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SPE/IADC 92622

Solid Expandable Tubular Technology: The Value of Planned Installation Vs.


Contingency
Chris Carstens, Unocal Corporation, and Kate Blasingame, Enventure Global Technology, L.L.C.

Copyright 2005, SPE/IADC Drilling Conference


This paper was prepared for presentation at the SPE/IADC Drilling Conference held in
Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 23-25 February 2005.
This paper was selected for presentation by an SPE/IADC Program Committee following
review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(s). Contents of the
paper, as presented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers or the
International Association of Drilling Contractors and are subject to correction by the author(s).
The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the SPE, IADC, their
officers, or members. Electronic reproduction, distribution, or storage of any part of this paper
for commercial purposes without the written consent of the Society of Petroleum Engineers or
the International Association of Drilling Contractors is prohibited. Permission to reproduce in
print is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words; illustrations may not be copied.
The abstract must contain conspicuous acknowledgment of where and by whom the paper
was presented. Write Librarian, SPE, P.O. Box 833836, Richardson, TX 75083-3836, U.S.A.,
fax 01-972-952-9435.

Abstract
Narrow pore pressure/fracture gradient windows often
necessitate additional casing strings to reach deeper objective
depths. Operators are constrained by the number of strings of
conventional casing that they can run through subsea or
surface wellhead equipment. Planning solid expandable
tubulars into the well design allows the operator to run
additional casing strings and drill to deeper objectives.
Using a solid expandable tubular system in the upper
sections of the well design preserves hole size from the onset
and allows more casing strings to be run without having to
push casing points to the frac-gradient limit. Preserving hole
size contributes to drilling efficiency, reduces equivalent
circulation density (ECD), and minimizes risk associated with
small hole size in deeper sections of the wellbore.
Another application for solid expandable tubulars is with
surface stack technology. Early surface stack systems were
designed around a subsea stack blowout preventer (BOP)
system placed on top of a 13-3/8 in. drilling riser. After setting
the 13-3/8 in. riser, only one or two casing strings could be run
through the riser, which precluded reaching deeper geologic
objectives.
This paper will look at two case histories. The first case
history compares two deepwater offset wells in Mississippi
Canyon. One well used expandable casing as a contingency,
and the other well incorporated the casing as part of the base
design. The second case history will evaluate a well where
solid expandable tubular technology allowed up to three
additional casing strings to be run in a surface stack
application. This paper discusses how combining solid
expandable tubular technology with surface stack technology
has pushed the technical limits of surface stack drilling into
deeper water and deeper formations.

Introduction
Adding value to any drilling design requires the deliberate and
thorough assessment of known factors and a reasonable and
plausible projection of crucial variables. Methodical planning
allows operators to design the most advantageous approach
that addresses known conditions proactively and employs the
latest technology to facilitate drilling and producing
hydrocarbons. But even the best laid plans can be disrupted by
unknown conditions, resulting in a deviation from the drilling
program design. Generating a well design to reach production
zones with viable economics requires a strategic approach that
addresses known factors as well as prepares for the
unexpected.
A major offshore operator developed a planning strategy
that enables them to optimize processes and technology for the
most efficient well design. One such strategy used by this
operator consists of solid expandable tubular systems
incorporated high in the wellbore to maintain larger hole size
at greater depths. This same operator also used expandable
casing in tandem with the latest subsea wellhead equipment
and increased the number of strings that could be run. These
planned applications allowed the operator to negate known
situations before they became problems. Coupling expandable
systems with the latest in surface stack technology made for a
more effective drilling process. Planned installations of the
expandable tubulars allowed the operator to reap significant
and substantial economic and technical benefits.
Well Design Theory and Best Practices
To improve drilling operational success, this operator, with
production in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and Southeast Asia,
uses a process that references and employs standard operating
procedures (SOPs), best practices, risk management and a
contractor management plan (CMP). Another factor in this
operators design strategy is the establishment of a solid
expandable liner installation database. Information gleaned
from previous expandable applications is used to populate a
database for knowledge reference that records parameters of
system installations and tracks successes and failures. This
captured knowledge helps the engineer optimize future
expandable tubular designs.
A cross-functional team of geophysicists, geologists and
drilling engineers develop a pore pressure and frac pressure
prediction based upon seismic, regional and offset data
models. From the pore pressure and frac pressure prediction,

