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OS Boot Camp Storage

Lab Exercises
July 2012

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Copyright
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Revision Date: July 2012


Revision Number: MR-7CN-NSOSBOOT.5.0

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Document Revision History


Rev #

File Name

Date

0.2

OS_Boot_Camp_Labs_Days_4_and_5
First-cut version with HP-UX lab only.
Added Solaris and AIX labs.

16-Feb-2005

Added Windows lab. Also an introductory


section on PuTTY and VNC.
ID-Review: completed one pass of edits
Second pass of edits, accommodates
differences in classroom lab hardware
Format review
Edits, corrections
Updates to Exercises
Updates to Exercises

23-Feb-2005

0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1.0

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20-Feb-2005

11-March-2005
18-March-2005
16-April -2008
09-May-2011
17-Jan-2012
10-July-2012

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Table of Contents
COPYRIGHT ............................................................................................................ 2
DOCUMENT REVISION HISTORY ............................................................................. 3
LAB EXERCISE 1: NETWORK CLIENT TOOLS: INSTALLATION AND USE .................... 7
LAB EXERCISE 1: PART 1 - PUTTY ................................................................................... 8
LAB EXERCISE 1: PART 2 - VNC CLIENT .......................................................................... 13
LAB EXERCISE 2: HP-UX LAB................................................................................. 15
LAB EXERCISE 2: PART 1: KSH (KORN SHELL) AND HOST SYSTEM BASICS............................... 16
LAB EXERCISE 3: SOLARIS LAB ............................................................................. 19
LAB EXERCISE 3:
LAB EXERCISE 3:
LAB EXERCISE 3:
LAB EXERCISE 3:
LAB EXERCISE 3:

PART 1 - SH (BOURNE SHELL) AND HOST SYSTEM BASICS ............................ 20


PART 2 - EXPLORE STORAGE HARDWARE AND DRIVERS............................... 26
PART 3 - INSTALL A SOFTWARE PACKAGE ON THE SOLARIS HOST................... 34
PART 4 - TEST DRIVE OUR EMC STORAGE FROM THE SOLARIS HOST ............. 39
PART 5 - CLEAN UP THE SOLARIS HOST .................................................... 49

LAB EXERCISE 4: AIX LAB ..................................................................................... 53


LAB EXERCISE 4:
LAB EXERCISE 4:
LAB EXERCISE 4:
LAB EXERCISE 4:

PART 1 - CSH AND HOST SYSTEM BASICS .................................................. 54


PART 2 - EXPLORE STORAGE HARDWARE AND DEVICE CONFIGURATION ......... 57
PART 3: INSTALL ADDITIONAL SOFTWARE ON THE AIX HOST........................ 66
PART 4 - CLEAN UP THE AIX HOST .......................................................... 70

LAB EXERCISE 5: WINDOWS 2000/2003 SERVER LAB ........................................... 73


LAB EXERCISE 5: PART 1 - EXPLORE THE HOST SYSTEM ...................................................... 74
LAB EXERCISE 5: PART 2 - INSTALL SOFTWARE ON THE WINDOWS HOST ............................... 83
LAB EXERCISE 5: PART 3 - CLEAN UP THE WINDOWS HOST ................................................. 88
LAB EXERCISE 6: LINUX LAB ................................................................................. 89
LAB EXERCISE 6: PART 1 - LINUX SYSTEM BASICS.............................................................. 90
LAB EXERCISE 6: PART 2 - INSTALLING UNISPHERE AGENT AND NAVISPHERE CLI .................... 95

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Lab Exercise 1: Network Client Tools: Installation and Use

Purpose:

Tasks:

To become familiar with two popular and free tools for connecting over
a network to servers, from a Windows desktop or laptop. All
subsequent labs Lab 1 through Lab 4 will require use of these tools.

In this lab, you perform the following tasks:


Verify if PuTTY is already available on a Windows desktop; if its not
available, install the PuTTY toolkit
Install VNC client on a Windows desktop
Verify proper operation of these tools with a simple test try
connecting to one Unix server and one Windows server
Understand basic features of these tools

References:

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Online Help for both tools

Lab Exercise 1: Part 1 - PuTTY


Step
1

Action
PuTTY is what we will need to connect over the network to any of our Unix servers (HPUX, Solaris or AIX).
Lets first check if PuTTY is already available on the desktop or laptop. Strictly speaking, it
is sufficient to have the single binary program, putty.exe, for remote terminal sessions.
Lets check for presence of this binary.
Start > Run
Type cmd to get a Command Prompt window.
In the command window, type:
C:
dir/s putty.exe

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Step

Action
What does dir /s do? Do a dir /? to find out.
Can you search for the same file on the system using Windows Explorer? How?
If the PuTTY binary already exists, were done. Do one, or both, of the steps below this
paragraph. If PuTTY does not exist, you will have to install it. Go directly to the next step,
Step 2.
Create a shortcut to the PuTTY program on the desktop.
Once this is done, you can start a PuTTY session by simply clicking on the shortcut
icon.
If you prefer the command line, you may want to add the full directory path to the
PuTTY binary location to your Path environment variable.
How does this help?
<Right_click> on My Computer, select Properties.
Select Advanced to Environment Variables.
Under System Variables, highlight Path, then select Edit
In the Variable Value field, navigate to the end of the current Path definition. Terminate
it with a semicolon (;) and add the directory location of the new binary. For example,
add:
;C:\putty
Press OK successively until you exit.

Lets check if our change has taken effect. Start a new Command Prompt window. From
the default directory (typically C:\ ), type:
putty
If weve done our path definition correctly, this should work - and open the PuTTY main
window.

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Step
2

Action
If PuTTY is not already on the desktop well be using well, well just have to install it.
PuTTY is distributed under the GPL license; there are thus no restrictions on installing it
on any number of machines. A large number of freeware sites make a copy of it available
for download; check google.
For your convenience, a recent version of the PuTTY toolkit is on your Resource CD.
Load the CD into your CD-ROM drive, then:
Start > Run
Browse to the binary on the CD called: putty-cvs-installer.exe
Running this binary will install PuTTY on your system. Once this is done, revisit Step 1
and complete the last two steps: add a desktop shortcut to the PuTTY binary; and set
your Path so you can run PuTTY on the command line from any directory.

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Step
3

Action
This is what the PuTTY main window looks like, when you start it:

Typically you feed in an IP address in the Host Name (or IP address) field, and select
Telnet which initiates a connection on TCP port 23 automatically.
Selecting Open at this point will put you into a telnet session right away.
If you expect to be logging in and out of the host repeatedly, you may want to feed the
host name into Saved Sessions and Save first. This helps avoid the bother of having to
remember the servers IP address each time you want to start a new session. The Load
button brings back the saved IP address for the selected host, at which point you can just
Open.
You must also set the backspace key sequence. The UNIX environment issues a Control-H
when the backspace key is pressed. You windows keyboard issues a Control-Y. The
Control-Y key sequence in UNIX will erase the line you have typed rather than deleting a
character. Dont forget to make this change and make it permanent in your saved
sessions.
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Step
4

Action

PuTTY has comprehensive online help. To access it, just press the question mark (?) on
the top right, and click on any field. You get context-sensitive help for the field you
select.
Or, you can just select Contents and browse the entire help document.
End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 1: Part 2 - VNC Client


Step
1

Action
We will be using VNC Client to connect to the Windows Server (Lab 4). All other labs
involve Unix servers - for those, PuTTY is sufficient. Like PuTTY, VNC Client is also
distributed freely under the GPL license.
For VNC, there is a server component and a client component. The lab server should
already be running the VNC server software, properly configured. You need to make sure
that you have the client component on the desktop or laptop you will be accessing the
server from.
Weve included the VNC Client binary on the Resource CD.
The filename is: vnc-4.0-x86_win32_viewer.exe
Copy this binary to a directory of your choice on the C: drive. Note that this is not an
install kit this binary is it! There is nothing to install.
You may want to call it something shorter on your C: drive perhaps vnc.exe, create a
shortcut to it, and/or add the directory to your Path variable , If you dont understand Path
you didnt read Part 1 on PuTTY, did you?

Running the VNC client with Start>Run , or directly from a Command Window gives
you a small startup screen like this:

You merely need to feed in the IP address of the Windows server, followed by a colon : ,
and the TCP Port number that the VNC server is listening on. Frequently thats port 5900,
but check with your lab instructor your server may be configured to use a different port.
Select OK and youre on the desktop of the server.
What TCP port number does telnet typically use?

You may want to explore the Options available on the VNC client. Perhaps the most
important one controls desktop sharing. Be nice - make sure you dont lock out other VNC
clients from connecting to the same server!

End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 2: HP-UX Lab

Purpose:

Tasks:

To become familiar with HP-UX, from a storage installation and


deployment perspective. The emphasis is on features unique to HP-UX,
relative to other flavors of Unix.

In this lab, you perform the following tasks:


Perform a software package installation on a HP-UX host.
Run various storage-centric utilities on a HP-UX host.
Perform a routine test on a HP-UX device provisioned from an EMC
storage array.

