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Encyclopedia of Spells

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Accio - Age Line - Aguamenti - Alohomora - Anapneo - Animagus Transfiguration - AntiApparition - Anti-Cheating spell - Anti-Disapparition Jinx - anti-gravity mist - anti-jinx antler jinx - Aparecium - Apparition - Apparition, Side-Along - armour-bewitching charm arrows, wand - Atmospheric Charm - Avada Kedavra - Avis
Accio (AK-ee-oh or A-see-oh)
"Summoning Charm"
"accio" L. send for, summon

Causes an object to fly to the caster, even over quite some distance; the target object is said to
have been Summoned. It would seem that the caster must know at least the general location
of the object Summoned.

Mrs. Weasley used a series of Summoning


Charms to find the magical items Fred and
George were trying to sneak out of the house at
the time of the Quidditch World Cup (GF6).

Harry learned the Summoning Charm for the


first task, when he Summoned his Firebolt to
him so he could fly around and past the
Hungarian Horntail (GF20).

The fake Moody used a Summoning Charm to grab the Marauder's Map off the stairs
on the night Harry solved the golden egg clue (GF25).

Harry used this charm to call the Triwizard Cup to him while escaping Voldemort and
the Death Eaters (GF34).

Used several times during the Battle of the Department of Mysteries by both sides.
The most notable instances were by Death Eaters attempting to pull the prophecy
sphere from Harry's hands, by Hermione to pick up wands after a Disarming Spell hit,
and most memorably by Ron in the Brain Room
after he'd been knocked silly (OP35).

Harry attempted to cast this nonverbally to Summon


his wand into his hand after Draco Malfoy had hit
him with a Full-Body Bind, but Harry couldn't make
the spell work at the time (HBP8). Harry had a
similar problem when his wand was knocked out of
his hand during his fight with Nagini at Godric's
Hollow (DH17).

Harry used this to Summon Rosmerta's brooms so that he and Albus Dumbledore
could return quickly to the castle on the night of the Battle of the Tower (HBP27).

Harry cast this on Hagrid (DH4).

Hermione used this to steal the Horcrux books - library books that he had taken out of
circulation - from Dumbledore's study (DH6).

Harry used this to Summon his glasses (DH7).

Fred Summoned hairs from a Muggle boy in Ottery St. Catchpole in order to help
Harry disguise himself using Polyjuice Potion (DH8).

Hermione used this to try to Summon the locket Horcrux in Regulus' room (DH10).
Harry similarly attempted to Summon it in Umbridge's office at the Ministry (DH13).

An object can be placed under counter-enchantments to prevent it being summoned


magically. The stone basin in the Horcrux cave and Hufflepuff's cup in Gringotts had
both been placed under such counter-enchantments (DH10, (DH26).

NOTE: The pronunciation of this spell has been debated by fans. The "official"
pronunciation from Scholastic is "A-see-oh." This is the pronunciation used in the
audio version of the books. The word is Latin, however, and in Latin the letter C is
always pronounced 'hard,' the same as the letter K. Some languages which are
descended from Latin, such as Italian, pronounce 'cc' as 'ch,' but this is almost
certainly not correct.

Age Line
incantation unknown

A thin golden line drawn on a floor, which affects anyone who crosses it if they are too
young. (Presumably, an Age Line could also be set up to prevent someone to cross who was
older than a given age.)

Albus Dumbledore drew an Age Line around the Goblet of Fire to keep away anyone
who was not yet seventeen years old. When the Weasley twins, who had taken an
Ageing Potion to try to fool it, crossed over the Age Line, they were thrown back and
sprouted long white beards (GF12).

Aguamenti (AH-gwa-MEN-tee)
"agua" Sp./Portuguese water (from Latin "aqua") + "mentis" L. mind

Charm that conjures a fountain or jet of clear water from the caster's wand.

Taught in sixth-year Charms in early September (HBP11). Oddly, the sixth years were
working on this charm or something similar after the New Year as well (HBP17).

Used by Harry on the crystal goblet in the cave of the locket Horcrux, but apparently
some effect of the potion that had previously been put in the goblet caused the water
to vanish before it could be drunk (HBP26).

Harry and Hagrid together used this to cast jets of water on Hagrid's burning house
(HBP28).

See CONJURING SPELLS.

Alohomora (AL-o-ho-MOR-ah)
Source: The Standard Book of Spells, Grade 1
Charm that causes a locked door to open.

Hermione used this spell to let herself, Ron, and Harry into the forbidden third floor
corridor during their first year (PS9).

This spell wouldn't work on the door requiring the winged key in the chamber
guarding the Philosopher's Stone (PS16).

Hermione used this spell on Flitwick's window when she, Harry, and Buckbeak
rescued Sirius (PA21).

This spell is needed to open the door of the Janus Thickey ward in St. Mungo's,
presumably so that Healers and visitors can get in and out easily, but mentally
confused patients lacking wands cannot (OP23).

Harry assumed that Umbridge's office door had been bewitched so that this spell
wouldn't work (OP29).

One of the doors in the Department of Mysteries not only was proof against this spell,
but melted Harry's knife-blade (OP34).

The Death Eaters used this spell to open doors shut by the D.A. during the Battle of
the Department of Mysteries (OP35).

Used by Hermione on Regulus' door (DH10).

The term Alohomora comes from sikidy, a form of divination from the Malagasy people of Madagascar. It is
the name of a magical symbol which means favourable to thieves (trans.). (massive thanks to Rattlesnakeroot
and her LJ friendsfor discovering this!)

Anapneo (ah-NAHP-nay-oh)
"anapneo" Gr. "breathe" (many thanks to those who wrote in and suggested we look at Greek for the source of
this)

Spell that clears the target's airway, if blocked.

Slughorn cast this on Marcus Belby when the latter began to choke after swallowing
too fast while attempting to respond to a question (HBP7).

Animagus Transfiguration
"animal" L. animal + "magus" Pers. magic user

The Transfiguration by which an Animagus takes his or her animal form, or reverts to human
form from animal form. The animal form is sometimes referred to as the witch or wizard's
Animagus form. See Animagi entry for further details about wizarding folk who can perform
this highly complex and dangerous magic.

McGonagall transforms into a cat (PS1, PA6).

Sirius Black, James Potter, and Peter Pettigrew became Animagi while students at
Hogwarts (PA17, PA18, PA19).

Animagi are supposed to be registered with the Ministry of Magic (PA18) but there
are unregistered ones around, for example Rita Skeeter (GF37).

For an excellent discussion of the legend and mythology of animal transformations,


see pages 9-15.

Anti-Apparition
no names or words given

Prevents someone from Apparating. See ANTI-DISAPPARITION JINX.

Anti-Cheating spell
no names or words given

Cast on quills before exams.

Used before exams at Hogwarts (PS16).

Anti-Disapparition Jinx
no names or words given

Prevents someone from Apparating.

Albus Dumbledore captured the Death Eaters who had been fighting in the
Department of Mysteries and held them with an Anti-Disapparition Jinx (OP36).

It seems a reasonable deduction that the Prime Minister's office is protected against
Apparition as an elementary security measure, since Fudge's visits to the Prime
Minister there have always involved the Floo Network rather than Apparition, and
since protection against Apparition isn't mentioned as part of the Prime Minister's new
security arrangements (HBP1).

Most wizarding dwellings are magically protected against unwanted Apparators,


according to Albus Dumbledore, who confirmed that "you can't Apparate anywhere
inside the buildings or grounds" of Hogwarts (HBP4). However, the Headmaster or
Headmistress can temporarily lift the restriction from a specific area of the school for
short periods, so that someone already within that area can Apparate to another place
within the same area, although they cannot leave the area by Apparition (HBP18).

anti-gravity mist
incantation unknown

Charm which creates an innocent-looking mist which hovers above the ground. A person
stepping into this mist immediately finds that up and down have reversed and they are
hanging from the ground over the endless sky.

Harry encountered this mist in the maze of the third task (GF31).

anti-jinx
various

See JINXES.

antler jinx
incantation unknown

Causes the victim to sprout antlers.

Pansy Parkinson was hit with this spell and had to miss some classes (OP30).

Aparecium (a-par-EE-see-um)
"appareo" L. to appear

Makes invisible ink become visible.

Hermione tried this on Riddle's diary, but it had no apparent effect (CS13).

Apparition (A-pa-RIshun)
Apparate, Disapparate
nonverbal spell
from "appareo" L. to appear

Advanced spell used by


fully trained witches and
wizards to disappear from
one place and appear
almost instantly
somewhere else. A person
who uses this spell is
referred to as an
Apparator.

See PS2 for a


possible example
of Apparition as
wandless magic.
However, given Harry's remarks in (HBP4) that his experience at that time was the
first time he had ever Apparated, it would appear that the incident referred to in PS2
was probably not Apparition but something else, such as Levitation.

Very difficult spell. Performed incorrectly, Apparition can result in the caster being
"splinched", which refers to part of the caster's body being left behind (GF5).
According to Harry's Apparition instructor, this happens when the caster is
insufficiently determined (HBP18).

According to Harry's Apparition instructor, there are three D's in performing


Apparition: destination, determination, and deliberation. (HBP18).

Wizards must pass a test in order to be obtain a license to be allowed to perform it. To
take the test, the applicant must be of age in the wizarding world (at least seventeen)
(HBP4).

Apparition becomes more difficult as distance increases. Only highly trained wizards
would try intercontinental Apparition (QA9).

Fudge appeared out of thin air in the cabinet room to inform the Prime Minister of the
goings-on at the Quidditch World Cup (HBP1).

Apparating directly into a wizarding house is just as rude as kicking down the front
door, even if most wizarding dwellings were not magically protected from unwanted
Apparators (HBP4).

See also APPARITION, SIDE-ALONG and OP - Edits and Changes to the Text.

Pius Thicknesse made it an imprisonable offence to connect number four, Privet Drive
to the Floo Network, place a Portkey there, or Apparate in or out, supposedly to
protect Harry (DH4).

According to Remus Lupin, it's impossible to track anyone who Apparates, unless you
grab hold of them as they disappear (DH11).

Harry, Ron, and Hermione Apparated together throughout what would have been their
seventh year many, many times, beginning with their escape from the wedding (DH9).

Harry and Hermione practiced Apparating and Disapparating together under the
Invisibility Cloak (DH16).

Apparition, Side-Along
see Apparition
A form of Apparition in which the Apparator touches someone else, such as a child too young
to Apparate, and Apparates with that person as a "passenger".

Mentioned in Ministry leaflet (HBP3).

Albus Dumbledore used Side-Along Apparition to take Harry from Privet Drive to
Budleigh Babberton (HBP4), and later to take him from Hogsmeade to the cave
(HBP25).

Harry used Side-Along Apparition to take Albus Dumbledore from the cave back to
Hogsmeade (HBP27).

Harry had thought Mad-Eye would come to number four, Privet Drive and take him
away using Side-Along Apparition (DH3).

armour-bewitching charm
incantation unknown

Bewitches a suit of armour to sing Christmas carols.

This charm was used as part of the Christmas decorations in 1994 [Y14].
Unfortunately, a suit of armour so enchanted is still not a particularly clever thing, so
many of them didn't know all the words to the songs. Peeves took to hiding inside the
armour and filling in the gaps with lyrics of his own invention, usually very rude ones
(GF22).

See ARMOUR.

arrows, wand
incantation unknown

Shoots arrows out of a wand.

The supporters of the Appleby Arrows were fond of firing arrows out of their wands
to celebrate goals. The practice was outlawed in 1894 (QA7).

See also WAND EFFECTS

Atmospheric Charm
no names or words given

Something to do with weather effects such as are seen at Ministry of Magic headquarters in
London.

Hermione says that if something has gone wrong with one, it will be more difficult to
fix than simply by casting Finite Incantatem (DH12).

Avada Kedavra (uh-VAH-duh kuh-DAH-vruh)


"Killing Curse"

Aramaic: "adhadda kedhabhra" - "let the thing be destroyed".


NOTE: Abracadabra is a cabbalistic charm in Judaic mythology that is supposed to bring healing powers. One
of its sources is believed to be from Aramaic avada kedavra, another is the Phoenician alphabet (a-bra-ca-dabra).

Causes instant death in a flash of green light, usually leaving no sign of physical damage or
of the cause of death that would be detectable to a Muggle autopsy.

One of the Unforgivable Curses (GF14), said to be unblockable and with no countercurse, although Albus Dumbledore managed to protect Harry by putting some statues
in its way during his duel with Voldemort in the Atrium (OP36).

This spell produces a jet (OP36) or flash (GF14) of green light, and a sound as though
some huge invisible thing is rushing at the target (GF1, GF14)

Harry is the only known person to survive the Killing Curse (esp. PS1, GF14, also
GF34).

This was the curse used by Tom Marvolo Riddle to kill his father and paternal
grandparents, who were found unmarked except for an expression of absolute terror
on their faces. A Muggle autopsy could not determine a cause of death (GF1). As far
as Albus Dumbledore was aware during Harry's sixth year, the Muggle authorities
never learned how the Riddles died because the Killing Curse usually leaves no sign
of damage, Harry's scar being the only known exception. The Ministry of Magic,
however, knew at once that the Riddles had been murdered by a wizard. Riddle had
taken care to use someone else's wand - that of his maternal uncle, Morfin Gaunt - to
commit the murder, so that the magical equivalent of forensics would point to a
suspect other than himself, and had further covered himself by tampering with
Morfin's memory so that Morfin himself believed he had committed the crimes
(HBP17). It's a disgrace to the name of wizarding law enforcement that no effort
appears to have been made to clear Frank Bryce of the crime, the only suspect the
Muggle authorities were aware of, when Morfin was sent to Azkaban for the crime
(HBP17).

Voldemort has also personally used the Killing Curse to murder Harry's parents
(GF34, DH17), Bertha Jorkins (GF33), Frank Bryce (GF1), and Charity Burbage
(DH1).

Wormtail, on orders from Voldemort, used Voldemort's wand to murder Cedric


Diggory with the Killing Curse (GF32).

A Death Eater tried to cast this on Hermione in the Battle of the Department of
Mysteries, but was tackled by Harry halfway through the incantation (OP35).

Voldemort tried to cast the Killing Curse on Harry (doesn't he ever learn?) and on
Albus Dumbledore after the Battle of the Department of Mysteries. Fawkes
swallowed a bolt of it at one point (OP36).

Judging from the effect, Bellatrix Lestrange killed a fox with a nonverbal Killing
Curse just before she and her sister Narcissa paid a call on Snape to discuss Draco
(HBP2).

Mentioned as the Killing Curse in a Daily Prophet article (HBP3).

"That phrase...was used by ancient wizards to make illnesses disappear. However, there's no proof it
was ever used to kill anyone." (pp.17-19)

Avis (AH-vis)
"avis" L. bird

Conjures a flock of small, twittering birds.

Mr. Ollivander used this spell to test Viktor Krum's wand during the Weighing of the
Wands, sending the birds out the window (GF18).

See CONJURING SPELLS.

Encyclopedia of Spells
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Babbling Curse - Backfiring Jinx - Banishing Charm - Bat-Bogey Hex - Bedazzling Hex binding/fastening magic - Blasting Curse - bluebell flames - Body-Bind Curse - Boggart
banishing spell - Bogies, Curse of the - bond of blood - Braking Charm - broomstick magic bubbles - Bubble-Head Charm
Babbling Curse
incantation unknown

Exact effect not mentioned, but one can assume it causes the victim to babble.

Lockhart supposedly cured a simple Transylvanian villager of this affliction (CS10).

Backfiring Jinx
incantation unknown

Exact effect not mentioned, but can be nasty.

The Office for the Detection and Confiscation of Counterfeit Defensive Spells and
Protective Objects got wind of one of these in Elephant and Castle in July 1996

[Y16], but it was sorted out by the Magical Law Enforcement Squad before they
arrived on the scene (HBP5).

Banishing Charm
reverse of Summoning Charm
Depulso (PA/g)

Sends an object away from the caster; the target object is said to have been Banished.

Harry and his classmates practiced this spell in their fourth-year Charms class.
Flitwick found himself being Banished around the room by Neville, whose aim wasn't
very good (GF26).

Bedazzling Hex
incantation unknown

Presumably causes the target object to bedazzle any observer.

Xenophilius Lovegood said that a travelling cloak may be imbued with a Bedazzling
Hex in order to make it function as an Invisibility Cloak (DH21).

Bat-Bogey Hex
incantation unknown

Engorges an opponent's 'bogies' to bat-size, gives them wings, and sets them to attacking his
or her face.

A speciality of Ginny Weasley's, which she used on Draco Malfoy to escape


Umbridge's office. It impresses not only Ron (OP33), but Fred and George, who use
Ginny as an example of the principle 'size is no guarantee of power' (OP6)

Slughorn asked Ginny Weasley to join the Slug Club after seeing her cast a this spell
on Zacharias Smith aboard the Hogwarts Express (HBP7).

binding/fastening magic
incantations vary, including Incarcerous

Spells which fasten chains or ropes to restrain someone or something.

Dragon keepers used this magic to drive stakes into the ground to fasten the dragons
to (GF19).

The chair in the Court of Magical Law magically restrained the accused using ropes
(GF30, OP8).

Snape fired "thin, snakelike cords" from his wand to bind Remus Lupin in the
Shrieking Shack (PA19).

Pettigrew bound Harry to the tombstone of Tom Riddle with a binding spell (GF32).

Charity Burbage was confined with invisible bindings at Malfoy Manor (DH1).

A Death Eater bound Ron with magical ropes in the caf (DH9).

See also ROPES, MAGICAL; CHAINS, MAGICAL

Blasting Curse
See CONFRINGO.

bluebell flames
"bluebell" flower with blue blossoms
incantation unknown

Creates a quantity of blue flame which can be directed to a specific place.

Hermione cast a bluebell flame that could be carried around in a jam jar, sent out a
short distance, then retrieved into the jar; she used it to set Snape's robes on fire
during the first Quidditch match of her first year (PS11).

Hermione used this spell against Devil's Snare when working through the challenges
surrounding the Philosopher's Stone (PS16).

Portable, waterproof fires are a speciality of Hermione's (CS11).

Body-Bind Curse
See PETRIFICUS TOTALUS.

Boggart banishing spell


See RIDDIKULUS.

Bogies, Curse of the


See CURSE OF THE BOGIES.

bond of blood
incantation unknown

The bond of blood is an extremely powerful ancient magic which is formed when a person
sacrifices himself or herself for a family member, out of love. The sacrifice creates a
lingering protection in the blood of the person who was saved. It is not activated, however,
until the charm is actually cast, and it is not sealed and functioning until another member of
the family accepts the saved person as his or her own. As with most ancient magic, the bond
of blood is mysterious and very strong and is not completely understood by most wizards.

Dumbledore decided to use the bond of blood to protect Harry against Voldemort. He
cast the charm on Harry, and Petunia sealed it when she agreed to take Harry into her
home. As a result, Harry is protected as long as he can call the Dursleys' house his
home.
Some have wondered why it was Lily's sacrifice which created the charm and not
James's, or for that matter, why the ancient magic is not in effect every time someone
dies for another person. The true nature of the charm is that it requires intentional
spellcasting on someone's part to activate the magic and it also requires the decision
of a family member to seal it. Without these two things, the magic does not happen.
These two required components are clear in OP37 (emphasis SVA's):
But I knew, too, where Voldemort was weak. And so I made my decision. You
would be protected by an ancient magic...I am speaking, of course, of the fact
that your mother died to save you. She gave you a lingering protection...a
protection that flows in your veins to this day. I put my trust, therefore, in your
mother's blood. I delivered you to her sister, her only remaining relative...
She took you, and in doing so, she sealed the charm I placed upon you. Your
mother's sacrifice made the bond of blood the strongest shield I could give
you...
While you can still call home the place where your mother's blood dwells,
there you cannot be touched or harmed by Voldemort. He shed her blood, but
it lives on in you and her sister. Her blood became your refuge. You need
return there only once a year, but as long as you can still call it home, whilst
you are there he cannot hurt you.

Braking Charm
incantation unknown

Charm used on a broomstick to allow it to stop effectively.

A Firebolt has an "unbreakable Braking Charm" on it (PA4).

See also HORTON-KEITCH BRAKING CHARM.

broomstick magic

See BRAKING CHARM, CUSHIONING CHARM, HURLING HEX.

c.f. QUIDDITCH SPELLS.

When Harry fell off his Nimbus 2000, it didn't fall to the ground but instead drifted
away toward the Whomping Willow, suggesting that it may have had some form of
enchantment on it to keep it flying without a rider (PA9).

Harry's Firebolt, when held and then released, floated at exactly the right height for
him to mount it (PA11).

Early broomsticks had only simple spells placed on them. A model on display in the
Museum of Quidditch only moves forward at one speed and will move up, down, and
stop (QA1).

bubbles
incantation unknown

Spell which pours non-bursting golden bubbles out of the wand.

Flitwick used this spell to create decorations for a Christmas tree in the Great Hall
(PS12).

Ron's broken wand was emitting large purple bubbles at one point, but from his
dismayed reaction it would seem that this was a malfunction rather than a spell he was
casting (CS13).

Bubble-Head Charm

incantation unknown

Encloses the head of the caster with a bubble of breathable air.

Cedric used this spell to travel underwater and rescue Cho in the second task (GF26).

Fleur used this spell to travel underwater when attempting to rescue Gabrielle in the
second task (GF26).

This became fashionable during the last month or so of Harry's fifth year, because
Dungbombs and Stink Pellets were being used frequently in the corridors (OP30).

Encyclopedia of Spells
<<Previous Letter | Back to Spells Index | Next Letter >>

canary transfiguration hex - candle magic - Caterwauling Charm - Cave Inimicum - chains,
magical - Cheering Charm - Colloportus - Colour Change - Confringo - Confundo Confundus Charm - Conjunctivitis Curse - conjured items - Conjuring Spells - contract,
binding magical - crop-related charms - Cross-Species Switches - Cruciatus Curse - Crucio Curse of the Bogies - curses - Cushioning Charm
canary transfiguration hex
incantation unknown

A temporary hex to change someone into a giant canary. After a few moments, the
Transfigured person molts back into themselves.

Fred and George placed this hex on seemingly innocent custard creams so that
whomever ate one was changed temporarily into a huge canary. Neville ate one of
these Canary Creams, much to the amusement of everyone in the Gryffindor common
room (GF21).

candle magic
no incantation used

This minor spell ignites candles and can make them float in midair.

The Great Hall is lit with thousands of floating candles (PS7)

Rita Skeeter uses this magic when she's trying to conduct an interview in a broom
cupboard (GF18).

Lockhart may have used a charm of this kind when he "lit the candles on his desk" so
that Dumbledore could examine the Petrified Mrs. Norris (CS9).

See also EVERLASTING CANDLE, INCENDIO, POISONOUS CANDLE,


WINGARDIUM LEVIOSA.

Caterwauling Charm
incantation unknown
"caterwaul" Eng. to make a screaming noise like that of a cat during mating season

When an unauthorized person enters the target area while the effect is running, a caterwauling
noise will be set off.

Hogsmeade was under a Caterwauling Charm that would go off if anyone moved
around outside while curfew was in effect (DH28).

Cave Inimicum (KAH-vay i-NI-mi-kum)


spell name unknown
cave L.: beware + inimicum L.: enemies
Defensive spell to keep enemies away.

Protective spell cast by Hermione around the tent and campsite when the trio was on
the run (DH14, 22).

chains, magical
magical effect, spell name unknown
incantation for rope version: Incarcerous (OP33)

This spell causes magical chains to snake out of a chair and bind a person to it.

The chair in the Court of Magical Law has these magical chains on it (GF30, OP8).

Similar to MAGICAL ROPES.

See also BINDING/FASTENING MAGIC.

Cheering Charm
incantation unknown

A charm that cheers a person up, makes them happy.

Cheering Charms were part of the Charms curriculum for the third-years. They were
included in the final exam for that term (PA15).

invented by Felix Summerbee during the 1400s (fw31)

Cheering Charms were part of the written Charms O.W.L. exam. Hermione worried
that she hadn't written enough about them, but since she was considering including
the countercharm for hiccups as part of her answer, it seems likely that she wrote
more than plenty (OP31)

Colloportus (co-lo-POR-tus)
spell name unknown
"colligo" L. to bind together + "portus" L. door

Seals a door, making an odd squelching noise.

Hermione, Harry, and several other members of the D.A. used this spell to try to
block the attacking Death Eaters during the battle of the Department of Mysteries
(OP35).

Colour Change (U.S.: Color Change)


incantation unknown

A Charm that is required during the practical portion of the Charms O.W.L. Possibly the same
as the flashing paint charm.