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CARSTENS AND BLASINGAME

the drilling engineer designs the casing program to obtain the


maximum setting depth of each casing string without
fracturing the previous shoe using a rig-specific kick tolerance
and kick intensity safety factor. Drilling deeper into a
narrowing pore pressure/frac gradient window with higher
ECDs requires more casing strings to prevent the drilling
operation from straying out of the stability window and into
well control and well-ballooning situations.
After casing point depths are selected, the engineer
chooses casing and hole sizes for each casing point. From an
evaluation, completion, ECD management and bottomhole
assembly (BHA) management perspective, the engineer must
provide for a sufficient usable hole size, plus allow for
contingency options due to pore pressure inaccuracy or
wellbore problems. If the hole size is too small at the bottom
of the well, the engineer performs another iteration of the
casing design with larger size casing program. Once it has
been determined that hole size requirement cannot be satisfied
with conventional casing strings, the engineer reconfigures the
design using solid expandable tubular technology. Once the
initial well design is established, a complete risk assessment is
performed to identify potential risks and to determine actions
to help avoid, mitigate or accept the expected risks. The risk
assessment should include participation from cementing,
casing handling and rig contractors as well. Changes in the
plan may result after a formal assessment is performed with
the design team. It is also recommended that the operator and
the solid expandable liner provider hold a job and risk review
with the rig contractor and service companies prior to running
the job.
Expandable Liner Placement Strategy
As part of their well-design philosophy, the operator
advocates incorporating solid expandable tubular systems in
the original well construction if it is necessary to reach TD
with adequate hole size and to mitigate downhole risk. The
engineer retains more control of the wellbore by considering
the most appropriate section for expandable tubular
installation during the design stage rather than in the
operational stage. If the engineer considers the solid
expandable tubular as only a last resort to drilling problems,
choice of size, length, and depth of the installation is dictated
by the situation after a problem occurs. These challenges are
difficult to plan for and lead to running the expandable
systems in or around hole sections with the greatest risks.
After determining that an expandable tubular liner is
needed, the most appropriate place for running it is
determined. Expandable systems set higher in the wellbore
have many advantages over those set lower in the wellbore
that include the following:
The wellbore in general is more stable because the pore
pressure/fracture gradient window is larger.
More annular clearance exists between the expandable
tubular outside diameter (OD) and the hole inside
diameter (ID) of the larger sizes.
Expansion pressures are lower.
Larger expandables run higher in the wellbore reduce the
need to use less common casing sizes to run through the
expandable liner.

SPE/IADC 92622

Additional expandable tubulars can be run deeper in the


wellbore if needed.
The 13-3/8 x 16 in. solid expandable tubular has the
highest reliability rating.
The 13-3/8 x 13-5/8 in. long string covers the expandable
tubular.
Any trade-off for lower collapse and handling capabilities
should also be considered. Designing a solid expandable
tubular system for a specific well requires consideration of a
number of the operators best practices and SOPs. The OD and
weight of the base casing is fundamental information that
governs the design because the tubular expands in the base
casing. Additional factors that warrant consideration include
the following:
Inline centralizer ID
Float equipment
Landing collar ID
Shoe joint ID and length
Dogleg severity in the overlap and openhole section
Liner hangers
Any other equipment in the base casing that may have a
restrictive ID
The pass-through or overlap casing
The Contractor Management Program (CMP) is another
part of this operators design process. By identifying a single
source vendor for each service associated with drilling
operations, a partnership is formed between the vendor and the
operator. Part of the CMP is to develop post-job reports and
job scorecards to ensure that learnings from previous jobs are
implemented on future jobs. Also, timelines are set for postjob analysis so that information on the installation is available
immediately. When possible, the same personnel are used in
the installations since familiarity with the drilling rig and
operator personnel reduces potential non-productive time
(NPT) and provides job consistency.
Formation Conditions and Drilling Challenges
As operators push into greater water depths and deep shelf
exploration opportunities, drilling engineers are required to
design wells to much deeper objectives, through higher pore
pressure transition zones and through steeper gradient drops in
depleted zones. The traditional solution to drilling in narrow
pore pressure/frac gradient windows is to run more casing.
Currently, operators are limited to the number of conventional
casing strings that can be run through the wellhead. The largebore subsea wellhead and tight tolerance liners can add casing
strings to the well design, but the maximum is typically six
casing strings. Many ultra-deepwater wells with target
objectives of 30,000 feet and greater require eight or more
casing strings to reach TD with an acceptable hole size.
Without the capacity to run additional casing strings, the
potential for borehole instability increases. Examples of these
instabilities include well flows, mud losses, rubble zones,
wellbore ballooning and ECD problems. Solid expandable
liners provide the only means to run additional casing strings
through the restrictions of subsea wellhead equipment.

