis
Consider the councils preferred approach to commissioning, shared
services, outsourcing and new delivery models

Ensure project teams are resourced appropriately


Utilise multi-skilled teams which can perform multiple roles
Augment internal teams with partners, suppliers & contractors

Redesign service delivery to reduce demand & devolve to community level

Pilot test take action to move fast on selected prototypes

 Engage early with ICT function or partner at a strategic level

Devolve authority to ensure quick decision making

Prototyping review alternative delivery models

Identify clear & agreed quality indicators/SLAs

Consider charging for non-core services

Create a culture that fosters innovation and risk taking by creating safe
spaces to experiment without blame for failure

Fund targeted health & social care services with personal care budgets

Recognise failure early, learn from mistakes quickly and move on

Offer personalised, automated & self-serve functionality where appropriate

Strong leadership, roadmap for change

Develop commercially focused detailed business case for each service

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Move away from monolithic provision of specialist services

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Maturity Model to deliver integrated services in the run up to 2025 and beyond

Back
Strategic focus

Stage 0 - Reactive

Stage 1 - Traditional

Stage 2 - Transforming

Stage 3 - Adaptive

Stage 4 - Future-Proof

Low quality service provider


Reactive to change.

Focus on service performance and


outputs, not on outcomes.

Focus only on key services and on


target disinvestment/new investment.

Collaborative and Integrated


service provider.

Outcome-based service provider.

Multi-channel service delivery


enabling self service .

Deep citizen insight.

Focused on quality of life and


targeted interventions.
Work in conjunction with
partner eco-system.

Personalised services.

Understand citizen value.

Joined-up and collaborative agency working.

Citizen insight

Parental style/attitude.

Possible formal investigation/intervention


into service failures.
No understanding of dynamics of Place.

Engagement is reactive through


a silo structure.

Unstructured and reactive engagement.

High levels of complaints.

Engagement with local community


beyond only formal consultation.

Proactive engagement with local


community with two-way communication.

Fully engaged with empowered


citizens and wider communities.

Single view of the citizen.

Multi-agency single view of the citizen.

Deep engagement with citizens


and stakeholders.

Citizen insight through data


segmentation and analysis.

Facilitate and engage with citizens to


self-serve and design services to
reduce demand.

Devolution of decisions and resources


to local communities.

Using silo data to build user profiles.

Not publicly accountable.

Operating model

Monolithic provider of services.


Partnership working approach weak or ineffective.
Majority of services delivered
locally through internal silos.

Majority of services provided directly


by the Authority.

Target operating model - 10 year


outlook that is future-proof and flexible.

One size fits all approach to


service delivery.

Implementing integration across


directorates and with other local agencies.

Focus on organisational structures.

Review core purpose/focus and


moving to a single new model
(commissioning, co-operative,
enabling council, etc.)

Some tactical services delivered


by third parties.

Commissioning strategic partnerships


with focus on essential outcomes.

Well established innovation and support


eco-system involving multiple partners
and agencies.
Commissioning approach central
to strategic planning and
council function.

Adopt agile and flexible working practices.


Traditional, top-down,
multi-layered hierarchical structure
with high overheads.

Low credibility and trust with


local people.

Leadership &
culture

Competing directorates not bound


into corporate strategy, not
mandatory and/or governed.

Processes

Shifting delegation and decision making


to front line teams.

A broker of service delivery from a


managed local marketplace.

Change focused.

Multi-skilled/tasked teams focused on


common outcomes.

Staff fearful or uncertain about


implications of change.

Conductor of strategic partnerships.

Strategic planning and a visionary roadmap


to drive and sustain change.

Political struggles overtake clear


direction, strategy and goals.

No focus on innovation or
service redesign.

Staff resistant to change and


demonstrate lack of accountability.

Insufficient management capacity.

Processes slow, inefficient and bureaucratic.

No focus on the customer experience


or service design around the customer.

Starting to integrate processes and


procedures.

Paper-based processes and desk-based


working.

Look to align customer service teams


and functional departments.

Individual department delivery of


citizen services.

Ultra-flexible and agile teams that are


commissioned and created to tackle a
specific outcome.

Hybrid managers, cross functional teams


and flexible relationships.

Departmental working to deliver


individual citizen services.