References:

HP-UX man pages


EMC Host Connectivity Guide for HP-UX

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Lab Exercise 2: Part 1: ksh (Korn shell) and Host System Basics
Step
1

Action
Using PuTTY, login as root to the HP-UX host.
If you dont know what PuTTY is, read the very first section of this lab workbook on
Network Client Tools.

Switch to the Korn shell with command-line editing capability. There are many UNIX
editors. We only have been taught one editor, vi. So in order to manipulate the
command line the Korn shell must be told which editor to use.
# ksh o vi

Change your terminal settings, so that the <Backspace> key behaves like erase :
# stty erase <backspace_key>

List all the files in roots home directory, / :


# ls

What filesystems are mounted on this host, and how much free space is there? We need
to bring in some software installation files.
# bdf
The free space in the / filesystem is: =
The free space in the /home filesystem is: =

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Kbytes
Kbytes

16

Step
6

Action
Lets make a directory to put our stuff in , and go there:
# cd /var/tmp
# ls
HP installs software in a depot format. The Software Assistant SWA, creates software
bundles for installation. These bundles are typically installed from directories called
depots.
# mkdir depot
# cd depot
# pwd

Get the history of previously-run commands within ksh :


# history

Now lets recall our first ls command. Type the sequence <Esc>, <k> repeatedly (not both
together tap <Esc> , then tap <k> ). Notice how the commands appear, starting with the
most recent one. Repeat the sequence until you get the command ls, then press <Enter>
to run it again.
Note: you can actually edit the recalled command with vi-like actions, but thats for you to
explore at leisure.

Note the exact revision of the HP-UX operating system, and the hardware architecture
obtained from the command:
# uname -a
Is our HP-UX revision 11.21, 11.31 or some other version?

Our HP-UX server OS version is:


What architecture is the HP-UX server:

End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 3: Solaris Lab

Purpose:

Tasks:

To become familiar with Solaris, from a storage installation and


deployment perspective. The emphasis is on features unique to Solaris,
relative to other flavors of Unix.

In this lab, you perform the following tasks:


Perform a software package installation on a Solaris host
Run various storage-centric utilities on a Solaris host
Perform routine tests on a Solaris device provisioned from an EMC
storage array.

References:

Solaris man pages


http://docs.sun.com
EMC Host Connectivity Guide for Sun Solaris

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Lab Exercise 3: Part 1 - sh (Bourne shell) and Host System Basics


Step
1

Action
Using PuTTY, login as root to the Solaris host.
If you dont know what PuTTY is, read the very first section of this lab workbook on
Network Client Tools.

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Step

Action
OK, lets look around the host first. What are the current settings for common environment
variables?
# env

What type of shell are we running? You can search the list from above, or you can simply
type:
# echo $SHELL
Did it report /bin/sh ? That would be the Bourne shell.
This is an older shell, and has fairly basic features compared to the others. But its worth
knowing for a couple of reasons. First, it happens to be the default shell on Solaris (what
you get if you add yourself as a user, and dont ask for some other login shell). Plus, a lot of
critical startup scripts are written in Bourne. EMC also uses Bourne shell to install Solutions
enabler.

If we preferred ksh , how would we switch to ksh in this session?

If we wanted bash to be the default login shell for root, what file do we edit? Run this
command. Dont actually edit it, though leave it alone. Corrupting this file will render
the system inaccessible. If you dont know what that file is remember we created a user
account earlier this week and you edited it.
# grep root <that_file>

If we did make the edit and saved that file, when does the change take effect? Does the
current PuTTY session switch to bash right away?

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Step
3

Action
Whats the environment variable PATH set to?

Our PATH tells the shell where to look for commands (binaries or shell scripts) when we
type them. The shell looks for a file matching the command name, and searchs the
directories in the order specified by PATH.
We dont like our current PATH. Were going to be installing some software ( naviseccli),
and after thats done, we want an extra (/opt/Unisphere/bin) directory in our PATH. We
also want the shell to always check our current directory too, for executables. So lets take
care of all this now.
Before we edit the profile, lets first save a copy. Just in case we dont like the results of
our edits.
# cp .profile .profile.orig

Start the vi editor on the file .profile (theres a period in front of profile). This is the
configuration file for the Bourne, Korn and Bash Shells theres one for every user, in there
home directory.

Which directory are we in now, and whose home directory is it? How do we know?

# vi .profile
Navigate down to the PATH line with the <j> key. Then navigate over to the end of the line
anyway you know. Simply pressing <l> repeatedly will do it. You can add stuff to the end of
the line with <a>. Were going to add the directories /opt/Unisphere/bin and . (just a
period) to our PATH. After were done, the line will look something like this:
PATH=/usr/bin:/etc:/usr/sbin:/usr/openwin/bin:/usr/ucb:/sbin:/usr/emc/ECC/bin:/usr/sym
cli/bin:/opt/EMCpower/bin:/opt/VRTSvmsa/bin:/opt/Acrobat5/bin:/opt/Unisphere/bin:.
Now check the PATH variable again. Has it changed? When will the new value take effect?

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Step
4

Action
Being the impatient sort, lets start a new PuTTY session and log in again as root. Examine
the PATH variable again. We should be happy with the results at this point. Run the
command:
# echo $PS1
PS1 stands for: Prompt String 1. There is a PS2 as well. By default, the shell uses whatever
PS1 resolves to right now, and makes that the command prompt.
Now lets try the command below. Be careful with all the quote marks. The ` (tilde) is the
back-quote key, usually under ~ (tilde) on the keyboard. This is not the standard singlequote mark!
# PS1=`date`>
The ` grave accent will execute the command inside them and replace the command text
with the command output.
What happened to our command prompt?

The key thing to note here is the difference between and ` (which is pretty universal
across all flavors of Unix shells). A double-quoted item - using a pair of - represents a text
string. A grave-quoted item using a pair of ` forces evaluation of the item by a shell, and
the result is put in place of the command.
OK, we like our new prompt. Lets make it permanent. How?
If youre one step ahead, youve already started a new PuTTY session and logged out of the
old ones. If not - lets try something new:
# . ./.profile
This forces the current shell to use all the definitions in our current .profile. If there are
problems with our edits, well know right away. If it works now, it will work with new PuTTY
logins too.

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Step
5

Action
What filesystems are mounted on this host, and how much free space is there?
# df -k

Whats the /proc filesystem? Why is /proc reporting zero for capacity, space used and
available?! Is this a conventional filesystem on a physical disk somewhere? Where does it
reside, physically on the host? For a good definition check out this link
http://tldp.org/LDP/LGNET/46/fink.html
Lets get into this directory and take a look around. Under /proc, youll see a bunch of
directories, one per process on the system. The directory name is the same as the PID. Look
around in a directory and see what you find. About the only thing that writes to the /proc
filesystem is the Solaris kernel. A bunch of diagnostic utilities read the information there.
For example, try the command:
# ptree a | more
What do you think this command is doing?

Do you see the command we just typed in ptree a - in the tree? Does the process
hierarchy begin to make sense?

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Step
6

Action
Lets record our exact Solaris revision, before moving on to the next part.
# uname a
Solaris versions are colloquially referred to as: Solaris 8, Solaris 9, Solaris 10 etc. If uname
reported 5.10, it means were running Solaris 10. Solaris 9 and 10 are the most commonly
deployed versions at this time.
My Solaris host operating system version is:

What is the hardware architecture? Is it 32 bit or 64 bit? It matters when you are
downloading the software from powerlink.

Frequently, installing a software package on Solaris requires that certain operating system
patches be installed as a pre-requisite. The command to show currently installed Solaris
patches is:
# showrev p
Try it and see what it says.

Pop quiz:
Lets say were checking if patch number 120220-01 is installed on our Solaris 10 host a
new driver we want to install requires that patch. Can you?

Is the host ready for our new driver right now?

End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 3: Part 2 - Explore Storage Hardware and Drivers


Step
1

Action
Using PuTTY, login as root to the Solaris host.
Lets first understand the prtconf utility. prtconf gives you a pretty good idea of a Sun hosts
current hardware configuration, what drivers have been installed, etc. Since this is an
unfamiliar command in Unix, the first thing we do (of course) is:
# man prtconf
From the man page, we know this command cant do any damage by itself its just printing
out stuff. By itself, this is a good reason to read the man page before you run anything
unfamiliar! Play around with the prtconf options and see how they affect the output to
screen. You may want to pipe the output through more so you can look at your own pace.
Since were storage-focused here, we invariably care about two key things on the host:
what HBA boards (typically Fibre Channel boards) are installed on the system; and are the
proper device drivers loaded for them.
Try this:
# prtconf Dv | grep i fibre
If this doesnt work maybe you need to search for other objects, try this command to find
your HBAs
# prtdiag
To list the driver information, firmware and wwpn for your adapters use this command:
# fcinfo hba-port
Do you see information on two Fibre Channel boards? The driver calls each physical board
or host port one instance.
Whats the name of the driver managing these two HBAs?

