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Community

Sports

World War II
vets recall
service

Doty Classic
postponed
for weather

Page 14-15

Page 6

Your Local Weather


Wed

Thu

Fri

7/15

7/16

7/17

75/53

78/63

85/70

A mainly
Times of sun
Scattered
sunny sky.
and clouds.
thunderHigh around
Highs in the
storms possi75F.Media
Winds Publication
upper 70s serving
ble. Delphos
A DHI
NNE at 5 to
and lows in
10 mph.
the low 60s.

Sat

Sun

7/18

88/70

A few thunderstorms
possible.

7/19

88/69

A few thunderstorms
possible.

The Delphos Herald

& Area Communities

2009 American Profile Hometown Content Servic

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Established in 1869

www.delphosherald.com

Council OKs first phase


of wastewater treatment
plant reconstruction
BY GREG SCHERGER
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
Delphos City Council met in regular session Monday evening for the final time in the
month of July, one week ahead of schedule,
with respect to attendance ability for members
and to address a variety of legislation on second
reading.
All members of the council and of the administration were present.
Council approved authorization for Mayor
Gallmeier and or Safety Services Director
Shane Coleman to enter into agreement with the
Ohio Public Works Commission States Capital
Improvement Program to fund improvements
to the Delphos Wastewater Treatment Plant.
Through the program, new treatment membranes and their associated support structure
will replace original equipment that has not
performed as necessary.
Council also passed a resolution that will
address a portion of the overall $4.3 million

project, focusing on an initial cost of $1,006,000


for the re-construction of roughly the first third
of the wastewater treatment plants re-configuration. The city will receive a $232,000 grant
and a zero percent 20-year loan in the amount of
$640,000 to apply to the total cost of the project.
The intent is to bring the initial pilot portion of
the full project on line as soon as possible, then
address the remainder of the re-construction
project, to improve the overall effectiveness of
the plant.
Improvements will also reduce overall costs,
especially with regard to electrical costs, and
bring the facility in compliance with EPA mandates.
Council also passed four ordinances, all on
second reading, including the provision to annex
approximately 10 acres to the city located
along Grone Road on the east side of the city
bringing Lees Restoration into the city limits.
The Allen County Commissioners previously
expressed their approval of the annexation.
See COUNCIL, page 12

$1.00

Carlisle now a Grand Champion


New Moon Carlisle of Amazing Love won his breed and group 4 owner handler at the
Lima Dog Show on June 27. That win gave Carlisle the point he needed to become
a Gand Champion and he can place the initials GCH before his name. Carlisle is a
3-year-old Neapolitan Mastiff was also awarded select dog and award of merit at the
Westminster dog show in New York City in 2014. He is owned by Sherry Subler from
Delphos. (Submitted photo)

School board talks


summer projects
BY STEVEN
COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgriffis@delphosherald.com

Library offers mythological heroes

Children worked their way through mazes, pinned the snake on Medusa and more Tuesday during the Delphos
Public Librarys Summer Ready Program offering Heroes of Mythology. Above: 7-year-old Olivia Bloom
makes here way through a maze. Friday is the last day for children to turn in their reading record. Party invitations to Kangaroo Cave will be sent to all those who have completed six weeks of reading 120 per week. Over
and Above Club prizes will also be drawn and called. (DHI Media/Nancy Spencer)

DELPHOS Bequests,
buses
and
building
improvements were at the
center of discussions during
Mondays meeting of the
Board of Education of the
Delphos City Schools.
District Superintendent
Kevin Wolfe updated the
board on continuing repairs
to Franklin Elementary,
advising members that, to
date, repairs have proven
principally cosmetic and
that no significant structural
issues have been recorded.
He then turned attention to
the high school and its aging
windows.
Wolfe reported that
an initial estimate on the
removal and replacement of
existing windows at the high
school ranges from between
$900 and $1,200 per window. Settling on an easily manipulated $1,000 per
window, and allowing for
the replacement of roughly 80 windows, he reported

that a complete update of


the schools window would
cost the district approximately $80,000.
Its a bus, Board
President Andy North said,
acquainting the anticipated
project cost with the cost of
acquiring a new school bus,
but how much is that going
to save us in heat?
The board discussed the
issue, considered the possibility of attacking the
renovation in stages, then
directed Wolfe to acquire
an estimate for the entire
project as a whole.
It seems to me that wed
be better off financially, that
we would get a better rate
if we bid it as one project,
North opined.
The board also reviewed
plans for new bathroom
facilities at the middle
school. Wolfe presented members with revised
blueprints for the roughly
$125,000 renovation, following which the board
unanimously directed Wolfe
to begin the bid process.
See BOARD, page 12

Annual fishing derby Saturday Winhover writing her own story

A young angler tries his luch at lat years fishing derby.


(DHI Media file photo)
INFORMATION
held at the quarry located
SUBMITTED
west edge of Delphos on St.
Rt. 697 (Ohio Street). The
DELPHOS The annual derby is open to all local kids
Kids Fishing Derby to be up age 12. Children need to
held at the Delphos Coon be accompanied by an adult.
and Sportsmen Club on Any child can fish even if
Saturday.
their parents are not memThe Fishing Derby to be bers of the Sportsmen Club.

Refreshments will be
available at no costs to children.
Prizes include a bicycles
for the boy and girl who
take first place with fishing
equipment for others.
Fishing will start at 8 a.m.
and end at 11 a.m. at which
time prizes will be given away.
Those fishing need to register at the Club House upon
arriving to fish to be eligible
for any prizes.
Fishing has been really
good lately. Crappie, bluegill, catfish, bass and even
some large carp are biting
very good this past week.
Nice sized crappies and bass
have been really biting the
best.

BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com

a light bulb went on when I started to learn


the parts of a story and character names.
Winhover quickly turned her newest
endeavor into a talent. She has amassed
DELPHOS Recent St. Johns High four Gold Key awards including the one
School graduate Liz Winhover loves to she earned for her Writing Portfolio at
read. That passion led to
the Fort Wayne Regional
another writing.
Scholastic Art & Writing
I had a really good teachAwards Ceremony. Her
er in fourth grade and she
portfolio then advanced to
knew how much I loved to
the national level where
read and it struck me that
it was evaluated in New
maybe I could write, too,
York City with entries
Winhover said. I started
from all across the counwith short stories and it grew
try. Her portfolio consistfrom that.
ed of eight different piecWinhover said it was hard
es of writing including
at first.
short stories, flash fiction,
I didnt even know the
poetry, memoirs and jourWinhover
terminology, she laughed. I
nalistic.
didnt know what dialogue was or the proSee WRITING, page 12
tagonist. I had to teach myself. It was like

Business 10 | Classifieds 11 | Entertainment 9 | For The Record 2 | Local-State 3-4 | Obituaries 2 | Sports 6-8 | Weather 2
Midget Football signups set
Upcoming coverage
Signups for the Delphos Midget Football Association will
Church festival Sunday
Canal Days entertainment
run from 6-7 p.m. Aug. 3 at the Stadium Park shelterhouse.
The Ottoville Parish
The Canal Days Committee has
This is for anyone between the ages of 9-12 not currently on
announced the entertainment for- Festival is Sunday in
a team. You must be 9 by or on Sept. 1 and no older than 12.
Ottoville.
this years event.
Tryouts wiill be from 6-7 p.m. on Aug. 10 and Aug. 11 near
STadium park diamond No. 4.
Contact Jereme Buzard at 419-235-3084 or Steve Buzard at
Read Saturdays Herald for more information!
419-303-7316 for more information.

DHI MEDIA
2015 Published in Delphos, Ohio

Volume 145, No. 9

2 The Herald

For The Record

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

OBITUARIES

single vehicle accident


Torrential rains earlier in the day played a role in a single vehicle accident early Tuesday
afternoon on State Route 66 north of the high school. (DHI Media/Steven Coburn-Griffis)

FROM THE ARCHIVES


one Year Ago
Members of the Delphos Canal Commission
are very excited about their newest project: rebuilding the Marguerite and bringing
her back to life. Trustee Linda Baker said
President Lou Hohman and Vice President
Steve Dorsten have been busy placing the
numbered oak bottom ribs of the vessel in the
order they were found as well as building the
ramps and platform for the display.
25 Years Ago 1990
Hard Time Bingo will once again be part
of the Landeck St. John the Baptist Churchs
summer festival on July 29. Photographed
with Hard Time the cow were Steve Bockey,
Jeff Bockey, Kimberly Miller, Ken Miller,
Craig Miller and Mark Bockey. Dinners will
be served and other activities include an
appearance by Happy the Hobo from Channel
55, a dance by Orrie Spring and music by
Dave Kill and the Good Ole Boys.
The 15th annual Spencerville all-comers
cross country meet will be Aug. 16 behind
Spencerville High School. Ribbons will go
first through sixth place in the one-mile races,
first through fortieth and the first 20 females
in the 5000-meter race, top five teams and the
top three female teams in the 5000-meter race.
Meet director is Brian McMichael.
Kelly Van Schoyck will be entertaining
the National Junior Olympics July 25-29
in Lincoln, Neb. Van Schoyck qualified by
advancing through district, state and regional
competition. Van Schoyck is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Shaw of Delphos.
35 Years Ago - 1980
In a strong defensive battle Wednesday
evening in womens softball, Darlenes Beauty

Shop came away with a victory against Rural


Communications 5-3. Almost every player for
Darlenes had at least one hit. Sherri Gephart,
Ag Klaus, Dot Geise, and Judy Hemker went
two for three. Darlene Schulte pitched the win
for Darlenes.
Rose Haigh, 90, of Delphos, once worked
in a Michigan tea room with former First
Lady Betty Ford, who was a model in the
store. The Haighs moved to Delphos in 1920,
and then to Grand Rapids, Mich. In 1927.
Rose took employment at Herpolsheimers, a
department store, where she was hostess and
cashier of the tea room. One of the models
who showed clothes to tearoom customers
was Betty Ford.
50 Years Ago 1965
Open House will be held July 18 in the
offices of the Metzner-Van Pelt Insurance
Agency, 155 W. Cleveland St. On June 1 of this
year the Metzner Insurance Agency, owned
by John Metzner, Sr., and John Metzner, Jr.,
merged with the Van Pelt Insurance Agency,
formerly located at 406 S. Pierce St., owned
by William Van Pelt, to form the new MetznerVan Pelt Insurance Agency.
The Delphos Pony League Reds scored
a 4-3 win Thursday night at the stadium at
the expense of an aggressive Ottoville team.
Jack Westrich, on the mound for Delphos,
had a one-hit shut-out going until the seventh
inning. Included in the six hits Delphos managed to get off the Ottoville hurler, Gasser,
were two by Lang.

see ArCHiVes, page 14

Your Local Weather


Wed

7/15

75/53

A mainly
sunny sky.
High around
75F. Winds
NNE at 5 to
10 mph.

Thu

7/16

78/63

Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the low 60s.

Fri

7/17

85/70

Scattered
thunderstorms possible.

Sat

7/18

88/70

A few thunderstorms
possible.

richard L. Dick
Dukes

April 28, 1940July 12, 2015


DELPHOS Richard
L. Dick Dukes, 75, of
Delphos, died at 4:47 p.m.
Sunday at St. Ritas Medical
Center.
He was born April 28,
1940, in Lima to Richard
Edwin and Vera Louise
(Rahrig) Dukes, who preceded him in death.
Dick is survived by five
siblings, Renee L. Dukes
of Round Rock, Texas, and
Kevin R. (Nancy) Dukes,
Keith E. (Deb) Dukes,
Maria M. Axe and Dodie
M. (Gregory) Seller, all of
Delphos.; his loving Aunt,
Carolyn Brandehoff; several nieces and nephews,
great-nieces, great-nephews
and cousins.
He is a life member of St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church, a 1958 graduate
of Delphos St. Johns High
School and a 1963 graduate
of the Dayton Art Institute.
His pride and joy were his
two cats, Dusty and Sassy,
who he loved dearly.
Dick retired after 45 years
at the Birkmeier Monument
Company
in
Delphos,
where he served in numerous capacities. When first
joining the company, Dick
was instrumental in starting
up and heading the design

department where he innovated personalized artwork


in monument design, thereby
changing the entire industry
using this concept. He continued to develop new ideas
and techniques, being the first
in the industry to do hand
etching and color painting on
monuments. Several years
later he transitioned into sales
and management, while continuing to focus on specialized monument design. He
was well known, liked and
respected in the monument
industry.
His great talent as an artist is immortalized through
his many landscape and still
life paintings he gifted to his
family, friends and St. Johns
Church. He was a member
of and an award winner at
the Wassenberg Art Center
in Van Wert. He was honored
to design the Coat of Arms
for the late, Bishop Albert
H. Ottenweller and the St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton Navy
Chaplain Medal for the late,
Reverend Thomas W. Kuhn.
Dick served for many
years on the Delphos St.
Johns Cemetery Board. He
was also a member of the F.O.
Eagles Aerie 471 of Delphos;
a past member of the B.P.O.
Elks Lodge #54 in Lima; a
past officer of the Delphos
Club; and a past member of
the Delphos Country Club.
A memorial Mass of
Christian Burial will begin
at 11 a.m. Tuesday at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church. A private family
burial of his cremains will
be at a later time. The family
will receive friends from 9:30
a.m. until service begins.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to the St. Johns Parish
Foundation.
Arrangements are being
made by his long time business friend, Thomas E.
Bayliff of Spencerville.

The Delphos
Herald
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary,
general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The
Delphos
Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
Wednesdays and Saturdays.
The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for
$0.96 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office for
Allen, Van Wert and Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $72 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833

CorreCtions

The Delphos Herald wants


to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the newsroom of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.

BIRTHS

st. ritAs
A girl, Layne Angeline,
was born July 3 at St. Ritas
Medical Center, to Scott and
Mary Miller of Pandora.
She weighed 8 pounds, 3
ounces and was welcomed
home by big brothers, Jack
and Grant.
Grandparents include Mark
and Linda Miller of Delphos
and Judy and Rick Essinger
of Rawson.
A girl was born July 12 to
inForMAtion sUBMitteD
Kristin and Grant McMichael
of Venedocia.
VAN WERT The following cases were heard Tuesday
A boy was born July 11 to
in Van Wert County Common Pleas Court by Retired Judge Bridget and Josh Ricker of
Charles Steele:
Dephos.
Arraignment
Justin Williams, 25, Lima, entered a not guilty plea to
trafficking cocaine, a felony 5. No bond was set as Williams
is currently incarcerated on unrelated charges. Pretrial will be
held on July 20.
Wheat $5.31
Change of plea
Corn$4.31
Levi strawser, 24, Fort Wayne, changed his plea to guilty
Soybeans $10.42
to charges of theft, a felony 5; and forgery, also a felony
5. He then requested and was granted Treatment in Lieu of
Conviction and his case was stayed pending completion of the
treatment program.
sentencing
erica Hatfield, 29, Middle Point, was sentenced on a
charge of trafficking heroin, a felony 5. She was sentenced to
DHi Media staff reports
five years community control, 60 days jail at later date, 200
hours community service, drug court, two years intensive proDELPHOS A Delphos
bation and drivers license suspended six months and she was man was cited for failure to
ordered to pay partial appointed counsel fees plus court costs. stop at an assured, clear disAn 11-month prison term was deferred.
tance following a two-vehicle
PROBATION VIOLATIONS
crash reported at 1:23 p.m.
Zachary Craig, 35, Van Wert, admitted a probation viola- Friday.
tion by testing positive of meth. The case was continued for
According to Delphos
sentencing on Monday.
Police reports, Mandy Owens
Dallas Fortner, 20, Mendon, admitted to violating his of Van Wert was stopped at the
probation by being convicted of a felony in Mercer County. intersection of Elida Road and
He was sentenced to prison for two years with credit for 512 East Fifth Steet waiting to turn
days served.
left onto Fifth Street when
Grant Albright, 38, Van Wert, admitted to violating his a vehicle driven by Anthony
probation by refusing to be transferred to WORTH Center. Teman, 21, of Delphos, failed
He was sentenced to 11 months prison with credit for 78 days to stop behind the Owens
served.
vehicle and struck it in the
travis Potter, 28, Celina, admitted to violating his proba- rear. Teman said he had failed
tion by being terminated from the WORTH Center unsuccess- to notice the light was red and
fully. He was sentenced to 12 months prison with credit for 42 had bent down to pick up his
days served.
water bottle.
No one was injured.

