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MO 121

SYLLABUS
SKS = 3

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

OBJECTIVE OF COURSE:

LEARNING APPROACH

LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

COURSE

CODE NUMBER

: MGMT 55038

PERIOD

: SEPTEMBER DESEMBER 2013 (SEMESTER GANJIL)

Logistics and supply chain activities communication, inventory management,


warehousing, transportation, and facility location have been performed since the start of
firms commercial activity.
This course will view the supply chain from the point of view of a general manager.
Logistics and supply chain management is all about managing the hand-offs in a supply
chain hand-offs of either information or product. The design of a logistics system is
critically linked to the objectives of the supply chain. The goal of this course is to
understand how logistical decisions impact the performance of the firm as well as the entire
supply chain. The key will be to understand the link between supply chain structures and
logistical capabilities in a firm or supply chain
The objectives of this course are:
1. To develop an understanding of key drivers of supply chain performance and their
inter-relationships with strategy and other functions of the company such as
marketing, manufacturing, and accounting.
2. To develop solutions for a variety of supply chain management and design
problems and develop an understanding for use of information technology in supply
chain optimization.
3. To develop the ability to incorporate B2B and B2C electronic commerce in supply
chain design and optimization.
4. To understand the complexity of inter-firm and intra-firm coordination in
implementing programs such as e-collaboration, quick response, jointly managed
inventories, and strategic alliances.
5. To develop the ability to design logistics systems and formulate integrated supply
chain strategy, so that all components are not only internally synchronized but also
tuned to firm corporate strategy, competitive realities and market needs
To accomplish these objectives, the course will use a variety of learning techniques:
readings, lectures, written reports, presentations, and, most importantly, class
discussion of case studies

Participant-Centered Learning
Logistics and supply chain analysis is best learned through practice. The cases we will study are about
real world business situations; they are an opportunity to both apply the concepts we discuss in class as
well as further develop our ability to think about business strategy. How much you get out of a case
depends on your preparation and active participation. Each of you must be fully prepared for each
session, and there will be assignments throughout the term to help focus your preparation.
You are expected to actively participate in each session comment, question, argue, and analyze.
Class participation provides us with an opportunity to develop our communication skills in presenting
a point of view and in listening. In many ways, these skills are as valuable as the analytical tools that will
be developed in the course. The lecturers will facilitate the learning process.
In order to gain greatest benefits of the course, youd better follow the learning process. Besides that,
you will have maximum benefits when you actively involve of sharing experiences in group/class
discussion. Whoever passive in class discussion will get score 0 (zero).
Case Analysis Format

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1. Every group (1-2 students) has to prepare and write case analysis paper for the assigned case prior
to attend the class.
2. 1 (one) group is to present (PowerPoint presentation) the assigned case in the class.
3. Other groups/students are required to ask questions or challenge the presenting group.
4. Each question by each student will be recorded as this will affect final grades.
5. The contents of the case analysis paper (should not exceed 7 pages, not including cover and
exhibits; A4 paper; 1.5 space; Arial 12):
Case Synopsis
Identification of Issues/Problems
Case Analysis
Recommendation(s)
Lessons Learned
6. The time allocation for case presentation as follows:
Each group will make maximum 20 minutes presentation
Followed by another maximum 40 minutes Questions and Answers (Q&A) session
Quizzes
Quizzes will be provided without prior notice. It will examine an individuals understanding upon the
course materials and cases.

Teaching Methods
You are expected to attend class regularly. It is understood that emergencies arise from time to
time. In such cases, please plan on acquiring any notes, announcements, etc. from a fellow student.
You are expected to arrive to class on time each day. Class will begin promptly, and tardiness is an
interruption that is both rude and distracting for both the lecturer and students. Please note that any
information you miss as a result of being late is your responsibility.
In order to provide a classroom that is conducive to learning, please refrain from:
- Answering cell phones or short message services
- Engaging in conversations with fellow classmates outside of the scope of the class
- Any other disruptive behavior
All assignments are due on the date specified in the discussion with lecturer. You may, however,
turn in any assignment in advance of the due date.
Material will be presented using lecture method, things such as hand-out, LCD, computer, however,
will also be utilized to increase the effectiveness of the lecture. In addition, only important topics to
be discussed in class, and it is the students responsibility to read other related topics.
Academic dishonesty/plagiarism in any form will not be tolerated. You are encouraged to become
familiar with MM-FEUI Rules of Conduct as they relate to academic dishonesty/cheating. If you are
in doubt regarding this policy, please consult with your Head of Program before you complete any
requirements of the course.