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Step
3

Action
On Sun hosts, youll commonly see either Emulex HBAs, which require the lpfc driver, or
Qlogic HBAs which require a driver whose name begins with qla. Some older hosts use the
JNI HBAs the drivers for these are either fcaw or fca-pci , depending on whether the
boards use Suns proprietary S-bus, or the more standard PCI bus.
How do we check if a Sun host has JNI boards of any type, with a suitable driver installed?
OK, so we know we have two Emulex HBAs and the driver is installed for them. Lets find
out more about the currently installed Solaris driver. In Solaris, Fibre Channel drivers are
installed like any other software package using the pkgadd utility. Once a package is
added, you can list information about it using pkginfo .
# pkginfo | grep i emu

emu is short for emulex

# pkginfo -l SUNWemlxs

Our lpfc driver version is:

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Step
4

Action
Frequently, we also care about what firmware revision is on the boards. Firmware is
basically code that resides in the flash memory on the HBA, and runs from there on the
HBAs processor chip. Its quite unlike our software driver of the previous step, which
actually gets built into the Solaris kernel.
All HBA manufacturers supply a utility that can be used for various diagnostics on these
boards, and also to load new firmware on the boards when needed. For Emulex, this utility
is called lputil . This utility can be downloaded from Emulex at this link
http://www.emulex.com/downloads/emc/drivers/solaris/602hx2.html
The file will then have to be copied to you Solaris host using your favorite utility ftp. The
name of the file is solaris-2.1a18-6.02hx2-1a.tar
Extract the files and you find multiple tar files that must be installed separately. There is
also a readme.first.txt file, please read it! You must install both the lpfc driver and then
the utility. When you extract all the tar files take note of their names, there are multiple
README.txt files they will tell you how to install the driver and the utility. At some point
you will be extracting multiple tar files. These may have tar file inside them which also must
be extracted. The driver file must be installed first. Cd to you parent directory of lpfc.1 and
execute this command

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Step

Action
Now we have to extract the Emulex applications and where necessary unzip the file.

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Step

Action
The tar file you extracted contains 2 more tar files that must also be extracted. This is such
fun. You can then use pkgadd to install the software packages contained in the directory

# pkgadd -d .
You may also find the file is compressed with a .gz format. You must use gunzip to
uncompress it before attempting the installation. We know that lputil is probably on the
host now, since the lpfc driver package is in there. How do we find it? Typically, userinstalled drivers would go either in /usr or /opt . So lets try those places.
# find /usr name lputil
OK, we found it. Now run this utility and fill in the following information:
The firmware revision on lpfc instance 0 is:
The firmware revision on lpfc instance 1 is:

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Step
5

Action
Warning: if youve already completed Lab 1, the HP-UX lab: be careful here the ctd
device numbering does NOT work the same in Solaris and HP-UX!
Now lets look for any LUNs we can see on our Fibre Channel buses. LUN stands for Logical
Unit Number, and its seen by the host as one physical disk. inq is a useful program written
by EMC to figure out what LUNs we can see. By a stroke of luck, inq is on this host already.
# which inq
What does which do ? Do a man which .
How does which relate to our PATH environment variable? (Part 1, Step 3)
Suppose we brought in a new version of the inq binary to the current directory. Which inq
binary will be run for each of the following commands? Your answer should contain a full
directory path name.
# inq
# ./inq
OK, lets look at the inq output carefully now. In our host, we know we are booting Solaris
from a local disk drive. There may also be one or two other local disk drives on the machine.
All of these are c0 devices. In Solaris, the c in ctd stands for a HBA or host bus instance. We
dont care about c0 right now, since thats an internal SCSI bus not Fibre Channel, like our
two Emulex boards.
Do you see any devices that are not on c0, and that report DGC under the VEND column?
VEND stands for Vendor. EMC CLARiiON devices report the vendor name as DGC. We are
sure you can guess the Symmetrix disk name.
Lets make a list of whatever devices we can see right now. In Solaris ctds, the d number is
the same as the LUN number presented by the array. The t number is a unique number
configured on the host for the target port and is the wwpn of the array the lun is from.

CTD device name


NOT one of ours example only:
c4t5006048ACCD23B1Ed10

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LUN
number
10

Step
6

Action
Remember, our Fibre Channel driver is called lpfc (Emulex), or qlgc (Qlogic). Two
parameters in the /etc/system file require modification when operating in a Solaris
environment. We must make the necessary edit to this configuration file (make a backup
copy before you start vi!). After we make the edit and save the file, we want to force the
host to reload the sd driver configuration. Save a backup copy of /etc/system, modifying
this file incorrectly may cause the scsi subsystem not to reload.
When using the Emulex or QLogic drivers, set the following parameters:
sd_io_time
sd_max_throttle
To modify these parameters for Emulex sd or QLogic sd drivers complete the following
steps:
1. Set sd_io_time to 60 seconds.
set sd:sd_io_time = 0x3C
This setting prevents the host from issuing warning messages while non-disruptive
operations are performed on the EMC storage system:
2. Set sd_max_throttle to 20.
set sd:sd_max_throttle = 20
This setting prevents the host from over-sending tag queuing commands which may cause
scsi cmd timeout and scsi bus reset.
We need to reboot the system to make the changes take effect
# shutdown r now

or

# init 6
What does init 6 do? Man pages will help here, or google.
We may see additional disk now that we have rebooted, check the messages file on your
system. The file is /var/adm/messages. Its where the kernel and most drivers write useful
messages to. Another way to get at the kernel log since the last reboot only is to simply
use the command: dmesg.

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Step

Action
For right now: Open up another PuTTY login as root, and issue the following command in it:
# tail f /var/adm/messages
What does tail f do? Do a man tail .
Did you see any activity in the tail f window? Kernel log messages have timestamps on
them. Does recent activity give you a clue as to whether were done?

OK, we can also try to rescan the bus if we have only masked new disks to an already
running SAN environment. Lets rescan our buses and build device files as necessary just in
case we have mapped and masked new devices:
For Solaris 9 and higher only:
# update_drv f sd
For Solaris 8:
# devfsadm C

Now run inq again.


If were all set, we now revisit Step 5 and fill in the new LUN in the table.

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Lab Exercise 3: Part 3 - Install a Software Package on the Solaris Host


Step
1
2

Action
Using PuTTY, login as root to the Solaris host.
Our goal in this part is to install the Unisphere Agent/CLI software package on the Solaris
host. Its useful to have that on the host with a CLARiiON array attached. We also may need
Solutions Enabler if we are attached to a Symmetrix. Download the Unisphere Agent, the
Navisphere/CLI and Solutions enabler depot from EMCs Powerlink website to your desktop.
If there is a newer version than the one listed here please use the newer one. From
http://powerlink.emc.com, follow Support then Software downloads. We want version
1.0.51.1.0038 or higher of the Solaris Unisphere Agent and the Navisphere/CLI 7.30.11.0.38
or higher. We also want the latest version of Solutions enabler so we can also install it. We
know that you may or may not have both types of arrays attached to your system, the
installation procedures are different and you need to try both.
As our first priority, lets make sure theres no older version of the package already installed
in there. We could try pkginfo , and grep for a suitable string (see Part 2 Step 3, where we
did something like this earlier). The only thing we know for sure about the package name is:
it should have the string nav (from Navisphere) or uni (from Unisphere) in it. Were not sure
if that string is uppercase, lowercase, or mixed.

What command did you try?

Did it show anything?


We conveniently have the package on the host, and ready to install (today must be our
lucky day). If not we must copy it from your laptop to the host. Now may be a good time for
ftp. Where is the file, possibly its in /var somewhere; and if it is its in gzip format. Our task
is to find that gzip file. If not create a directory called software on a filesystem with enough
room to hold your download.

The find command that worked for us is:

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Step
4

Action
Next, we have to get our package out from the gzip archive. Try this:
# cd <wherever_the_gzip_is>
# gzcat *.gz | tar xvf
What is this doing? gzcat is just like a gzip d decompression, however it writes
decompressed stuff to standard output. tar x means: extract whatever tar file appears after
the f option. In the case where the filename is - , tar extracts from standard input. The pipe
handles routine business: take the standard output of the first command (zcat) and use that
for standard input on the second command (tar). This is fairly advanced command syntax if
you prefer the next set of commands does the same thing.
If this all looks clever but confusing, take your time and do it in two steps. List the files
between steps, so you can see what is happening:
# cd <wherever_the_gzip_is>
# ls l
# gzip d *.gz
# ls l
# tar xvf *.tar
# ls l
If everything worked fine, we should have the package file called
HostAgent-Solaris-32-sparc-en_US-1.0.51.1.0038-1.pkg

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Step
5

Action
Without further ado, lets install this thing:
# pkgadd d HostAgent-Solaris-32-sparc-en_US-1.0.51.1.0038-1.pkg
Dont forget the NAVISPHERE/CLI also you may have to repeat the command obove with a
different pkg file.
You want to select the default, i.e. install everything, by typing <Return> when you get
there:

Youll also have to type Y for Yes a couple of times


When were all done, lets verify that everything we want has been installed:
# pkginfo l UNIAGENT
# pkginfo l NAVISCLI

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Step
6

Action
Lets check if the Unisphere Agent process is running:
# ps ef | grep i uni
Since its not, lets start it:
# /etc/init.d/agent start
Did that work?
# ps ef | grep i uni

Can you guess the command that will stop the agent process? Take a look at the agent
startup script. You may find a clue in there or it may confirm your guess.