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SPE/IADC 92622SOLI D EXPANDABLE TUBULAR TECHNOLOGY: THE VALUE OF PLANNED INSTALLATION VS. CONTINGENCY

Case Histories
Wells in which the operator used solid expandable tubular
technology revealed a distinct correlation between up-front
planning of system installations and the success rate of those
applications. In the GoM the operator ran eight unplanned
systems as contingencies and ran one as part of the planned
well design. The application of the planned expandable system
was a textbook installation. Of the eight contingency
applications, four were textbook installations, two did not get
a good pressure test, one failed during installation and one
failed post-installation. The two solid expandable liners that
failed to get a good pressure test were expanded in a distressed
well with wellbore ballooning, flowing and sticky formations.
Although both solid expandable liners were successfully set
and the operator reached the planned TD, additional trouble
time was associated with each liner due to the depths and the
hole conditions experienced while running the expandable
liner.
This same operator incorporated eight planned expandable
systems in six different wells offshore Indonesia. In addition
to the planned design application, all eight expandable systems
were used with surface stack technology in subsea
applications. All eight were successfully installed, realizing a
100% success rate defined as no problems whatsoever
occurring with the expandable liner system. From these
success percentages, the operator deduced that in a planned
design mode, more time is available to design, build and ship
the equipment. Hole conditions are usually more conducive to
running the liner than in a unplanned mode where in most
cases the wellbore has deteriorated, necessitating the need for
an expandable liner.
Gulf of Mexico, Mississippi Canyon
Well 1
The first well in the case history comparison used a solid
expandable tubular system deep in the wellbore to reach the
production zone at ~25,000 ft (Figure 1). The operator had
considered using an expandable at several points throughout
the drilling process. Since the expandable liner was being used
as a contingency, the drilling engineer evaluated the need for
an additional casing string at every casing point. Once 16 in.
base casing had been set, a 13-3/8 x 16 in. solid expandable
tubular was considered, but the operator elected not to run an
expandable at that point. The engineer again considered an
expandable after the 11-7/8 in. casing and 9-7/8 in. casing had
been set. In each case, the risk of running the expandable was
considered to be greater than the risk associated with fighting
the well down. The operator fell behind in casing points
during drilling operations and was unable to make up the point
loss on each casing string set. The operator eventually
determined that reaching TD with adequate hole size would
not be possible and elected to run a 6 x 7-5/8 in. solid
expandable liner.
Installing the Solid Expandable Tubular System
The operator prepared the hole by underreaming the 6-1/2
in. hole which had been drilled below 7-5/8 in. casing to 7 in.
By enlarging the hole section, the expandable casing could be