COURT NEWS

GRAINS

Sun

7/19

88/69

A few thunderstorms
possible.

2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service

ACCIDENTS

For movie information, call

419.238.2100 or visit
vanwertcinemas.com
Van-Del Drive-In - NOW OPEN!
van-del.com 419.968.2178

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The driver of a Time


Warner Cable van struck a
fire hydrant when leaving
the alley west of North Main
Street.
According
to
police
reports, Matthew Woodruff,
34, of McGuffey was parked
facing north and he attempted
to back up and he struck the
fire hydrant in front of an
apartment.
Delpha wrecker service
removed the vehicle from
on top of the hydrant. The
hydrant had been pulled out
of the ground and was lying
on its side. Delphos Fire
and Rescue removed the fire
hydrant.
No citations were issued.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

The Herald 3

Local/State
Huey sound of hope
to land at Ribfest
BY ANNE
COBURN-GRIFFIS
Sentinel Editor

agriffis@putnamsentinel.com

World War II veterans (from left) Harold Liebrecht, Burl Morris and Art Grotehouse
related their war efforts during a roundtable event on Sunday at the Canal Commission
Museum. (DHI Media/Steven Coburn-Griffis)

Remembering the War

Three local veterans recollect WWII


BY STEVEN COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgriffis@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS Tom Brokaw called them
the greatest generation, those men and
women who rode out the Great Depression
and then rallied to the cause when the United
States entered into World War II. On Sunday,
three veterans of the second war to end all
wars talked about their experiences to a small
crowd at the Canal Commission Museum,
lending understanding to how that phrase
came to be coined.
Art Grothouse, Harold Liebrecht and Burl
Morris are three men from disparate military
branches air force, army and navy, respectively all of whom served, at one time or
another, in the Pacific Ocean theater. All three
spoke, unselfservingly, of hardship and sacrifice; with pride in service to country and compatriots; and with an understanding of their
role in a necessary war. The men occasionally
smiled as they spoke, remembering lighter
moments. For the great part, though, they
were somber, both with the effort of remembering and with the memories, themselves.
Liebrecht related, in brief, his efforts in the
Phillipines and then his stint in Japan where
he saw firsthand the effects of what was then
the most terrible weapon ever devised by man.
I remember being in an LST (landing
ship, tank) heading for Japan, we slept in
tents there for a while, he said. I was in the
occupational forces there for about a year. I
got a chance and we went down to where they

dropped the bomb. I walked through some of


that. Everything was chipped. Everything was
burned out.
For Morris, entering the war was a family
event, something he did with his brother, both
mens eyes open to the responsibilities they
were assuming.
My brother and I both decided that we
didnt want to be drafted and we went and
signed up and joined the Navy, he said.
They did a lot of testing psychological
testing, other kinds of testing. I dont know
how they determined what you were qualified
for, really. I was sent to hospital corps school
and my brother was sent to signalmen corps
training. After three solid months of training
for hospital corps, my line of duty then was to
really take good care of all people.
Grothouse entered into military service on
December 26, 1941, volunteering in order to
gain acceptance into the air force. After training for six months at a new base in Wichita
Falls, Texas, he first served in a bombing
group in Anchorage, Alaska, and then, later,
in the Phillipines. There, he played a role in
the fulfillment of that famous promise, I shall
return.
MacArthur always said that theyd run
him out of the Phillipines and he always said
that he was coming back, Grothouse said.
Well, we kind of softened the place up for
him and he invaded the Phillipines.
For two hours the men spoke, answering
questions and relating their remembrances,
their understandings of an era and a generation that was as fierce as it was great.

OTTAWA From 1959


through April 1975, the
United States was engaged
in a prolonged struggle
between nationalist forces attempting to unify the
country of Vietnam under
a communist government.
Many Americans watched
the conflict from the safety
of the dinner table or sofa.
Members of the U.S. military
on the ground, a very alien
ground, found themselves
dropped in a jungle landscape
to fight a hidden enemy, protecting villagers who may or
may not have been working
against them.
And as they combated
guerrilla warfare that included ambush, booby-traps as
well as the effects of chemical weapons and defoliants
employed by the United
States government to expose
the enemy, one life line connected them all: the American
Huey helicopter.
They brought the soldiers
into the war, they brought
them supplies, said Ann
Wiechart, a Core Member
of the American Huey 369
Organization. If they were
injured, it brought them out of
the war. They brought these
guys home. And when they
hear the sound of the Huey,
its a healing for them.
The American Huey 369
Organization began in 2005
when Air Force pilot John
Walker saw an ad on Ebay
for a grounded Huey, and
purchased it for restoration.
Although Walker himself is
not a Vietnam veteran, he
understood the significance
of the aircraft, especially
for those who were. While
on the road as a salesman,
Wiecharts husband Gary, a
Vietnam veteran, also saw a
similar ad and told his wife
about it.
Gary Wiechart discovered that Walker and other
volunteers were in the process of developing the
National American Huey
History Museum (NAHHM)
at Grissom Air Force Base
(GAFB)/Grissom
Air

Lisa Wiechart Meyer captured this photo of her brother


Matt giving a Huey pilot the thumbs up from his father
Garys graveside. Gary Wiechart was Vietnam War veteran. (Photo submitted)
Museum in Peru, Indiana. He
stopped at the museum while
on the road and was given a
tour, even though the museum was closed that day.
He said, Someday I want
to give back, said Ann.
Well, Garys not here anymore to give back, but they
are giving everyday.
Gary died from cancer,
with complications from the
malaria he contracted in the
war, while his brother-in-law
Jim Dickman was making
arrangements for the organization to bring a helicopter to
Fort Jennings Bicentennial.
Gary was to take part in
an American Huey 369
Organization Honor Flight
during the event. Gary and
Anns son Matt was placed
on the Honor Flight.
Since that time, a special connection has formed
between the organization and
Gary and Anns daughter,
Angie. Angie convinced her
mother to attend one of the
Huey events.
And I cant explain the
power that comes over you
once youre connected with
it; the healing, said Ann.
And thats what its doing

for these veterans.


One of the two restored
flight-ready Huey helicopters, soon to be three, will be
onhand at the Rhythm and
Ribfest in Ottawa on July 18.
Veterans and other visitors
will be able to touch the aircraft, sit in it and have its history explained by volunteers.
Veterans will have the opportunity for one-one-sessions in
the helicopter.
Its the thank-you that
they did not get when they
came home. Its therapy,
said Ann. And they encourage us to go up to veterans
and say thank-you.
Membership flights will
be also offered at the festival. A membership to the
association is $100, with a
percentage of the flight going
to a designated charity and to
the museum.
Ann Weichart believes
that a flight on a Huey is one
that will not be forgotten. She
said, What theyre there for
is the sound of hope, for any
veterans of the Vietnam War
or any wars after that, their
families and to educate the
general public.

Marion Township Trustees hold July meeting


Bonifas resigns
from Elida positions
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

BY STEVEN
COBURN-GRIFFIS
DHI Media Correspondent
sgriffis@delphosherald.com
ELIDA After over 12
years of service in the Village
of Elida, Janet Bonifas tendered her resignation on
Monday. A grim Kim Hardy,
mayor, read her letter of resignation to a shell-shocked
council during their meeting
on Tuesday.
This letter is to inform
you that I am resigning from
my positions as fiscal officer, tax administrator and
office manager at the Village
of Elida, Ohio, Hardy said,
reading from Bonifas letter.
Thank you for the opportunity to serve the residents
of Elida for the last 12 plus
years.
Council President Larry
Flick accepted the resignation
with regret.
I surely dont want to see
you leave, Councilor Claude
Paxton said to Bonifas.

The Marion Township Trustees held their regular schedule


meeting on Monday at the Marion Township office with the following members present: Jerry Gilden, Joseph Youngpeter and
Howard Violet.
The purpose of the meeting was to pay bills and conduct ongoing business. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and
approved as read.
The Trustees then reviewed the bills and gave approval for 22
checks totaling $29,271.42.
Road Foreman Elwer reported that on June 29, a representative from the Allen County Engineers Office and the Allen
Soil and Water met with residences from the Good Road area to
discuss water issues. After some discussion, it was decided that
the Allen Soil and Water will take a closer look and come back
with some suggestions.
Bonifas
Fiscal Officer Kimmet gave the Trustees the Bank
Bonifas, whose last day Reconciliation and Fund Status reports for June 30 to review
in the employ of the village and sign.
He advised the trustees he received the 2015-16 Liability
is July 21, commented that it
was a difficult decision.
I will miss the people of
Elida; theyre good people,
Bonifas said. But its time
for me to move on. I wish the
village the best of luck.
While
acknowledging
that she will assume a new
position in the public sector
sometime in the very near
future, Bonifas was not at
liberty to say where or when.

Insurance policy which they had previously reviewed and


approved.
Police Chief Vermillion gave the trustees the June activity
report for the township from the Allen County Sheriffs Dept.
There being no further business, a motion by Trustee
Youngpeter to adjourn was seconded by Trustee Violet and
passed unanimously.

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4 The Herald

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Local/State
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
TODAY
9 a.m. - noon Putnam County Museum is open, 202 E.
Main St. Kalida.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
Noon Rotary Club meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. Shepherds of Christ Associates meet in the St.
Johns Chapel.
6:30 p.m. Delphos Kiwanis Club, Eagles Lodge, 1600
E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. Bingo at St. Johns Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. Hope Lodge 214 Free and Accepted Masons,
Masonic Temple, North Main Street.
Sons of the American Legion meet at the Delphos Legion
hall.
The Fort Jennings Board of Education meets in the library.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241
N. Main St., is open.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.
3-7 p.m. The Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.
5:30 p.m. The Delphos Canal Commission meets at the
museum, 241 N. Main St.
7 p.m. Spencerville Local Schools Board of Education
meets.
St. Johns Athletic Boosters meet in the Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. Delphos Chapter 26 Order of the Eastern Star
meets at the Masonic Temple on North Main Street.
Delphos VFW Auxiliary meets at the VFW Hall, 213 W.
Fourth St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. Delphos Optimist Club, A&W Drive-In, 924
E. Fifth St.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is open.
11 a.m.-4 p.m. Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff St.

Retired teachers visit


Window Creations
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
Nearly 30 Putnam County retired
teachers and their guests toured the
amazing Window Creations facility near
Ottoville on July 9.
Reggie Buehrer and his son lead
tours for the group through the complex
explaining how stained glass windows
are designed, restored, disassembled and
assembled. Up to 18 people are actively involved the business, including the
entire Buehrer family, and they have
learned to do most processes in house.
Three-dimensional glass work is
unique to Window Creations, and is
used more often since windows are often
times absent in contemporary buildings.
PCRTA also had the opportunity to view
sketches for St. Barbaras Church that is
being rebuilt in Cloverdale.
Before the tour, association members
enjoyed fellowship and a great meal
at the Ottoville Main Street Market.
President Roger Luersman conducted the
business meeting. Scissors and colored
pencils, along with monetary donations
were collected for the school supply give
away in August.
Membership Chair Dorothy Hanefeld
reported that 34 letters were sent to
newly retired teachers in the county and
three of them were able to attend the July
meeting.
Under old business, a thank note from

PCRTA science fair winner Kambrie


Edelbrock was shared.
Under new business, President
Luersman presented some ideas for
future fund raisers for the scholarship
fund which included book signings by
author and member Lloyd Harnishfeger,
a trip to a performance at ONU in Ada
or the Niswonger PAC in Van Wert, or a
possible bus trip with the proceeds going
towards the fund.
The 2016 meeting dates were
announced and are April 14 at the Pandora
Methodist Church, July 14, Sept. 8 at the
Fort Jennings Memorial Hall and Dec. 8
at the Glandorf Fellowship Hall.
District II Representative Bruce
Hodges presented statements that were
accepted at the May ORTA Executive
Board meeting, which included that local
associations can increase membership
and receive a rebate for members who
join both their local association and
ORTA beginning in 2016. ORTA is also
looking for a Technology/Social Media/
Communications Director. Hodges also
mentioned that retirees need to educate
themselves about candidates and issues,
and to vote during the upcoming election
year.
The next PCRTA meeting will be
Sept. 10 at the Delphos Postal Museum
and the meal will be catered by Baked to
Perfection.

Cattell

Cattell turning 100

DHI Media Staff Reports

DELPHOS Isabel (Vogt)


Cattell will celebrate her
100th birthday on Monday at
Lafayette Pointe Care Center
in West Lafayette.
Isabel Vogt was born July
20, 1915, near Delphos to
Mary and Lewis Vogt. On
June 25, 1938, she married
Joseph C. Cattell of Delphos.
He passed away on Aug. 10,
2000.
Isabel has three daughters,
Joan (Bill) Bruning, Mary Ann
(Kent) Arnold and Pat (Dave)
Kuhns; and three granddaughters, three grandsons, four
great-granddaughters and four
great-grandsons.
Isabel had one sister, Esther
(Vogt) Lause; and two brothers, Lewis Vogt and Eugene
Vogt, who all are deceased.
Cards will be appreciated at:
Lafayette Pointe Care
Center
620 E. Main St.
West Lafayette OH 43845

SATURDAY
9-11:30 a.m. Delphos Project Recycle at Delphos Fuel
and Wash.
9 a.m. to noon Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society, located at the east edge of the
St. Johns High School parking lot, is open.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Delphos Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire
and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. Bingo at St. Johns Little Theatre.
July 16
Patricia Brinkman
Doug Sickels
Munch Stemen
Nick Schnipke
Samantha Farler
July 17
Stephanie Line
Austin Jostpille
Irvin Suever

Off Stage to hold auditions for Murder Inn


INFORMATION SUBMITTED
VAN WERT Off Stage Productions,
a community theatre company providing
quality and affordable dinner theatre,
proudly announces open auditions for its
Fall production Murder Inn, written
by Howard Voland & Keith McGregor.
This comedy/murder mystery will be
directed by Dan Bulau.
Open auditions are set for 7 p.m.
Aug. 2 and Aug 4 at the Van Wert Senior
Center located at 220 Fox Road, Van
Wert. The play needs a cast of 12 (four
men, eight women) of various ages. No
prior acting experience necessary to
audition.

Scripts are available for review a night of mayhem and madness as


before auditions at Premier Financial, knives begin to pop up in the most
211 S. Walnut Street, Van Wert. Call unexpected places. As the storm builds
419-605-6708 for more information.
and the body count rises, the survivors
Performance dates will be Oct. 24, try to figure out who done it. And even
25, 30 and 31 and Nov. 1, 6 and 7.
more important- whos likely to have
Murder Inn is set in New England, it done to them next?
at the Barnsley Inn, a dilapidated eighCharacters: (*ages, etc. are flexible
teenth century inn, which is supposedly as long as they work as a group)
NEWSPAPER
haunted by Marco, a knife-throwing
JohnREPRODUCTION
Talbot - (20s,) sonNOTE:
of the owner
NEWSPAPER
REPRODUCTION
NOTE: recommended.
133LPI minimum
required,
150LPI
poltergeist.
of
Barnsley
Inn.
A
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133LPI minimum required, 150LPI recommended.
A group of tourists, on a tour- young man.
Ghosts and Ghouls of New England*Martha Talbot - (50s) Owner of
is forced, by a storm, to make an Barnsley; cantankerous, short and plump
unscheduled stop at the Barnsley. with gray hair
What looks to be an unpleasant and
NEWSPAPER REPRODUCTION NOTE:
See
MURDER, page
12
uncomfortable detour soon
turns into
NEWSPAPER
REPRODUCTION
NOTE:
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150LPI recommended.