In a real install, youd have to go edit the Agent configuration file at this point. Were going
to skip that now (today is our lucky day..)

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Step
7

Action
Lets check if the naviseccli command works, now that weve installed it:

Will the naviseccli command work when you are defaulted to the root directory? If not
what do we have to fix on the system? What variable?

Look at the output of the command.


# which naviseccli
What does the which command tell us?

How did HP-UX find our naviseccli executable? What previous step helped us?

End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 3: Part 4 - Test Drive our EMC Storage from the Solaris Host
Step
1
2

Action
Using PuTTY, start a login as root to the Solaris host.
Before we can use any of our CLARiiON LUNs from Solaris, we need to format them first. All
format does is: write a partition table at the head of the disk, following a standard layout.
Needless to say, this could- erase existing information on a disk (though not always). Do
not run this command on the boot disk it will erase it.
Lets pick one of the CLARiiON (DGC)/Symmetrix luns in our table of Part 2, Step 5. Were
looking for any one of those ctd devices. If youve listed any device whose name begins with
c0 in that table, this is a good time to stop and seek help. The one thing you dont want to
do is to run format on your boot disk drive.. unless you really know what youre doing.
Here goes:
# format
This brings up a menu as shown in the following screenshot.

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Step
2

Action

Select a disk by its number i.e. 1-11 in this example


The disk will return the statement it is not labeled and will as you if you want to do it. The
label is the partition table of the disk
Type y to confirm (Solaris is just trying to protect you here.)

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Step

Action
Can you tell from this screen that weve been messing with a CLARiiON/Symmetrix
device, and not any other type?

The first column, Part, is the partition number same as the slice number. Run inq again
do you see an s2 at the end of all our ctd device names? The s2 refers to slice 2 or partition
2 of this disk which in Solaris is the entire disk.

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Step
3

Action
OK, its time to get our pencils out and fill out one of our tables. Ignore the unassigned
partitions on this LUN it means they are not configured. You can use all of them if you wish
but we are just using the ones listed here. We have four others. Fill out the table below for
these four partitions. Someone has already done s6 for us, since they were getting mildly
anxious about all the formatting going on.
Slice name
S0
S1
S2
S6

Starting cylinder

Ending cylinder
0

Which slice encompasses the entire disk?

Our customer just stopped by, and she appears pleased with progress on the storage
provisioning. She says she will be building a filesystem on a CLARiiON LUN and migrating
some huge files over. Shes trying to estimate how long that copy might take. Could we
possibly spot-check the write speed we can get on a LUN?
No problem, we know all about dd or do we? man dd sounds like a good idea at this point.
After having read that, lets try a write test on our newly-formatted device. Were going to
be doing raw device writes, and we figure on using the entire device (you know which slice
that is).
Since we want to measure the I/O rate from the host, lets first open a new PuTTY session
as root, and fire up this command there:
# iostat nxzM 5
iostat can be very handy at times like this; of course you want to read the man page. iostat
options are very different on different Unix systems.
Whats the 5 doing? That argument pretty much means the same for iostat, vmstat etc. on
any flavor of Unix.

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Step

Action
On our first PuTTY session, lets fire up the write test:
# dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdsk/ c4t5006048ACCD23B1Ed10s2 bs=64k
What is this command doing?
dd just reads data from the input file (whatever is specified as if) and writes the data to
the output file (whatever is specified as of).
In our command, we use the special device /dev/zero for input. This is not a real storage
device its a synthetic device that spews out zeroes as fast as the host processor can
generate them. This is a fairly standard way to create a heavy write workload to a storage
device. When the entire output device has been filled with zeroes, dd exits.
How do we know were writing to a raw device?
The bs=64k just tells dd that it should read and write in 64-Kbyte chunks which are quite
large by normal standards. This guarantees high bandwidth on a fast storage system with
lots of cache on it.

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Step

Action
Have you been watching that iostat window?
Oh no, what happened? It seemed to write really fast for a while, and then it stopped?
Has our dd hung?
No it has not hung the disk you are writing to is only 139MB in size and has run out of space.
At this point you probably want to kill the PuTTY session with the dd in it its unlikely you
can recover that session.
Lets start a new login and examine the wreckage. First things first can we read from the
device now? Come to think of it, we should have probably tried that before we even
attempted the write test.. remember, reading a raw device is very safe.

# dd if=/dev/rdsk/c4t5006048ACCD23B1Ed10s2
Continued on the next line
of=/dev/dsk/c4t5006048ACCD23B1Ed10s2 of=/dev/null
You can think of /dev/null as an infinitely large sink device you can keep writing to it
forever and it will never fill up.
The counterpart that we used in our earlier command - /dev/zero - is an infinitely large
source device. You can keep reading from it and youll never run out of records to read.
OK, so did our dd read succeed? It didnt; it probably gave you an error like the one below,
and exited immediately.
dd: /dev/rdsk/ c4t5006048ACCD23B1Ed10s2: open: I/O error
To figure out what went wrong, lets go back to our slice table in Step 2.
Our first dd test was writing to slice 2, which means it started writing from block 0 of the
physical disk or LUN. Is this a problem?
Which cylinder has the Solaris device label on it the label that format created?! Did we
just blow it off, with our first dd?
How do we recover from this situation?
Remember, the disk didnt have a label to start with, before our format. Now we have a
possibly corrupted label. Not much difference there. We dont have any useful data on the
disk anyway. It has been provisioned.

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Step
4

Action
After fixing our minor problem of Step 3, lets see if theres any other way to run this demo
for our (by now visibly shaken) customer.
Is there another safe slice we could be using, in that first dd if=/dev/zero command of
Step 3?
We want the biggest one possible. If they all start at cylinder 0 you must change a
partition to start, lets say 10 cylinder into the disk and finish on the last cylinder. If you
use slice 6 and repartition it you will not destroy the label we just put back in place.
Try it out; if you came this far, you know how to fix it, anyway. We would rather you
mess up here than at a real customer site.
Did the dd run much longer this time, and actually finish?
Can you tell from the iostat window if the dd is doing anything?
How many 64K records did dd write, before exiting?
You already know how big your slice is. Does the completed record count above make
sense? Show the math.

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Step
5

Action
Filesystems, unlike dd, have some degree of intelligence so they can deal with slice 2 just
fine. They know how to stay out of troublesome spots like disk labels. Lets build a
filesystem on the device we just clobbered and recovered. Please use the raw device to
create the filesystem.
# newfs /dev/rdsk/c4t5006048ACCD23B1Ed10s2
Solaris again thoughtfully asks if we really want to do this, and we say y .
This is another command you want to be careful with you usually dont want to newfs a
raw device that already contains a filesystem on it. Unless you dont need that data ever
again. Typos count!
What type of filesystem did newfs make for us? Do a man newfs .
Now lets make a mount point lets call it /test . This is just the root directory for our new
filesystem just like all the others you see when you run df .
# mkdir /yourfirstname
Lets mount the filesystem. Be careful, you want to use the /dev/dsk device here i.e. the
block device. Not the /dev/rdsk, which is the raw device.
# mount /dev/dsk/c4t5006048ACCD23B1Ed10s2 /yourfirstname
Did it work?
Run df k to find out. How much room do we have on our new filesystem?
Do basic tests with the new filesystem: copy some files over to it, read them back.
Now unmount the filesystem. This is done with the umount command which is just the
English word unmount without the first n (youre not the first one to have trouble with this
concept, and you wont be the last).
# cd /
# umount /yourfirstname
Did it work?
# df -k
# cp vfstab vfstab.orig
# vi vfstab
If youve already read man mount before you got here nice work!

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Step
6

Action
Why is cd / a good idea before attempting a umount? What happens when your current
directory is somewhere in /test, and you attempt the umount? Try it and see.
OK, everything works. Now we want to fix it so we dont have to issue that mount
command ever again we want the host to mount that filesystem automatically at boot-up
time. Take a look at the /etc/vfstab file.
The man page for vfstab is not particularly friendly. Try this document from Sun instead:
http://docs.sun.com/app/docs/doc/805-7228/6j6q7uev3?a=view
In general, docs.sun.com is a good place to go for any information about Solaris.
Now that were done reading, lets fix the vfstab the way we want it. First, lets back up the
original vfstab:
# cd /etc
We want to add one line to the file, for our new filesystem. Its easiest to start with the
existing entries for the / filesystem, and then make minor edits.
The first field should be your block device ( /dev/dsk/.. )
The second field is your raw device (/dev/rdsk/..) This is the device we check when we fell
there may have been corruption when the system shutdown abnormally. Kind of like
checkdisk in windows
The 3rr field is your mount point and will be /yourfirstname
You really want differences from the / filesystem in only two fields: use (hyphen) for
fsck_pass, and yes for mount_at_boot and hyphen in the last 2 field

Explaining the meanings of various fields in vfstab is beyond the scope of this class; you just
need to understand how to add entries for non-booting filesystems, if necessary.
Now that its done, do we really want to reboot the host to test it? Theres a simpler way to
check our edits, fortunately:
# cd /
# mount a Did it work?
# df k
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Step

Action
If it did you edited the file correctly. If not you must go back and fix the problem.