run to bottom easily without encountering any tight spots or


creating a surge situation. In this installation, the operator used
synthetic mud and cleaned the hole using best practices. The
float was tabbed open (a first for the system) to reduce surge.
The operator elected to execute a squeeze cement job on this
installation. The primary cement job would be performed prior
to expansion, thereby eliminating a squeeze trip after during
drillout. A polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit was
selected for drillout.
The openhole liner system installed in this first well
extended the 7-5/8-inch casing shoe in order to isolate a hole
interval with possible loss circulation conditions. This shoe
extension was achieved without having to sacrifice diameter.
Approximately 2,000 feet of 6 x 7-5/8 in. solid expandable
pipe was run to TD. Expansion pressures required for this
installation were within the expected parameters, at
approximately 3,000-3,500 psi. Once expanded, the entire
system was pressure tested to 2,750 psi for 30 minutes. This
application, at over 20,000 ft measured depth (MD), was the
deepest solid expandable tubular installation of any size at the
time. Also, this installation was the first to be drilled out with
a PDC bit. Although installation of the expandable liner was
successful and the TD objective was achieved, the operator
recorded considerable NPT in making the decision to run the
expandable liner.
Well 2
Another well on the same geologic structure in Mississippi
Canyon was drilled by the same operator, enabling them to use
actual information from the previous well in the design phase.
This information and pre-drill well design kick tolerance
calculations exposed a tight window between pore pressure
and fracture gradient. The drilling engineer determined that
running another casing string would require less time than that
needed to address potential drilling challenges. Calculations
were run with and without an expandable casing string. Using
a solid expandable casing string high in the wellbore resulted
in a margin between the mud weight (MW) and the leakoff
test (LOT) greater than the minimum required for design
purposes. By maintaining hole stability with the margin
between the MW and LOT, the chances of maintaining hole
integrity were increased, thereby reducing associated flat
times. By placing the solid expandable tubular system below
the proposed 16-in. casing string, a nominal ID of 13.950 in.
allowed a 13-3/8 x 13-5/8 in. casing string to be run through
and cover the expandable liner (Figure 2). In addition, the
placement of this expandable liner would allow for additional
expandables to be run below the intermediate casing string if
necessary.
Designing the System
In selecting float equipment and connections for the base
pipe, the post-expansion dimensions of the expandable were
compared to the ID of the base casing and its components to
calculate and evaluate an OD/ID interference report. The
interference report also concluded that it was acceptable to run
connection sleeves that would provide additional connection
integrity during the expansion process. One of the challenges
the drilling engineer faces is that expandable liners have non-

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CARSTENS AND BLASINGAME

oilfield standard IDs. With the additional time available in a


pre-planned system, the engineer can source the bits and BHA
tools required for efficient drill-out of the solid expandable
tubular system.
Had the desired drillout ID not been obtained after these
iterations, then the overlap section of the base casing could
have been further modified by varying the cone size of the
expandable system or by running a lighter weight casing in the
overlap section. Once the base casing equipment had been
finalized in accordance with the current operators criteria, the
expandable tubular was designed accordingly. Limiting
potential ID restrictions enabled the engineer to optimize a
plan that used the expandable liner with the largest passthrough ID possible. In this case, the operator was able to drill
out with a 13-3/4 x 16-1/2 in. tricenter bit, as desired, and then
run 13-3/8 in. flush joint casing.
As a result of past experience with expandable casing, the
operator requested two other system criteria be considered in
addition to the standard information. The first design request
called for an eccentric guide shoe to be added to the shoe joint.
If hole obstructions were encountered, the system could be
worked to the bottom of the hole section more easily. The
second design request consisted of an additional anchor
hanger (which contains the elastomer seals that compress into
the base pipe) in the overlap section. Having two anchor
hangers in the overlap increased the potential that the
openhole section would be isolated.
Installing the Solid Expandable Tubular System
Because the operator knew that running the expandable
system required an enlarged hole, the operator chose a
bicenter bit (14-1/2 x 17 in.) to drill the hole section, thus
saving an underreaming trip. In this installation, the operator
used synthetic mud and cleaned the hole using best practices.
As in the first case history, the float was tabbed open to reduce
surge. The operator performed a primary cement job, where
cement is pumped prior to expansion. A two-stage cement
slurry, with a longer thickening time lead slurry followed by a
reduced thickening time and increased compressive strength
tail slurry, improved the integrity of the shoe. The operator
used the offline capabilities of the dual-activity drillship to
make up, run and expand the expandable casing in triples.
Time to make up and run the expandable liner was nine joint
per hour. After making up the inner-string and engaging the
cone assembly, the liner was run in the hole to TD at ~1,000
ft/hour. The average expansion rate was ~440 ft/hr.
The openhole liner system installed in this well extended
the shoe of the 16 in. casing to drill deeper with a larger
diameter. Over 2,700 ft of 13-3/8 x 16 in. solid expandable
pipe was run to TD. To initiate expansion, the dart was landed
with 364 bbl of mud and the pressure increased to 1,400 psi.
Expansion pressures required for this installation were within
the expected parameters, at ~1,900 to 2,300 psi. After
expansion, the liner was successfully tested for 30 minutes at
1,100 psi. A tricenter bit was used for drillout. The operator
obtained the desired shoe integrity test, eliminating the need
for a squeeze procedure.
As predicted, the use of a planned solid expandable tubular
system high in the wellbore resulted in significant reduction in
flat time. Compared with the first case history, the number of