Harry mixed up the incantations for this charm and the Growth Charm, accidentally
making a rat grow alarmingly during his practical Charms O.W.L. He was supposed
to turn it orange (OP31).
This was an ironic test question, considering that Ron's attempt to turn Scabbers yellow during his first
train ride with Harry was one of the earliest attempted uses of magic in Harry's experience (PS6).

Confringo (con-FRIN-goh)
Blasting Curse
"confringo" L. to smash, crush; to ruin, undo

Causes the target to explode.

In the All-England Wizarding Duelling Competition of 1420, Alberta Toothill


defeated Samson Wiblin, who was the favorite, using a Blasting Curse (fw27).

Cast by Harry at the sidecar that had fallen off the flying motorbike; it exploded,
knocking one Death Eater off his broom and making another fall back (DH4).

Cast by Hermione in Bathilda Bagshot's house when Nagini was coming for her and
Harry; the spell ricocheted around the room, exploding a mirror. She later referred to
it as the Blasting Curse (DH17).

Confundo (con-FUN-doh)
Confundus Charm
"confundo" L. to mix up, jumble together, confuse, bewilder, perplex

Causes confusion. A person who is affected by this Charm is said to be Confunded.

Snape suggested that Harry, Ron, and Hermione were Confunded by Sirius Black into
believing him innocent (PA21).

The fake Moody used this charm to fool the Goblet of Fire into accepting Harry's
name under a fourth school (GF17).

Hermione used a Confundus Charm on McLaggen during Keeper tryouts in her sixth
year (HBP11).

Snape speculated that a Confundus Charm had been placed on Dawlish, who was
known to be susceptible (DH1).

Cast by Harry on each of the two wizards outside the main entrance of Gringotts
(DH26).

Confundus Charm (con-FUN-dus)


See CONFUNDO.

Conjunctivitis Curse
incantation unknown
"conjunctiva" L. connecting (as in membrane of the eye) + "-itis" L. inflammation

A spell that affects the eyes and vision of the target.

Sirius was going to suggest this spell to use against the Hungarian Horntail (GF19).

Krum tried this during the first task, but the dragon went into such violent convulsions
that she smashed some of her own eggs (GF20).

Madame Maxime used this to force Golgomath's thugs to drop Hagrid when the giants
became hostile with the ascension of the new Gurg (OP20).

conjured items
no incantation used

A spell that creates objects out of thin air.

McGonagall conjured up a large fan and instructed Ernie Macmillan to waft the
Petrified Nearly Headless Nick to the hospital wing using it (CS11).

Dumbledore conjured up hundreds of squashy purple sleeping bags when the students
needed to spend the night in the Great Hall (PA9).

There is legislation about what you can conjure and what you can't (SN).

There are laws of magic (as opposed to human legislation) governing what you can
conjure and what you can't, such as Gamp's Law of Elemental Transfiguration, to
which food is one of the five exceptions (you can't create food out of nothing)
(DH29).

Most things conjured out of thin air will disappear after a couple of hours (SN). Some
exceptions to this are the sleeping bags, which survived a lot longer than just a couple
of hours, and the leg of Neville's desk, which had been accidentally vanished (CS16)
(although this may have been an instance of Reparo instead).

"drawing up a chair" (conjuring a chair out of thin air)


o Dumbledore drew up comfy chintz armchairs (OP8)
o McGonagall draws up straight-backed, wooden chairs (OP22).
o Arthur Weasley drew up more chairs so his visitors could sit down in his ward
at St Mungo's (OP8).
o Dumbledore literally drew up a chair for Trelawney to sit in at the Christmas
feast in 1993 [Y13] (PA11). He also drew up a chintz armchair for himself to
sit in when representing Harry at his hearing before the Wizengamot and when
Mrs. Figg arrived to testify, Dumbledore drew up another for her (OP8).

Dumbledore conjured a tea tray in Hagrid's cabin (GF24).

Dumbledore arranged the Great Hall for the musical entertainment at the Yule Ball
with "move objects" and this spell:
"Dumbledore stood up and asked the students to do the same. Then, with a
wave of his wand, all the tables zoomed back along the walls leaving the floor
clear, and then he conjured a raised platform into existence along the right
wall." (GF23)

Bill and Charlie Weasley conjured up tablecoths for dinner in the garden at the
Burrow (GF5).

Fudge conjured two large glasses of amber liquid (one for himself, one for the Prime
Minister) on the night he informed the latter of Sirius Black's escape from Azkaban
(HBP1).

See ARROWS, WAND, CHAINS, MAGICAL, FERULA, ROPES, MAGICAL.

Conjuring Spells
incantation unknown

A type of magic that creates objects out of thin air.

Conjuring spells are advanced magic; they are N.E.W.T. level at Hogwarts, taught in
sixth and seventh years (OP13).

See AGUAMENTI, ARROWS, WAND, AVIS, CHAINS, MAGICAL, FERULA,


FOUNTAIN OF WINE, INANIMATUS CONJURUS, INCARCEROUS, LEEK
JINX, ORCHIDEOUS, ROPES, MAGICAL, SERPENSORTIA

See CONJURED ITEMS

contract, binding magical


incantation unknown

This spell or spells makes a contract magically unbreakable.

Placing a name in the Goblet of Fire constituted a binding magical contract. The
people whose names were chosen were obliged to participate in the contest Even
Dumbledore couldn't undo this magic, since Harry was forced to compete in the
Tournament when his name came out of the Goblet (GF16).

See also UNBREAKABLE VOW.

crop-related charms
various

Various effects on crops depending on the specific charm in question.

The Ministry of Magic report "A Study into Muggle Suspicions about Magic"
recommended that the International Confederation of Wizards impose an immediate
ban on further crop-related charms until the fuss about so-called "crop circles" - really
entries in the Annual International Wizard Gardening Competition - died down (DP).

Cross-Species Switches
various

Classification of Transfiguration magic in which one type of creature is Transfigured into


another.

The fourth years had to write an essay about using these after practicing transfiguring
guinea fowl into guinea pigs (GF22).

Apparently it's easier to do the spell when the creatures have similar names (e.g.
guinea fowl into guinea pigs), similar appearance (e.g. hedgehogs into pincushions),
or both (e.g. beetles into buttons).

Cruciatus Curse (KROO-see-AH-tus)


"cruciatus" L. torture (n.)

See CRUCIO.

Crucio (KROO-see-oh)
"Cruciatus Curse"
"crucio" L. torment (v.)

One of the "Unforgivable Curses," this spell causes the victim to suffer almost intolerable
pain. Some victims of prolonged use of this curse have been driven insane. A victim of this
curse is said to have been Cruciated.

Demonstrated by the fake Moody to the fourth-year Defence Against the Dark Arts
class (GF14).

Used by Voldemort's followers during his years of power, both on wizards and
Muggles (GF14).

Crouch authorized its use by Aurors against suspects during the first war against
Voldemort (GF27).

The Longbottoms (see) were victims of the Cruciatus Curse and were driven insane
by it (GF30, OP9, OP23)

When Neville heard the golden egg's song, he was afraid that the second task would
involve Harry facing this spell (GF21).

Krum was forced to use this on Cedric during the third task (GF31)

Voldemort used it on Wormtail (GF29), Avery (GF33 and probably OP26), and Harry
(GF34)

During the Battle of the Department of Mysteries, Bellatrix realized that Neville was
the child of the Longbottoms, whom she had tortured. She took fiendish pleasure in
using the Cruciatus Curse on the Longbottoms' son.
Later, Harry tried to use the Cruciatus Curse on Bellatrix Lestrange, but it didn't do
much. She taunted him that he had to mean it or it wouldn't work (OP36).

When speculating about what the weapon might be that was the focus of the attention
of the Order of the Phoenix and of the Death Eaters, Harry assured everyone that
Voldemort didn't need any new weapon to cause pain, since the Cruciatus Curse
worked just fine, thank you very much (OP6)

Not named, but magical torture was being used (DH9).

Bellatrix used this on Hermione at Malfoy Manor (DH23).

Amycus Carrow attempted to use this on Ginny while duelling with her. Harry later
tried but failed to use it on Snape (HBP28).

When Amycus Carrow taught Defence Against the Dark Arts (which under him
turned into just the Dark Arts) the students were supposed to practice the Cruciatus
Curse on fellow students who had earned detentions (DH29).

Amycus Carrow wanted to Cruciate the Ravenclaws until they told him who had
attacked Alecto; shortly afterwards, Harry cast the Cruciatus Curse on him for spitting
in Professor McGonagall's face (DH30).

Curse of the Bogies


incantation unknown
"bogy" uncertain origin: "Old Bogey" = The Devil c. 1836; "bogle" Scottish phantom or goblin c. 1505 and
"bogge" terror, possibly from "bwg" Welsh ghost and "bwgwl" fear
Yeah, maybe. But more likely:
"bogey" British slang: booger

Effect unknown.

Ron threatened to learn this curse, then use it on Hermione and Neville if they all got
caught roaming the school at night on their way to a duel with Draco Malfoy (PS9)

see BAT-BOGEY HEX.

curses
various

The following spells are known as curses.

Babbling Curse

Blasting Curse

Body-Bind Curse

Cruciatus Curse

Curse of the Bogies

Entrail-Expelling Curse

Fiendfyre

Flagrante Curse

Gemino Curse

Impediment Curse

Imperius Curse

Jelly-Fingers curse

Killing Curse

Leg-Locker Curse

Reductor Curse

Sponge-Knees Curse

Thief's Curse

Unforgivable Curses

Cushioning Charm
incantation unknown

The Cushioning Charm creates an invisible "pillow" on the handle of a broom to make flying
more comfortable.

Invented by Elliot Smethwyk in 1820 (QA9).

Hermione cast a Cushioning Charm when she, Bogrod, Harry, Ron, and Griphook
were thrown from a Gringotts cart (DH26).

Note: In the film, Hermione uses the incantation Arresto Momentum to save them when they
fell. Since that's only in the film, however, we can't consider it to be canon.

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Dark Mark - defensive charge - Defensive Charm - Deletrius - Defodio - Densaugeo Deprimo - Descendo - Diffindo - Disapparate - Disarming Charm - Disillusionment Charm Dissendium - door-opening spell - Drought Charm - Duro
Dark Mark
See MORSMORDRE and PROTEAN CHARM.

defensive charge
no incantation needed; automatic response

A charge like that of electricity runs through the body of a wizard with this automatic
defensive spell.

When Vernon Dursley tried to hold Harry around the neck, he felt a sudden charge
like electricity running through Harry and he had to drop him. This appears to have
been an automatic defensive response on Harry's part, since there is no indication that
he intentionally cast a spell (OP1).

Dumbledore used a similar spell to make Umbridge let go of Marietta, whom she was
shaking violently. This may be a different form of the spell, however, since
Dumbledore used his wand to perform it (OP27).

Defensive Charm
incantation unknown
Aside from the fact that it is a spell to defend the caster, little is known about the actual
effects produced by this spell.

Fulbert the Fearful died in 1097 when the Defensive Charm he cast to protect himself
backfired (fw20).

The Magical Law Enforcement Squad gives newly-hired Hit-Witches and HitWizards training in the latest defensive charms (DP).

Deletrius (deh-LEE-tree-us)
spell name unknown
"deleterius" L. destroy, eradicate

Erases the ghost images of spells revealed by Priori Incantato. Possibly can be used to
remove other spell effects as well.

Amos Diggory used this to erase the ghost image of the Dark Mark he had caused to
be emitted from Harry's wand (GF9).

Defodio (deh-FO-dee-oh)
"gouging spell"
"defodio" L. dig down, hollow out

Digs through or hollows out the target.

Cast by Hermione (who was then joined by Harry and Ron) to help the dragon enlarge
the passageway (DH26).

Densaugeo (den-sah-OO-gi-oh)
"dens" L. tooth + "augeo" L. grow

Causes the victim's teeth to enlarge grotesquely.

Hermione was hit by this spell from the wand of


Draco Malfoy. Draco and Harry had begun
fighting in the corridor, but the curses missed
and hit Hermione and Goyle (GF18)

Deprimo (de-PREE-moh)
spell name unknown
Etymology uncertain, but perhaps related to "primer", Eng. something used to ignite an explosive charge

Blasts a hole through the target object.

Hermione used this spell to blast a hole through the sitting room floor of the
Lovegoods' house (DH21).

Descendo (deh-SEN-doe)
"descendo" L. descend, come down

Causes something to descend or lower itself.

Ron used this spell to lower the ceiling hatch and ladder leading to the Burrow's attic
(DH6).

Crabbe cast this spell on a fifty-foot high pile of junk in the Room of Requirement, to
make it fall over (DH31).

Diffindo (dih-FIN-doe)
"Severing Charm" (?)
"diffindo" L. cleave, open

Spell that cuts something open.

Harry used this spell on Cedric's book bag to slow him down so Harry could tell him
about the dragons (GF9).

Harry cast this in an attempt to sever the tentacles of thought that the attacking brain
wrapped around Ron during the battle of the Department of Mysteries (OP35).

Harry used this spell to slice the cover off his own brand-new copy of Advanced
Potion-Making (tapping the cover while saying the spell). He then repeated the spell
for the copy of the book he had borrowed from the Potions dungeon's supply of spare
textbooks (HBP11).

Hermione used this spell to cut Ron free of the magical ropes (DH9).

Harry used this spell to try to cut Mrs. Cattermole free of the chained chair, but it
didn't work (DH13).

Harry used this spell to break the ice on the pool containing the sword of Gryffindor
in the Forest of Dean (DH19).

Disapparate (dis-AP-a-rate)
incantation unknown
"dis-" opposite of, from L. "apart" + "appareo" L. to appear

Apparition (see), as seen from the place a wizard is leaving.

Daedalus Diggle says that he, Hestia Jones, and the Dursleys will be driving for about
10 minutes before Disapparating to the safe location picked out for the Dursleys
(DH3).

Mundungus panicked and Disapparated when Voldemort came at him (DH5).

Hermione recommended Disapparating and heading for the countryside from


Tottenham Court Road (DH9).

Disarming Charm
See EXPELLIARMUS.

Disillusionment Charm

incantation unknown
"disillusion" Eng. to lose faith

A charm which hides the true, magical nature of something.

Hippogriffs and winged horses may be kept by wizards as long as they perform a
Disillusionment Charm on them regularly so that Muggles won't notice anything
strange about them (FB).

Mad-Eye Moody cast a Disillusionment Charm on Harry to protect him during the
trip from Privet Drive to Grimmauld Place ("I'm going to Disillusion you..."). To
Harry, it felt as though someone had broken an egg on his head, like a flood of cold
running down over him. When under the Charm, his body took on the appearance of
whatever was behind him. He felt like a human chameleon. When Moody removed
the Charm, it felt like trickling of warmth instead of cold (OP3, OP4).

The thirteen witches and wizards who came to collect Harry from number four, Privet
Drive for the last time used Disillusionment Charms (DH4).

Hermione used Disillusionment Charms as part of the protective enchantments used


to hide the camp she shared with Harry and Ron during the hunt for the Horcruxes
(DH15).

Hermione suggested using a Disillusionment Charm when planning the visit to


Godric's Hollow (DH16).

One of the ways to create an Invisibility Cloak is to imbue a travelling cloak with a
Disillusionment Charm (DH21).

Albus Dumbledore did not need an Invisibility Cloak because he could perform a
Disillusionment Charm that was powerful enough to make him effectively invisible
without one (DH22).

Voldemort cast a Disillusionment Charm to conceal himself from anyone watching


from Hogwarts Castle when he arrived to rob Albus Dumbledore's tomb; the
Disillusionment Charm worked so well that even he could not see himself (DH24).

Vincent Crabbe, Gregory Goyle, and Draco Malfoy used a Disillusionment Charm to
hide in the corridor outside the Room of Requirement during the Battle of Hogwarts,
which is how they happened to sneak in when Harry, Ron, and Hermione arrived to
search for the diadem of Ravenclaw (DH31).

Dissendium (dis-EN-dee-um)
spell name unknown

uncertain: "dissocio" L. to sever or divide? Possibly similar in sound to "descend."


Comments from Amanda in email:
"Dissocio" in its verb form means "to part" or "to separate". The word "en" can mean both "here!" and "look!"
Dium, of course, refers to the sun and normally translates as "day" or "today" but I have seen it used as a
command to mean "now." So together dissendium could mean "part/separate here, now!"

Opens the secret door in the statue of the hump-backed witch.

Harry learnt this word from the Marauder's Map. It is said aloud while the statue is
tapped with the caster's wand (PA10)

door-opening spell
no incantation used

Sends a jet of sparks out of the wand, opening the target door.

Lupin used this spell to open the door of the staff room wardrobe, which contained a
Boggart his class was to confront (PA7).

Harry's bedroom door opened by itself when the Advance Guard came to take him to
number twelve, Grimmauld Place (OP3).

cf. ALOHOMORA

Drought Charm
incantation unknown

Dries up water.

Harry briefly considered this as a method of getting to the bottom of the lake, but
realized he couldn't dry up that much water with it (GF26v)

Duro (DUR-oh)
"duro" L. to harden, solidify

Turns the target object to stone.

Hermione cast this on a tapestry that two pursuing Death Eaters were about to hit
(DH32)

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Engorgement Charm - Engorgio - Ennervate - Entrail-Expelling Curse - Entrancing


Enchantments - Episkey - Erecto - Evanesco - Expecto Patronum - Expelliarmus - Expulso Extension Charm, Undetectable - Extinguishing Spell
Engorgement Charm
See ENGORGIO.

Engorgio (en-GOR-gee-oh)
"Engorgement Charm"
"engorger" Fr. swallow greedily

Spell which causes the target to swell in size.

The twins placed an Engorgement Charm on the Ton-Tongue Toffee that they
"accidentally" dropped in front of Dudley (GF4).

Kevin, the little wizard boy in the World Cup campground, was casting an
Engorgement Spell (or something very similar) on a slug (GF7).

Hermione suspected that Hagrid has used an Engorgement Charm on his pumpkins
(CS7).

The fake Moody used an Engorgement Charm on each of the three spiders he had
bought to class to demonstrate the Unforgivable Curses (GF14).

Harry cast this on a spider to practice with his wand (DH20).

Ennervate (EN-er-vayt)
See RENNERVATE.

Entrail-Expelling Curse
no incantation given

Apparently this curse causes the victim's insides to come out of them. Eww....

This nasty spell was invented by Urquhart Rackharrow in the 1600s. His portrait now
hangs ominously in the Dai Llewellyn Ward of St. Mungo's (OP22).

Entrancing Enchantments
no incantation given

Spells that cause the target person to fall in love with the caster.

Lockhart suggested that Flitwick was an expert in these, much to Flitwick's


embarassment (CS13).

Episkey (eh-PIS-key)
"episkeyazo" Gr. to repair

Heals/repairs damage that has been inflicted on the target.

Tonks used this to repair Harry's broken nose (HBP8).

Harry used this to repair Demelza's bleeding mouth after Ron accidentally punched
her during Quidditch practice (HBP14).

Erecto (er-EC-toe)
"erigere", L. to set up straight, straighten out

Straightens out the target object and sets it up.

Hermione used this to set up the tent (including pegging down the ropes) which had
been a tangled mess up till then (DH14).

Evanesco (ev-an-ES-ko)
"Vanishing Spell"
"evanesco" L. to disappear

Makes something vanish (not just become invisible, but go away completely)

When Colin was taking his picture and asking him to sign it, Harry wished he knew a
good Vanishing Spell to escape the embarassment (CS6)

Another form of this spell actually makes things go away. Neville did this by mistake
to one of the legs of his desk when McGonagall announced that, in spite of the attacks
on students and the banishment of Albus Dumbledore and Hagrid, they would still be
given their exams (CS16).

Bill Weasley used this to make a stack of scrolls disappear while cleaning up after a
meeting of the Order of the Phoenix during Harry's first night at number twelve,
Grimmauld Place (OP5).

Snape used the Vanishing Spell to get rid of Harry's less-than-perfect attempt at a
Draught of Peace (OP12).

The fifth years had to practice Vanishing spells for some of their first Transfiguration
homework that year (OP13).

Fifth years work on the Vanishing Spell in Transfiguration, starting with snails and
then working their way up to mice (OP15).

According to Professor McGonagall, Vanished objects go "into non-being, which is to


say, everything" (DH30).

See Vanishing Magic for a more complete discussion of the uses of this spell and
others like it.

Expecto Patronum (ex-PEK-toh pa-TROH-num)


"Patronus Charm"
"expecto" L. expect or look for + "patronus" Medieval L. patron saint, symbolizing a patron or assistant
ALTERNATE ETYMOLOGY: "expecto" L. to expel from the chest, i.e.to send forth from one's self.

Conjures a Patronus, a silvery phantom shape, usually that of an animal, which is the
embodiment of the positive thoughts of the caster. A Patronus will drive away Dementors.

Lupin taught Harry to cast this spell, which he performed with minor success until he
faced a large group of Dementors who were trying to attack Sirius Black. Harry saw a
Patronus come charging across the lake and later realized that he himself cast it
(PA12, GF31).

Harry used his Patronus Charm to drive off two Dementors in an alley near Privet
Drive. He got into trouble for doing it, although he had no honourable alternative
under the circumstances (OP1).

Cast by Harry, then by Hermione at the Ministry of Magic, on which occasion Harry
said that it is the only spell that Hermione has trouble with (DH13).

See MESSENGER SPELL, PATRONUS.

Expelliarmus (ex-pel-ee-AR-mus)
"Disarming Spell"
"expelo" L. to drive out + "arma" L. weapon

Causes opponent's weapon to fly out of his or her hand. The opponent is then said to have
been Disarmed.

Basic defensive spell, taught at the Duelling Club by Snape (CS10) used frequently
thereafter. If the exact nature of the opponent's weapon is uncertain, the spell can have
unexpected results. If several people cast the spell simultaneously, the target may be
rendered unconscious (PA19, GF31, GF34)

Lupin used this on Harry, Ron, and Hermione simultaneously in the Shrieking Shack
on the night they first met Sirius Black (PA17).

Snape's use of this spell against Lockhart had rather violent results (CS10).

This was the first spell taught at the first D.A. meeting. Zacharias Smith thought this
was silly, but Harry pointed out that he used that spell against Voldemort just a few
months before and that it had saved his life (OP18).

Harry cast this at Stan Shunpike (DH4).

Used by Ron against Bellatrix Lestrange at Malfoy Manor (DH23).

Harry again used this against Voldemort during their final duel (DH36).

Referred to in verb form Disarm (DH4, DH5, etc.)

Expulso (ex-PUL-soh)
L. to drive out, expel

Blows up the target.

Used by Thorfinn Rowle during the fight at the caf; he blew up the table behind
Harry with it (DH9).

Extension Charm, Undetectable


no incantation given

Extends the internal dimensions of the target object without affecting the external
dimensions.

Hermione cast this on the beaded handbag that she took to the wedding; throughout
the rest of the story, it is used to carry books, a tent when not in use, clothes, and all
the other supplies of the journey (DH9). While the bag makes an unusual noise if
dropped (DH8), it does not appear to weigh more than a normal bag of its size and can
even be stuffed down a sock in an emergency (DH26).

See WIZARD SPACE.

Extinguishing Spell
no incantation given

Spell that puts out fires.

Used by dragon keepers; they kept them at the ready when handling the dragons for
the first task (GF14).

Cho accidentally mispronounced Expelliarmus and set her friend's sleeve on fire.
Marietta extinguished it with her wand (OP18).

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feather-light - Ferula - Fidelius Charm - Fiendfyre - finger-removing jinx - Finite - Finite


Incantatem - fire magic - fire talking - Fixing Charm - Flagrante Curse - Flagrate - FlameFreezing Charm - flashing paint charm - flying magic - fountain of wine - Four-Point Spell Freezing Charm - Full Body-Bind - fur spell - Furnunculus
"feather-light"

Incantation: unknown
Effect: Spell that makes the target object weigh practically nothing.
References:

After running away from the Dursleys, Harry considered the idea of casting
a spell to make his trunk "feather-light" so he could carry it all the way to
London on his broomstick (PA3).

The spell Harry was considering for this was not named.

Ferula

Incantation: Ferula (feh-ROO-lah)


Effect: Spell that conjures a wooden rod
References:

Lupin used this spell to conjure a splint and bandages for Ron's broken leg
(PA19).