Remember there must be 7 fields. It should look something like the entry for the /
filesystem.

Now have you installed Solutions Enabler? You may want to look at the readme file that
comes with the software package.

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Lab Exercise 3: Part 5 - Clean up the Solaris Host


Step
1

Action
Unmount test filesystem; remove the test mount point
# cd /
# umount /yourfirstname
Did it work?
# df -k
# rm rf yourfirstname

Restore the original vfstab file.


# cd /etc
# cp vfstab.orig vfstab
Does that original version still work?
# mount a
# df -k

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Step
3

Action
Restore device-special files to their original state: run the script below
# /var/tmp/cleanup_devices
Did you bother to give the script a look before running it? What if it had been a one-liner to
blow off the / partition? A dash of healthy skepticism goes a long way.
Did the cleanup script work? Lets check.
# update_drv f sd
# inq
inq should show one missing CLARiiON device (as it was for you at the start). If not, please
notify a lab instructor thank you.

Restore the original .profile for the user root


# cd /
# cp <backup_name> .profile
Hopefully the backup has a meaningful name, and we can actually find it?
Is that backup for real, anyway? Lets test it and see.
# . ./.profile
Any problems?
Good! Restore the original /etc/vfstab file

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Step
4

Action
Remove all traces of Unisphere Agent and CLI.
# pkgrm NAVISCLI
# pkgrm HOSTAGENT
Respond with y to any questions that pkgrm asks.
We also want to remove any files left behind by these packages:
# cd /etc
# pwd
# rm rf Unisphere
# cd /opt
# pwd
# rm rf Unisphere

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Step
5

Action
Remove any non-critical files that we may have generated in /var/tmp/pkg :
# cd /var/tmp/pkg
# ls al
# rm f HOSTAGENT.pkg
# rm f Agent tar files and the navisphere cli file
# ls -al
Stop the agent also, if you remember how. It is in the lab!
If everything worked correctly, there should be just the original .tar.gz file here no other
files. Please remove that also and call your instructor over to verify the cleanup.

Dont forget to logout from all of your PuTTY sessions on this host. There are several ways
to do this, pick your choice.
# logout
While in the PuTTY window, hold down the <Ctrl> and <d> keys together.
# <Ctrl><D>
Kill the PuTTY window on your desktop.

End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 4: AIX Lab

Purpose:

Tasks:

To become familiar with IBMs AIX, from a storage installation and


deployment perspective. The emphasis is on features unique to AIX,
relative to other flavors of Unix.

In this lab, you perform the following tasks:


Perform software package installations on an AIX host
Run various storage-centric utilities on an AIX host

References:

AIX man pages


http://www.redbooks.ibm.com
EMC Host Connectivity Guide for AIX

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Lab Exercise 4: Part 1 - csh and Host System Basics


Step
1

Action
Using PuTTY, login as root to the AIX host.
If you dont know what PuTTY is, read the very first section of this lab workbook on
Network Client Tools.

Lets have a look at the current login environment. What are the settings for common
environment variables?
# env

What type of shell are we running? You can search the list from above perhaps you run
env | more next - or you can simply type:
# echo $SHELL
Did it report /usr/bin/ksh ? That would be the Korn shell.

Whats the file that determines which type of shell we get, at login time? It is the same
file you used to create a user account in the lab on Monday.
Lets take a look at that file. Were user root, so lets do:
# grep root <that_file>

Do you see the Korn shell specified there for root?

Since we want a c shell, and we want it now! lets just manually start one:
# csh
csh is a Just a different shell. It has it own special nuances.

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Step
3

Action
Lets set up the history mechanism, create the history variable.
# set history = 100
Type the following command to create some history to recall from.
# ls
# pwd
# find / -name software
# history
Lets rerun one of those older commands from your history list pick a safe one for your
own host. In our screenshot, lets rerun # 5
# !5

What did the !5 do?

For some reason, we didnt quite like the command we just ran. Maybe we want to find the
syslog.conf file instead. Thats easy enough:
# ^errlog^syslog.conf

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Step
4

Action
Lets check the operating system version on our AIX host:
# oslevel
For AIX, we also want to know the specific maintenance level. Frequently the way we get
supported drivers that are native to AIX is: move up to a new maintenance level on the
entire operating system.
# oslevel r

The OS revision / maintenance level of our AIX host is:

A tip before proceeding. There is an extremely small list of tasks for which an AIX host
requires a reboot. Rest assured that not a single task that you will attempt - in this entire
lab belongs in this list.
An uptime (i.e. time since the machine last booted) of several years would not be
considered unusual on an AIX host. This is a good thing; when you do reboot one, it could
take a long time. A half-hour or longer for a full reboot may be normal, depending on the
configuration.
So if you find yourself stuck at some point and get the urge to reboot the AIX host dont
do it. Talk to a lab instructor first.
End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 4: Part 2 - Explore Storage Hardware and Device Configuration


Step
1

Action
Just to be different, were going to accomplish all of Lab Exercise 3 (all four parts) with just
that one original PuTTY session. So dont go opening any new login sessions now.. we have a
bash shell already, and well stay with it.

If youre going to be working with AIX, it would help to know your way around smit. smit
stands for System Management Interface Tool, and its unique to AIX. On an X-Windows
system console, it gives you a real X-based graphical utility to manage every possible aspect
of an AIX system.
Since were doing terminal sessions here no X were going to use smits cousin, i.e.
smitty :
# smitty
Check out the definitions for the navigation keys at the bottom mostly using the F1
through F10 keys at the top of your keypad. Important keys to remember are <F3> (which
backs you to the previous screen) and <F10> which gets you out of smitty.
Lets explore the host a little. Being storage people, obviously our first questions are:
Does this host have any Fiber Channel boards (HBAs, adapters) installed?
How many?

Hint: Follow Devices from the main screen > FC Adapter > FC Adapter > List all FC Adapters
The FC stands for Fibre Channel.

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Step

Action

Whats the biggest I/O transfer these adapters have been configured to handle? We want
the answer in Kbytes.

Hint: Youre going to need a hex-to-decimal converter for this one. The desktop calculator
on Windows can do it in scientific mode. Thats in case youre unsure of your hexadecimal
(thats base 16) arithmetic.
Next were going to find out what drivers have been installed if any for these Fiber
Channel HBAs of ours. On AIX, its a safe bet you have one of the IBM-branded Emulex
HBAs, which would use a native IBM-supplied Fiber Channel driver. The driver-name begins

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Step

Action
with the string df.
So lets find this driver:
# lslpp l | grep df
What is this command doing? lslpp is the AIX command to display all installed packages. The
output of lslpp is being piped here to the grep filter command. Were filtering for the string
df, so we only see the small subset of packages of immediate interest to us.
Typically, this command would produce a small list of AIX driver-related packages such as
this:

What disk devices naturally, this would include any presented from an EMC CLARiiON or
Symmetrix array do we see right now, on this host?
# lsdev Cc disk
Hmm. This does not look too interesting. All those 16 Bit SCSI or 16 Bit LVD devices are just
the internal, local disks on the AIX host were booted off one of them.
Do you see any hdisks that have one of these words in their descriptions? FC is short for
Fibre Channel; Symmetrix; or CLARiiON?

Well, lets ask the host to go rescan its I/O buses. Perhaps it will find some new devices.
Usually this would be handled by a standard AIX utility called cfgmgr . For EMC storage
devices only, we supply a special script called emc_cfgmgr . The script is somewhere in
/usr but were not sure where.
Did you find that script? What is its full pathname?
What command did you use to figure out where it was?
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Step

Action
Gee, thats a pretty long path name. We dont want to type that each time were in another
directory. Lets edit the path and make life easier.
# PATH=$PATH:your_directory_from_above
# export PATH
# which emc_cfgmgr

Does which find the script?


So lets run it. A word of caution on cfgmgr or its special subset, emc_cfgmgr when
running these commands, dont try to do anything else on the host. Be patient until they
complete.
# emc_cfgmgr
Do we see any new devices?
# lsdev Cc disk
5

It appears that running the config manager has helped: were seeing some new disks now.
Unfortunately, we cant quite tell if theyre one of ours. Theyre all claiming to be of the
type: Other FC SCSI Disk Drive. If theyve been configured properly, they would call
themselves Symmetrix or CLARiiON devices.
Lets try another utility and see what it says.
# inq
Where is the binary for this command?