Fully automated and less labour intensive


processes which deliver more quickly
and reliably for service users.
Process for structured appraisal of
strategic and service delivery options.
Experienced and effective change.
Efficient programme management.

Paperless processes designed for a


mobile workforce.
Delivery of citizen services - automated,
citizen centric and outcome based
delivery of integrated services.
Regular review and adoption of
commissioning and sourcing concepts.
Streamlined sourcing and procurement.

Technology

Reactive and piecemeal ICT strategy.

Basic ICT strategy.

ICT is a barrier to organisational change.

ICT infrastructure centrally controlled.

Ageing technology.

Disparate legacy systems.

High levels of failure.

Reliance on in-house applications.

Emerging fragmented/shadow IT.

Siloed technology investments.

No strategic plan to bring services online.

No strategic plan to bring services online.

ICT and digital strategy aligned to


corporate strategy.

ICT enabling self-funding initiatives.

ICT insights shaping future


corporate strategy.

Adopted ICT strategy across


the organisation.

Enhanced technology
facilitating agile working.

IT central to driving citizen interaction


and enagement.

Centrally governed strategy & budget.

Single view of the citizen.

Delivering intelligent and predictive services.

Alternative delivery models e.g. cloud, SaaS.

Automating self-service functionality.

Enabling personalised citizen interactions.

Business case led approach to


technology investment.

Established eco-system of delivery partners


Outcome-led decision making.

Real-time, secure data sharing


and collaboration.

Provides barrier to new ways of working,


efficiencies and improved staff productivity.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

ICT is a strategic enabler of change.

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Conclusion
Theres no doubt that local authorities are setting out on a complex and
challenging transformation which will see organisations and the services they
deliver change dramatically between now, 2025 and beyond in response
to a fast-changing environment. Significant, rapid developments in society
and technology compounded by an ageing population and further financial
constraint must be accommodated and balanced in order to adapt to a
radically different public service landscape.
In the next ten years the enlarged UK population is projected to have more
than 5.5 million people over the age of 65 and less than three workers to
support every pensioner. We need to have a more integrated approach to
services, especially in health and care and to engage with younger people,
underpinned by IT-enhanced ways of working which support more agile and
mobile activity, a shift to lower cost self-service and more immediate and
convenient channels, available any time, any place predominantly through a
smartphone (or a smart vehicle).
Better use of digital technologies, the cloud, data analytics and automation
is already helping to transform local services for communities and for
the employees who deliver them. In order to achieve more efficient
organisations, authorities will build on this foundation to establish a new
working model for the future which embraces partnership, collaboration,
agility and innovation.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

The new generation of local authorities will broker relationships with people,
communities, public and private sectors to deliver personalised and joined-up
local services and guardianship based on intelligent insight and focused on
outcomes.
It may be challenging, but this journey poses an exciting opportunity to
radically re-think the way organisations operate for the benefit of both local
communities and the authorities which serve and safeguard them. Then
again, doing nothing is not an option.

Kim Ryley: The actions taken by local government organisations over the
next five years will impact the success of choices and investments by 2025.
Currently, we are still thinking in the short term and do not have the funds
required to significantly transform services. We need to make the space,
time and resources to innovate and test the new model of the future. This
requires a loosening of the apron strings from central government and the
freedom to make change and be transparent about our goals and progress.
This will require the right leadership that is willing to be bold and not shy
away from the risk of failure.

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Next

Contributors
Graham Cook

Vic Allison
Deputy Managing Director, Wychavon District Council

Home

Consultant and Former Deputy Chief Executive,


Reigate and Banstead Borough Council

Vic started his career as a Trainee Accountant with


Stratford-on-Avon District Council. He moved to Leicester
City Council in 1993 where he was Senior Accountant and
then Group Accountant. After a spell as Principal Accountant
back at Stratford-on-Avon, he moved on to West Oxfordshire
District Council where he was to spend eight years as Head
of Corporate Finance, Director of Finance and finally Strategic
Director (Resources). Vic joined Wychavon in 2006 as Head of
Resources. Vic was awarded an MBE in 2008 for services to local
government and the communities of Worcestershire.