Etymology: "ferule" alt. spelling of "ferrule" Eng. wooden handle for strength or protection, from "ferula" L.
fennel plant

Fidelius Charm

Incantation: uncertain, possibly Fidelius (fih-DAY-lee-us)


Effect: "An immensely complex spell involving the magical concealment of a secret inside a
single, living soul. The information is hidden inside the chosen person, or Secret-Keeper, and
is henceforth impossible to find -- unless, of course, the Secret-Keeper chooses to divulge it"
(PA10).
References:

Used to try to protect Lily and James Potter from Voldemort. "As long as the SecretKeeper refused to speak, You-Know-Who could search the village where Lily and
James were staying for years and never find them, not even if he had his nose pressed
against their sitting room window!" (PA10) Unfortunately, Peter Pettigrew was chosen
as Secret-Keeper, and he betrayed the secret.

Dumbledore used the Fidelius Charm to hide number twelve Grimmauld Place, the
headquarters of the Order of the Phoenix. He himself was the Secret-Keeper for the
Order (OP6). Note that he once mentioned it in front of the Dursleys (HBP3).

Snape could refer (at least indirectly) to the fact that a Fidelius Charm applied to the
headquarters of the Order of the Phoenix, but since he was not the Secret Keeper he
could not mention the name of the place (HBP2).

"When a Secret-Keeper dies, their secret dies with them, or to put it another way, the
status of their secret will remain as it was at the moment of their death. Everybody in
whom they confided will continue to know the hidden information, but nobody else...
"In other words, a secret (e.g., the location of a family in hiding, like the Potters) is
enchanted so that it is protected by a single Keeper (in our example, Peter Pettigrew,
a.k.a. Wormtail). Thenceforth nobody else - not even the subjects of the secret
themselves - can divulge the secret. Even if one of the Potters had been captured,
force-fed Veritaserum or placed under the Imperius Curse, they would not have been

able to give away the whereabouts of the other two. The only people who ever knew
their precise location were those whom Wormtail had told directly, but none of them
would have been able to pass on the information (JKR)."

After the death of a Secret Keeper, each of the people to whom he or she had confided
the secret will become a Secret Keeper. The power of the Fidelius Charm will be
diluted more and more as more and more people are Secret Keepers (DH6).

Mention of a Secret Keeper (DH9).

Etymology: "fidelis" L. trusty, faithful

Fiendfyre

Incantation: unknown
Effect: Creates a cursed fire, made up of flames of abnormal size and heat that can crumble
fairly substantial objects to soot at a mere touch. Left burning long enough, the fire will take
the shapes of gigantic fiery beasts (including serpents, chimaeras, dragons, and birds of prey)
which will pursue any target humans.
References:

One of the substances that can destroy Horcruxes, but Hermione considered it far too
dangerous to ever use (DH31).

Crabbe cast this in the Room of Requirement while it was in its Room of
Hidden Things mode (DH31). He died in the ensuing magical inferno.

Etymology: "fiend" + "fyre", from Old English "fyr", fire

"finger-removing jinx"

Incantation: unknown
Effect: Removes the target person's fingers.
References:

Goodwin Kneen's wife, Gunhilda, hit him with this jinx after he came home a bit late
from celebrating Ilkley's win in Quidditch (QA3).

Finite

(fi-NEE-tay)
"finio" L. settle, end, die, cease

Stops a currently operating spell effect.

Lupin used this spell to take a Tarantallegra Hex off Neville Longbottom (OP36).

Harry used this spell to cancel the effects of Descendo (cast by Crabbe) on
a large pile of objects (DH31).

This spell might be a shorthand way of casting the General Counter-Spell (Finite
Incantatem).

Finite Incantatem

(fi-NEE-tay in-can-TAH-tum)
"finio" L. settle, end, die + "incantationem" L. the art of enchanting

Stops currently operating spell effects.

Snape used this spell to end the various unfortunate spells that were affecting
members of the Duelling Club when things got a little out of hand (CS11).

Contrary to what is shown in CS/f, this spell does not blow up rogue Bludgers. The
magic required to tamper with a Bludger is extremely high level and can't be
counteracted a simple spell, especially not one cast by a 13-year-old (CS/f)

fire magic

References:

"bluebell flames"

candle magic

Fiendfyre

Fire-Making Spell

"fire whip"

Flagrate

Flagrante Curse

Green Sparks

Incendio

Red Sparks

Anti-fire magic:

Aguamenti

extinguishing spells

Flame-Freezing Charm

Miscellaneous magic fires and fire effects:

at the Quidditch World Cup, a magical fire shot violet sparks twenty feet
into the air (GF7).

Other references:

Floo Powder

Fire Talking

Wand Effects

Fire-Making Spell

Source: The Standard Book of Spells, Grade 1 (Pm)


Incantation: Incendio (in-SEN-dee-oh)
Effect: creates fire
References:
Arthur Weasley used this to start a fire in the Dursleys' fireplace (GF4).
Used by a Death Eater to set fire to Hagrid's cabin (HBP28).
No incantation given in the book:
Hagrid started a roaring fire in the hut-on-the-rock without a wand (PS4) (PS/f depicts this
incorrectly)
Wormtail started a fire under the cauldron in which Voldemort was reborn (GF32).
The spell is given a name on Pottermore.
Etymology: "incendo" L. to set fire to

"fire whip"

Incantation: non-verbal
Effect: creates a powerful whip or lasso of fire
Dumbledore used a nonverbal spell during his duel with Voldemort in the Atrium that created
a fiery rope emanating from the tip of his wand (OP36). A year later, Dumbledore used a
nonverbal spell to create a ring of fire emanating from his wand like a vast lasso. It acted as a
barrier against Inferi (HBP26). A year after that, McGonagall non-verbally caused a torch to
fly out of its bracket, creating a ring of fire that filled the corridor and flew like a lasso at her
target (DH30). Judging from the effects, these instances appear to be the same unnamed fire
spell.

"fire talking"

Incantation: initiated with Floo Powder


Effect: communication between fires
Using Floo Powder in a fire connected to the Floo Network, a person can communicate with
another over distance. The head of the person making contact appears in the midst of the
flames and they can hold a conversation and even interact physically with the person they are
connecting to.
References:
Amos Diggory used this method of contacting Arthur Weasley when the fake Moody reported
being attacked (GF11).
While in hiding, Sirius Black talked to Harry by means of a wizard fireplace (GF19).
Snape used a powder thrown into the fire to contact Lupin and ask to speak to him (PA14).
When the Ministry wanted to spy on all communication in and out of Hogwarts, they
employed the Floo Regulation Board to monitor the Hogwarts fires (OP27, OP28).

Fixing Charm
no words given

Spell that magically fastens one thing to another.

Elveira Elkins wrote to the Daily Prophet Problem Page because she could not make a
simple Fixing Charm 'stick'. The correspondent who dealt with everyday magical
problems diagnosed that the caster was allowing her attention to wander whilst
'charming', and recommended using nails instead (DP).

See also PERMANENT STICKING CHARM.

Flagrante Curse

(flah-GRAN-tay)
no words given

Causes the target object to burn anyone who touches it.

Cast by Gringotts personnel on the contents of the Lestranges' vault (DH26).

c.f. FLAGRATE.

Flagrate

(flah-GRAH-tay)
"flagro" L. blaze, burn

Creates a burning, fiery line in the air which can be "drawn" with the wand into specific
shapes. The shape lingers for some time.

Hermione used this spell to draw fiery X marks on the doors of the circular hall in the
Department of Mysteries (OP34).

May be the same basic magic as wand writing and wand sparks.

Flame-Freezing Charm
no words given

Changes the properties of fire so that its heat feels like a warm breeze.

Spell used by witches and the wizards in medieval times who were burned at the
stake. They would then scream and pretend to be burning up (PA1)

flashing paint charm


no incantation given

This "tricky little charm" makes the paint on a banner flash different colors.

Hermione used this charm on the banner that the Gryffindors had painted on one of
the sheets Scabbers had ruined. It said Potter for President, and Dean, who was good
at drawing, had drawn a Gryffindor lion under the words (PS11).

It is probably this charm which Hermione used to make the various squares on their
revision schedules flash different colors as they prepared for O.W.L.s (OP29).

See COLOR CHANGE, POSTERS.

flying magic
no incantation given

While "[n]o spell yet devised enables wizards to fly unaided in human form" (QA1), various
spells create flying effects.

Wingardium Leviosa levitates objects (PS10).

Dobby used a Hover Charm to float a pudding above Aunt Petunia's kitchen (CS2).

Spells cast on broomsticks and carpets allow them to fly

Voldemort learned to fly without a broom, much to the surprise of the


Order of the Phoenix, who discovered this ability during the Battle of the
Seven Potters (DH4, 5). The only other person known to fly without a
broom is Snape, who learned the magic from Voldemort (DH30).

The films show Quirrell (PS/f) and Death Eaters (OP/f, HBP/f, etc.) flying through the air.
This effect, while effective visually, is definitely not canon.

"fountain of wine"
no incantation given

A spell which produces a fountain of wine from the end of the caster's wand.

Mr. Olivander performed this spell with Harry's wand to test it at the Weighing of the
Wands (GF18).

Similar to the spell used by Mrs. Weasley to create a creamy sauce from her wand
when cooking (GF5).

See CONJURING SPELLS, particularly AGUAMENTI

Four-Point Spell

See POINT ME.

Freezing Charm

According to Slughorn, one simple Freezing Charm will disable a Muggle burglar
alarm (HBP4).

See FLAME FREEZING CHARM, PESKIPIKSI PESTERNOMI.

Full Body-Bind

See PETRIFICUS TOTALUS.

fur spell
no incantation given

A spell that causes a person to grow fur.

Fred and George, in an effort to cheer up Ginny, cast this spell on themselves so they
would be covered with fur. All it did was irritate Percy (CS11).

Furnunculus

(fur-NUN-kyoo-lus)
Curse that causes boils to break out all over the victim.

Harry cast this spell on Draco, but it was deflected and hit Goyle in the face (GF18,
GF37)

Fred and George tried to cheer up Ginny by covering themselves with fur or boils and
then jumping out at her (CS11).

Obliviator Arnold Peasegood suffered a minor attack of boils while helping to break
up a goblin riot in Chipping Clodbury (DP).

c.f. BOIL-CURE POTION, BULBADOX POWDER HIVES HEX, WARTCAP


POWDER.

related to "furnus" L. oven?


related to "furunculus" L. which means "petty thief" and is the basis of the English word "furuncle," which is a
fancy name for "boil" (as in a skin lesion, not the verb for the point at which a liquid becomes a gas). Obviously,

at some point, wizards decided it was easier to say the spell when they threw in the extra "n" after the letters f-ur. Submitted by Claire T. Nollet

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feather-light - Ferula - Fidelius Charm - Fiendfyre - finger-removing jinx - Finite - Finite


Incantatem - fire magic - fire talking - Fixing Charm - Flagrante Curse - Flagrate - FlameFreezing Charm - flashing paint charm - flying magic - fountain of wine - Four-Point Spell Freezing Charm - Full Body-Bind - fur spell - Furnunculus
"feather-light"

Incantation: unknown
Effect: Spell that makes the target object weigh practically nothing.
References:

After running away from the Dursleys, Harry considered the idea of casting
a spell to make his trunk "feather-light" so he could carry it all the way to
London on his broomstick (PA3).

The spell Harry was considering for this was not named.

Ferula

Incantation: Ferula (feh-ROO-lah)


Effect: Spell that conjures a wooden rod
References:

Lupin used this spell to conjure a splint and bandages for Ron's broken leg
(PA19).

Etymology: "ferule" alt. spelling of "ferrule" Eng. wooden handle for strength or protection, from "ferula" L.
fennel plant

Fidelius Charm

Incantation: uncertain, possibly Fidelius (fih-DAY-lee-us)


Effect: "An immensely complex spell involving the magical concealment of a secret inside a
single, living soul. The information is hidden inside the chosen person, or Secret-Keeper, and
is henceforth impossible to find -- unless, of course, the Secret-Keeper chooses to divulge it"
(PA10).
References:

Used to try to protect Lily and James Potter from Voldemort. "As long as the SecretKeeper refused to speak, You-Know-Who could search the village where Lily and
James were staying for years and never find them, not even if he had his nose pressed
against their sitting room window!" (PA10) Unfortunately, Peter Pettigrew was chosen
as Secret-Keeper, and he betrayed the secret.

Dumbledore used the Fidelius Charm to hide number twelve Grimmauld Place, the
headquarters of the Order of the Phoenix. He himself was the Secret-Keeper for the
Order (OP6). Note that he once mentioned it in front of the Dursleys (HBP3).

Snape could refer (at least indirectly) to the fact that a Fidelius Charm applied to the
headquarters of the Order of the Phoenix, but since he was not the Secret Keeper he
could not mention the name of the place (HBP2).

"When a Secret-Keeper dies, their secret dies with them, or to put it another way, the
status of their secret will remain as it was at the moment of their death. Everybody in
whom they confided will continue to know the hidden information, but nobody else...
"In other words, a secret (e.g., the location of a family in hiding, like the Potters) is
enchanted so that it is protected by a single Keeper (in our example, Peter Pettigrew,
a.k.a. Wormtail). Thenceforth nobody else - not even the subjects of the secret
themselves - can divulge the secret. Even if one of the Potters had been captured,
force-fed Veritaserum or placed under the Imperius Curse, they would not have been
able to give away the whereabouts of the other two. The only people who ever knew
their precise location were those whom Wormtail had told directly, but none of them
would have been able to pass on the information (JKR)."

After the death of a Secret Keeper, each of the people to whom he or she had confided
the secret will become a Secret Keeper. The power of the Fidelius Charm will be
diluted more and more as more and more people are Secret Keepers (DH6).

Mention of a Secret Keeper (DH9).

Etymology: "fidelis" L. trusty, faithful

Fiendfyre

Incantation: unknown
Effect: Creates a cursed fire, made up of flames of abnormal size and heat that can crumble
fairly substantial objects to soot at a mere touch. Left burning long enough, the fire will take
the shapes of gigantic fiery beasts (including serpents, chimaeras, dragons, and birds of prey)
which will pursue any target humans.
References:

One of the substances that can destroy Horcruxes, but Hermione considered it far too
dangerous to ever use (DH31).

Crabbe cast this in the Room of Requirement while it was in its Room of
Hidden Things mode (DH31). He died in the ensuing magical inferno.

Etymology: "fiend" + "fyre", from Old English "fyr", fire

"finger-removing jinx"

Incantation: unknown
Effect: Removes the target person's fingers.
References:

Goodwin Kneen's wife, Gunhilda, hit him with this jinx after he came home a bit late
from celebrating Ilkley's win in Quidditch (QA3).

Finite

(fi-NEE-tay)
"finio" L. settle, end, die, cease

Stops a currently operating spell effect.

Lupin used this spell to take a Tarantallegra Hex off Neville Longbottom (OP36).

Harry used this spell to cancel the effects of Descendo (cast by Crabbe) on
a large pile of objects (DH31).

This spell might be a shorthand way of casting the General Counter-Spell (Finite
Incantatem).

Finite Incantatem

(fi-NEE-tay in-can-TAH-tum)
"finio" L. settle, end, die + "incantationem" L. the art of enchanting

Stops currently operating spell effects.

Snape used this spell to end the various unfortunate spells that were affecting
members of the Duelling Club when things got a little out of hand (CS11).

Contrary to what is shown in CS/f, this spell does not blow up rogue Bludgers. The
magic required to tamper with a Bludger is extremely high level and can't be
counteracted a simple spell, especially not one cast by a 13-year-old (CS/f)

fire magic

References:

"bluebell flames"

candle magic

Fiendfyre

Fire-Making Spell

"fire whip"

Flagrate

Flagrante Curse

Green Sparks

Incendio

Red Sparks

Anti-fire magic:

Aguamenti

extinguishing spells

Flame-Freezing Charm

Miscellaneous magic fires and fire effects:

at the Quidditch World Cup, a magical fire shot violet sparks twenty feet
into the air (GF7).

Other references:

Floo Powder

Fire Talking

Wand Effects

Fire-Making Spell

Source: The Standard Book of Spells, Grade 1 (Pm)


Incantation: Incendio (in-SEN-dee-oh)
Effect: creates fire
References:
Arthur Weasley used this to start a fire in the Dursleys' fireplace (GF4).
Used by a Death Eater to set fire to Hagrid's cabin (HBP28).
No incantation given in the book:
Hagrid started a roaring fire in the hut-on-the-rock without a wand (PS4) (PS/f depicts this
incorrectly)
Wormtail started a fire under the cauldron in which Voldemort was reborn (GF32).
The spell is given a name on Pottermore.
Etymology: "incendo" L. to set fire to

"fire whip"

Incantation: non-verbal
Effect: creates a powerful whip or lasso of fire
Dumbledore used a nonverbal spell during his duel with Voldemort in the Atrium that created
a fiery rope emanating from the tip of his wand (OP36). A year later, Dumbledore used a
nonverbal spell to create a ring of fire emanating from his wand like a vast lasso. It acted as a
barrier against Inferi (HBP26). A year after that, McGonagall non-verbally caused a torch to
fly out of its bracket, creating a ring of fire that filled the corridor and flew like a lasso at her
target (DH30). Judging from the effects, these instances appear to be the same unnamed fire
spell.

"fire talking"

Incantation: initiated with Floo Powder


Effect: communication between fires
Using Floo Powder in a fire connected to the Floo Network, a person can communicate with
another over distance. The head of the person making contact appears in the midst of the

flames and they can hold a conversation and even interact physically with the person they are
connecting to.
References:
Amos Diggory used this method of contacting Arthur Weasley when the fake Moody reported
being attacked (GF11).
While in hiding, Sirius Black talked to Harry by means of a wizard fireplace (GF19).
Snape used a powder thrown into the fire to contact Lupin and ask to speak to him (PA14).
When the Ministry wanted to spy on all communication in and out of Hogwarts, they
employed the Floo Regulation Board to monitor the Hogwarts fires (OP27, OP28).

Fixing Charm
no words given

Spell that magically fastens one thing to another.

Elveira Elkins wrote to the Daily Prophet Problem Page because she could not make a
simple Fixing Charm 'stick'. The correspondent who dealt with everyday magical
problems diagnosed that the caster was allowing her attention to wander whilst
'charming', and recommended using nails instead (DP).

See also PERMANENT STICKING CHARM.

Flagrante Curse

(flah-GRAN-tay)
no words given

Causes the target object to burn anyone who touches it.

Cast by Gringotts personnel on the contents of the Lestranges' vault (DH26).

c.f. FLAGRATE.

Flagrate

(flah-GRAH-tay)

"flagro" L. blaze, burn

Creates a burning, fiery line in the air which can be "drawn" with the wand into specific
shapes. The shape lingers for some time.

Hermione used this spell to draw fiery X marks on the doors of the circular hall in the
Department of Mysteries (OP34).

May be the same basic magic as wand writing and wand sparks.

Flame-Freezing Charm
no words given

Changes the properties of fire so that its heat feels like a warm breeze.

Spell used by witches and the wizards in medieval times who were burned at the
stake. They would then scream and pretend to be burning up (PA1)

flashing paint charm


no incantation given

This "tricky little charm" makes the paint on a banner flash different colors.

Hermione used this charm on the banner that the Gryffindors had painted on one of
the sheets Scabbers had ruined. It said Potter for President, and Dean, who was good
at drawing, had drawn a Gryffindor lion under the words (PS11).

It is probably this charm which Hermione used to make the various squares on their
revision schedules flash different colors as they prepared for O.W.L.s (OP29).

See COLOR CHANGE, POSTERS.

flying magic
no incantation given

While "[n]o spell yet devised enables wizards to fly unaided in human form" (QA1), various
spells create flying effects.

Wingardium Leviosa levitates objects (PS10).

Dobby used a Hover Charm to float a pudding above Aunt Petunia's kitchen (CS2).

Spells cast on broomsticks and carpets allow them to fly

Voldemort learned to fly without a broom, much to the surprise of the


Order of the Phoenix, who discovered this ability during the Battle of the
Seven Potters (DH4, 5). The only other person known to fly without a
broom is Snape, who learned the magic from Voldemort (DH30).

The films show Quirrell (PS/f) and Death Eaters (OP/f, HBP/f, etc.) flying through the air.
This effect, while effective visually, is definitely not canon.

"fountain of wine"
no incantation given

A spell which produces a fountain of wine from the end of the caster's wand.

Mr. Olivander performed this spell with Harry's wand to test it at the Weighing of the
Wands (GF18).

Similar to the spell used by Mrs. Weasley to create a creamy sauce from her wand
when cooking (GF5).

See CONJURING SPELLS, particularly AGUAMENTI

Four-Point Spell

See POINT ME.

Freezing Charm

According to Slughorn, one simple Freezing Charm will disable a Muggle burglar
alarm (HBP4).

See FLAME FREEZING CHARM, PESKIPIKSI PESTERNOMI.

Full Body-Bind

See PETRIFICUS TOTALUS.

fur spell
no incantation given

A spell that causes a person to grow fur.

Fred and George, in an effort to cheer up Ginny, cast this spell on themselves so they
would be covered with fur. All it did was irritate Percy (CS11).

Furnunculus

(fur-NUN-kyoo-lus)
Curse that causes boils to break out all over the victim.

Harry cast this spell on Draco, but it was deflected and hit Goyle in the face (GF18,
GF37)

Fred and George tried to cheer up Ginny by covering themselves with fur or boils and
then jumping out at her (CS11).

Obliviator Arnold Peasegood suffered a minor attack of boils while helping to break
up a goblin riot in Chipping Clodbury (DP).

c.f. BOIL-CURE POTION, BULBADOX POWDER HIVES HEX, WARTCAP


POWDER.

related to "furnus" L. oven?


related to "furunculus" L. which means "petty thief" and is the basis of the English word "furuncle," which is a
fancy name for "boil" (as in a skin lesion, not the verb for the point at which a liquid becomes a gas). Obviously,
at some point, wizards decided it was easier to say the spell when they threw in the extra "n" after the letters f-ur. Submitted by Claire T. Nollet

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Geminio - Gemino Curse - Glisseo - gouging spell - Gripping Charm - grooming charms Growth Charm - Gubraithian fire
Geminio (jeh-MIN-ee-oh)
from "geminare" L. to double

Duplicates the target object.

Hermione uses this to duplicate (in appearance, anyway) the locket Horcrux so that
Umbridge won't realize that it is missing (DH13).

Gemino Curse
no incantation given, but see GEMINIO

When touched, the target object will multiply, but the copies are worthless.

Gringotts placed Gemino Curses on the objects in the Lestranges' high security vault,
creating a lot of apparently identical copies from which the genuine objects could not
be distinguished. According to Griphook, a would-be thief who continued to handle
treasure under such a curse would eventually be crushed by the weight of expanding
gold (DH26).

Glisseo (glis-EH-oh)
from "glisser" Fr. slip, slide

Converts the target object into a smooth slide.

When Hermione cast this, the stairs on which she, Harry, and Ron were standing
flattened into a chute down which they slid very fast (DH32)

c.f. GRYFFINDOR TOWER.

gouging spell
See DEFODIO.

Gripping Charm
no incantation given

Spell that allows the enchanted object to be held more easily.

Gripping Charms, invented in 1875, are cast on a Quaffle to make it possible for a
Chaser to hold onto it one-handed (since a Chaser needs at least one hand free to
control his or her broomstick) (QA6).

grooming charms
no incantation given

Minor spells for personal grooming.

Molly Weasley thought that Bill's hair was too long and wanted to give it a trim. She
fingered her wand as she suggested this, indicating that she would use her wand to do
the trimming (GF5). (On the other hand, Molly may have had Diffindo in mind for

this or some other general use spell, so there may not be a specific hair-trimming
spell.)
Oddly enough it was Charlie, not Bill, whom Molly made a point of giving a haircut a
day or so before Bill's wedding. Ron said later that he expected Charlie to sneak out
and use a spell to regrow his hair (DH7).

Eloise Midgen tried to curse her pimples off, but that is not the recommended
procedure and it did not work as well as she might have hoped (GF13).

During breakfast on the day of her first Divination class with Firenze, Parvati curled
her eyelashes around her wand because she wanted to make a good impression on the
centaur (OP27). This may not have been a spell, however, any more than the use of
Muggle hair curlers would have been.

Growth Charm
no incantation given

Spell to make things grow in size.

Harry accidentally mixed up the incantations for Colour Change and Growth Charms
during his practical Charms O.W.L. (OP31).

c.f. ENGORGIO.

Gubraithian fire
no incantation given

Spell to make the target object burn forever.

Mentioned in Charms (OP20).

Dumbledore sent the Gurg a branch enchanted like this (OP20).

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Hair-thickening Charm - Hex-Deflection - hexes - Homenum revelio - Homorphus Charm horn tongue - Horton-Keitch Braking Charm - hot air charm - Hover Charm - Hurling Hex
Hair-thickening Charm

no incantation given

A spell which lengthens and thickens a person's hair.

