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PHILIPPINE NATIONAL HEROES ALBUM

JOSE RIZAL

Jos Protacio Rizal Mercado y Alonso Realonda (June 19, 1861 December 30, 1896) was a
Filipino nationalist, novelist, poet, ophthalmologist, journalist, and revolutionary. He is widely
considered one of the greatest heroes of the Philippines.[6] He was the author of Noli Me Tngere,
El Filibusterismo, and a number of poems and essays. He was executed on December 30, 1896,
by a squad of Filipino soldiers of the Spanish Army.

ANDRES BONIFACIO

Andrs Bonifacio y de Castro (November 30, 1863 May 10, 1897) was a Filipino nationalist
and revolutionary leader. He is often called "the Father of the Philippine Revolution". He was a
founder and later Supremo ("supreme leader") of the Kataas-taasan, Kagalang-galangang
Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan.

EMILIO AGUINALDO

Emilio Famy Aguinaldo QSC PLH[c] (22 March 1869[d] 6 February 1964) is officially
recognized as the First President of the Philippines (1899-1901) and led Philippine forces first
against Spain in the latter part of the Philippine Revolution (1896-1897), and then in the SpanishAmerican War (1898), and finally against the United States during the Philippine-American War
(1899-1901). He was captured by American forces in 1901, which brought an end to his
presidency.

APOLINARIO MABINI

Apolinario Mabini y Maranan (July 23, 1864 May 13, 1903) was a Filipino revolutionary
leader, educator, lawyer, and statesman who served as the first Prime Minister of the Philippines,
serving first under the Revolutionary Government, and then under the First Philippine Republic.

MARCELO H. DEL PILAR

Marcelo Hilario del Pilar y Gatmaitn (August 30, 1850 July 4, 1896), better known by his
pen name Plaridel,[1] was a Filipino writer, lawyer, and journalist. He was the second and last
editor of the La Solidaridad (Solidarity), the newspaper of the Reform Movement in Spain.[2]

JUAN LUNA

Juan Luna y Novicio (October 23, 1857 December 7, 1899) was a Filipino painter, sculptor and
a political activist of the Philippine Revolution during the late 19th century. He became one of the
first recognized Philippine artists.

MELCHORA AQUINO

Melchora Aquino de Ramos (January 6, 1812 March 2, 1919) was a Filipina revolutionary
who became known as "Tandang Sora" ("Elder Sora") in the history of the Philippines because of
her age when the Philippine Revolution broke out in 1896 (she was already 84 at the time). She is
also known as the "Grand Woman of the Revolution" and the "Mother of Mother of Laurel for her
contributions to Philippine history.

GABRIELA SILANG

Mara Josefa Gabriela Cario Silang (19 March 1731 20 September 1763) was a Filipino
revolutionary leader and the wife of the Ilocano insurgent leader, Diego Silang. Following Diego's
assassination in 1763, she led the insurgency for four months before she was captured and
executed by the colonial government of the Spanish East Indies.

GREGORIO DEL PILAR

Gregorio "Kilabot ng Tirad Pass" del Pilar y Sempio (November 14, 1875 December 2, 1899)
was one of the youngest generals in the Philippine Revolutionary Forces during the Philippine
Revolution and the Philippine-American War. He is most known for his role and death at the Battle
of Tirad Pass. Because of his youth, he was called the "Boy General.

EMILIO JACINTO

Emilio Jacinto y Dizon (December 15, 1875 April 16, 1899), was a Filipino General during
the Philippine Revolution. He was one of the highest ranking officers in the Philippine Revolution
and was one of the highest ranking officers of the revolutionary society Kataas-taasan, Kagalanggalangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan or simply and more popularly called Katipunan. He
is popularly known in Philippine history textbooks as the Brains of the Katipunan while some
contend he should be rightfully recognized as the "Brains of the Revolution".