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Step

Action

This is getting interesting. inq is reporting devices from vendor DGC (look at the second
column). Thats a dead giveaway that we have CLARiiON LUNs on this host. The way inq
figured this out is: it asked the storage array LUN directly. Technically, this is called making
a SCSI inquiry.
6

So why are the corresponding hdisk devices not showing up as CLARiiON devices? What
configures a hdisk device on AIX to be one kind or another, anyway?
Lets find out more about one of our Other FC hdisks:
# lsattr El hdisk3
This command is just asking AIX: tell me what the current characteristics are for this device.
The output looks like this:

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Step

Action
Experienced people can tell right away from two fields above the ww_name and the
node_name that this is a CLARiiON device, without any doubt. But you dont need to
know that, just yet. Just be aware of the lsattr command in fact, lets rerun this lsattr
command, and save the output to a file, say in /var/tmp/FC_Other.txt. We want to refer to
this file later.
How would you do that saving? Redirection to standard output would work.

Any devices on AIX - and this includes hdisk devices get their characteristics from the
ODM database. The ODM database needs to have definitions for specific device types as
they get added to the system. So lets check EMC-installed packages, and see if we have the
ODM definitions installed on this host, for a CLARiiON.
# lslpp l | grep i emc

Whats the grep i doing? If you dont know, man grep has the answer.

Do you see something similar to whats below?

We see a bunch of definitions for Symmetrix support, but wheres the CLARiiON stuff?!
Well, its not in there. That would explain why our CLARiiON hdisks are showing up as
generic Fibre Channel devices.

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Step

Action
So lets install those CLARiiON definitions. Be careful with commands like the one below,
Unix is case-sensitive. It matters if something is upper-case or lower-case.
# installp agXd /usr/sys/inst.images/EMC.AIX.5.3.0.1 EMC.CLARiiON.fcp
OR
The above command works well if you know the name of the package you are trying to
install but if you dont!? Copy the ODM definition package to the directory
/usr/sys/inst.images and run this command and it will help install the package via the smit
menu program

What did this command do? Smit will bring up the menu driven interface and installp is the
software installation utility on AIX. You can look up those four options with man installp
theres usually no reason why you wouldnt use them. The first argument here that would
be /usr/sys/inst.images tells installp where to look for the software package. The second
argument, EMC.CLARiiON.fcp, is the exact name of the software set to install. Youre
allowed to say all for the second argument, though we didnt do that here. That could
potentially take for ever, installing things weve never heard of and will never need.

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Step

Action
Did the installp command work? How can you verify that weve in fact successfully
installed the CLARiiON definitions?

We still have those Fibre Channel hdisks with stale or inappropriate device definitions. Lets
remove all traces of them from the host, and rebuild them with emc_cfgmgr
CAUTION: In the commands below, make sure to use your Fibre Channel hdisk numbers!
The Other FC ones. Dont remove the system disk! Please!!
# rmdev l hdisk3 d
# rmdev l hdisk4 d
# rmdev ..

How can we tell that all of our Fibre Channel hdisks are no longer there? Run that lsdev
command of Step 4 again, and check.
OK - now that we have a clean host, and CLARiiON definitions in place.
Lets go discover our devices again, and have them rebuilt on AIX:
# emc_cfgmgr
9

What does lsdev show now? If weve done everything right, this is what our hdisks would
look like now:

Now we know why understanding the role of the ODM is important, in AIX. Lets re-examine
the device attributes for one specific CLARiiON /Symmetrix devices again.

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Step

Action
Rerun step 6 the lsattr command on the same hdisk this time saving the output to the
file /var/tmp/CLAR.txt

Compare the files /var/tmp/CLAR.txt and /var/tmp/FC_Other.txt. How?

Was the AIX name for the device type Other FC versus CLARiiON FCP - the only thing
thats changed for the hdisk?

Do you feel any of the other things that changed really matter?
End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 4: Part 3: Install Additional Software on the AIX Host


Step
1

Action
Since we have an open session running csh, and were logged in as root were happy. Lets
stay with this PuTTY session. The goal of this part is to install another software package on
the AIX host called the Unisphere Host Agent / CLI. This software is useful when you
provision devices on a CLARiiON array to the host. Download the Unisphere Agent, the
Navisphere/CLI and Solutions enabler depot from EMCs Powerlink website to your desktop.
If there is a newer version than the one listed here please use the newer one.
From http://powerlink.emc.com, follow Support then Software downloads. We want
version 1.0.51.1.0038 or higher of the AIX Unisphere Agent and the Navisphere/CLI
7.30.11.0.38 or higher. We also want the latest version of Solutions enabler so we can also
install it. We know that you may or may not have both types of arrays attached to your
system, the installation procedures are different and you need to try both.

Our first task here, of course, is to check if the software is already on the host. All we know
is that the package name has the string Nav/Uni in it, and were not really sure if thats all
upper-case, all lower-case or a mix.
What command would you use for this?

Does it look like the software is already installed on the host?

Lets us assume it is not there and we need to get the software. One of our thoughtful
friends we have many of them, its a big, bad world out there knew we were doing this
job at short notice. Our AIX host wasnt ready at the time, so hes downloaded the
Agent/CLI software we need to one of our other AIX hosts. Our first task is to get it over to
this AIX host so we can proceed with installation.
Along the way, were going to learn some useful remote shell features. In all the commands
below, youre going to have to substitute alternate_ibm_host_name with the appropriate
hostname.
Lets first see if we can talk to the alternate IBM host by name; if not well fix it. Choose one
of the IBM hosts that you are not using there are at least 3 others that your fellow
classmates are using. Check the pdf on the Citrix login page to get the name and/or IP
address to that system.
# ping alternate_ibm_host_name

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Step

Action
If that didnt work, what file can we edit on this host so the problem goes away?

Do whats needed. Edit this file and add the appropriate entry it will look something like
this:
# vi /etc/hosts
csap2ibm2 10.127.12.138

Now lets try a remote shell command:


# rsh alternate_ibm_host_name ls /software
In the command above, were asking the IBM host to run an ls of the /software directory on
a host we are not logged into.

How did it work? Were not even logged on at that alternate IBM host!

To answer that, lets log into the alternate IBM host on another PuTTY window. Well log in
as root. On that window, do this:
# cat .rhosts
.rhosts is a configuration file for controlling remote shell access from other hosts. What
does the line + root mean? Do a man rhosts - on the alternate IBM host.

Now that we know why this is working, lets get back to our AIX host. We dont even need
that PuTTY session on the alternate IBM host anymore, so go ahead and kill that.
Lets ask the AIX host where that software file of ours is. All we know is: its a compressed
archive, with the file extension .Z (upper-case)or it is a tar file, and our friend put it
somewhere in /software .
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Step

Action
# rsh alternate_ibm_host_name find /software name *.tar
You may also have to look for the ODM definitions and the solutions enabler software and
the Navisphere/unisphere software. The navishpere/Unisphere software is in an lpp format
not tar.

Looks like weve found it, lets bring it over.


# cd /var/tmp
# mkdir pkg
# cd pkg
# pwd
# rcp alternate_ibm_host_name:file_name .

You put in the full path name in file_name above, beginning with /, right? How else is the
Alternate_IBM host going to know where to look for the file?
HINT: Were you aware that PuTTY has a copy/paste function? Its very simple, actually
you select text to copy with the left mouse button, then paste it with right-click.

What does that last . (period) mean in the rcp command?


Remember, rcp is just a slight twist on the conventional cp command.
# pwd
# ls -l
Looks like we have our file, so lets move on to the install step.
3

Installation is pretty straightforward; its just the three commands below. You may want to
run ls l after the first two though, so you have some idea of whats happening.
# uncompress *.Z
# tar xvf *.tar

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Step

Action
# installp agXd . all

As usual how do we know for sure that: we have both our Agent and CLI installed?
Look for packages with nav/uni in their names uppercase or lowercase, not sure.

Did the Host Agent start up?


# ps ef | grep i uni
Looks like it didnt. How do we start it? We dont have a clue; there is a startup file for the
Agent somewhere on the host, but we have no idea what its called on AIX. Perhaps we
need to get the documentation for the Navisphere Agent/CLI installation procedure on AIX.

To get the documentation, go to http://powerlink.emc.com, and navigate to


Support>Software downloads>Navisphere Host Agent/CLI for AIX. Then follow the link at
the top of the page for the documentation. Get the PDF file and figure out how to
start/stop the Agent process.

Did the procedure work? Verify starting and stopping the Agent.
Run the ps ef command each time, and convince yourself it works.

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Lab Exercise 4: Part 4 - Clean up the AIX Host


Step
1

Action
Cleanup is pretty straightforward we just reverse all of our steps, starting from the back.
But lets first get rid of all our personal files on the /var partition.
# cd /var/tmp
# pwd
# ls l
# rm rf pkg
# rm f *.txt

Uninstall the Navisphere Agent and CLI. installp u takes care of the uninstall. Youll have to
run this twice once for the Agent and once for the CLI. Theyre considered separate
software sets. You may have to search for uni instead depending on the version of code that
is installed.
# lslpp l | grep i nav
# installp u HOSTAGENT
# installp u NAVISCLI
Did it work?
# lslpp l | grep -i nav
Just in case the software left some files lying around, lets remove it:
# cd /etc
# pwd
# rm rf Unisphere
# cd /opt

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Step

Action
# pwd
# rm rf Unisphere

Remove the hdisks related to the CLARiiON only. You need to be awake for this step.
Just carefully repeat Step 8 of Part 2. Be careful with rmdev, use it only on devices that
youre sure are related to the CLARiiON array.
And verify the results after:
# lsdev Cc disk
At this point, the only hdisks you should see are the internal drives.