Miles Bletchley cast a jinx on Alicia Spinnet that made her eyebrows grow to cover
her eyes. Snape refused to accept that a member of the Slytherin team would do such
a thing, suggesting instead that Alicia had cast a Hair-thickening Charm (evidently the
spell used) on herself, presumably to make her hair look better (OP19).

Hex-Deflection
A form of magic or class of spells that defend the caster against hexes.

The fake Moody included Hex-Deflection in his fourth-year Defence Against the
Dark Arts classes (GF28).

hexes
The following spells are known as hexes.

Bat-Bogey Hex

Bedazzling Hex

canary transfiguration hex

Hurling Hex

knee-reversing hex

Stinging Hex

Twitchy Ears Hex

toenail-growing hex

Homenum revelio (HOM-eh-num reh-VEL-ee-oh)


"homoinis" L. human being + "revelo" L. to unveil, uncover

Reveals human presence in the target area.

Cast by Hermione just after she, Ron, and Harry entered number twelve, Grimmauld
Place (DH9).

Homorphus Charm
"homo" Gr. the same + "morph": Eng. change shape [force a werewolf not to change]
or
"homo" L. man + "morph": Eng. change shape [force werewolf into human shape]

A good charm to use against a werewolf. Its exact effects aren't given.

Lockhart supposedly used this charm to defeat the Wagga Wagga werewolf and
demonstrated the feat in Defence Against the Dark Arts (CS10).

horn tongue
no incantation given

Transfigures the target's tongue to a bony substance resembling horn, presumably.

Harry, looking for spells to help him combat a dragon, wisely decided not to use this
one as it would just give the dragon one more weapon (GF20).

Horton-Keitch Braking Charm


no incantation given

Makes a racing broom easier to handle.

Invented and patented by Basil Horton and Randolph Keitch, the founders of the
Comet Trading Company (QA9).

hot air charm


no incantation given, but involves a complicated wand motion

Fires off a jet of hot air from the end of the caster's wand.

Hermione used this charm to melt snow and dry off her snow-covered robes (OP21).

Dumbledore used something similar on Harry's wet robes, but the spell he cast
instantaneously made the robes warm and dry and didn't involve any wasted wand
motion (HBP26).

Hover Charm
no incantation given

Makes an object float in the air.

Dobby used this spell (without wand or incantation) to float Aunt Petunia's violet
pudding in the air (CS2).

Hermione had to use one on Harry to get him into his bunk while he was unconscious
after their visit to Godric's Hollow (DH17).

See also LEVITATION CHARM.

Hurling Hex
no spell words given

A nasty kind of hex that can be placed on a broom. The effect is presumably to make the
target broom attempt to hurl its rider off.

When Harry's Firebolt was stripped down to be checked for jinxes and curses,
Flitwick checked whether it had a Hurling Hex on it. It didn't (PA12).

This may have been the spell Quirrell cast on Harry's Nimbus 2000 to try to throw
him off (PS11).

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Impediment Curse / Jinx - Impedimenta - Imperio - Imperius Curse - Imperturbable Charm Impervius - Inanimatus Conjurus - Incarcerous - Incendio - insect jinx - instant scalping Invisibility Charm
Impediment Curse / Jinx
See IMPEDIMENTA.

C Line

Impedimenta (im-ped-ih-MEN-tah)
"Impediment Curse," "Impediment Jinx"
"impedimentum" L. hindrance

Stops an object or slows it down.

Harry learned this spell to use in the third task. Ron also learned it, using it to stop a
bee in midair. Harry used it to good effect on the Acromantula and on the huge BlastEnded Skrewt (GF29, (GF31).

Madam Hooch used this to knock Harry away from Draco as they were fighting after
a Quidditch match (OP19).

Harry taught the D.A. to use this (OP21).

Harry saw his father use this on Snape in the Pensieve (OP28)

The Impediment Jinx was used by Death Eaters and by Harry during the Battle of the
Department of Mysteries (OP35)

Harry used this on Inferi in the cave (HBP26)

Harry used this on Amycus Carrow while the latter was duelling Ginny during the
Battle of the Tower. Later Harry cast it on either Amycus or on Alecto Carrow when
they tried to catch him from behind, and still later he attempted to cast it on Snape
(HBP28).

Cast by Harry on a Death Eater just after the sidecar he was riding in broke off the
flying motorbike (DH4).

Imperio (im-PAIR-ee-oh)
"Imperius Curse"
"impero" L. order, govern, command

One of the Unforgivable Curses, this spell causes the victim to be completely under the
command of the caster, who can make the victim do anything the caster wishes. A victim of
this spell is said to have been Imperiused.

Lecture with demonstration in Defence Against the Dark Arts (GF14)

Cast on Krum by the fake Moody (GF31, GF35).

Cast on Crouch junior by Crouch senior (GF35).

Cast on Crouch senior by Voldemort (GF35).

Cast by Voldemort on Harry (GF34)

c.f. Voldemort: First Rise of the Dark Lord

Harry raised the possibility - which Arthur Weasley then refuted - that Fudge may
have been acting under the Imperius Curse (OP9).

Herbert Chorley, a Junior Minister in the government of Muggle Britain, began


impersonating a duck as a result of a reaction to a poorly performed Imperius Curse
(HBP1).

Cast by Draco Malfoy on Madam Rosmerta, and by her on Katie Bell (HBP12,
HBP27).

Cast by Yaxley on Pius Thicknesse (DH1).

Referred to by the verb Imperiused (DH5).

Cast by Harry on various goblins and on Travers during the retrieval of the cup
Horcrux (DH26).

Harry believes that Stan Shunpike must have been Imperiused (DH5).

Imperius Curse
See IMPERIO.

Imperturbable Charm (IM-per-TUR-ba-bul)


"imperturbatus" L. undisturbed, calm (thanks to Manuel Weiss for help with this)

Creates a magical barrier on a target object, such as a door, to prevent eavesdropping. The
target object is said to have been Imperturbed.

The door to the kitchen in number twelve, Grimmauld Place had an Imperturbable
Charm placed on it. This prevented the kids from using Extendable Ears to eavesdrop
on the meetings there. Anything thrown toward a door which has been Imperturbed
will bounce off without touching it. Ginny tested the door by lobbing Dungbombs at it
(OP4).

Impervius (im-PER-vee-us)
"im-" prefix from L. not + "pervius" L. letting things through

Makes something waterproof or water repellent.

Hermione used this spell to make Harry's glasses repel water during a rainy Quidditch
match (PA9).

The entire Gryffindor team used it on their faces to try to practice in a driving rain,
but they still gave up after an hour (OP18).

Recommended by Hermione to Ron as a way of protecting Yaxley's belongings from


the rain in his office until it can be stopped (DH12).

Hermione used this in an attempt to protect herself, Ron, Bogrod, and Griphook from
the burning, multiplying treasure in the vault (DH26).

Inanimatus Conjurus (in-an-i-MAH-tus con-JUR-us)


"inanimus-" L. not living + "coniurus" L. conjure

Although not identified, the name suggests that this involves the conjuring inanimate objects.

The fifth years were assigned homework about this by McGonagall at the very
beginning of the school year (OP14). Since according to McGonagall Conjuring spells
are usually not attempted until N.E.W.T. level, perhaps this assignment was
preparatory theory work.

See CONJURING SPELLS.

Incarcerous (in-CAR-sir-us)
"incarceratus" L., past participle of "incarcerare", from in- + carcer prison

Sends thick ropes out of thin air to wrap around someone or something.

Umbridge used this spell on Magorian the centaur, which prompted the rest of the
centaurs to attack (OP33).

Harry used this spell on Inferi in the cave (HBP26).

Harry tried and failed to cast this on Snape during Snape's departure from Hogwarts
(HBP28).

This could be the incantation for other binding spells.

See also CONJURING SPELLS.

Incendio (in-SEN-dee-o)
"incendo" L. to set fire to

Starts a fire.

Arthur Weasley used this to start a fire in the Dursleys' fireplace (GF4).

Used by a Death Eater to set fire to Hagrid's cabin (HBP28).

insect jinx
no incantation given

Sprouts feelers on the victim's head, removes the victim's powers of speech, and forces the
victim to scuttle along the ground.

Harry was tempted to jinx Dudley like this when Dudley was taunting him about his
nightmares (OP1).

instant scalping
no incantation given

As the name suggests, this hex removes hair.

This spell appears in Basic Hexes for the Busy and Vexed, which Harry consulted to
find a spell to work against dragons (GF20)

Invisibility Charm
no incantation given

Spell to make a person or thing invisible.

Cast on the new Quidditch stadium in Exmoor (DP).

See HEADLESS HAT, INVISIBILITY BOOSTER, INVISIBILITY CLOAK,


VANISHING MAGIC.

The Invisible Book of Invisibility

Invisibility Section (of the library)

Encyclopedia of Spells
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Impediment Curse / Jinx - Impedimenta - Imperio - Imperius Curse - Imperturbable Charm Impervius - Inanimatus Conjurus - Incarcerous - Incendio - insect jinx - instant scalping Invisibility Charm
Impediment Curse / Jinx
See IMPEDIMENTA.

C Line

Impedimenta (im-ped-ih-MEN-tah)
"Impediment Curse," "Impediment Jinx"
"impedimentum" L. hindrance

Stops an object or slows it down.

Harry learned this spell to use in the third task. Ron also learned it, using it to stop a
bee in midair. Harry used it to good effect on the Acromantula and on the huge BlastEnded Skrewt (GF29, (GF31).

Madam Hooch used this to knock Harry away from Draco as they were fighting after
a Quidditch match (OP19).

Harry taught the D.A. to use this (OP21).

Harry saw his father use this on Snape in the Pensieve (OP28)

The Impediment Jinx was used by Death Eaters and by Harry during the Battle of the
Department of Mysteries (OP35)

Harry used this on Inferi in the cave (HBP26)

Harry used this on Amycus Carrow while the latter was duelling Ginny during the
Battle of the Tower. Later Harry cast it on either Amycus or on Alecto Carrow when
they tried to catch him from behind, and still later he attempted to cast it on Snape
(HBP28).

Cast by Harry on a Death Eater just after the sidecar he was riding in broke off the
flying motorbike (DH4).

Imperio (im-PAIR-ee-oh)
"Imperius Curse"
"impero" L. order, govern, command

One of the Unforgivable Curses, this spell causes the victim to be completely under the
command of the caster, who can make the victim do anything the caster wishes. A victim of
this spell is said to have been Imperiused.

Lecture with demonstration in Defence Against the Dark Arts (GF14)

Cast on Krum by the fake Moody (GF31, GF35).

Cast on Crouch junior by Crouch senior (GF35).

Cast on Crouch senior by Voldemort (GF35).

Cast by Voldemort on Harry (GF34)

c.f. Voldemort: First Rise of the Dark Lord

Harry raised the possibility - which Arthur Weasley then refuted - that Fudge may
have been acting under the Imperius Curse (OP9).

Herbert Chorley, a Junior Minister in the government of Muggle Britain, began


impersonating a duck as a result of a reaction to a poorly performed Imperius Curse
(HBP1).

Cast by Draco Malfoy on Madam Rosmerta, and by her on Katie Bell (HBP12,
HBP27).

Cast by Yaxley on Pius Thicknesse (DH1).

Referred to by the verb Imperiused (DH5).

Cast by Harry on various goblins and on Travers during the retrieval of the cup
Horcrux (DH26).

Harry believes that Stan Shunpike must have been Imperiused (DH5).

Imperius Curse
See IMPERIO.

Imperturbable Charm (IM-per-TUR-ba-bul)


"imperturbatus" L. undisturbed, calm (thanks to Manuel Weiss for help with this)

Creates a magical barrier on a target object, such as a door, to prevent eavesdropping. The
target object is said to have been Imperturbed.

The door to the kitchen in number twelve, Grimmauld Place had an Imperturbable
Charm placed on it. This prevented the kids from using Extendable Ears to eavesdrop
on the meetings there. Anything thrown toward a door which has been Imperturbed
will bounce off without touching it. Ginny tested the door by lobbing Dungbombs at it
(OP4).

Impervius (im-PER-vee-us)
"im-" prefix from L. not + "pervius" L. letting things through

Makes something waterproof or water repellent.

Hermione used this spell to make Harry's glasses repel water during a rainy Quidditch
match (PA9).

The entire Gryffindor team used it on their faces to try to practice in a driving rain,
but they still gave up after an hour (OP18).

Recommended by Hermione to Ron as a way of protecting Yaxley's belongings from


the rain in his office until it can be stopped (DH12).

Hermione used this in an attempt to protect herself, Ron, Bogrod, and Griphook from
the burning, multiplying treasure in the vault (DH26).

Inanimatus Conjurus (in-an-i-MAH-tus con-JUR-us)


"inanimus-" L. not living + "coniurus" L. conjure

Although not identified, the name suggests that this involves the conjuring inanimate objects.

The fifth years were assigned homework about this by McGonagall at the very
beginning of the school year (OP14). Since according to McGonagall Conjuring spells
are usually not attempted until N.E.W.T. level, perhaps this assignment was
preparatory theory work.

See CONJURING SPELLS.

Incarcerous (in-CAR-sir-us)
"incarceratus" L., past participle of "incarcerare", from in- + carcer prison

Sends thick ropes out of thin air to wrap around someone or something.

Umbridge used this spell on Magorian the centaur, which prompted the rest of the
centaurs to attack (OP33).

Harry used this spell on Inferi in the cave (HBP26).

Harry tried and failed to cast this on Snape during Snape's departure from Hogwarts
(HBP28).

This could be the incantation for other binding spells.

See also CONJURING SPELLS.

Incendio (in-SEN-dee-o)
"incendo" L. to set fire to

Starts a fire.

Arthur Weasley used this to start a fire in the Dursleys' fireplace (GF4).

Used by a Death Eater to set fire to Hagrid's cabin (HBP28).

insect jinx
no incantation given

Sprouts feelers on the victim's head, removes the victim's powers of speech, and forces the
victim to scuttle along the ground.

Harry was tempted to jinx Dudley like this when Dudley was taunting him about his
nightmares (OP1).

instant scalping
no incantation given

As the name suggests, this hex removes hair.

This spell appears in Basic Hexes for the Busy and Vexed, which Harry consulted to
find a spell to work against dragons (GF20)

Invisibility Charm
no incantation given

Spell to make a person or thing invisible.

Cast on the new Quidditch stadium in Exmoor (DP).

See HEADLESS HAT, INVISIBILITY BOOSTER, INVISIBILITY CLOAK,


VANISHING MAGIC.

The Invisible Book of Invisibility

Invisibility Section (of the library)

Encyclopedia of Spells
<<Previous Letter | Back to Spells Index | Next Letter >>

Impediment Curse / Jinx - Impedimenta - Imperio - Imperius Curse - Imperturbable Charm Impervius - Inanimatus Conjurus - Incarcerous - Incendio - insect jinx - instant scalping Invisibility Charm
Impediment Curse / Jinx
See IMPEDIMENTA.

C Line

Impedimenta (im-ped-ih-MEN-tah)
"Impediment Curse," "Impediment Jinx"
"impedimentum" L. hindrance

Stops an object or slows it down.

Harry learned this spell to use in the third task. Ron also learned it, using it to stop a
bee in midair. Harry used it to good effect on the Acromantula and on the huge BlastEnded Skrewt (GF29, (GF31).

Madam Hooch used this to knock Harry away from Draco as they were fighting after
a Quidditch match (OP19).

Harry taught the D.A. to use this (OP21).

Harry saw his father use this on Snape in the Pensieve (OP28)

The Impediment Jinx was used by Death Eaters and by Harry during the Battle of the
Department of Mysteries (OP35)

Harry used this on Inferi in the cave (HBP26)

Harry used this on Amycus Carrow while the latter was duelling Ginny during the
Battle of the Tower. Later Harry cast it on either Amycus or on Alecto Carrow when
they tried to catch him from behind, and still later he attempted to cast it on Snape
(HBP28).

Cast by Harry on a Death Eater just after the sidecar he was riding in broke off the
flying motorbike (DH4).

Imperio (im-PAIR-ee-oh)
"Imperius Curse"
"impero" L. order, govern, command

One of the Unforgivable Curses, this spell causes the victim to be completely under the
command of the caster, who can make the victim do anything the caster wishes. A victim of
this spell is said to have been Imperiused.

Lecture with demonstration in Defence Against the Dark Arts (GF14)

Cast on Krum by the fake Moody (GF31, GF35).

Cast on Crouch junior by Crouch senior (GF35).

Cast on Crouch senior by Voldemort (GF35).

Cast by Voldemort on Harry (GF34)

c.f. Voldemort: First Rise of the Dark Lord

Harry raised the possibility - which Arthur Weasley then refuted - that Fudge may
have been acting under the Imperius Curse (OP9).

Herbert Chorley, a Junior Minister in the government of Muggle Britain, began


impersonating a duck as a result of a reaction to a poorly performed Imperius Curse
(HBP1).

Cast by Draco Malfoy on Madam Rosmerta, and by her on Katie Bell (HBP12,
HBP27).

Cast by Yaxley on Pius Thicknesse (DH1).

Referred to by the verb Imperiused (DH5).

Cast by Harry on various goblins and on Travers during the retrieval of the cup
Horcrux (DH26).

Harry believes that Stan Shunpike must have been Imperiused (DH5).

Imperius Curse
See IMPERIO.

Imperturbable Charm (IM-per-TUR-ba-bul)


"imperturbatus" L. undisturbed, calm (thanks to Manuel Weiss for help with this)

Creates a magical barrier on a target object, such as a door, to prevent eavesdropping. The
target object is said to have been Imperturbed.

The door to the kitchen in number twelve, Grimmauld Place had an Imperturbable
Charm placed on it. This prevented the kids from using Extendable Ears to eavesdrop
on the meetings there. Anything thrown toward a door which has been Imperturbed
will bounce off without touching it. Ginny tested the door by lobbing Dungbombs at it
(OP4).

Impervius (im-PER-vee-us)
"im-" prefix from L. not + "pervius" L. letting things through

Makes something waterproof or water repellent.

Hermione used this spell to make Harry's glasses repel water during a rainy Quidditch
match (PA9).

The entire Gryffindor team used it on their faces to try to practice in a driving rain,
but they still gave up after an hour (OP18).

Recommended by Hermione to Ron as a way of protecting Yaxley's belongings from


the rain in his office until it can be stopped (DH12).

Hermione used this in an attempt to protect herself, Ron, Bogrod, and Griphook from
the burning, multiplying treasure in the vault (DH26).

Inanimatus Conjurus (in-an-i-MAH-tus con-JUR-us)


"inanimus-" L. not living + "coniurus" L. conjure

Although not identified, the name suggests that this involves the conjuring inanimate objects.

The fifth years were assigned homework about this by McGonagall at the very
beginning of the school year (OP14). Since according to McGonagall Conjuring spells
are usually not attempted until N.E.W.T. level, perhaps this assignment was
preparatory theory work.

See CONJURING SPELLS.

Incarcerous (in-CAR-sir-us)
"incarceratus" L., past participle of "incarcerare", from in- + carcer prison

Sends thick ropes out of thin air to wrap around someone or something.

Umbridge used this spell on Magorian the centaur, which prompted the rest of the
centaurs to attack (OP33).

Harry used this spell on Inferi in the cave (HBP26).

Harry tried and failed to cast this on Snape during Snape's departure from Hogwarts
(HBP28).

This could be the incantation for other binding spells.

See also CONJURING SPELLS.

Incendio (in-SEN-dee-o)
"incendo" L. to set fire to

Starts a fire.

Arthur Weasley used this to start a fire in the Dursleys' fireplace (GF4).

Used by a Death Eater to set fire to Hagrid's cabin (HBP28).

insect jinx
no incantation given

Sprouts feelers on the victim's head, removes the victim's powers of speech, and forces the
victim to scuttle along the ground.

Harry was tempted to jinx Dudley like this when Dudley was taunting him about his
nightmares (OP1).

instant scalping
no incantation given

As the name suggests, this hex removes hair.

This spell appears in Basic Hexes for the Busy and Vexed, which Harry consulted to
find a spell to work against dragons (GF20)

Invisibility Charm
no incantation given

Spell to make a person or thing invisible.

Cast on the new Quidditch stadium in Exmoor (DP).

See HEADLESS HAT, INVISIBILITY BOOSTER, INVISIBILITY CLOAK,


VANISHING MAGIC.

The Invisible Book of Invisibility

Invisibility Section (of the library)

Encyclopedia of Spells
<<Previous Letter | Back to Spells Index | Next Letter >>

Jelly-Brain Jinx - Jelly-Fingers Curse - Jelly-Legs Jinx - jinxes


Jelly-Brain Jinx
no incantation given

Presumably affects the target's mental processes.

During the September 1999 riot that took place during the Puddlemere/ Holyhead
game, a lot of Harpy supporters were using this jinx (DP).

Jelly-Fingers curse
no incantation given

Presumably makes the target's fingers like jelly, so that they cannot grasp anything properly.

After a June 1999 Portree/ Arrows game, the losing Seeker accused his opposite
number of putting this curse on him as they both closed in on the Snitch (DP).

Jelly-Legs Jinx
"Locomotor Wibbly"

Causes the target's legs to wobble uncontrollably.

Hermione used the spell to break Harry's Shield Charm as they were practicing for the
third task (GF31).

Malfoy, Crabbe, and Goyle were hit with this jinx (along with a few other hexes and
curses) on the Hogwarts Express (GF37).

This jinx is found in the book Curses and Counter-Curses (Pm).

jinxes
A jinx is a spell cast to cause damage or other negative effect. A jinx is similar to a curse, but
typically not as powerful or cast with such negative intention. Jinxes are part of defensive
magic, although Umbridge tried to teach that spells should never be used in this way, even in
self-defense or as part of a legitimate attack. She used the textbook Defensive Magical
Theory by Slinkhard:
'He says that counter-jinxes are improperly named,' said Hermione promptly. 'He says
"counter-jinx" is just a name people give their jinxes when they want to make them sound
more acceptable (OP15)'.
A jinx is removed or undone by a counter-jinx. Defenses against jinxes are called "antijinxes." Some jinxes are also referred to as hexes.

Warrington of Slytherin was hit with a jinx that made his skin look as though he were
covered with corn flakes (OP30).

Madam Pince has been known to place jinxes on library books to protect them from
students who might doodle on them, tear out pages, or keep them checked out for too
long (QA).

To repair the exploding toilet caused by Willy Widdershins, Arthur told Harry he
would use a 'simple enough' anti-jinx (OP9).

The handle of Ron's new Cleansweep 11 had an anti-jinx varnish applied to it (OP9).

Jinxes:
o Anti-Disapparation Jinx
o Backfiring Jinx
o finger-removing jinx

o Hair-thickening Charm
o Impediment Jinx
o Jelly-Brain Jinx
o Jelly-Legs Jinx
o Revulsion Jinx
o snitch jinx
o Stretching jinx
o Trip Jinx

Encyclopedia of Spells
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Killing Curse - knee-reversing hex - knitting charm


Killing Curse
See AVADA KEDAVRA.

knee-reversing hex
no incantation given

Causes the target's knee to become backwards.

During the eleventh century, Gertie Keddle wrote in her diary that she hexed a man
who came to retrieve a leather-covered ball from her cabbage patch, and she'd "like to
see him fly with his knees back to front, the great hairy hog" (QA3).

knitting charm
no incantation given

Enchants knitting needles to knit.

Hermione bewitched knitting needles to knit elf hats (OP17).

Encyclopedia of Spells

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Langlock - leek jinx - Legilimens - Leg-Locker Curse - Levicorpus - Levitation Charm Liberacorpus - Library book spells - light spell - lightening spell - Locomotor - Locomotor
Mortis - Lumos
Langlock (LANG-lok)
"lang" Eng. language (which derives from L. lingua tongue, language) + "lock" Eng. to fasten

A jinx that glues the target's tongue to the roof of his or her mouth.

One of the Half-Blood Prince's self-invented spells. Twice used by Harry on Filch, to
general applause; referred to as a jinx (HBP12)

Used by Harry on Peeves; referred by Ron as a hex (HBP19).

leek jinx
no incantation given

Results in leeks growing out of the target's ears.

During the tension-filled week leading up to the Gryffindor- Slytherin Quidditch


match in the spring of 1994 [Y14], a nasty incident in the corridors resulted in a
Gryffindor fourth year and a Slytherin sixth year going to the hospital wing with leeks
sprouting out of their ears.

See CONJURING SPELLS.

Legilimens (le-JIL-i-menz)
"legens" L. reader + "mens" L. mind

See Legilimency.