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THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Kay Meyer, Eloise Shumaker,
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FRIDAY: Eloise Shumaker, Sharon Wannemacher, Mary
Jane Watkins, Valeta Ditto and Marge Kaverman.
SATURDAY: Sandy Hahn, Martha Etzkorn, Joyce Day and
Helen Fischer.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 3-7 p.m. Thursday; 11 a.m.-4
p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.-noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Volunteer Coordinator Barb Haggard
at the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Blood drive nets 61 units


INFORMATION SUBMITTED

DELPHOS The American Red Cross held a blood drive


at the Delphos Eagles on July 9. The goal for the day was 47
pints of blood and 61 pints were collected.
Those reaching gallon levels are: Karen Sendelbach and
Rhonda Longstreth - two gallons; Janet Siefker - nine gallons;
and Alice Hilvers - 15 gallons.
The next blood drive at the Delphos Eagles is set for Sept.
10.

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Wednesday, July 15, 2015

The Herald 5

The Next Generation


4-H club prepare
for upcoming events
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
The Pathfinders of Delphos meeting on June 18 had Safety
Officer Rebecca Violet give a report on Sports Safety for the
summer activities.
Upcoming events and important dates include: from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. July 21 is 4-H Judging (registering has began and
ends July 15); Black Inc. applications are due Aug. 7 and
judging will be from 8 a.m. to noon Aug. 15; and July 21 is
also the Table Setting Contest.
Pathfinders of Delphos next meeting will be held July 13
at Sue Hempflings house.

Members of the Knights of Columbus Golfing Committee, from left, Tom Odenweller, Mark Wilson, Scott Hamilton,
Derek Webb, Nate Webb are shown with St. Johns Junior High Science teacher Teresa Recker and High School
Principal Adam Lee. (Submitted photo)

K of C donates to St. Johns


Science Department
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
The Delphos St. Johns junior high
and high school science department has
recently positioned themselves to make
a huge advancement into the technology
world thanks to a very generous donation
from the Delphos Knights of Columbus
Golfing Committee. This donation has
enabled Delphos St. Johns to purchase
five sets of state of the art Physics
equipment from Vernier Software and
Technology.
The recently purchased equipment
will allow the junior high students to collect data by using sensor probes. These
sensor probes will allow the students to
conduct experiments dealing with temperature, motion, force, conductivity,
gas pressure, heart rate, light, magnetic

field, pH, and voltage. A device, called a


LabQuest 2, will allow for graphing and
analysis capabilities. The Vernier equipment will make it easier to collect, analyze, and share data from various experiments. The equipment, which also has
wireless connectivity, will encourage
collaboration and personalized learning
both with and among the students. This
new technology and software is compatible with computers, Chromebooks,
iPads, and Android devices.
This equipment will also allow physics students to study Newtons Laws of
Motion, Atwoods experiment, friction,
momentum, harmonic motion, pendulums, collisions, free fall, acceleration,
interaction of forces and many other
aspects of objects in motion. Students
will also conduct experiments to study

Ohms Law, series and parallel circuits.


Students will now be able to collect all
data electronically, make graphs, and
even study videos of objects in motion.
They will be able to transfer the data and
graphs to laptop computers in order to
print the information for easier interpretation and analysis. The information can
also be projected onto a SmartBoard for
all students to see and analyze.
The science teachers are very grateful
to the Knights of Columbus for their
generous donation. Their generosity will
allow for hands-on scientific exploration
which will help the students to master
numerous concepts and thus help prepare them for future careers in the areas
of science, technology, engineering and
math.

Putnam libraries set childrens programming


INFORMATION
SUBMITTED

OTTAWA The Putnam


County District Library in
Ottawa has announced the
following activities:
Fairy Garden at the
Library
The Putnam County
District Library will have a
Mini Fairy Garden project at 6 p.m. on July 20.
Join Kathie Stinson and
create a Mini Fairy Garden
or a Small Globe Garden.
The cost is $10 per garden,
supplies provided. Any
questions call the Ottawa
library at 419-523-3747.
Magician at the Library
The Putnam County

District Library will have


Magic Nate at all eight
locations in July. All are
welcome to attend this
free program sponsored by
the Friends of the Putnam
County District Library and
area local businesses.
The schedule is as follows: July 22 - Ottawa
Location at 9:30 a.m.;
Leipsic Edwards-Gamper
Memorial Location at 11:30
a.m.; Ottoville-Monterey
Twp. at 1:30 p.m.; PandoraRiley Location at 3:30
p.m.; July 23 - Continental
Location at 9:30 a.m.;
Columbus Grove Location
at 11:30 a.m.; Kalida-Union
Twp. Location at 1:30 p.m.;
and Fort Jennings at 3:30
p.m.

Hero Party at the


Library
The Putnam County
District Library will have
You Be The Hero at all
eight locations in July. All
are welcome to dress as
your favorite hero. Register
to win Kings Island Tickets,
winner will be drawn after
the last Hero Party. This
program is sponsored by
the Friends of the Putnam
County District Library and
Area Local Businesses.
The schedule is as follows: July 27 - Ottawa
location at 11 a.m.; Kalida
Union Twp. at 1 p.m.; July
28 - Fort Jennings location
at 11 a.m.; Pandora-Riley
location at 1 p.m.; July 29
- Leipsic Edwards-Gamper

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subscriber family!
Jesse Lindeman
Peggy Sherrard
Joyce Ricker
Kim Schweizer
Joan Waltman
Valeta Kramer
Phyllis Turnwald
Sandy Schmersal
Thomas McCabe
Sue Ricker

Ben Norbeck
Charles Geise
John Burnett
Elizabeth Ricker
Linda Suever
Carl Bilimek
Herman Wienken
Brian Gossard
Laura Trentman
Ruth Lucke
Janelle Friedrich
Mickey Johnson
Jerry Mericle
Tina Davila
Dennis Wieging
Gary Levitt
David Ostendorf
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Memorial at 11 a.m.;
Ottoville-Monterey Twp. at
1 p.m.; July 30 - Columbus
Grove location at 11 a.m.;
and Continental location at
1 p.m.

Katie Vorst of Delphos, left, and Bryce Campbell of Van


Wert are two of the three 2015 Farm Focus Scholarship
winners. (Submitted photo)

2015 Farm Focus


Scholarship Winners
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED

VAN WERT Farm


Focus Inc. was founded in
1974 in order to promote agriculture in Van Wert County
and the surrounding area. It
is their continued mission to
assist Van Wert County students through a scholarship
program that will enable them
to pursue a degree in an agricultural related field.
The 2015 Scholarship
Recipients:
Bryce Campbell, Van
Wert, is the son of Tony and

Tammy Campbell and is a


sophomore at The Ohio State
University in Columbus
majoring in agriculture engineering;
Katie Vorst, Delphos,
the daughter of Chris and
Sandy Vorst, is a junior at
The Ohio State University
majoring in agribusiness and
applied economics; and
Tiffany Ricketts,
Rockford, is the daughter of
Darryl and Ginny Ricketts,
she will be attending Wright
State University Lake Campus
as a freshman, majoring in
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6 The Herald

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Sports

July a waiting game


for Ohio MLB fans
Now that we have reached the official midway point of
the Major League Baseball season, we can look back and look
ahead.
We look back at
some
disappointJim Metcalfe
ments.
We Ohio fans
of the Cincinnati
Reds and Cleveland
Indians began the
season with high
hopes as EVERY
fan of EVERY Major
League
Baseball
team does as hope springs eternal in Major League Baseball
in spring training! and dreams of hoisting high the World
Series trophy.
Alas and alack for those of you Shakespearean fans
among my growing legion (or my semi-growing legion!) of
fanatics both of us have had many a night of groanings and
gnashing of teeth.
I havent given up hope for my Redlegs and I wouldnt
mind the Indians making a long run in the post-season, either.
I think that would be ideal for those success-starved cities in
the far corners of the Buckeye State.
However, ending the first half losing three
out of four to the Giancarlo Stanton-less Miami
Marlins
left a bitter taste in my mouth and a sinking
feeling in
my gut that it wont be long before the feared fire sale that
we Reds fans have experienced a time or two in our time on
this mortal coil we call Planet Earth will occur.
Maybe it has to happen.
The reality of being a small-market team even with a
rabid fan base among some financial powerhouses: not
only the long-time Evil Empires of the New York Yankees
and Boston Red Sox but now the Los Angeles Dodgers (even
the presence of Earvin Magic Johnson amongst the ownership group only quells by dislike a little), Los Angeles of
Anaheim Angels and others; makes it much harder to keep a
strong team together when too many are entering their contract
years.
They have a $110 million-plus team salary and that only
places them 16th of the 30 teams. Sixteenth!!
After all, what team in MLB wouldnt want to bolster their
starting rotation with a Cy Young-caliber ace like Johnny
Cueto, who has been the focus of hot and heavy trade talks but
is apparently signed for another year?
You know he is due and will get a MAJOR increase
from his $10 million-plus salary.
Or acquire a Cy Young-caliber flamethrowing closer like
Aroldis Chapman?
He will definitely command a big raise from his current $8
million-plus salary.
Or Mike Leake, making almost $10,000,000 on a 1-year
contract?
They have a lot of contracts expiring, like Billy Hamilton,
that will need at least a minimum raise.
I do not relish the job Walt Jockety and the like along
with owner Rob Castellini will have to do in the next month
as we move forward.
Everything I have written for the Reds I can repeat for the
Indians.
We wont like it if the inevitable occurs for either or both
teams but as they say every spring training, hope springs
eternal.

Metcalfes
Musings

Three key parts of the Brad Doty Classic sponsored by Ohio Logistics race at Limaland Motorsports Park gathered
for the pre-race press conference Tuesday are namesake Brad Doty, center; Gene Frankart, left, the originator of
the race that became the Classic; and Greg Wilson, current owner of the UNOH All-Star Sprint Speed Week Circuit
Championship. (DHI Media/Jim Metcalfe)

Doty Classic postponed but


officials still hopeful to race
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

LIMA Mother Nature has not been


kind to the Tri-County and Limaland
area this spring and summer.
She has wrecked many an athletic
event.
Limaland Motorsports Park at 1500
Dutch Hollow Road in Lima has not
escaped her wrath.
The latest event to be scratched a day
is the 27th annual Brad Doty Classic
sponsored by Ohio Logistics.
It was originally slated for today
but due to the excessive rains that have
plagued the area the past week, it has
been pushed back a day to Thursday.
Thats why we set it for a 2-day
window. We have always run it on a
Wednesday and the rain date is the next
day, Brad Doty, the namesake of the
prestigious event, explained Tuesday
during the annual pre-race press conference. You really dont want Mother
Nature to influence the race but this
year, we decided to move it back to
give her a chance to dry it out today. Its
supposed to be sunny with some wind to
help dry it out Wednesday. Its not even
the track; its the parking lot and the pit
area that needs to dry out.
This is the third time weve had to
push it back a day and the race has only

been canceled once in the 90s. It will


be a relief if we can get that checkered
flag to drop Thursday and get the racers
on their way for the rest of the season.
There will be fans from all over the
country and even the world we had
a few from Australia here last year. We
dont want those fans that have to drive
a distance to drive all day, thinking thats
its dry and sunny here, and not know
racing has been postponed.
One might expect the track itself to
be super muddy but Doty says that isnt
always the case.
Actually, the rain can make the track
harder than you expect; when rain is
expected, as it has been for a while, they
pack the dirt harder in anticipation so it
can drain better. I live 2 1/2 hours east
of here in Ohio and we have not gotten
near the rain the Lima area has, he continued. I look forward to this race every
year; its special. Several years ago, I
became a partner; I have a stake in it, so
its even more special. I understand promoters a lot better now that I did when
I was racing, thats for sure; you want a
good race and a pleasurable experience
for the fans and the race officials at
Limaland know how to put on a show.
The schedule is the same Thursday:
pit gates open at 3 p.m. and grandstand
gates open at 4. Hot laps commence at
6:30 p.m. and racing starts at 7:30 p.m.
There are no facilities for campers but

they are welcome on a limited basis.


We have averaged 45 cars here
the last 10 years its been at Limaland.
You will have the best of the World of
Outlaws racers, he said. There are
12-14 teams that have full-time rides,
which means they have to show up
for every race for the points; they run
between 80 and 90 races during the
year throughout the country. Plus, you
will have outsiders and the University
of Northwestern Ohio Circuit champion
will be here as well. Its great competition.
I was a long-time driver but saw my
racing career pretty much come to an
end in an accident in 1988. The first benefit race was at Attica Raceway Park in
1989 and a couple years after that, they
asked me if they could rename it in my
honor. I had no affiliation with it until
2005 when I became a full-time partner.
In 2006, it moved her to Limaland and
its been growing ever since. This is one
of the premier quarter-mile high-banked
ovals in the country and one of the premier races. Its so satisfying to see the
grandstands full and great racing. Its
a boon to the Lima ecomony and just a
great event. I have such great partners
in this.

See DOTY, page 7

OHSAA adopts national recommendations for


minimizing concussion risks in FB practice
Information Submitted

COLUMBUS Beginning
immediately, the Ohio High
School Athletic Association
has joined dozens of states
in adopting recommendations from the National
Federation of State High
School Associations (NFHS)
Concussion Summit Task
Force, which will reduce the
risk in football for concussions and head impact exposure.
The
recommendations were approved by the
OHSAAs Joint Advisory
Committee
on
Sports
Medicine in June and presented to OHSAA Commissioner
Dan Ross and the OHSAA
staff. The OHSAA Board
of Directors unanimously
approved the changes in a
conference call vote Monday.
The changes, which are
listed below, become effective immediately, beginning
with the start of football practices in Ohio on August 1.
The NFHS is the governing
body of high school sports in
this country and Ohio follows
its playing rules.
With the support and
leadership from the football
coaches association, we have
been out in front of concussion awareness and education, and these changes will
now bring Ohio up to a place
as a national leader in this
area, Dr. Ross said. Like
many of our regulations,

these guidelines are to be


followed and monitored by
member schools and coaches, but we are fortunate in
Ohio that many coaches have
already been following these
safety measures. There will
always be a risk for concussion, but football is safer now
than it has ever been, and
these guidelines will make it
even safer.
The three principles that
the guidelines reflect include
exposure of an individual
athlete to full contact in terms
of frequency and duration,
the cumulative effect of the
exposure on an individual
athlete, and recovery time
for each athlete after contact.
The recommendations adopted for immediate compliance
include:
Spring, Summer and All
Off-Season Contact
Already the rule in Ohio,
there is no contact permitted
except during the season, and
pads may not be worn at any
time except during the season. (Many states that allow
spring football practice and
contact in the summer have
a much higher rate of concussions.)
Preseason Practice (all
practices prior to the first
regular-season game)
Note: the following regulations apply to individual student-athletes. Position
groups, etc., can alternate
contact to adhere to the regulations. Also, contact with

soft equipment such as bags,


shields, sleds, etc., does not
count toward contact limitations. Additionally, the task
force noted that preseason
practices may require more
full-contact time than practices occurring later in the
regular season to allow for
teaching fundamentals with
sufficient repetition:
1. Physical Examinations:
Already the rule in Ohio, a
medical examiner must certify each individuals physical fitness no less than once
each calendar year and these
signed forms must be on file
at the school before any candidate for a team may participate in practice.
2. Acclimatization Period:
Already the rule in Ohio, a
five-day acclimatization period is mandatory prior to any
contact drills. Only helmets
are permitted on the first
and second days of practice.
Shoulder pads may be added
on days three and four. Full
pads may be worn on the fifth
day. Full contact is permitted
on the sixth day.
3. Full Contact Limited
During Two-A-Day Practices:
When more than one practice
takes place in a day, full contact is permitted only during
one of the practices. With the
importance of recovery time
to help minimize concussion
risks, consideration should
also be given to the timing of
full contact during the next
day (i.e. if full contact occurs

during session 2 of two-adays, there should not be full


contact in session 1 of two-adays the following day).
Practice During the
Season (all practices after
the first regular-season
game)
Note: the following regulations apply to individual student-athletes. Position
groups, etc., can alternate
contact during the week to
adhere to the regulations.
Also, contact with soft equipment such as bags, shields,
sleds, etc., does not count
toward full contact limitations:
1. Limit full contact on
consecutive days.
2. A student-athlete is limited to 30 minutes of full contact in practice per day.
3. A student-athlete is limited to 60 minutes of full
contact in practice per week.
4. A student-athlete can be
involved in full contact in a
maximum of two practices in
a seven-day span.
These regulations are
being put into place for the
safety of our student-athletes, and it is incumbent
on coaches to monitor the
contact in their practices,
Ross said. Our coaches are
educators and leaders. They
want whats best for kids, and
these regulations are in line
with these safety recommendations.