Grading Policy & Method


The assessment of the course will use the following criteria:
Understand the theories and concepts that are given in the course
Implement the theories and concepts gained to the real business situation
Provide constructive contributions to your colleagues in solving problems and cases
Able to express positive ideas and communicate clearly that will enlighten the class discussion
Your performance in the course will be evaluated through several following methods:
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Quantity and quality of your participation during class discussions


Presentation, including content quality, duration, and handling questions
Quality of your group in analyzing the cases
Quality of your answers in quizzes
Quality of your answers in Mid-term and Final Examination
Your course grade will be determined as follows:
No.
First Term
1. Participation/Discussion/Quiz
2. Case Analysis Paper
3. Mid-Term Exam
Total

15%
10%
25%
50%

No.
Second Term
1. Participation/Discussion/Quiz
2. Case Analysis Paper
3. Final Exam
Total

15%
10%
25%
50%

Plagiarism
Plagiarism often results from careless note-taking from other sources during writing process, with
intentionally unwilling, or unintentionally forget, to put references around students original words.
Plagiarism is defined as:
Using someone elses words or idea without proper documentation;
Copying some portion of your text from another source without proper recognition;
Borrowing another persons specific ideas without documenting the source;
Turning in a paper written by or copying from someone else, from service business, or from a
World Wide Web Site (reproductions of such essays or papers).
Maintaining intellectual integrity:
In the learning and writing processes, it is important that students learn how to work with sources
without plagiarizing, either intentionally or accidentally. Intellectual endeavor emphasizes sharing
knowledge and information for advancing knowledge.
Students need to develop autonomous thinking to reach their opinion and conclusions. To
encourage that practice, students can read, synthesize and write about other peoples work.
However, students are obligated to give reference on these texts whenever they quote them directly,
paraphrase the authors point or points, or use the authors ideas to help clarify, sustain, support, or
organize their own ideas.
Using other sources for a paper, students must document ideas or words derived from them both by
listing the sources, both in a bibliography at the end of the paper and by citing sources in the main
text itself.
To cite a source is to make clear to the reader (1) who originated the idea or quotation that you have
used; and (2) where it can be found. This then allows the reader to do further research or check your
evidence.
Sanction
A practice of plagiarism is considered a serious offense and major infringement of academic values
which is subject to academic sanctions, on which the lecturer shall give the paper a grade at the most
50, unless the Management prefers other sanction.

Main Textbooks
1. Harrison, A. & van Hoek, R. (2008). Logistics Management & Strategy: Competing through the
Supply Chain, 3rd Edition, Harlow, Essex: Financial Times Prentice Hall.

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2. Li, L. (2007). Supply Chain Management: Concepts, Techniques & Practices, Singapore: World
Scientific Publishing Co.

Case Study Text Book


Chopra, S. & Meindl, P. (2007). Supply Chain Management: Strategy, Planning & Operations, 3rd
Edition, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Case Study Sources


No.

Case Title

Source

1.

HP Co.: DeskJet Printer Supply Chain (A)

Stanford Graduate School of Business Case # GS-3A

2.

Starbucks Corporation

Stanford Graduate School of Business Case # GS-54

3.

Specialty Packaging Corp., Part A

Chopra & Meindl (2007), pp. 230-231

4.

Sport Obermeyer, Ltd.

Harvard Business School Case # 9-695-022

5.

Li & Fung 2006

Harvard Business School Case # 9-307-077

6.

UPS & HP

Richard Ivey School of Business Case # 907D02

7.

ALKO Inc.

Chopra & Meindl (2007), pp. 353-354

8.

PSA: The Worlds Port of Call

Harvard Business School Case # 9-802-003

9.

SCM at World Co. Ltd.

Harvard Business School Case # 9-601-072

10.

Ford Motor Co.: Supply Chain Strategy

Harvard Business School Case # 9-699-198

Additional Readings
1. Baldwin, C. Y & Clark, K. B. (1997). Managing in an Age of Modularity, Harvard Business Review,
September-October.
2. Beamon, B. M. (1999). Measuring Supply Chain Performance, International Journal of Operations
& Production Management, 19(3).
3. Bookbinder, J. H. & Tan, C. S. (2003). Comparison of Asian & European Logistics Systems,
International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 33(1).
4. Buxey, G. (2006). Inventory Control Systems: Theory & Practice, International Journal of
Information & Operations Management Education, 1(2).
5. Chandra, C. & Kumar, S. (2000). Supply Chain Management in Theory & Practice: A Passing Fad
or a Fundamental Change, Industrial Management & Data Systems, 100(3).
6. Christopher, M. & Jttner, U. (2000). Developing Strategic Partnerships in the Supply Chain: A
Practitioner Perspective, European Journal of Purchasing & Supply Management, 6.
7. Gulati, R. & Garino, J. (2000). Get the Right Mix of Bricks & Clicks, Harvard Business Review,
May-June.
8. Hesse, M. & Rodrigue, J. P. (2004). The Transport Geography of Logistics & Freight Distribution,
Journal of Transport Geography, 12.
9. Lee, H. L.; Padmanabhan, V. & Whang, S. (1997). The Bullwhip Effect in Supply Chains, MIT
Sloan Management Review, Spring.
10. Magretta, J. (1998a). Fast, Global & Entrepreneurial: Supply Chain Management, Hong Kong Style:
An Interview with Victor Fung, Harvard Business Review, Mach-April.
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11. Magretta, J. (1998b). The Power of Virtual Integration: An Interview with Dell Computers Michael
Dell, Harvard Business Review, September-October.
12. van der Vorst, J. G. A. J. & Beulens, A. J. M. (2002). Identifying Sources of Uncertainty to
Generate Supply Chain Redesign Strategies, International Journal of Physical Distribution &
Logistics Management, 32(6).