Leg-Locker Curse
See LOCOMOTOR MORTIS.

Levicorpus (leh-vi-COR-pus)

"levo" L. to lift up, raise + "corpus" L. body

Dangles the target person upside-down by the ankle in mid-air.

A spell developed by the Half-Blood Prince, the incantation for which was written
down in his old Potions textbook without a description of the effects (but fortunately
with the counter-jinx); Harry very rashly cast this on Ron without a clear idea of what
the effects would be (HBP12)

Harry tried and failed to cast this on Snape during Snape's departure from Hogwarts
(HBP28).

Hermione used this to levitate Harry by the ankle so that he could reach the cup
(DH26).

The counter-jinx is Liberacorpus

Levitation Charm
"Wingardium Leviosa"?
"wing" + "arduus" L. high, steep + "levo" L. to raise up, levitate

A basic charm that allows the target to float up to five feet above the ground

Wingardium Leviosa is a levitation spell (PS10)

See HOVER CHARM, CANDLE MAGIC; also LANTERN, FLOATING,


SNOWBALL, BEWITCHED.

Lee Jordan levitated two Nifflers into Umbridge's office. She blamed Hagrid (OP31)

Although Harry did perform the Levitation Charm as part of his practical Charms
O.W.L., it is never stated that this is the same as Wingardium Leviosa. It seems likely,
however (OP31)

Not named, but this or something similar was used on Charity Burbage at Malfoy
Manor (DH1) as well as on the champagne bottles and lanterns at Bill Weasley's
wedding to Fleur Delacour (DH8).

Again not named, a levitation spell was used by James and Sirius to lift a police car
into the path of three onrushing Death Eaters on brooms (Pre).

Liberacorpus (lee-ber-ah-COR-pus)

"liber" L. free + "corpus" L. body

Counter-jinx to Levicorpus (see).

A spell developed by the Half-Blood Prince, the incantation for which was written
down in his old Potions textbook without a description of the effects, alongside the
spell for which it is a counter-jinx. Harry cast it on Ron (HBP12)

Harry used this to counteract Hermione's spell (DH26).

library book spells


no incantation given

Madam Pince puts a variety of spells and curses on the books in the Hogwarts library to make
sure that kids don't damage them. (At least, not twice...)

Dumbledore absent-mindedly doodled in a library book and was surprised to find it


beating him on the head (QA).

The screaming book in the Restricted Section may have been reacting according to
one of the spells on it (PS12)

Madam Pince has been known to add some unusual hexes and jinxes at times, besides
the usual collection of library book spells (QA).

See THIEF'S CURSE.

light spell
no incantation used

Appearing with a soft, crackling sound, this spell creates a handful of shimmering light.

Lupin used this spell while on the Hogwarts Express. It lit the compartment and the
form of the Dementor that was searching the train (PA5).

See also LUMOS, BLUEBELL FLAMES.

lightening spell
no incantation given

Causes an object to become less heavy and thereby easier to carry.

Harry apparently knew such a spell by the summer after his second year, since he
planned to use it on his trunk in order to make it light enough to carry it to London on
his broomstick (PA2).

Locomotor... (lo-co-MO-tor)
"loco" L. from a place + "motionem" L. motion

Moves an object. Typically, the spell word "Locomotor" is followed by a target word, which
is the object to be moved.

Flitwick used Locomotor trunks to move Trelawney's belongings back up the main
staircase, back to her lodgings (OP26)

Tonks used Locomotor Trunk to move Harry's trunk downstairs before flying off to
Grimmauld Place (OP3).

McGonagall used Piertotum Locomotor to animate the statues and suits of armour,
sending them into the battle of Hogwarts (DH30).

Locomotor Mortis (lo-co-MO-tor MOR-tis)


"Leg-Locker Curse"
"loco" L. from a place + "motionem" L. motion + "mortis" L. death

Locks together the legs of the victim, making him or her unable to walk.

Draco cast this spell on Neville just for kicks; Neville then had to hop all the way
back to Gryffindor Tower (PS13)

See also PETRIFICUS TOTALUS

Lumos (LOO-mos)
"lumen" L. light

Causes a small beam of light to shine from the end of the caster's wand.

This spell is used frequently as people skulk about the castle or the Forbidden Forest.

Dumbledore even used one when looking for Mr. Crouch (GF28), and his beam of
light was just as narrow and flashlight-like as Harry's usually is. You'd think
Dumbledore would have been able to summon up something a little brighter.

When Harry lost his wand during the Dementor attack, he desperately said Lumos and
to his surprise, the tip of his wand lit up even though he wasn't holding the wand at
the time. The light from a Lumos spell works even when the Dementors' presence had
cancelled out the light from the streetlamps and even the stars (OP1)

The spell to turn the light off is Nox.

Cast by Harry while searching both number twelve, Grimmauld Place (DH10) and
while searching the Lestranges' vault (DH26).

See also WAND EFFECTS.

Encyclopedia of Spells
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Memory Charm - Memory Modifying Charm - messenger spell - Meteolojinx Recanto Mobiliarbus - Mobilicorpus - Mors Mordre - Muffliato - Muggle-Repelling Charm
Memory Charm
See OBLIVIATE.

Memory Modifying Charm


See OBLIVIATE.

messenger spell
no incantation used

Sends a magical messenger to someone in the form of the caster's Patronus.

Dumbledore sent a message to Hagrid using this spell. He simply pointed his wand in
the direction of Hagrid's cabin and sent the messenger without saying a word. Hagrid
came directly to Dumbledore, which suggests that it is possible to retrace the
messenger's path (GF28).

Tonks sent a message to Hagrid to come get Harry at the gates of Hogwarts, but
Snape got the message instead (HBP8).

This spell is the method of communication used between members of the Order of the
Phoenix that
JKR mentioned on her website.

Cast by Kingsley Shacklebolt to send a message to the wedding guests at the Burrow;
his Patronus is a lynx (DH8).

Cast by Arthur Weasley to send a message to the Burrow announcing the arrival of the
Minister for Magic (DH7) and later to send a message to Harry, Ron, and Hermione;
his Patronus is a weasel (DH9).

Hermione said she had been practicing and thought she could cast this spell (DH9).

McGonagall cast this spell to contact the other three Heads of House just prior to the
battle of Hogwarts; non-verbally, she conjured three Patronuses at once and sent them
to their destinations, an impressive feat (DH30).

Meteolojinx Recanto (mee-tee-OH-lo-jinx ree-CAN-toh)


Halts a spell that is causing rain.
"meteorologia" Gr. meteorology + "jinx" + "recanto" L. to recant; to charm back, charm away

Arthur Weasley recommended this to Ron while the latter was disguised as Reg
Cattermole, saying it had worked for Bletchley (DH13).

Mobiliarbus (MO-bi-lee-AR-bus)
"mobilis" L. movable + "arbor" L. tree

Moves a tree (PA10).

The basic spell for moving something starts with the "Mobili-" prefix. It is up to the
caster to be able to tack on the correct Latinate word for the object to be moved, in
this case a tree. It seems unlikely that there is a "standard" spell for moving a tree to
one side!

Mobilicorpus (MO-bi-lee-COR-pus)
"mobilis" L. movable + "corpus" L. body

Moves a body.

The basic spell for moving something starts with the "Mobili-" prefix. In this case, the
Latin word for "body" is tacked on the end.

Remus Lupin used this spell to levitate Snape's unconscious body for transport back
to school from the Shrieking Shack (PA19). Unfortunately for Snape, Sirius Black
then took over managing the levitation while Lupin covered Wormtail with his wand,
and for some reason Sirius didn't seem to be very careful about keeping Snape from
bumping into things (PA20).
Thought of the day: "A real friend helps you move a body."

Morsmordre (mors-MOR-druh)
"The Dark Mark"
"mors" L. death + "mordere" L. to bite

Conjures an immense glowing skull in the sky, comprised of green sparks. There is a snake
coming out of the skull's mouth.

This spell is known only to Death Eaters, who send it up in the sky when they kill.
The Dark Mark was seen at the Quidditch World Cup in 1994, [Y14], conjured by
Barty Crouch Jr. using Harry's wand (GF9)

c.f. PROTEAN CHARM.

Muffliato (muf-lee-AH-to)
"muffle" Eng. to deaden a sound, making it more difficult to hear

Fills the ears of target persons near the caster with an unidentifiable buzzing, so that the
caster can hold lengthy conversations without being overheard.

One of the spells Harry learned from the Half-Blood Prince's notes. Hermione
disapproved of it and would refuse to talk at all if Harry had cast the spell on anyone
in the vicinity (HBP12)

Ron wished Harry had used this when Sprout caught the trio talking in class during
their sixth year (HBP14)

Cast by Hermione to help cover up her conversation with Harry and Ron on the night
of Harry's seventeenth birthday (DH7).

The corridors at the Ministry of Magic were as hushed as though the Muffliato charm
had been cast over the place (DH13).

One of the protective charms cast by Hermione on the campsite (DH14).

Muggle-Repelling Charm
See REPELLO MUGGLETUM.

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Nox
Nox (noks)
"nox" L. night

Turns off the light from a Lumos spell.

Harry and Hermione used this spell to extinquish the lights on their wands in the
Shrieking Shack (PA17).

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Obliteration Charm - Obliviate - Obscuro - Occlumency - Oppugno - Orchideous


Obliteration Charm
"oblitesco" - L. to conceal oneself
"oblittero" - L. to cancel , blot out

Removes traces or tracks left by someone.

Hermione used this to make it look as though she, Ron, and Harry hadn't walked back
from Hagrid's cabin in the snow (OP20)

Obliviate (oh-BLI-vee-ate)
"Memory Charm", "Memory Modifying Charm"
"oblivisci" L. forget

Modifies or erases portions of a person's memory.

These spells are used routinely by the Ministry of Magic as they work to keep the
wizarding world a secret from the Muggles.

They are used if a Muggle sees a dragon (PS14) and after an enchanted item falls into
Muggle hands (CS3).

So many Muggles have seen the Loch Ness Monster that the Ministry of Magic has
been unable to perform Memory Charms on all of them (DP).

According to Blenheim Stalk in Muggles Who Notice, some Muggles "escape" Mass
Memory Charms on occasion that are used to cover up major incidents (FB).

Memory Charms were used on the witnesses to Peter Pettigrew's murder of twelve
Muggles and subsequent escape as a rat (PA10).

Bertha Jorkins had had a Memory Charm placed on her by Crouch Sr. after she
discovered Barty Crouch Jr. at the Crouch home (GF33). Voldemort broke through it,
but the process left her mind damaged and he killed her (GF1).

Mr. Roberts, the campground manager near the Quidditch World Cup, needed ten
Memory Charms a day or he started noticing odd things going on. Later, after he and
his family had been attacked by the Death Eaters, they all received Memory Charms
(GF7, GF9).

Lockhart used Memory Charms on those whose adventures he claimed as his own.
He'd interview someone who battled some creature or conquered some dark foe, then
write the story as if he did it himself and cast a Memory Charm on to the person so
they'd forget it was really them. He tried to do the same to Harry and Ron, but it
backfired onto him instead (CS16).

The Ministry of Magic arranged for the President of an unnamed country to forget to
telephone the Muggle Prime Minister in order to clear time on the latter's schedule for
an interview with Cornelius Fudge and Rufus Scrimgeour (HBP1).

A Ministry wizard whose job it is to cast Memory Charms is called an Obliviator


(GF7).

Mnemone Radford was the first Ministry of Magic Obliviator, noted for developing
Memory Modifying charms (JKR).

Teams of Obliviators attempted to modify the memories of all Muggles who saw what
really happened during the so-called hurricane in the West Country during the
summer of 1996 [Y16].

Hermione modified her parents' memories, making them forget not only who they
were and that they had a daughter, but making them think that they had different
names and wanted to move to Australia (DH6). However, she later said that she had
never cast a Memory Charm before (DH9).

Hermione cast this on various witnesses to the caf incident to cover her trail and that
of her friends (DH9).

Hermione looked as though she had been Obliviated when she recalled seeing the
locket Horcrux two years before (DH10).

Obscuro (ob-SKOO-roh)
"obscuro" L. to cover, darken, obscure

Blocks someone's vision.

Hermione used this spell to create a blindfold on the painting of Phineas Nigellus
Black (OP15).

Occlumency
"occlusum" - L. to block or close + "mens" - L. mind

Specialized branch of magic, not usually taught at Hogwarts, which consists of protecting
one's mind against outside intrusion.

Dumbledore asked Snape to teach Harry Occlumency because of the continuing


connection between Harry and Voldemort.

See also LEGILIMENS.

Oppugno (oh-PUG-noh)
"oppugno" L. to attack, assault

Causes conjured creatures under the control of the caster to attack the target.

Hermione used this to set a flock of conjured canaries on Ron Weasley (HBP14).

Orchideous (or-KID-ee-us)
"Orchideae" L. name for the orchid plant family

Conjures a bouquet of flowers out of the end of a wand.

Mr. Ollivander used this spell to test Fleur's wand at the Weighing of the Wands
(GF18).

Tom Riddle "produced a bunch of roses from nowhere" for Hepzibah Smith, which
was either sleight of hand or a non-verbal spell, possibly a spell similar to Orchideous
(HBP20)

See CONJURING SPELLS.

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Pack - Patronus - Patronus Charm - pepper breath - Permanent Sticking Charm - Peskipiksi
Pesternomi - Petrification - Petrificus Totalus - Piertotum Locomotor - Placement Charm Point Me - Portus - possession - Prior Incantato - Protean Charm - Protego - Protego
horribilis - Protego totalum
Pack
"pack!"

A spell that causes items to assemble themselves into a trunk.

Tonks used this spell to help Harry pack his school trunk when he was leaving the
Dursleys' house. She said she wasn't very good at housework spells and that her
mother used to be able to even make the socks fold themselves up together. Tonks'
version was a bit messier, but it certainly got the job done quickly (OP3).

Patronus
A silvery-white, conjured creature created by using the Patronus Charm. The Patronus is used
against Dementors and Lethifolds.

Harry's Patronus is a stag (like his father's Animagus form) (PA21, OP1).

Andros the Invincible is alleged to have been the only wizard known to have
produced a Patronus the size of a giant (fw)

Aberforth Dumbledore's Patronus is a goat (DH28).

Albus Dumbledore's Patronus is a phoenix (DH20, JKR)

Hermione's Patronus is an otter and Cho's is a swan (OP27). Seamus at first wasn't
sure what his was, just that it was hairy; it turned out to be a fox (OP27, DH32).

Luna Lovegood's Patronus is a hare (DH32).

Ernie Macmillan's Patronus is a boar (DH32).

Kingsley Shacklebolt's Patronus is a lynx (DH8).

Severus Snape's Patronus is a doe (DH33).

Dolores Umbridge's Patronus is a cat (see) (DH13).

Ron's Patronus is a Jack Russell terrier (JKR, DH32).

Arthur Weasley's Patronus is a weasel (DH7, DH9).

A Patronus can be commanded by the caster to attack. Harry controlled his and told it
to attack each Dementor in turn when they attacked him and Dudley in the alley near
Privet Drive (OP1).

See EXPECTO PATRONUM.

Flavius Belby survived a Lethifold attack by casting a Patronus Charm against it


(fw/51, FB)

A Patronus can also appear as a shapeless silvery mist, but when cast correctly, it
forms a "corporeal Patronus," which means it takes the form of an actual creature
(corporeal means having a physical form, from "corpus" L. for body). (OP8)

After a severe emotional upheaval, a witch's or wizard's Patronus may change form
(HBP16); this happened to Tonks after Sirius' death, when her Patronus seems to have
taken the shape of a wolf (HBP8).

Patronus Charm (pa-TROH-nus)


"patronus" Mediaeval L. patron saint

See EXPECTO PATRONUM.

pepper breath
no incantation given

This charm gives the target person fiery hot breath.

Harry, when researching spells to use against a dragon, decided against this one
(GF20).

Permanent Sticking Charm

no incantation given

Spell that magically fastens one thing to another. It is extremely difficult to remove anything
fastened with a Permanent Sticking Charm.

Both the portrait of Sirius' mother and the tapestry showing the Black family tree
were fastened to the wall with Permanent Sticking Charms. As a result, the members
of the Order couldn't remove them from the walls (OP6).

The enchanted portrait in the Prime Minister's office could not be removed from the
wall by Muggle means, so it may have a Permanent Sticking Charm on the back
(HBP1).

Used by Sirius Black to put up Muggle posters, Gryffindor banners, and so on in his
room at number twelve, Grimmauld Place before he left home (DH10).

See FIXING CHARM

Peskipiksi Pesternomi (pes-kee PIK-see pes-ter-NO-mee)


"Freezing Charm"?
"pesky" + "pixie" + "pester" + "no" + "me"

Lockhart's version of a Freezing Charm.

Lockhart tried this spell on the escaped Cornish Pixies. It had no effect. The spell
words certainly don't fit the usual format, so it seems likely that Lockhart was making
the whole thing up on the spot (CS6).

Petrification
"petrificare" L. to make into stone, from "petra" L. rock

Not a spell so much as a magical effect, caused by seeing the reflected eyes of a basilisk.

The Petrification effect resembles death, except that the victim is still alive, as if in
suspended animation. It takes careful examination to discern whether a victim is in
fact Petrified rather than dead. If a ghost is Petrified, it turns a dark smoky grey and
can only be moved by the use of a fan. The antidote is made from mandrake roots
(CS9).

Petrificus Totalus (pe-TRI-fi-cus to-TAH-lus)


"Full Body Bind", "Body-Bind Curse", or "full" (UK) / "Full" (US) Body-Bind Curse"

"petrificare" L. to make into stone + "totalis" L. entire

Source: Curses and Counter-Curses by Vindictus Viridian (Pm)


Turns the entire body of the victim rigid.

Hermione cast this spell on Neville with profuse apologies when he tried to stop them
from going after the Philosopher's Stone. She referred to it as the Full Body Bind as
well as using the incantation (PS16).

Referred to by Harry as the Body-Bind Curse (PS17).

Used by Harry on Dolohov during the battle of the Department of Mysteries (OP35)

Cast by Dumbledore on Harry as a nonverbal spell (HBP27, HBP28)

Cast by Harry on a brutal-faced Death Eater and on Fenrir Greyback (HBP28).

Fred Weasley said, while waiting in dress robes in the hot sun for the wedding guests
to arrive, that when he got married, all of them could wear what they liked, and he'd
put a full Body-Bind Curse on Molly Weasley until it was all over (DH8).

Hermione cast this spell at Antonin Dolohov in the caf (DH9).

Piertotum Locomotor (pee-air-TOH-tum lo-co-MO-tor )


"pier" = ? + "totum" L. total, all
"loco" L. from a place + "motionem" L. motion

A variation of the Locomotor spell, used to animate statues and armour.

McGonagall used this spell to animate the Hogwarts suits of armour and statues to
fight in the Battle of Hogwarts (DH30).

Placement Charm
no incantation given

Spell that magically positions something in place.

used to put a bridle on a kelpie, the only way to control one (FB).

Point Me
"Four-Point Spell"

A simple spell, performed with the wand laying flat on the open palm of the caster. When the
words are spoken, the wand rotates to point north.

Harry used this spell to good advantage in the Triwizard maze, keeping himself
walking in more or less the right direction (GF31).

Portus (POR-tus)
"porta" L. gate, entrance

Turns the target object into a Portkey.

Dumbledore turned an old kettle into a Portkey to number twelve, Grimmauld Place
on the night of the snake attack on Arthur Weasley (OP22).

Dumbledore turned the head of the wizard statue into a Portkey to his office with this
spell after his duel with Voldemort (OP36).

When the spell is cast, the target object glows blue and trembles briefly before
returning to a normal appearance (OP22, OP36).

possession
no incantation given

Dark Magical effect of one person's spirit inhabiting or taking over the body of another.
The only examples of possession are the actions of Voldemort, the greatest Dark wizard of
the age.

He used this horrible form of intrusion on snakes and small animals while hiding out
in the wilds of Albania without a body of his own.

He possessed Quirrell in order to monitor and control him. In this particular case,
Voldemort's face appeared protruding from the back of Quirrell's head (PS17).

Tom Riddle's memory form, freed from its diary by life energy from Ginny Weasley,
inhabited the little girl off and on, forcing her to kill roosters, write on the wall, and so
on. She talked about it later and said that there were long periods of time when she
couldn't remember what had happened to her (OP23).

During the climactic battle between Dumbledore and Voldemort, the Dark Lord
possessed Harry, trying to make Dumbledore have to choose to kill Harry in order to
defeat Voldemort. Harry remembered the love of his mother and friends and the
feelings of love drove Voldemort out of him (OP36).

While a Horcrux is still intact, the bit of soul inside it can flit in and out of someone if
they grow too close emotionally to the object acting as a magical container (DH6).

Prior Incantato (prye-OR in-can-TAH-toe)


also: Priori Incantatem
"Reverse Spell Effect"

"prior" L. former, earlier, preceeding + "incantatare" L. to bewitch or enchant


Can be cast as a spell, ("Prior Incantato"), in which case it forces the target wand to emit a
ghost image of the last spell it cast. The images can be dispelled using Deletrius.
When two wands are forced to duel that have core material from the same single creature, the
result will be "Priori Incantatem," a display in sequence of the last spells one of the wands
cast. Which wand will show the spell effect depends on the willpower of the two wizards
involved.

Amos Diggory cast this on Harry's wand to discover whether it had cast the Dark
Mark (GF9).

When Harry and Voldemort duelled, their wands, which share a core of a feather from
the same phoenix, were linked in the Priori Incantatem effect (GF36).

Protean Charm (PRO-tee-an)


"protean" Eng. able to readily assume a different form, from Proteus, a sea god from Greek mythology who
could change his shape rapidly

Complex spell that makes something change form.

Hermione was able to cast a Protean Charm on the fake Galleons the D.A. used
during the 1995 - 1996 [Y15 - Y16] school year to pass along the date and time of
each meeting. The spell caused the numbers on the members' coins to change when
Harry changed the numbers on his coin. The Ravenclaws were all astounded that
Hermione, who wasn't in their house, could cast this spell, since it's N.E.W.T. level.
Clearly none of them could cast this magic at fifth year level (OP19). Ironically,
Hermione got the idea from Voldemort's use of the Death Eaters' Dark Marks as a
means of communication.

Draco Malfoy, in turn, deliberately copied the notion of Hermione's D.A. coins to
enchant coins as a means of communication for himself with Madam Rosmerta
(HBP27).

Protego (pro-TAY-go)
"Shield Charm"
"protego" L. to defend

This spell creates a magical barrier that will deflect hexes thrown at the caster.

Harry learned this spell in his preparations for the third task (GF31).

Harry used the Shield Charm to defend himself against Snape's Legilimency during
Occlumency training and found himself unexpectedly seeing some of Snape's
memories (OP26).

Harry used this spell to defend himself and to stop various Death Eaters from
Summoning the prophecy away from him during the Battle of the Department of
Mysteries (OP35, OP36).

Mentioned as Shield Charm in Ministry leaflet (HBP3).

According to the twins, many adult wizards as of Harry's sixth year cannot cast this
spell properly, hence the popularity of the Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes "Shield"
clothing line (HBP6).

Ron, grasping at straws, speculates that Moody could have used a Shield Charm
against the Killing Curse (DH6).

Cast by Remus Lupin, Nymphadora Tonks, and various other wedding guests after
Shacklebolt delivered his warning (DH9).

Cast by Harry to protect Ron from Hermione (DH19).

Cast by Hermione at the waterfall (DH25).

Cast by Snape during his duel with McGonagall (DH30).

Used by Harry at the beginning of his final duel with Voldemort (DH36).

Protego horribilis (pro-TAY-go ho-RIB-i-lis)


"protego" L. to defend + "horribilis" L. "horrible, terrifying"

Presumably a variation of Protego.

Cast by Flitwick during the battle of Hogwarts (DH30).

Protego totalum (pro-TAY-go TOH-tah-lum)


"protego" L. to defend + "totalum" mediaeval L. "the whole"

Presumably a variation of Protego.

Hermione cast this along with several other protective enchantments on the campsite
in the woods next to the old Quidditch World Cup campgrounds (DH14).

Casting this spell evidently became part of the routine protective enchantments used
on their campsites during the hunt for the Horcruxes, because escaping from the
Lovegoods' house, Hermione immediately began running in a circle around her
companions, casting this along with other protective enchantments before they set up
their tent (DH22).

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Quidditch spells - Quietus


Quidditch spells
no incantation given

Several charms are used to make the game of Quidditch possible:

The Quaffle is enchanted to make it fall more slowly than would otherwise be the
case. This spell was invented by Daisy Pennifold, hence the modern Quaffle is
referred to as a Pennifold Quaffle.