See OHSAA, page 7

Kalida ACME keeps


on pitching to success
By Charlie Warnimont
DHI Media Sports Editor
sports@putnamsentinel.com

ARCHBOLD - Pitching
has been a key to the success
of the Kalida ACME team
this summer.
The Wildcats received
another solid pitching performance Tuesday evening and
used a pair of timely fly balls
to defeat Miller City 3-0 in
the semifinals of the District
2 ACME district tournament
at Archbolds War Memorial
Field.
The win sends Kalida (145) to the ACME district finals
tonight at Archbold against
either Ayersville, Archbold or
Miller City at approximately
7:30 p.m.
Miller City (11-4) drops
into the losers bracket and
will play the ArchboldAyersville winner at 5:30 p.m.
Trent Siebeneck was the
latest Kalida pitcher to shine
on the mound. Siebeneck
tossed a 2-hit shutout and
used three big plays by his
defense to preserve the shutout. Siebeneck had four
strikeouts in the win and
walked two batters.
Our pitching has been
real good, Kalida ACME
coach Gary Zeller said.
Trent Siebeneck came out
and threw a 2-hit shutout and
you cant do much better than
that. Trent has been pitching good all year. We had
a couple of errors but good
pitching will keep you in the
game.
Both of Miller Citys hits
came in the same inning as
Justin Schnipke had a 1-out
single but was forced at second base on a Lane Hiltner
ground ball to shortstop.

Hiltner stole second base


before Jackson Lammers
walked. Logan Dukes followed with a sharp single
to right field. Kalidas Brady
Laudick came up throwing
and fired a strike to home
plate, where Jeffery Knueve
slapped the tag on a sliding
Hiltner.
Miller Citys other scoring
threat came in the sixth as
they loaded the bases with
one out.
Lammers reached second
base on a throwing error to
start the inning before Jacob
Schimmoeller and Corbin
Niese worked one out walks.
Kuhlman hit a slow roller to third base that Austin
Klausing charged and flipped
a throw home to get Lammers.
Bryce Riepenhoff followed
with a ground ball to third
that Klausing bare-handed
and ran to the bag for the third
out of the inning.
We had a couple of nice
plays to get us out of potential big innings, Zeller said.
Brady threw a runner out at
home plate and Austin had
two big plays in the sixth
inning at third base. He had
that force out at the plate and
then that bare-handed catch
and both of those were huge.
Its all about timely hitting, Miller City ACME
coach Beau Pester said.
Their pitcher threw well
and we didnt get many runners on. It was just a bad
hitting night. And when we
did have runners on, we just
couldnt get that timely hit.
Their pitcher did a good job
of mixing speeds and keeping
us off-balance.

See ACME, page 7

www.delphosherald.com

Sports

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Doty

The Herald 7

ACME
(Continued from page 6)
Kalida took a 1-0 lead in the second inning as Austin
Klausing started the frame being hit by a pitch. After two fly
ball outs, Trent Gerding singled before walks to Derek Buss
and Austin Swift forced in a run.
Kalida added a run in the fifth as Swift singled and was
sacrificed to second by Siebeneck. Swift took third on a passed
ball before scoring on a sacrifice fly to center by Laudick.
The same trio helped account for the Wildcats third run as
Swift reached second base on a throwing error. A ground ball
to second by Siebeneck moved Swift to third before he scored
on a sacrifice fly to left by Laudick.
Kuhlman took the loss for Miller City as he allowed three
runs on five hits with two strikeouts and two walks.
***
Kalida 010 010 1 - 3 5 2
Miller City 000 000 0 - 0 2 1
WP-Siebeneck. LP-Kuhlman.

Local Roundup

UNOH workers survey the Limaland Motorsports Park racetrack along the backstretch Tuesday. The wet weather that
has hit the area the last week and affected the track, the parking lot and the pit area caused race officials to postpone
the race until Thursday. (DHI Media/Jim Metcalfe)
(Continued from page 6)
Then on Victory Lane,
its such an emotional time;
I see winners with tears in
their eyes and it brings tears
to mine.
One of those drivers that
hopes to grab the trophy, the
UNOH All-Star Sprint Speed
Week Circuit Champion
Greg Wilson, plans on giving
it his best shot.
Ive been racing here
since 2004. Its such a beautiful facility and such a competitive atmosphere, Wilson
said. Brad was such a great
racer and an even better
ambassador of the sport. Its
a premier event on the schedule here. Ive had my share
of success at the track and
have some confidence going
in with a couple of wins the
last two years, plus being the
Circuit champ. I come from
Findlay, so this is like my
home track, so I want to do
very well here.

OHSAA

I had such a great team to


work with before but, either
being wise or foolosh, I have
become an owner of the
team. What helps me in that
is that Ohio Logistics, the
sponsor of this event, is also
one of my sponsors, along
with Hercules Tire and several others.
That brings on headaches
of its own but its the racing
that is in Wilsons blood and
the title is the goal.
My whole goal is to get
into the 40-lap feature. I
know for me, getting ready
to run in this race is not so
much adrenaline but nerves,
he added. You want to do
well here for your sponsors,
your team and your fans; like
I said before, this is my home
track. There are so many
great racers that will be here
but if you worry too much
about the competition, you
probably wont do well anyway. I know this; I and my
team will give 110 percent

(Continued from page 6)


As the report also states, these regulations
will evolve and may become more restrictive
as additional concussion research emerges.
In addition, the NFHS Concussion Summit
Task Force has advised the OHSAA to review
its current policy on total quarters permitted,
which currently stands at 50 quarters total for
the season for high school student-athletes
and 32 quarters for 7th-8th grade student-athletes (or 28 quarters if only seven games are
played). The Task Force also asks the OHSAA
and all member schools to:
1. Continue to work with the football
coaches association and all member schools to
ensure that coaches have completed the NFHS
Fundamentals of Coaching course, which is a
requirement in Ohio.
2. Continue to place emphasis on proper
fitting and care of helmets.
3. Continue to place emphasis on proper

to try and bring home the


trophy.
The one that started this
process that became the
Brad Doty Classic was Gene
Frankart.
I didnt know Brad personally before his accident
but I knew of him from the
World of Outlaws. He ran a
couple of times at the track I
co-own, Attica, he explained
of his involvement. Shortly
after he was injured, he had
no income and a big family,
so we decided to run a benefit
for him in 1988. Basically,
we passed the hat among the
drivers and we chipped in
some of our own. Two years
later, we asked him if we
could rename it the Classic
in his honor and he agreed.
According to Frankart, it
wasnt so easy to actually
benefit Brad.
The thing was, he
wouldnt take the money; he
donated it to the Spinal Cord
Foundation. As it gained

tackling and hitting techniques at all times,


especially before full contact begins.
4. Know and follow the state law on
concussion management protocol: http://
www.ohsaa.org/medicine/Concussions/
ConcussionRegulations.pdf
5. Develop and put into practice an
Emergency Action Plan (will be distributed
by the OHSAA in the fall 2015 as part of the
Anyone Can Save a Life program).
6. Whenever possible, have a certified
athletic trainer present at all football practices
and contests.
7. Continue to place emphasis on hydration.
8. Continue to place emphasis on inclement
weather regulations.
The report of recommendations and guidelines from the NFHS Concussion Summit
Task Force can be found at the following
link: http://www.ohsaa.org/medicine/2014NFHSMinimizingHeadImpact.pdf

Legion tourney starts today


Information Submitted
OTTAWA The First
District American Legion
baseball tournament gets
underway today with games
in Ottawa and Findlay.
The two opening-round
games have Whitehouse facing Pemberville at 7 p.m. at
Findlay, while Ottawa and
Toledo play in Ottawa at 6
p.m.
The
WhitehousePemberville winner will play
Findlay in Findlay
Thursday at 7 p.m., while the
Ottawa-Toledo winner plays
Napoleon in Ottawa at
6 p.m.

Post 63 enters the district


tournament with an 8-10-1
record. Ottawa has not played
a game since July 8 when they
visited Adrian, Michigan.
The teams last five games
of the regular season were
rained out, including games
against District 1 foes Findlay
and Pemberville.
Here is a look at the bracket for the First District tournament:

Wednesday, July 15
Whitehouse vs. Pemberville,
at Findlay, Game 1, 7 p.m.
Ottawa vs. Toledo, at Ottawa,
Game 2, 6 p.m.
Thursday, July 16
Whitehouse-Pemberville
winner vs. Findlay, at Findlay, 7
p.m., Game 3
Ottawa-Toledo winner vs.

Napoleon, at Ottawa, 6 p.m.,


Game 4
Friday, July 17
Ottawa-Toledo loser vs.
Game 3 loser, Findlay, Game
5, 7 p.m.
Whitehouse-Pemberville
loser vs. Game 4 loser, at Ottawa,
Game 6, 6 p.m.
Saturday, July 18
Game 3 winner vs. Game 4
winner, at Findlay, 1 p.m. Game
7
Game 5 winner vs. Game 6
winner, at Ottawa, Game 8, 1
p.m., Game 8
Game 7 loser vs. Game 8
winner, at Findlay, 7 p.m., Game
9
Sunday, July 19
Game 7 winner vs. Game 9
winner, at Findlay, 1 p.m.
Second game is needed, one
hour after first game is complete

Read all the local coverage in

The Delphos
Herald

Subscribe today

419-695-0015

steam, we renamed it the


Classic as a sanctioned event
and he eventually became
a partner in the Classic,
Frankart added. It will be an
interesting race here. There
hasnt been anyone racing
on this track since July 3
because of the weather.
World of Outlaws History
The World of Outlaws
Sprint Car Series is the
premier winged sprint car
series in the world, featuring the world class drivers.
Beginning in 1978, the World
of Outlaws tour invades racetracks and thrills fans in 23
different states while sanctioning events at some of the
most famous dirt racing facilities in the world. In addition,
the Outlaws will be racing
for nearly $6 million in purses and other prize money
between the season opener at
Volusia Speedway Park and
the Outlaws World Finals at
The Dirt Track at Charlotte
Motor Speedway.

Information Submitted
AYBT hosting Summer
Slam
The American Youth
Basketball Tour (AYBT) is
hosting the Midwest Summer
Slam at at Ohio Northern
University in Ada on July
25-26 for boys and girls teams
4th grade through varsity.
All teams are guaranteed
four games.
This is a trophy event with
pool play on Saturday and
single-elimination tournament on Sunday.
The cost is only $195.
To register, go to www.
aybtour.com and select
Special Event.
Contact Jim Clay at coachclay@hotmail.com or call
419-771-9508 with any questions.
Registration deadline is
July 18.
------------Grove hosting midget
football tryouts
COLUMBUS GROVE
Tryouts for the Columbus

Grove midget football team


will be held the week of July
27.
Tryouts will be held from
5:30-7 p.m. at the Columbus
Grove football field.
If you have any questions,
please contact Keith Bonifas
at 419-659-2952.

------------Titans hosting midget


football camp
OTTAWA The OttawaGlandorf High School football coaches will again be
hosting their annual Junior
High and Midget football
camp this summer.
The camp is for any student in grades 4-8 this fall.
The Titan Football Junior
High/Midget Camp will be
held July 20-23 from 9-10:30
a.m. at the high school football practice fields.
Cost of the camp is $30
and is due the first day of
camp along with a signed
permission slip.
Camp brochures will be
available the first day of
camp.

NRA

RIFLE

Qualification

WOMEN
ON
TARGET

SHOOTING
CLINIC
PISTOL

Qualification

SHOTGUN

Qualification

JULY 18, 2015

$15.00

(Pre-registration required)

Cost includes use of


firearms, targets,
ammunition.
Clinic rain or shine.
Registration preferred
by July 15, 2015

For information contact


Jerry Trivette at 419-236-1613
olebanjo@gmail.com
Jim Harlan at 419-203-3042
AUTO DEALERS

FURNITURE

Delpha
Chev/Buick Co.

Lehmanns Furniture
Westrich Furniture & Appliances

Pitsenbarger Auto

Omers Alignment Shop

First Federal Bank

Delphos Ace Hardware


& Rental

AUTO PARTS

FINANCIAL
INSTITUTIONS

GARAGE

HARDWARE

Interested sponsors call The Delphos Herald, Public Service Dept. 419-695-0015

8 The Herald

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Sports

WWW.ATHLONSPORTS.COM

INSIDEBASEBALL
A WEEKLY TURN AROUND THE BASES

AROUND THE HORN

IMPROVING THE ALL-STAR GAME


MLB POWER RANKING
ADAM JONES OWNS MAX SCHERZER
LOOK BACK AT 2014 MIDYEAR RANKING

Lets Revamp the


All-Star Game

Charlie Miller

Athlon Sports
Baseball Editor
@AthlonCharlie

Last years MLB Power Ranking at the All-Star break:


A year can make a huge difference
1. As
2. Brewers
3. Dodgers
4. Angels
5. Braves

his is the 14th season that the All-Star Game has counted. If
you recall, way back in 2001, both teams ran out of pitchers and
the game ended in a 7-7 tie after 11 exciting innings, leaving fans
at Miller Park and TV viewers disappointed, to put it mildly.
So, in all his wisdom, Commissioner Bud Selig along with TV
executives led efforts to bring some meaning back to the All-Star
Game, as if the real meaning of an exhibition for the fans had ever left.
The result, of course, is that the All-Star Game now determines homefield advantage for the World Series.
I dont understand how players and teams accept determining homefield advantage by teams elected by the fans in a popularity vote.
With the starters voted in by the fans, some players elected by a survey
of players, and other reserves selected by the managers, how can we expect the best of each league to be there? And without the best vs. the best,
how can we use this game to determine home-field advantage?
The All-Star Game no longer reflects the way the game is played on
a daily basis. Again, how can we allow a game in which no pitcher will
log more than a couple of innings to have such a significant effect on
the World Series? And managers take great pains to get everyone in the
game. Either the All-Star Game is an exhibition in which every player
gets in, or its a serious, must-win game. Straddling that line just doesnt
work.
Here are my suggestions to improve the All-Star Game for the fans.