Uninstall the CLARiiON definitions in the ODM.


This is just to uninstall the EMC.CLARiiON.fcp package. Step 2 shows you how to do that.
This may take a while to complete; be patient.
If the uninstall didnt work, chances are you didnt do a thorough job of Step 3. Revisit that.
Verify that the package is really gone:
# lslpp l | grep i emc
Only the Symmetrix definitions should exist at this point.

If we followed all instructions to the letter, wed have just one PuTTY session open on this
host. Press<Ctrl-D> once to exit csh; another <Ctrl-D> to exit the login shell.
End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 5: Windows 2000/2003 Server Lab

Purpose:

Tasks:

To become familiar with Microsofts server operating systems, from a


storage installation and deployment perspective.

In this lab, you perform the following tasks:


Perform software package installations on a Windows server
Run various storage-centric utilities on a Windows server

References:

http://www.microsoft.com
EMC Host Connectivity Guide for Windows

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Lab Exercise 5: Part 1 - Explore the Host System


Step
1

Action
Using VNC Client, open a desktop session on the Windows server.
If you dont know what VNC means, read the very first section of this lab workbook on
Network Client Tools.

Lets start the Computer Management console on our Windows server. This is a versatile
graphical utility that provides for monitoring and administering various aspects of the
system. Well be using this console frequently.
<Right-click> on the My Computer icon. Note: in some hosts this icon may have been
renamed to something more appropriate, for example the server name.
Select Manage.

This brings up the main window of the Management console:


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Step

Action

<Right-click> on Computer Management, and select Properties.

The manufacturer of this Windows server is:

The exact model name of this server is:

This is critical information when assessing a Windows environment for potential


connectivity to EMC storage.
4

Now lets get the exact operating system version were running.

<Right-Click> on My Computer, Open > Help > About Windows

Our Windows Server Version is (2000, 2003 etc) :

The installed Service Pack level is:

Lets find out what HBAs (Host Based Adapters) have been installed.
From the Management Console, select Device Manager on the left, then SCSI and RAID
Controllers on the right pane:

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Step

Action

On Windows servers, the most popular Fibre Channel HBAs used for storage connectivity
are Emulex and Qlogic.

The number of Fibre Channel HBAs installed on our server is:

You can select each HBA and examine its Properties.

The manufacturer/model of our Fibre Channel HBAs is:

You can then select the Driver tab and get more detail on each HBA board:

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Step

Action

Lets write down the key properties of the HBAs we see on this server:
PCI slot number Driver version
HBA 1
HBA 2

The storage HBA drivers write messages to a system log on Windows called the Event log.
Lets take a look at the Event log. From the Management Console, select Event Viewer >
System on the left pane:

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Step

Action

Each line on the right pane represents one logged event. You may view details on any single
event by clicking on it. You can also scroll through the events using the arrow keys in the
detail window. By default, the most recent event appears on top, so youre scrolling back in
time by moving down the list.

Scroll down the event list until you find an event reported by our elxsli2 Fibre Channel
driver.
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Step

Action

What does the event message from elxsli2 say?

Do you think this is an error of some kind? Why or why not?

When was the server last rebooted?


HINT: all drivers, including our elxsli2 driver, will start up during a reboot. Just scroll back
in time a bit more and look.
7

Next well examine what CLARiiON LUNs are visible to this host, via the Fibre Channel HBAs.
From the Management Console, select Device Manager on the left. Then expand the Disk
Drives tab on the right pane.
Were looking for CLARiiON LUNs, which are reported with the identifier DGC.

How many DGC drives is the system reporting?

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Step

Action
Now lets examine each of the DGC drives in detail; explore its Properties:

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Step

Action
Fill in the entries for the following table, for each DGC drive that you see under Device
Manager. They may be Symmetrix drives instead.

Location number LUN number


DGC drive 1
DGC drive 2
DGC drive 3
DGC drive 4
DGC drive 5
DGC drive 6

How many CLARiiON LUNs have actually been provisioned on this host? You should have
this information from your lab instructor.

How many DGC drives do you see above, in Device Manager?

Why dont these two numbers match?!


HINT: Take a look at the location numbers above; and also at our HBA table of Step 5.

Suppose I had six LUNs provisioned from the CLARiiON, and four paths from the server to
each LUN. How many CLARiiON devices should Device Manager report?

Lets take a CLARiiON-provisioned device for a test-drive. We want to make sure we can
actually use these things from the host.

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Step

Action
On the Management Console , select Storage > Disk Management

You should see one Disk on the right for each of the provisioned CLARiiON LUNs.

How can we tell which Disk is which LUN?


Format an NTFS partition on one LUN of your choice, and copy some files over from the C:
drive.

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Lab Exercise 5: Part 2 - Install Software on the Windows Host


Step
1

Action
Our goal in this part is to install the Navisphere Agent and CLI on the Windows server. These
are useful software packages to have when CLARiiON storage has been provisioned on the
host, as it has in our case.
Lets first make sure a (possibly older) version of the software is not already installed on the
system.
Start > Settings > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs

Were looking for two different programs one called Navisphere Agent, and the other
called Navisphere CLI. If you see either or both, remove them.

Our next task is to get the latest install packages for these programs. Unfortunately, we
dont have access to the Internet today - we are working in a data center that is totally
sealed off from the outside world, for security reasons. So no Powerlink for us today.
Anticipating our problem, you have thoughtfully downloaded the two install executables on

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Step

Action
to our neighboring Sun server. We know the programs are somewhere in /var maybe in
some subdirectory deep under there. And we know the root password for the Sun box. So
lets go find our binaries. We know they have the string Nav (for Navisphere) in their names
but of course, we dont know if its all upper-case, lower-case or both.
Youre going to need PuTTY to log into the Sun box. If you have no clue what PuTTY is, go
back and read the very first section of this book.

What find command did you use on Solaris to find those two binaries?

OK, were home free we think. Now we just need to get those files over via ftp, right?
Lets try it do the following in a Command Prompt on the Windows server.

C:
mkdir emc
ftp <ip_address_of_sun>
login: root
<password>

Oops. What happened? Why does it say Connection refused, or some such?
We still have our PuTTY session on the Sun box; lets go have a look there. For some reason,
the Sun hosts ftp server doesnt like us logging in as root, perhaps? We vaguely remember
something about ftpusers from a Unix class way back when; so lets try a man ftpusers.

Did you find the configuration file for ftp security? What is it called?

What edit do we have to make in this file, so we can log in as root from the ftp client?
DONT EDIT IT see below!
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Step

Action

We point this out to the Sun host administrator who promptly has a fit, and says:
Absolutely no editing configuration files on MY Sun server while Im around. Do whatever
you want on your Windows box!!!.
At this point were beginning to feel a little stuck. How do we get our files from there to
here?! Maybe the Sun host has a floppy drive probably wont work too well, those files
are pretty large anyway. And who knows how to format a floppy on Sun so Windows can
read it? Plus, nobody knows exactly where the Sun host is. That grumpy admin says: Its in a
large rack somewhere in the back room.
Were now wistfully thinking of the Internet caf we spotted five miles down the road on
the way in maybe we can get in there and download our files real quick from Powerlink,
and be back in a half-hour. Wait a minute, were running Windows Server, right? Maybe
this Windows host has an FTP server on it? How about we run ftp client on the Sun host,
and push the files over from there?
Lets go into our Management Console, and poke around.
Did it work?

The moral of this lesson is:


1. All Unix admins are an unfriendly lot and horribly difficult to deal with
2. Its frequently a challenge in the field figuring out how to get stuff from here to
there; so carry all software you may possibly need with you burned on CD. Hard
drives do fail and always, at the worst possible moment.
3. Learn as many ways as possible to skin a cat. Because youll never know which one is
politically feasible in any given situation.
4. All except 1. above

Half the battle is over. Actually installing Navisphere Agent and CLI on Windows (or most
other software, for that matter) is a piece of cake just do:
Start > Run > <Browse to the install binary>
You need to do this twice: once to install the Agent, and once to install the CLI.

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Step

Action
When installing the Agent, the program asks you for Agent configuration information. Make
sure to add two entries here. Each entry will have the username system and the IP address
of each CLARiiON SP. This allows the host to function as a network portal for the CLARiiON
array.
After installing the CLI, you want to change the Path so you can run navicli from any
directory, when in a Command Prompt window.
How do you do that? You didnt actually read that first section in the book on PuTTY, did
you?

Test your changed Path definition. How?

If the Agent is installed correctly, you should see a Windows service running called the
Navisphere/Unisphere Agent. Verify this. If you see the Navisphere agent you should
uninstall is before you add the Unisphere
From the Management Console, select Services and Applications > Services

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Step

Action

Check if you can stop the Agent, and restart it.

Did it work?

In which directory is the configuration file for this Agent? What is the configuration file
called?

What does Automatic mean in the Startup Type field?