The Golden Snitch is enchanted to keep it within the bounds of the pitch.

Bludgers are enchanted to try to knock any and all players off their brooms.

Dobby the house-elf managed to enchant a Bludger so that it only pursued


Harry Potter, eventually managing to break his arm (CS10).

See also BRAKING CHARM, CUSHIONING CHARM, GRIPPING CHARM.

Quietus (KWY-uh-tus)
reverse: Sonorus
"quietus" L. quiet, peaceful

Reverses the effect of Sonorus, making the caster's voice normal in volume.

Ludo Bagman used this in conjunction with Sonorus to allow himself to speak to
large crowds at the World Cup and at the Triwizard Tournament (GF8).

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Reducio - Reducto - Reductor Curse - Refilling Charm - Relashio - Reluctant


Reversers, A Charm To Cure - Rennervate - Reparo - Repelling Spell Repello - Repello Muggletum - restoring spell - Revulsion Jinx Rictusempra - Riddikulus - room-sealing spell - ropes, magical - rowboat
spell
Reducio (re-DOO-see-oh)
reverse: Engorgio
"redusen" Middle Eng. diminish, from "reducer" Old Fr. bring back to the source, from "reducere" L. bring, lead

Causes an Engorged object to return to its normal size.

The fake Moody, who had enlarged a spider with an Engorgement Charm,
used this to return it to its normal size (GF14).

Harry, who had enlarged a spider with an Engorgement Charm, tried to use this
to return it to its normal size, but it didn't work (DH20).

Reducto (re-DUC-toh)
"Reductor Curse"
"redusen" Middle Eng. diminish, from "reducer" Old Fr. bring back to the source, from "reducere" L. bring, lead

Blasts solid objects out of the caster's path.

Snape used this on rosebushes at the Yule Ball after his talk with Karkaroff
(GF23)

Harry learned this spell as part of his preparation for the third task. He used it to
blast a hole in the hedge (GF31)

A Reductor Curse during D.A. training reduced a table to dust (OP19)

Used by the various D.A. members at the beginning of the battle of the
Department of Mysteries to smash shelves in the Hall of Prophecy as a
diversion (OP35).

Reductor Curse
See REDUCTO.

Refilling Charm
incantation unknown

Causes the target container to refill itself.

Taught in sixth-year Charms (HBP22). It is not clear how this differs from a
Conjuring Spell, which is a Transfiguration.

Harry used this successfully for the first time to refill the cups/glasses used by
Slughorn and Hagrid at Aragog's wake (HBP22).

Relashio
"rilascio" It. - to release, to relax, to issue

Releases a jet of fiery sparks. Underwater, this spell fires a jet of boiling water.

Harry used this spell against the Grindylows during the second task (GF26).

Note that this incantation was given a rather different result in HBP10 when Ogden
used it to knock Marvolo backward - away from Merope, whom he was attempting
to strangle. This is not consistent with the previous usage of this incantation.
The incantation was again given a different result when Hermione used it to force
the chains to withdraw into the arms of the chained chair (DH13) and when Ron
attempted to use it on Pettigrew's silver hand (although this last didn't work)
(DH23).
Harry used this to release the dragon from its chains in Gringotts' high-security
area (DH25).

Reluctant Reversers, A Charm To Cure


no incantation given

Broom charm.

This spell is on page twelve of the Handbook of Do-It-Yourself Broom Care


(PA2).

Rennervate (REN-er-vayt)
"en-" Old French from "in-" L. cause to be + "nerves" Eng. c.1603 strength, from "nervus" L. nerve
See Edits and Changes to the Text - GF; this spell has been officially renamed by JKR from its original
name. Some versions list this spell as "Enervate," which changes the etymology quite a bit. In fact, if the word
was really Enervate, the Latin origins would have exactly the opposite meaning from what it meant as
Ennervate.

Spell used to revive a person who has been hit by a Stunner.

Amos Diggory woke up Winky with this (GF9)

Dumbledore used it to revive Barty Crouch junior (GF35)

Dumbledore also used it to revive Viktor Krum after he was stunned while
watching over Barty Crouch senior (GF28).

Reparo (re-PAR-oh)
"reparare" L. repair, restore

Undoes damage to an object.

Probably the spell Mr. Weasley used to repair Harry's glasses (CS4), Bill
Weasley used to repair the table leg (GF5), and Percy used to repair his glasses
when he bowed just a little bit too low (GF8).

Hermione cast this spell to repair the broken glass in the door to a railway carriage
compartment (GF11)

McGonagall used what is very likely this spell to restore the leg of Neville's desk,
which he had accidentally vanished (CS16).

Harry used this to fix the china bowl of Murtlap essence he'd knocked to the
floor. The spell couldn't put the liquid back in the repaired bowl, however (OP15).

Snape used this spell to repair a shattered jar in his office during Occlumency
lessons (OP26).

Hermione used this to repair a teacup that Ron had broken in Transfiguration
(OP30).

Horace Slughorn and Albus Dumbledore seem to have cast this spell
nonverbally (and in a masterly way) to undo the damage Slughorn had inflicted
upon his borrowed living quarters in Budleigh Babberton (HBP4).

After cutting the covers off the old and new Potions textbooks in his possession
and swapping them, Harry "repaired" the two swapped covers simultaneously by
tapping each, then giving the incantation once (HBP11).

Harry used this to repair a bowl he had broken in Herbology (HBP14).

Harry attempted to use this to keep the sidecar attached to the flying motorbike,
but it didn't work (DH4).

Repelling Spell
See REPELLO.

Repello (re-PEL-oh)
"Repelling Spell"
"repello" L. to repel

Spell that keeps something away from the caster or from a target object that the spell is cast
upon.

The basic spell for repelling something starts with "Repello" followed by the correct
Latinate word for the target to be repelled.

Before the Golden Snitch was introduced to Quidditch, this spell was cast by the
spectators to keep the Snidget on the pitch (QA4).

See REPELLO MUGGLETUM.

Repello Muggletum (re-PEL-oh MUG-ul-tum)


"Muggle-Repelling Charm"
"repello" L. to repel + "Muggletum"

Keeps Muggles away from the target place or object.

The basic spell for repelling something starts with "Repello" followed by the correct
Latinate word for the object or objects (e.g., people) to be repelled.

The Quidditch World Cup Stadium had Muggle-Repelling Charms all over it; if
Muggles got anywhere near it, they would suddenly remember some appointment
they were late for and hurry off (GF8).

Various wizarding schools such as Durmstrang may have Muggle-Repelling


Charms on them to prevent discovery (GF11).

One of the protective charms cast by Hermione on the campsite (DH14).

restoring spell
no incantation used

Forces an Animagus who has transformed into animal form to revert to his or her human
form. The spell's effect is a bright blue-white flash of light.

Lupin and Sirius cast this spell together to change Scabbers back into Peter
Pettigrew (PA19)

Revulsion Jinx
no incantation given

Forces the target to back off from the caster, letting go of him or her if the target is holding on
to the caster. May be associated with a flash of purple light when cast.

Hermione used this jinx to force Yaxley to let go of her during the escape from the
Ministry of Magic. At the time there was a flash of purple light (DH13, DH14).

Rictusempra (ric-tu-SEM-pra)
"Tickling Charm"
"rictus" L. gaping mouth, grin + "sempra" L. always

Causes a person to laugh uncontrollably.

Harry cast this spell on Draco at the Duelling Club (CS10).

CS/f incorrectly shows this spell throwing Draco across the room, and CS/g is
similarly incorrect in its effects.

Riddikulus (ri-di-KYOO-lus)
"boggart banishing spell"
"ridiculum" L. joke, from "ridere" L. to laugh

A simple charm requiring force of mind, this spell requires the caster to visualize his or her
worst fear in an amusing form while reciting the incantation. When performed correctly, this
forces the boggart to take on an appearance which will inspire the laughter that forms an
effective defense against the creature.

Lupin taught the third year Defence Against the Dark Arts class to use this
spell (PA7). The laughter it produces in onlookers is what does the boggart in.

Harry used this against a boggart in the Triwizard maze (GF31).

Molly tried and failed to use this spell against the boggart at number twelve,
Grimmauld Place (OP9).

Harry did a perfect one during his Defence Against the Dark Arts practical
O.W.L. (OP31)

room-sealing spell
no incantation given

Seals a room with a powerful charm that none but a powerful wizard could break.

Snape used a powerful magic spell to seal his office (GF25)

See COLLOPORTUS.

ropes, magical
no incantation used in many cases, but possibly Incarcerous or similar

Sends out magical ropes from a wand which tie up someone firmly.

Dumbledore used magic ropes from his wand to bind Barty Crouch Jr. (GF36)

Quirrell created ropes out of thin air to bind Harry in the Chamber of the
Stone. Then he clapped his hands and the ropes fell away (PS17).

Wormtail conjured tight cords to bind Harry to the headstone of Voldemort's


father (GF32)

Snape used this spell to tie up Lupin. When he did it, there was a loud bang
(PA19).

A similar enchantment is used on the chained chair in the Court of Magical Law.
When a prisoner sits in that chair, the chains glow gold and encircle the person's arms,
binding them to the chair (GF30, OP8, DH13)

See CONJURED ITEMS

rowboat spell
no incantation used

Propels a rowboat along without oars.

Hagrid used his umbrella to cast this spell and "speed things up a bit" when he and
Harry were coming back from the Hut-on-the-Rock (PS5).

Possibly it is this spell which propels the fleet of small boats from the dock near
Hogsmeade station to Hogwarts castle (PS6).

See BOATS.

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Salvio hexia - Scarpin's Revelaspell - Scourgify - Scouring Charm - sealing


spell - Sectumsempra - Serpensortia - Severing Charm - Shield Charm Shock Spell - Silencing Charm - Silencio - sleep, bewitched - slug-vomiting
Charm - snitch jinx - Sonorus - Specialis Revelio - Sponge-Knees Curse Stealth Sensoring Spell - Stinging Hex - Stretching Jinx - Stunner - Stupefy Stupefying Charm - Substantive Charm - Summoning Charm - Supersensory
Charm - Switching Spell
Salvio hexia (SAL-vee-oh HEX-ee-ah)
"salvia" L. without breaking + "hexia" hexes

Specific effect is not given, but the Latin derivation seems to suggest that this affects and
possibly augments the other spells being cast.

Hermione cast this along with several other protective enchantments on the
campsite in the woods next to the old Quidditch World Cup campgrounds
(DH14).

Casting this spell evidently became part of the routine protective enchantments used
on their campsites during the hunt for the Horcruxes, because escaping from the
Lovegoods' house, Hermione immediately began running in a circle around her

companions, casting this along with other protective enchantments before they set up
their tent (DH22).

Scarpin's Revelaspell
See SPECIALIS REVELIO.

Scourgify (SKUR-ji-fy)
"excoriata" L. 'to be stripped of' (thanks to Ruth Eyres)

Cleans things.

Tonks used this spell to clean out Hedwig's cage in Harry's bedroom (OP3).

James Potter used this spell to "wash out" Snape's mouth when the latter called
Lily a Mudblood just after their Defence Against the Dark Arts O.W.L.
(OP28).

Possibly the same thing as the Scouring Charm.

Scouring Charm
"Scourgify" (?) or possibly "Tergeo" (?)

Cleans things.

Hermione taught Neville a Scouring Charm to clean frog guts out from under his
fingernails (GF14).

A Scouring Charm is required to eradicate an infestation of bundimuns (FB)

There is no specific reference that Scourgify and the Scouring Charm are the same
thing, but it seems very likely.

sealing spell
No incantation used

Seals a roll of parchment with a touch of the wand.

Used by Umbridge to seal the pink parchment note she sent to McGonagall by
way of Harry; McGonagall slit it open with her wand when she received it
(OP12).

Sectumsempra (sek-tum-SEM-pra)
"sectus" L. past participle of "seco", to cut "sempra" L. always

Cuts the target.

A spell invented by the Half-Blood Prince "for enemies" (HBP21)

Considered to be Dark Magic; anything severed from a target's body by this spell
cannot be grown back by magic, according to Molly Weasley (DH5).

Harry cast this on Draco. Snape said afterward that there might be a certain
amount of scarring, but that immediate treatment with dittany might prevent that
(HBP24)

Apparently the nonverbal spell used by Snape on James Potter that resulted in a
gash across James' face during their confrontation just after their Defence
Against the Dark Arts O.W.L, as seen by Harry in the Pensieve (OP28),
judging from Snape's remarks during his departure from Hogwarts (HBP28).

Harry used this on Inferi in the cave, but it didn't do much good (HBP26)

Harry tried and failed to cast this on Snape during Snape's departure from
Hogwarts (HBP28).

Snape cast this at the wand-hand of a Death Eater who had been aiming at
Remus Lupin's back, but missed and hit George Weasley instead, removing one
of his ears (DH5, DH33).

Serpensortia (ser-pen-SOR-sha)
"serpens" L. serpent + "ortus" L. past participle of "ortir", to come into existence
(or second segment could be derived from "sortir" Old Fr. to go out)
(thanks to Jake Downs for suggesting we look at "ortir")

Causes a large serpent to burst from the end of the caster's wand.

Draco cast this spell on Harry at the Duelling Club on Snape's suggestion; the
serpent moved to attack Justin Finch-Fletchley (CS10).

See CONJURING SPELLS.

Severing Charm
"Diffindo" (?)

Spell to cut something.

Ron used this spell to remove the lace from the neck and sleeves of his used dress
robes (GF23).

Shield Charm
See PROTEGO.

Shock Spell
No incantation mentioned

Spell used at St. Mungo's to treat mental illnesses.

One reader of The Quibbler wrote Harry after his interview was published and
suggested that he needed a course of Shock Spells at St. Mungo's, since he was
obviously a nutter (OP26)

This is clearly a reference to shock therapy, a technique used in the treatment of


mental illness in the Muggle world. Some see it as a bit barbaric, but it does produce
results in some cases.

Silencing Charm
See SILENCIO.

Silencio (si-LEN-see-oh)
"Silencing Charm"
"silencio" L. to be quiet

Magically silences the target of the spell.

The song of the Fwooper will drive the listener insane and must therefore be sold
with a Silencing Charm on it. This charm must be recast on the Fwooper every
month (FB).

Fifth-years work on this spell in Charms using bullfrogs and ravens (OP18).

Hermione cast this spell on a Death Eater during the Battle of the
Department of Mysteries, which caused the spell he used to attack her to be a
lot less damaging. He still knocked her out, though, and did "enough damage to be
going on with," according to Pomfrey (OP35, OP38).

sleep, bewitched
incantation unknown

Puts the target person into a deep sleep; subject is in a state almost like suspended animation
and does not breathe for the duration of the spell.

Dumbledore placed Cho, Ron, Hermione, and Gabrielle Delacour into this
kind of sleep while they were "held hostage" by the merpeople in the lake
(GF27).

Fleur tried to put her dragon into some sort of enchanted sleep during the first
task (GF20)

slug-vomiting charm
no incantation given (no, it's not "eat slugs")

Causes the victim to belch up slugs.

Ron tried to hit Malfoy with this curse after Malfoy had called Hermione a
Mudblood. Unfortunately, Ron's wand had been damaged earlier, so the spell
backfired (CS7)

Interestingly, Ron had only a short time before, at breakfast, snapped "Eat slugs,
Malfoy!" This is not the incantation, however, although CS/f clearly and incorrectly
indicates that it is.

The name for this spell is mentioned in (OP19).

snitch jinx

no incantation given

A delayed-action jinx which writes the word "sneak" across someone's face in pimples if they
break an agreement they sign. This jinx may be an invention of Hermione Granger.

Hermione jinxed a piece of parchment with this spell. Each member of the D.A.
signed the parchment when the group started meeting and in so doing put themsleves
under its effect. When Marietta Edgecombe told Umbridge about the DA, the
word "sneak" broke out on her face instantly. Umbridge tried to remove it but
couldn't, which indicates just how talented Hermione is at casting spells (OP16)

This jinx was still in effect on Marietta the following September (HBP7)

c.f. CONTRACT, BINDING MAGICAL.

Sonorus (so-NO-rus)
reverse: Quietus
"sonorus" L. loud

Makes the caster's voice carry over long distances.

Ludo Bagman used these spells to make his voice heard throughout the
Quidditch World Cup stadium and over the stands of people watching the
Triwizard Tournament (GF8, GF31)

Specialis Revelio (spe-see-AH-lis reh-VEL-ee-oh)


Scarpin's Revelaspell

Used to identify the ingredients of the target potion or the enchantments on a target object.

Used by Hermione on the Half-Blood Prince's copy of Advanced PotionMaking (HBP9)

Used by Ernie Macmillan (HBP18)

Sponge-Knees Curse
no incantation given

Presumably turns the target's knees spongy, making it difficult for him or her to walk.

During the a riot that took place during the Puddlemere/ Holyhead game, a group
of Puddlemere supporters were using this curse "in retaliation" to the Jelly-Brain
Jinx, according to one Puddlemere supporter (DP).

See JELLY-LEGS JINX.

Stealth Sensoring Spells


no incantation given

Spells to detect anyone sneaking past them. Can be placed on physical objects such as doors.

After two Nifflers had been placed in her office, Umbridge placed Stealth
Sensoring Spells on her door, which detected Harry and Hermione as they broke in
to use the fire (OP32)

Stretching Jinx
no incantation given

Presumably causes the target object or creature to stretch (extend in length).

Mrs. Weasley said before their sixth year that Harry and Ron had grown so
much that they looked as though they'd had this jinx put on them (HBP5).

Stinging Hex
no incantation given

A fairly low-powered hex that causes a stinging pain in the victim.

When under assault by Snape's Legilimency, Harry found it almost impossible to


resist the intrusion until Snape happened upon the memory of Harry's kiss with
Cho Chang. The resistence he felt to Snape viewing this memory translated into a
Stinging Hex that broke Snape's spell. Harry had not consciously decided to
perform that spell, so it seems unlikely that that he actually spoke any words. It would
seem instead that this hex was purely an extension of his intention to fight Snape
off (OP24).

Stunner
See STUPEFY.

Stupefy (STOO-puh-fye)
"Stunner" "Stunning Spell" "Stupefying Charm"
reverse: "Rennervate"
"stupefacio" L. to make senseless, from "stupeo" L. stunned

Renders the target of the spell unconscious; this spell hurls a bolt of red light.

Used by Ministry wizards to try to stop whomever cast the Dark Mark during the
Quidditch World Cup riot (GF9)

Used by dragon keepers (a lot of them at once) to manage dragons (GF19).

Flavius Belby tried to use a Stupefying Charm against a Lethifold, but only
succeeded in blasting a hole through his bedroom door (FB)

Effective against Pogrebins (FB).

Not very effective against Hagrid, who is part giant (OP31).

Harry tried to cast this on Snape during Snape's departure from Hogwarts, but
missed (HBP28).

Cast by Harry several times at pursuing Death Eaters (DH4).

Referred to using the verb Stun (DH5).

Harry cast this on Thorfinn Rowle and attempted to cast it on Antonin Dolohov
but missed the latter, hitting the waitress instead (DH9).

Used by Harry on Dolores Umbridge and on Yaxley (DH13).

Cast by Harry, Ron, and Hermione on the crowd of goblins responding to the
alarm at Gringotts (DH25).

Stupefying Charm
See STUPEFY.

Substantive Charm
no incantation given

Effect unknown.

Seamus Finnigan, the day before Harry's year's first O.W.L., was reciting the
definition of this charm aloud (OP31)

Summoning Charm
See ACCIO.

Supersensory Charm
Lets the caster sense things out of his or her line of sight.

Ron says he can use this spell instead of looking in the mirrors when he drives a car
(DH/e).

Switching Spell
various, depending on the Transfiguration intended

A category of Transfiguration spells that swap one thing for another.

Hermione knew quite a bit about Switching Spells already in her first year, and
gained some house points for it from McGonagall (PS9)

Neville wasn't particularly adept at these, managing to switch his own ears onto a
cactus during Transfiguration class (GF15).

Hermione, discussing ways to combat dragons:


"Well, there are Switching Spells...but what's the point of Switching it? Unless
you swapped its fangs for wine-gums or something that would make it less
dangerous..." (GF20)

The definition of Switching Spells was on the theory portion of the Transfiguration
O.W.L. that Harry took in June 1996 (OP31)

See CROSS-SPECIES SWITCHES

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Taboo - talon-clipping charm - Tarantallegra - Tergeo - Thief's Curse - Thief's


Downfall - Tickling Charm - time travel - toenail-growing hex - Tongue-Tying
Curse - Trace, the - Transmogrifian Torture - Trip Jinx - Twitchy Ears Hex
Taboo
no incantation given
"taboo", Eng. forbidden, particularly when forbidden by social custom

When put on a word, anyone who then says that word becomes trackable by the caster;
saying the word breaks protective enchantments and causes some kind of magical
disturbance.

The Death Eaters placed a Taboo on the word "Voldemort", reasoning that only
serious opposition such as the Order of the Phoenix would use it (DH20)

Harry accidentally broke the magical protections around the campsite where he was
staying by slipping and saying the name as he had been used to doing for years,
forgetting that it was Taboo (DH22).

The choice of name for this effect is neat; there was already a social taboo on saying
the name before the spell was ever cast.

talon-clipping charm
no incantation given

A charm used for dragon care.

Harry found this spell in a book in the Hogwarts library when researching ways
to overcome the Hungarian Horntail in the first task (GF20).

Tarantallegra (TAIR-an-tuh-LEG-ruh)
"tarantella" It. dance associated with the tarantula, from Taranto, a city in Italy + "allegro" It. fast

Forces the victim's legs to do a crazy dance.

Draco cast this spell on Harry at the Duelling Club (CS10).

Dolohov used this spell on Neville during the Battle of the Department of
Mysteries (OP35).

Tergeo (tair-GAY-oh)
"tergeo" L. to wipe off, to wipe dry; to scour, to clean

Cleans up the target object or person.

Hermione used this spell to siphon blood off Harry's face, which had been left
there after his nose had been broken by Draco Malfoy (HBP8)

Ron used this spell to siphon oven grease off his handkerchief so that he could lend it
to Hermione, who had just burst into tears (DH6).

Harry used this spell to remove dust from some of the framed photographs in
Bathilda Bagshot's house (DH17).

Thief's Curse
no incantation given

An unspecified bit of nastiness which can be cast on someone who steals something.

People who stand too long reading Quidditch Through the Ages in a shop
without buying it might find themselves the object of this curse (QA).

Thief's Downfall
no incantation given

A waterfall that can be released over the track at Gringotts that has the effect of washing
away all enchantment, all magical concealment.

This was released against Harry, Ron, Hermione, and Griphook during their raid
on the Lestranges' vault. It removed the effects of Polyjuice Potion from
Hermione, of a number of small charms and Transfigurations from Ron, and
lifted the Imperius Curse from Bogrod, whom they had compelled to accompany
them. It did not, however, damage Harry's Invisibility Cloak or other magical
items that they had with them (DH25).

Tickling Charm
See RICTUSEMPRA.

Tickling Spell
See TITILLANDO.

time travel
no incantation used; by magical device only

An extremely dangerous magical effect, allows a person to travel back in time. Because of the
potential for catastrophe should history be altered, time travel is all but forbidden in
wizarding society. Certain magical devices can be used for time travel, but access to them
is strictly controlled.

Hermione once used a Time-Turner to repeat hours of the day and take more
classes than would otherwise have been possible (PA21).

The Pensieve and Tom Riddle's diary allowed a form of time travel, although
the person or persons traveling were not actually part of the time they entered.
Instead, they became observers, unseen and unheard. This form of time travel is tied
to stored memories and the traveller views the past from a vantage point near the
person whose memories are used. This form of time travel might be better termed
"memory travel."

Time is studied in one of the rooms of the Department of Mysteries; a


Death Eater whose head fell into a huge bell jar in that room was changed from the
neck up into a baby (OP35).

Titillando (ti-ti-LAN-do)
"Tickling Spell"

A curse which causes the victim to be tickled.

Similar to the charm Rictusempra, but nastier, apparently, since it's found in the
book Curses and Counter-Curses (Pm).

toenail-growing hex
no incantation given

Causes the target's toenails to grow alarmingly fast.

One of the Half-Blood Prince's self-invented spells (HBP12).

Used by Harry on Crabbe (HBP12).

Ron recommended that Harry use it on McLaggen after the latter's antics cost
them a match (HBP19)

Tongue-Tying Curse
"Mimble wimble"

Binds the target's tongue to keep him or her from talking about some specific subject.