SPE/IADC 92622

days required to drill this well decreased 65%, from 140 days
to 48 days to reach a comparable depth (Figure 3) resulting in
significant cost savings.
Makassar Straits in Indonesia
This same operator pioneered surface stack technology in the
mid 1990s in the Makassar Straits in Indonesia. Falling
production and low oil prices were the motivators to find a
way to reduce well costs and improve production economics.
With that goal in mind, the birth of saturation exploration
drilling and the surface stack system ensued. Initial
applications targeted wells designed with water depths around
1,000 ft and drilled to less than 10,000 ft MD. Today, with
more than 150 surface stack well applications in Indonesia,
Thailand and the Philippines, the operator has pushed the
design window for this technology into deeper waters and to
deeper drilling objectives. Surface stack applications are now
routinely run in water depths greater than 6,000 ft and to
depths of 18,000 ft MD. The operator is currently using this
technology in 7,600-ft of water, a record-setting depth.
Early surface stack systems were designed around a subsea
stack BOP system placed on top of a 13-3/8 in. drilling riser.
After setting the 13-3/8 in. riser, only one or two casing strings
could be run through the riser, which precluded reaching
deeper geologic objectives. As deeper geologic targets in
narrow pore pressure/fracture gradient windows were sought,
additional casing strings were required to reach the objectives.
Using solid expandable tubular systems enabled the operator
to run up to three additional casing strings and explore deeper
geologic objectives.
Designing the System
The drilling engineer for this case history considered
various surface stack casing designs using 13-3/8 in. or 16 in.
riser, with and without solid expandable tubular systems
(Figure 4). A 13-3/8 in. drilling riser typically set at ~4000 ft
below mud line allows an 11-3/4 in. liner to be set above the
top of a transition around 12,500 ft. An expandable liner is
then set at ~14,000 ft followed by a 9-3/8 in. liner run below
to ~15,000 ft. This design allows the operator to reach TD
beyond 16,000 ft with an 8-1/2 in. hole.
The initial well design called for a planned expandable
liner below the 11-3/4 in. liner and a contingency expandable
liner below the 9-3/8 in. liner due to pore pressure uncertainty.
During a well design peer review with global participation, it
was recommended that the expandable liner be run further up
the hole for reliability and design efficiency. The well was
redesigned with the 13-3/8 in. expandable liner below the 16
in. casing, making it the third 16 in., 109 lb/ft base casing
installation for this operator. Taking into account all of the
restrictions in the base casing, a post-expansion ID of 13.770
in. and a drift diameter of 13.632 in. could be achieved. These
dimensions allowed the operator to run a 13-3/8 in.
conventional liner, 11-3/4 in. liner, 9-5/8 x 11-3/4 in. solid
expandable tubular system and TD the well with a 9-7/8 in.
hole with several contingency conventional casing and
expandable liners available if required.

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SPE/IADC 92622

Installing the Solid Expandable Tubular System


As in the GoM, the operator utilized globally-accepted best
practices and SOPs to ensure a successful and reliable
installation. Due to the distance from the expandable liner
providers supply base and lengthy shipping times, additional
QA/QC measures were taken upon arrival in Indonesia to
ensure that the equipment had not been damaged and to
familiarize national crews with running expandable liners.
Because the expandable system required an enlarged hole,
the operator chose a tri-center PDC bit (14-1/2 x 17 in.) to drill
the hole section, thus saving an underreaming trip. In this
installation, the operator used synthetic mud and cleaned the
hole using best practices. The operator performed a primary
cement job, where cement is pumped prior to expansion.
The openhole liner system installed in this well extended
the shoe of the 16 in. casing to drill deeper with a larger
diameter. Approximately 1,500 feet of 13-3/8 x 16 in. solid
expandable pipe was run to TD. To initiate expansion, the dart
was landed with 195 bbl of mud and the pressure increased to
1,900 psi. Expansion pressures required for this installation
were within the expected parameters, at ~1,300 psi. After
expansion, the liner was successfully pressure tested. The
shoe track was drilled out in 2.5 hours with a 13-1/2 in. rock
bit, and the operator received a satisfactory LOT without
remedial cementation.
Conclusion
Maintaining a proactive approach to well construction is
imperative to a drilling design that optimizes the latest
technology and procedures. Solid expandable tubulars
continue to be a viable solution that adapts easily to a myriad
of drilling challenges and situations. Its inclusion as part of the
original well design offers a means for significant savings, be
it economic or time. The decrease in drill time, as illustrated in
the second GoM well, reduced the non-productive time and
helped expedite completion, which increased the operational
efficiency.
Taking the more strategic approach and running
expandables higher in the hole increases the operators options
should problems need to be resolved deeper in the wellbore.
The proactive application of expandable systems allows the
engineer more time to optimize the technology, plan the
design and ship the equipment. This operators design process
also considers risk assessment, equipment QA/QC, post-job
follow-up, and a detailed experience database, all key factors
in establishing their success rate with solid expandable
technology.
Incorporating expandable tubulars into the original drilling
plan has proven to be a viable approach to well design as
illustrated with a 100% success rate in applications offshore
Indonesia and GoM. In addition to an effective construction
element, these systems are versatile enough to be used in
conjunction with other enabling technology. Combining
expandable systems with surface stack drilling has pushed the
technical limits into deeper water and deeper formations. This
operators experience with solid expandable tubular systems
has reinforced its reputation as a value-added technology and
confirmed it as a constructive solution.