2) Restructure the voting


I like giving the fans a say in selecting players. Im okay with fans
selecting the starters. But rather than allowing every player to be nominated, narrow the field for the fans. Begin the voting process on June 5
with only six players on the ballot at each position, nominated by the
players and managers. This would prevent undeserving playerslike
Omar Infante of the Royals this seasonfrom being elected to start.
3) Reduce the roster
Do we really need 34 All-Stars from each league? If you take 10 pitchers and have one sub for each position, that would be 26 players. Add
four to make it an even 30. I know its a small change, but it will allow
for some stars to play deeper into the game, which would be a good thing,
in my opinion.
4) Fine-tune the Home Run Derby
Im not a fan of the Home Run Derby, but I understand the popularity.
Open the festivities on Monday night with the Home Run Derby with a
few tweaks.
First, I would create second and third levels in the stands in the outfield that would offer bonus points for hitting longer home runs. In some
stadiums, this could simply be the upper decks. But the hitters should
be rewarded for longer, more prodigious clouts. After all, the longer the
home run, the more fans seem to get excited. I would make the third level
almost impossible to reach. The scoring would be simple and easy for
fans to grasp. A point for a home run in the first level, reaching the second
level would be three points and the third level even more.
Secondly, I would divide the home run area into nine sections from
foul pole to foul pole. Hitters would receive bonus points for each section reached with home runs. That rewards hitters who have power to

Or, some things stay the same


26. Padres
27. Cubs
28. Diamondbacks
29. Phillies
30. Astros

NUMBERS GAME

.500

The MLB All-Star Game brings the biggest stars of the game together on the same
team. The great Hank Aaron (left) and Willie Mays enjoy time together prior to the 1970
All-Star Game in Cincinnati.

all fields. Again, simple scoring would reward hitters a bonus point for
hitting a home run into a second section. Then maybe even two bonus
points for the third section. Seeing guys trying to go oppo could be fun.
I welcome the bracket aspect of the derby this year. But I would suggest
three innings for each match, and allow only three outs per inning.
I would play the final round like the old Home Run Derby of the
1950s. The two players would alternate for nine innings to determine the
champion. I think that would add drama.
5) Make it a complete All-Star week
Or at least four full days. After the Home Run Derby on Monday
night, I would play the Futures Game the night before the main event. I
really like the idea of the Futures Game. Its a terrific way to reward prospects and give the fans a glimpse into the future, so I wouldnt change
much other than the timing and pitting American League prospects vs.
National League prospectsnot World vs. U.S. The Futures Game
should be played at the site of the All-Star Game on Tuesday night, in
prime time, when theres no other baseball, rather than on Sunday afternoon opposite a full slate of games as it is now. After the All-Star Game
on Wednesday, honor the past with an Old-Timers All-Star Night. That
would be an outstanding opportunity to honor the past and give retired
players another moment in the spotlight. Rather than having the recently
retired John Smoltz face an aging Willie Mays, have a three-inning game
with older players from the 1950s and 60s. Then have a seven-inning
version with more recently retired players like Cal Ripken, Barry Bonds,
Mark McGwire, Chipper Jones, Pedro Martinez, Greg Maddux, Smoltz
and Tom Glavine. You think fans wouldnt flock to see those guys in
uniform one more time?
Oh, and the solution for home-field advantage for four games in the
World Series? How about taking the most wins in interleague play? After
all, that seems to be a more fair and accurate way to judge the better
league anyway.

ATHLON SPORTS POWER RANKING


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

Cardinals
Pirates
Royals
Dodgers
Angels
Nationals
Yankees
Mets
Astros
Twins
Cubs
Rays
Giants
Blue Jays
Orioles

All-Star break coming at a good time for reeling Redbirds.


Bucs treat Cardinals rather rudely with a pair of walk-offs.
Enter break 4.5 games better than rest of American League.
Good for baseball that Clayton Kershaw will be at All-Star Game.
Angels have been rocking since GM Jerry DiPoto resigned.
Won 14 of last 20 heading into the break.
Beginning to create a little space above AL East foes.
Non-pitchers hitting just .237.
Torrid start turns into horrid July.
Second-best record in AL.
Anthony Rizzo, Kris Bryant give HR Derby a Cubs flavor.
Swept by first-place Royals last week, then swept Astros.
Nothing helps a team get well like hosting the Phillies for three games.
Will Jays make a big splash at the trade deadline?
Will Os make a big splash at the trade deadline?

As good as Max Scherzer has been this


season and over his career, Adam Jones
of Baltimore has the Washington ace
figured out. After homering twice off of
Scherzer on Sunday, Jones is now hitting
.500 with a 1.500 OPS after 22 regularseason at-bats against Scherzer in his
career. Thats Jones highest average
against any pitcher with as many as 20
at-bats.

TURN BACK THE CLOCK


July 18, 1961
The Milwaukee Braves pull off a double
steal and triple steal in the same inning. With Cincinnatis Jim Maloney on
the mound and Johnny Edwards behind
the plate, Hank Aaron steals third and
Joe Adcock second with Joe Torre at bat.
After a walk to Torre, the three pull off a
triple steal with Aaron stealing home for
the only time in his career.

TRIVIA CORNER
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.

Tigers
Who will pick up slack for loss of Miguel Cabrera?
Red Sox
As miserable as season has been, Sox not out of it.
Rangers
Limped home at the break, losing 15 of 20.
Diamondbacks Snakes are well within striking distance of NL wild card.
Braves
Losing closer Jason Grilli for season is a huge blow.
Padres
One game better than last season after 90 games.
Mariners
Alternated wins and losses for last 12 games.
As
8.5-game deficit is not insurmountable.
Indians
Last 14 games: pitchers have 116 Ks, allowed only 82 hits, 24 walks.
White Sox
Would-be sellers at deadline suddenly climbing in standings.
Rockies
Sweep of Braves ends sour first half on a high note.
Reds
How soon will Reds begin rebuilding?
Brewers
Adam Lind could be a nice trade chip.
Marlins
Now both All-Star starters on shelf with injuries.
Phillies
Long, arduous season getting worse in Philly.

You may have noticed that there are no


Yankees or Red Sox in the starting lineup
for the 2015 All-Star Game. For many
fans, thats not a big deal. But do you
know the last year there were no American League starters from either Boston
or New York in the All-Star Game?
Written and compiled by Charlie Miller.
Follow Charlie on Twitter: @AthlonCharlie.
Email: Charlie.Miller@athlonsports.com
TRIVIA ANSWER: 1945 was the last time neither team had a
starter in the All-Star Game.

1) Keep it an exhibition game


I know that players treating this game as meaningless is what caused
MLB to overreact in the first place. But heres a thought: Tie players
foundations to the game. Most players have a cause they support, and
if they dont already, being selected to play in the All-Star Game would
give them a reason to find a cause. Only foundations and charities of
players who participate will benefit. Winning players foundations will
benefit more than those of the losers. How many players will beg out of
an opportunity to boost their charitable work? No more than are begging
out now.

The Indians are just 5-14 in reigning Cy Young winner Corey Klubers starts. But it isnt all about
Klubers ineffectiveness. Cleveland has been shut
out three times in his starts, scored just one run
another three times and tallied two runs four times.
Kluber has, um, enjoyed the worst run support
in baseball this season. In the three shutouts,
the Indians were victimized by Dallas Keuchel,
Jeff Samardzija and Sonny Gray...The Cubs Chris
Coghlans consecutive games played streak ended
last week at 150. The new active leader is Kansas
Citys Kendrys Morales at 123...The Cubs Jake
Arrieta ended the first half on a roll. Over his last
five starts, the righthander is 4-0 with a 1.13 ERA,
34 strikeouts and just 21 hits and four walks allowed. If the Cubs are to attain equal status with
St. Louis, Arrieta could play a huge role. For his
career, he owns a 1.63 ERA and 1.047 WHIP in nine
starts against the Redbirds... Mark Buehrle, a
38th-round draft pick of the White Sox in 1999,
has now won at least 10 games for 15 consecutive
seasons. Hes also logged at least 200 innings for
the past 14 seasons and is well on the way to doing
so again this season.

Photos: Aaron/Mays: Getty Images;


Jones: Newscom

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

The Herald - 9

Arts & Entertainment


Movie Review

Crossword Puzzle

"Greenbacks"
Across

1 Shower bar
5 Packs
9 Roughnecks
14 Almanac contents

19 Make reparations, e.g.


20 Starch from San
Francisco

Trashy Teddy Seth McFarlane and his foul-mouth furball strike again. Starring Mark
Wahlberg and Amanda Seyfried.
Directed by Seth McFarlane
R
The bawdy little talking
furball is back. Writer-director
Seth McFarlanes raunchy teddy
bear returns in all his crass,
computer-generated comedic
glory for another round of
surrealist stoner silliness with
his Bostonian best friend, John
(Mark Wahlberg), in this sequel
to the $550-million-grossing
2012 hit.
It begins, as many movies do,
with a wedding, as Ted (voiced
by McFarlane) ties the knot
with his gum-smacking bride,
Tami-Lynn (Jessica Barth).
Soon, however, theres trouble
in paradise: Ted and TamiLynn discover they cant have a
baby, for a couple of reasons
including that Ted, a teddy bear,
lacks the necessary anatomical
equipment. And trying to adopt
creates another problem, which
comes to loom large: The legal
question of whether Ted is a
person or a piece of property.
How you feel about the
humor in Ted 2 will likely align
with how you feel in general
about the work of McFarlane,
whose TV show Family Guy
established and enshrined him as
a golden boy of rollicking, ribald
politically incorrect hilarity. For

some, hes a brilliant, envelopepushing social satirist. Others


lean to the more offended
side of the critical spectrum,
noting his penchant for crude
jokes, scatological humor and
the sharp, scathing edges on
the blades of his irreverent,
insensitive lampoonery.
Theres plenty of all of that,
however you feel about it, in
Ted 2, from the dazzling Busby
Berkeley-inspired
musical
opening credits sequence to the
almost nonstop parade of crude
jokes, celebrity cameos and
gurgling bong hits that follow.
I wont say its not funny, and
some of it is flat-out hilarious.
McFarlane runs his characters
(which include Amanda Seyfried
as a newbie attorney who takes
on Teds personhood case)
through a gamut of R-rated
punch lines and crazily comical
setups. A Liam Neeson walkon, as a grocery-store customer
overly concerned about the ageappropriateness of his breakfast
cereal, is a total hoot. (Stay for
all the credits for the full payoff.)
Jay Leno gamely goes along
with a joke about gay sex.
Characters come to expect the
same (obscene) search suggestion
for any Google query. Teds
bachelor partyremember, hes

a bearfeatures a unique kind of


porn. There a profanely inspired
moment of speculative banter
about what the F. in author F.
Scott Fitzgeralds name really
stands for.
But some things seem
unnecessarily drawn-out and
repetitive, with gags and ploys
from the first movie recycled or
repeatedlike a subplot with
creepy stalker Donny (Giovanni
Ribisi), who wants to slice into
Ted to see what makes him tick.
At one point, John yells Dj
vu! I hear you, sir!
The Kardashians, rocker
Steven Tyler and Harrison Ford
all but assuredly wont like the
jokes made at their expense,
but quarterback Tom Brady was
clearly aboard for his scene, in
which Ted and John infiltrate
his bedroom for an ill-fated
artificial-insemination scheme.
If some of that sounds like
the bottom of comedy barrel,
perhaps youll be a bit more
uplifted by Ted 2s underlying
civics lesson about gay rights,
the struggle of blacks in America
and the inherent dignity of all
living things.
Who says tubby, trash-talking
teddy bears are all huff, puff and
fluff?

23 Petits ___ (tiny peas)


24 Penny figure
25 Beads up
28 Isle near Mull

35 "I'm for it!"


36 Some poems
37 Give relief to
38 Breathe heavily
39 Mattel doll

9
16

17

18

19

20

21

25

26

27

28
34

36

37

39

40

44

45

29

12

13

30

31

32

35
38

41

42

43

46

47
50

11

24

33

49

10

22

23

30 "Never heard of him"


33 Not-so-sharp dairy
item

15

16 His cube was a craze


18 University VIP

14

15 ___ rug (small floor


covering)
17 Post-bottle sound

48

51

52

53

54

56

57

58

60

61

62

63

64

65

55

40 Meeting all
requirements
44 Epoch
45 Grouse house
46 Coffee orders with
foamy tops
47 Racket's ending
48 Wrap for some parties
49 NBA team
56 Ecstatic
57 Graceful steed
58 Directs toward
60 Make the morning
paper?
61 It can be high
62 Granny or bowline
63 Golfer Vijay

Down

21 Mil. recruiter at
colleges

1 Kinsman

65 Antsy

43 Milan meat sauce

22 US Open winner
Mandlikova

2 Grave responsibility
3 Bushy hairstyle

47 "Dallas" clan name


48 Kid with

25 Blazing speed

4 Browser bothers

49 Janitorial tools

5 A little crazy

26 Comparatively spread
out

6 Snacks with milk

27 Justice Kagan

51 Rested (on)

7 Regular guy?

28 A genius, no

52 Stylish Lagerfeld

8 ___-froid (calmness)

29 Probabilities

53 Ohio native

9 Wall-mounted safety
device

30 "Easy Rider" biker

54 Good-hearted

31 Away

55 City haze

32 Scouts take them

59 Muddy pen

10 Startlingly unusual
11 Orchestra pitch-setter

50 Letters on the cross

34 Goes to a restaurant

12 One of Columbus's
fleet

64 Nasty look

42 Hit with a haymaker

38 Kids' game
40 Find after digging

13 List of appts.

41 Arequipa's land

Neil Pond, Parade Magazine

WebDonuts

Sudoku

Sudoku Puzzle #3640-M

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Answers to Puzzle

Answers to Sudoku
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Medium

2009 Hometown Content

2009 Hometown Content

59

10 The Herald

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Business

K&M Tire acquires Kelle Oils


Wholesale Tire Division
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

DELPHOS Delphos-based K&M Tire has purchased


the assets of Kelle Oil Companys Wholesale Tire Division
located Braman, OK.
The purchase, effective July 10th
includes tire inventory and a customer list
of their wholesale tire customers. Kelle
Oil distributed approximately 10 different
brands of tires in the farm, commercial,
and passenger and light truck tire categories. Kelle Oil will continue to operate
under the Kelle Oil name and focus solely
on their retail/commercial tire store and oil distribution.
We are very excited about this opportunity with Kelle
Oil to expand and add to our customer base in Kansas and
Oklahoma. said Cheryl Gossard, K&M Tire Vice President.

Customer service is our number one priority. We will focus


on making sure we have the inventory in stock that they need,
along with providing them with dependable deliveries.
K&M plans to service its new customers from the companys existing warehouses in the Oklahoma City and Wichita
areas.
Founded in 1970, K&M Tire operates 18 distribution centers in 11 states
throughout the Great Lakes, Midwest,
Great Plains, and South Central regions,
servicing customers in more than 20
states. The company distributes approximately 20 brands of passenger and light
truck tires, 12 brands of truck tires, and 10 brands of farm
tires. K&M Tire will continue to look for growth opportunities
throughout the Midwest and Southwest regions of the United
States.