Arthur Weasley said that Mad-Eye Moody had set up a couple of curses at
number twelve, Grimmauld Place in case Snape returned there. The curses
were to both "keep him out and bind his tongue if he trie[d] to talk about the place"
(DH6).

Harry, Ron, and Hermione were affected by this upon their arrival at number
twelve, Grimmauld Place. Something whooshed over them like cold air, causing
their tongues to curl backward on themselves, making it impossible for them to speak,
though their tongues soon unravelled again. It was unpleasant, and afterwards Ron
made retching noises and (with Hermione) stammered for a while (DH9).

This curse appears in the book Curses and Counter-Curses (Pm).

Trace, the
no incantation given

The charm that detects magical ability around under-seventeens.

Moody said that if Harry or anyone around him cast a spell to get him out of
number four, Privet Drive, Pius Thicknesse and the Death Eaters would
know about it thanks to the Trace (DH4).

Discussed by Harry and Ron as the principal reason why they had to wait until after
Harry's seventeenth birthday to begin hunting for Horcruxes (DH6). When the
time came, Harry initially revelled in its removal (DH7).

Ron said that it's wizarding law that the Trace breaks at seventeen and that it cannot
be put on an adult (DH9). When asked if Harry's Trace could still be on him,
Remus Lupin said 'Impossible', then added that for one thing, if it had been the
Death Eaters would have known for certain where Harry was (DH11).

Transmogrifian Torture
"trans" L. across + ?
"transmogrify" Eng. verb c.1656, from L. to change or alter greatly and often with grotesque or humorous effect
c.f. Calvin and Hobbes: his "duplicating machine" is called a Transmogrifier ("Calvin and Hobbes" is a very
popular comic strip in the U.S.)
perhaps also related to:
"moggy" Br. slang: cat

Supposedly something which results in a cat being killed.

Lockhart pronounced with certainty that Mrs. Norris was dead, killed by the
Transmogrifian Torture. Immediately thereafter, Dumbledore informed everyone
that she wasn't in fact dead, rather she was Petrified, and Lockhart pointed out that
he knew this all along. Knowing Lockhart, it is distinctly possible that there is no
such thing as the Transmogrifian Torture (c.f. PESKIPIKSI PESTERNOMI) (CS9)

Trip Jinx
no incantation given

Trips the target.

Draco Malfoy used a Trip Jinx to catch Harry in the seventh floor corridor,
running away from the Room of Requirement (OP27)

Twitchy Ears Hex


no incantation given

Causes the ears of the victim to wiggle and twitch uncontrollably.

Harry was hit with this hex as they practiced Hex-Deflection in Defence
Against the Dark Arts (GF28)

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Unbreakable Charm - Unbreakable Vow - Unforgivable Curses - Unplottable


Unbreakable Charm
incantation not given

Makes an object unbreakable.

Hermione cast an Unbreakable Charm on the jar in which she imprisoned Rita
Skeeter in beetle form (GF37).

Unbreakable Vow
incantation not given

The spell apparently cannot be performed using wandless magic (judging from Snape's
remarks to Bellatrix rather than from the Weasley twins' underage efforts) and requires
that the Bonder's wand be touching the joined hands of the person administering the vow
and the person taking the vow. As each clause of the oath being sworn is agreed to, a thin
tongue of brilliant red flame shoots from the caster's wand and winds itself around the
joined hands of the participants, remaining in place as other clauses of the oath are sworn to.

Snape swore an Unbreakable Vow to Narcissa Malfoy with Bellatrix


Lestrange as Bonder (HBP2).

The Weasley twins tried to get Ron to make one when he was about five, but
Arthur caught them at it (HBP16).

Unforgivable Curses
Three curses in particular are known as Unforgivable because using them on another human
being can result in a life term in Azkaban. These three curses were used extensively by
Voldemort's followers during his rise to power in the 1970s, and their use by Aurors
against suspects was in turn authorized by Bartemius Crouch senior at that time. One,
the Killing Curse, was used by Voldemort himself on Harry Potter, but the curse
backfired and Voldemort was defeated.
The three curses are:

Cruciatus Curse (see CRUCIO)

Imperius Curse (see IMPERIO)

Killing Curse (see AVADA KEDAVRA)

During the Battle of the Department of Mysteries, Harry tried to use the
Cruciatus Curse on Bellatrix Lestrange, but it didn't have much effect. She taunted
him:
"Never used an Unforgivable Curse before, have you, boy? You need to mean them, Potter!
You need to really cause pain--to enjoy it-- righteous anger won't hurt me for long..." (OP36)

Unplottable
incantation not given

A magical effect on a place; makes it impossible to plot its location on a map.

Hermione suggested that this may have been done to make Durmstrang and
Beauxbatons harder to locate by other witches and wizards (GF11).

Hogwarts also has wards and spells on it to hide its true nature from Muggles, but it
is apparently not Unplottable.

The Room of Requirement is Unplottable, so that it doesn't appear on the


Marauder's Map (HBP21).

Number twelve Grimmauld Place is Unplottable (OP6).

See MUGGLE-REPELLING CHARMS.

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Vanishing Spell
Vanishing Spell
See EVANESCO, VANISHING MAGIC.

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Waddiwasi - wand effects - wand sparks - wand writing - Wingardium


Leviosa - wizard space
Waddiwasi (wah-di-WAH-see)
"vadd" Sw. a soft mass + "vas y" Fr. go there
It makes sense because Lupin didn't just make a wad of gum leave that keyhole, but directed it into Peeves' nose. (contributed by Alina)

Shoots a wad of gum out of a keyhole.

Lupin considers this to be a useful little spell. He used it to remove a wad of gum
from a keyhole that Peeves was putting there. The gum then shot up Peeves' nose
(PA7).

The "useful spell" that Lupin was showing them was undoubtedly the "wasi" part, in
this case with a target word attached, "wad." Again we see how important intention is
to magic, since the wad was directed into Peeves' nose by intent with the "go there"

part of the spell. In another situation, the spell might be "stolawasi" to send a robe into
a student's trunk, but it would only work if the student focused his mind on where he
wanted the robe to go.

wand effects
no words used

Causes loud booming noises, sparks, or flashes of light, designed to get people's attention.

Purple firecrackers to get everyone's attention (PS10)

McGonagall created a loud bang to get people's attention in the hallway (CS10)

Ollivander cast a stream of silver smoke rings and a fountain of wine during the
Weighing of the Wands (GF18)

Harry's wand spun and shot golden fire at Voldemort on its own (DH4).

Hermione's wand erupted purple and gold streamers which draped themselves
artistically over the bushes (DH7).

The wizard who performed the wedding ceremony cast a shower of silver stars over
the bride and groom at the end (DH8).

Harry's wand emitted a bang and red sparks when he closed the curtains over
Mrs. Black's portrait (DH9).

See also: BUBBLES, WAND SPARKS, WAND WRITING.

wand sparks
no incantation given

Emits red or green sparks from the wand, used as a signal.

Harry, Draco, Neville fired red sparks into the air to call for help in the
Forbidden Forest (PS15).

Harry and Ron shot sparks to hold off an advancing skrewt (GF21).

For the third task, each champion was instructed beforehand to send up red sparks
if he or she got into difficulty and wished to be rescued (GF31).

When Harry's temper was getting the better of him, his wand inadvertently gave off a
few red and gold sparks (OP2).

The signal that it was clear for the Advance Guard to leave Privet Drive with
Harry was a shower of red sparks, then green sparks, far off in the night sky (OP3).

Harry's wand spun around by itself and shot gold flames at Voldemort when the
latter pursued him after his departure from Privet Drive. Albus Dumbledore
later said that this was because during their duel three years before, Harry's wand
had taken on some of the power and qualities of Voldemort's wand, recognized
him as both kin and mortal enemy, and regurgitated some of his own power back at
him (DH4, DH5, DH35).

Harry's wand emitted a bang and red sparks when he closed the curtains over Mrs.
Black's portrait (DH9).

wand writing
no incantation given

Emits an animated ribbon from the tip of the wand that spells words or forms numbers

Dumbledore used ribbon from his wand to form letters in air (PS7).

Tom Marvolo Riddle wrote his name in the air, then rearranged the letters (CS17)

The judges of the Triwizard Tournament showed scores with ribbons coming
from their wands (GF20)

Wingardium Leviosa (win-GAR-dee-um lev-ee-OH-sa)


"Levitation Charm" (OP31)
"wing" + "arduus" L. high, steep + "levo" L. to raise up, levitate

Causes an object to levitate.

Very simple spell taught to first year Charms students (PS10).

In an excellent example of how intention affects magic, Ron used this spell to make a
mountain troll's club levitate, then crash back onto its own head, even though the
"wing" portion of the spell seems specific to feathers (PS10).

Harry cast this on the sidecar after it broke off from the flying motorbike (DH4).

Ron cast this on a twig to move it into position to press the place at the roots of the
Whomping Willow to make it hold still, clearing the way to the tunnel leading to
the Shrieking Shack (DH32).

wizard space
Causes objects to hold more than their outer dimensions would seem to allow.

While not mentioned by name, this magical effect is seen in a number of places in the
wizarding world. It would seem that "wizard space" is fairly common, since Molly
Weasley didn't seem a bit surprised when their Ford Anglia could hold a lot more
people and cargo than it should (CS5).

(On the other hand, Molly Weasley knew that the car "borrowed" by Mundungus
for a Christmas Day visit to Arthur Weasley in hospital had been "enlarged with a
spell", rather than having been built like that (OP23).)

Cauldrons apparently can hold a lot of stuff. Harry dumped an entire collection of
Lockhart's books into Ginny's cauldron, for example. And apparently it didn't
get too heavy for an eleven-year-old to carry as a result (CS4).

Harry's invisibility cloak also seems to have this quality, since it can expand to
cover several children and a crated dragon, but still can be easily used by a single
person (PS14, etc). However, it has limits. When the D.A. was first formed,
Hermione pointed out that the invisibility cloak couldn't cover all the members
at the same time (OP17).

The magical tents Mr. Weasley borrowed for use at the Quidditch World Cup
were considerably more spacious inside than they looked from the outside (GF7).
Perkins didn't want them back because his lumbago was too bad to let him camp
comfortably, so Mr. Weasley kept them until he loaned one to Hermione, which
proved to be very useful (DH14). That tent was later lost during a raid by Snatchers
(DH26).

See EXTENSION CHARM, UNDETECTABLE.

Gryffindor House
Head: Professor Minerva McGonagall (1990s)
Founder: Godric Gryffindor
Blazon: gules, a lion rampant or (that is, a golden lion on a red field, hence the Gryffindor
colours of scarlet and gold)
Ghost: Sir Nicholas de Mimsy-Porpington ("Nearly Headless Nick")
Characteristics:
Gryffindors are known for their courage
Location:

Gryffindor Tower, entrance on the seventh floor


The entrance is located behind a large painting of a Fat Lady in a pink silk dress. If
you know the right password to tell her, she swings open to reveal a round opening in the
wall. The common room contains a lot of squashy armchairs, a fireplace, and tables. The
fireplace is connected to the Floo Network, but as it is extremely public except in the dead
of night, Gryffindors usually use owls to communicate with their families instead. There's
also a notice board, for public announcements such as the date of the next Hogsmeade
weekend, but also for notices from individual students seeking to buy or sell secondhand
books, or trade Chocolate Frog cards, or similar, as in any school.
There are two staircases opening off the common room into the Tower itself: the boys'
staircase, on which the seven boys' dormitories are located (one for each year) and the girls'
staircase, on which the seven girls' dormitories are located (one for each year). The girls'
staircase is under a spell so that if a boy sets foot on it and persists for a few steps, a wailing
klaxon goes off and the staircase temporarily Transfigures itself into a stone slide, sending
him and anyone else on the stairs sailing to the bottom. According to Hogwarts: A
History, the founders believed that girls were more trustworthy than boys, so that while
the girls' staircase is enchanted to prevent boys from getting in, the boys' staircase does not
carry a reciprocal enchantment (OP17). Each dormitory is a round room with windows
looking out onto the grounds, and containing four-poster beds.
Gryffindor Quidditch team
The Gryffindor team won the Quidditch Cup during the 1993 - 1994 season - the
first time since 1984 - and again during the 1995 - 1996 season. They wear robes of
scarlet.

Known Gryffindors, past and present


For each known Gryffindor below, his or her name is given together with the years he or she
was a student in Gryffindor. See the individual students' entries for more information (such as
the references for how we know that they're Gryffindors and what years they were in).
1892-1899

Dumbledore, Albus Percival Wulfric Brian (PS6)

c. 1931 - 1938

McGonagall, Minerva (Sch2)

1940 - expelled 1943

Hagrid, Rubeus (BN)

(1960s)

Weasley, Arthur

Weasley (nee Prewett), Molly (GF31)

1971 - 1978

Black, Sirius [verified in OP9 that he was in the same house as James, confirmed
HBP4]

Evans, Lily (HBP4)

Lupin, Remus [verified in OP9 that he was in the same house as James]

Pettigrew, Peter (DH33)

Potter, James (Sch2)

(1990s)

Coote, Ritchie (HBP11)


At least a second year by Harry's sixth year, definitely not in Harry's own year,
no more than a year above Harry.

Frobisher, Victoria (Vicky) (OP13)


At least a second year by Harry's sixth year, probably not in Harry's own year.

Hooper, Geoffrey (OP13)


At least a second year by Harry's fifth year, definitely not in Harry's own year.

Kirke, Andrew (OP21)


At least a second year by Harry's fifth year, definitely not in Harry's own year.

Robins, Demelza (HBP11)


At least a second year by Harry's sixth year, probably not in Harry's own year,
no more than a year above Harry.

Sloper, Jack (OP21)


At least a second year by Harry's fifth year, definitely not in Harry's own year.

1982-1989

Weasley, Bill (GF12)

1983-1990

Weasley, Charlie (PS9, GF12

1987 - 1994

Weasley, Percy Ignatius (PS7)

Wood, Oliver (PS9)

1989 - 1996

Johnson, Angelina (PS11)

Jordan, Lee

Spinnet, Alicia (PS11)

Stimpson, Patricia (OP12, probably Gryffindor)

Towler, Kenneth (OP12, probably Gryffindor)

Weasley, Fred (PS7)

Weasley, George (PS7)

1990 - 1997

Bell, Katie (PS11)

McLaggen, Cormac (HBP4, HBP11)

1991 - 1998

Brown, Lavender (PS7)

Finnigan, Seamus (PS7)

Granger, Hermione (PS7)

Longbottom, Neville (PS7)

Patil, Parvati (PS7)

Potter, Harry (PS7)

Thomas, Dean (PS7)

Weasley, Ronald "Ron" (PS7)

1992 - 1999

Creevey, Colin (CS6)

Weasley, Ginny (CS5)

1993 - 2000

Vane, Romilda (HBP4, HBP15)

1994 - 2001

Creevey, Dennis (GF12)

MacDonald, Natalie (GF12)

Peakes, Jimmy (HBP11)

1995 - 2002

Abercrombie, Euan

Possible Gryffindors (not canon)

two unidentified girls? (1991 - 1998)

King, R. J. H. (PS/f)

McGonagall, M. G. (PS/f)

Mary MacDonald - could be Gryffindor from the context, but it doesn't specifically
say so (DH33)

Two Unidentified Gryffindor Girls


This intriguing piece of deduction was done by Jeralyn, the Voicelady on HP4GU. She
writes:
The standard wisdom among fans is that if Hermione, Lavender, and Parvati had
another roommate, we would have heard something about her by now.
Actually, I have figured out that there are two more Gryffindor girls in their year that we
haven't been introduced to yet.
I've been rereading PA... (a)nd the scene with Lupin and the boggart in the wardrobe is
very telling. Lupin wants all the students to have a go, and the scene runs as follows:
1

Neville - Snape in Gran's dress and hat

Parvati - the mummy

Seamus - the banshee

unidentified female student - rat

unidentified female student - rattlesnake

unidentified female student - eyeball

Dean - hand

Ron - spider

Then Lupin calls it back before Harry has to deal with it, and sends it to Neville to finish it
off. Harry and Hermione didn't have to work with it, because they answered the questions
correctly at the beginning of the class.
Now we know that Lavender was one of those unidentifed students. We also know that
there are definitely only five boys in Harry's dorm room, so that's how I knew that the two
remaining students were girls.
Ta-da!
EDITOR'S NOTE:
This isn't conclusive proof of anything, of course, but it's a nice bit of deduction and just might turn out to be
true! Another perfectly reasonable explanation, of course, is that the boggart was getting confused and was
changing form at random. -- Steve Vander Ark
A suggestive bit of evidence against this theory is that every known Gryffindor - all three girls and eventually all
five boys - belonged to the D.A., as well as the entire Gryffindor Quidditch team, every non-Slytherin
prefect in Hermione's and Ron's year, and even including the close friends of various members' current
boyfriends and girlfriends. Everybody, in other words, who was thought to be a likely candidate for
membership, and we know all the members - and no extra Gryffindor girls are among them. -- MLW

Ravenclaw House
Head: Professor Filius Flitwick
Founder: Rowena Ravenclaw
D Line

Blazon: azure, an eagle or (that is, a golden eagle on a blue


field, hence the Ravenclaw colours of blue and bronze)
Ghost: Helena Ravenclaw, the Grey Lady
Sorting Hat's description:
Or yet in wise old Ravenclaw
If you've a ready mind
Where those of wit and learning
Will always find their kind.

Location: Ravenclaw Tower, which is located on the west side of the castle (OP18); the
entrance is a door at the top of a tightly winding spiral staircase that leads up from the fifth
floor. The door has neither handle nor keyhole, but a talking bronze knocker in the shape of
an eagle. Rather than asking for a conventional password, the knocker will ask a question;
if answered correctly, the knocker will compliment the person on the answer and the door
will swing open (DH29).
The common room, like the other House common rooms, is decorated in House colours (blue
and bronze silk wall hangings, in this case, and a midnight-blue carpet decorated with stars).
The room is wide, circular, and very airy, with a domed ceiling painted with stars, and walls
with graceful arched windows that provide a spectacular view of the surrounding mountains.
There are bookcases, tables, and chairs, and opposite the entrance is another door leading to
the dormitories. Beside this door is a plinth on which stands a life-size statue in white marble
of Rowena Ravenclaw wearing her diadem (DH29).

Ravenclaw Quidditch team


blue robes

Known Ravenclaws, Past and Present:


For each known Ravenclaw below, his or her name is given (with a link to the appropriate
entry in Which Wizard), together with the years he or she was a student in Ravenclaw. See
the individual students' entries for more information (e.g., who they are, more detailed
analysis for how we know that they're Ravenclaws, how we know what years they were in...).
(years unknown, but near-contemporary with the Founders)

Helena Ravenclaw, The Grey Lady

(years unknown)

Flitwick, Filius (JKR)

(ea. 1940s)

Moaning Myrtle (JKR)

(1990s)

Bradley (male) (OP30, OP31)


The earliest possible year for Bradley is two years above Harry while the latest is
three years below, because Bradley was on the Ravenclaw Quidditch team in
Harry's fifth year.

Chambers (OP31)
The earliest possible year for Chambers is two years above Harry while the latest
is three years below, because Chambers was on the Ravenclaw Quidditch
team in Harry's fifth year.

Fawcett, S. (CS11, GF16)


No more than a year below Harry since she was at the Duelling Club. She isn't on the
list of students in Harry's own year (HPM), and can be no more than two years above
him since she wasn't of age at the beginning of Harry's fourth year.

1988 - 1995

Clearwater, Penelope

1988 - 1996

Davies, Roger (PA13, GF23, OP25)


Davies is older than Harry - Fleur Delacour thought of Harry as a "little boy"
but went to the Yule Ball with Davies, and Davies was captain of the
Ravenclaw Quidditch team during Harry's third year. The earliest possible
year for Davies is two years above Harry, since he was still captain of the team
during Harry's fifth year.

1990 - 1997

Carmichael, Eddie (OP31)

Chang, Cho (PA13)

Edgecombe, Marietta
Likely the same year as her friend, Cho Chang.

1991 - 1998

Boot, Terry (PS7)

Brocklehurst, Mandy (PS7)

Corner, Michael [1]

Cornfoot, Stephen (appears in HPM but not in books)

Entwhistle, Kevin (appears in HPM but not in books)

Goldstein, Anthony [1]

Li, Su (HPM)

McDougal, Morag (PS7, HPM)

Patil, Padma (PS7, GF)

Turpin, Lisa (PS7)

1992 - 1999

Lovegood, Luna (OP10)

1994 - 2001

Ackerley, Stewart (GF12)

Quirke, Orla (GF12)

[1] The screen capture from HPM lists Corner and Goldstein as Hufflepuffs, but they appear
in OP as Ravenclaws; OP is the definitive source, so they appear on this page.

Slytherin House
Head: Professor Severus Snape until spring of 1997, then Horace Slughorn.
Founder: Salazar Slytherin.
Blazon: vert, a serpent argent (that is, a silver serpent on a green field, hence the Slytherin
colours of green and silver) (PA15, GF15). The serpent device signifies the founder's gift of
being a Parselmouth (CS11).
Ghost: The Bloody Baron (PS7).
Location: The Slytherin common room is a low-ceilinged, dungeon-like room with greenish
lamps and chairs, with skulls all around. It is located under the
lake (DH23) [1].
Sorting Hat description: (PS7)
Or perhaps in Slytherin
You'll make your real friends
Those cunning folk use any means
To achieve their ends.
Slytherin Quidditch team
green robes
players chosen more for size than finesse or skill, it seems
all fly on Nimbus 2001s
the 1991-92 team included no girls
Known Slytherins, past and present

For each known Slytherin below, his or her name is


given (with a link to the appropriate entry in Which
Wizard), together with the years he or she was a student
in Slytherin. See the individual students' entries for more
detailed information (such as the references for how we
know that they're Slytherins and what years they were
in).
(unknown, but roughly contemporary with the
Founders)

The Bloody Baron

(years unknown, but possibly nineteenth century)

Slughorn, Horace

1858-1866

Black, Phineas Nigellus

(1936 - 1943) (or is it 1938?)

Avery (Riddle's contemporary)

Riddle, Tom Marvolo became Lord Voldemort

(c. 1970s)

Avery (Snape's contemporary)

Black, Bellatrix (c. 1970s)

Black, Narcissa (c. 1965 - 1972)

Black, Regulus (c. 1972 - 1979)

Lestrange, Rodolphus (c. 1970s)

Lestrange, Rabastan (c. 1970s)

Malfoy, Lucius (1965 - 1972)

Rosier, Evan (c. 1970s)

Snape, Severus (1971 - 1978)

Wilkes (c. 1970s)

(1990s)

Bletchley, Miles

Higgs, Terence
At least a year ahead of Harry, since he played Seeker in Harry's first year.

Urquhart (HBP14)
No more than a year older than Harry, since he was on the team in Harry's sixth year. May be
younger than Harry.

Vaisey (HBP14)
No more than a year older than Harry, since he was on the team in Harry's sixth year. May be
younger than Harry.

1986 - 1994

Flint, Marcus
Repeated a year without being kicked off the team, so actually left Hogwarts at the end of Harry's
third year rather than his second. This error was fixed in later editions of the books.

1988 - 1995

Bole

Derrick

1989 - 1996

Montague

Pucey, Adrian

Warrington, C. (c.1989 - 1996)

1991 - 1998

Bulstrode, Millicent

Crabbe, Vincent

Davis, Tracey (witch) (HPM)

Goyle, Gregory

Greengrass, Daphne (HPM, OP31)

Malfoy, Draco

Nott, Theodore

Parkinson, Pansy

Zabini, Blaise

1992 - 1999

Harper (male)

1993 - 1994

Astoria Greengrass (first name uncertain, could be Asteria, sister to Daphne)


(JKR)

1994 - 2001

Baddock, Malcolm

Pritchard, Graham

[1] according to Rowling's instructions to the designers of the set for CS/f., later verified in
DH23.

Hufflepuff House
Head: Professor Pomona Sprout
Founder: Helga Hufflepuff
Blazon: or, a badger sable (that is, a black badger on a golden field, hence the Hufflepuff
colours of yellow and black) (GF15)
Ghost: The Fat Friar
Sorting Hat's description (PS7):
These belong in Hufflepuff,
Where they are just and loyal.
Those patient Hufflepuffs are true
And unafraid of toil.
Location: Accessed through a still life painting found near the
kitchens; to reach it, you enter a door to the right of the
main staircase in the Entrance Hall and down a staircase
there (GF17). Although it is therefore at dungeon level, it is
"as dissimilar as possible" from the Potions classroom. As
we have seen in the other common rooms, it is decorated in
House colours, which in this case means that there are lots of
yellow hangings; like Gryffindor Tower, it has a lot of comfortable armchairs. There are
"little underground tunnels leading to the dormitories, all of which have perfectly round
doors, like barrel tops" (BLC, JKR).