POTENTIAL ENERGY
Potential energy is the energy that an object has due to its position in a force field or that a
system has due to the configuration of its parts.[1][2] Common types include
the gravitational potential energy of an object that depends on its vertical position and mass,

the elastic potential energy of an extended spring, and the electric potential energy of
a charge in an electric field. The SI unit for energy is the joule (symbol J).
The term potential energy was introduced by the 19th century Scottish engineer and
physicist William Rankine,[3][4] although it has links to Greek philosopher Aristotle's concept
of potentiality. Potential energy is associated with forces that act on a body in a way that
depends only on the body's position in space. These forces can be represented by a vector at
every point in space forming what is known as a vector field of forces, or a force field.
If the work of a force field acting on a body that moves from a start to an end position is
determined only by these two positions, and does not depend on the trajectory of the body, then
there is a function known as potential energy that can be evaluated at the two positions to
determine this work. Furthermore, the force field is determined by this potential energy and is
described as derivable from a potential.
EXAMPLE:

In the case of a bow and arrow, when the archer does work on the bow, drawing the string back,
some of the chemical energy of the archer's body is transformed into elastic potential-energy in the
bent limbs of the bow. When the string is released, the force between the string and the arrow
does work on the arrow. Thus, the potential energy in the bow limbs is transformed into the
kinetic energy of the arrow as it takes flight.

KENITIC ENERGY
The kinetic energy of an object is the energy that it possesses due to its motion.[1] It is defined
as the work needed to accelerate a body of a given mass from rest to its stated velocity. Having
gained this energy during its acceleration, the body maintains this kinetic energy unless its

speed changes. The same amount of work is done by the body in decelerating from its current
speed to a state of rest.
In classical mechanics, the kinetic energy of a non-rotating object of mass m traveling at
a speed v is
. In relativistic mechanics, this is a good approximation only when v is much
less than the speed of light.

EXAMPLE:

The cars of a roller coaster reach their maximum kinetic energy when at the bottom of their path.
When they start rising, the kinetic energy begins to be converted to gravitational potential energy.
The sum of kinetic and potential energy in the system remains constant, ignoring losses to friction.

PERCUSSION INSTRUMENT

A percussion instrument is a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scraped


by a beater (including attached or enclosed beaters or rattles); struck, scraped or rubbed by
hand; or struck against another similar instrument. The percussion family is believed to
include the oldest musical instruments, following the human voice.[1]
The percussion section of an orchestra most commonly contains instruments such as timpani,
snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle and tambourine. However, the section can also
contain non-percussive instruments, such as whistles and sirens, or a blown conch shell. On
the other hand, keyboard instruments, such as the celesta, are not normally part of the
percussion section, but keyboard percussion instruments such as the glockenspiel and
xylophone (which do not have piano keyboards) are included.
Percussion instruments are most commonly divided into two classes: Pitched percussion
instruments, which produce notes with an identifiable pitch, and unpitched percussion
instruments, which produce notes without an identifiable pitch.

STRINGED INSTRUMENT

String instruments or stringed instruments are musical instruments that produce sound from
vibrating strings. In most strings instruments, the vibrations are transmitted to the body of the
instrument, which also vibrates, along with the air inside it. In the Hornbostel-Sachs scheme of
musical instrument classification, used in organology, they are called chordophones. Some
common instruments in the string family are violin, guitar, sitar, electric bass, viola, cello,
harp, double bass, rebab, banjo, mandolin, ukulele, and bouzouki.

WIND INSTRUMENT

A wind instrument is a musical instrument that contains some type of resonator (usually a
tube), in which a column of air is set into vibration by the player blowing into (or over) a
mouthpiece set at the end of the resonator. The pitch of the vibration is determined by the
length of the tube and by manual modifications of the effective length of the vibrating column of
air. In the case of some wind instruments, sound is produced by blowing through a reed; others
require buzzing into a metal mouthpiece.

PARTIDO COLLEGE
GOA, CAMARINES SUR
SY 2014-2015

SUBMITTED BY:

LANCE LURENZ HIDDIZEL I. PANUELOS


GRADE 4

SUBMITTED TO:

VINA P. SAMONTE
ADVISER/TEACHER

PARTIDO COLLEGE
GOA, CAMARINES SUR
SY 2014-2015

SUBMITTED BY:

LANCE LURENZ HIDDIZEL I. PANUELOS


GRADE 4

SUBMITTED TO:

VINA P. SAMONTE
ADVISER/TEACHER

PARTIDO COLLEGE
GOA, CAMARINES SUR
SY 2014-2015

SUBMITTED BY:

LANCE LURENZ HIDDIZEL I. PANUELOS


GRADE 4

SUBMITTED TO:

VINA P. SAMONTE
ADVISER/TEACHER