Sessions & Topics


First Term
Session

Topics

Reading Materials

1.

Introduction to Logistics & Supply Chain Management


Supply Chain Strategy

2.

Network Design in Supply Chain


Design of Supply Chain: Examples

Logistics Network & Distribution


Case: HP Co.: DeskJet Printer Supply Chain (A)

4.

Supplier Relations & Strategic Sourcing


Case: Starbucks Corporation

5.

Demand Management
Case: Specialty Packaging Corp., Part A

6.

Supply Chain Planning & Control

Li (2007): Ch. 2
Van der Vorst & Beulens (2002)
Li (2007): Ch. 8
Bookbinder & Tan (2003)
Li (2007): Ch. 4
Christopher & Jttner (2000)
Chopra & Meindl (2007): Ch. 7
Lee et al. (1997)
Harrison & van Hoek (2008): Ch. 6
Li (2007): Ch. 6

Case: Sport Obermeyer, Ltd.


7.

Chopra & Meindl (2007): Ch. 1


Chandra & Kumar (2000)

Global Supply Chain

Harrison & van Hoek (2008): Ch. 4


Magretta (1998a)

Case: Li & Fung 2006


MID-TERM EXAM
Second Term
Session
8.

Topics

Reading Materials

Purchasing Management & Procurement


e-Procurement

9.

Transportation Systems: Infrastructure & Operations


Case: UPS & HP

10.

Managing Inventories in Supply Chain


Case: ALKO Inc.

11.

Information Technology in Supply Chain


Case: PSA: The Worlds Port of Call

12.

Knowledge Management in Supply Chain


Guest Lecture: to be determined

13.

Supply Chain Performance

Li (2007): Ch. 9
Hesse & Rodrigue (2004)
Li (2007): Ch. 7
Buxey (2006)
Chopra & Meindl (2007): Ch. 16
Gulati & Garino (2000)
Li (2007): Ch. 11
Baldwin & Clark (1997)
Harison & van Hoek (2008): Ch. 3
Beamon (1999)

Case: SCM at World Co., Ltd.


14.

Harrison & van Hoek (2008): Ch. 9


Li (2007): Ch. 3

Logistics Future Challenges & Opportunities


Case: Ford Motor Co.: Supply Chain Strategy

Harrison & van Hoek (2008): Ch. 10


Magretta (1998b)

FINAL EXAM

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PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism often results from careless note-taking from other sources during writing process, with
intentionally unwilling, or unintentionally forget, to put references around students original words.
PLAGIARISM IS DEFINED AS:
Using someone elses words or idea without proper documentation;
Copying some portion of your text from another source without proper recognition;
Borrowing another persons specific ideas without documenting the source;
Turning in a paper written by or copying from someone else, from service business, or from a
World Wide Web Site (reproductions of such essays or papers).
MAINTAINING INTELLECTUAL INTEGRITY:
In the learning and writing processes, it is important that students learn how to work with sources
without plagiarizing, either intentionally or accidentally. Intellectual endeavor emphasizes sharing
knowledge and information for advancing knowledge.
Students need to develop autonomous thinking to reach their opinion and conclusions. To
encourage that practice, students can read, synthesize and write about other peoples work.
However, students are obligated to give reference on these texts whenever they quote them directly,
paraphrase the authors point or points, or use the authors ideas to help clarify, sustain, support, or
organize their own ideas.
Using other sources for a paper, students must document ideas or words derived from them both by
listing the sources, both in a bibliography at the end of the paper and by citing sources in the main
text itself.
To cite a source is to make clear to the reader 1) who originated the idea or quotation that you have
used; and 2) where it can be found. This then allows the reader to do further research or check your
evidence.
Sanction. A practice of plagiarism is considered a serious offense and major infringement of academic
values which is subject to academic sanctions, on which the lecturer shall give the paper a grade at the
most 50, unless the Management prefers other sanction.

LOGISTICS & SCM (HMS)

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