This last detail is reminiscent of hobbit architecture as described in J.R.R. Tolkien's book
The Hobbit - MLW.
Hufflepuff Quidditch team
Known Hufflepuffs, Past and Present
For each known Hufflepuff below, his or her name is given (with a link to the appropriate
entry in the Which Wizard), together with the years he or she was a student in Hufflepuff,
and the specific reference which verified the membership.

The Fat Friar (years unknown) (PS7)

Abbott, Hannah (1991 - 1998) (PS7)

Bones, Susan (1991 - 1998) (PS7)

Branstone, Eleanor (1994 - 2001) (GF12)

Cadwallader (HBP19)

Cauldwell, Owen (1994 - 2001) (GF12)

Diggory, Cedric (1989 - 1995) (GF5)

Finch-Fletchley, Justin (1991 - 1998) (PS7)

Hopkins, Wayne (1991 - 1998) (HPM)

Jones, Megan (1991 - 1998) (HPM)

Macmillan, Ernie (1991 - 1998) (PS7)

Madley, Laura (1994 - 2001) (GF12)

Smith, Zacharias (1990s) (OP26)

Stebbins (male) (1990s) (GF23)

Summers (male) (1990s)

Summerby (male) (1990s) (OP26)

Tonks, Nymphadora (1984-1991) (JKR)

Whitby, Kevin (1994 - 2001) (GF12)

Zeller, Rose (1995 - 2002) (OP11)

[1] The screen capture from HPM lists Corner and Goldstein as Hufflepuffs, but they appear
in OP as Ravenclaws; OP is the definitive source, so they do not appear on this page.
Academics

schedule of classes by year


o

First Year

Second Year

Third Year

Fourth Year

Fifth Year

Sixth Year

Seventh Year

Ordinary Wizarding Levels (O.W.L.s)

Nastily Exhausting Wizarding Tests (N.E.W.T.s)

schedule of
classes by
year
First Year:
classes:

Astronomy

Charms

Defense
Against the Dark Arts

Herbology

History of Magic

Potions

Transfiguration

June: finals (exams)


Second Year
Same classes as first year. During the Easter holidays, students choose two or
more additional classes for year 3.
partial list:

Ancient Runes

Arithmancy

Care of Magical Creatures

Divination

Muggle Studies

June: finals (exams)


Third Year
Same classes as second year, add two new subjects. Students may drop an
elective class if they wish but they are required to continue with the core classes
begun in first year.

June: finals (exams)

Fourth Year
Same classes as third year, begin preparing for O.W.L.s. Students may drop an
elective class if they wish but they are required to continue with the core classes
begun in first year.

June: finals (exams)


Fifth Year
Same classes as fourth year. Students may drop an elective class if they wish but
they are required to continue with the core classes begin in first year.

June: Ordinary Wizarding Levels (O.W.L.s)


Sixth Year:
Students don't know what their classes for sixth year will be until after they
receive the results of their O.W.L.s. Once they have their O.W.L. results, the
students know whether they have achieved the required grades to get into the
classes they're interested in for sixth year. On the first day of term, each student
meets with his or her Head of House to determine which classes he or she can
take. If the student did not pass an O.W.L., he or she discusses options with the
Head of House.

If a student achieved the required O.W.L. in a particular subject (which varies from teacher to
teacher), he or she may continue in that subject, but is not required to do so. For example,
several (well, all, as far as we know) of Harry's year opted to drop out of Care of Magical
Creatures, much to Hagrid's dismay.
June: finals (exams)
Seventh Year:

We won't know what the classes are for seventh year until the book comes out, although it is
likely that seventh years concentrate on taking classes in their chosen fields.
June: Nastily Exhausting Wizarding Tests (N.E.W.T.s)
Ordinary Wizarding Levels (O.W.L.s)

At the end of fifth year, each student sits an Ordinary Wizarding Level (O.W.L.) for each of
the classes he or she takes. These are standardized tests administered by the Wizarding
Examinations Authority; the teachers may proctor exams outside their own subjects but do
not attend the Ordinary Wizarding Level (O.W.L.) in their own subjects.
Each O.W.L. has a theory portion, and for applicable classes a separate practical portion is
given, so that many O.W.L.s are in two parts, although only one O.W.L. score is given for

each subject. See the individual classes for the details of the material covered in the
individual exams.

Pass Grades

Fail Grades

Outstanding (O)

Exceeds Expectations (E)

Acceptable (A)

Poor (P)

Dreadful (D)

Troll (T)

Nastily Exhausting Wizarding Tests (N.E.W.T.s)

At the end of seventh year, each student sits a Nastily Exhausting Wizarding Test (N.E.W.T.)
for each of the classes he or she takes. These are standardized tests administered by the
Wizarding Examinations Authority, given at the same time and apparently in the same way
that O.W.L.s are given to fifth-year students.
The school motto, which appears on the crest, is "Draco dormiens nunquam
titillandus," which means "Never tickle a sleeping dragon."

Hogwarts in the movies


by Quentin Lowagie (see original [French] version)

Here's a map of the castle and the grounds we can see in the films (warning : this
version of the castle and its grounds doesn't fit at all with the books !). I
found information in SS/f, CS/f, PA/f and GF/f of course, the Bramman's painting
(inspired from the movie model - maybe he had access to several legended maps) and
two paintings available on the CS/dvd2. But these two paintings are trials and ideas
about possible positions and interpretations and all and don't really fit with the final
versions of the films. There are also a lot of differences between SS/f and GF/f.
Maybe I should redraw the whole map, but it's too fastidious.
This map is approximate, especially for the cliffs, and the scale is not correct at all,
because it's quite difficult to determine when you have very short sequences showing
the buildings, especially seen from another angle each time. The deepness of a aerial
view doesn't help the making of a "plane" map... But the organization of the buildings
between them is right, and I don't think I've forgotten anything ; there are just some
inconsistencies due to details brought up below. The organization of the legend
numbers is also peculiar, but most of the following precisions came step by step.
There are some differences and changes with each movie, especially in CS/f where
the greenhouses and the Whomping Willow have been added (and anyway they could
have been already present in SS/f); in PA/f where the clock building, the courtyard
with the fountain and the long wooden bridge were added (and the moving of the
Forest and Hagrid's Hut locations); and in GF/f where the owlery has been added
(and outside of the castle). At this point of the movies (the 4th), it became impossible
to have the big courtyard where the Whomping Willow was located in CS/f! There
are also many differences with the levels, and this map doesn't show them.
The PA/f buildings didn't exist in SS/f and CS/f, even if we never really see the place
where they're supposed to stand in the two first movies, because Hogwarts is always
shown from South-East but in PA/f, one strongly insists on the South-West view
where the new buildings stand. Maybe their location has voluntary been hidden to
allow the designers to add other elements when they have other ideas for the next
movies... The Hagrid's hut location in PA is completely changed because in SS/f and
CS/f the lake continues directly behind the castle that really seems to be on a peak, as
we see on the last CS/f image. There's not really any space for them ! In PA/f, the
castle is still on a peak but the lake seems to contour the forest and pass behind the
castle at last, as we can see Hagrid throwing pebbles (or rather stones) in the water.
It seems that Hogwarts is almost at the end of the lake, because Hagrid faces its
whole length... But these buildings have been designed for PA/f, they didn't exist
before and it's normal to have some inconsistencies, the designer's ideas evolving
along the movies and the discoveries of new special effects techniques. That's why my
map is a map of the more recent movie, including everything we've seen so far, and
not a map of the early movies, because each movie shows new elements that weren't
in the previous. I just attempted to put everything we see in the films. I'll be able to
make the ultimate map when the 7th movie is realised!
Like I said, there are too much changes, along the movies, creating inconsistencies.
That's why my map is approximate. But if we have a look at the arrangement of the
elements together (well, the first Hagrid's Hut, forest and Quidditch pitch locations
with the castle and lake locations), it completely agrees with JKR's map (PA/DVD2).
Just the castle inside doesn't fit with the books, even if it's so wonderful and that JKR
said it's quite faithful to what she imagined.

Movie designers haven't done a careful study of the castle of the books, that's a fact.
They appointed the concerned places with not much faith to the books (but it is true
that we don't have much rigorous descriptions in the Tolkien way) ; they took
existing places to place them in the model, and therefore it CAN'T be the "real"
Hogwarts. But there are some things they could have respected, like for the Great
Hall location compared to the entrance hall and the marble stairs location or the
entrance or the Gryffindor tower location in PA/f. But they're movies, and "personal"
adaptations, so whatever. There is no clear and accurate answers to my questions,
because the models have been designed as the films went, with a more aesthetic than
canon research!... But if someone knows where to find photos of the original model
(more than we see in the PA/DVD2), just tell me! Maybe I should simply contact
Warner Bros. instead of wasting my time...
UPDATE : now that I saw a map of the PA video game, I don't need any clue or help
because I noticed my map is almost the same! Great! That's the same pleasure than
SVA had when he realized that his Hogwarts and Environs map was almost the same
as JKR one! But I'm still quite satisfied with my map and the study that permitted its
design, even if now they seem a bit useless.

References :
1. We know where the Greenhouse #3 is, but instead of the greenhouses in SS/f, we
just see grass where Filch and our friends (and Draco) go to Hagrid's for their
detention (#27).
2. The Hungarian Horntail crashes on the foot of this bridge decorated with lanterns
(this bridge not always visible in PA/f). She chases Harry through the whole crack
located in the middle of the castle, therefore passing below the previous two bridges.
3. This Dark Tower has been added to lock Sirius in PA/f (a smaller building was
there in SS/f and CS/f). In the book, Sirius is locked in Flitwick's office.
4. The new PA/f buildings : the hospital wing - but for the location only, because it
makes the link between the clock building and the building with towers on each angle
(one of them is the Gryffindor's) in the third movie. Maybe it should have been at the
same place as SS/f and CS/f but should've had another entrance... However, it seems
to be the same room that was in the first two movies.
5. The new PA/f buildings : the clock building
6. The new PA/f buildings : the courtyard with the fountain and the ruined cloister
(I've forgotten two turrets to the angles beside the wooden bridge)
7. The new PA/f buildings : the wooden bridge ended with a little building - this
complex is one of the several movie Hogwarts entrances (still there in GF/f), for they
take this way to go to Hogsmeade in PA/f (the other entrances are #32 and 39#)
8.New PA/f element : the menhirs where Hermione hits Malfoy

9.New PA/f element : the stairs leading to Hagrid's Hut in PA/f, that should be a bit
more perpendicular to the wooden bridge
10. The PA/f's "double" Hagrid's Hut that should be placed a bit lower
11. We can see that this tower is the Gryffindor's (common room + dormitories)
because there's a view of that tower in SS/f before we see H-R-H chatting in the
common room (and it seems to fit with Bramman's painting). From PA/f, Harry can
see Hagrid's hut at last by his dormitory window, as in the books (even if the former
location was more accurate)
12. The Great Hall we always see in the general views; the Great Table is on the left.
13. These dotted lines evoke the cliff sketching of SS/f and CS/f (but here again
nothing is sure...)
14. In SS/f, we should find at the top of this building the statue Neville was hanging
from momentarily during his first disastrous flying lesson
15. In this big stretch of grass in SS/f, the first years have their first flying lessons
and Harry and Wood practice Quidditch. It's not very clear and doesn't really fit with
the Whomping Willow and all in CS/f, and I think it's too big on my map. In fact, it
should be a lot bigger and include the Quidditch pitch to fit with JKR's, as the
grounds are surrounded by walls, walls that could be of that kind. The views of this
place have been shot in Alnwick Castle, Northumberland (the first flying lesson and
the Wood practice in SS/f and the Whomping Willow scene in CS/f)
16. Many things happen in this courtyard and its cloister (it's a bit like their
"playtime court", but only in the two first movies). I made it a lot too big, but I
couldn't help it if I wanted the rest to fit (this cloister is in Lacock Abbey, England).
The Transfiguration classroom is around this cloister, and maybe the entrance to
Dumbledore's office too (the Griffin) (cf. 37), where Harry frees Dobby and Lucius
Malfoy leaves Hogwarts by a door opposite, leading to crenels and the outside - but
we don't really know where the main entrance is!... We also see crenels in the
courtyard, but there's no courtyard with all these details together... So I don't really
think Dumbledore's office entrance is in that cloister (see #37). In SS/f, we can see
the Trophies (there's no room for them at this point of the movies) and the DADA
classroom in SS/f. From CS/f, the DADA classroom in #42, under the roof.
17. I don't really know how this complicated building looks; most of the towers are
right but it changed a lot through the movies. It changes a bit in CS/f and begins to
look like the clock building in PA/f (q.v. the roof). Maybe we can find the library
there- we see ramparts by the windows (CS/f). When Harry looks for Nicholas
Flamel in the Restricted Section (during the night in SS/f), he directly finds Snape
and Quirrell in the famous cloister (#16). It's very likely that the Library is in that
building because the cloister is beside it. It's also clear that McGonagall's office is in
there, accorded to the Remembrall scene.
18. This Quidditch pitch location is only valid for SS/f and fits with JKR's map maybe it's a bit too far or too close to the castle - but without exact scale, I can't
determine it. The CS/f and PA/f pitches are closer to the castle (#34 and #40). The

little stadium erected for the first task, the amphitheatre and the maze erected for the
third task in GF/f are somewhere over there, but the first task stadium is more in the
north-west, on rocky hills.
19. The Dark Forest in SS/f, CS/f and on JKR's map
20. The Dark Forest in PA/f. Its location has totally changed because it's still behind
Hagrid's hut that also has its location changed. In the two first movies, it faced the
two big towers inspired from Durham cathedral (highly modified in PA/f). Instead of
his hut, we see a big valley filled with small rivers (q.v. the Harry's flight on Buckbeak
in Care of Magical Creatures). In fact, it seems that the peak where the castle stands
is at the end of a valley making a non symmetrical T with the lake, which the end fits
between CS/f and PA/f.
21. The direction of the Hogsmeade Station fits with the JKR's map but not the
village. The station and the direction taken by the train at the end of SS/f (south) fits
with the reality too. Somewhere there may be the path taken by the carriages to lead
the students to the castle on the 1st September in PA/f
22. In SS/f and CS/f, the Hagrid's Hut and the Dark Forest location fit better with
the JKR's map
23. The Whomping Willow in CS/f
24. The PA/f's Whomping Willow seems to be somewhere there downwards, quite
far actually - it seems to have a lot of land added in this portion (where there's the
lake in the first two movies). I located it regarding the view we have of the Great Hall.
It's relatively isolated.
25. The Lake
26. Cliffs (there we can see a hollow going under three bridges and extended with
grass under the wooden bridge in PA/f - this hollow separates the castle in two parts
- we can imagine, the lower part, for living : the Houses (4 towers in a building - not
faithful to the books, don't forget), the hospital wing and the Great Hall - the second
section for working : all the classrooms, the greenhouses and the library (that could
explain the fact they're always in #16 and another courtyard located just before #32
in SS/f (the scar hurting episode) and CS/f (the Ford Anglia episode) - courtyards
quite far from their tower)
27. Grass
28. Trees
29. Grass (in PA/f)
30. These two towers have been redesigned in PA/f ; they're inspired from the
Durham Cathedral in England. The shape of the building behind them is also
inspired from the cathedral. On the centre of the "crown" we have a round tower with
a squared base. This tower has 4 other round towers on each angle. I don't know
what we can find in that building; it looks too much like a church. In CS/f, we can see

the greenhouses at the base of these two towers. In SS/f, there is directly the grass
(#27). In PA/f, we find another valley.
31. Grass, trees and hills ; maybe a path to go to the CS/f Quidditch pitch (cf. the
CS/DVD2 paintings)
32. We can find here small buildings with a porch taken by the Ford Anglia escaping
to the woods - it fits with Hagrid's Hut location - they take the same porch to go to
their detention and after the scar hurts in SS/f (again in Alnwick castle). This
entrance is once of the several movie Hogwarts entrances, along with #7 and #39.
33. The locker rooms are on that side of the Quidditch field
34. CS/f Quidditch stadium (very close from the castle!)
35. This wall is not there in SS (the Whomping Willow neither). It appeared in CS/f
with the greenhouses (but there's NOTHING clear!) and it should be in the center of
the famous courtyard (#16) (see PA/f), but it was difficult to get it centred.
36. The Boathouse, according to Bramman. I suppose it's the building where the 1st
years' boats are stored each year from September to September. We can see stairs
along the cliffs leading to #39
37. According to Bramman, the marble stairs should be at the base of this tower we
always see in the large shots. The moving stairs should follow, in the whole tower.
When we see the Gryffindors going to their dormitories at the beginning of SS/f, they
take the moving stairs, then take at least one corridor to get to their tower. So it
should be consistent, except in PA/f, where the Fat Lady portrait is among the stairs,
which falsifies everything, since the Gryffindor tower is located on #11 in ES/f as in
GF/f (all this to add a useless and not funny scene, without thinking about the
consistency!) Plus, the stairs are linked to many corridors, while 3/4 of the tower are
not linked to any building. Anyway, Hogwarts is supposed to be a magical building,
and we don't know exactly if the stairs stops on the ground level.
The divination class is on the top of a very big tower, but which one? Maybe this
tower? I don't think so, actually... Last chance to know will be OP/f!
In GF/f, the Trophy Room replaces the little room located left of the staff table. It
seems to be somewhere under this big tower.
In GF/f, Harry is in serious trouble on the roof of this tower, chased by the
Hungarian Horntail. He succeeds in getting back on his broomstick, flies away and
turns to #30 and then to #13 and passes below the two bridges to escape the dragon,
defeating her by flying through the third bridge's arches (#2).
38. GF/f shows us that Dumbledore's office and residence constitute the three
turrets attached to the biggest tower of the castle (#37): the first turret for the
portraits, the curious instruments and the Pensieve, the second for the office itself,
Fawkes and the Sorting Hat, and the third for, upstairs, Dumbledore's personal
observatory, and his bedroom-lounge downstairs). The Bramman picture already
implied it. This location for the office could fit with Lucius Malfoy's departure at the
end of CS/f via a place "similar" to #39...
So far, PA/f is the only movie that doesn't show Dumbledore's office. Actually, it
does! The classrom lit by spine-shaped candles in which Lupin teaches Harry how to

repel the Dementors is in fact the original Dumbledore's office set, the objects
decorating it having just been replaced. They could have found another set, because
one can recognize the office without any problem. Too bad!
39. Here's the little building extending the Great Hall in which it would be logical to
find the marble stairs where, for example, McGonagall greets the first years in SS/f (I
forgot to draw a little turret located between this building and the Great Hall, on the
rooftop, and another turret located more or less above the staff table (#12). On the
other hand, in PA/f, this small building became a little courtyard. So, as I said in #7,
this place seems to be one of the several movie Hogwarts entrances, along with #7
and #32
40. These are the greenhouses in CS/f and PA/f
41. The PA/f stadium, even if we have difficulty seeing parts of the castle with all that
rain, is more or less at the same place than the CS/f one, but a bit lower. So, I don't
really know until we see the location of the new Forest in PA/f... (yeah right, that
makes a lot of stadiums on the map, I know!)
42. We can find here the CS/f, PA/f et GF/f DADA class, located under the roof. The
building is flanked with two turrets. The first one serves as the stairs, the other one,
on the opposite of the class, is the teacher's office. GF/f gives its precise location.
43. In the center of this crown formed by this building stands a round tower with a
squared base, becoming a fully squared tower in PA/f. This tower is flanked by four
other round towers on each angle. They are a bit smaller in PA/f
44. Here's the only really additional GF/f element (the first task stadium, the second
task platforms and the third task amphitheatre and maze being temporary
constructioned) : the owlery, that was isolated from the rest of the castle, instead of
being a part of it (in the West Tower).
map and research 2004-2006 Quentin Lowagie

Beauxbatons Academy of Magic

Headmistress: Olympe Maxime


Location: France
Uniforms: robes of fine silk; attendants of the carriage wear pale blue
Coat of Arms: two crossed golden wands on a powder-blue field, each emitting three stars
The Academy's building is called the Palace of Beauxbatons, and unlike Hogwarts Castle it
does not contain suits of armour. Rather than a Great Hall as at Hogwarts, the Palace contains
a Dining Chamber, which is elaborately decorated at Christmastime but in a different style
than that used at Hogwarts (GF23). The scholastic system at the Academy is also arranged
differently than that at Hogwarts; instead of sitting Ordinary Wizarding Levels or their
equivalent at the end of five years, Academy students sit exams after six years (HBP5).

Where is Beauxbatons?

During the feast celebrating the arrival of the students for the Triwizard Tournament, Rowling
chose to serve "bouillabaisse". This is a very typical fish soup from the southeast of France
and is not really eaten elsewhere, at least not as a common dish. It is likely, then (though an
assumption) that Beauxbatons is on the Mediterranean coast of France (maybe by Marseilles)
which could explain as well why the students of Beauxbatons are so cold in Hogwarts. -thanks to Amyll.
The word(s) Beauxbatons, roughly translated from French, means "beautiful wands." In the
film, it is implied that Beauxbatons is an all-girls school, but this is not canon.
Durmstrang Institute

Headmasters: Igor Karkaroff (until fleeing in 1995)


Location: a castle in northern Europe, far enough north that days are very short in winter
Uniform: furs, blood-red robes
The Durmstrang Intitute also has a castle, but it is not as big as Hogwarts, having only four
floors. Its fires are only lit for magical purposes. The grounds are quite extensive and include
lakes and mountains (GF23).
Durmstrang has the reputation of teaching Dark Arts, and it does not admit Muggle-born
students (GF11). Gellert Grindelwald was a student here once, and he carved "his" symbol actually the symbol representing the Deathly Hallows - into one of the walls, where it
remains today (DH8).
For more information see the essay, Languages at Durmstrang.
The name Durmstrang comes from the German phrase "Sturm und Drang" which translates
to "Storm and Stress." The phrase refers to a movement in German literature in the late
1700s which emphasized "subjectivity and the unease of man in contemporary society" (
The Columbia Encyclopedia). In the film, it is implied that Durmstrang is an allboys school, but this is not canon.
Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry

Headmaster: Albus Dumbledore et al.


Location: Scotland
Uniform: black robes, black pointed hats
For more information on Hogwarts, click here.
Other Wizarding Schools

There are four that we know of:

a school in Brazil from which Bill Weasley had a penfriend(GF7)

students in the U.S. have their own school (SN)

The Salem Witches' Institute, U.S.A. (possibly a school) (GF7)

Mahoutokoro in Japan (Pm)

The School Year at Hogwarts

The year begins on September 1

Hogwarts Express leaves King's Cross Station at 11 a.m., bringing students


to Hogsmeade Station where the 2nd through 7th years ride horseless
carriages up to the castle and 1st years cross the lake in boats with Hagrid

the start-of-year feast


o

the Sorting

a few words from Dumbledore

vast quantities of food and drink

a few more words from Dumbledore, including the "start-of-term


notices"

classes begin on September 2 - schedules handed out at breakfast

Quidditch trials during the second week (PS7), also flying lessons for first
years

Halloween Feast on the evening of October 31


o

hundreds of live bats flying around

delicious pumpkin treats

first Quidditch match in the beginning of November

second week of December McGonangall takes names of those who are


staying over the Christmas holidays

end of first term is usually about a week before Christmas and most of the
students and some of the teachers go home

December 25: Christmas Feast

shortly after January 1: Hogwarts Express returns and start of second term

Easter holidays - two-week break, students go home, exact dates vary


every year

exams are held the first week of June

results come out the second week of June

Leaving Feast, sometimes called the end-of-term feast, the evening before
the Hogwarts Express goes back to London

the Hogwarts Express returns to London during the third week of June

all staff and students leave Hogwarts during the summer except for Filch
(SN)

Daily Routines at Hogwarts

The day begins with breakfast in the Great Hall. During breakfast, the
morning mail arrives in a flurry of hundreds of owls. A bell signals the start
of the first class at 9 am.

There are two morning classes with a break between (signalled by a bell),
followed by lunch and a break.

After lunch, classes resume at 1 pm. It is not clear if there are one or two
classes in the afternoon.

Supper is served in the Great Hall toward evening, after which the
students are expected to be in their House common rooms for studying
and socializing. Curfew for older students is 9 pm (OP).

There is no set bedtime after supper.

Gryffindor class schedules (Harry's year)

class schedule, 1991-1992

class schedule, 1992-1993

class schedule, 1993-1994

Examination schedule for 3rd years, June 3-6, 1994

class schedule, 1994-1995

class schedule, 1995-1996