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CARSTENS AND BLASINGAME

Figure 1 Case History #1: Running the expandable liner lower in the well as a contingency.

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SPE/IADC 92622

SPE/IADC 92622

Figure 2 Case History #2: Pre-planned expandable liner run high in the well.

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CARSTENS AND BLASINGAME

Depth

SPE/IADC 92622

Days Vs. Depth

2,000
4,000

Well #1 with contingency SET System

6,000

Well #2 with pre-planned SET System

8,000
10,000
12,000
14,000
16,000
18,000
20,000
22,000
24,000
26,000
28,000
30,000
0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

Days

110

120

130

140

150

Figure 3 - Comparable days versus depth for both Mississippi Canyon wells.

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160

170

180

190

200

SPE/IADC 92622

Solid Expandable Tubular Applicat ions wit h Surf ace St ack Wellhead
13- 3/ 8" Riser

13- 3/ 8" Riser

14-1/2" x 17"
12-1/4" x 14-1/8"

11-3/ 4"
10-5/8" x 12-1/4" Hole

8 1/2" Hole

6 1/8" Hole

- - 16, 000 f t - TD

9 3/ 8"

9-7/8" x 11-3/4" Hole

- - 15, 200 f t - -

13-3/ 8"

8-1/2" x 9-7/8" Hole

9-7/8" x 11-3/4"

8-1/2" x 9-7/8"

9 5/ 8" x 11 3/ 4" SET

9-3/ 8"

TD

13-3/ 8" x 16" SET


13-1/2" x 16"

11-3/ 4"

- - 14, 000 f t - -

9 5/ 8" x 11 3/ 4" SET

7"

20" Hole

16"

10-5/8" x 12-1/4"

10-5/8" x 11-5/8"

9 5/ 8"

16" Riser

12-1/4"x 14-1/8"

12-1/4"x 14-1/8"

13-3/ 8"

- - 12, 500 f t - -

11-3/ 4"
10-5/8" x 12-1/4"

11-3/ 4"

Sur f ace St ack

Riserless

17-1/2" Hole

Riserless

17-1/2" Hole

17-1/2" Hole

13- 3/ 8" Riser

- - 10, 000 f t - -

13-3/ 8"
12-1/4" x 13-1/2"

13-3/ 8"

TD = 17, 500
Surf ace St ack

Riserless

W D = 6, 000
Sur f ace St ack

Riserless

Surf ace St ack

7 5/ 8" x 9 3/ 8" SET

9 5/ 8" x 11 3/ 4" SET

TD

9-7/8" x 11-3/4" Hole

9 3/ 8"
8-1/2 x 9-7/8" Hole

- - 17, 000 f t - -

7-1/2" x 8-1/2" Hole

Requir es 3 1/ 2" DP and r esult s in high ECDs

- - 18, 000 f t - TD

Figure 4 - Casing designs using 13-3/8 in. or 16 in. riser with and without solid expandable tubular systems.

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7-1/2" x 8-1/2" Hole

7 5/ 8" x 9 3/ 8" SET