Practical Money

Making summer more energy efficient


BY NATHANIEL SILLIN
Its expected to be a hotter summer this
year, but dont confine your money-saving
efforts to the thermostat.
The warm months can be the best time
to focus on cutting year-round energy costs.
Free of snow, ice and wind, its easier
to spot problems, do repairs and budget
for energy-efficient appliances and fix-up
projects that can save considerable money
in the future.
Your first step should be better tracking
and analysis of the energy you buy. The
most common sources of energy spending are home utilities and fuel costs for
vehicles. However, if you own a vacation
home, operate a business within your residential space or have different vehicles for
land or water, see if you can separate those
numbers so you can more clearly identify
usage patterns month to month and find
ways to cut back.
Think about an energy audit. Whether
you do it yourself or pay for the services of
a certified professional summer is the best
time to do a basement-to-rooftop energy
audit. Some utility companies have home
energy audits online so you can see where
your energy is going. Prospective homeowners might make an energy audit part of
their home inspection process. According
to the U.S. Department of Energy, in 2014,
the average American spent 60 percent
of their energy dollars heating rooms and

water. Another 16 percent goes to lighting,


cooling and food refrigeration. The remainder nearly a quarter of total home energy
uses covers all miscellaneous energy use
in the house.
Then focus on the thermostat. In the
summer, confine heavy air conditioning
use to the hottest nights, and the rest of the
time, try to set the thermostat a little higher
than you do now. For example, the U.S.
Energy Department says that setting your
air conditioning to 78 degrees instead of
72 can save between 6-18 percent on your
summer cooling bill. Before you spend
money on a programmable thermostat or
convert your real-time utility billing to a
budget plan, note that some research questions their value. First, see how much you
can save by shutting off vents and doors
and drawing curtains in unused rooms and
spaces. If you dont have pets, you may
consider setting your thermostat significantly higher than 78 before you leave for
work.
Lights out. Weve all been admonished
to turn off the lights when we leave a room,
but there are other things we can do to capture random, or vampire, energy waste.
Sensors, dimmers and timers can reduce
lighting use, and installing power strips can
keep computers, microwaves, cable boxes,
DVRs and high-end TV sets from sucking
energy even when theyre not turned on.
Unplugging between uses works too. Also,
swapping conventional incandescent bulbs

for compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) can


provide lighting that lasts longer and saves
money on replacements.
Check for tax credits and rebates. Make
a call to your tax professional, check the
Internal Revenue Services website (irs.gov/
uac/Form-5695,-Residential-Energy-Credits)
and EnergyStar.gov for news on residential energy credits for specific replacement
appliances and energy-saving improvements
to your home. Keep in mind that Congress
traditionally acts late each year to renew old
credits or to approve new ones.
Consider energy-smart landscaping.
Keep in mind that well-placed trees and
shrubs can shield a home from the sun and
the elements year-round and potentially
save 25 percent on energy costs annually.
Cars, gas, and public transportation.
If you drive, consolidate errands, fill up
your tank at cheaper times and consider
smartphone apps to find low gas prices for
commuting and vacation use. And if you
dont regularly use public transportation,
start testing it during the summer. The
additional walking most people do when
they take public transportation has health
benefits as well.
Bottom line: This summer, dont just
try to keep cool. Save money by changing
your year-round energy behavior.
Nathaniel Sillin directs Visas financial
education programs. To follow Practical
Money Skills on Twitter: www.twitter.com/
PracticalMoney.

St. Ritas Health


Partners introduces
MyChart E-Visits
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

News About Your Community

Delphos heralD
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
Got a news tip? Need to promote an event or business?

Nancy Spencer, editor


419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com

Lucas Vaas, advertising


419-695-0015 ext. 136
Vicki Gossman, ext. 128

STOCKS

Quotes of local interest supplied by


EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business April 11, 2014
Description

Last Price

American Electric Power Co., Inc.


55.19
AutoZone, Inc.
676.46
Bunge Limited
87.13
BP p.l.c.
40.33
Citigroup Inc.
55.91
CenturyLink, Inc.
29.98
CVS Health Corporation
109.82
Dominion Resources, Inc.
69.20
Eaton Corporation plc
66.43
Ford Motor Co.
14.81
First Defiance Financial Corp.
36.49
First Financial Bancorp.
18.20
General Dynamics Corporation
146.97
General Motors Company
31.77
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 30.29
Huntington Bancshares Incorporated
11.44
Health Care REIT, Inc.
68.13
The Home Depot, Inc.
115.36
Honda Motor Co., Ltd.
32.06
Johnson & Johnson
99.78
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
69.04
Kohls Corp.
64.77
Lowes Companies Inc.
68.39
McDonalds Corp.
98.78
Microsoft Corporation
45.62
Pepsico, Inc.
97.13
The Procter & Gamble Company
82.04
Rite Aid Corporation
8.82
Sprint Corporation
4.00
Time Warner Inc.
89.99
United Bancshares Inc.
15.5501
U.S. Bancorp
43.88
Verizon Communications Inc.
47.41
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
73.79
Dow Jones Industrial Average
18,053.58
S&P 500
2,108.95
NASDAQ Composite
5,104.89

Change

-0.15
-8.86
+0.72
+0.37
+0.37
-0.02
+0.66
+0.11
+0.02
+0.17
-0.36
+0.08
+0.74
+0.09
+0.88
+0.08
-0.33
+0.46
+0.35
-0.49
+0.95
+0.70
+0.09
+0.35
+0.08
-0.09
+0.13
-0.07
+0.29
+0.10
0.00
+0.05
+0.21
-0.09
+75.90
+9.35
+33.38

LIMA When patients do not feel well, going to the doctor may
be inconvenient or difficult. St. Ritas Health Partners has introduced
a new technology MyChart E-Visits that allows some patients
to communicate electronically with doctors from wherever they are.
Patients with conditions including: back pain, a cold or cough, diarrhea, heartburn, sinus problems or urinary problems can use MyChart
E-Visits. With the E-Visit system, patients will answer a series of questions to inform the doctor of symptoms. The doctor will respond with
recommended treatment or prescribe medicine, if needed.
According to Ronda Lehman, chief operating officer of St. Ritas
Professional Services, MyChart E-Visits are another nice option for
mothers with small children or patients with transportation issues.
E-Visits are timely and convenient.
Patients can expect a response within 24 hours Monday-Friday.
Based on how patients answer E-Visit questions, they may be asked to
schedule a face-to-face visit with their healthcare provider.
MyChart E-Visits are available only with doctors who participate
in the program. If a patients doctor does not offer E-Visits, the patient
will need to schedule an office visit. E-Visits also require patients to
have an account through MyChart a secure, online medical record
and communication system.

VAN REGIONAL & OVER-THE-ROAD


TANKER INTERMODAL DEDICATED
COMPANY DRIVERS OWNER-OPERATORS
TEAM AND SOLO WORK AVAILABLE
TRAINING | MEDICAL/DENTAL/VISION | 401(K)

schneiderjobs.com/newjobs
800-44-PRIDE

Real Estate Transfers


Allen County
City of Delphos
Heritage
Meadow
Development, LLC. to Chadd
R. and Nicole L. Duvall, 1220
Grothause St., Delphos, $38,000.
Sandra K. Schimmoeller,
Lorraine Metzger, Dennis C.
Lause, Michael Metzger and Dee
Ann Lause to Rodney and Tasha
Klinger, 526 Dewey St., Delphos,
$30,000.
Matthew L. and Amanda
Sutton to Terence Lee Keaser, 120
Monroe St., Delphos, $43,500.
Village of Elida
John D. Goodman and
Goodman Family Real Estate
Trust to Tyler Strawn, 4020
Allentown Road, Lima, $54,500.
National Home Investors,
LLC. to Kamal Yoakim, 3838
Allentown Road, Lima, $9,000.
Marion Township
Reeshad R. Buhariwalla to
Holly Jacomet, 4090 N. Acadia
Road, Delphos, $195,000.
Gladys I. Ditto and Ditto
Living Trust to Corey M.
Conaway, 3737 N. Defiance
Trail, Lima, $119,000.
Charles A. and Laura L.
Klausing and Laura L. Lyons to
Zachary and Rebekah Stemen,
6516 Kiggins Road, Delphos,
$205,000.
Spencer Township
Jeri A. and Paul S. Frair to
Randall W. and Kimberly L.
Roof, 11680 Spencerville Road,
Spencerville, $95,000.
Spencerville
Harold E. Fisher and Steve
Haller to Taffy C. Campbell,
311 Brett Lane, Spencerville,
$83,000.
Putnam County
Sharla J. Welty, 2.0 acres,
Riley Township, to Thomas T.
Gall and Leah G. Gall.
Gladys M. Verhoff, Lots 727
and 728, Columbus Grove, to
Rose L. Hovest and Brian G.
Hovest.
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company, Lots 656 and
657, Columbus Grove, to Ryan
Stackhouse.
Fort Jennings State Bank, Lot
324, Columbus Grove, to Ross
M. Verhoff.
Weisenburger Properties
LLC, Lot 72, Continental, to
Cory S. D. Talobtt and Hannah
M. Smith.
Bernice A. Candler LE, Lots
566, 567 and 568, Columbus
Grove, to Dusty B LLC.
Charles E. Huff and Kathleen
Huff, Lots 1039 and 1055,
Columbus Grove, to Kyle E.
Barto and Sarah A. Barto.
Jason D. Ricker and Jennifer
K. Ricker, Lots 164, Kalida, to
Kyle Recker.
Cynthia L. Brinkman and
Mark A. Brinkman, Lots 183
and 184, Pandora, to Mark
A. Brinkman and Cynthia L.
Brinkman.
Dylan Taylor Knueven,
11.906 acres and 49.835 acres,
Liberty Township, to Knueven
Farms LLC.
Arnold Potts Lodge No. 135
Fraternal Order of Police, Lot
77, Columbus Grove, to Triple S.
Holdings.
Secretary of Housing and
Urban Development, Lot 646,
Ottawa, to Nicacio Garcia.
Daniel R. Ellerbrock and
Carol D. Ellerbrock, Lot 438,
Kalida, to Austin L. Kruse and
Jenna E. Kruse.
James R. Barnes, Katherine
T. Barnes, Terry Ann Clark,
Jerry Clark, Susan Kay Feathers,
Dana Alan Barnes and Patricia
Barnes, Lots 44, 45, 46 and 47,
Rushmore, to Helen M. Barnes.
Thomas
J.
Schroeder
and Barbara E. Schroeder,

17.325 acres and 2.209 acres,


Pleasant Township, to Thomas
J. Schroeder and Barbara E.
Schroeder.
David L. Wallenhorst, 2.269
acres and 1.345 acres, Jennings
Township, to Gerald Wallenhorst
and Mary Elizabeth Wallenhurst.
T. Joseph Hermiller, Linda
Diller, Thomas Diller, Kathy
Hermiller, Teresa Croy, and
Barbara Hermiller nka Barbara
Doepker, Lot 21, Ottawa, to
TJKH Properties LLC.
Robert L. Ellerbrock, dec.,
40.0 acres, Ottawa Township, to
Imogene A. Ellerbrock.
Ryan L. Patrick and Carrie E.
Patrick fka Carrie E. Buss, Lot
172, Kalida, to Chad M. Smith
and Stacey M. Smith.
Van Wert County
Larry E. ODaffer, Janice M.
ODaffer to Larry E. ODaffer
Irrevocable Trust, inlot 1193,
Van Wert, portion of section 12,
Jackson Township.
Virginia J. Pollock to Samuel
K. Pollock, portion of section 1,
York Township.
Shawn M. Dancer to
Joseph L. Warnecke, Sherry R.
Warnecke, lot 1-4, Delphos MAR
subdivision.
Estate of Fred L. Cross to
Lisa A. Cross, portion of lot 62,
Delphos subdivision.
Estate of Marna M. Blackburn
to the estate of Marna M.
Blackburn, inlot 694, Delphos.
Blackie LLC to Zachary R.
Elwer, inlot 694, Delphos.
Regis A. Walter to Deanna
Walter, inlots 167, 168, Middle
Point.
Clark D. Stoller, Mary M.
Stoller to Friendship Housing of
Van Wert Ltd., portion of inlots
35, 36, Van Wert.
Phil McClure Family Living
Trust, Bonnie J. McClure Family
Living Trust to David E. Myers,
Rosewitha I. Myers, inlot 1929,
Van Wert.
Dorothy M. Lilies, David R.
Lilies to Edward L. Friedrich,
portion of section 28, Washington
Township.
Ideal Suburban Homes Inc. to
DuVall Family Revocable Living
Trust, inlot 4395, Van Wert.
James L. Feathers to Thomas
B. Feathers, inlot 602, Delphos.
Scott V. German to Carrie A.
Rostorfer, portion of section 33,
Washington Township.
Bruce R. Rager to John
Contreras, Rebecca Contreras,
portion of sections 7, 18, Ridge
Township.
Jennifer M. Armentrout,
Jennifer M. Bridges, Kenny
Bridges Jr., Kenneth Bridges Jr.
to Brad A. Vannett, Joanne E.
Vannett, inlot 2094, portion of
inlot 2095, Van Wert.
Lonnie D. Whitlock, Nicole
Dawn Whitaker, Nicole Whitlock
to Kenneth D. Whitlock, inlots
2536, 2537, portion of inlot 2538,
Van Wert.
John F. Craft, Zona Craft
to Roger L. Welch Revocable
Living Trust, portion of inlots
409, 410, Van Wert.
Estate of Annis Faye Lepper
to Dillin J. Sturgeon, portion of
inlot 1453, Van Wert.
Sherry A. Eibling, Sherry A.
Hernandez, Sheriff Thomas M.
Riggenbach to Creative Home
Buying Solutions, portion of section 18, Hoaglin Township.
Earlene A. Perkins, Earlene
A. Tindall, Gary Perkins to EAP
Boomer LLC, inlot 2687, Van
Wert.
Robert D. Barker Jr., Denise
Barker, Robert Barker Jr. to GTS
Management LLC, lot 137, Van
Wert subdivision.

MOTORCYCLES
WANTED

IVE NEVER BEEN ONE TO


SETTLE FOR AVERAGE.

EOE M/F/D/V

THANKS FOR READING


The

www.delphosherald.com

1903-CURRENT
ANY CONDITION-ANY LOCATION

Call 614-917-7878

Classifieds
www.delphosherald.com

www.delphosherald.com

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
240 Healthcare
105
245 Manufacturing/Trade
ANNOUNCEMENTS
105Announcements
515 AUCTIONS
110 Card Of Thanks
250 Office/Clerical
115 Entertainment
255 Professional
120 InKARTS-4-Kim
Memoriam
260 Restaurant
AUCTION AT Delphos
125
Lost And Found
265 Retail
Prizes:Harley-Davidson
Self Storage, Gressel
130 Prayers
270 Sales and Marketing
Exalter Trike, 275 Situation
Drive Monday,
August
135Kart,
School/Instructions
Wanted
3rd, 6:00 p.m. Golf clubs
140Club
HappyCar
Ads Cart,??? 280 Transportation
Donations:
145 Ride Share$5.00/Ticket & bag, desk hutch, pro$20.00/5 Tickets 300 REAL
paneESTATE/RENTAL
tanks, luggage,
200 EMPLOYMENT
When:July 18th 305 Apartment/Duplex
cabinet, chair, misc.
205 Business Opportunities 310 Commercial/Industrial
@Shannon
items. Property of Randy
210
Childcare Station in 315 Condos
Van Wert
Metzger, 710 E. Second
215 Domestic
320 House
St., Delphos.
220 Elderly Home Care
325 Mobile
Homes
225 Employment Services 330 Office Space
230 Farm
And Agriculture
335 Room
CARD
OF
GARAGE SALES/
235
340 Warehouse/Storage
110General

555

THANKS

THE FAMILY of Henrietta Calvelage would like


to thank the Meadows of
Kalida staff who cared
for Henrietta. You truly
became a part of her
family as well as ours.
You will forever be in our
hearts. Thank you to Fr.
Charles Obinwa, the
Friends of Hope, as well
as the St. Joseph
Church Choir and
Eucharistic Ministers for
their help at the funeral.
Also thank you to the talented ladies of St.
Joseph who provided the
funeral luncheon. A special thank you to the staff
of Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home for their
kindness and guidance
during this difficult time.
We would especially like
to thank the grandchildren, great grandchildren and great-great
grandchildren of Henrietta's for their love and
support in our hour of
need. Finally thank you
to our friends and extended families that sent
cards, flowers, food, memorials and offered their
condolences during this
time. Henrietta is gone
but her legacy lives on in
all of us.
Joe & Ladonna Calvelage
John & Sharon Calvelage
Ruth Miehls
Janice & Dennis Wehri
Joyce Grote
Virgil & Karen Calvelage

235 HELP WANTED


OTR SEMI Driver
Home weekends and
most nights, with benefits, vacation, 401K.
AWC Trucking
419-692-3951

WAREHOUSE/LIFT
Operator
Global Warehousing
LLC, 900 Gressel Drive,
Delphos, Ohio is currently in need of a parttime warehouse person
fo r M on -Fri 5:00p m9:00pm. This is a crossdocking operation; hours
subject to adjustment.
Interested candidates for
this position apply at the
address above between
the hours of 10:00am3:00pm, Mon-Fri.