Grahams career spans 30 years in local government and 11


years working for two major UK management consultancies. He
has led major service departments and managed programmes of
outsourcing, IT led change and the trade sales of public bodies.
Latterly, he was Deputy Chief Executive of Reigate and Banstead
Borough Council. At Reigate and Banstead he initiated a series of
projects to redesign services and working practices, redesigned
the relationship between the police and the council and led a
number of major multi-partner regeneration programmes.

Paul Bradbury
Group Business Development Director, Civica

Gerard Doyle
Managing Director, Canons Associates Ltd

As Group Business Development Director for Civica, Paul


has over 20 years experience in both selling and developing
complex ICT and business process service based solutions
to both corporate and public sector clients. During his
career he has managed a number of business development
teams responsible for hardware, software, business process
outsourcing and managed services. Paul has specialist interest in
outcomes based intervention, working with authorities to drive
forward the delivery of integrated services to maximise value
and service to the citizen.

Gerard is Managing Director of Canons Associates Ltd, which


specialises in Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) consultancy.
Gerard has over 20 years BPO experience, after spending 10
years as IS/IT Director for Capita PLC, working on 500M+
public and private sector contracts and seven years as Global
Chief Information Officer (CIO) for Manpower Inc. Gerard
also worked for Somerfield Plc for five 8
years as their Logistics
and Supply Chain Director and Tesco Plc for 10 years as their
Financial Systems and Administration Controller
between 1980-1990.

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Back Next

Jack Hegarty

Steve Shakespeare
Managing Director, Civica Services

Managing Director, Wychavon District Council


and Chief Executive of Malvern Hills District Council

Steve has over 30 years experience in the IT industry and has


spent the last 18 years in a number of executive-level roles,
with a particular focus on establishing and leading IT service
orientated businesses. Steve brings a wealth of knowledge and
experience and since 2010 has been responsible for leading the
development and delivery of the Groups UK Managed Services,
Cloud Solutions, IT Outsourcing and BPO operations. Steve
has specialist interest in services that embrace new technology
in a practical way, working in partnership with clients to
deliver agile programmes of change that deliver on value and
outcomes.

Jack has had over 25 years local government experience.


He has been Managing Director of Wychavon since 2004,
where his key responsibilities include heading the councils
paid service and acting as its principal policy advisor. As well
as, leading and directing the workforce (circa 220 full time
equivalent posts and a net budget of 11m) to achieve the
councils aims, priorities and promises; and representing the
council as appropriate at a national, regional and local level. He
joined Wychavon in 2000 as Head of Planning Services. Before
that he held roles in Worthing Borough Council, Horsham
District Council and Watford Borough Council.

Julian Wain

Kim Ryley

Consultant and interim Former Chief Executive,


Gloucester City Council

Former Chief Executive, Hull City Council and


Shropshire and Chair at SOLACE in Business

Julian Wain began his career in housing at


Stratford-on-Avon DC, before moving to Solihull MBC,
where he worked in various roles in housing, regeneration
and economic development, becoming Strategic Director for
Physical and Economic Regeneration in 2002. From 2007 to
2014 he was Chief Executive of Gloucester City Council. He
is currently a freelance consultant and interim specialising in
housing and regeneration and in new models of service delivery.

Kim has 35 years experience in local public service, 14 of these


as a Chief Executive in several large City and Unitary councils.
He is a past president of the Society of Local Authority Chief
Executives (Solace, UK), is a Solace Board Director, and currently
Chair of the societys business arm, Solace in Business, as well
as the societys lead on International Relations. Kim is also
a trustee of the Leadership Centre for Public Services and a
member of the International Committee of the International
City Managers Association in the USA.

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts

Start the conversation and


get in touch with Civica
We are working in partnership with Solace on a future model readiness
engagement designed to support your initial investigations into 2025
readiness. Where are you now? What is a realistic goal for your authority?
How are you going to get there?

Address:
2 Burston Road, Putney SW15 6AR
E-mail:
report2025@civica.co.uk
www.civica.co.uk
www.public-knowledge.co.uk

Home

Introduction

Executive
summary

Changing
citizen

Characteristics
of British
society

Five local
authority
imperatives

Eight future
model
characteristics

Leadership
attributes

Impact of
future
technology

Maturity
model
acceleration

Conclusion

Contributors
/Contacts