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Lab Exercise 5: Part 3 - Clean up the Windows host


Step
1

Action
Uninstall the Navisphere Agent. Make sure to specify: remove all configuration files.

Uninstall the Navisphere Secure CLI.


Uninstall Solutions Enabler

Did the uninstall work? How can you make sure?

Where are the two install binaries we obtained from the Sun server? Delete our copies of
those two files on this Windows host.

Did you format one or more CLARiiON LUNs? Delete all of those partitions. Be careful here;
you dont want to delete your boot partition!

Did you change any of the settings on the FTP Server on this Windows host? Put it back
exactly the way it was, thanks..

Kill your VNC client, and also any PuTTY sessions you may have open on the Sun server.

End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 6: Linux Lab

Purpose:

Tasks:

To become familiar with Linux, from a storage installation and


deployment perspective. The emphasis is on features unique to Linux,
relative to other flavors of Unix.

In this lab, you perform the following tasks:


Perform a software package installation on a Linux host.
Run various storage-centric utilities on a Linux host.
Perform a routine test on a Linux device provisioned from an EMC
storage array.

References:

Linux man pages


EMC Host Connectivity Guide for Linux

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Lab Exercise 6: Part 1 - Linux System Basics


Step
1

Action
Using PuTTY, login as root to the Linux host.
very fir
If you dont know what PuTTY is, read the st section of this lab workbook on Network
Client Tools.
What is the current running kernel:
Use command: uname -a
[root@sandboxlinux root]# uname -a
Linux sandboxlinux 2.6.21-4.EL #1 Fri Oct 3 18:13:58 EDT 2003 i686 i686 i386 GNU
Write current running kernel:

Review all the disks on your system


Use the command: cat /proc/scsi/scsi

# cat /proc/scsi/scsi
Host: scsi2 Channel: 00 Id: 00 Lun: 00
Vendor: EMC Model: SYMMETRIX Rev: 5874
Type: Direct-Access ANSI SCSI revision: 04
Host: scsi2 Channel: 00 Id: 01 Lun: 01
Vendor: EMC Model: SYMMETRIX Rev: 5874
Type: Direct-Access ANSI SCSI revision: 04

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Step
3

Action
Use Emulex script to dynamically scan the devices. Emulex has the
LUN Scan Utility which is available from the EMC-approved site on
the Emulex website. You may have to download it.
Usage examples
# gunzip lun_scan.sh.gz
# chmod a+x lun_scan
To scan all lpfc HBAs:
# lun_scan all
To scan the lpfc HBA with scsi host number 2:
# lun_scan 2
To scan the lpfc HBAs with scsi host number 2 and 4:
# lun_scan 2 4
Note: HBA driver vendors provide scripts that automate the scanning of the
SCSI interface. EMC does not provide support for these scripts. Support
resides solely with the HBA vendor.

Use the command: inq -btl


This command will display the bus target and lun for each device
[root@linux1 sbin]# inq -btl
Inquiry utility, Version V7.3-532 (Rev 0.0) (SIL Version V5.4.0.0 (Edit Lev el 532)
Copyright (C) by EMC Corporation, all rights reserved.
For help type inq -h.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------DEVICE :VEND :PROD
:REV :SER NUM :CAP(kb) :Bus :Tid :Lun
------------------------------------------------------------------------------/dev/sda :EMC :SYMMETRIX
:5568 :3103C300 : 459840 : 0: 0: 0
/dev/sdb :EMC :SYMMETRIX
:5568 :3103D300 : 459840 : 0: 0: 1
/dev/sdc :EMC :SYMMETRIX
:5568 :3103E300 : 459840 : 0: 0: 2
/dev/sdd :EMC :SYMMETRIX
:5568 :3103F300 : 459840 : 0: 0: 3

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Step
5

Action
Using the command " inq -hba "determine the manufacture of the Fibre Channel adaptors
available on your system, the state of the HBA.
[root@linux1 boot]# inq -hba
Inquiry utility, Version V7.3-532 (Rev 0.0) (SIL Version V5.4.0.0 (Edit Level 532)
Copyright (C) by EMC Corporation, all rights reserved.
For help type inq -h.

--------------------------------------------------HBA name:
Emulex-LP9002-1
host WWN:
20000000C93AE357
vendor name:
Emulex Corporation
model:
LP9002
firmware version: 3.90A7 (C2D3.90A7)
driver version: 7.1.14; HBAAPI(I) v2.0.f, 12-01-03
serial number: BG40856280
vendor code:
0xc9
HBA type:
Fibre Channel
port count:
1
port number:
1
port WWN:
10000000C93AE357
Port OS name:
/proc/scsi/lpfc/2
port type:
LPORT
port speed:
1GBIT
supported speed: 2GBIT
port state:
ONLINE
port FCID:
0x1

This command could fail if the inq version and the adapter driver are not compatible. You
can also find this information is you go to the /proc/scsi/lpfc directory and cat the files in
that location. The files are numbers and reference the controller number of the HBA. The
command would be:

What is the module name of the hba.


Hint refer to OS port name from above example
Refer to Student Guide: Refer to : Host Bus Adapters Operation; lsmod shows information
about all loaded modules

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Step
6

Action
[root@linux1 sbin]# lsmod
Module
Size Used by Not tainted
sg
36940 0 (autoclean)
ide-cd
35680 0 (autoclean)
cdrom
33696 0 (autoclean) [ide-cd]
agpgart
56664 7 (autoclean)
parport_pc
19076 1 (autoclean)
lp
9028 0 (autoclean)
parport
37088 1 (autoclean) [parport_pc lp]
autofs
13364 0 (autoclean) (unused)
e1000
71712 1
floppy
58160 0 (autoclean)
microcode
4724 0 (autoclean)
lpfcdfc
144520 2
keybdev
2976 0 (unused)
mousedev
5524 1
hid
22212 0 (unused)
input
5888 0 [keybdev mousedev hid]
ehci-hcd
20104 0 (unused)
usb-uhci
26412 0 (unused)
usbcore
79392 1 [hid ehci-hcd usb-uhci]
ext3
91592 2
jbd
52336 2 [ext3]
lpfc
215920 0 [lpfcdfc]
ata_piix
3908 0 (unused)
libata
27716 0 [ata_piix]
sd_mod
13744 0
scsi_mod
108840 4 [sg lpfc ata_piix libata sd_mod]

The driver is lpfc

Find the Symmetrix World Wide Port Name


Use: cd /proc/scsi/lpfc
[root@linux1 lpfc]#
grep -i wwpn *
lpfc0t00 DID 0000b5 WWPN 50:06:04:82:bf:d1:78:dd WWNN

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Step
7.

Action
Before you install PowerPath note that installing or upgrading PowerPath requires you to
reboot the host. Plan to install or upgrade PowerPath when a reboot will cause minimal
site disruption.
Locate the PowerPath software in course software directory or retrieve it from powerlink
Untar the PowerPath archive. Type
tar -xzf EMCpower.LINUX.5.1.<x>.<build>.tar.gz

Install PowerPath. Type


rpm -i EMCpower.LINUX-5.3.<x>-<build>.<package>.rpm

Register PowerPath on the host. Type


./emcpreg install
Enter y at the prompt.

What is the command rpm?

When prompted, enter the 24-character alphanumeric sequence supplied by the instructor
and press ENTER. Be sure to use hyphens to separate groups of four alphanumeric
characters without any spaces. In the Lab you will use License Key: B4P9-DB4Q-LF6WQ0SA-ML90-VRL4. (those are zeros, not Os) The license key given here is a temporary
license, valid for this class only ,and should not be given out to anyone.
If you enter a valid registration key, you see a key successfully installed message
Start PowerPath. Type
/etc/init.d/PowerPath start

End of Lab Exercise

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Lab Exercise 6: Part 2 - Installing Unisphere Agent and Navisphere CLI


Step
1

Action
Install the Host Agent and CLI software: You should know where to find it by now.
a. Log in as the root user.
b. If any previous revision of Uniisphere Agent or CLI is installed on the server,
remove it before continuing.
c. You will have to download it from powerlink and unzip it.
d. Install the agent and CLI:
rpm -ivh naviagentcli-xxx-yyy.noarch.rpm.
Verify that the agent and CLI are installed:
rpm -qa | more
Edit the $HOME/.bash_profile and the $HOME/.bashrc files to add Navisphere CLI to the
path. The modified entry should look like this example:
PATH=$PATH:/opt/Unisphere/bin export PATH
Verify Privileged Users in the agent.config file. The entry for the root user is automatically
created.
Change to the /etc/Navisphere directory and look for (use ls) the agent.config file. Open
the file with vi and search for user. To search the file type / followed by user. Notice the
line that starts with user root. That is the administrative Privileged User
Enter the following commands from the root directory to stop and restart the agent:
/etc/init.d/naviagent stop (only one space; between agent and stop.)
/etc/init.d/naviagent start

Now install the Solutions Enabler package. I know we didnt tell you how but it is just like
all the other installs of the Solutions Enabler. When you are done please clean the system
of all your installs and modifications. Remember to leave the machine as you found it.

End of Lab Exercise

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