320

HOUSE FOR
RENT

SEVERAL MOBILE
Homes/House for rent.
View homes online at
www.ulmshomes.com or
inquire at 419-692-3951

420

FARMS FOR
SALE

40 ACRE farm for sale.


Jennings Township, located near Fort Jennings.
Level ground, no buildings, Hoytville soil. Send
replies to Box 130 c/o
Delphos Herald, 405 N.
Main St., Delphos, OH
45833.

YARD SALES

1010 CAROLYN Dr.,


Delphos. 7/16-7/18,
8:00am-6:00pm. Nice
clothes, too much to list!
433 E. 8th St. Thurs.
9am-4pm, Fri. 5pm-8pm,
Sat. 9am-2pm. Grill, furniture, household, 3T4T, Decor, much more.
615 MOENING St. 7/167/17, 8:00am-6:00pm.
Bedding, kitchenware,
humidifiers, cookbooks,
workbaskets, camping
items, jewelry, miscellaneous. Perrin's
HUGE 5-Family Sale
1609 Ft. Jennings Rd.,
Delphos
Thur July 16 3pm-7pm
Fri July 17 9am-5pm
Sat July 18 9am-12pm
Items include clothes for
every occasion and
name brand items such
as INC, American Eagle,
Express, Dockers: dress
tops and pants, jeans,
and shorts ranging in
sizes juniors to women's.
Baby and kids clothes
and toys. Homecoming
and prom dresses. High
top table and chairs, luggage, boys bedding, and
books, books, books!
PlayStation 2 with 7
games and 4 controllers
and other miscellaneous
items.

570

LAWN AND
GARDEN

Friedrich

345 Vacations
350
Wanted
To Rent
610
AUTOMOTIVE
355 Farmhouses For Rent
360 Roommates Wanted

Geise

400 REAL ESTATE/FOR SALE


405 Acreage and Lots
410 Commercial
415 Condos
420 Farms
automatic
425
Houses transmission
standard
transmission
430
Mobile Homes/
Manufactured Homes
differentials
435
Vacation case
Property
transfer
440
Want To&Buy
brakes
wheel bearings

Transmission, Inc.

5002MERCHANDISE
miles north of Ottoville
505 Antiques and Collectibles
510 Appliances
515 Auctions

419-453-3620

625 CONSTRUCTION

AMISH
CONSTRUCTION
CREW
New Home Construction, Home Remodeling, Pole Barns,
Garages,
Concrete
Floors, Roofing, Reside & Storm Damage,
Window/Door
Replacement, much
more! No job too
small! Free estimates,
call David in Willshire,
Ohio 1-260-706-3494.

655

HOME REPAIR
AND REMODEL

POHLMAN
BUILDERS
Specializing in

ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED

POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS

Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
665

LAWN, GARDEN,
LANDSCAPING

Lawn Service Mueller Tree


Specializing in

Weed Control & Fertilization


Lawn Fertilization &
Weed Control
New Lawn Installation
Lawn Over-seeding
Lawn Mowing
Phone:

419-695-0328 or
419-235-3903
577

MISCELLANEOUS

LA-Z-Boy Recliner, burgundy color, new, $285.


Pro Form Air Walker exerciser, very good condition, $35. Call 419-4533055
LAMP REPAIR, table or
floor. Come to our store.
Hohenbrink
TV.
419-695-1229

585 PRODUCE

Service

Tree Trimming,
Topping & Removal,
Brush Removal

419-203-8202

bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured

L.L.C.

Trimming & Removal


Stump Grinding
24 Hour Service Fully Insured

KEVIN M. MOORE

(419) 235-8051

GESSNERS TEMANS
OUR TREE
PRODUCE
SERVICE

INDIANA MELONS
COMING SOON!

OHIO SWEET CORN


TENNESSEE TOMATOES
AVAILABLE NOW!
OPEN AT 3 LOCATIONS:

939 E. 5th St., Delphos


714 E. Main St., Van Wert
9557 St. Rte, 66, Delphos
419-692-5749 or 419-234-6566

Do you need to know


what is going on before
anyone else?
Do you have a desire to
know more about the
people and news in the
community??
The Times Bulletin
DHI Media company with newspapers, website
& niche products in Van Wert, Ohio is looking for
an energetic, self-motivated, resourceful

REPORTER
to join its staff.

The right candidate will possess strong grammar


and writing skills, be able to meet deadlines and
have a working knowledge of still photography. A
sense of urgency and accuracy are requirements.
Assignments can range from hard economic news
to feature stories.

Send resumes to: The Times Bulletin


Attn. Kirk Dougal
PO Box 271, Van Wert, Ohio 45891
or email to: kdougal@timesbulletin.com

Trimming Topping Thinning


Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Since 1973

419-692-7261

Bill Teman 419-302-2981


Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

520 Building Materials


525
Computer/Electric/Office
MISCELLANEOUS
670
530 Events
535 Farm Supplies and Equipment
540 Feed/Grain
545 Firewood/Fuel
550 Flea Markets/Bazaars
555 Garage Sales
560 Home Furnishings
565 Horses, Tack and Equipment
570 Lawn and Garden
575 Livestock
GREAT RATES
577 Miscellaneous
580 Musical Instruments
NEWER
FACILITY
582 Pet in Memoriam
583 Pets and Supplies
585 Produce
586 Sports
andfrom
Recreation
Across
Arbys
588 Tickets
590 Tool and Machinery

COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
419-692-0032

SAFE &
SOUND

DELPHOS

SELF-STORAGE
Security Fence
Pass Code Lighted Lot
Affordable 2 Locations
Why settle for less?

419-692-6336
930 LEGALS
ORDINANCE #2014
An Ordinance authorizing the Safety Service
Director to enter into a
seven-year contract with
Allen County Refuse to
supply solid waste, refuse and recycling services to the City of
Delphos and declaring it
an emergency.
ORDINANCE #2015
An Ordinance approving the proposed 2016
Budget for the City of
Delphos.
ORDINANCE #2015-20
An Ordinance authorizing approval of the
minutes from the Tax Incentive Review Council
and declaring this act an
emergency.
ORDINANCE #2015-21
An Ordinance establishing the salary of the Intermittent
Firefighter/EMT Employee.
ORDINANCE #2015-22
An Ordinance authorizing the Auditor for the
City of Delphos to issue
a warrant to Stolly Insurance for the 2015-2016
insurance coverage and
declaring it an emergency.
ORDINANCE #2015-24
An Ordinance accepting
the application of all
owners of real estate
located in and situated in
the Northwest Fraction
of Outlot 14 in Gilliland
Outlots, Washington
Township, now known
as Lot 1396 and Lot
1397, for annexation to
the City of Delphos, Allen and Van Wert
Counties, State of Ohio.
ORDINANCE #2015-4
A Resolution to amend
and/or restate existing
pick-up plan for participating employees of the
Ohio Police & Fire Pension Fund.
RESOLUTION #2015-5
A Resolution to amend
and/or restate existing
pick-up plan for participtating employees of
the Ohio Police & Fire
Pension Fund.
Passed and approved
this 1st day of June
2015.
Daniel Hirn,
Council President
Attest:
Sherryl George
Deputy Clerk of Council
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete text of this
legislation is on record at
the Municipal Building
and can be viewed during regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller, Clerk
07/08/2015, 07/15/2015

Did you know?

Pregnancy
food
cravings have been the
butt of many jokes,
and many husbands to
pregnant women expect
their better halves to request chocolate, French
fries or strange combinations such as pickles
and ice cream during
a pregnancy. Although
theres no definitive
answer why pregnancy
cravings occur, some
feel they must be tied to
nutritional needs, serving as the bodys way
of telling a woman that
it needs particular nutrients. Authors of a study
published in Frontiers in
Psychology delved further into the pregnancy
cravings conundrum.
Coauthor Natalia C. Or-

loff, a graduate student


at SUNY Albany, determined cravings may
be more psychological
than nutritional/physical. She surmises that
women crave certain
foods because these
foods tend to be forbidden or off-limits
in a society so focused
on healthy eating.
During pregnancy, it
may be more socially
acceptable to bite into
a hot-fudge sundae or
enjoy a cheese-topped
burger. However, no
woman, pregnant or
otherwise, should overindulge.
Overeating
can cause weight gain
and potentially negative
consequences for mothers and their babies.

The Inter-Faith Thrift Shop


has a part-time job opening for a

Retail Coordinator

High school diploma/GED is needed.


Retail sales a plus but not necessary.
Responsible for merchandise on the Sales floor.
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Mon. - Friday
and 1 Saturday/month

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Going
after grubs
in your lawn
DELPHOS
HERALD
THE

Landscaping is a rewarding
hobby
for many
Telling The
Tri-Countys
Story Since 1869
homeowners. Men and women with green
thumbs often take pride in their lush lawns and
gardens, feeling a sense of accomplishment
as their landscapes spend spring and summer
830 Boats/Motors/Equipment
670 Miscellaneous
592 Want To
returning
toBuy
form and making
yards more in835 Campers/Motor Homes
675 Pet Care
593 Good Thing To Eat
viting
spaces to spend relaxing
summer
nights.
840 Classic Cars
680 Snow
Removal
595 Hay
845 Commercial
685 Travel
597
ButStorage
evenBuildings
the most well-maintained
lawns
850 Motorcycles/Mopeds
690 Computer/Electric/Office
are600
not
immune
to
problems
that
can
compro855 Off-Road Vehicles
695 Electrical
SERVICES
mise
all
the
hard
work
men
and
women
put
into
860 Recreational Vehicles
700 Painting
605 Auction
865 Rental and Leasing
705
Plumbing
610
Automotive
their lawns. One such problem many home870 Snowmobiles
710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding
615 Business Services
owners
encounter
is
a
grub
infestation.
Grubs
875 Storage
715 Blacktop/Cement
620 Childcare
are625a Construction
type of pest that can 720
cause
considerable
880 SUVs
Handyman
885 Trailers
725many
Elder Care
630 Entertainment
damage
to lawns, and while
homeown890 Trucks
Farm Services
ers635
have
no
doubt
heard
of
grubs,
they
might
895 Vans/Minivans
800 TRANSPORTATION
640 Financial
899 Want To Buy
805 Auto
want
to learn more about these
pesky pests so
645 Hauling
925 Legal Notices
810
Auto
Parts
and
Accessories
650
Health/Beauty
they know what to do should
grubs
ever
appear
950 Seasonal
815 Automobile Loans
655 Home Repair/Remodeling
in 660
their
yards.
953 Free & Low Priced
820 Automobile Shows/Events
Home
Service
665
Lawn,are
Garden,
Landscaping 825 Aviations
What
grubs?
Grubs are insects that live in the soil, where
they feed on grass and roots. Many grubs are
the larva of Japanese beetles, and those beetles
typically lay their eggs in sun-drenched areas
Applying an appropriate insecticide is
of lawns in midsummer.
one way homeowners can prevent grub inWhat are signs of grub damage?
festations.
Grubs not only damage lawns on their own,
but they serve as food sources for local wild- grubs around the roots of grass. In such inlife as well, attracting wildlife, which can do its stances, applying insecticide may be enough to
prevent a small grub problem from spreading.
own damage to lawns.
Insecticides also can be an effective preLawns can turn brown for a variety of reasons, and grubs are just one of many potential ventative measure for homeowners looking
culprits behind the browning of once-luscious to avoid grub infestations. Speak with a local
landscapes. Grubs feed on roots, so homeown- landscaping professional for recommendations
ers who suspect their lawns have fallen victim about which insecticide to apply and how best
to grub infestations can pull up the areas where to apply it.
What can I do about grub damage?
grass has turned brown to see if there are any
Attempting to treat grubs in the spring may
grubs, which look like worms.
Landscapes that have suddenly become be ineffective, as grubs are large and no longer
popular among local wildlife that is digging up feeding in spring. So homeowners dealing with
lawns may also be infested with grubs. Skunks grub infestations should address the situation
and raccoons feed on grubs, and may dig up before they retire their green thumbs for the
winter. Remove debris from grub infestations
lawns where grubs are present.
Damage resulting from grub infestation is with a rake before watering the affected areas.
Watering can help some damaged roots recovmost visible from late summer to early fall.
er, but areas that have been especially damaged
Can grub damage be prevented?
Preventing grub infestation typically re- may need to be reseeded.
Grub infestations can be a nuisance to homequires homeowners to keep watchful eyes on
their lawns. Pay particular attention to areas owners who put lots of time and effort into
that begin to brown, especially areas that are their lawns. But homeowners can take steps to
turning brown in spite of adequate watering. treat such infestations and prevent them from
An early indicator of a grub infestation is small returning the following summer.

To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122

Horoscopes
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
You are in for a treat this week,
Aries. You finally get to experience the results of all of your
hard work. Celebrate with a dinner out or a good party.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Taurus, calmly approach a difficult situation this week. Giving
yourself time to carefully assess a problem will provide the
most effective solution.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, a resolution to a problem you havent been able to
solve is on the horizon. This will
make things much easier in the
long run, and your patience will
pay off.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, since you are a friendly
person and the life of the party,
it should come as no surprise
that everyone wants to be your
friend. Expand your social circle
if you feel you have time.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, sometimes you take on too
much. Reevaluate your schedule and see if there are ways
you can cut back on your com-

mitments for a few days.


VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, your goal for the time being is to take care of business
and clear your calendar. You
may be more than ready to indulge in some rest and relaxation.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Curiosity may get the better of
you this week, Libra. Its good
to pursue your interests, but
make sure you arent stepping
on anyones toes along the way.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, you desire quick answers, but no one seems to be
moving at your pace this week.
You might just have to buckle
down and be patient. Answers
will come in due time.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, a trip is enticing,
but you have too many responsibilities on your plate to up and
leave right now. You will have
time to get away soon enough.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Capricorn, take a hectic schedule day-by-day. Everything will
get done in time, and you just

need to have a little patience.


Distract yourself this week.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Someone or something may
have turned you off of making
a large purchase, Aquarius.
Discuss your sudden change
of heart with someone close to
you.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
Dont turn your world upside
down to take on another project, Pisces. You have plenty on
your plate to keep you busy as
it is.
FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
JULY 19 - Benedict Cumberbatch, Actor (39)
JULY 20 - Julianne Hough,
Actress/Dancer (27)
JULY 21 - Josh Hartnett, Actor (37)
JULY 22 - Don Henley, Singer (68)
JULY 23 - Daniel Radcliffe,
Actor (26)
JULY 24 - Jennifer Lopez,
Actress/Singer (46)
JULY 25 - Iman, Model (60)

OHIO SCAN NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS


Basement Remodeling
All Things Basementy!
Basement
Systems
Inc. Call us for all of
your basement needs!
Waterproofing, Finishing,
Structural
Repairs,
Humidity and Mold Control
FREE ESTIMATES! Call
1-800-978-0665
Health
Got Knee Pain? Back
Pain? Shoulder Pain?
Get a pain-relieving brace
-little or NO cost to you.
Medicare Patients Call
Health Hotline Now! 1800-983-1929
Life Alert. 24/7. One
press of a button sends
help FAST! Medical, Fire,
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Brochure. CALL 800-9710827
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your stairs! **Limited time
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Help Wanted
Butler Transport - Your
Partner in Excellence.
CDL Class A Drivers
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All miles paid. 1-800528-7825 or www.butler
transport.com
Drivers
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Lets Talk! We support
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www.
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throughout U.S. - No
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Apply online at www.
mamotransportation.com
under Careers or call
1-800-501-3783
Misc.
Got an older car, boat
or RV? Do the humane
thing. Donate it to the
Humane Society. Call 1800-870-1923
SOCIAL
SECURITY
DISABILITY BENEFITS.
Unable to work? Denied
benefits? We Can Help!
WIN or Pay Nothing!
Contact Bill Gordon &
Associates at 1-800547-0636 to start your
application today!
Sell your structured
settlement or annuity
payments for CASH
NOW. You dont have
to wait for your future
payments any longer! Call
1-800-419-5820
DONATE YOUR CAR,
TRUCK OR BOAT TO
HERITAGE FOR THE
BLIND. Free 3 Day
Vacation, Tax Deductible,
Free
Towing,
All
Paperwork Taken Care
Of. CALL 1-800-695-6206
WANT A PRINT AD that
reaches over 2,000,000
OHIO READERS in just
7 days? Your ad can
be Display or Classified
One Call, One Fee, 127
Ohio Newspapers, Big
Results. Call Mitch at
the Ohio Newspaper
Association (Columbus,
Ohio): 614-486-6677
Meet
singles
right
now! No paid operators,
just real people like
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12 The Herald

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

www.delphosherald.com

Mold

Writing

Elida

(Continued from page 1)

(Continued from page 1)

She is also a four-time winner of the Buckeye


Creativity Award in the Junior/Senior Division of the
Ohio State University Lima Campus Allen County High
School Creative Art and Writing Competition and a frequent winner of the Catholic Daughters of the Americas
Writing Competition in the essay division.
Winhover can be found at the Delphos Public Library
most evenings performing her library page duties. She
doesnt consider the position a job.
This is my favorite place to be in the world and
this is the best job ever! Winhover said. When I was
younger, I read so much that my parents limited the
number of books I could check out and I had to check
out at least one non-fiction book because I hated reading them. If I screwed up, I was grounded from my
library card.
Her favorite author is Ally Carter, a young-adult
and adult fiction writer. She writes books about spies,
thieves and teenagers. Winhover had the opportunity
to meet Carter and it cemented in her mind what she
wanted to do.
I have read all of Carters books and its pretty cool
to see someone like that in the flesh, Winhover said.
While her dream is to be a published author,
Winhover is trying to be realistic.
I know its really hard to get published, so Im
going to school for professional writing, which will
qualify me for grant-writing and technical writing, she
said. Ill write for me on the side.
Winhover will start her college career in August
at Miami University. She is the daughter of Jay and
Carolyn Winhover and has an older sister, Nicole.

Environmental Health Director


Britt Menchhofer at the Van Wert
County Health Department advised
residents to remove all wet contents
as soon as possible.
She listed mattresses, padding,
stuffed animals, drywall, and furniture as items that should be removed
if contaminated by the floodwater.
Wet carpeting, furniture, bedding, and any other items holding
moisture or water inside the building can develop mold within 24 to
48 hours, according to the Federal
Emergency Management Agencys
National Flood Insurance Program.
If an item has been wet for less than
48 hours, help control mold growth
by cleaning with a phenolic or pineoil cleaner (non-ammonia detergent,
soap, or commercial cleaner) and
disinfecting with a 10 percent bleach
solution (1-1/2 cups of bleach in
a gallon of water). Items should
then be completely dried and monitored for several days for any fungal
growth and odors. If any mold develops, throw the item away.
Menchhofer also said residents
need to dry out the area that has
flooded, which can usually be done
using fans pointed towards the
wet area. FEMAs National Flood
Insurance Program also suggests

Council
(Continued from page 1)
James Kimmett was re-hired as an intermittent
employee for the city, returning from retirement
on an as-needed basis within the wastewater treatment plant. Kimmett holds and has maintained
his Class III Operators License and is qualified
to function in the position of the Wastewater
Superintendent, when needed, at a rate of $25.00
per hour, without benefits.
Numerous streets within the city will see tar
and chipping re-surfacing efforts in conjunction
with the Allen County Engineers. Included in
the efforts are re-surfacing to Main Street from
10th to near the Putnam County line at Pohlman
Road; 13th Street to Washington St.; 9th Street
from Franklin Street to Pierce Street; Ft. Jennings
Road from 3rd to 5th street; Pierce Street from
1st Street to the CCX railroad crossing; and
Franklin Street from Cleveland Street to the CCX
railroad. Total cost to the city for the project is
$15,103.60, appropriated from the Maintenance
Fund. Completion of street improvements is
expected in August.

Murder

Council wrapped up its legislation review,


accepting the contract between the Ohio Council
8, American Federation of State, County, and
Municipal Employees (AFSCME ) AFL-CIO
and the City of Delphos, retroactive to July 1,
2015.
Delphos resident Vicky Tucker advised council of the difficulties that she has experienced
with mold in her Moening Street home and the
ill effects that she has suffered as a result of flood
and sewage water backing up into the crawl space
at her residence. She indicated steps she is taking
to remedy the problem and urged council to take
whatever steps they can to improve the sewer
problems plaguing the city, especially evident due
to the recent record rainfall of the past six weeks.
Council discussed at some length possibile avenues to provide for additional service within the
Maintenance Department to keep the sewer system as clean and functional as possible. As part of
that effort, council requested that residents avoid
blowing grass clippings into the street. The clippings quickly bridge and clog street drains adding
to back up problems and limiting drainage.

using portable dehumidifiers.


Menchhofer advised residents
should thoroughly clean all hard surfaces that has contamination from
floodwater.
Mold can cause respiratory
problems especially with young children, Menchhofer said.
She also mentioned elderly people
having more problems with mold.
It can especially aggravate asthma, Menchhofer noted.
While cleaning mold, Menchhofer
reminds residents to wear a mask,
rubber boots, and sturdy clothing as
a means to limit bare skin contact.
Also residents should open a window or make sure they have fresh air
flowing through the facility they are
cleaning because exposure to fumes
from bleach and other cleaning materials can be harmful as well.
Besides mold, the floodwater can
also cause issues with private wells.
If flooding has been near or over the
casing, the well should be properly
disinfected, which a list of how to
do this can be found on the Van
Wert County Health Departments
website.
Menchhofer said if people are
concerned about their well water, the
Van Wert County Health Department
will do water samples to see if it is
safe to drink.

(Continued from page 1)


Council then passed three ordinances on
emergency, each related to street construction
and repair. The first accorded Bluffton Paving
a contract within the village. The second
modified language in an ordinance concerning
a state-prioritized construction effort along
State Route 309, the villages portion of which
is $220,000. Finally, council addressed a language change in an ordinance which allows
the village to seek grant funding from Ohio
Public Works. Under the provisions of the
revised ordinance, the village will seek a sum
not to exceed $173,101 from OPW, with
the monies used to greatly offset the villages
$220,000 share of the SR 309 project.
In other business, council:
heard that plans are moving ahead for the
construction of a new Town Hall and scheduled a council-as-a-whole meeting to review
architectural plans and estimated costs on July
30 at 7 p.m.
were informed that the village received
a portable breath analyzer through participation in the State of Ohios Click It or Ticket
campaign.
were informed that a village resident,
Connie Plummer, has volunteered the materials and labor to clean up the triangle near
Neiderts.
The next regular meeting of the Elida
Village Council is scheduled for July 28 at
7:30 p.m. in the Town Hall.

Annual fishing derby Saturday

A young angler tries his luch at lat years fishing derby.


(DHI Media file photo)
INFORMATION
ed west edge of Delphos on
SUBMITTED
St. Rt. 697 (Ohio Street).
The derby is open to all
DELPHOS The annu- local kids up age 12.
al Kids Fishing Derby will Children need to be accombe held at the Delphos panied by an adult. Any
Coon and Sportsmen Club child can fish, even if their
on Saturday.
parents are not members of
The Fishing Derby is to the Sportsmen Club.
be held at the quarry locatRefreshments will be

Board

(Continued from page 4)

(Continued from page 1)

*Agnes Tate: Middle


Aged (40-50+) Meddlesome,
antagonistic, sarcastic, inconsiderate. Everyones murder
victim of choice.
Carolyn Pickett - (20s)
Niece and traveling companion for Agnes; attractive and
unassuming.
Ellen Halsey - (25-35) The
tour guide, attractive and professional.
*Muriel Lampmann Middle Aged (40-50+).
Petite and.ethereal. A true
believer in the occult. An airhead of sorts, but very sweet.
Traveling alone
*Patricia
Simpson
Middle Aged (40-50+)
Reserved, nervous, always
tense. Traveling alone.
Todd Currier - (20s)
Congenial, intelligent and
well dressed in a casual way.
Hes traveling with his father.
*Lawrence Currier - (Mid
to late 50s) A college professor on sabbatical, doing
research for a book. Widowed
in the last couple of years.
Distinguished and intellectual.
*Grace Sharp- (60+) A
retired school teacher; shes
petite and fluffy, and she
looks helpless, which is by
no means the case. Traveling
with her longtime friend,
Doris Brooks.
*Doris Brooks - (60+)
Retired nurse practitioner.
Matter-of-fact and sarcastic.
Traveling with Grace.
Donald Schultz - (In his
40s) The van driver. Physically
either heavy or very thin.
Morose.
Come audition for the
fall show. Prepare to join the
group and have the time of
your life while entertaining
patrons in a relaxing and comfortable setting. Stay tuned for
forthcoming announcements
indicating show times and
reservation information of the
seven shows held at the Senior
Center at 220 Fox Road, Van
Wert, OH.
Off Stage Productions
can be found online at offstagetheatre.com and on
Facebook at facebook.com/
OffStageProductions

The board also approved the


purchase of a single 66-passenger
Bluebird school bus from Cardinal
Bus Sales and Service at a cost of
$75,380. The board initially considered the purchase of two buses,
but, in light of the potential cost
involved in replacing windows at
the high school, opted to purchase
just one.
District Treasurer Brad Rostorfer
advised the board that the district
received a bequest from a Jefferson
High alumnus. Melvin Hoover,
class of 1954, willed the district
$50,000 as the principal for a continuing scholarship fund. Rostorfer
and Board President Andy North
speculated that the donation will
generate roughly $2,000 to $4,000
annually.
While the board gratefully accepted the bequest, debate continued as
to which financial vehicle would
provide the greatest benefit, how best
to administer the funds. Discussion
on the matter was tabled pending
review by the finance committee
and further research into available
options.
Addressing an opportunity to
improve the science curriculum at
the middle school, Wolfe informed

available at no cost to children.


Prizes include bicycles
for the boy and girl who
take first place with fishing
equipment for others.
Fishing will start at 8
a.m. and end at 11 a.m., at
which time prizes will be
given away.
Those fishing need to
register at the Club House
upon arriving to fish and be
eligible for any prizes.
Fishing has been really
good lately. Crappie, bluegill, catfish, bass and even
some large carp are biting
very good this past week.
Nice sized crappies and
bass have been really biting
the best.

Archives
the board that the Van Wert County
commissioners approached the
district with a proposal. See the
Change, an academic program that
offers physics curriculum assistance
targeted at middle school students,
may be made available at little
or no cost to the district through
the commissioners. Typically associated with a $50,000 fee, Wolfe
explained that the commissioners
have offered to pay most, if not all,
of the cost through a grant available
to them. At most, he felt that the
district might have to pick up its
share of a $10,000 surplus not covered by the grant.
Im meeting with the other three
schools sometime in the next week
or so to discuss this, Wolfe said.
Id hate to see the other districts get
this and we dont.
Wolfe was directed by board
members to update them as new
information becomes available.
The board also awarded Katherine
Hickey a one-year contract as multiple handicap teacher at Franklin
Elementary. Hickey, who was raised
in Avon Lake but has family ties in
the area, recently graduated from
Bowling Green State University and
will assume her first teaching assignment this fall.
In other business, the board:

approved the annual budget of


the Delphos Public Library, established at $581,200.
accepted the resignations of
Brett Halsey, kindergarten teacher
at Franklin Elementary, and Irene
Renner, a cook at the high school.
Halsey has will assume the position
of elementary school principal in
the Hardin Northern school district
this fall, while Renner is leaving for
personal reasons.
issued 2015-16 school year supplemental contracts to Joy DeVelvis,
co-prom coordinator; Kristen Gable,
boys athletic manager/clerical; and
Ryan Strickler, girls athletic manager.
instructed Rostorfer to seek
milk and bread bids for the 2015-16
school year.
approved 2015-16 student handbooks for the elementary, middle and
high schools.

approved
the Athletic
Department Handbook and ticket prices for the 2015-16 school
year. Admission prices to athletic
events were unchanged from last
year.
The next meeting will be held at
8 p.m. Aug. 10 in the Administrative
Building.

Library
(Continued from page 5)
Cupcake Challenge
The Putnam County District Library in
Ottawa will have a Cupcake Challenge
from 3-5 p.m. on July 29 for all kids grades
6-12. Can your team design the decor for a
cupcake - take the challenge, in three rounds
based on random themes and limited supplies. Winners will walk away with piles
of buck! Book Bucks. All are welcome
to attend this free program sponsored by
the Friends of the Putnam County District
Library & area local businesses. For more
programs visit our website at www.mypcdl.
org.
Family Fun Movie Night
The Putnam County District Library in
Ottawa will have a movie at 6 p.m. on July
28. Due to licensing, we can not post the
movie title outside the library. HINTA
2005 release about the adventures of a boys
active imagination in 3-D. The first 50 people will get 3-D glasses. All are welcome to
see this free movie. This program is spon-

sored by The Friends of the Putnam County


District Library. For any questions call the
Ottawa Library at 419-523-3747.
Book Discussion /Author Visit at the
Library
The Putnam County District Library in
Ottawa will have Book Discussion at 5 p.m.
on July 30. Register at the library and pick
up your copy of Whiskers of the Lion by
P. L. Gaus. In Whiskers of the Lion, Sheriff
Bruce Robertson is charged with finding a
young Amish woman on the run from a murderous drug ring so she can testify in federal
court. Join author P. L. Gaus at 6:00 p.m. for
a presentation and book signing. P. L. Gauss
widely praised Amish-Country Mysteries
continue to probe the tension between the
self-reliance of the Amish world and the
urgencies of the English world. Q & A and
book signing will follow his presentation
with books available for purchase. All are
welcome to attend this free program sponsored by the Friends of the Putnam County
District Library.
For more programs, visitmypcdl.org.

(Continued from page 2)


Eagles and Star Caf continued their battle for second
place in the Delphos Softball
League Friday by chalking
up victories over Capitol
Theatre and Lion Clothing,
respectively. Scoring all their
runs in the sixth inning, the
Eagles managed to edge out
Capitol 3 to 2 at Waterworks
Park. With four men crossing
the plate in the fourth frame,
Star went on to defeat the
Lions 8 to 4 at City Field.
The members of the S.S.B.
Class of the United Brethren
Church and five guests convened Friday evening at the
home of Carol Jean and Wayne
Dray, North Jefferson Street.
In a contest conducted by the
teacher, Mrs. Carl Brown,
Marjorie Blythe received the
honors. Most successful in a
game were Mrs. Brown and
Margaret Fought.

See new stories


every day at
delphosherald.com

Trivia

Answers to last Wednesdays questions:


TV show host Steven Colbert surprised former President
Bill Clinton by setting up a Twitter account for him during
an interview on his Comedy Central show, The Colbert
Report. The accounts handle was @PrezBillyJeff. Soon
after, Clinton set up another account with the handle @
billclinton.
When it comes to the Muppets, Astoria is the name of
the wife of the balcony heckler Waldorf.
Todays questions:
For what TV-related reason did a female acquaintance of
Charlie Sheen sue the actor for $1 million for invasion of
privacy and emotional distress in 2006?
How did a Hungarian sheepdog end up being nominated for an Oscar for the 1984 film Greystoke: The
Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes?
Answers in Wednesdays Herald.
Todays joke:
In a darken theater where the suspenseful mystery
story was being staged, a member of the audience suddenly stood up and cried, Where is the murdered?
A threatening voice behind her replied, Right in
back of you, if you dont sit down!